Science.gov

Sample records for flashing jet studies

  1. A study of falling-jet flash evaporators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Olson, D. A.; Bharathan, D.; Green, H. J.

    1982-11-01

    Experimental results of flash evaporation from sheets of water, 3.2 mm and 6.3 mm thick and 27.9 cm wide, falling freely in the presence of their own vapor, are reported. With no flashing the jets fall in coherent sheets, but with flashing the jets were observed to spread and break up into droplets. Flashing was characterized by an effectiveness parameter, which increased with increasing water temperature and jet length. Variations in water flow rate and heat flux did not influence the effectiveness appreciably.

  2. Flash evaporation from turbulent water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Penney, T.

    1983-02-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of flash evaporation from turbulent planar and axisymmetric water jets are reported. In the range of jet thicknesses tested, for planar jets, due to shattering, evaporation is found to be nearly independent of the jet thickness. Evaporation from the planar jets was found to be dependent on the initial level of turbulence in the water supply manifold. An approximate analysis to model the evaporation process based on the physical phenomena and experimental observations is outlined. Comparisons between the experimental data and analytical predictions of the liquid temperature variation along the jet are included. Use of screens in the water jet are shown to be effective for enhancing evaporation.

  3. Measured performance of falling-jet flash evaporators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. J.; Olson, D. A.; Bharathan, D.; Johnson, D. H.

    1981-06-01

    The rates of heat transfer and approach to thermal equilibrium of flash evaporators operating at pressures of 2 to 4 kPa were investigated. Heat and mass transfer rates from falling jet evaporators operating in the temperature range of 18 to 30 C are measured. The initial experimental results are given and the apparatus is described.

  4. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  5. Flash!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Govert

    2002-04-01

    About three times a day our sky flashes with a powerful pulse of gamma ray bursts (GRB), invisible to human eyes but not to astronomers' instruments. The sources of this intense radiation are likely to be emitting, within the span of seconds or minutes, more energy than the sun will in its entire 10 billion years of life. Where these bursts originate, and how they come to have such incredible energies, is a mystery scientists have been trying to solve for three decades. The phenomenon has resisted study -- the flashes come from random directions in space and vanish without trace -- until very recently. In what could be called a cinematic conflation of Flash Gordon and The Hunt for Red October, Govert Schilling's Flash!: The Hunt for the Biggest Explosions in the Universe describes the exciting and ever-changing field of GRB research. Based on interviews with leading scientists, Flash! provides an insider's account of the scientific challenges involved in unravelling the enigmatic nature of GRBs. A science writer who has followed the drama from the very start, Schilling describes the ambition and jealousy, collegiality and competition, triumph and tragedy, that exists among those who have embarked on this recherche. Govert Schilling is a Dutch science writer and astronomy publicist. He is a contributing editor of Sky and Telescope magazine, and regularly writes for the news sections of Science and New Scientist. Schilling is the astronomy writer for de Volkskrant, one of the largest national daily newspapers in The Netherlands, and frequently talks about the Universe on Dutch radio broadcasts. He is the author of more than twenty popular astronomy books, and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles on astronomy.

  6. Flashing superluminal components in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120

    PubMed

    Gomez; Marscher; Alberdi; Jorstad; Garcia-Miro

    2000-09-29

    A 16-month sequence of radio images of the active galaxy 3C120 with the Very Long Baseline Array reveals a region in the relativistic jet where superluminal components flash on and off over time scales of months, while the polarization angle rotates. This can be explained by interaction between the jet and an interstellar cloud located about 8 parsecs from the center of the galaxy. The cloud, which rotates the polarization direction and possibly eclipses a section of the jet, represents a "missing link" between the ultradense broad-emission-line clouds closer to the center and the lower density narrow-emission-line clouds seen on kiloparsec scales. PMID:11009410

  7. Flashing liquid jets and two-phase droplet dispersion I. Experiments for derivation of droplet atomisation correlations.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Vincent; Bowen, Phil; Witlox, Henk

    2007-04-11

    The large-scale release of a liquid contained at upstream conditions above its local atmospheric boiling point is a scenario often given consideration in process industry risk analysis. Current-hazard quantification software often employs simplistic equilibrium two-phase approaches. Scaled water experiments have been carried out measuring droplet velocity and droplet size distributions for a range of exit orifice aspect ratios (L/d) and conditions representing low to high superheat. 2D Phase-Doppler Anemometry has been utilised to characterise droplet kinematics and spray quality. Droplet size correlations have been developed for non-flashing, the transition between non-flashing and flashing, and fully flashing jets. Using high-speed shadowography, transition between regimes is defined in terms of criteria identified in the external flow structure. An overview companion paper provides a wider overview of the problem and reports implementation of these correlations into consequence models and subsequent validation. The fluid utilised throughout is water, hence droplet correlations are developed in non-dimensional form to allow extrapolation to other fluids through similarity scaling, although verification of model performance for other fluids is required in future studies. Data is reduced via non-dimensionalisation in terms of the Weber number and Jakob number, essentially representing the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the system, respectively. A droplet-size distribution correlation has also been developed, conveniently presented as a volume undersize distribution based on the Rosin-Rammler distribution. Separate correlations are provided for sub-cooled mechanical break-up and fully flashing jets. This form of correlation facilitates rapid estimates of likely mass rainout quantities, as well as full distribution information for more rigorous two-phase thermodynamic modelling in the future. PMID:16956721

  8. Study of transient jet gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Aaron Jaan

    1988-03-01

    This work involves the use of flash lamp schlieren and the development of flash lamp light slicing (planar imaging) and their employment in visualization of transient gas jets discharging into the atmosphere and the mixing that ensues. Details of the flash lamp light slicing system design are provided. Visualization of flows from a pulsed valve discharge system and a shock tube open at the downstream end of the driven section are used to simulate real discharges. Gas flow Mach numbers for discharges of air into the atmosphere range to about 0.4. Axial light slicing images show development of the starting jets, including the formation of the starting vortex and coherent structures that form along the jet shaft. Transverse light slicing images reveal the development of scallops and cusps inside the head of the jet. Voids in the jet were observed at about 4 to 6 diameters from the exit plane. This may imply that ambient and jet gases differentiate at some points downstream. These features suggest cyclic development of jet features. The results can also be used to validate and calibrate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) computer codes used to predict the behavior of fluids under varying initial and boundary conditions.

  9. Daily Physical Activity and Hot Flashes in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation FLASHES Study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Carolyn; Matthews, Karen; Thurston, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of physical activity in menopausal hot flashes. Competing models conceptualize physical activity as a risk or protective factor for hot flashes. Few studies have examined this relationship prospectively using physiologic measures of hot flashes and physical activity. Design Over two 48 hour-periods, 51 participants wore a physiologic hot flash monitor and activity monitor, and reported their hot flashes in an electronic diary. Physiologic hot flashes, reported hot flashes and reported hot flashes without physiological corroboration were related to activity changes using hierarchical generalized linear modeling, adjusting for potential confounders. Setting Community. Patients Midlife women. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Physiologically-detected hot flashes and reported hot flashes with and without physiologic corroboration. Results Hot flash reports without physiologic corroboration were more likely after activity increases (OR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00-1.10, p=.01), particularly among women with higher levels of depressive symptoms (interaction p=.02). No other types of hot flashes were related to physical activity. Conclusion Acute increases in physical activity were associated with increased reporting of hot flashes lacking physiologic corroboration, particularly among women with depressive symptoms. Clinicians should consider the role of symptom perception and reporting in relations between physical activity and hot flashes. PMID:24491454

  10. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  11. Case studies of selected Project "Flash" events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, K. A.; Michaelides, S. C.; Savvidou, K.; Orphanou, A.; Constantinides, P.; Charalambous, M.; Michaelides, M.

    2009-03-01

    Flooding is a consequence of the prevailing meteorological situation, the intensity and duration of precipitation, geomorphology, human activities over a geographical region and other factors. Floods result in damage and destruction of infrastructure and private property and, in some cases, in fatalities. Flash floods are sudden and quite localized in extend, characterized by excessive amounts of rainfall within a short period of time and are distinguished from other floods by their degree of severity. The broader knowledge concerning flash floods is useful for the better understanding of the underlying thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms, as well as the associated physical processes. The wider understanding of flashfloods can form part of an integrated system for short and very short forecasting of these events. In the present study, the synoptic, dynamic and thermodynamic conditions during the development of a baroclinic depression which affected the area of Cyprus on 6 November 2005 are studied. The depression was associated with extreme weather phenomena, such as thunderstorms, a water spout and high precipitation accumulations. The results indicate the importance of the dynamic parameters in the system's development and the thermodynamic analysis has shown the convective potential of the atmosphere.

  12. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.V.

    1993-12-01

    Even though this project in the past has concentrated on the measurement of thermal bimolecular reactions of atomic species with stable molecules by the flash or laser photolysis-shock tube (FP- or LP-ST) method using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) as the diagnostic technique, during the past year the authors have concentrated on studies of the thermal decompositions of selected chlorocarbon molecules. These studies are necessary if the degradation of chlorine containing organic molecules by incineration are to be understood at the molecular level. Clearly, destruction of these molecules will not only involve abstraction reactions, when possible, but also thermal decomposition followed by secondary reactions of the initially formed atoms and radicals. Studies on the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}Cl are complete, and the curve-of-growth for Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption has been determined. The new thermal decomposition studies are similar to those already reported for CH{sub 3}Cl.

  13. Jet and flash imprint lithography for the fabrication of patterned media drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gerard M.; Brooks, Cynthia; Ye, Zhengmao; Johnson, Steve; LaBrake, Dwayne; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-10-01

    The ever-growing demand for hard drives with greater storage density has motivated a technology shift from continuous magnetic media to patterned media hard disks, which are expected to be implemented in future generations of hard disk drives to provide data storage at densities exceeding 1012 bits per square inch. Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) technology has been employed to pattern the hard disk substrates. This paper discusses the infrastructure required to enable J-FIL in high-volume manufacturing; namely, fabrication of master templates, template replication, high-volume imprinting with precisely controlled residual layers, dual-sided imprinting and defect inspection. Imprinting of disks is demonstrated with substrate throughput currently as high as 180 disks/hour (dual-sided). These processes are applied to patterning hard disk substrates with both discrete tracks and bit-patterned designs.

  14. Experimental study of flash boiling spray vaporization through quantitative vapor concentration and liquid temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaoming; Hung, David L. S.; Xu, Min

    2014-08-01

    Flash boiling sprays of liquid injection under superheated conditions provide the novel solutions of fast vaporization and better air-fuel mixture formation for internal combustion engines. However, the physical mechanisms of flash boiling spray vaporization are more complicated than the droplet surface vaporization due to the unique bubble generation and boiling process inside a superheated bulk liquid, which are not well understood. In this study, the vaporization of flash boiling sprays was investigated experimentally through the quantitative measurements of vapor concentration and liquid temperature. Specifically, the laser-induced exciplex fluorescence technique was applied to distinguish the liquid and vapor distributions. Quantitative vapor concentration was obtained by correlating the intensity of vapor-phase fluorescence with vapor concentration through systematic corrections and calibrations. The intensities of two wavelengths were captured simultaneously from the liquid-phase fluorescence spectra, and their intensity ratios were correlated with liquid temperature. The results show that both liquid and vapor phase of multi-hole sprays collapse toward the centerline of the spray with different mass distributions under the flash boiling conditions. Large amount of vapor aggregates along the centerline of the spray to form a "gas jet" structure, whereas the liquid distributes more uniformly with large vortexes formed in the vicinity of the spray tip. The vaporization process under the flash boiling condition is greatly enhanced due to the intense bubble generation and burst. The liquid temperature measurements show strong temperature variations inside the flash boiling sprays with hot zones present in the "gas jet" structure and vortex region. In addition, high vapor concentration and closed vortex motion seem to have inhibited the heat and mass transfer in these regions. In summary, the vapor concentration and liquid temperature provide detailed information

  15. Roll-to-roll nanopatterning using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sean; Ganapathisubramanian, Maha; Miller, Mike; Yang, Jack; Choi, Jin; Xu, Frank; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to pattern materials at the nanoscale can enable a variety of applications ranging from high density data storage, displays, photonic devices and CMOS integrated circuits to emerging applications in the biomedical and energy sectors. These applications require varying levels of pattern control, short and long range order, and have varying cost tolerances. Extremely large area R2R manufacturing on flexible substrates is ubiquitous for applications such as paper and plastic processing. It combines the benefits of high speed and inexpensive substrates to deliver a commodity product at low cost. The challenge is to extend this approach to the realm of nanopatterning and realize similar benefits. The cost of manufacturing is typically driven by speed (or throughput), tool complexity, cost of consumables (materials used, mold or master cost, etc.), substrate cost, and the downstream processing required (annealing, deposition, etching, etc.). In order to achieve low cost nanopatterning, it is imperative to move towards high speed imprinting, less complex tools, near zero waste of consumables and low cost substrates. The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. In this paper we address the key challenges for roll based nanopatterning by introducing a novel concept: Ink Jet based Roll-to-Roll Nanopatterning. To address this challenge, we have introduced a J-FIL based demonstrator product, the LithoFlex 100. Topics that are discussed in the paper include tool design and process performance. In addition, we have used the LithoFlex 100 to fabricate high performance wire grid polarizers on flexible polycarbonate (PC) films. Transmission of better than 80% and extinction ratios on the order of

  16. Photonic Flash Sintering of Ink-Jet-Printed Back Electrodes for Organic Photovoltaic Applications.

    PubMed

    Polino, Giuseppina; Shanmugam, Santhosh; Bex, Guy J P; Abbel, Robert; Brunetti, Francesca; Di Carlo, Aldo; Andriessen, Ronn; Galagan, Yulia

    2016-01-27

    A study of the photonic flash sintering of a silver nanoparticle ink printed as the back electrode for organic solar cells is presented. A number of sintering settings with different intensities and pulse durations have been tested on both full-area and grid-based silver electrodes, using the complete emission spectrum of the flash lamps from UV-A to NIR. However, none of these settings was able to produce functional devices with performances comparable to those of reference cells prepared using thermally sintered ink. Different degradation mechanisms were detected in the devices with a flash-sintered back electrode. The P3HT:PCBM photoactive layer appears to be highly heat-sensitive and turned out to be severely damaged by the high temperatures generated in the silver layer during the sintering. In addition, UV-induced photochemical degradation of the functional materials was identified as another possible source of performance deterioration in the devices with grid-based electrodes. Reducing the light intensity does not provide a proper solution because in this case the Ag electrode is not sintered sufficiently. For both types of devices, with full-area and grid-based electrodes, these problems could be solved by excluding the short wavelength contribution from the flash light spectrum using a filter. Optimized sintering parameters allowed manufacture of OPV devices with performance equal to those of the reference devices. Photonic flash sintering of the top electrode in organic solar cells was demonstrated for the first time. It reveals the great potential of this sintering method for the future roll-to-roll manufacturing of organic solar cells from solution. PMID:26704172

  17. Collimated Jet Or Expanding Outflow: Possible Origins of GRBs And X-Ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Mineshige, Shin; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto

    2006-08-10

    We investigate the dynamics of an injected outflow propagating in a progenitor in the context of the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through two dimensional axisymmetric relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. Initially, we locally inject an outflow near the center of a progenitor. We calculate 25 models, in total, by fixing its total input energy to be 10{sup 51} ergs s{sup -1} and radius of the injected outflow to be 7 x 10{sup 7} cm while varying its bulk Lorentz factor, {Lambda}{sub 0} = 1.05 {approx} 5, and its specific internal energy, {epsilon}{sub 0}/c{sup 2} 30 (with c being speed of light). The injected outflow propagates in the progenitor and drives a large-scale outflow or jet. We find a smooth but dramatic transition from a collimated jet to an expanding outflow among calculated models. The opening angle of the outflow ({theta}{sub sim}) is sensitive to {Lambda}{sub 0}; we find {theta}{sub sim} < 2{sup o} for {Lambda}{sub 0} {approx}> 3. The maximum Lorentz factor is, on the other hand, sensitive to both of {Lambda}{sub 0} and {epsilon}{sub 0}; roughly {Lambda}{sub max} {approx} {Lambda}{sub 0}(1 + {epsilon}{sub 0}/c{sup 2}). In particular, a very high Lorentz factor of {Lambda}{sub max} {approx}> 100 is achieved in one model. A variety of opening angles can arise by changing {epsilon}{sub 0}, even when the maximum Lorentz factor is fixed. The jet structure totally depends on {Lambda}{sub 0}. When {Lambda}{sub 0} is high, a strong bow shock appears and generates a back flow. High pressure progenitor gas heated by the bow shock collimates the outflow to form a narrow, relativistic jet. A number of internal oblique shocks within the jet are generated by the presence of the back flow and/or shear instability. When {Lambda}{sub 0} is low, on the contrary, the outflow expands soon after the injection, since the bow shock is weak and thus the pressure of the progenitor gas is not high enough to confine the flow. Our finding will explain a smooth

  18. Multiple jet study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Test data is presented which allows determination of jet penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets into a ducted subsonic heated mainstream flow. Jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios ranged from 6 to 60. Temperature profile data is presented at various duct locations up to 24 orifice diameters downstream of the plane of jet injection. Except for two configurations, all geometries investigated had a single row of constant diameter orifices located transverse to the main flow direction. Orifice size and spacing between orifices were varied. Both of these were found to have a significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. The best mixing of the hot and cold streams was achieved with duct height.

  19. High throughput Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography for semiconductor memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Fletcher, Brian; Thompson, Ecron; Liu, Weijun; Stachowiak, Tim; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; Irving, J. W.; Longsine, Whitney; Traub, Matthew; Truskett, Van; LaBrake, Dwayne; Ye, Zhengmao

    2016-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. There are two critical components to meeting throughput requirements for imprint lithography. Using a similar approach to what is already done for many deposition and etch processes, imprint stations can be clustered to enhance throughput. The FPA-1200NZ2C is a four station cluster system designed for high volume manufacturing. For a single station, throughput includes overhead, resist dispense, resist fill time (or spread time), exposure and separation. Resist exposure time and mask/wafer separation are well understood processing steps with typical durations on the order of 0.10 to 0.20 seconds. To achieve a total process throughput of 15 wafers per hour (wph) for a single station, it is necessary to complete the fluid fill step in 1.5 seconds. For a throughput of 20 wph, fill time must be reduced to only one second. There are several parameters that can impact resist filling. Key parameters include resist drop volume (smaller is better), system controls (which address drop spreading after jetting), Design for Imprint or DFI (to accelerate drop spreading) and material engineering (to promote wetting between the resist and underlying adhesion layer). In addition, it is mandatory to maintain fast filling, even for edge field imprinting. In this paper, we address the improvements made in all of these parameters to enable a 1.50 second filling process for a sub-20nm device like pattern and have demonstrated this capability

  20. A flash photographic method for droplet impingement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, V.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental method to visualize the impingement process of a liquid droplet onto a solid surface with sufficient clarity to reveal fine details of the droplet surface structure and rim jet produced during the impingement process. The method incorporates a 35 mm SLR camera with bellows, motor drive, macro lens, backlighting by a short duration flash lamp, diffusers and a commercially available timing control unit to trigger the flash. Results using the experimental arrangement are demonstrated for a water droplet striking a horizontal surface at a velocity of about 1 m/s, though the photographic method may be applied to any other condition and liquid. A series of photographs are presented that show the repeatability of the impingement process, image clarity, surface structure of the droplet during impingement.

  1. High performance wire grid polarizers using jet and flashTM imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sean; Yang, Jack; Miller, Mike; Ganapathisubramanian, Maha; Menezes, Marlon; Choi, Jin; Xu, Frank; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-03-01

    The ability to pattern materials at the nanoscale can enable a variety of applications ranging from high density data storage, displays, photonic devices and CMOS integrated circuits to emerging applications in the biomedical and energy sectors. These applications require varying levels of pattern control, short and long range order, and have varying cost tolerances. Extremely large area roll to roll (R2R) manufacturing on flexible substrates is ubiquitous for applications such as paper and plastic processing. It combines the benefits of high speed and inexpensive substrates to deliver a commodity product at low cost. The challenge is to extend this approach to the realm of nanopatterning and realize similar benefits. The cost of manufacturing is typically driven by speed (or throughput), tool complexity, cost of consumables (materials used, mold or master cost, etc.), substrate cost, and the downstream processing required (annealing, deposition, etching, etc.). In order to achieve low cost nanopatterning, it is imperative to move towards high speed imprinting, less complex tools, near zero waste of consumables and low cost substrates. The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. In this paper we have developed a roll based J-FIL process and applied it to technology demonstrator tool, the LithoFlex 100, to fabricate large area flexible bilayer wire grid polarizers (WGP) and high performance WGPs on rigid glass substrates. Extinction ratios of better than 10000 were obtained for the glass-based WGPs. Two simulation packages were also employed to understand the effects of pitch, aluminum thickness and pattern defectivity on the optical performance of the WGP devices. It was determined that the

  2. Rectangular subsonic jet flowfield study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Tatterson, Gary B.; Swan, David H.

    1987-01-01

    The flowfield of a rectangular jet with 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at an axial Reynolds number of 127,000, using a three-dimensional laser anemometer. The flowfield surveys resulted in mean velocity vector field plots and contour plots of the Reynolds stress tensor components for the major and minor axes. These data contribute substantially to currently available data of jet flowfields.

  3. A Study of Small EUV Flashes around Coronal Hole Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, Laura E.; Valluri, Meghala; McAteer, James

    2016-05-01

    Coronal holes (CHs) are theorized to have magnetically open magnetic flux lines and are the source of high-speed solar wind. It is hypothesized that there will be small scale reconnection events at the CH boundary due to interaction between open fields of the CH and closed fields of the quiet and active sun. These reconnection events are expected to manifest themselves as spatially small and temporally short increases in extreme ultraviolet intensity at the CH boundary. We investigate an automated detection of small flashes near the CH boundary and present statistics on the characteristics of these flashes, including lifetime, size, and brightness. We compare these characteristics to those of flashes occurring away from the CH boundary. The application of active contours without edges (ACWE) allows for the automated detection of CHs without dependence on a fixed threshold value. ACWE employs an energy-minimization in which CHs are assumed to have more homogeneous intensities than surrounding active and quiet Sun. The CHs segmented with ACWE tend to correspond to unipolar magnetic regions, are consistent with concurrent solar wind observations, and qualitatively match the coronal holes segmented by other methods. Detection of flashes around the CH boundary serve as additional evidence of correct CH segmentation and provides further evidence supporting the hypothesis of reconnection events at CH boundaries, while the ACWE now provides a tool to study these flashes further in large datasets.

  4. Flash Photolysis Studies of 4-Chloroanisole in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Hameed, Faten S. M.; Krajnik, Paul; Getoff, Nikola

    1994-03-01

    The photoinduced formation of transients in aqueous 4-chloroanisole (4 ClA), at pH 7 and 9, were studied by conventional flash photolysis. The absorption spectra of various transients in airfree as well as in aqueous solutions saturated with N2O , air or pure oxygen, are presented and discussed.

  5. Laboratory studies of volcanic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Susan Werner; Sturtevant, Bradford

    1984-09-01

    The study of the fluid dynamics of violent volcanic eruptions by laboratory experiment is described, and the important fluid-dynamic processes that can be examined in laboratory models are discussed in detail. In preliminary experiments, pure gases are erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used are Freon 12 and Freon 22, two gases of high molecular weight and high density that are good analogs of heavy and particulate-laden volcanic gases; nitrogen, a moderate molecular weight, moderate density gas for which the thermodynamic properties are well known; and helium, a low molecular weight, lowdensity gas that is used as a basis for comparison with the behavior of the heavier gases and as an analog of steam, the gas that dominates many volcanic eruptions. Transient jets erupt from the reservoir into the laboratory upon rupture of a thin diaphragm at the exit of a convergent nozzle. The gas accelerates from rest in the reservoir to high velocity in the jet. Reservoir pressures and geometries are such that the fluid velocity in the jets is initially supersonic and later decays to subsonic. The measured reservoir pressure decreases as the fluid expands through repetitively reflecting rarefaction waves, but for the conditions of these experiments, a simple steady-discharge model is sufficient to explain the pressure decay and to predict the duration of the flow. Density variations in the flow field have been visualized with schlieren and shadowgraph photography. The observed structure of the jet is correlated with the measured pressure history. The starting vortex generated when the diaphragm ruptures becomes the head of the jet. Though the exit velocity is sonic, the flow head in the helium jet decelerates to about one-third of sonic velocity in the first few nozzle diameters, the nitrogen head decelerates to about three-fourths of sonic velocity, while Freon maintains nearly sonic velocity. The impulsive acceleration of reservoir fluid into the surrounding atmosphere

  6. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J. V.

    1998-03-05

    Following earlier investigations on the dissociation rates of halogen containing molecules, we studied the thermal decompositions of CHCl{sub 3} and CF{sub 3}Br. In addition, we measured the branching ratio and rate constants for the thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}CO. We studied three bimolecular rate processes: H + H{sub 2}CC0, CF{sub 3} + H{sub 2}, and H + CF{sub 3}H. Decomposition studies in reflected shock waves on three reactions were completed using atomic resonance absorption spectroscopic (ARAS) detection and/or the laser schlieren density gradient (LS) method.

  7. A study of thunderstorm microphysical properties and lightning flash counts associated with terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. E.; Splitt, M. E.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lazarus, S.; Smith, D. M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-04-01

    The terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) is an emission of highly energetic radiation produced by or at least in close association with lightning. Previous investigations attempted to isolate the production mechanisms and production altitude(s) of TGFs as well as macrophysical characteristics, while thunderstorm microphysical characteristics were largely ignored. This investigation into thunderstorms and their hydrometeor and flash characteristics utilize temporal and spatial coincident satellite passes between the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to determine the bulk (or footprint) microphysical properties of two types of study events, the thunderstorm complexes which are associated with TGFs (TGF case) and the thunderstorm complexes which did not produce a TGF detected by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the pass (non-TGF case). Results are presented for two different comparison methods. The first case utilizes geographic region weighted by TGF distribution, and the second is based on TGF percentage of occurrence when compared to total flash count of data set. Results show that the associated storms around the TGF location possess differences in the hydrometeor concentrations: cloud liquid water, cloud ice, precipitation water, and precipitation ice. These results take place at different levels of the atmosphere, including the mixed phase region. Additionally, results will show that TGFs are a consistent percentage of observed flashes as the rate of TGFs as a function of Lightning Imaging Sensor flash count is relatively constant.

  8. Flash X-Ray Injector Study

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A C

    2004-03-26

    The study described in this report1 models the FXR injector from the cathode to the exit of the injector. The calculations are compared to actual experimental measurements, table 1. In these measurements the anode voltage was varied by changing the Marks-Bank charging voltage. The anode-cathode spacing was varied by adjusting the location of the cathode in hopes of finding an island of minimum emittance (none found). The bucking coil current was set for zero field on the cathode. In these measurements, a pepper-pot mask was inserted into FXR at beam bug 135 and viewed downstream via a wiggle probe diagnostic at cell gap J21, figure 1. The observed expansion of the beamlets passing through the mask of known geometric layout and hole size allow a calculation of the phase space beam properties.

  9. Living together flash-floods: the Versilia (Italy) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, Enrica; Pileggi, Tiziana; Gruntfest, Eve; Ruin, Isabelle; Federici, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    The phenomena involved in extreme flash-flood events are complex and their prediction is affected by a given degree of uncertainty that makes the warning communication very difficult to achieve. The promotion of the natural hazards perception and the improvement in warning communication, aimed at human life losses reduction, became extremely important to accomplish. As a case study the Versilia river basin, in North - West Tuscany, Central Italy, prone to frequent flash-flood events, is considered. In the area, as stated from Santini (a local historian of XIX century), since 1386 existed special statutes, imposing rivers maintenance for protection against floods. Historical data testify also that the biggest flood events have occurred in the years 1774, 1885, 1902 and 1996. The last event is the one deeply analyzed and better documented. It was exceptional, the consequences on the population were dramatic, and the effects on building and infrastructures were catastrophic. With reference to the Versilia region, a geographic database for flood risk assessment, integrating diachronic data with the results of hydrological and sedimentological modeling, and integrating different competencies, is implemented. The purpose is to provide valuable aid to flash-floods prediction, risk assessment, structural and non-structural mitigation measures. As a first attempt, the combination of all the information available on the history of floods of Versilia region and model results, together with human exposure to flash-flood risk, is also explored. The aim is to investigate the detailed hydrometeorological circumstances that lead to accidental casualties and to better understand the predominant physical factors of risk. In the framework of enhancing natural hazards perception, a very particular educational experience, dedicated to the personnel that work on the territory with different roles and in different fields (i.e. municipal and provincial police, national forest body

  10. Combat aircraft jet engine noise studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, S.; Fournier, G.; Pianko, M.

    Methods of noise prediction and attenuation, based on results obtained in civil applications are presented. Input data for directivity and radiation forecasts are given by measurements of vane and blade pressure fluctuations, and by modal analysis of the spinning waves propagating in the inlet duct. Attention is given to sound generation mechanisms for subsonic and supersonic single jets and bypass jets. Prediction methods, based on Lighthill's equation (tensor due to the turbulence), are discussed, and the various means of jet noise reduction are reviewed. The CEPRA 19 anechoic wind tunnel, which is primarily designed for studying the jet noise radiated in the far field with flight effects is described.

  11. Combat aircraft jet engine noise studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, S.; Fournier, G.; Pianko, M.

    1992-04-01

    Methods of noise prediction and attenuation based on results obtained in civil applications are presented. Input data for directivity and radiation forecasts are given by measurements of vane and blade pressure fluctuations and by modal analysis of the spinning waves propagating in the inlet duct. Attention is given to sound generation mechanisms for subsonic and supersonic single jets and bypass jets. Prediction methods, based on Lighthill's equation (tensor due to the turbulence), are discussed, and the various means of jet noise reduction are reviewed. The CEPRA 19 anechoic wind tunnel, which is primarily designed for studying the jet noise radiated in the far field with flight effects is described.

  12. Flash Floods: A Spatial and Temporal Analysis A Case Study of the Flash Floods in Southwestern Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Floods are the leading cause of weather-related fatalities in the United States and the second most common cause of weather-related death worldwide. Of all floods, flash floods are found to be the most deadly with an average global mortality rate of 3.62%. This study performed a spatial and temporal analysis of flash flood risk using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze an event that occurred in southwestern Missouri in March 2008. The goals of the study were to identify different impacts of the disaster as indicated by flood reports; examine the social and natural factors that account for the spatial and temporal distribution and severity of the impacts; and to compare the results with a previous study of a flash flood event in France. In the Missouri case, the analysis confirmed that small catchments react faster than large catchments and to smaller amounts of rainfall. Seventy-seven percent of incidents (water rescues, fatalities, flooded homes, and flooded roads) occurred in catchments smaller than 200 km2. The study also showed that a majority of the severe impacts (water rescues, fatalities, and flooded homes) occurred after the rainfall had tapered off, perhaps indicating that people erroneously perceive the danger has passed once the rain has stopped. When looking at water rescues and fatalities, the results of this study found that fewer incidents occurred in medium size catchments (50-450 km2) than in either large (>450 km2) or small catchments (<50 km2). This is similar to the French study which found that no fatalities occurred in medium-sized catchments. Using GIS to examine flash flood risk, will take strides forward comparing human vulnerability with size of catchment. This project integrated qualitative and quantitative data using GIS. Displays the time series before, during, and after the flood report/accident which occurred in catchment 5.

  13. Numerical and experimental study of the dynamics of a superheated jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Avick; Gopalakrishnan, Shivasubramanian; Balasubramanian, Sridhar

    2015-11-01

    Flash-boiling is a phenomenon where a liquid experiences low pressures in a system resulting in it getting superheated. The sudden drop in pressures results in accelerated expansion and violent vapour formation. Understanding the physics behind the jet disintegration and flash-boiling phenomenon is still an open problem, with applications in automotive and aerospace combustors. The behaviour of a flash-boiling jet is highly dependent on the input parameters, inlet temperature and pressure. In the present study, the external (outside nozzle) and the internal (inside nozzle) flow characteristics of the two-phase flow has been studied numerically and experimentally. The phase change from liquid to vapour takes place over a finite period of time, modeled sing Homogeneous Relaxation Model (HRM). In order to validate the numerical results, controlled experiments were performed. Optical diagnostic techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Shadowgraphy were used to study the flow characteristics. Spray angle, penetration depth, droplet spectra were obtained which provides a better understanding of the break-up mechanism. Linear stability analysis is performed to study the stability characteristics of the jet.

  14. CYTOGENETIC STUDIES IN MICE TREATED WITH THE JET FUELS, JET-A AND JP-8

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytogenetic studies in mice treated with the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8
    Abstract
    The genotoxic potential of the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8, were examined in mice treated on the skin with a single dose of 240 ug/mouse. Peripheral blood smears were prepared at the start of the ...

  15. Numerical studies of solar chromospheric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    some of the short chromospheric jets. The taller jets tend to follow ballistic trajectory. The contribution of the coronal conditions are quantitatively modeled in the form of a power law based on the amplification of shock waves under the density stratified medium. In Chapter 5, the role of the magnetic field is investigated using the two-dimensional simulations. We distinguish the contribution of the corona and magnetic field using the power law. The average magnetic field strength produces only a small effect on the scale of chromospheric jets. The observed regional difference is mainly explained by the difference of the coronal conditions, which is caused by the different magnetic field structure. We also find shorter chromospheric jets above the strong magnetic flux tube. This is in contrast to the observational studies. In Chapter 6, a three-dimensional simulation is presented to investigate the effect of three-dimensionality on the scale of chromospheric jets and the dependence on the photospheric magnetic field structure. The tall chromospheric jets with the maximum height of 10–11 Mm and lifetime of 8–10 min are formed. These tall jets are located above the strong magnetic field concentration. This result is different from the two-dimensional study and consistent with the observational reports. The strongly entangled chromospheric magnetic field drives these tall chromospheric jets through the Lorentz force. We also find that the produced chromospheric jets form a cluster with the diameter of several Mm with finer strands. In Chapter 7, we summarize and discuss our new findings and their implications for the solar chromospheric jets. The regional difference of chromospheric jets is explained through the coronal temperature and density, which is produced by the heating process with the different strength and structure of the magnetic field. The observational relation between the magnetic network and chromospheric jets are interpreted through the magii netic

  16. Thermochemical conversion of biomass - Gasification by flash pyrolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caubet, S.; Corte, P.; Fahim, C.; Traverse, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of the basic components of dried biomass (cellulose, lignin, wood) is studied in inert atmosphere. Glucose is studied for comparison. The experiments are performed in an alumina porous bed reactor heated at temperatures between 600 and 1000 C. Flash pyrolysis (heating rate 250 C/sec) allows the production of a medium heating value synthetic gas with gas phase conversion thermal efficiency of up to 95 percent. The weight percent of carbon gasified during the pyrolysis reaches 90 percent for cellulose and 70 percent for wood. Light hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H4, C2H2, C2H6) provide about 50 percent of the energy recovered in the gas. Ethylene represents 5 percent (vol) of the pyrolysis gas. The overall ethylene and acetylene yield is markedly increased at high temperatures for short gas residence times. The pyrolysis reactions are endothermic. The total amount of energy required for pyrolysing wood at 850 C roughly corresponds to 20 percent of its heating value.

  17. Study of Beijiang catchment flash-flood forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Huang, S.; Dong, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Beijiang catchment is a small catchment in southern China locating in the centre of the storm areas of the Pearl River Basin. Flash flooding in Beijiang catchment is a frequently observed disaster that caused direct damages to human beings and their properties. Flood forecasting is the most effective method for mitigating flash floods, the goal of this paper is to develop the flash flood forecasting model for Beijiang catchment. The catchment property data, including DEM, land cover types and soil types, which will be used for model construction and parameter determination, are downloaded from the website freely. Based on the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model, a model for flash flood forecasting of Beijiang catchment is set up. The model derives the model parameters from the terrain properties, and further optimized with the observed flooding process, which improves the model performance. The model is validated with a few observed floods occurred in recent years, and the results show that the model is reliable and is promising for flash flood forecasting.

  18. Fuels characterization studies. [jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, G. T.; Antoine, A. C.; Flores, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current analytical techniques used in the characterization of broadened properties fuels are briefly described. Included are liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatographic ground-type methods development is being approached from several directions, including aromatic fraction standards development and the elimination of standards through removal or partial removal of the alkene and aromatic fractions or through the use of whole fuel refractive index values. More sensitive methods for alkene determinations using an ultraviolet-visible detector are also being pursued. Some of the more successful gas chromatographic physical property determinations for petroleum derived fuels are the distillation curve (simulated distillation), heat of combustion, hydrogen content, API gravity, viscosity, flash point, and (to a lesser extent) freezing point.

  19. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd[sup 3+] + L(ligand), [RuL[sub 5]H[sub 2]O][sup 2+], laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO)[sub 6] + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd[sup 3+] ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO)[sub 6]-2,2'-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  20. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-10-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd{sup 3+} + L(ligand), [RuL{sub 5}H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+}, laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO){sub 6} + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd{sup 3+} ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO){sub 6}-2,2`-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Numerical studies of solar chromospheric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    short chromospheric jets. The taller jets tend to follow ballistic trajectory. The contribution of the coronal conditions are quantitatively modeled in the form of a power law based on the amplification of shock waves under the density stratified medium. In Chapter 5, the role of the magnetic field is investigated using the two-dimensional simulations. We distinguish the contribution of the corona and magnetic field using the power law. The average magnetic field strength produces only a small effect on the scale of chromospheric jets. The observed regional difference is mainly explained by the difference of the coronal conditions, which is caused by the different magnetic field structure. We also find shorter chromospheric jets above the strong magnetic flux tube. This is in contrast to the observational studies. In Chapter 6, a three-dimensional simulation is presented to investigate the effect of three-dimensionality on the scale of chromospheric jets and the dependence on the photospheric magnetic field structure. The tall chromospheric jets with the maximum height of 10-11 Mm and lifetime of 8-10 min are formed. These tall jets are located above the strong magnetic field concentration. This result is different from the two-dimensional study and consistent with the observational reports. The strongly entangled chromospheric magnetic field drives these tall chromospheric jets through the Lorentz force. We also find that the produced chromospheric jets form a cluster with the diameter of several Mm with finer strands. In Chapter 7, we summarize and discuss our new findings and their implications for the solar chromospheric jets. The regional difference of chromospheric jets is explained through the coronal temperature and density, which is produced by the heating process with the different strength and structure of the magnetic field. The observational relation between the magnetic network and chromospheric jets are interpreted through the magii netic energy release

  2. Numerical studies of the radiant flash pyrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.; Antal, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    When biomass particles are heated very rapidly (>1000/sup 0/C/s) in an oxygen free environment, they undergo pyrolysis with the formation of little or no char. If concentrated solar energy is used to rapidly heat the particles, their temperature may exceed that of the surrounding gaseous environment by several hundred degrees Celsius when pyrolysis occurs. This ''two temperature'' effect gives rise to the formation of high yields of sirups from the pyrolyzing biomass. Interest in the selective formation of sirups during the radiative flash pyrolysis of biomass caused the authors to initiate numerical explorations of the combined effects of heat and mass transfer on the radiative flash pyrolysis phenomena. These explorations are described in this paper.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Axisymmetric Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.; Grigsby, Carl E.; Lee, Louise P.; Woodling, Mildred J.

    1959-01-01

    Some experimental and theoretical studies have been made of axisymmetric free jets exhausting from sonic and supersonic nozzles into still air and into supersonic streams with a view toward problems associated with propulsive jets and the investigation of these problems. For jets exhausting into still air, consideration is given to the effects of jet Mach number, nozzle divergence angle, and jet static pressure ratio upon jet structure, jet wavelength, and the shape and curvature of the jet boundary. Studies of the effects of the ratio of specific heats of the jets are included are observations pertaining to jet noise and jet simulation. For jets exhausting into supersonic streams, an attempt has been made to present primarily theoretical certain jet interference effects and in formulating experimental studies. The primary variables considered are jet Mach number, free stream Mach number, jet static pressure ratio, ratio of specific heats of the jet, nozzle exit angle, and boattail angle. The simulation problem and the case of a hypothetical hypersonic vehicle are examined, A few experimental observations are included.

  4. Flash spectroscopic studies of the kinetics of the halorhodopsin photocycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.; Vodyanoy, V.

    1986-01-01

    The photoreactions of halorhodopsin are complicated by the fact that the parent pigment and its photoproducts interact with chloride. Thus, in any photoreaction scheme at least four species have to be accounted for: HR565 and HR578 Cl-, as well as HR640 and HR520 Cl-. A photocycle scheme proposed earlier places the two main photointermediates of halorhodopsin, HR520 Cl- and HR640, into a single photocycle, with a chloride-dependent equilibrium between them [Oesterhelt, D., Hegemann, P., & Tittor, J. (1985) EMBO J. 4, 2351-2356]. This scheme, with the additional feature of direct photoproduction of HR640 from HR565, was tested in this work by using numerical solutions of the appropriate differential equations to simulate flash-induced absorption changes at 500 nm (production of HR520 Cl-) and at 660 nm (production of HR640). The time scale of the simulation was ms following the flash. Comparison of the simulated curves with experimental traces yielded a unique set of three rate constants. The proposed photocycle scheme and these rate constants predict well the shapes and amplitudes of flash traces at various chloride concentrations. It appears from the photocycle scheme, and the numerical values of rate constants, that chloride is bound with high affinity to the parent halorhodopsin molecule, but with much lower affinity to its main photointermediate. This may be the consequence of the fact that in the parent halorhodopsin in the retinal configuration is all-trans, but in the two photointermediates it is 13-cis.

  5. Numberical studies of the radiant flash pyrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    When biomass particles are heated very rapidly (>1000/sup 0/ C/s) in an oxygen free environment, they undergo pyrolysis with the formation of little or no char. If concentrated solar energy is used to rapidly heat the particles their temperature may exceed that of the surrounding gaseous environment by several hundred degrees Celsius when pyrolysis occurs. This ''two temperature'' effect gives rise to the formation of high yields of syrups from the pyrolyzing biomass. Numberical exploration of the combined effects of heat and mass transfer on the radiative flash pyrolysis phenonmena are described in this paper. (5 tables, 8 figs, 12 refs.)

  6. Numerical studies of the radiant flash pyrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    When biomass particles are heated very rapidly (temperatures greater than 1000 degrees/s) in an oxygen free environment, they undergo pyrolysis with the formation of little or no char. If concentrated solar energy is used to rapidly heat the particles their temperature may exceed that of the surrounding gaseous environment by several hundred degrees Celsius when pyrolysis occurs. This two temperature effect gives rise to the formation of high yields of syrups from the pyrolyzing biomass. Numerical exploration of the combined effects of heat and mass transfer on the radiative flash pyrolysis phenonmena are described in this paper. 12 references.

  7. Study of asymmetric supersonic jet flow for ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.M. . Dept. of Aerospace Engineering); Knoke, G.S. ); Geller, E.W.; Liu, H.T. ); Jou, W.H. ); Chen, F.C.; Murphy, R.W. )

    1990-01-01

    An asymmetric subsonic jet nozzle with a small aspect ratio can entrain a mass several times higher than a circular jet can entrain in a low subsonic flow. In this study, we extend the Mach number of the jet to 2.5. The advantage an asymmetric jet has over a circular jet in enhancing mass transfer still exists in the supersonic range. The main objective of this study is to explore the possibility of applying the asymmetric jet to a supersonic ejector with pressure build-up. The wall confinement was found to have a strong effect on the entrainment.

  8. Escitalopram Reduces Hot Flashes in Non-depressed Menopausal Women: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Roseanne DeFronzo; Menza, Matthew; Allen, Lesley A.; Marin, Humberto; Bienfait, Karina L.; Tiu, Jade; Howarth, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Background Hot flashes are one of the most troubling manifestations of menopause, affecting about 80% of women. Due to recent controversies about hormone replacement therapy (HRT), many women are seeking alternative treatments. The use of antidepressants to treat hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms has been an active area of investigation. However, the majority of past research in this area has included women with significant medical or psychiatric histories that may influence treatment response. This was the first study to examine the impact of escitalopram on hot flashes, mood, sleep, and quality of life in a healthy sample of non-depressed menopausal women. Methods Twenty-five menopausal women, with no significant psychiatric or medical history, were enrolled. All women were treated with escitalopram (10-20mg flexibly dosed) for 8 weeks. The active treatment phase was preceded by a single blind placebo lead-in period. Results Over the course of the study, women reported significant decreases in both hot flash frequency and severity and improvements in dysphoria, anxiety, quality of life, and sleep. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that escitalopram may be a feasible and effective option for treating hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in healthy women who might not ordinarily consider antidepressant treatment. PMID:19439155

  9. Methods for jet studies with three-particle correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneau, Claude A.

    2006-12-15

    We present a method based on three-particle azimuthal correlation cumulants for studying jet interactions with the medium produced in heavy ion collisions (at RHIC) where jets cannot be reconstructed on an event-by-event basis with conventional jet-finding algorithms. The method is specifically designed to distinguish a range of jet interaction mechanisms such as Mach cone emission, gluon Cerenkov emission, jet scattering, and jet broadening. We describe how anisotropic flow contributions of second order (e.g., v{sub 2}{sup 2}) are suppressed in three-particle azimuthal correlation cumulants, and discuss specific model representations of dijets, away-side scattering, and Mach cone emission.

  10. Experimental study of flapping jets in a soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julia; Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2015-11-01

    Plateau and Rayleigh's observation and explanation on jet instability have inspired us over the years and there has been a significant advance in understanding the jet dynamics. Here, we present a quasi-two-dimensional experimental study of flapping jets in a soap film. Newtonian and non-Newtonian solutions are injected in a flowing soap film. Thinning, break-ups, and beads-on-a-string of the jets, and axisymmetric vortices shredded from the flapping jets are visualized. We employ PIV of the flow motion around the jets to gain an understanding of the roles of instabilities in the flow.

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of the formation conditions of stepped leaders in negative flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shijun; Zeng, Rong; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chijie

    2015-08-01

    Natural lightning flashes are stochastic and uncontrollable, and thus, it is difficult to observe the formation process of a downward negative stepped leader (NSL) directly and in detail. This situation has led to some dispute over the actual NSL formation mechanism, and thus has hindered improvements in the lightning shielding analysis model. In this paper, on the basis of controllable long air gap discharge experiments, the formation conditions required for NSLs in negative flashes have been studied. First, a series of simulation experiments on varying scales were designed and carried out. The NSL formation processes were observed, and several of the characteristic process parameters, including the scale, the propagation velocity, and the dark period, were obtained. By comparing the acquired formation processes and the characteristic parameters with those in natural lightning flashes, the similarity between the NSLs in the simulation experiments and those in natural flashes was proved. Then, based on the local thermodynamic equation and the space charge estimation method, the required NSL formation conditions were deduced, and the space background electric field (Eb) was proposed as the primary parameter for NSL formation. Finally, the critical value of Eb required for the formation of NSLs in natural flashes was determined to be approximately 75 kV/m by extrapolation of the results of the simulation experiments.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of the formation conditions of stepped leaders in negative flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shijun; Zeng, Rong; Zhuang, Chijie; Li, Jianming

    2015-08-15

    Natural lightning flashes are stochastic and uncontrollable, and thus, it is difficult to observe the formation process of a downward negative stepped leader (NSL) directly and in detail. This situation has led to some dispute over the actual NSL formation mechanism, and thus has hindered improvements in the lightning shielding analysis model. In this paper, on the basis of controllable long air gap discharge experiments, the formation conditions required for NSLs in negative flashes have been studied. First, a series of simulation experiments on varying scales were designed and carried out. The NSL formation processes were observed, and several of the characteristic process parameters, including the scale, the propagation velocity, and the dark period, were obtained. By comparing the acquired formation processes and the characteristic parameters with those in natural lightning flashes, the similarity between the NSLs in the simulation experiments and those in natural flashes was proved. Then, based on the local thermodynamic equation and the space charge estimation method, the required NSL formation conditions were deduced, and the space background electric field (E{sub b}) was proposed as the primary parameter for NSL formation. Finally, the critical value of E{sub b} required for the formation of NSLs in natural flashes was determined to be approximately 75 kV/m by extrapolation of the results of the simulation experiments.

  13. Experimental study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gomon, M.

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to study the behavior of highly viscous gravity-driven jets filling a container. Matters of interest are the formation of voids in the fluid pool during the filling process and the unstable behavior of the fluid in the landing region which manifests itself as an oscillating motion. The working fluids used in this research are intended to simulate the flow behavior of molten glass. Qualitative and quantitative results are obtained in a parametric study. The fraction of voids present in the fluid pool after the filling of the container is measured for different parameter values of viscosity and mass flow rate. Likewise, frequencies of the oscillating jet are measured. Results are inconclusive with regard to a correlation between parameter settings and void fractions. As for frequencies, power law correlations are established.

  14. A study on flash sintering and related phenomena in titania and its composite with alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhar

    In 2010, Cologna et. al. [1] reported that with a help of small electric field 120 Vcm-1, the sintering temperature of 3 mol % yittria stabilized zirconia could be brought down to 850°C from 1450°C. On top of reducing the temperature requirements, the green sample could be sintered from starting density of 50% to near full density in mere 5 seconds, a sintering rate three orders of magnitude higher than conventional methods. This discovery led to the emergence of a new field of enhanced sintering with electric field, named "Flash Sintering". The objective of this thesis is to understand the phenomenological behavior of flash-sintering and related phenomena on titania and its composites with alumina at elevated temperature. The possible mechanisms to explain flash sintering are discussed: Joule heating and the avalanche of defect generation [2], both induced by the rapid rise in conductivity just before the onset of the flash. Apparently, both mechanisms play a role. The thesis covers the response of pure titania and composites of titania-alumina under flash and compared with conventional sintering. We start with the sintering behavior of pure titania and observe lowering of sintering temperature requirements with higher applied electric field. The conductivity of titania during flash is also measured, and compared with the nominal conductivity of titania at equivalent temperatures. The conductivity during flash is determined to be have a different activation energy. For the composites of titania-alumina, effect of flash on the constrained sintering was studied. It is a known fact that sintering of one component of composite slows down when the other component of a different densification rate is added to it, called constrained sintering. In our case, large inclusions of alumina particles were added to nano-grained titania green compact that hindered its densification. Flash sintering was found to be overcoming this problem and near full densification was achieved

  15. Multiple jet study data correlations. [data correlation for jet mixing flow of air jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Eberhardt, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Correlations are presented which allow determination of penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets injected normal to a ducted subsonic heated primary air stream. Correlations were obtained over jet-to-primary stream momentum flux ratios of 6 to 60 for locations from 1 to 30 jet diameters downstream of the injection plane. The range of geometric and operating variables makes the correlations relevant to gas turbine combustors. Correlations were obtained for the mixing efficiency between jets and primary stream using an energy exchange parameter. Also jet centerplane velocity and temperature trajectories were correlated and centerplane dimensionless temperature distributions defined. An assumption of a Gaussian vertical temperature distribution at all stations is shown to result in a reasonable temperature field model. Data are presented which allow comparison of predicted and measured values over the range of conditions specified above.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of combustion jet ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. Y.; Ghoniem, A. F.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    A combustion jet ignition system was developed to generate turbulent jets of combustion products containing free radicals and to discharge them as ignition sources into a combustible medium. In order to understand the ignition and the inflammation processes caused by combustion jets, the studies of the fluid mechanical properties of turbulent jets with and without combustion were conducted theoretically and experimentally. Experiments using a specially designed igniter, with a prechamber to build up and control the stagnation pressure upstream of the orifice, were conducted to investigate the formation processes of turbulent jets of combustion products. The penetration speed of combustion jets has been found to be constant initially and then decreases monotonically as turbulent jets of combustion products travel closer to the wall. This initial penetration speed to combustion jets is proportional to the initial stagnation pressure upstream of the orifice for the same stoichiometric mixture. Computer simulations by Chorin's Random Vortex Method implemented with the flame propagation algorithm for the theoretical model of turbulent jets with and without combustion were performed to study the turbulent jet flow field. In the formation processes of the turbulent jets, the large-scale eddy structure of turbulence, the so-called coherent structure, dominates the entrainment and mixing processes. The large-scale eddy structure of turbulent jets in this study is constructed by a series of vortex pairs, which are organized in the form of a staggered array of vortex clouds generating local recirculation flow patterns.

  17. Chandra enables study of x-ray jets.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Daniel

    2010-04-20

    The exquisite angular resolution of the Chandra x-ray telescope has enabled the detection and study of resolved x-ray jets in a wide variety of astronomical systems. Chandra has detected extended jets in our galaxy from protostars, symbiotic binaries, neutron star pulsars, black hole binaries, extragalactic jets in radio sources, and quasars. The x-ray data play an essential role in deducing the emission mechanism of the jets, in revealing the interaction of jets with the intergalactic or intracluster media, and in studying the energy generation budget of black holes. PMID:20378839

  18. Chandra enables study of x-ray jets

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The exquisite angular resolution of the Chandra x-ray telescope has enabled the detection and study of resolved x-ray jets in a wide variety of astronomical systems. Chandra has detected extended jets in our galaxy from protostars, symbiotic binaries, neutron star pulsars, black hole binaries, extragalactic jets in radio sources, and quasars. The x-ray data play an essential role in deducing the emission mechanism of the jets, in revealing the interaction of jets with the intergalactic or intracluster media, and in studying the energy generation budget of black holes. PMID:20378839

  19. Laboratory study of jet-noise suppressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, R. E. A.; Fuchs, H. V.; Michel, U.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments on four different types of subsonic jet-noise suppressors are reported. The suppressors were compared to a clean circular jet on an equal-thrust per unit-exit-area basis. On this basis the noise production of the different jets varied only slightly, in contrast to some results reported previously.

  20. The Study of Internal Deformation Fields in Borosilicate Glass Using X--Ray Flash Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, Stephen; Proud, William; Field, John

    2001-06-01

    Studying the ballistic performance of brittle materials such as borosilicate glass is of particular interest in fields such as transparent armour plating, security glazing and blast-proof windows. Here we extend studies already carried out on the response of borosilicate glass to rod impacts^1 by using flash X-rays to look at the damage occurring behind the damage front. Measurements such as this are impossible using conventional high speed cameras due to optical opacity caused by damage. The new technique of 3--dimensional digital flash X-ray speckle photography, which has been successfully applied to polyester^2 and sand^3 specimens is also utilised. The technique involves seeding the specimen with a layer of lead filings and then taking flash X-ray images before and during an impact event. Digital cross-correlation can then be used to make measurements of the internal displacements occurring throughout the specimen. Using a stereoscopic geometry the out-of-plane displacements can also be determined and a full 3--dimensional displacement map constructed. In this paper these two powerful and complementary techniques are used to study the ballistic response of a borosilicate glass sample. ^1Bourne, N.K., Forde, L.C., Millet, J.C.F., Field, J.F., Impact and Penetration of a Borosilicate Glass, J.Phys.IV FRANCE Colloq. C3, 7 (1997), pp 157-162. ^2Synnergren, P., Goldrein, H.T., Dynamic Measurements of Internal Three-Dimensional Displacement Fields with Digital Speckle Photography and Flash X--Rays, Applied Optics 38 (1999) pp 5956-5961. ^3Grantham, S.G., Proud, W.G., Goldrein, H.T., Field, J.F., The Study of Internal Deformation Fields in Granular Materials Using 3--D Digital X--Ray Flash Photography, Laser Interferometry X, Proc. SPIE 4101 (2000) pp 321-328.

  1. Study of Jet Transverse Momentum and Jet Rapidity Dependence on Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthula, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    In a collision experiment involving highly energetic particles such as hadrons, processes at high momentum transfers can provide information useful for many studies involving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One way of analyzing these interactions is through angular distributions. In hadron-hadron collisions, the angular distribution between the two leading jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT ) is affected by the production of additional jets. While soft radiation causes small differences in the azimuthal angular distribution of the two leading jets produced in a collision event, additional hard jets produced in the event have more pronounced influence on the distribution of the two leading jets produced in the collision. Thus, the dijet azimuthal angular distribution can serve as a variable that can be used to study the transition from soft to hard QCD processes in a collision event. This dissertation presents a triple-differential study involving the azimuthal angular distribution and the jet transverse momenta, and jet rapidities of the first two leading jets. The data used for this research are obtained from proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions occurring at a center of mass energy of 1.96TeV, using the DØ detector in Run II of the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois, USA. Comparisons are made to perturbative QCD (pQCD) predictions at next-to-leading order (NLO).

  2. Visualization study of enhanced flash boiling of R-22 with 5 mm steel and glass spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, D.W.; O`Neal, D.L.

    1998-10-01

    This paper presents the qualitative results and discussion from an experimental investigation of passive enhanced flash boiling of R-22 (an HCFC) from a small vessel. A bench-top experimental apparatus was used to conduct enhanced flash boiling tests with 5.0 mm diameter steel and glass spheres placed at the base of the glass vessel. Sixty-second experiments were conducted with initial refrigerant amounts of 0.23 kg and 0.68 (0.5 lbm and 1.5 lbm), exiting orifices of 1.59 mm and 5.56 mm in diameter (0.063 in. and 0.219 in.), and with an initial pressure of 840 kPa (122 psia). The experiments were designed to simulate the flash boiling process that occurs within the refrigerant accumulator of air-source heat pumps during the reverse-cycle defrost. Results from the visualization study include a complete description of the flashing process with added steel and glass spheres. It was also shown that the enhancement method significantly increased the rate of total vapor production by 24--55% when exposed to a rapid depressurization.

  3. Flash Flood Risks and Warning Decisions: A Mental Models Study of Forecasters, Public Officials, and Media Broadcasters in Boulder, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Bostrom, Ann; Lazo, Jeffrey K; Lazrus, Heather

    2015-11-01

    Timely warning communication and decision making are critical for reducing harm from flash flooding. To help understand and improve extreme weather risk communication and management, this study uses a mental models research approach to investigate the flash flood warning system and its risk decision context. Data were collected in the Boulder, Colorado area from mental models interviews with forecasters, public officials, and media broadcasters, who each make important interacting decisions in the warning system, and from a group modeling session with forecasters. Analysis of the data informed development of a decision-focused model of the flash flood warning system that integrates the professionals' perspectives. Comparative analysis of individual and group data with this model characterizes how these professionals conceptualize flash flood risks and associated uncertainty; create and disseminate flash flood warning information; and perceive how warning information is (and should be) used in their own and others' decisions. The analysis indicates that warning system functioning would benefit from professionals developing a clearer, shared understanding of flash flood risks and the warning system, across their areas of expertise and job roles. Given the challenges in risk communication and decision making for complex, rapidly evolving hazards such as flash floods, another priority is development of improved warning content to help members of the public protect themselves when needed. Also important is professional communication with members of the public about allocation of responsibilities for managing flash flood risks, as well as improved system-wide management of uncertainty in decisions. PMID:25988286

  4. A Visual Study of Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Debora A.; Stadnicki, John

    1997-11-01

    A jet which issues from a small hole in a flow surface, pitched and skewed relative to the crossflow, creates a single streamwise vortex which resembles the flow downstream of a half-delta-wing vortex generator. The term ``vortex generator jet'' (VGJ) has been used to describe such a flow. Investigators of jet-generated vortices have recognized their applicability to active control and their flexibility in terms of being activated and deactivated. We have installed a spanwise array of VGJ's in a turbulent boundary layer in the zero-pressure-gradient test section of the 12" × 36" boundary layer wind tunnel at Boston University. The Reynolds number based on jet diameter is in the range 4000 < Re < 10000. Our experimental investigations include flow visualization of a single pitched and skewed jet in crossflow, as well as wall shear stress measurements downstream of the array of jets. To capture still images of a cross-section of the jet flow, a light sheet formed by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used to illuminate smoke-tagged jet fluid. The wall shear stress measurements are made using an oil-film interferometry technique. Parameters varied include jet velocity and angles of jet pitch and skew.

  5. Studying flash floods in a small watershed by analyzing short term stream response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. Z.; Jacobsen, N.

    2013-12-01

    The study was conducted from early May through late July of 2013 in a small suburban watershed, called the Dry Run Creek, in northeast Iowa. Flooding is considered one of the largest hazards in the United States, causing economic damage in billions of dollars. Investigations across the country have documented dramatic changes in river discharge over the past decades due to an increase in rainfall events. Consequently, many areas in the U.S. have been experiencing flash flood occurrences. The objectives of this study were three folds; (1) delineate avenues of high surface runoff in the watershed during the wet season, (2) conduct flash flood analysis of a selected site during a high intensity rain event, and (3) calculate short term flood recurrence probabilities at the above site. Water levels, turbidity, and total suspended sediment data were collected from 10 sites in the watershed once a week for 10 weeks. In addition, water quality parameters and terrain characteristics were analyzed to determine topographic control on sediment and nutrient flux during rain events. Short term prediction of flood frequency was done by calculating Recurrence Interval (RI) by using the equation T = (n+1)/M, where T is recurrence interval, n is the number of records, and M is the ranked position of the flow on the record. On May 29, 2.58 inches of rain fell on the watershed from 4:30 to 8 p.m. causing the water level at the selected site to rise from 1.99 ft at 4:15 p.m. to 9.38 ft at 8:45 p.m. The event produced a severe flash flood condition in the creek by releasing discharge that is 562% higher than the average flow rate at the site for that time of the season. The water level eventually exceeded the bankfull stage. Avenues of high runoff coincided with the areas characterized by low infiltration rates due to paved surfaces. Upland slopes showed greater control on flash floods compared to channel widths. Recurrence probability of flash floods at a given site was found to be

  6. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Mittal, R; Bielamowicz, S

    2011-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called "Coanda effect" in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  7. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Mittal, R.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier–Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called “Coanda effect” in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  8. Numerical and experimental study of rotating jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Che, Zhizhao; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Rotating jets are investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The experiments are performed on a rotating jet rig and the effects of a range of parameters controlling the liquid jet are investigated, e.g. jet flow rate, rotation speed, jet diameter, etc. Different regimes of the jet morphology are identified, and the dependence on several dimensionless numbers is studied, e.g. Reynolds number, Weber number, etc. The breakup process of droplets is visualized through high speed imaging. Full three-dimensional direct numerical simulations are performed using BLUE, a massively parallel two-phase flow code. The novel interface algorithms in BLUE track the gas-liquid interface through a wide dynamic range including ligament formation, break up and rupture. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  9. A Comprehensive Study on Energy Efficiency and Performance of Flash-based SSD

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seon-Yeon; Kim, Youngjae; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Lee, Joonwon; Seo, Euiseong

    2011-01-01

    Use of flash memory as a storage medium is becoming popular in diverse computing environments. However, because of differences in interface, flash memory requires a hard-disk-emulation layer, called FTL (flash translation layer). Although the FTL enables flash memory storages to replace conventional hard disks, it induces significant computational and space overhead. Despite the low power consumption of flash memory, this overhead leads to significant power consumption in an overall storage system. In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of flash-based storage devices from the viewpoint of power consumption and energy efficiency by using various methodologies. First, we utilize simulation to investigate the interior operation of flash-based storage of flash-based storages. Subsequently, we measure the performance and energy efficiency of commodity flash-based SSDs by using microbenchmarks to identify the block-device level characteristics and macrobenchmarks to reveal their filesystem level characteristics.

  10. Some properties of negative cloud-to-ground flashes from observations of a local thunderstorm based on accurate-stroke-count studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Baoyou; Ma, Ming; Xu, Weiwei; Ma, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Properties of negative cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes, in terms of number of strokes per flash, inter-stroke intervals and the relative intensity of subsequent and first strokes, were presented by accurate-stroke-count studies based on all 1085 negative flashes from a local thunderstorm. The percentage of single-stroke flashes and stroke multiplicity evolved significantly during the whole life cycle of the study thunderstorm. The occurrence probability of negative CG flashes decreased exponentially with the increasing number of strokes per flash. About 30.5% of negative CG flashes contained only one stroke and number of strokes per flash averaged 3.3. In a subset of 753 negative multiple-stroke flashes, about 41.4% contained at least one subsequent stroke stronger than the corresponding first stroke. Subsequent strokes tended to decrease in strength with their orders and the ratio of subsequent to first stroke peaks presented a geometric mean value of 0.52. Interestingly, negative CG flashes of higher multiplicity tended to have stronger initial strokes. 2525 inter-stroke intervals showed a more or less log-normal distribution and gave a geometric mean value of 62 ms. For CG flashes of particular multiplicity geometric mean inter-stroke intervals tended to decrease with the increasing number of strokes per flash, while those intervals associated with higher order strokes tended to be larger than those associated with low order strokes.

  11. A three-dimensional study of the glottal jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, F.; Silva, F.; Sciamarella, D.; Artana, G.

    2012-05-01

    This work builds upon the efforts to characterize the three-dimensional features of the glottal jet during vocal fold vibration. The study uses a Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry setup on a self-oscillating physical model of the vocal folds with a uniform vocal tract. Time averages are documented and analyzed within the framework given by observations reported for jets exiting elongated nozzles. Phase averages are locked to the audio signal and used to obtain a volumetric reconstruction of the jet. From this reconstruction, the intra-cycle dynamics of the jet axis switching is disclosed.

  12. Benchmark studies of thermal jet mixing in SFRs using a two-jet model

    SciTech Connect

    Omotowa, O. A.; Skifton, R.; Tokuhiro, A.

    2012-07-01

    To guide the modeling, simulations and design of Sodium Fast Reactors (SFRs), we explore and compare the predictive capabilities of two numerical solvers COMSOL and OpenFOAM in the thermal jet mixing of two buoyant jets typical of the outlet flow from a SFR tube bundle. This process will help optimize on-going experimental efforts at obtaining high resolution data for V and V of CFD codes as anticipated in next generation nuclear systems. Using the k-{epsilon} turbulence models of both codes as reference, their ability to simulate the turbulence behavior in similar environments was first validated for single jet experimental data reported in literature. This study investigates the thermal mixing of two parallel jets having a temperature difference (hot-to-cold) {Delta}T{sub hc}= 5 deg. C, 10 deg. C and velocity ratios U{sub c}/U{sub h} = 0.5, 1. Results of the computed turbulent quantities due to convective mixing and the variations in flow field along the axial position are presented. In addition, this study also evaluates the effect of spacing ratio between jets in predicting the flow field and jet behavior in near and far fields. (authors)

  13. Experimental study of a vertical jet in a vegetated crossflow.

    PubMed

    Ben Meftah, Mouldi; De Serio, Francesca; Malcangio, Daniela; Mossa, Michele; Petrillo, Antonio Felice

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems have long been used as receiving environments of wastewater discharges. Effluent discharge in a receiving water body via single jet or multiport diffuser, reflects a number of complex phenomena, affecting the ecosystem services. Discharge systems need to be designed to minimize environmental impacts. Therefore, a good knowledge of the interaction between effluents, discharge systems and receiving environments is required to promote best environmental management practice. This paper reports innovative 3D flow velocity measurements of a jet discharged into an obstructed crossflow, simulating natural vegetated channel flows for which correct environmental management still lacks in literature. In recent years, numerous experimental and numerical studies have been conducted on vegetated channels, on the one hand, and on turbulent jets discharged into unvegetated crossflows, on the other hand. Despite these studies, however, there is a lack of information regarding jets discharged into vegetated crossflow. The present study aims at obtaining a more thorough understanding of the interaction between a turbulent jet and an obstructed crossflow. In order to achieve such an objective, a series of laboratory experiments was carried out in the Department of Civil, Environmental, Building Engineering and Chemistry of the Technical University of Bari - Italy. The physical model consists of a vertical jet discharged into a crossflow, obstructed by an array of vertical, rigid, circular and threaded steel cylinders. Analysis of the measured flow velocities shows that the array of emergent rigid vegetation significantly affects the jet and the ambient flow structures. It reduces the mean channel velocity, allowing the jet to penetrate higher into the crossflow. It significantly increases the transversal flow motion, promoting a major lateral spreading of the jet within the crossflow. Due to the vegetation array effects, the jet undergoes notable variations in its

  14. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  15. A Parametric Study of Jet Interactions with Rarefied Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional computational techniques, in particular the uncoupled CFD-DSMC of the present study, are available to be applied to problems such as jet interactions with variable density regions ranging from a continuum jet to a rarefied free stream. When the value of the jet to free stream momentum flux ratio approximately greater than 2000 for a sharp leading edge flat plate forward separation vortices induced by the jet interaction are present near the surface. Also as the free stream number density n (infinity) decreases, the extent and magnitude of normalized pressure increases and moves upstream of the nozzle exit. Thus for the flat plate model the effect of decreasing n (infinity) is to change the sign of the moment caused by the jet interaction on the flat plate surface.

  16. Randomised controlled trial comparing hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlan David, Shannon; Salzillo, Sandra; Bowe, Patrick; Scuncio, Sandra; Malit, Bridget; Raker, Christina; Gass, Jennifer S; Granai, C O; Dizon, Don S

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy of hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, and to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a clinical trial comparing a drug with a complementary or alternative method (CAM). Design Prospective randomised trial. Setting Breast health centre of a tertiary care centre. Participants 15 women with a personal history of breast cancer or an increased risk of breast cancer who reported at least one daily hot flash. Interventions Gabapentin 900 mg daily in three divided doses (control) compared with standardised hypnotherapy. Participation lasted 8 weeks. Outcome measures The primary endpoints were the number of daily hot flashes and hot flash severity score (HFSS). The secondary endpoint was the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDIS). Results 27 women were randomised and 15 (56%) were considered evaluable for the primary endpoint (n=8 gabapentin, n=7 hypnotherapy). The median number of daily hot flashes at enrolment was 4.5 in the gabapentin arm and 5 in the hypnotherapy arm. HFSS scores were 7.5 in the gabapentin arm and 10 in the hypnotherapy arm. After 8 weeks, the median number of daily hot flashes was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 80% in the hypnotherapy arm. The median HFSS was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 85% in the hypnotherapy arm. HFRDIS scores improved by 51.6% in the gabapentin group and by 55.2% in the hypnotherapy group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Hypnotherapy and gabapentin demonstrate efficacy in improving hot flashes. A definitive trial evaluating traditional interventions against CAM methods is feasible, but not without challenges. Further studies aimed at defining evidence-based recommendations for CAM are necessary. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00711529). PMID:24022390

  17. Diurnal rhythm and concordance between objective and subjective hot flashes: The Hilo Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Lynnette L.; Reza, Angela; Mills, Phoebe; Morrison, Lynn; Rahberg, Nichole; Goodloe, Amber; Sutherland, Michael; Brown, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test for a diurnal pattern in hot flashes in a multi-ethnic population living in a hot, humid environment. To examine rates of concordance between objective and subjective measures of hot flashes using ambulatory and laboratory measures. Methods Study participants aged 45–55 were recruited from the general population of Hilo, Hawaii. Women wore a Biolog hot flash monitor, kept a diary for 24-hours, and also participated in 3-hour laboratory measures (n=199). Diurnal patterns were assessed using polynomial regression. For each woman, objectively recorded hot flashes that matched subjective experience were treated as true positive readings. Subjective hot flashes were considered the standard for computing false positive and false negative readings. True positive, false positive, and false negative readings were compared across ethnic groups by chi-square analyses. Results Frequencies of sternal, nuchal and subjective hot flashes peaked at 15:00 ± 1 hour with no difference by ethnicity. Laboratory results supported the pattern seen in ambulatory monitoring. Sternal and nuchal monitoring showed the same frequency of true positive measures, but non-sternal electrodes picked up more false positive readings. Laboratory monitoring showed very low frequencies of false negatives. There were no ethnic differences in the frequency of true positive or false positive measures. Women of European descent were more likely to report hot flashes that were not objectively demonstrated (false negative measures). Conclusions The diurnal pattern and peak in hot flash occurrence in the hot humid environment of Hilo was similar to results from more temperate environments. Lack of variation in sternal vs. non-sternal measures, and in true positive measures across ethnicities suggests no appreciable effect of population variation in sweating patterns. PMID:20220538

  18. Picosecond diffuse reflectance and transmission laser flash photolysis study of various triaryl-2-pyrazolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, G. P.; Leicester, P. A.; Wilkinson, F.; Worrall, D. R.; Ferreira, L. F. Vieira; Chittock, R.; Toner, W.

    In this study the first ever reported application of diffuse reflectance laser flash photolysis for the observation of sub-nanosecond transient absorption decays is presented. The compounds studied are various triaryl-2-pyrazolines, both as microcrytals and contained within polycarbonate films. The microcrystalline samples were studied using pump—probe laser flash photolysis in diffuse reflectance mode and the observed transient absorption decay could be fitted using a biexponential model with, in the case of 1, 5-diphenyl-3-styryl-2-pyrazoline, lifetimes of 1.6 × 10 -10 and 1.3 × 10 -9s for the first and second decay components, respectively. This model could also be used to fit the decay kinetics obtained from transmission pump—probe laser flash photolysis experiments conducted upon polycarbonate films containing this same compound, the lifetimes in this instance being 5.5 × 10 -12 and 1.7 × 10 -10s for the first and second decay components, respectively. In addition, a study of the quenching of the pyrazoline excited states in a polycarbonate matrix by disulphone magenta was undertaken. In this case it was necessary to modify the second term of the biexponential model with a term to allow for Förster type long range energy transfer, the Förster critical transfer distance being determined as 25 Å. This biexponential model is rationalized as initial excitation being to the S2 state, the first decay component being relaxation to the S1 state and the second component decay of the S1 state to the ground state, by radiative and non-radiative relaxation and, when DSM is present, long range energy transfer to this energy acceptor.

  19. FIREFLY: A cubesat mission to study terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenzing, J. H.; Rowland, D. E.; Hill, J.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    FIREFLY is small satellite mission to investigate the link between atmospheric lightning and terrestrial gamma-ray flashes scheduled to launch in late 2010. The instrumentation includes a Gamma-Ray Detector (GRD), VLF receiver, and photometer. GRD will measure the energy and arrival time of x-ray and gamma-ray photons, as well as the energetic electron flux by using a phoswitch-style layered scintillator. The current status of the instrumentation will be discussed, including laboratory tests and simulations of the GRD. FIREFLY is the second in a series of NSF-funded cubesats designed to study the upper atmosphere.

  20. Cartographic Production for the FLaSH Map Study: Generation of Rugosity Grids, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Knorr, Paul O.; Hansen, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Project Summary This series of raster data is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Series release from the Florida Shelf Habitat Project (FLaSH). This disc contains two raster images in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) raster grid format, jpeg image format, and Geo-referenced Tagged Image File Format (GeoTIFF). Data is also provided in non-image ASCII format. Rugosity grids at two resolutions (250 m and 1000 m) were generated for West Florida shelf waters to 250 m using a custom algorithm that follows the methods of Valentine and others (2004). The Methods portion of this document describes the specific steps used to generate the raster images. Rugosity, also referred to as roughness, ruggedness, or the surface-area ratio (Riley and others, 1999; Wilson and others, 2007), is a visual and quantitative measurement of terrain complexity, a common variable in ecological habitat studies. The rugosity of an area can affect biota by influencing habitat, providing shelter from elements, determining the quantity and type of living space, influencing the type and quantity of flora, affecting predator-prey relationships by providing cover and concealment, and, as an expression of vertical relief, can influence local environmental conditions such as temperature and moisture. In the marine environment rugosity can furthermore influence current flow rate and direction, increase the residence time of water in an area through eddying and current deflection, influence local water conditions such as chemistry, turbidity, and temperature, and influence the rate and nature of sedimentary deposition. State-of-the-art computer-mapping techniques and data-processing tools were used to develop shelf-wide raster and vector data layers. Florida Shelf Habitat (FLaSH) Mapping Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/flash) endeavors to locate available data, identify data gaps, synthesize existing information, and expand our understanding of geologic processes in our dynamic

  1. A Correlation Study of Meteorological Dynamics and Thunderstorm Activity Leading to Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Daniel Edward

    The Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) was first discovered by Fishman et al. in 1994. The TGF is an emission of highly energetic radiation produced by or at least in close association with lightning. Fishman theorized that the TGFs were spawned at Sprite altitudes, however, Dwyer and Smith, utilizing detailed Monte Carlo calculations found the production level was within the troposphere, particularly in the altitude range of 15-21 km. This altitude places the TGF generating mechanism within thunderstorm cloud height. Current investigations tend to study the TGF itself in an attempt to isolate the production mechanism and production level while the thunderstorm characteristics have largely been ignored. The investigation into thunderstorms and their characteristics will utilize temporal and spatial coincident passes between the Ramatay High-energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in order to ascertain the bulk or footprint overlap fundamental storm properties of two types of events, the TGF generating thunderstorm (Yes case) and the non-TGF generating thunderstorm (Null case). Common components to each case are the presence of lightning during the coincident pass, spatial overlap of sub-satellite footprint within 500km and temporal difference of no more than one-hour. The defining difference is the Yes case has a RHESSI recorded TGF event while the Null case has no RHESSI recorded TGF event. Data presented will show that TGF storms possesses identifiable differences in the hydrometeor concentrations at different levels of the atmosphere. The Yes storm possesses elevated zero-degree isotherms, storm tops, increased occurrence of lower flash rates, low flash rate density and fairly uniform occurrence of lower optical radiance. These properties have statistically significant differences from their Null counterparts. It may be possible to identify potential TGF storms utilizing these storm characteristics and ground

  2. Detection and study of new heavy particles through jet identification

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    A solution to the problem of the identification of an arbitrary number of jets in high energy collisions is reviewed. Some of the applications of this solution to the study of the electroweak interactions are illustrated through two examples: the detection and analysis of top quarks, and the detection of charged Higgs or pseudo Goldstone bosons, in e/sup +/e/sup -/ reactions. Although these two examples involve e/sup +/e/sup -/ initial states, the jet identification method described in this paper could be used in the analysis of any reaction involving jets.

  3. 3-D LDA study of a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Tatterson, Gary B.; Swan, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at an axial Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry. The flow field survey resulted in mean velocity vector field plots and contour plots of the Reynolds stress tensor components. This paper presents contour plots in the planes of the jet minor and major axes at different axial locations. These data contribute substantially to currently available data of jet flow fields and will provide a valuable database for three-dimensional modeling.

  4. A study of real jet effects on the surface pressure distribution induced by a jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, S. C., Jr.; Mendenhall, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of jet exit profile, exit Mach number, swirl and turbulence level on jet-induced loadings for jets exhausting from a surface into a crossflow is presented. The importance of each of these real jet characteristics is assessed using available data. Where adequate surface pressure distribution data are available, a correlation method to predict surface pressure for a jet exhausting from an infinite flat plate is used either to attempt to develop a correlation based on the real jet characteristics or to model the effects of that characteristic. Data comparisons are presented for selected cases. Also, a summary of information on surface pressure distribution data for jet exhausting from flat plates into a subsonic crossflow is presented.

  5. A Flash Flood Study on the Small Montaneous River Catchments in Western Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Győri, Maria-Mihaela; Haidu, Ionel; Humbert, Joël

    2013-04-01

    The present study focuses on flash flood modeling on several mountaneous catchments situated in Western Romania by the use of two methodologies, when rainfall and catchment characteristics are known. Hence, the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) Method and the Rational Method will be employed for the generation of the 1%, 2% and 10% historical flash flood hydrographs on the basis of data spanning from 1989-2009. The SCS Method has been applied on the three gauged catchments in the study area: Petris, Troas and Monorostia making use of the existing interconnection between GIS and the rainfall-runoff models. The DEM, soil data and land use preprocessing in GIS allowed a determination of the hydrologic parameters needed for the rainfall-runoff model, with special emphasis on determining the time of concentration, Lag time and the weighted Curve Number according to Antecedent Moisture Conditions II, adapted for the Romanian territory. HEC-HMS rainfall-runoff model (Hydrologic Engineering Center- Hydrologic Modeling System) facilitates the historical 1%, 2% and 10% flash flood hydrograph generation for the three afore mentioned watersheds. The model is calibrated against measured streamflow data from the three existing gauging stations. The results show a good match between the resulted hydrographs and the observed hydrographs under the form of the Peak Weighted Error RMS values. The hydrographs generated by surface runoff on the ungauged catchments in the area is based on an automation of a workflow in GIS, built with ArcGIS Model Builder graphical interface, as a large part of the functions needed were available as ArcGIS tools. The several components of this model calculate: the runoff depth in mm, the runoff coefficient, the travel time and finally the discharge module which is an application of the rational method, allowing the discharge computation for every cell within the catchment. The result consists of discharges for each isochrones that will be subsequently

  6. Flash Bulletin: Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Debbie

    1984-01-01

    Explains the flashes of light emitted by fireflies as competition, species-specific code, species identification and mating behavior and ecology. Suggests activities to conduct to study the insects and their behavior. (ERB)

  7. Studies of turbulent round jets through experimentation, simulation, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keedy, Ryan

    This thesis studies the physics of the turbulent round jet. In particular, it focuses on three different problems that have the turbulent round jet as their base flow. The first part of this thesis examines a compressible turbulent round jet at its sonic condition. We investigate the shearing effect such a jet has when impinging on a solid surface that is perpendicular to the flow direction. We report on experiments to evaluate the jet's ability to remove different types of explosive particles from a glass surface. Theoretical analysis revealed trends and enabled modeling to improve the predictability of particle removal for various jet conditions. The second part of thesis aims at developing a non-intrusive measurement technique for free-shear turbulent flows in nature. Most turbulent jet investigations in the literature, both in the laboratory and in the field, required specialized intrusive instrumentation and/or complex optical setups. There are many situations in naturally-occurring flows where the environment may prove too hostile or remote for existing instrumentation. We have developed a methodology for analyzing video of the exterior of a naturally-occurring flow and calculating the flow velocity. We found that the presence of viscosity gradients affects the velocity analysis. While these effects produce consistent, predictable changes, we became interested in the mechanism by which the viscosity gradients affect the mixing and development of the turbulent round jet. We conducted a stability analysis of the axisymmetric jet when a viscosity gradient is present. Finally, the third problem addressed in this thesis is the growth of liquid droplets by condensation in a turbulent round jet. A vapor-saturated turbulent jet issues into a cold, dry environment. The resulting mixing produces highly inhomogeneous regions of supersaturation, where droplets grow and evaporate. Non-linear interactions between the droplet growth rate and the supersaturation field make

  8. Flash-quench studies on the one-electron reduction of triiodide.

    PubMed

    Farnum, Byron H; Ward, William M; Meyer, Gerald J

    2013-01-18

    The one-electron reduction of triiodide (I(3)(-)) by a series of reduced ruthenium polypyridyl compounds was studied in an acetonitrile solution at room temperature using the flash-quench technique. Reductive quenching of the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited state of [Ru(bpy)(2)(deeb)](2+), [Ru(deeb)(2)(bpy)](2+), or [Ru(deeb)(3)](2+), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine and deeb is 4,4'-(CO(2)CH(2)CH(3))(2)-2,2'-bipyridine, by iodide generated the reduced ruthenium compounds and diiodide (I(2)(•-)). Charge recombination of the reduced ruthenium compounds and I(2)(•-) occurred with rate constants near the calculated diffusion limit of 2.6 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). The reaction of the reduced ruthenium compounds with I(3)(-) was characterized spectroscopically through the addition of I(3)(-) into the experimental solution prior to the laser flash. Transient absorption data indicated that I(2)(•-) was a reaction product of I(3)(-) reduction and appeared with an average second-order rate constant of (5.0 ± 0.6) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for all three compounds. The insensitivity of the rate constants for I(3)(-) reduction over an 80 meV change in the driving force was unexpected. The relevance of these findings to solar energy conversion within dye-sensitized solar cells is discussed. PMID:23276296

  9. Fundamental Studies For The Triple-Flash X-Ray Generator For Biomedical Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1989-06-01

    The fundamental studies for the triple-flash x-ray generator having variable spectra for biomedical radiography are described. Two types of triple-flash x-ray generators consisted of the following components: a high-voltage generating unit, a voltage divider unit, three high-voltage pulsers, a triple-parallel impulse switching system utilizing air gap pulsers for the main gas gaps, a high-power gas diode having three terminals, a turbo molecular pump, and three x-ray tubes having cold cathodes. For the single-tube generator, the pulse condensers of the pulsers were charged to the same or different energies by using a voltage divider unit and were connected to the x-ray tube through a high-power gas diode. In contrast, the pulsers were connected directly to three tubes without a diode. The duration of each x-ray pulse was a few ps, and the minimum time interval between two pulses was about 100ps (single-tube type), the x-ray intensity was less than lx10-5C/kg at lm per pulse, and the effective focal spot size was determined by the diameter of the anode rod. The triple exposure of pulsed x-rays having variable spectra and time intervals was obtained.

  10. A numerical study of the positive cloud-to-ground flash from the forward flank of normal polarity thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoliang; Guo, Fengxia; Zhao, Tianliang; Qin, Meiou; Zhang, Lei

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the electrical conditions favorable to the occurrence of positive cloud-to-ground (+ CG) flashes from the forward flank of normal polarity thunderstorm by building a three-dimensional stochastic lightning model and a normal polarity charge structure model. The lightning model well simulated the bilevel branched structure of lightning flash, which has been observed by previous studies. Simulation results indicate that the downshear extension of the charge layer to the forward flank would decrease the electric field of thunderstorm. When only the upper positive charge layer downshear extended to the forward flank, it could not give rise to the occurrence of + CG flashes. When both the upper positive and midlevel negative charge layers downshear extended to the forward flank, if the charge of the negative charge layer was less than the positive charge layer above it in the forward flank of the thunderstorm, that generated sufficient charge imbalance between these two charge layers, + CG flashes could originate from the forward flank; otherwise, IC flashes occur.

  11. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-06-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  12. Superoxide Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Fang, Huaqiang; Shang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Xu, Zhengshuang; Ye, Tao; Wang, Xianhua; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Quan; Cheng, Heping

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible mitochondrial permeability transition and the resultant cytochrome c release signify the commitment of a cell to apoptotic death. However, the role of transient MPT (tMPT) because of flickering opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore remains elusive. Here we show that tMPT and the associated superoxide flashes (i.e. tMPT/superoxide flashes) constitute early mitochondrial signals during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Selenite (a ROS-dependent insult) but not staurosporine (a ROS-independent insult) stimulated an early and persistent increase in tMPT/superoxide flash activity prior to mitochondrial fragmentation and a global ROS rise, independently of Bax translocation and cytochrome c release. Selectively targeting tMPT/superoxide flash activity by manipulating cyclophilin D expression or scavenging mitochondrial ROS markedly impacted the progression of selenite-induced apoptosis while exerting little effect on the global ROS response. Furthermore, the tMPT/superoxide flash served as a convergence point for pro- and anti-apoptotic regulation mediated by cyclophilin D and Bcl-2 proteins. These results indicate that tMPT/superoxide flashes act as early mitochondrial signals mediating the apoptotic response during oxidative stress, and provide the first demonstration of highly efficacious local mitochondrial ROS signaling in deciding cell fate. PMID:21659534

  13. Jet Noise Reduction by Microjets - A Parametric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of injecting tiny secondary jets (microjets ) on the radiated noise from a subsonic primary jet is studied experimentally. The microjets are injected on to the primary jet near the nozzle exit with variable port geometry, working fluid and driving pressure. A clear noise reduction is observed that improves with increasing jet pressure. It is found that smaller diameter ports with higher driving pressure, but involving less thrust and mass fraction, can produce better noise reduction. A collection of data from the present as well as past experiments is examined in an attempt to correlate the noise reduction with the operating parameters. The results indicate that turbulent mixing noise reduction, as monitored by OASPL at a shallow angle, correlates with the ratio of jet to primary jet driving pressures normalized by the ratio of corresponding diameters (p d /pjD). With gaseous injection, the spectral amplitudes decrease at lower frequencies while an increase is noted at higher frequencies. It is apparent that this amplitude crossover is at least partly due to shock-associated noise from the underexpanded jets themselves. Such crossover is not seen with water injection since the flow in that case is incompressible and there is no shock-associated noise. Centerline velocity data show that larger noise reduction is accompanied by faster jet decay as well as significant reduction in turbulence intensities. While a physical understanding of the dependence of noise reduction on p d /pjD remains unclear, given this correlation, an analysis explains the observed dependence of the effect on various other parameters.

  14. Fluorescence imaging study of free and impinging supersonic jets: Jet structure and turbulent transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inman, Jennifer Ann

    A series of experiments into the behavior of underexpanded jet flows has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. This work was conducted in support of the Return to Flight effort following the loss of the Columbia. The tests involved simulating flow through a hypothetical breach in the leading edge of the Space Shuttle Orbiter along its reentry trajectory, with the goal of generating a data set with which other researchers can test and validate computational modeling tools. Two nozzles supplied with high-pressure gas were used to generate axisymmetric underexpanded jets exhausting into a low-pressure chamber. These nozzles had exit Mach numbers of 1 and 2.6. Reynolds numbers based on nozzle exit conditions ranged from about 200 to 35,000, and nozzle exit-to-ambient jet pressure ratios ranged from about 1 to 37. Both free and impinging jets were studied, with impingement distances ranging from 10 to 40 nozzle diameters, and impingement angles of 45°, 60°, and 90°. For the majority of cases, the jet fluid was a mixture of 99.5% nitrogen seeded with 0.5% nitric oxide (NO). Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of NO was used to non-intrusively visualize the flow with a temporal resolution on the order of lets. PLIF images were used to identify and measure the location and size of flow structures. PLIF images were further used to identify unsteady jet behavior in order to quantify the conditions governing the transition to turbulent flow. This dissertation will explain the motivation behind the work, provide details of the laser system and test hardware components, discuss the theoretical aspects of laser-induced fluorescence, give an overview of the spectroscopy of nitric oxide, and summarize the governing fluid mechanical concepts. It will present measurements of the size and location of flow structures, describe the basic mechanisms and origins of unsteady behavior in these flows, and discuss the dependence of such behavior on particular flow

  15. Experimental study of self magnetic pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4 megavolt

    SciTech Connect

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Bicrel, Béatrice; Cassany, Bruno; Desanlis, Thierry; Voisin, Luc; Maisonny, Rémi; Toury, Martial; Hourdin, Laurent; Cartier, Frédéric; Cartier, Stéphanie; D'Almeida, Thierry; Delbos, Christophe; Garrigues, Alain; Plouhinec, Damien; Ritter, Sandra; Sol, David; Zucchini, Frédéric; Caron, Michel

    2013-10-15

    The Self Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode is a potential high-brightness X-ray source for high voltage generators (2–10 MV) that has shown good reliability for flash radiography applications [D. D. Hinchelwood et al., “High power self-pinch diode experiments for radiographic applications” IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 35(3), 565–572 (2007)]. We have studied this diode at about 4 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator operated at the CEA/GRAMAT [G. Raboisson et al., “ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator,” in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (1989), pp. 567–570]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode is modified in order to set up flash radiographic diodes. A previous set of radiographic experiments was carried out on ASTERIX with a Negative Polarity Rod Pinch (NPRP) diode [B. Etchessahar et al., “Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV,” Phys. Plasmas 19(9), 093104 (2012)]. The SMP diode which is examined in the present study provides an alternative operating point on the same generator and a different radiographic performance: 142 ± 11 rad at 1 m dose (Al) for a 3.46 ± 0.42 mm spot size (1.4× FWHM of the LSF). This performance is obtained in a reproducible and robust nominal configuration. However, several parametric variations were also tested, such as cathode diameter and anode/cathode gap. They showed that an even better performance is accessible after optimization, in particular, a smaller spot size (<3 mm). Numbers of electrical, optical, and X-ray diagnostics have been implemented in order to gain more insight in the diode physics and to optimize it further. For the first time in France, visible and laser imaging of the SMP diode has been realized, from a radial point of view, thus, providing key information on the electrode

  16. Experimental study of self magnetic pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4 megavolt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Maisonny, Rémi; Toury, Martial; Hourdin, Laurent; Bicrel, Béatrice; Cassany, Bruno; Desanlis, Thierry; Voisin, Luc; Cartier, Frédéric; Cartier, Stéphanie; D'Almeida, Thierry; Delbos, Christophe; Garrigues, Alain; Plouhinec, Damien; Ritter, Sandra; Sol, David; Zucchini, Frédéric; Caron, Michel

    2013-10-01

    The Self Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode is a potential high-brightness X-ray source for high voltage generators (2-10 MV) that has shown good reliability for flash radiography applications [D. D. Hinchelwood et al., "High power self-pinch diode experiments for radiographic applications" IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 35(3), 565-572 (2007)]. We have studied this diode at about 4 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator operated at the CEA/GRAMAT [G. Raboisson et al., "ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator," in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (1989), pp. 567-570]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode is modified in order to set up flash radiographic diodes. A previous set of radiographic experiments was carried out on ASTERIX with a Negative Polarity Rod Pinch (NPRP) diode [B. Etchessahar et al., "Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV," Phys. Plasmas 19(9), 093104 (2012)]. The SMP diode which is examined in the present study provides an alternative operating point on the same generator and a different radiographic performance: 142 ± 11 rad at 1 m dose (Al) for a 3.46 ± 0.42 mm spot size (1.4× FWHM of the LSF). This performance is obtained in a reproducible and robust nominal configuration. However, several parametric variations were also tested, such as cathode diameter and anode/cathode gap. They showed that an even better performance is accessible after optimization, in particular, a smaller spot size (<3 mm). Numbers of electrical, optical, and X-ray diagnostics have been implemented in order to gain more insight in the diode physics and to optimize it further. For the first time in France, visible and laser imaging of the SMP diode has been realized, from a radial point of view, thus, providing key information on the electrode plasmas evolution

  17. A study of jet energy measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This thesis describes the effort being made to improve the Jet Energy Reconstruction as performed by the CDF international collaboration at the Tevatron collider. This experiment studies proton-antiproton interactions at a center of mass energy of 1.8 TeV. During the three years data taking period Run 1, from 1992 to 1995 the CDF experiment collected an amount of data corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 110 pb{sup -1}. One of the major results obtained analyzing this data sample is the discovery of the top quark. In the year 2000 a new period of data taking, Run 11, will start with a higher luminosity and a slightly higher center of mass energy giving us the chance to explore high energy physics even deeper. In preparation of this new run several upgrades are being made to adapt the CDF detector to the high luminosity foreseen and to improve its capabilities. Many signatures requested to trigger the detector aim at signaling a quark or a gluon in the final state. Unfortunately we are not able to measure quarks as free particles because they undergo a fragmentation process when turning into jets of particles. Thus it is of key importance to build up algorithms which reconstruct the energy of the initial parton starting from the jet informations. The description of the algorithm adopted till now will be given as an introduction to the new method being developed, that will be the main subject of this thesis. In Chapter I we will give a theoretical introduction on strong interactions to describe the mechanism to produce hadronic jets. In Chapter 2 we will describe some results from the experiment where the reconstruction of hadronic jets was important. Here we will also mention some important results which we think we can obtain during new the data taking period. We will give particular emphasis to those processes where an improved jet energy measured would bring to better results. In Chapter 3 we will give a description of the CDF detector including some

  18. Multiple-laser flash shadowgraphy system for terminal studies of small-caliber projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalonia, R. C.; Mitra, Gautam; Singh, G. S.; Varma, R. K.; Singh, Manpreet; Singh, Manjit; Sethi, V. S.; Yadav, M. S.

    2010-06-01

    A multiple-laser flash shadowgraphy system has been innovatively designed and developed to study the terminal effects of projectiles. The system has been designed based on modulated laser diodes operated at low voltage and current. In order to study the ballistics effects of small arms, an exposure time of the order of a few hundreds ns and a delay time of the order of a few tens of μs are needed. An ultrashort pulse generator has been developed to provide the exposure and delay time pulses. The developed system has been integrated with a field lens assembly and camera assembly. To record the shadowgraphs, a target is placed near the center of the field lens and a bullet is fired from a fixed gun. The system is described, and experimental results and conclusions are reported.

  19. A Simulation Study on the Flash X-Ray Spectra Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiufeng; Li, Shiping; Cao, Hongrui; Xiao, Rui; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Linwen; Yin, Zejie

    2013-11-01

    Accurate measurement of flash X-ray energy spectra plays an important role in high-energy flash radiography. In this paper, by virtue of Geant4 toolkit, we simulated the generation and transport of X-ray photons resulting from the interaction of a high-energy electron beam with a solid thin target. We obtained the flash X-ray energy spectral distribution in the plane perpendicular to the electron beam incident direction. Our results indicate that the flash X-ray spectrum is almost uniform in the azimuthal direction but is quite different in the radius direction. Specifically, as the radius increases, the incident X-ray dose decreases significantly. Our work paves a theoretical basis for selecting appropriate structures and layout of the spectrometer and facilitates the measurements of flash X-ray energy spectra.

  20. Studying the hydro-meteorological extremes. The benefits from the European Flash Flood research oriented HYDRATE project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsanis, Ioannis K.; Koutroulis, Aristeidis G.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Grillakis, Emmanouil G.

    2010-05-01

    The present paper summarizes the advances of flash flood research for the Greek case study, within the frame of HYDRATE EC funded project. As a first step, a collation of homogenous primary data on flash floods occurred in Greece based on various data sources resulted in 21 documented events, enriching the HYDRATE database. Specific major events were selected for further detailed data collation and analysis. A common intensive post event field survey was conducted by various researchers with different skills and experience, in order to document the 18th of September 2007, Western Slovenia flash flood event. The observation strategy and the lessons learned during this campaign were applied successfully for surveying an event in Crete. Two flash flood events occurred in Crete were selected for detailed analysis, the 13th of January 1994 event occurred in Giofiros basin and the 17th of October 2006 event occurred in Almirida basin. Several techniques, like distributed rainfall-runoff modelling, hydraulic modelling, indirect and empirical peak discharge estimation, were applied for the understanding of the dominant flash flood processes and the effect of initial conditions on peak discharge. In a more general framework, the seasonality of the hydrometeorologic characteristics of floods that occurred in Crete during the period 1990-2007 and the atmospheric circulation conditions during the flood events were examined. During the three and a half years research period, many lessons have learnt from a fruitful collaboration among the project partners. HYDRATE project improved the scientific basis of flash flood research and provided research knowledge on flood risk management.

  1. Experimental study of a two-phase surface jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Matias; Esmaeilpour, Mehdi; Politano, Marcela S.; Carrica, Pablo M.

    2013-04-01

    Results of an experimental study of a two-phase jet are presented, with the jet issued near and below a free surface, parallel to it. The jet under study is isothermal and in fresh water, with air injectors that allow variation of the inlet air volume fraction between 0 and 13 %. Measurements of water velocity have been performed using LDV, and the jet exit conditions measured with PIV. Air volume fraction, bubble velocity and chord length distributions were measured with sapphire optical local phase detection probes. The mean free surface elevation and RMS fluctuations were obtained using local phase detection probes as well. Visualization was performed with laser-induced fluorescence. Measurements reveal that the mean free surface elevation and turbulent fluctuations significantly increase with the injection of air. The water normal Reynolds stresses are damped by the presence of bubbles in the bulk of the liquid, but very close to the free surface the effect is reversed and the normal Reynolds stresses increase slightly for the bubbly flow. The Reynolds shear stresses < {u^' } w^' } } rangle decrease when bubbles are injected, indicating turbulence attenuation, and are negative at deeper locations, as turbulent eddies shed downward carry high axial momentum deeper into the flow. Flow visualization reveals that the two-phase jet is lifted with the presence of bubbles and reaches the free surface sooner. Significant bubble coalescence is observed, leading to an increase in mean bubble size as the jet develops. The coalescence near the free surface is particularly strong, due to the time it takes the bubbles to pierce the free surface, resulting in a considerable increase in the local air volume fraction. In addition to first explore a bubbly surface jet, the comprehensive dataset reported herein can be used to validate two-phase flow models and computational tools.

  2. Simplification approach to detect urban areas vulnerable to flash floods using GIS: a case study Warsaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Marzena; Osińska-Skotak, Katarzyna

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a consistent methodology to determine urban areas that are particularly vulnerable to the effects of torrential rains. They are, as a result of climate change, more and more prevalent in the temperate climate, usually spring - summer from mid-May to late August - and involve the risk of flash floods. In recent years, the increase in the incidence of such phenomena is noticeable throughout the whole Europe. It is assumed that through the analysis of environmental and infrastructural conditions, using the developed methodology, it is possible to determine areas vulnerable to flooding due to torrential rains. This may lead to a better management, quicker response in case of a phenomenon, and even to take measures to prevent the occurrence of adverse effects of torrential rains (for instance modernization of the urban drainage system and development of methods to get rid of rapidly collected water). Designation of areas particularly vulnerable to the effects of heavy rains can be achieved by adapting hydrological models, but they require an appropriate adjustment and highly accurate input data: (based on spot or radar measurements of precipitation, land cover, soil type, humidity, wind speed, vegetation species in a given area, growing season, the roughness and porosity of the cover and soil moisture) but such detailed data are generally hard to obtain or not available for less developed areas. It could also be achieved by performing spatial analysis in GIS, which is a more simplified form of modelling, but it gives results more quickly and the methodology can be adapted to the commonly available data. A case study of Warsaw's district Powiśle has been undertaken for three epochs - from 2008 to 2010 and areas, that are particularly vulnerable to the effects of flash floods and heavy rains, have been designated.

  3. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  4. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Transition in Underexpanded Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for studying the onset of transition to turbulence. For this study, we have used PLIF of nitric oxide (NO) to image underexpanded axisymmetric free jets issuing into a low-pressure chamber through a smooth converging nozzle with a sonic orifice. Flows were studied over a range of Reynolds numbers and nozzle-exit-to-ambient pressure ratios with the aim of empirically determining criteria governing the onset of turbulence. We have developed an image processing technique, involving calculation of the standard deviation of the intensity in PLIF images, in order to aid in the identification of turbulence. We have used the resulting images to identify laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes. Jet scaling parameters were used to define a rescaled Reynolds number that incorporates the influence of a varying pressure ratio. An empirical correlation was found between transition length and this rescaled Reynolds number for highly underexpanded jets.

  5. Laboratory Studies of Supersonic Magnetized Plasma Jets and Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergey

    2013-06-01

    In this talk I will focus on laboratory plasma experiments producing magnetically driven supersonic plasma jets and on the interaction of these jets with ambient media. The experiments are scalable to astrophysical flows in that the critical dimensionless numbers such as the plasma collisionality, the plasma beta, the Reynolds number and the magnetic Reynolds number are all in the astrophysically appropriate ranges. The experimental results will be compared with computer simulations performed with laboratory plasma codes and with astrophysical codes. In the experiments the jets are driven and collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields and it is found that the level of MHD instabilities in the jets strongly depends on the strength of the field represented by the ratio of the thermal to magnetic field pressures (plasma beta). The experiments show the possibility of formation of episodic outflows, with periodic ejections of magnetic bubbles naturally evolving into a heterogeneous jet propagating inside a channel made of self-collimated magnetic cavities [1,2]. We also found that it is possible to form quasi-laminar jets which are “indirectly” collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields, but this requires the presence of the lower density halo plasma surrounding the central jet [3]. Studies of the radiative shocks formed in the interaction of the supersonic magnetized plasma flows with ambient plasma will be also presented, and the development of cooling instabilities in the post-shock plasma will be discussed. This research was sponsored by EPSRC Grant No. EP/G001324/1 and by the OFES DOE under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-SC-0001063. References 1. A. Ciardi, S.V. Lebedev, A. Frank et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 691: L147-L150 (2009) 2. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, S.V. Lebedev, S.N. Bland et al., Physics of Plasmas, 17, 112708 (2010). 3. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, M. Bocchi, S.V. Lebedev et al., Physics of Plasmas, 19, 022708 (2012).

  6. The HBV spatially distributed flash flood forecasting model - The Slovenia case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsanis, I. K.; Grillakis, M. G.; Blöschl, G.; Pogačnik, N.

    2009-04-01

    The HBV distributed flash flood forecasting model which is in operational use in northern Austria is applied to a watershed in northwest Slovenia, a case study for the FP6 project HYDRATE. The selected watershed consists of 6 sub-basins with a total area of 646 Km2. Model setup and calibration was performed in this watershed and three long duration rainfall - runoff periods were simulated in order to examine the efficiency of the model. The selected periods included rainfall events that produced high outflows on the exit of the watershed, such as the September 2007 event that caused a flash flooding and severe damages to the towns of Zali Log and Zelezniki. The model uses 1km grid rainfall and temperature data of fifteen minute time intervals in order to simulate the rainfall - runoff process. Inverse distance weighting interpolation is used in order to generate the spatially distributed rainfall and temperature while the hydrological parameters are defined for each 1km grid cell that correspond to one hydrological response units (HRU - areas with analogous hydrogeological characteristics). The basic calibration of the HBV model is based on hydrological parameters of each HRU, parameters that control the rainfall - runoff process within the basin and non HRU parameters that control the river routing between the basins. The model performance is based on seven efficiency criteria that were selected as appropriate for long simulation periods, e.g. coefficient of determination R2 and Nash Sutcliffe efficiency E. The HBV model produced satisfactory results for the three rainfall periods and could be used as an operational model in Slovenia as well.

  7. Nanosecond flash studies of reduction of benzophenone by aliphatic amines. Quantum yields and kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1981-03-11

    Nanosecond flash photolysis, steady irradiation, and deuterium substitution studies have been carried out on solutions of benzophenone with added reductants. Quantum yields (phi/sub ketyl/) for reduction in benzene of benzophenone triplet to ketyl radical, based on phi = 2 for benzhydrol (I), were approx. 1 for cyclohexane (II), tert-butylamine (III), 2-aminobutane (IV), cyclohexylamine (V), di-n-propylamine (VI), and triethylamine (VII), approx. 0.7 for 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (VIII), and approx. 0 for tert-butyl alcohol (IX). Thus, quenching, without radical formation by H abstraction from N and/or ..cap alpha..-C, does not occur with common aliphatic amines but does with Dabco (VIII). The latter quenching is markedly increased by small additions of acetonitrile; the flash spectrum from this compound indicates formation of a triplet amine CT complex or radical ion pair. Triplet-reductant interaction rate constants, k/sur ir/, are high for the amines (approx. 10/sup 8/-10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/) but also show significant deuterium kinetic isotope effects: 1.9 with III-N-d/sub 2/; 1.4 with IV-N-d/sub 2/; 1.2-1.3 with IV-..cap alpha..-C-d. It is proposed that k/sub ir/ measures H atom abstraction, favored in the transition state by an initial charge-transfer interaction. Overall steady irradiation quantum yields of reduction by amines, phi/sub Red/, are much lower than phi/sub ketyl/. This is attributed to disproportionationreactions of ketyl and alkylaminyl radicals for primary and secondary amines, and, possibly, aminoalkyl radicals for tertiary amines. In the case of tert-butylamine, the rate constant for disproportionation is obtained from the decay kinetics of ketyl radical and leads to phi/sub Red/ in agreement with that directly measured.

  8. Study on the characteristics of supersonic Coanda jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kudo, Takemasa; Yu, Shen

    1998-09-01

    Techniques using Coanda effect have been applied to the fluid control devices. In this field, experimental studies were so far performed for the spiral jet obtained by the Coanda jet issuing from a conical cylinder with an annular slit, thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets and so on. It is important from the viewpoints of effective applications to investigate the characteristics of the supersonic Coanda jet in detail. In the present study, the effects of pressure ratios and nozzle configurations on the characteristics of the supersonic Coanda jet have been investigated experimentally by a schlieren optical method and pressure measurements. Furthermore, Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically using a 2nd-order TVD finite-volume scheme with a 3rd-order three stage Runge-Kutta method for time integration. k - ɛ model was used in the computations. The effects of initial conditions on Coanda flow were investigated numerically. As a result, the simulated flow fields were compared with experimental data in good agreement qualitatively.

  9. Numerical Study on GRB-Jet Formation in Collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Nagataki, Shigehiro; Takahashi, Rohta; Mizuta, Akira; Takiwaki, Tomoya; /Tokyo U.

    2006-08-22

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are performed using the ZEUS-2D code to investigate the dynamics of a collapsar that generates a GRB jet, taking account of realistic equation of state, neutrino cooling and heating processes, magnetic fields, and gravitational force from the central black hole and self gravity. It is found that neutrino heating processes are not so efficient to launch a jet in this study. It is also found that a jet is launched mainly by B{sub {phi}} fields that are amplified by the winding-up effect. However, since the ratio of total energy relative to the rest mass energy in the jet is not so high as several hundred, we conclude that the jets seen in this study are not be a GRB jet. This result suggests that general relativistic effects, which are not included in this study, will be important to generate a GRB jet. Also, the accretion disk with magnetic fields may still play an important role to launch a GRB jet, although a simulation for much longer physical time {approx} 10-100 s is required to confirm this effect. It is shown that considerable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized in the accretion disk. Thus there will be a possibility for the accretion disk to supply sufficient amount of {sup 56}Ni required to explain the luminosity of a hypernova. Also, it is shown that neutron-rich matter due to electron captures with high entropy per baryon is ejected along the polar axis. Moreover, it is found that the electron fraction becomes larger than 0.5 around the polar axis near the black hole by {nu}{sub e} capture at the region. Thus there will be a possibility that r-process and r/p-process nucleosynthesis occur at these regions. Finally, much neutrons will be ejected from the jet, which suggests that signals from the neutron decays may be observed as the delayed bump of the light curve of the afterglow or gamma-rays.

  10. Computer study of a jet flap ASTVOL 'Harrier'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. B., III; Liperra, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the costs/benefits trade-off was conducted for an Advanced Supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (ASTOVL) aircraft incorporating a jet flap. The data used were the theory of jet flaps and high aspect ratio nozzles, experience with a V/STOL aircraft study performed for NASA Ames Research Center in February 1982, and a high performance aircraft-synthesis program (ACSYNT). The methodology was to accurately model the supersonic Harrier V/STOL aircraft design on ACSYNT, and then modify the design by both adding high aspect-ratio nozzles in place of the rear (core-flow) nozzles on the Pegasus-type turbofan engine, and integrating these nozzles on each wing's trailing edge, thus creating a jet flap. The predicted performance advantages (increase in maximum lift coefficient with flap deflection and horizontal thrust recovery) were traded off against the disadvantages (additional weight and thrust loss due to ducting) on two representative missions.

  11. Study of liquid jet instability by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lisong; Adamson, Leanne J; Bain, Colin D

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a liquid microjet was used to measure the dynamic surface tension of liquids at the surface ages of ≤1 ms using confocal microscopy. The reflected light from a laser beam at normal incidence to the jet surface is linear in the displacement of the surface near the confocal position, leading to a radial resolution of 4 nm and a dynamic range of 4 μm in the surface position, thus permitting the measurement of amplitude of oscillation at the very early stage of jet instability. For larger oscillations outside the linear region of the confocal response, the swell and neck position of the jet can be located separately and the amplitude of oscillation determined with an accuracy of 0.2 μm. The growth rate of periodically perturbed water and ethanol∕water mixture jets with a 100-μm diameter nozzle and mean velocity of 5.7 m s(-1) has been measured. The dynamic surface tension was determined from the growth rate of the instability with a linear, axisymmetric, constant property model. Synchronisation of the confocal imaging system with the perturbation applied to the jet permitted a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the neck into a ligament and eventually into a satellite drop. PMID:22852668

  12. Study of liquid jet instability by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lisong; Adamson, Leanne J.; Bain, Colin D.

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a liquid microjet was used to measure the dynamic surface tension of liquids at the surface ages of ≤1 ms using confocal microscopy. The reflected light from a laser beam at normal incidence to the jet surface is linear in the displacement of the surface near the confocal position, leading to a radial resolution of 4 nm and a dynamic range of 4 μm in the surface position, thus permitting the measurement of amplitude of oscillation at the very early stage of jet instability. For larger oscillations outside the linear region of the confocal response, the swell and neck position of the jet can be located separately and the amplitude of oscillation determined with an accuracy of 0.2 μm. The growth rate of periodically perturbed water and ethanol/water mixture jets with a 100-μm diameter nozzle and mean velocity of 5.7 m s-1 has been measured. The dynamic surface tension was determined from the growth rate of the instability with a linear, axisymmetric, constant property model. Synchronisation of the confocal imaging system with the perturbation applied to the jet permitted a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the neck into a ligament and eventually into a satellite drop.

  13. Numerical Study on Cryogenic Coflowing Jets under Transcritical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Hiroumi; Teramoto, Susumu; Okamoto, Koji; Yamanishi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-01

    A numerical and experimental study is presented on cryogenic coflowing jets under transcritical conditions for a better understanding of the propellant mixing in supercritical-pressure rocket engines. The major concerns are dominant flow structures in the mixing of cryogenic coflowing jets under transcritical conditions. Experimentally, in advance of detailed numerical simulations, cryogenic nitrogen/gaseous nitrogen coaxial jets were visualized by the backlighting photography technique. It was observed that a dense nitrogen core has a shear-layer instability near the injector exit and eventually breaks up into large lumps which dissolve and fade away downstream. In numerical simulations, LES technique was employed for more detailed discussion on the flow structures. LES of a cryogenic nitrogen/gaseous nitrogen coflowing plane jet was conducted with the same density and velocity ratios of inner/outer jets as the experiments. As observed in the experiments, the shear-layer instability in the inner mixing layers is predominant near the injector exit. After roll-up and paring, the shear-layer instability waves become large-scale vortices. They cause coherent vortex structures which become dominant in the downstream and break the dense core into lumps. Strouhal numbers of the shear-layer instability and the dense lump shedding in the numerical simulations were comparable to those measured in the experiments, respectively.

  14. A numerical study of confined turbulent jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T.-H.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical investigation is reported of turbulent incompressible jets confined in two ducts, one cylindrical and the other conical with a 5 degree divergence. In each case, three Craya-Curtet numbers are considered which correspond, respectively, to flow situations with no moderate and strong recirculation. Turbulence closure is achieved by using the k-epsilon model and a recently proposed realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model that relates the Reynolds stresses explicitly to the quadratic terms of the mean velocity gradients and ensures the positiveness of each component of the turbulent kinetic energy. Calculations are carried out with a finite-volume procedure using boundary-fitted curvilinear coordinates. A second-order accurate, bounded convection scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to prevent the solutions from being contaminated by numerical diffusion. The calculated results are compared extensively with the available experimental data. It is shown that the numerical methods presented are capable of capturing the essential flow features observed in the experiments and that the realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model performs much better than the k-epsilon model for this class of flows of great practical importance.

  15. LCFIPlus: A framework for jet analysis in linear collider studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suehara, Taikan; Tanabe, Tomohiko

    2016-02-01

    We report on the progress in flavor identification tools developed for a future e+e- linear collider such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Building on the work carried out by the LCFIVertex collaboration, we employ new strategies in vertex finding and jet finding, and introduce new discriminating variables for jet flavor identification. We present the performance of the new algorithms in the conditions simulated using a detector concept designed for the ILC. The algorithms have been successfully used in ILC physics simulation studies, such as those presented in the ILC Technical Design Report.

  16. Experimental and numerical study of pulsating transversal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, M. A.; Fedorova, N. N.; Fedorchenko, I. A.; Pozdnyakov, G. A.; Timofeev, K. Yu.; Zhakharova, Yu. V.

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents results of joint experimental and numerical investigation of pulsating jet penetration into still air and supersonic flow. Goal of the study is to investigate two-dimensional (2D) Hartmann generator (HG) properties and clear up its possibilities in providing better mixing between air and secondary (injected) gases.

  17. On the use of continuous flash suppression for the study of visual processing outside of awareness

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eunice; Brascamp, Jan; Kang, Min-Suk; Blake, Randolph

    2014-01-01

    The interocular suppression technique termed continuous flash suppression (CFS) has become an immensely popular tool for investigating visual processing outside of awareness. The emerging picture from studies using CFS is that extensive processing of a visual stimulus, including its semantic and affective content, occurs despite suppression from awareness of that stimulus by CFS. However, the current implementation of CFS in many studies examining processing outside of awareness has several drawbacks that may be improved upon for future studies using CFS. In this paper, we address some of those shortcomings, particularly ones that affect the assessment of unawareness during CFS, and ones to do with the use of “visible” conditions that are often included as a comparison to a CFS condition. We also discuss potential biases in stimulus processing as a result of spatial attention and feature-selective suppression. We suggest practical guidelines that minimize the effects of those limitations in using CFS to study visual processing outside of awareness. PMID:25071685

  18. Laser flash photolysis studies of atmospheric free radical chemistry using optical diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, Paul H.; Nicovich, J. M.; Hynes, Anthony J.; Stickel, Robert E.; Thorn, R. P.; Chin, Mian; Cronkhite, Jeffrey A.; Shackelford, Christie J.; Zhao, Zhizhong; Daykin, Edward P.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent studies carried out in our laboratory are described where laser flash photolytic production of reactant free radicals has been combined with reactant and/or product detection using time-resolved optical techniques to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms of important atmospheric chemical reactions. Discussed are (1) a study of the radical-radical reaction O + BrO yields Br + O2 where two photolysis lasers are employed to prepare the reaction mixture and where the reactants O and BrO are monitored simultaneously using atomic resonance fluorescence to detect O and multipass UV absorption to detect BrO; (2) a study of the reaction of atomic chlorine with dimethylsulfide (CH3SCH3) where atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl is employed to elucidate the kinetics and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is employed to investigate the HCl product yield; and (3) a study of the aqueous phase chemistry of Cl2(-) radicals where longpath UV absorption spectroscopy is employed to investigate the kinetics of the Cl2(-) + H2O reaction.

  19. A case study for scientific I/O: improving the FLASH astrophysics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, Rob; Daley, Chris; Liao, Wei-keng; Gao, Kui; Ross, Rob; Dubey, Anshu; Choudhary, Alok

    2012-01-01

    The FLASH code is a computational science tool for simulating and studying thermonuclear reactions. The program periodically outputs large checkpoint files (to resume a calculation from a particular point in time) and smaller plot files (for visualization and analysis). Initial experiments on BlueGene/P spent excessive time in input/output (I/O), making it difficult to do actual science. Our investigation of time spent in I/O revealed several locations in the I/O software stack where we could make improvements. Fixing data corruption in the MPI-IO library allowed us to use collective I/O, yielding an order of magnitude improvement. Restructuring the data layout provided a more efficient I/O access pattern and yielded another doubling of performance, but broke format assumptions made by other tools in the application workflow. Using new nonblocking APIs in the Parallel-NetCDF library allowed us to keep high performance and maintain backward compatibility. The I/O research community has studied a host of optimizations and strategies. Sometimes the challenge for applications is knowing how to apply these new techniques to production codes. In this case study, we offer a demonstration of how computational scientists, with a detailed understanding of their application, and the I/O community, with a wide array of approaches from which to choose, can magnify each other's efforts and achieve tremendous application productivity gains.

  20. Monitoring of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes: relevance for climate studies and aircraft environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Marco

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are sudden (typically lasting a few millisecond) bursts of energy originating in tropical thunderstorms. TGFs are very energetic (typicall 10-20 kJ) and are characterized by a high-energy spectrum reaching many tens of megaelectronvolts. We summarize the satellite observations of the AGILE satellite, a high-energy astrophysics mis-sion operating in an equatorial orbit since mid-2007. AGILE is ideally suited to detect TGFs because of an on-board dedicated millisecond trigger logic, and a wide energy range extending up to 100 MeV. AGILE has been detecting hundreds of high-quality TGFs in about 2 years of data acquisition, and substantially improved the high-energy detection of these impulsive phenomena. AGILE is detecting an emission spectrum up and above 40 MeV, and establishes that the particle accelerating TGF potential difference can reach hundreds of MegaVolt. We will discuss the relevance of our observations for climate studies and especially for the possible implications for aircraft traveling in equatorial regions. Both the radiative and electromagnetic environment related to TGFs will be considered for a possible influence on aircraft naviga-tion. High-energy satellite data are of crucial importance for the study and monitoring of this important atmospheric phenomenon that deserves the highest level of attention in the future.

  1. Symmetric Coronal Jets: A Reconnection-controlled Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Pariat, E.; DeForest, C. E.; Antiochos, S.; Török, T.

    2010-06-01

    Current models and observations imply that reconnection is a key mechanism for destabilization and initiation of coronal jets. We evolve a system described by the theoretical symmetric jet formation model using two different numerical codes with the goal of studying the role of reconnection in this system. One of the codes is the Eulerian adaptive mesh code ARMS, which simulates magnetic reconnection through numerical diffusion. The quasi-Lagrangian FLUX code, on the other hand, is ideal and able to evolve the system without reconnection. The ideal nature of FLUX allows us to provide a control case of evolution without reconnection. We find that during the initial symmetric and ideal phase of evolution, both codes produce very similar morphologies and energy growth. The symmetry is then broken by a kink-like motion of the axis of rotation, after which the two systems diverge. In ARMS, current sheets formed and reconnection rapidly released the stored magnetic energy. In FLUX, the closed field remained approximately constant in height while expanding in width and did not release any magnetic energy. We find that the symmetry threshold is an ideal property of the system, but the lack of energy release implies that the observed kink is not an instability. Because of the confined nature of the FLUX system, we conclude that reconnection is indeed necessary for jet formation in symmetric jet models in a uniform coronal background field.

  2. MAXI and GLAST Studies of Jets in Active Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Greg; Kataoka, Jun; Sikora, Marek

    2008-10-13

    The recent launch of GLAST--coinciding with the MAXI workshop--opens a new era for studies of jet-dominated active galaxies, known as blazars. While the emission processes operating in various spectral bands in blazars are reasonably well understood, the knowledge of the details of the structure of the jet, location of the dissipation region with respect to the accreting black hole, and coupling of the jet to the accretion process are known only at a rudimentary level. Blazars are variable, and this provides an opportunity to use the variability in various bands--and in particular, the relationship of respective time series to each other--to explore the relative location of regions responsible for emission in the respective bands. Observationally, this requires well-sampled time series in as many spectral bands as possible. To this end, with its all-sky, sensitive monitoring capability, the recently launched GLAST, and MAXI, to be deployed in 2009, are the most promising instruments bound to provide good sampling in respectively the energetic gamma-ray, and the soft X-ray band. This paper highlights the inferences regarding blazar jets that can be gleaned from such joint observations.

  3. Photoreduction of azaoxoisoaporphines by amines: laser flash and steady-state photolysis and pulse radiolysis studies.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Julio R; Aliaga, Christian; Cañete, Alvaro; Kciuk, Gabriel; Szreder, Tomasz; Bobrowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Photoreduction of 7H-benzo[e]perimidin-7-one (3-AOIA, A1) and its 2-methyl derivative (2-Me-3-AOIA, A2) by non-H-donating amines (1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane [DABCO]; 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine [TMP]), and a hydrogen-donating amine (triethylamine [TEA]), has been studied in deaerated neat acetonitrile solutions using laser flash photolysis (LFP) and steady-state photolysis. The triplet excited states of A1 and A2 were characterized by a strong absorption band with λmax = 440 nm and lifetimes of 20 and 27 μs respectively. In the presence of tertiary amines, both triplet excited states were quenched with rate constants close to the diffusional limit (kq ranged between 10(9) and 10(10) M(-1) s(-1)). The transient absorption spectra observed after quenching with DABCO and TMP were characterized by maxima located at 460 nm and broad shoulders in the range of 500-600 nm. These transient species are attributed to solvent-separated radical ion pairs and/or to isolated radical anions. In the presence of TEA, these transients undergo proton transfer, leading to the neutral hydrogenated radicals, protonated over the N1- and O-atoms. Transient absorption spectra of these transients were characterized by maxima located at 400 and 520 nm and 430 nm respectively. Additional support for these spectral assignments was provided by pulse radiolysis (PR) experiments in acetonitrile and 2-propanol solutions. PMID:23647175

  4. Firefly and FireStation: Missions to Study Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsert, K. A.; McTague, L. E.; Truong, N.; Sneeringer, J.; DeJoy, J.; Kujawski, J. T.; Rowland, D. E.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    The NSF Firefly CubeSat is a 3U mission designed to perform cutting-edge science, as a secondary payload. Firefly will be the first dedicated mission launched to study Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGFs), their link to lightning, and their effect in producing energetic electrons that may become stably trapped in the inner radiation belt. Firefly demonstrates the capability of small missions such as CubeSat to do important, focused science, with abundant student involvement, and with a minimal budget and available resources. In addition, a related mission called FireStation will be part of the STP-H4 platform on the International Space Station. FireStation relies heavily on existing flight experience from the NSF-funded Firefly CubeSat mission, with some modifications to interface and sensors. This presentation will focus on the Firefly and FireStation mission design, as well as important lessons learned in the development, testing, and design. Future developments in CubeSat-class spacecraft for measurements of energetic radiation will be discussed.

  5. Laser flash photolysis, EPR and raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures. Progress report, April 1, 1993--November 19, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1993-11-19

    A laser flash photolysis kinetic study of a W(CO){sub 5} intermediate reacting with several different substituted 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands at pressures up to 150 MPa in liquid toluene has confirmed the considerable influence of steric hindrance on the mechanism of a thermal ring closure reaction. A similar laser flash photolysis kinetic study has been carried out with Mo(CO){sub 6} and several bidentate ligands resembling 2,2{prime}-bipyridine dissolved in supercritical carbon dioxide. A much larger negative activation volume is found in supercritical carbon dioxide than observed previously with this solute system dissolved in liquid toluene. Rate of replacement of one polydentate ligand by another stronger chelating agent in the first coordination sphere of aqueous gadolinium(III) ion was measured over a range of pressures and other variables using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. Two consecutive first order reaction steps are observed that show acid-catalysis.

  6. The Effectiveness of Flash Cards in a Mathematics Self-Study Course for Group IV Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Ray E.

    As part of continuing research aimed at identifying optimal methods for training Navy personnel who have achieved marginal scores on military selection tests, flash card instruction methods were adapted for application to a comprehensive range of basic mathematical operations involved in a previously developed course in fundamental mathematics.…

  7. An experimental study of the glottal jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, Darina; Sidlof, Petr; Kotek, Michal; Kopecky, Vaclav

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of the flow field analysis in a static scaled model of human larynx. Here we are focused on the effect of the nozzle gap parameter and the incoming flow velocity. The study is performed in the aerodynamic channel using the PIV technique.

  8. A study on the phenomena of flash-sintering with tetragonal zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, John Stanley Curtis

    A new method for the sintering of ceramics will be presented in detail. This method called Flash-Sintering was first reported in 2010 by Cologna et al. In Flash-Sintering an electric field is applied across a "green" sample with a pair of electrodes and the sintering is measured as a function of the field and temperature. The electric field is shown to remarkably enhance densification. Both the sintering time to achieve near full density and the temperature required are reduced substantially. These changes allow for sintering of 3m% yttria stabilized zirconia at furnace temperatures below 850°C in a matter of seconds. The objective of this dissertation is to understand the phenomenological behavior of flash-sintering. This new method is a highly non-linear event which occurs at a particular temperature for a given applied field and sintering is accompanied by an abrupt rise in the conductivity. The development of relationships between the electrical control parameters, the sintering behavior, and the evolution of the microstructure are the principal themes of this doctoral research. The present work covers the following topics: (i) The influence of uniaxial pressure applied in combination with electrical field on sintering and superplastic deformation, which show an equivalence between mechanical and electrical driving forces, (ii) A shift of the flash to a higher temperature with increasing particle size of the ceramic powders, (iii) The influence of the electric field on the incubation time for the onset of the flash in experiments carried out at isothermal furnace temperatures, and the effect of the current density immediately following the flash on densification, (iv) The relationship between electrical parameters on microstructure (grain size) evolution, (v) A comparison with the microstructure and mechanical strength of specimens prepared by conventional sintering, and (vi) Measurement of luminescence spectra, which lies in the visible range, that

  9. Usefulness of satellite water vapour imagery in forecasting strong convection: A flash-flood case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Christo G.; Kozinarova, Gergana

    Using a case study of a severe convective event as an example, a framework for interpreting 6.2 µm channel satellite imagery that enables to indicate upper-level conditioning of the convective environment is presented and discussed. In order to illustrate the approach, all convective cells during the summer of 2007 that produced precipitations over Bulgaria are considered. They are classified regarding the observed moisture pattern in mid-upper levels as well as the low-level conditions of air humidity and convergence of the flow. Water vapour (WV) images are used to study the evolution of the upper-level moist and dry structures. The proposed interpretation is that the role of the upper-level dry boundaries identified in the WV imagery as favoured areas for the initiation of deep moist convection cannot be understood (and hence cannot be forecasted accurately) by considering them in isolation from the dynamic rate at which they are maintained. The paper examines the 23 June 2006 flash flood in Sofia city as a case, in which the operational forecast of the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology of Bulgaria based on the mesoscale NWP model ALADIN underestimated the severity of the convective process. A comparison between the satellite water vapour imagery and the corresponding geopotential field of the dynamical tropopause, expressed in terms of potential vorticity (PV), shows an error in the performance of the ARPEGE operational numerical model. There is an obvious mismatch between the PV anomaly structure and the dry zone of the imagery. The forecast field shows underestimation of the tropopause height gradient and displacement of the PV anomaly to the southwest of the real position seen in the satellite image. It is concluded that the observed poor forecast is a result of the ARPEGE failure to treat correctly the interaction between the PV anomaly and the low-level warm anomaly.

  10. A study of changes in apparent ionospheric reflection height within individual lightning flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somu, Vijaya B.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Haddad, Michael A.; Cummer, Steven A.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric reflection heights estimated using the zero-to-zero and peak-to-peak methods to measure skywave delay relative to the ground wave were compared for 108 first and 124 subsequent strokes at distances greater than 100 km. For either metric there was a considerable decrease in average reflection height for subsequent strokes relative to first strokes. We showed that the observed difference cannot be explained by the difference in frequency content of first and subsequent return-stroke currents. Apparent changes in reflection height (estimated using the peak-to-peak method) within individual flashes for 54 daytime and 11 nighttime events at distances ranging from 50 km to 330 km were compared, and significant differences were found. For daytime conditions, the majority of the flashes showed either decrease (57%) or non-monotonic variation (39%) in reflection height with respect to the immediately preceding stroke. With respect to the first stroke, 91% of the flashes showed monotonic decrease in height. For nighttime flashes, patterns in reflection height changes with respect to the immediately preceding stroke were as follows: 46% no change, 27% monotonic decrease, and 27% non-monotonic variation. When changes were measured with respect to the first stroke, 54% of nighttime flashes showed monotonic decrease and 46% no change. Ionospheric reflection height tends to increase with return-stroke peak current. The observed daytime effects can be explained by (a) the dependence of EMP penetration depth on source intensity, which decreases with stroke order, (b) additional ionization associated with elves, or (c) combination of (a) and (b) above.

  11. Kinetics of the superoxide radical oxidation of(cobalt sepulchrate)(2+). A flash photolytic study

    SciTech Connect

    Bakac, A.; Espenson, J.H.; kCreaser, I.I.; Sargeson, A.M.

    1983-12-28

    The postulated formation of the superoxide radical anion, O/sub 2//sup -/-, as an intermediate in the reaction of Co(sep)/sup 2 +/ (sep = sepulchrate) with molecular oxygen has now been confirmed by a trapping reaction with Cu/sup 2 +/. In the absence of Cu/sup 2 +/, O/sub 2//sup -/-oxidizes a second Co(sep)/sup 2 +/ to Co(sep)/sup 3 +/. The latter reaction, studied directly by use of the flash photolytic technique, has at 25/sup 0/C a rate constant of (4.6+/-1.1) x 10/sup 7/M/sup -1/s/sup -1/, independent of pH in the range 11.3-12.6. Nitrogen perdeuteration yields d(N)/sup 6 -/Co(sep)/sup 2 +/, which reacts with O/sub 2/ at the same rate but with O/sub 2//sup -/ 2.1 times more slowly. The proposed mechanism of the O/sub 2//sup -/ reaction consists of the hydrogen atom abstraction from a N-H bond of Co(sep)/sup 2 +/ by O/sub 2//sup -/, followed by the rapid protonation of the products, Co/sup III/(sep-H)/sup 2 +/ and HO/sub 2/, to form Co(sep)/sup 3 +/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. In contrast, the reaction between Co(sep)/sup 2 +/ and O/sub 2/, which shows no kinetic isotope effect, occurs by outer-sphere electron transfer.

  12. Photochemical transformations and laser flash photolysis studies of dibenzobarrelenes containing 1,2-dibenzoylalkene moieties

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, C.V.; Murty, B.A.R.C.; Lahiri, S.; Chackachery, E.; Scaiano, J.C.; George, M.V.

    1984-12-14

    Phototransformations of the dibenzobarrelenes 10 = 11,12-dibenzoyl-9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethenoanthracene, 11 = 11,12-dibenzoyl-9,10-dihydro-9-methyl-9,10-ethenoanthracene, 23 = 11,12-dibenzoyl-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dimethyl-9,10-ethenoenthracene, prepared by the reaction of the appropriate anthracenes with dibenzoylacetylenes, are reported. Irradiation of 10 and 11 in solvents such as benzene, methanol, and acetone gave the corresponding dibenzosemibullvalenes, 17 = 8c, 8d-dibenzoyl-4b,8b,8c,8d-tetrahydrodibenzo(a,f)cyclopropa(c,d)- and 18, respectively, in good yields. These dibenzosemibullvalenes on catalytic hydrogenation using 5% Pd on charcoal gave the corresponding cyclopropane ring-opened products, 21 and 22, respectively. Irradiation of 23 in benzene gave a mixture of 2,3-dibenzoyl-2,3-dihydro-1,4-dimethyl-2,3-benzonaphthalene 27 (2%), 1,4-dibenzoyl-5,8-dimethyl-2,3:6,7-dibenzocyclo-octatetraene (24, 20%), the carbinol (45%), and benzoic acid (7%). Irradiation of 23 in methanol gave a mixture of 27 (25%), 24 (27%), and benzoic acid (8%). Laser flash photolysis (337.1 nm) of 10, 11, and 23 led to transient species, characterized by strong absorptions in the 300-650-nm region. These transients are due to the triplet states of the substrates, as established by quenching studies involving oxygen, di-tert-butylnitroxide, azulene, and ..beta..-carotene. Energy-transfer sensitization of 10, 11, and 23 by benzophenone in benzene also gave rise to the same transients, as formed under direct irradiation. The quantum yields of triplet formation (PHI/sub T/) were estimated to be high for 10 and 11 (approx. 1), whereas it is significantly lower for 23 (approx. 0.7). 24 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Jet characterization in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS): applications to climatology and transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Hegglin, M. I.; Daffer, W. H.; Santee, M. L.; Ray, E. A.; Pawson, S.; Schwartz, M. J.; Boone, C. D.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Walker, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    A method of classifying the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS) jets has been developed that allows satellite and aircraft trace gas data and meteorological fields to be efficiently mapped in a jet coordinate view. A detailed characterization of multiple tropopauses accompanies the jet characterization. Jet climatologies show the well-known high altitude subtropical and lower altitude polar jets in the upper troposphere, as well as a pattern of concentric polar and subtropical jets in the Southern Hemisphere, and shifts of the primary jet to high latitudes associated with blocking ridges in Northern Hemisphere winter. The jet-coordinate view segregates air masses differently than the commonly-used equivalent latitude (EqL) coordinate throughout the lowermost stratosphere and in the upper troposphere. Mapping O3 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) satellite and the Winter Storms aircraft datasets in jet coordinates highlights important advantages in comparison to an EqL-coordinate view: strong PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the subtropical jet are washed out in the latter and clearly highlighted in the former. The jet coordinate view emphasizes the presence of stratospheric ozone well below the tropopause, especially poleward of and below the jet core, and highlights other transport features associated with the upper tropospheric jets. MLS and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer trace gas fields for spring 2008 in jet coordinates show very strong, closely correlated, PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the jet, and evidence of intrusions of stratospheric air below the tropopause below and poleward of the subtropical jet; these features are consistent between instruments and among multiple trace gases. Our characterization of the jets is facilitating studies that will improve our understanding of upper tropospheric trace gas evolution.

  14. A Study Of Leonid Impact Flashes On The Moon In 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. L.; Aceituno, F. J.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Quesada, J. A.

    2005-08-01

    In November 2004 the lunar phase was adequate to observe lunar impact flashes at the time of the Leonid meteor shower, as it was the case in 1999 and 2001, because a large number of meteoroidal impacts were expected to hit the night part of the Moon visible from Earth. We again arranged a special multisite observing campaign with telescopes aiming at the night part of the Moon in order to detect and analyze such flashes. In this paper we report our unambiguous detections, our computations of the energy released in each impact, their locations on the Moon and possible inferences on crater sizes. Those fresh craters might perhaps be observable from SMART-1. Some implications on Leonid meteor fluxes on Earth and size distribution of the particles are also discussed. This research was supported by the spanish AYA-2002-0382 project. FEDER funds are also acknowledged.

  15. A study of jet handedness at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, H.; SLD Collaboration

    1993-10-01

    We present a preliminary study of jet handedness is hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} bosons measured in the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). Following the proposal of Nachtman and Efremov et al., we defined a scalar quantity for each hadronic jet and measured the sign asymmetry (jet handedness) of this quantity for samples of quark jets and antiquark jets, which are expected to be oppositely polarized in Z{sup 0} decays. From our preliminary study, no evidence for a significantly non-zero handedness was observed. Assuming standard model values of quark polarizations, we set an upper limit on the analyzing power of our handedness method.

  16. [Study on the discharge properties of xeon flash lamp and experimental measurement].

    PubMed

    Zhao, You-Quan; Miao, Pei-Liang; He, Feng; Gu, Jian; Zhai, Rui-Wei

    2014-07-01

    The Xenon flash lamp is a new type of light source for analytical instrument. The present paper analyzed the discharge process of xenon flash lamp, presented the discharge test system, and conducted experimental measurement of the voltage, current and optical pulse signal in the process of discharge. The results show that in the preliminary discharge, the free electron concentration was at a low level, so the energy was at a low level, then following the gas discharge, numerous free electrons formed in the lamp, resultin in the increase in the concentration of free electrons, therefore discharge current rised rapidly and voltage reduced. The lamp released photons to generate light pulse in the moment of ionic recombination, The pulse xenon lamp light energy output and spectral characteristic is related to electron energy in recombination and combination level of xenon, if the input energy and the energy consumption of the xenon lamp is inconsistent, it will lead to repeated capacitor charging and discharging and produce oscillation waveform. This paper is very useful for understanding the process of xenon lamp discharge, optimizing the driver circuit and the production of xenon flash lamp. PMID:25269320

  17. FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize recent additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in FLASH, highlighting new non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities. We then describe 3D Cartesian and 2D cylindrical FLASH MHD simulations that have helped to design and analyze experiments conducted at the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a laser illuminates a carbon rod target placed in a gas-filled chamber. A magnetic field diagnostic (called a Bdot) employing three very small induction coils is used to measure all three components of the magnetic field at a chosen point in space. The simulations have revealed that many fascinating physical processes occur in the experiments. These include megagauss magnetic fields generated by the interaction of the laser with the target via the Biermann battery mechanism, which are advected outward by the vaporized target material but decrease in strength due to expansion and resistivity; magnetic fields generated by an outward expanding shock via the Biermann battery mechanism; and a breakout shock that overtakes the first wave, the contact discontinuity between the target material and the gas, and then the initial expanding shock. Finally, we discuss the validation and predictive science we have done for this experiment with FLASH.

  18. Jet-A reaction mechanism study for combustion application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Acosta, Waldo

    1991-01-01

    Simplified chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of Jet A fuel was studied. Initially, 40 reacting species and 118 elementary chemical reactions were chosen based on a literature review. Through a sensitivity analysis with the use of LSENS General Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, 16 species and 21 elementary chemical reactions were determined from this study. This mechanism is first justified by comparison of calculated ignition delay time with the available shock tube data, then it is validated by comparison of calculated emissions from the plug flow reactor code with in-house flame tube data.

  19. Jet-A reaction mechanism study for combustion application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Acosta, Waldo

    1991-01-01

    Simplified chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of Jet A fuel are studied. Initially 40 reacting species and 118 elementary chemical reactions were chosen based on the literature review of previous works. Through a sensitivity analysis with the use of LSENS General Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, 16 species and 21 elementary chemical reactions were determined from this study. This mechanism is first justified by comparison of calculated ignition delay time with available shock tube data, then it is validated by comparison of calculated emissions from plug flow reactor code with in-house flame tube data.

  20. Estimation of the relative severity of floods in small ungauged catchments for preliminary observations on flash flood preparedness: a case study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il

    2012-04-01

    An increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration has caused significant danger and loss of life and property in Korea as well as many other parts of the World. Since such floods usually accompanied by rapid runoff and debris flow rise quite quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood damage, this study presents a new flash flood indexing methodology to promptly provide preliminary observations regarding emergency preparedness and response to flash flood disasters in small ungauged catchments. Flood runoff hydrographs are generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the annual maximum rainfall series of long-term observed data in the two selected small ungauged catchments. The relative flood severity factors quantifying characteristics of flood runoff hydrographs are standardized by the highest recorded maximum value, and then averaged to obtain the flash flood index only for flash flood events in each study catchment. It is expected that the regression equations between the proposed flash flood index and rainfall characteristics can provide the basis database of the preliminary information for forecasting the local flood severity in order to facilitate flash flood preparedness in small ungauged catchments. PMID:22690208

  1. Jet characterization in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS): applications to climatology and transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Hegglin, M. I.; Daffer, W. H.; Santee, M. L.; Ray, E. A.; Pawson, S.; Schwartz, M. J.; Boone, C. D.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Walker, K. A.

    2011-06-01

    A method of classifying the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS) jets has been developed that allows satellite and aircraft trace gas data and meteorological fields to be efficiently mapped in a jet coordinate view. A detailed characterization of multiple tropopauses accompanies the jet characterization. Jet climatologies show the well-known high altitude subtropical and lower altitude polar jets in the upper troposphere, as well as a pattern of concentric polar and subtropical jets in the Southern Hemisphere, and shifts of the primary jet to high latitudes associated with blocking ridges in Northern Hemisphere winter. The jet-coordinate view segregates air masses differently than the commonly-used equivalent latitude (EqL) coordinate throughout the lowermost stratosphere and in the upper troposphere. Mapping O3 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) satellite and the Winter Storms aircraft datasets in jet coordinates thus emphasizes different aspects of the circulation compared to an EqL-coordinate framework: the jet coordinate reorders the data geometrically, thus highlighting the strong PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the subtropical jet, whereas EqL is a dynamical coordinate that may blur these spatial relationships but provides information on irreversible transport. The jet coordinate view identifies the concentration of stratospheric ozone well below the tropopause in the region poleward of and below the jet core, as well as other transport features associated with the upper tropospheric jets. Using the jet information in EqL coordinates allows us to study trace gas distributions in regions of weak versus strong jets, and demonstrates weaker transport barriers in regions with less jet influence. MLS and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer trace gas fields for spring 2008 in jet coordinates show very strong, closely correlated, PV, tropopause height and trace gas gradients across the jet, and

  2. Numerical study of sound propagation in a jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Liu, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An improved computer oriented solution method for problems involving the propagation of sound through a nonuniform jet flow is developed. The method seeks to optimize the use of computer resources such as core storage space and central memory time. Complete formulation details are presented for a jet flow model consisting of a fixed point source on the jet center line in the potential core.

  3. Statistical studies and modeling of RHESSI terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, Bryna J. C.

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are intense bursts of gamma-rays from thunderstorms with photon energies extending above 20 MeV and lasting about a millisecond. TGFs were discovered by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory satellite in 1994 (Fishman et al.) and many more have been observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) since its launch in 2002 (Smith et al., 2005). RHESSI has a smaller effective area than BATSE, but it has excellent spectral resolution and a database of over 900 TGFs, making it ideal for statistical studies of TGF occurrence and spectra. In this work, I show that TGFs produced over the land and ocean have similar diurnal and seasonal variations as the lightning in these regions and that these TGF populations do not have significantly different spectra. I also demonstrate that thunderstorm locations identified by the World Wide Lightning Location Network are good proxies for RHESSI TGF source locations and that TGFs detected closer to their sources have harder spectra than TGFs detected at larger distances. TGF production and population models are developed and predictions from these models are compared with the spectra and detection frequency of nearby and distant TGFs. Vertically-oriented narrow-beam sources at high altitudes are found to be inconsistent with these data and with the number of high energy photons in TGFs associated with geolocated lightning strikes more than 300 km from the sub-satellite point. The models show that RHESSI TGFs need to be considered as a collection of events with many different altitudes, luminosities and source distances and that saturation of the RHESSI detectors during TGF events plays an important role in the observed spectra and occurrence rates of RHESSI TGFs. The models indicate that TGFs are most likely to be produced near the tops of thunderclouds with average altitudes of 17 km and that TGF sources are widely

  4. An experimental study of the noise generating mechanisms in supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Flow fluctuation measurements with normal and X-wire hot-wire probes and acoustic measurements with a traversing condenser microphone were carried out in small air jets in the Mach number range from M = 0.9 to 2.5. One of the most successful studies involved a moderate Reynolds number M = 2.1 jet. The large scale turbulence properties in the jet, and the noise radiation were characterized. A parallel study involved similar measurements on a low Reynolds number M = 0.9 jet. These measurements show that there are important differences in the noise generation process of the M = 0.9 jet in comparison with low supersonic Mach number (M = 1.4) jets. Problems encounted while performing X-wire measurements in low Reynolds number jets of M = 2.1 and 2.5, and in installing a vacuum pump are discussed.

  5. ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Studies for Soot Formation in Laminar Coflow Diffusion Flames of Jet A-1 and Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffaripour, Meghdad

    In the present doctoral thesis, fundamental experimental and numerical studies are conducted for the laminar, atmospheric pressure, sooting, coflow diffusion flames of Jet A-1 and synthetic jet fuels. The first part of this thesis presents a comparative experimental study for Jet A-1, which is a widely used petroleum-based fuel, and four synthetically produced alternative jet fuels. The main goals of this part of the thesis are to compare the soot emission levels of the alternative fuels to those of a standard fuel, Jet A-1, and to determine the effect of fuel chemical composition on soot formation characteristics. To achieve these goals, experimental measurements are constructed and performed for flame temperature, soot concentration, soot particle size, and soot aggregate structure in the flames of pre-vaporized jet fuels. The results show that a considerable reduction in soot production, compared to the standard fuel, can be obtained by using synthetic fuels which will help in addressing future regulations. A strong correlation between the aromatic content of the fuels and the soot concentration levels in the flames is observed. The second part of this thesis presents the development and experimental validation of a fully-coupled soot formation model for laminar coflow jet fuel diffusion flames. The model is coupled to a detailed kinetic mechanism to predict the chemical structure of the flames and soot precursor concentrations. This model also provides information on size and morphology of soot particles. The flames of a three-component surrogate for Jet A-1, a three-component surrogate for a synthetic jet fuel, and pure n-decane are simulated using this model. Concentrations of major gaseous species and flame temperatures are well predicted by the model. Soot volume fractions are predicted reasonably well everywhere in the flame, except near the flame centerline where soot concentrations are underpredicted by a factor of up to five. There is an excellent

  7. Time-Resolved Imaging Study of Jetting Dynamics during Laser Printing of Viscoelastic Alginate Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Xiong, Ruitong; Mei, Renwei; Huang, Yong; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2015-06-16

    Matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write (MAPLE DW) has been successfully implemented as a promising laser printing technology for various fabrication applications, in particular, three-dimensional bioprinting. Since most bioinks used in bioprinting are viscoelastic, it is of importance to understand the jetting dynamics during the laser printing of viscoelastic fluids in order to control and optimize the laser printing performance. In this study, MAPLE DW was implemented to study the jetting dynamics during the laser printing of representative viscoelastic alginate bioinks and evaluate the effects of operating conditions (e.g., laser fluence) and material properties (e.g., alginate concentration) on the jet formation performance. Through a time-resolved imaging approach, it is found that when the laser fluence increases or the alginate concentration decreases, the jetting behavior changes from no material transferring to well-defined jetting to well-defined jetting with an initial bulgy shape to jetting with a bulgy shape to pluming/splashing. For the desirable well-defined jetting regimes, as the laser fluence increases, the jet velocity and breakup length increase while the breakup time and primary droplet size decrease. As the alginate concentration increases, the jet velocity and breakup length decrease while the breakup time and primary droplet size increase. In addition, Ohnesorge, elasto-capillary, and Weber number based phase diagrams are presented to better appreciate the dependence of jetting regimes on the laser fluence and alginate concentration. PMID:26011320

  8. Experimental results to study astrophysical plasma jets using Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupias, B.; Gregory, C. D.; Falize, E.; Waugh, J.; Seiichi, D.; Pikuz, S.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Ravasio, A.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Barroso, P.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Nazarov, W.; Takabe, H.; Sakawa, Y.; Woolsey, N.; Koenig, M.

    2009-08-01

    We present experimental results of plasma jet, interacted with an ambient medium, using intense lasers to investigate the complex features of astrophysical jets. This experiment was performed in France at the LULI facility, Ecole Polytechnique, using one long pulse laser to generate the jet and a short pulse laser to probe it by proton radiography. A foam filled cone target was used to generate high velocity plasma jet, and a gas jet nozzle produced the well known ambient medium. Using visible pyrometry and interferometry, we were able to measure the jet velocity and electronic density. We get a panel of measurements at various gas density and time delay. From these measurements, we could underline the growth of a perturbed shape of the jet interaction with the ambient medium. The reason of this last observation is still in debate and will be presented in the article.

  9. Flash photolysis study of the mechanism of photochromism of naphtho(1,8-b,c)furan spiropyrans

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, A.S.; Malkin, Y.N.; Mezheritskii, V.V.; Zhukovskaya, O.N.; Revinskii, Y.V.; Kuz'min, V.A.

    1982-09-01

    The present article concerns the study of the photochromic properties of spiropyrans of the naphtho(1,8-b,c)furan series by the method of flash photolysis. The rate constants of dark cyclization of spiropyrans of the naphtho(1,8-b,c)furan series increase with an increase in the polarity of the solvent; this is due to the role of the state with charge transfer during a change in the hybridization of the carbon spiro atom. The photochromism reaction takes place through a triplet state in sensitized photolysis.

  10. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  11. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology. PMID:26724077

  12. Experimental Study on Thermal Interaction of Ethanol Jets in High Temperature Fluorinert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Rongyuan; Takahashi, Minoru

    As a fundamental study for the direct contact heat exchange which was employed for in-vessel heat exchange in the Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR) and for the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident in lead alloy-cooled fast reactor (LFR), ethanol jet was injected into high temperature fluorinert (FC-3283) as a simulation experiment in order to investigate the jet boiling phenomena just after volatile water contacting with the high temperature continuous lead alloy liquid. Two series of tests (no-boiling and boiling) were initiated to evaluate the ethanol vapor volume which generated around the ethanol jet. From synchronized temperature measurement around ethanol jet, the overview of the boiling behavior showed that jet boiling occurred at bottom part of jet first and developed to the upper part within very narrow area around jet.

  13. Experimental parametric study of jet vortex generators for flow separation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selby, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    A parametric wind-tunnel study was performed with jet vortex generators to determine their effectiveness in controlling flow separation associated with low-speed turbulence flow over a two-dimensional rearward-facing ramp. Results indicate that flow-separation control can be accomplished, with the level of control achieved being a function of jet speed, jet orientation (with respect to the free-stream direction), and orifice pattern (double row of jets vs. single row). Compared to slot blowing, jet vortex generators can provide an equivalent level of flow control over a larger spanwise region (for constant jet flow area and speed). Dye flow visualization tests in a water tunnel indicated that the most effective jet vortex generator configurations produced streamwise co-rotating vortices.

  14. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Nonpremixed Jet Flames in Crossflow Under Low-Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxx, Isaac G.; Idicheria, Cherian A.; Clemens, Noel T.

    2002-11-01

    We will present results of a study of turbulent nonpremixed jet flames in crossflow under normal and low gravity conditions. This enables us to experimentally separate the competing influences of initial jet-to-crossflow momentum ratio and buoyancy effects on the flame structure. The low gravity conditions (10-30 milli-g) are achieved by dropping a self-contained jet flame rig in the University of Texas 1.25-second drop tower facility. This rig uses a small blow-through wind tunnel to create the crossflow. The jet flames issue from an orifice that is flush with the wall. High-speed CCD imaging of jet flame luminosity is the primary diagnostic. We present results for hydrocarbon jet flames with initial jet-to-crossflow momentum ratios of 10-20. Results such as flame trajectory, flame length, large scale structure and flame tip dynamics will be presented.

  15. Lunar Impact Flash Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    A bright impact flash detected by the NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash location. A process for locating the impact flash, and presumably its associated crater, was developed using commercially available software tools. The process was successfully applied to the March 2013 impact flash and put into production on an additional 300 impact flashes. The goal today: provide a description of the geolocation technique developed.

  16. A flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence kinetics study of the reaction S/3P/ + OCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, R. B.; Davis, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    Using the technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, the reaction of ground-state atomic sulfur with carbonyl sulfide has been investigated over the temperature range from 233 to 445 K. Over this temperature range, the experimental data were fitted to an Arrhenius equation of the form k sub 1 = (1.52 plus or minus 0.20) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-3.63 plus or minus 0.12 kcal/mol/RT) cu cm/molecule/sec. A comparison of these results with previous investigations on this reaction system is presented.

  17. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Ciancone, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configutations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  18. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  19. Statistical Study of Chromospheric Anemone Jets Observed with Hinode/SOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, N.; Nakamura, T.; Kawate, T.; Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K.

    2011-04-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode has revealed numerous tiny jets in all regions of the chromosphere outside of sunspots. A typical chromospheric anemone jet has a cusp-shaped structure and bright footpoint, similar to the shape of an X-ray anemone jet observed previously with the Soft X-ray Telescope on board Yohkoh. The similarity in the shapes of chromospheric and X-ray anemone jets suggests that chromospheric anemone jets are produced as a result of the magnetic reconnection between a small bipole (perhaps a tiny emerging flux) and a pre-existing uniform magnetic field in the lower chromosphere. We examine various chromospheric anemone jets in the solar active region near the solar limb and study the typical features (e.g., length, width, lifetime, and velocity) of the chromospheric anemone jets. Statistical studies show that chromospheric anemone jets have: (1) a typical length ~1.0-4.0 Mm, (2) a width ~100-400 km, (3) a lifetime ~100-500 s, and (4) a velocity ~5-20 km s-1. The velocity of the chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the lower solar chromosphere (~10 km s-1). The histograms of chromospheric anemone jets near the limb and near the disk center show similar averages and shapes of distributions, suggesting that the characteristic behavior of chromospheric anemone jets is independent of whether they are observed on the disk or at the limb. The observed relationship between the velocity and length of chromospheric anemone jets shows that the jets do not follow ballistic motion but are more likely accelerated by some other mechanism. This is consistent with numerical simulations of chromospheric anemone jets.

  20. STATISTICAL STUDY OF CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JETS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/SOT

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, N.; Nakamura, T.; Kawate, T.; Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K.

    2011-04-10

    The Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode has revealed numerous tiny jets in all regions of the chromosphere outside of sunspots. A typical chromospheric anemone jet has a cusp-shaped structure and bright footpoint, similar to the shape of an X-ray anemone jet observed previously with the Soft X-ray Telescope on board Yohkoh. The similarity in the shapes of chromospheric and X-ray anemone jets suggests that chromospheric anemone jets are produced as a result of the magnetic reconnection between a small bipole (perhaps a tiny emerging flux) and a pre-existing uniform magnetic field in the lower chromosphere. We examine various chromospheric anemone jets in the solar active region near the solar limb and study the typical features (e.g., length, width, lifetime, and velocity) of the chromospheric anemone jets. Statistical studies show that chromospheric anemone jets have: (1) a typical length {approx}1.0-4.0 Mm, (2) a width {approx}100-400 km, (3) a lifetime {approx}100-500 s, and (4) a velocity {approx}5-20 km s{sup -1}. The velocity of the chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfven speed in the lower solar chromosphere ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}). The histograms of chromospheric anemone jets near the limb and near the disk center show similar averages and shapes of distributions, suggesting that the characteristic behavior of chromospheric anemone jets is independent of whether they are observed on the disk or at the limb. The observed relationship between the velocity and length of chromospheric anemone jets shows that the jets do not follow ballistic motion but are more likely accelerated by some other mechanism. This is consistent with numerical simulations of chromospheric anemone jets.

  1. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  2. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  3. 35 minute green flash observed at Little America on 16 October 1929: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A

    2015-02-01

    On 16 October 1929 five members of the Byrd Expedition 1 observed an intermittent 35 min green flash at the Little America station (latitude -78.57°) in Antarctica. The flash was the result of strong atmospheric refraction, likely associated with a subcritical Novaya Zemlya mirage. This paper examines the constraints placed on the observation by the Earth-Sun orbital kinematics. It is found that the length of the observation cannot be explained solely by the slowness of the setting rate of the Sun, nor the time required just before the beginning of the Antarctic summer for the top of the Sun to set, reach its relative minimum position at the horizon, and then rise back up again. The observed length of the effect, however, is consistent with the Sun effectively setting twice and rising twice during the observation, with the first effective rising being the result of the observers climbing up the radio towers at the Little America station in order to keep the top of the Sun in view. PMID:25967839

  4. A computational study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, M.W.

    1998-11-01

    Two commercially-available computational fluid dynamics codes, FIDAP (Fluent, Inc., Lebanon, NH) and FLOW-3D (Flow Science, Inc., Los Alamos, NM), were used to simulate the landing region of jets of highly viscous fluids impinging on flat surfaces. The volume-of-fluid method was combined with finite difference and finite element approaches to predict the jet behavior. Several computational models with varying degrees of physical realism were developed, and the results were compared with experimental observations. In experiments, the jet exhibited several complex behaviors. As soon as it exited the nozzle, the jet began to neck down and become narrower. When it impacted the solid surface, the jet developed an instability near the impact point and buckled to the side. This buckling became a spiraling motion, and the jet spiraled about the impact point. As the jet spiraled around, a cone-shaped pile was build up which eventually became unstable and slumped to the side. While all of these behaviors were occurring, air bubbles, or voids, were being entrapped in the fluid pool. The results obtained from the FLOW-3D models more closely matched the behavior of real jets than the results obtained from /the FIDAP models. Most of the FLOW-3D models predicted all of the significant jet behaviors observed in experiments: necking, buckling, spiraling, slumping, and void entrapment. All of the FIDAP models predicted that the jet would buckle relatively far from the point of impact, whereas the experimentally observed jet behavior indicates that the jets buckle much nearer the impact point. Furthermore, it was shown that FIDAP is incapable of incorporating heat transfer effects into the model, making it unsuitable for this work.

  5. Monte Carlo sensitivity in jet studies - what is the physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, P.

    1983-07-01

    Tests of perturbative QCD in hard processes involving jets have been found to depend on the jet fragmentation model used. We emphasize the need for testing the factorization of hard and soft processes, i.e., the independent fragmentation of jets. A method of analysis is suggested, which allows a model-independent determination of the gluon fragmentation function from e/sup +/e/sup -/ data. We also comment on some simple features expected in anti pp ..-->.. (2 or 3 jets) + X events. 19 references.

  6. Testing Astrophysics in the Lab: Simulations with the FLASH code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, Vikram

    2003-10-01

    FLASH is a multi-physics, block-structured adaptive mesh refinement code for studying compressible, reactive flows in various astrophysical environments. We compare the results of two- and three-dimensional FLASH simulations to experimental data obtained at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The LANL experiment (Tomkins et al. 2003, PhFl, 15, 896) involves the lateral interaction between a planar Ma=1.2 shock wave with one or two cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) gas. The development of primary and secondary flow instabilities after the passage of the shock, as observed in the experiments and numerical simulations, are reviewed and compared. We investigate the deposition of vorticity due to the impact of the shock wave on the cylinder, and the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The interaction of shock waves with high-density clouds is a common phenomenon in astrophysics. Shock-cloud interactions are seen in the interstellar medium and within supernova remnants and wind-driven nebulae. On large scales, refraction of galactic radio jets flowing past density gradients provides conditions suitable for strong vorticity generation, jet bending, and eventual jet disruption. On smaller scales, interactions between shocks and clouds have been proposed as a means to trigger the collapse of giant molecular clouds, leading to the onset of star formation. By carefully comparing our numerical simulations with experimental data we will validate FLASH for shock-cloud interactions, albeit in the restricted regime of low-Mach number adiabatic planar shocks and for low density contrasts. Following similarity arguments, such comparisons build confidence that the numerical simulations adequately describe the hydrodynamical evolution of shock-cloud interactions on timescales inaccessible to direct observations.

  7. Multi-frequency study of jet in HH 80-81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta

    2016-07-01

    We present multi-wavelength radio observation of the large radio jet from Herbig-Halo object HH 80-81 to study morphology of the jet in detail. We have combined the low frequency data of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) with high frequency Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) archival data for multi-frequency study. We have seen a highly collimated jet emitting from central source and the jet is collinear with the central source and HH 80-81. The spectrum of the source is studied in detail and we find the signature of spectral absorption towards the low frequency region.

  8. The study of a plasma jet injected by an on-board plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebnev, I. A.; Ivanov, G. V.; Khodnenko, V. P.; Morozov, A. I.; Perkov, I. A.; Pertsev, A. A.; Romanovskii, Iu. A.; Rylov, Iu. P.; Shishkin, G. G.; Trifonov, Iu. V.

    The injection of a steady plasma jet into the ionosphere results in interactions which were studied in experiments conducted onboard two Meteor satellites in 1977-1979. The jet parameters at the propulsion system output were as follows: propulsive mass: Xe; Xe (+) ion density at the nozzle section; 3 x 10 to the 11th per cu cm; plasma stream divergence: 20 degrees; jet velocity: 10-12 km/cm; ion energy: 130 eV; electron temperature: 1 + 3 eV. A Bennett-type modified radio-frequency mass-spectrometer and a two-channel electromagnetic wave analyzer were used for the measurements. It was found that (1) the injected plasma jet propagation depends on the jet injection pitch angle; (2) when the plasma jet was injected along the magnetic field, impactless jet spreading took place without considerable interaction with the ionospheric plasma; (3) when the plasma jet was injected across the magnetic field, considerable interaction was observed between the plasma jet/ionospheric plasma and the earth's magnetic field; and (4) electromagnetic fields were generated near the satellite by plasma jet interaction.

  9. Parametric Study of Synthetic-Jet-Based Flow Control on a Vertical Tail Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastero, Marianne; Lindstrom, Annika; Beyar, Michael; Amitay, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Separation control over the rudder of the vertical tail of a commercial airplane using synthetic-jet-based flow control can lead to a reduction in tail size, with an associated decrease in drag and increase in fuel savings. A parametric, experimental study was undertaken using an array of finite span synthetic jets to investigate the sensitivity of the enhanced vertical tail side force to jet parameters, such as jet spanwise spacing and jet momentum coefficient. A generic wind tunnel model was designed and fabricated to fundamentally study the effects of the jet parameters at varying rudder deflection and model sideslip angles. Wind tunnel results obtained from pressure measurements and tuft flow visualization in the Rensselaer Polytechnic Subsonic Wind Tunnel show a decrease in separation severity and increase in model performance in comparison to the baseline, non-actuated case. The sensitivity to various parameters will be presented.

  10. Characterization of the transient species generated by the photoionization of Berberine: A laser flash photolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ling-Li; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Hui; Li, Kun; Zhu, Rong-Rong; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Yao, Si-De; Wu, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Shi-Long

    2009-09-01

    Using 266 nm laser flash photolysis it has been demonstrated that Berberine (BBR) in aqueous solution is ionized via a mono-photonic process giving a hydrated electron, anion radical that formed by hydrated electron react with steady state of BBR, and neutral radical that formed from rapid deprotonation of the radical cation of BBR. The quantum yield of photoionization is determined to be 0.03 at room temperature with KI solution used as a reference. Furthermore utilizing pH changing method and the SO 4rad - radical oxidation method, the assignment of radical cation of BBR was further confirmed, the p Ka value of it was calculated, and the related set up rate constant was also determined.

  11. Laser-induced photoelectrochemistry. Time-resolved coulostatic-flash studies of cadmium sulfide electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.H.; Perone, S.P.; Deutscher, S.B.

    1981-02-19

    Coulostatic-flash irradiation of semiconductor-liquid-junction cells with a pulsed laser source permits time-resolved measurements of photopotential transients in the nanosecond time domain. The transients observed with CdS electrodes are unusual in that they exhibit wavelength and solution dependence. Both fast (10 ns) and slow (approx. 100 ns) transients are observed in various aqueous electrolytes with irradiation near the band gap. Similar results in nonaqueous solution and with CdSe suggest that these transient photopotentials are related to processes within the semiconductor itself. A much slower (approx. 1 ..mu..s) transient is observed in polysulfide solution with irradiation in the ultraviolet; it is suggested that this transient photopotential is due to light absorption by polysulfide.

  12. Polyelectrolyte stabilized drug nanoparticles via flash nanoprecipitation: a model study with beta-carotene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhengxi; Margulis-Goshen, Katrin; Magdassi, Shlomo; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Macosko, Christopher W

    2010-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte protected beta-carotene nanoparticles (nanosuspensions) with average diameter of <100 nm were achieved by turbulent mixing and flash nanoprecipitation (FNP). Three types of multi-amine functional polyelectrolytes, epsilon-polylysine (epsilon-PL), poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), and chitosan, were investigated to electrosterically protect the nanoparticles. Particle size and distribution were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS); particles were imaged via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Low pH and high polyelectrolyte molecular weight gave the smallest and most stable particles. High drug loading capacity, >80 wt%, was achieved by using either PEI or chitosan. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that beta-carotene nanoparticles were amorphous. These findings open the way for utilization of FNP for preparation of nanoparticles with enhanced bioavailability for highly water insoluble drugs. PMID:20143406

  13. Molecular jets driven by high-mass protostars: a detailed study of the IRAS 20126+4104 jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti o Garatti, A.; Froebrich, D.; Eislöffel, J.; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.

    2008-07-01

    Context: Protostellar jets from intermediate- and high-mass protostars provide an excellent opportunity to understand the mechanisms responsible for intermediate- and high-mass star-formation. A crucial question is if they are scaled-up versions of their low-mass counterparts. Such high-mass jets are relatively rare and, usually, they are distant and highly embedded in their parental clouds. The IRAS 20126+4104 molecular jet, driven by a 10^4 L⊙ protostar, represents a suitable target to investigate. Aims: We present here an extensive analysis of this protostellar jet, deriving the kinematical, dynamical, and physical conditions of the H2 gas along the flow. Methods: The jet was investigated by means of near-IR H2 and [Fe II] narrow-band imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy of the 1-0 S(1) line (2.12 μm), NIR (0.9-2.5 μm) low-resolution spectroscopy, along with ISO-SWS and LWS spectra (from 2.4 to 200 μm). Results: The flow shows a complex morphology. In addition to the large-scale jet precession presented in previous studies, we detect a small-scale wiggling close to the source, which may indicate the presence of a multiple system. The peak radial velocities of the H2 knots range from -42 to -14 km s-1 in the blue lobe, and from -8 to 47 km s-1 in the red lobe. The low-resolution spectra are rich in H2 emission, and relatively faint [Fe II] (NIR), [O I] and [C II] (FIR) emission is observed in the region close to the source. A warm H2 gas component has an average excitation temperature that ranges between 2000 K and 2500 K. Additionally, the ISO-SWS spectrum reveals a cold component (520 K) that strongly contributes to the radiative cooling of the flow and plays a major role in the dynamics of the flow. The estimated L_H2 of the jet is 8.2 ± 0.7 L⊙, suggesting that IRAS 20126+4104 has a significantly increased accretion rate compared to low-mass YSOs. This is also supported by the derived mass flux rate from the H2 lines (dot{M}_out(H2)˜ 7.5× 10-4 M

  14. Spectral variability studies and acceleration scenarios in jets of blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Manasvita

    2009-06-01

    This work focuses on the study of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and the spectral variability patterns of blazars, especially BL Lac objects. It also investigates the dominant mode of particle acceleration in the jets of blazars. The first part of the work describes the BL Lac object 3C 66A, which was the target of an intensive multiwavelength campaign in 2003/2004. During the campaign, flux measurements from radio to X-ray frequencies and upper limits in the very high energy (VHE) g-ray regime were obtained. A time-dependent leptonic jet model has been used to obtain a detailed description of the physical processes in 3C 66A. This successful model results in the reproduction of the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) and the optical variability pattern. The model also predicts an intrinsic cutoff value for the VHE g-ray emission and the possibility of the object being observed by MAGIC, Fermi, and other future missions. The second part of the work uses the internal shock model to explore the particle acceleration scenarios and the subsequent production of radiation via synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton processes at sub-pc scales of a relativistic jet. A code has been developed to simulate the acceleration mechanism and to calculate the resulting spectrum after accounting for the inhomogeneity in the photon density throughout the acceleration region by dividing the region into multiple zones and considering the subsequent time- dependent radiation transfer within the zone and in between zones. An extensive study to understand the effects of varying shock and radiative parameters on the SED and spectral lightcurves of a generic blazar source has been carried out to aid in future theoretical analysis of such sources. This dissertation also includes a brief description of the observations conducted with the 1.3 m McGraw-Hill telescope of the MDM observatory at Kitt Peak, Arizona. The observations were carried out as a part of an ongoing long- term

  15. Susceptibility to the Flash-Beep Illusion Is Increased in Children Compared to Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innes-Brown, Hamish; Barutchu, Ayla; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Crewther, David P.; Grayden, David B.; Paolini, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Audio-visual integration was studied in children aged 8-17 (N = 30) and adults (N = 22) using the "flash-beep illusion" paradigm, where the presentation of two beeps causes a single flash to be perceived as two flashes ("fission" illusion), and a single beep causes two flashes to be perceived as one flash ("fusion" illusion). Children reported…

  16. Arc Jet Testing of Thermal Protection Materials: 3 Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Conley, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Arc jet testing is used to simulate entry to test thermal protection materials. This paper discusses the usefulness of arc jet testing for 3 cases. Case 1 is MSL and PICA, Case 2 is Advanced TUFROC, and Case 3 is conformable ablators.

  17. Experimental study of highly turbulent isothermal opposed-jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Gianfilippo; Gomez, Alessandro

    2010-10-01

    Opposed-jet flows have been shown to provide a valuable means to study a variety of combustion problems, but have been limited to either laminar or modestly turbulent conditions. With the ultimate goal of developing a burner for laboratory flames reaching turbulence regimes of relevance to practical systems, we characterized highly turbulent, strained, isothermal, opposed-jet flows using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The bulk strain rate was kept at 1250 s-1 and specially designed and properly positioned turbulence generation plates in the incoming streams boosted the turbulence intensity to well above 20%, under conditions that are amenable to flame stabilization. The data were analyzed with proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and a novel statistical analysis conditioned to the instantaneous position of the stagnation surface. Both POD and the conditional analysis were found to be valuable tools allowing for the separation of the truly turbulent fluctuations from potential artifacts introduced by relatively low-frequency, large-scale instabilities that would otherwise partly mask the turbulence. These instabilities cause the stagnation surface to wobble with both an axial oscillation and a precession motion about the system axis of symmetry. Once these artifacts are removed, the longitudinal integral length scales are found to decrease as one approaches the stagnation line, as a consequence of the strained flow field, with the corresponding outer scale turbulent Reynolds number following a similar trend. The Taylor scale Reynolds number is found to be roughly constant throughout the flow field at about 200, with a value virtually independent of the data analysis technique. The novel conditional statistics allowed for the identification of highly convoluted stagnation lines and, in some cases, of strong three-dimensional effects, that can be screened, as they typically yield more than one stagnation line in the flow field. The ability to lock on the

  18. A study of flow past an airfoil with a jet issuing from its lower surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothapalli, A.; Leopold, D.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a NACA 0018 airfoil with a rectangular jet of finite aspect ratio exiting from its lower surface at 90 deg to the chord were investigated. The jet was located at 50% of the wing chord. Measurements include static pressures on the airfoil surface, total pressures in the near wake, and local velocity vectors in different planes of the wake. The effects of jet cross flow interaction on the aerodynamics of the airfoil are studied. It is indicated that at all values of momentum coefficients, the jet cross flow interaction produces a strong contra-rotating vortex structure in the near wake. The flow behind the jet forms a closed recirculation region which extends up to a chord length down stream of the trailing edge which results in the flow field to become highly three dimensional. The various aerodynamic force coefficients vary significantly along the span of the wing. The results are compared with a jet flap configuration.

  19. An experimental study of turbulent flow in attachment jet combustors by LDV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Wu, Cheng-Kang

    1993-12-01

    Flame stabilization in attachment jet combustors is based on the existence of the high temperature recirculation zone, provided by the Coanda effect of an attachment jet. The single attachment jet in a rectangular channel is a fundamental form of this type of flow. In this paper, the detailed characteristics of turbulent flow of a single attachment jet were experimentally studied by using a 2-D LDV. The flowfield consists of a forward flow and two reverse flows. The forward one is composed of a curved and a straight section. The curved section resembles a bent turbulent free jet, and the straight part is basically a section of turbulent wall jet. A turbulent counter-gradient transport region exists at the curved section. According to the results, this kind of combustor should have a large sudden enlargement ratio and not too narrow in width.

  20. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  1. Theoretical study of the effects of refraction on the noise produced by turbulence in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, E. W.; Graham, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    The production of noise by turbulence in jets is an extremely complex problem. One aspect of that problem, the transmission of acoustic disturbances from the interior of the jet through the mean velocity profile and into the far field is studied. The jet (two-dimensional or circular cylindrical) is assumed infinitely long with mean velocity profile independent of streamwise location. The noise generator is a sequence of transient sources drifting with the surrounding fluid and confined to a short length of the jet.

  2. Numerical study of a confined slot impinging jet with nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat transfer enhancement technology concerns with the aim of developing more efficient systems to satisfy the increasing demands of many applications in the fields of automotive, aerospace, electronic and process industry. A solution for obtaining efficient cooling systems is represented by the use of confined or unconfined impinging jets. Moreover, the possibility of increasing the thermal performances of the working fluids can be taken into account, and the introduction of nanoparticles in a base fluid can be considered. Results In this article, a numerical investigation on confined impinging slot jet working with a mixture of water and Al2O3 nanoparticles is described. The flow is turbulent and a constant temperature is applied on the impinging. A single-phase model approach has been adopted. Different geometric ratios, particle volume concentrations and Reynolds number have been considered to study the behavior of the system in terms of average and local Nusselt number, convective heat transfer coefficient and required pumping power profiles, temperature fields and stream function contours. Conclusions The dimensionless stream function contours show that the intensity and size of the vortex structures depend on the confining effects, given by H/W ratio, Reynolds number and particle concentrations. Furthermore, for increasing concentrations, nanofluids realize increasing fluid bulk temperature, as a result of the elevated thermal conductivity of mixtures. The local Nusselt number profiles show the highest values at the stagnation point, and the lowest at the end of the heated plate. The average Nusselt number increases for increasing particle concentrations and Reynolds numbers; moreover, the highest values are observed for H/W = 10, and a maximum increase of 18% is detected at a concentration equal to 6%. The required pumping power as well as Reynolds number increases and particle concentrations grow, which is almost 4.8 times greater than the

  3. Study of the subjet structure of quark and gluon jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Ganis, G.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Gotzhein, C.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Kim, H.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Measurements of the subjet structure of quark and gluon jets in hadronic Z decays are presented. The analysis is based on one million hadronic events recorded by the ALEPH detector. Roughly symmetric three-jet events are selected with a coarse jet-resolution cut-off, y1. Gluon jets are identified with a purity of 94.6% in those events where evidence of long-lived heavy-flavour hadrons in the other two jets is found. The jets are then analyzed using a smaller cut-off y0 (< y1) so that subjets are resolved. The properties of the jets (subjet multiplicities ( Nq), ( Ng) and rates Rng( q) for n = 1, 2, 3, 4) are determined and are found to be in good agreement with the expectations of perturbative QCD as long as the subjet resolution parameter y0 is sufficiently large to keep non-perturbative effects small. In particular, the ratio {(N g - 1) }/{(N q - 1) }, which to leading order in QCD is given by the ratio of colour factors {C A}/{C F} = {9}/{4}, is measured to be 1.96 ± 0.15 for y0 = 2 · 10 -3, but falls to 1.29 ± 0.03 for y0 = 1.6 · 10 -5.

  4. A Study of Radio Polarization in Protostellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cécere, Mariana; Velázquez, Pablo F.; Araudo, Anabella T.; De Colle, Fabio; Esquivel, Alejandro; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is commonly observed in connection with shocks of different velocities, ranging from relativistic shocks associated with active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, or microquasars, to weakly or non-relativistic flows such as those observed in supernova remnants. Recent observations of synchrotron emission in protostellar jets are important not only because they extend the range over which the acceleration process works, but also because they allow us to determine the jet and/or interstellar magnetic field structure, thus giving insights into the jet ejection and collimation mechanisms. In this paper, we compute for the first time polarized (synchrotron) and non-polarized (thermal X-ray) synthetic emission maps from axisymmetrical simulations of magnetized protostellar jets. We consider models with different jet velocities and variability, as well as a toroidal or helical magnetic field. Our simulations show that variable, low-density jets with velocities of ˜1000 km s-1 and ˜10 times lighter than the environment can produce internal knots with significant synchrotron emission and thermal X-rays in the shocked region of the leading bow shock moving in a dense medium. While models with a purely toroidal magnetic field show a very large degree of polarization, models with a helical magnetic field show lower values and a decrease of the degree of polarization, in agreement with observations of protostellar jets.

  5. Micronucleus studies in the peripheral blood and bone marrow of mice treated with jet fuels, JP-8 and Jet-A.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Kligerman, Andrew D; Prihoda, Thomas J; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2006-09-19

    The potential adverse effects of dermal and inhalation exposure of jet fuels are important for health hazard evaluation in humans. The genotoxic potential of jet fuels, JP-8 and Jet-A, was investigated in an animal model. Mice were treated dermally with either a single or multiple applications of these jet fuels. Peripheral blood and bone marrow smears were prepared to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). In all experiments, using several different exposure regimens, no statistically significant increase in the incidence of MN was observed in the bone marrow and/or peripheral blood of mice treated with JP-8 or Jet-A when compared with those of untreated control animals. The data in mice treated with a single dose of JP-8 or Jet-A did not confirm the small but statistically significant increase in micronuclei reported in our previous study. PMID:16815737

  6. Experimental study on gas-liquid flow characteristics of submerged air jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, S. J.; Liu, J. T.; Miao, T. C.; Wu, D. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The gas-liquid flow structure and interfacial behavior of submerged air jets were investigated experimentally using high speed digital video camera and image processing techniques. The jet pressure ratio varied from 1.8 to 4.8 in the experiment. And results from different jet nozzles were processed and compared. Statistical characteristics of the jet diameters along the axial distance were obtained and analyzed. Time series analysis was implemented to study the interface unsteadiness by calculating the gas-liquid interface deviation. The results showed that the jet diameters increase first linearly then nonlinearly and its growth rate decreases along the axial distance. The reason for the divergence between the result of this experiment and those done by other researchers was analyzed. Comparing the results of different pressure ratios and nozzle diameters, we found that larger jet pressure ratios have larger jet diameters and nozzle diameters nearly have no bearing on the distribution of dimensionless jet diameters. The interface unsteadiness in low and high pressure ratios exhibited totally distinct properties. And a minimum unsteady value was found along the axis of the air jets.

  7. Analytic and Monte Carlo studies of jets with heavy mesons and quarkonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Reggie; Dai, Lin; Hornig, Andrew; Leibovich, Adam K.; Makris, Yiannis; Mehen, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We study jets with identified hadrons in which a family of jet-shape variables called angularities are measured, extending the concept of fragmenting jet functions (FJFs) to these observables. FJFs determine the fraction of energy, z, carried by an identified hadron in a jet with angularity, τ a . The FJFs are convolutions of fragmentation functions (FFs), evolved to the jet energy scale, with perturbatively calculable matching coefficients. Renormalization group equations are used to provide resummed calculations with next-to-leading logarithm prime (NLL') accuracy. We apply this formalism to two-jet events in e + e - collisions with B mesons in the jets, and three-jet events in which a J/ψ is produced in the gluon jet. In the case of B mesons, we use a phenomenological FF extracted from e + e - collisions at the Z 0 pole evaluated at the scale μ = m b . For events with J/ψ, the FF can be evaluated in terms of Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) matrix elements at the scale μ = 2 m c . The z and τ a distributions from our NLL' calculations are compared with predictions from monte carlo event generators. While we find consistency between the predictions for B mesons and the J/ψ distributions in τ a , we find the z distributions for J/ψ differ significantly. We describe an attempt to merge PYTHIA showers with NRQCD FFs that gives good agreement with NLL' calculations of the z distributions.

  8. Kinetics and product studies of the reaction ClO + BrO using flash photolysis-ultraviolet absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randall R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction between BrO and ClO was studied over the pressure range 50-700 torr and temperature range 220-400 K, using the flash photolysis-ultraviolet absorption method described by Watson et al. (1979). In order to investigate the mechanism of the BrO + ClO reaction, the product branch reactions Br + Cl2O yielding ClO + BrCl and Cl2O + h(nu) yielding products were examined. The rate constant for the overall reaction and the Arrhenius expression for the Br + Cl2O reaction are given, as well as the quantum yield for the production of atomic oxygen from the Cl2O photolysis.

  9. Fundamental Study on a Long-Duration Flash X-Ray Generator with a Surface-Discharge Triode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kei; Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Oizumi, Teiji; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1994-07-01

    Fundamental studies on a long-duration flash X-ray generator are described. This generator consisted of the following components: a high-voltage power supply with a maximum voltage of 100 kV, an energy-storage condenser of 500 nF, a main discharge condenser of 10 nF, a turbo molecular pump, a thyratron pulser as a trigger device, and a surface-discharge triode. The effective pulse width was less than 30 µs, and the X-ray intensity approximately had a value of 0.6 µC/kg at 1.0 m per pulse with a charged voltage of 60 kV. The maximum tube voltage was equivalent to the initial charged voltage of the condenser, and the peak tube current was less than 40 A. With this generator, we could obtain stable X-ray intensity maximized by preventing damped oscillations of the tube voltage and current.

  10. A Study of Flash Anneal in combination with the conventional RTA for DRAM application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, YoungHo; Lee, JinKu; Lee, MiRi; Jeon, SeungJoon; Oh, JaeGeun; Lee, Yu. Jun; Shin, MinJung; Kim, JaeYoung; Cha, SeonYong; Hong, Kwon; Park, SungKi; Kusuda, Tatsufumi; Nishihara, Hideo; Yokouchi, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of FLA technique on the DRAM peripheral transistor improvements by integrating into the SDRTA (Source/Drain RTA) and ADD RTA (Add RTA after contact formation). FLA with conventional RTA was not effective because of SCE (Short Channel Effect) control. FLA only was effective to improve SCE and Iop, and especially more effective on technology shrink. By flash anneal (FLA), we tried to achieve better activation, lower series resistance and less dopant loss. For higher activation, the pre-heat temperature of FLA was varied by 50 °C higher or lower than the desired base temperature. For lower resistance, the sidewall spacer thickness was reduced by 50 Å, 100 Å and 150 Å. For reducing dopant loss during the contact etch process, the deeper S/D Rp was used by increasing the S/D implant energy with an increased Rp by 150 Å, 200 Å and 250 Å. Results with FLA base show 13.4% improvement, and at the higher pre-heat temperature, it can be improved to 16.9%. In conclusion, FLA can be one of the candidates for periperal transistor performance improvement of next generation DRAM device.

  11. Electronic Flash In Data Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. E.

    1982-02-01

    Photographic acquisition of data often may be simplified, or the data quality improved upon by employing electronic flash sources with traditional equipment or techniques. The relatively short flash duration compared to movie camera shutters, or to the long integration time of video camera provides improved spatial resolution through blur reduction, particularly important as image movement becomes a significant fraction of film format dimension. Greater accuracy typically is achieved in velocity and acceleration determinations by using a stroboscopic light source rather than a movie camera frame-rate control as a time standard. Electrical efficiency often is an important advantage of electronic flash sources since almost any necessary light level for exposure may be produced, yet the source typically is "off" most of the time. Various synchronization techniques greatly expand the precise control of exposure. Biomechanical and sports equipment studies may involve velocities up to 200 feet-per-second, and often will have associated very rapid actions of interest. The need for brief exposures increases H.s one "ZOOMS in on the action." In golf, for example, the swing may be examined using 100 microsecond (Us) flashes at rates of 60 or 120 flashes-per-second (FPS). Accurate determination of linear and rotational velocity of the ball requires 10 Us flashes at 500-1,000 FPS, while sub-Us flashes at 20,000-50,000 FPS are required to resolve the interaction of the ball and the club, head. Some seldom. used techniques involving streak photography are described, with enhanced results obtained by combining strobe with the usual continuous light source. The combination of strobe and a fast electro-mechanical shutter is considered for Us photography under daylight conditions.

  12. What quenches the helium shell flashes. [thermonuclear reactions in stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackmann, I.-J.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of a typical stellar helium shell flash cycle. A sequence of 12 flashes for a population I star is considered. The changes taking place at a constant mass layer in the helium-burning shell are studied as the flash develops. A highly simplified mathematical description is presented, taking into account the three necessary conditions for the occurrence of the flash and the pressure-density and temperature-density relationships. Quantities which are helpful in explaining what triggers the flash are found to be useful in explaining what quenches the flash.

  13. Sensitivity of Orographic Moist Convection to Landscape Variability: A Study of the Buffalo Creek, Colorado, Flash Flood Case of 1996.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Warner, Thomas T.; Manning, Kevin

    2001-11-01

    A number of numerical experiments with a high-resolution mesoscale model were conducted to study the convective rainfall event that caused the 1996 Buffalo Creek, Colorado, flash flood. Different surface conditions and treatments of land surface physics were utilized to assess the sensitivity of this orographic moist convection to local and regional landscape forcing.Given accurate large-scale synoptic conditions at the lateral boundaries, the mesoscale model with a convection-resolving grid shows reasonably good skill in simulating this convective event with a lead time of up to 12 h. Sensitivity experiments show that a primary reason for this success is the use of an advanced land surface model that provides time-varying soil-moisture fields. This land surface model plays an important role in capturing the complex interactions among the land surface, the PBL, cloud-modulated radiation, and precipitation. For the case simulated, such interactions contribute to the temporal and spatial distribution of surface heating at small scales, and the convective triggering and development.Tests show that the landscape variability at small and large scales significantly affects the location and intensity of the moist convection. For example, on timescales of 6 to 12 h, differences in initial soil moisture associated with irrigation in the plains affect the evolution of the convection near the Continental Divide. Also, the surface modification by a wildfire burn influences the path of the major convective event that caused the flash flood.A watershed-based quantitative-precipitation-forecast skill score is proposed and employed. The relative success with which this severe thunderstorm is simulated over complex terrain provides some hope that the careful treatment of land surface physics in convection-resolving models can perhaps provide some useful level of predictability.

  14. Mixing Near the Subtropical Jet - a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L. L.; Randel, W. J.; Browell, E.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    Mixing is an important part of irreversible stratosphere troposphere exchange. Yet the mixing process is poorly understood. We present a case study of mixing in the vicinity of the subtropical jet, using airborne in situ and remote sensing data during SONEX mission. The case of intrusion of stratospheric air is identified using ozone profile curtains from DIAL LIDAR onboard DC-8. The thermal structure across the tropopause is mapped using temperature profiles from Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP), together with the potential vorticity field based on the ECMWF data. Spatial extent of mixing between stratospheric and tropospheric air is examined using tracer relationships from in situ measurement onboard DC-8. Results show that mixing between stratospheric and tropospheric air involved air mass with ozone value up to ~400 ppbv. The case study also show that based on the tracer relationship alone, without the background information provided by the LIDAR data and MTP data, it is often difficult to conclude whether the observed mixing represent stratosphere to troposphere transport or troposphere to stratosphere transport. Results also show that using 2 PVU or 3.5 PVU contour as the tropopause in this case will likely underestimate the stratosphere to troposphere transport.

  15. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  16. Space shuttle orbiter reaction control system jet interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter has forward mounted and rear mounted Reaction Control Systems (RCS) which are used for orbital maneuvering and also provide control during entry and abort maneuvers in the atmosphere. The effects of interaction between the RCS jets and the flow over the vehicle in the atmosphere are studied. Test data obtained in the NASA Langley Research Center 31 inch continuous flow hypersonic tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 10.3 is analyzed. The data were obtained with a 0.01 scale force model with aft mounted RCS nozzles mounted on the sting off of the force model balance. The plume simulations were accomplished primarily using air in a cold gas simulation through scaled nozzles, however, various cold gas mixtures of Helium and Argon were also tested. The effect of number of nozzles was tested as were limited tests of combined controls. The data show that RCS nozzle exit momentum ratio is the primary correlating parameter for effects where the plume impinges on an adjacent surface and mass flow ratio is the parameter where the plume interaction is primarily with the external stream. An analytic model of aft mounted RCS units was developed in which the total reaction control moments are the sum of thrust, impingement, interaction, and cross-coupling terms.

  17. Gas jet studies towards an optimization of the IGISOL LIST method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Kessler, T.; Karvonen, P.; Kurpeta, J.; Marsh, B.; Piszczek, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Äystö, J.

    2011-04-01

    Gas jets emitted from an ion guide have been studied as a function of nozzle type and gas cell-to-background pressure ratio in order to obtain a low divergent, uniform jet over a distance of several cm. The jet has been probed by imaging the light emitted from excited argon or helium gas atoms. For a simple exit hole or converging-diverging nozzle, the jet diameter was found to be insensitive to the nozzle shape and inlet pressure. Sonic jets with a FWHM below 6 mm were achieved with a background pressure larger than 1 mbar in the expansion chamber. The measurements are supported by the detection of radioactive 219Rn recoils from an alpha recoil source mounted within the gas cell. A Laval nozzle produced a well-collimated supersonic jet at low background pressures with a FWHM of ˜6 mm over a distance of 14 cm. Direct Pitot probe measurements, on-axis, revealed a non-uniform pressure distribution in the gas jet of the Laval nozzle, supporting the visual observations. All measurements are motivated by the requirement of a good geometrical overlap between atoms and counter-propagating laser beams in the gas cell-based Laser Ion Source Trap (LIST) project. Computational fluid dynamics gas flow simulations were initiated to guide the future development of the gas jet system.

  18. Jet pumps for thermoacoustic applications: Design guidelines based on a numerical parameter study.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, Joris P; Bühler, Simon; Wilcox, Douglas; van der Meer, Theo H

    2015-10-01

    The oscillatory flow through tapered cylindrical tube sections (jet pumps) is characterized by a numerical parameter study. The shape of a jet pump results in asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects which cause a time-averaged pressure drop to occur under oscillatory flow conditions. Hence, jet pumps are used as streaming suppressors in closed-loop thermoacoustic devices. A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics model is used to calculate the performance of a large number of conical jet pump geometries in terms of time-averaged pressure drop and acoustic power dissipation. The investigated geometrical parameters include the jet pump length, taper angle, waist diameter, and waist curvature. In correspondence with previous work, four flow regimes are observed which characterize the jet pump performance and dimensionless parameters are introduced to scale the performance of the various jet pump geometries. The simulation results are compared to an existing quasi-steady theory and it is shown that this theory is only applicable in a small operation region. Based on the scaling parameters, an optimum operation region is defined and design guidelines are proposed which can be directly used for future jet pump design. PMID:26520283

  19. Jet pumps for thermoacoustic applications: Design guidelines based on a numerical parameter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterhuis, Joris P.; Bühler, Simon; Wilcox, Douglas; van der Meer, Theo H.

    2015-10-01

    The oscillatory flow through tapered cylindrical tube sections (jet pumps) is characterized by a numerical parameter study. The shape of a jet pump results in asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects which cause a time-averaged pressure drop to occur under oscillatory flow conditions. Hence, jet pumps are used as streaming suppressors in closed-loop thermoacoustic devices. A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics model is used to calculate the performance of a large number of conical jet pump geometries in terms of time-averaged pressure drop and acoustic power dissipation. The investigated geometrical parameters include the jet pump length, taper angle, waist diameter and waist curvature. In correspondence with previous work, four flow regimes are observed which characterize the jet pump performance and dimensionless parameters are introduced to scale the performance of the various jet pump geometries. The simulation results are compared to an existing quasi-steady theory and it is shown that this theory is only applicable in a small operation region. Based on the scaling parameters, an optimum operation region is defined and design guidelines are proposed which can be directly used for future jet pump design.

  20. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Lupelli, I.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Manzanares, A.; Mlynář, J.; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A. E.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-08-01

    Runaway electrons (RE) during disruptions are a concern for future tokamaks including ITER with its metallic wall. Although RE are rare in spontaneous disruptions with the JET ITER-like Wall (JET-ILW), RE beams up to 380 kA were obtained using massive injection (MGI) of argon in JET-ILW divertor discharges. Entry points into the RE domain defined by operational parameters (toroidal field, argon fraction in MGI) are unchanged but higher RE currents have been obtained inside the JET-ILW MGI-generated RE domain when compared to JET-C. This might be due to the influence of the metallic wall on the current quench plasma. Temperatures of 900 °C have been observed following RE impacts on beryllium tiles. Heat deposition depth of ∼2 mm has to be assumed to match the tile cooling time. 3D simulations of the RE energy deposition using the ENDEP/MEMOS codes show that material melting is unlikely with 100 kA RE beams.

  1. Studies of the effects of curvature on dilution jet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Srinivasan, Ram; Reynolds, Robert S.; White, Craig D.

    1992-02-01

    An analytical program was conducted using both three-dimensional numerical and empirical models to investigate the effects of transition liner curvature on the mixing of jets injected into a confined crossflow. The numerical code is of the TEACH type with hybrid numerics; it uses the power-law and SIMPLER algorithms, an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system, and an algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model. From the results of the numerical calculations, an existing empirical model for the temperature field downstream of single and multiple rows of jets injected into a straight rectangular duct was extended to model the effects of curvature. Temperature distributions, calculated with both the numerical and empirical models, are presented to show the effects of radius of curvature and inner and outer wall injection for single and opposed rows of cool dilution jets injected into a hot mainstream flow.

  2. Experimental studies on an air-air jet exhaust pump

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    Industrial ventilation employing an air-air jet exhaust pump connected to a compressed-air line was investigated. The motive air supply pressure was maintained between 2 and 3 bar. A unique ejector housing was constructed to receive both the convergent-divergent primary nozzle and the mixing chamber. The entire unit adapts readily to any existing compressed-air system. The mixing chamber was so constructed that the length of its cylindrical section may be changed. Pressure variations along the mixing chamber were recorded, and this offered a valuable appreciation of the effects of the length-to-diameter ratios. Results indicate the influence of the supply air pressure and pressure ratio on the jet entrainment capacity and efficiency. It has also been shown that the present design is capable of achieving the maximum reported jet-pump efficiency of around 25% corresponding to a nozzle-to-mixing chamber area ratio of 0.15.

  3. Study of the atmospheric flashes and man-made global phenomena ultraviolet and infrared glow of the night air on the board of satellite "VERNOV"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garipov, Gali; Panasyuk, Mikhael; Svertilov, Sergey; Bogomolov, Vitaliy; Barinova, Vera; Saleev, Kirill

    2016-04-01

    The set of scientific payload for optical observation on-board of "Vernov" satellite, launched at July 8, 2014, had measured transient (millisecond) flashes in the atmosphere in two wavelength bands: ultraviolet (UV,240-380nm) and red-infrared (IR,610-800nm). Global distribution of the flashes, their frequency and time parameters are studied in this work. Transient flashes measured from the satellite frequently were detected in high latitudes in winter time. Flashes in equatorial region were observed in series which were stretched along magnetic meridian and some of them were detected in cloudless regions. At night time when the Earth atmosphere was observed in nadir direction there were registered the optical signals of artificial origin, distributed along the meridian in an extended region of latitude in the Northern and Southern hemispheres of the Earth, modulated by low frequency and at the coincidence of the orbits with the geographic location of the powerful radio stations. Examples of the waveforms of such signals in UV and IR spectral ranges and their global distribution are presented in this presentation. Particular attention is paid to man-made causes of the glow in the ionosphere under the influence of the high power radio wave transmitters of low (LF) and high frequencies (HF). The height of the luminescence source and components of the atmosphere, which can be the sources of this radiation, are discussed.

  4. Multiwavelength study of 20 jets that emanate from the periphery of active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Tripathi, Durgesh; Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present a multiwavelength analysis of 20 EUV jets which occurred at the periphery of active regions close to sunspots. We discuss the physical parameters of the jets and their relation with other phenomena such as Hα surges, nonthermal type-III radio bursts and hard X-ray (HXR) emission. Methods: These jets were observed between August 2010 and June 2013 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument that is onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). We selected events that were observed on the solar disk within +/-60° latitude. Using AIA wavelength channels that are sensitive to coronal temperatures, we studied the temperature distribution in the jets using the line of sight (LOS) differential emission measure (DEM) technique. We also investigated the role of the photospheric magnetic field using the LOS magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard SDO. Results: It has been observed that most of the jets originated from the western periphery of active regions. Their lifetimes range from 5 to 39 min with an average of 18 min and their velocities range from 87 to 532 km s-1 with an average of 271 km s-1. All the jets are co-temporally associated with Hα surges. Most of the jets are co-temporal with nonthermal type-III radio bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES spacecraft in the frequency range from 20 kHz to 13 MHz. We confirm the source region of these bursts using the potential field source surface (PFSS) technique. Using Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations, we found that half of the jets produced HXR emission and they often shared the same source region as the HXR emission (6-12 keV). Ten out of 20 events showed that the jets originated in a region of flux cancellation and six jets in a region of flux emergence. Four events showed flux emergence and then cancellation during the jet evolution. DEM analyses showed that for most of the spires of the jets, the DEM peaked at around log

  5. Multiwavelength study of 20 jets that emanate from the periphery of active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Tripathi, Durgesh; Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present a multiwavelength analysis of 20 EUV jets which occurred at the periphery of active regions close to sunspots. We discuss the physical parameters of the jets and their relation with other phenomena such as Hα surges, nonthermal type-III radio bursts and hard X-ray (HXR) emission. Methods: These jets were observed between August 2010 and June 2013 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument that is onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). We selected events that were observed on the solar disk within +/-60° latitude. Using AIA wavelength channels that are sensitive to coronal temperatures, we studied the temperature distribution in the jets using the line of sight (LOS) differential emission measure (DEM) technique. We also investigated the role of the photospheric magnetic field using the LOS magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard SDO. Results: It has been observed that most of the jets originated from the western periphery of active regions. Their lifetimes range from 5 to 39 min with an average of 18 min and their velocities range from 87 to 532 km s-1 with an average of 271 km s-1. All the jets are co-temporally associated with Hα surges. Most of the jets are co-temporal with nonthermal type-III radio bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES spacecraft in the frequency range from 20 kHz to 13 MHz. We confirm the source region of these bursts using the potential field source surface (PFSS) technique. Using Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations, we found that half of the jets produced HXR emission and they often shared the same source region as the HXR emission (6-12 keV). Ten out of 20 events showed that the jets originated in a region of flux cancellation and six jets in a region of flux emergence. Four events showed flux emergence and then cancellation during the jet evolution. DEM analyses showed that for most of the spires of the jets, the DEM peaked at around log

  6. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  7. A numerical study of drop-on-demand ink jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromm, J.

    1982-01-01

    Ongoing work related to development and utilization of a numerical model for treating the fluid dynamics of ink jets is discussed. The model embodies the complete nonlinear, time dependent, axi-symmetric equations in finite difference form. The jet nozzle geometry with no-slip boundary conditions and the existence of a contact circle are included. The contact circle is allowed some freedom of movement, but wetting of exterior surfaces is not addressed. The principal objective in current numerical experiments is to determine what pressure history, in conjunction with surface forces, will lead to clean drop formation.

  8. Theoretical and experimental study on the ejector augmented jet flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The analytical concept used in determining the characteristics of jet flap or related propulsive systems suitable for VTOL and STOL applications was examined. The configuration chosen was a two dimensional wing with a biplane flap, having a jet injected on the upper surface of the wing at the flap hinge axis and discharging into the channel between the two elements of the flap. The experimental work was conducted in a two dimensional test installation in a subsonic wind tunnel. The model description, the test conditions, and a summary of the experimental results are presented.

  9. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-01

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  10. Analytical study of the twin-jet shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the analytical model of twin-jet shielding is summarized. The models consist of a point noise source impinging on a cylinder of heated flow in which the temperature and flow velocity are uniform cross the cross section. In the formulation of the model, the wave equations are written for the regions outside the flow and within the flow cylinder. The solutions to the wave equations are matched at the jet boundary under the conditions of continuity of pressure and continuity of the vortex sheet. The solution reduces to an indefinite integral involving Bessel functions. The integral is solved approximately using a saddle point method.

  11. Multi-wavelength polarimetry and variability study of M87 jet during 2002-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.; Cara, Mihai; Owen, Frazer; Harris, Daniel E.; Sparks, William B.; Li, Kunyang; Kosak, Katie

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present the multi-wavelength study of M87 jet. We compare the radio and optical polarimetry and variability. We attempt to study the spectrum of the jet in radio through X-rays wavelengths. By comparing the data with previously published VLA and HST observations, we show that the jet's morphology in total and polarized light is changing significantly on timescales of ~1 decade. We are looking for the variability of different knots and changes in their spectra using our deep, high resolution observations of the jet between 2002 and 2008. The observations have 2-3 times better resolution that any similar previous study (Perlman et al. 1999) in addition allowing us to observe variability. During this time, the nucleus showed month-scale variability in optical and X-rays and also flared twice in all wave- lengths including radio. The knot HST-1, located closest to the nucleus, displayed a huge flare, increasing about 100 times in brightness. The knot A and B complex shows variations in polarization structures indicating the presence of a helical magnetic field which may be responsible for the in-situ particle accelerations in the jet. We compare the evolution of different knots and components of the jet, when our observations overlap with the multi-wavelength monitoring campaigns conducted with HST and Chandra and comment on particle acceleration and main emission processes. We further use the data to investigate the observed 3-dimensional structure of the jet and the magnetic field structure.

  12. Multi-wavelength polarimetry and variability study of M87 jet during 2003-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.; Cara, Mihai; Owen, Frazer N.; Harris, Daniel E.; Sparks, William B.; Li, kunyang; Kosak, Katie; Georganopoulos, Markos

    2016-04-01

    We present the multi-wavelength study of M87’s jet . We compare the radio and optical polarimetry and variability and attempt to study the spectrum of the jet in radio through X-rays wavelengths. By comparing the data with previously published VLA and HST observations, we show that the jet's morphology in total and polarized light is changing significantly on timescales of ~1 decade. We are looking for the variability of different knots and changes in their spectra using our deep, high resolution observations of the jet between 2003 and 2008. The observations have 2-3 times better resolution that any similar previous study (Perlman et al. 1999) in addition allowing us to observe variability. During this time, the nucleus showed month-scale variability in optical and X-rays and also flared twice in all wave- lengths including radio. The knot HST-1, located closest to the nucleus, displayed a huge flare, increasing about 100 times in brightness. The knot A and B complex shows variations in polarization structures indicating the presence of a helical magnetic field which may be responsible for the in-situ particle accelerations in the jet. We compare the evolution of different knots and components of the jet, when our observations overlap with the multi-wavelength monitoring campaigns conducted with HST and Chandra and comment on particle acceleration and main emission processes. We further use the data to investigate the observed 3-dimensional structure of the jet and the magnetic field structure.

  13. A performance application study of a jet-flap helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. J.; Laforge, S.; Holchin, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    A performance study was made of the application of a jet-flap to a reaction-drive rotor for a heavy-lift helicopter mission and for a high-speed-helicopter maneuverability (200 knots, 2g) mission. The results of the study are as follows: As a result of the increase in maximum airfoil lift coefficient achieved by the jet-flap, rotor solidity is reduced with the jet-flap to approximately 59% of a nonjet-flap rotor. As a result of the saving in rotor solidity, and hence in rotor weight, the jet-flap configuration had a 21% higher productivity than a nonjet-flap configuration. Of the three propulsion systems studied utilizing a jet-flap (hot cycle, warm cycle, cold cycle) the hot cycle gave the largest increase in productivity. The 200 knot 2g mission is performed best with a warm cycle propulsion system. The jet-flap permits designing for a rotor blade loading coefficient C sub T/sigma = .170 at 2g without encountering blade stall. The jet-flap rotor permits a 200 knot 2g maneuver without suffering the penalty of an unreasonable rotor solidity that would be required by a nonjet-flap rotor.

  14. THE EVOLUTION OF HETERGENEOUS 'CLUMPY JETS': A PARAMETER STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Yirak, Kristopher; Schroeder, Ed; Frank, Adam; Cunningham, Andrew J.

    2012-02-20

    We investigate the role discrete clumps embedded in an astrophysical jet play on the jet's morphology and line emission characteristics. By varying clumps' size, density, position, and velocity, we cover a range of parameter space motivated by observations of objects such as the Herbig-Haro object HH 34. We here extend the results presented in Yirak et al., including how analysis of individual observations may lead to spurious sinusoidal variation whose parameters vary widely over time, owing chiefly to interactions between clumps. The goodness of fits, while poor in all simulations, are best when clump-clump collisions are minimal. Our results indicate that a large velocity dispersion leads to a clump-clump collision-dominated flow which disrupts the jet beam. Finally, we present synthetic emission images of H{alpha} and [S II] and note an excess of [S II] emission along the jet length as compared to observations. This suggests that observed beams undergo earlier processing, if they are present at all.

  15. Preliminary Study Using Forward Reaction Control System Jets During Space Shuttle Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; Valasek, John

    2006-01-01

    Failure or degradation of the flight control system, or hull damage, can lead to loss of vehicle control during entry. Possible failure scenarios are debris impact and wing damage that could result in a large aerodynamic asymmetry which cannot be trimmed out without additional yaw control. Currently the space shuttle uses aerodynamic control surfaces and Reaction Control System jets to control attitude. The forward jets are used for orbital maneuvering only, while the aft jets are used for yaw control during entry. This paper develops a controller for using the forward reaction control system jets as an additional control during entry, and assesses its value and feasibility during failure situations. Forward-aft jet blending logic is created, and implemented on a simplified model of the space shuttle entry flight control system. The model is validated and verified on the nonlinear, six degree-of-freedom Shuttle Engineering Simulator. A rudimentary human factors study was undertaken using the forward cockpit simulator at Johnson Space Center, to assess flying qualities of the new system and pilot workload. Results presented in the paper show that the combination of forward and aft jets provides useful additional yaw control, in addition to potential fuel savings and the ability to balance the use of the fuel in the forward and aft tanks to meet availability constraints of both forward and aft fuel tanks. Piloted simulation studies indicated that using both sets of jets while flying a damaged space shuttle reduces pilot workload, and makes the vehicle more responsive.

  16. Experimental study of turbulence in isothermal jet impingement at intermediate plate spacings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landfried, D. Tyler; Valentino, Alex; Mazumdar, Sagnik; Jana, Anirban; Kimber, Mark

    2013-11-01

    One fundamental problem in fluid dynamics is that of the axisymmetric round flow impinging on a plate placed some distance downstream of the jet. Impinging jets have a rich history of applications including small plate spacings, H/D ~ 1, such as encountered in electronics cooling, or large plate spacings, H/D ~ 102, such as vertical takeoff aircrafts and rocket engines. However, intermediate plate spacings, such as the lower plenum of the next generation nuclear reactors, are not typically studied. In this paper, an experimental study is conducted investigating the effect of the impingement plate on the flow behavior compared to the near free jet behavior when the plate is removed. Using air as the working fluid, a single jet is considered at jet Reynolds numbers of 10000, 20000, and 30000. A three-wire anemometer probe is used to quantify the mean components of velocities as well as the Reynolds stress and the third-order moments in the flow field at various distances between the jet outlet and the impingement plate. When present, the impingement plate is placed a distance of 8, 11, 14, and 17 diameters downstream of the jet. Additionally trends in the kinetic energy and dissipation are investigated for validation with numerical models.

  17. Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV

    SciTech Connect

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Bicrel, Beatrice; Cassany, Bruno; Desanlis, Thierry; Voisin, Luc; Hebert, David; Bernigaud, Virgile; Magnin, Laurent; Nicolas, Remi; Poulet, Frederic; Tailleur, Yaeel; Caron, Michel; Cartier, Frederic; Cartier, Stephanie; Hourdin, Laurent; Rosol, Rodolphe; Toury, Martial; Delbos, Christophe; Garrigues, Alain; Soleilhavoup, Isabelle; and others

    2012-09-15

    The negative polarity rod pinch diode (NPRPD) is a potential millimeter spot size radiography source for high voltage generators (4 to 8 MV) [Cooperstein et al., 'Considerations of rod-pinch diode operation in negative polarity for radiography,' in Proceedings of the 14th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 2003, pp. 975-978]. The NPRPD consists of a small diameter (few mm) cylindrical anode extending from the front end of the vacuum cell through a thin annular cathode, held by a central conductor. The polarity has been inverted when compared to the original rod pinch diode [Cooperstein et al., 'Theoretical modeling and experimental characterization of a rod-pinch diode,' Phys. Plasmas 8(10), 4618-4636 (2001)] in order to take advantage from the maximal x-ray emission toward the anode holder at such a voltage [Swanekamp et al., 'Evaluation of self-magnetically pinched diodes up to 10 MV as high resolution flash X-ray sources,' IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 32(5), 2004-2016 (2004). We have studied this diode at 4.5 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator [Raboisson et al., 'ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator,' in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 1989, pp. 567-570.]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode has been modified in order to set up flash a radiographic diode [Etchessahar et al., 'Negative polarity rod pinch diode experiments on the ASTERIX generator,' in Conference Records-Abstracts, 37th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science, 2010]. The experiments and numerical simulations presented here allowed the observation and analysis of various physical phenomena associated with the diode operation. Also, the influence of several experimental parameters, such as cathode and anode diameters, materials and surface states, was examined. In order to achieve the most comprehensive characterization of the

  18. Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Bernigaud, Virgile; Caron, Michel; Cartier, Frédéric; Cartier, Stéphanie; Hourdin, Laurent; Magnin, Laurent; Nicolas, Rémi; Poulet, Frédéric; Rosol, Rodolphe; Tailleur, Yaël; Toury, Martial; Compant La Fontaine, Antoine; Bicrel, Béatrice; Cassany, Bruno; Desanlis, Thierry; Voisin, Luc; Hébert, David; Delbos, Christophe; Garrigues, Alain; Soleilhavoup, Isabelle

    2012-09-01

    The negative polarity rod pinch diode (NPRPD) is a potential millimeter spot size radiography source for high voltage generators (4 to 8 MV) [Cooperstein et al., "Considerations of rod-pinch diode operation in negative polarity for radiography," in Proceedings of the 14th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 2003, pp. 975-978]. The NPRPD consists of a small diameter (few mm) cylindrical anode extending from the front end of the vacuum cell through a thin annular cathode, held by a central conductor. The polarity has been inverted when compared to the original rod pinch diode [Cooperstein et al., "Theoretical modeling and experimental characterization of a rod-pinch diode," Phys. Plasmas 8(10), 4618-4636 (2001)] in order to take advantage from the maximal x-ray emission toward the anode holder at such a voltage [Swanekamp et al., "Evaluation of self-magnetically pinched diodes up to 10 MV as high resolution flash X-ray sources," IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 32(5), 2004-2016 (2004). We have studied this diode at 4.5 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator [Raboisson et al., "ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator," in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 1989, pp. 567-570.]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode has been modified in order to set up flash a radiographic diode [Etchessahar et al., "Negative polarity rod pinch diode experiments on the ASTERIX generator," in Conference Records-Abstracts, 37th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science, 2010]. The experiments and numerical simulations presented here allowed the observation and analysis of various physical phenomena associated with the diode operation. Also, the influence of several experimental parameters, such as cathode and anode diameters, materials and surface states, was examined. In order to achieve the most comprehensive characterization of the

  19. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, Lee K.

    1981-01-01

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  20. Apollo light flash investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, W. Z.; Pinsky, L. S.; Bailey, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    The visual phenomenon of light flashes resulting from high energy, heavy cosmic rays penetrating the command module structure and crewmembers' eyes is investigated. Light flash events observed during dedicated sessions on Apollo 15, 16, 17 are described along with a Monte Carlo simulation of the exposure of an astronaut to cosmic radiation during a mission. Results of the Apollo Light Flash Moving Emulsion Detector experiment developed for Apollo 16 and 17 to obtain a direct record of incident cosmic ray particles are correlated with crewmembers' reports of light flashes.

  1. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-12-07

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  2. Flash Expansion Threshold in Whirligig Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Romey, William L.; Lamb, Alicia R.

    2015-01-01

    In the selfish herd hypothesis, prey animals move toward each other to avoid the likelihood of being selected by a predator. However, many grouped animals move away from each other the moment before a predator attacks. Very little is known about this phenomenon, called flash expansion, such as whether it is triggered by one individual or a threshold and how information is transferred between group members. We performed a controlled experiment with whirligig beetles in which the ratio of sighted to unsighted individuals was systematically varied and emergent flash expansion was measured. Specifically, we examined: the percentage of individuals in a group that startled, the resulting group area, and the longevity of the flash expansion. We found that one or two sighted beetles in a group of 24 was not enough to cause a flash expansion after a predator stimulus, but four sighted beetles usually initiated a flash expansion. Also, the more beetles that were sighted the larger the resulting group area and the longer duration of the flash expansion. We conclude that flash expansion is best described as a threshold event whose adaptive value is to prevent energetically costly false alarms while quickly mobilizing an emergent predator avoidance response. This is one of the first controlled experiments of flash expansion, an important emergent property that has applications to understanding collective motion in swarms, schools, flocks, and human crowds. Also, our study is a convincing demonstration of social contagion, how the actions of one individual can pass through a group. PMID:26301958

  3. Experimental study on the use of synthetic jet actuators for lift control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Ricardo Benjamin

    An experimental study on the use of synthetic jet actuators for lift control is conducted. The synthetic jet actuator is placed on the pressure side towards the trailing edge on a NACA 65(2)-415 airfoil representative of the cross section of an Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) in an industrial gas compressor. By redirecting or vectoring the shear layer at the trailing edge, the synthetic jet actuator increases lift and decreases drag on the airfoil without a mechanical device or flap. A compressor map that defines upper and lower bounds on operating velocities and airfoil dimensions, is compared with operating conditions of the low-speed wind tunnel at San Diego State University, to match gas compressor conditions in the wind tunnel. Realistic test conditions can range from Mach=0.12 to Mach= 0.27 and an airfoil chord from c=0.1 m to c=0.3 m. Based on the operating conditions, a final airfoil model is fabricated with a chord of c=0.1m. Several synthetic jet actuator designs are considered. A initial synthetic jet is designed to house a piezoelectric element with a material frequency of 1200 hz in a cavity with a volume of 4.47 cm3, a slot width of 0.25 mm, and a slot depth of 1.5 mm. With these dimensions, the Helmholtz frequency of the design is 1800Hz. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments show that the design has a jet with a peak centerline jet velocity of 26 m/s at 750 Hz. A modified slant face synthetic jet is designed so that the cavity fits flush within the NACA airfoil surface. The slanted synthetic jet has a cavity volume of 4.67 cm3, a slot width of 0.25 mm, and a slot depth of 3.45 mm resulting in a Helmholtz frequency of 1170 hz for this design. PIV experiments show that the jet is redirected along the slant face according to the Coanda effect. A final synthetic jet actuator is directly integrated into the trailing edge of an airfoil with a cavity volume of 4.6 cm3, a slot width of 0.2 mm, and a slot depth of 1.6 mm. The Helmholtz frequency is 1450 Hz and

  4. Investigations into the low temperature behavior of jet fuels: Visualization, modeling, and viscosity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Daniel L.

    Aircraft operation in arctic regions or at high altitudes exposes jet fuel to temperatures below freeze point temperature specifications. Fuel constituents may solidify and remain within tanks or block fuel system components. Military and scientific requirements have been met with costly, low freeze point specialty jet fuels. Commercial airline interest in polar routes and the use of high altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has spurred interest in the effects of low temperatures and low-temperature additives on jet fuel. The solidification of jet fuel due to freezing is not well understood and limited visualization of fuel freezing existed prior to the research presented in this dissertation. Consequently, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling that simulates jet fuel freezing and model validation were incomplete prior to the present work. The ability to simulate jet fuel freezing is a necessary tool for fuel system designers. An additional impediment to the understanding and simulation of jet fuel freezing has been the absence of published low-temperature thermo-physical properties, including viscosity, which the present work addresses. The dissertation is subdivided into three major segments covering visualization, modeling and validation, and viscosity studies. In the first segment samples of jet fuel, JPTS, kerosene, Jet A and Jet A containing additives, were cooled below their freeze point temperatures in a rectangular, optical cell. Images and temperature data recorded during the solidification process provided information on crystal habit, crystallization behavior, and the influence of the buoyancy-driven flow on freezing. N-alkane composition of the samples was determined. The Jet A sample contained the least n-alkane mass. The cooling of JPTS resulted in the least wax formation while the cooling of kerosene yielded the greatest wax formation. The JPTS and kerosene samples exhibited similar crystallization behavior and crystal habits during

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of jet height hysteresis in packed beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhl, Maximilian H.; Lu, Guang; Third, James R.; Prüssmann, Klaas P.; Müller, Christoph R.

    2013-06-01

    The jet-spout transition in fluidized beds can show hysteretic behavior. In this study the jet-spout transition was studied as a function of orifice velocity for particles of different size and shape using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The measurements showed that the particle shape primarily affect to the width of the hysteresis loop whereas particle size governs the position of the hysteresis loop with regards to the orifice velocity.

  6. Numerical Study of Gamma-Ray Burst Jet Formation in Collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Nagataki, S.; Takahashi, R.; Mizuta, A.; Takiwaki, T.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst. /Tokyo U.

    2007-06-08

    Two-dimensional MHD simulations are performed using the ZEUS-2D code to investigate the dynamics of a collapsar that generates a GRB jet, taking account of realistic equation of state, neutrino cooling and heating processes, magnetic fields, and gravitational force from the central black hole and self-gravity. It is found that neutrino heating processes are not efficient enough to launch a jet in this study. It is also found that a jet is launched mainly by B{sub {phi}} fields that are amplified by the winding-up effect. However, since the ratio of total energy relative to the rest-mass energy in the jet is not as high as several hundred, we conclude that the jets seen in this study are not GRB jets. This result suggests that general relativistic effects will be important to generating a GRB jet. Also, the accretion disk with magnetic fields may still play an important role in launching a GRB jet, although a simulation for much longer physical time ({approx}10-100 s) is required to confirm this effect. It is shown that a considerable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized in the accretion disk. Thus, there will be a possibility for the accretion disk to supply the sufficient amount of {sup 56}Ni required to explain the luminosity of a hypernova. Also, it is shown that neutron-rich matter due to electron captures with high entropy per baryon is ejected along the polar axis. Thus, there will be a possibility that r-process nucleosynthesis occurs at such a region. Finally, many neutrons will be ejected from the jet, which suggests that signals from the neutron decays may be observed as the delayed bump of the light curve of the afterglow or gamma rays.

  7. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2015-03-15

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  8. DAMAS Processing for a Phased Array Study in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Plassman, Gerald e.

    2010-01-01

    A jet noise measurement study was conducted using a phased microphone array system for a range of jet nozzle configurations and flow conditions. The test effort included convergent and convergent/divergent single flow nozzles, as well as conventional and chevron dual-flow core and fan configurations. Cold jets were tested with and without wind tunnel co-flow, whereas, hot jets were tested only with co-flow. The intent of the measurement effort was to allow evaluation of new phased array technologies for their ability to separate and quantify distributions of jet noise sources. In the present paper, the array post-processing method focused upon is DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources) for the quantitative determination of spatial distributions of noise sources. Jet noise is highly complex with stationary and convecting noise sources, convecting flows that are the sources themselves, and shock-related and screech noise for supersonic flow. The analysis presented in this paper addresses some processing details with DAMAS, for the array positioned at 90 (normal) to the jet. The paper demonstrates the applicability of DAMAS and how it indicates when strong coherence is present. Also, a new approach to calibrating the array focus and position is introduced and demonstrated.

  9. Studying the Dynamics of Non-stationary Jet Streams Formation in the Northern Hemisphere Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emtsev, Sergey; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Barodka, Siarhei

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we investigate dynamics of non-stationary jets formation in troposphere by means of mesoscale simulations in the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) modeling system, analyzing jet streams that affected the territory of Belarus over the time period of 2010-2012. For that purpose, we perform modeling on domains with 5 km, 3 km and 1 km grid steps and 35 vertical coordinate levels with an upper boundary of 10 hPa. We focus our attention to identification of basic regularities in formation, movements and transformations of jet streams, as well as to analysis of their characteristic features, geographical position and underlying atmospheric processes and their classification. On the basis of these regularities, we define basic meteorological parameters that can be used to directly or indirectly (as well as qualitatively and quantitatively) identify the presence of jet streams in the specific region of troposphere, and also to determine their localization, stage of development and other characteristics. Furthermore, we estimate energetic parameters of the identified jet streams and their impact on synoptic situation in the surrounding region. Analyzing meteorological fields obtained from satellite observations, we elaborate a methodology of operational detection and localization of non-stationary jet streams from satellite data. Validation of WRF modeling results with these data proves that mesoscale simulations with WRF are able to provide quite successful forecasts of non-stationary tropospheric jet streams occurrence and also determination of their localization and main characteristics up to 3 days in advance.

  10. Jets in air-jet family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The A-jet families on Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiments were analyzed by the study of jets which are reconstructed by a grouping procedure. It is demonstrated that large-E sub J R sub J events are characterized by small number of jets and two-jet like asymmetric shape, binocular events and the other type. This type has a larger number of jets and more symmetrical shape in the P sub t plane.

  11. A Study of the Unstable Modes in High Mach Number Gaseous Jets and Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Gene Marcel

    1993-01-01

    Instabilities affecting the propagation of supersonic gaseous jets have been studied using high resolution computer simulations with the Piecewise-Parabolic-Method (PPM). These results are discussed in relation to jets from galactic nuclei. These studies involve a detailed treatment of a single section of a very long jet, approximating the dynamics by using periodic boundary conditions. Shear layer simulations have explored the effects of shear layers on the growth of nonlinear instabilities. Convergence of the numerical approximations has been tested by comparing jet simulations with different grid resolutions. The effects of initial conditions and geometry on the dominant disruptive instabilities have also been explored. Simulations of shear layers with a variety of thicknesses, Mach numbers and densities perturbed by incident sound waves imply that the time for the excited kink modes to grow large in amplitude and disrupt the shear layer is taug = (546 +/- 24) (M/4)^{1.7 } (Apert/0.02) ^{-0.4} delta/c, where M is the jet Mach number, delta is the half-width of the shear layer, and A_ {pert} is the perturbation amplitude. For simulations of periodic jets, the initial velocity perturbations set up zig-zag shock patterns inside the jet. In each case a single zig-zag shock pattern (an odd mode) or a double zig-zag shock pattern (an even mode) grows to dominate the flow. The dominant kink instability responsible for these shock patterns moves approximately at the linear resonance velocity, nu_ {mode} = cextnu_ {relative}/(cjet + c_ {ext}). For high resolution simulations (those with 150 or more computational zones across the jet width), the even mode dominates if the even penetration is higher in amplitude initially than the odd perturbation. For low resolution simulations, the odd mode dominates even for a stronger even mode perturbation. In high resolution simulations the jet boundary rolls up and large amounts of external gas are entrained into the jet. In low

  12. A CFD study of gas-solid jet in a CFB riser flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Guenther, Chris

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a gas–solid jet in a high-density riser flow were conducted. The impact of gas–solid injection on the riser flow hydrodynamics was investigated with respect to voidage, tracer mass fractions, and solids velocity distribution. The behaviors of a gas–solid jet in the riser crossflow were studied through the unsteady numerical simulations. Substantial separation of the jetting gas and solids in the riser crossflow was observed. Mixing of the injected gas and solids with the riser flow was investigated and backmixing of gas and solids was evaluated. In the current numerical study, both the overall hydrodynamics of riser flow and the characteristics of gas–solid jet were reasonably predicted compared with the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  13. Jet azimuthal decorrelation studies with the D-zero detector

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.

    1996-10-01

    Experimental results on the measurement of the azimuthal decorrelation between jets with pseudorapidity separation up to five units are presented. The data were taken at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during the 1992-1993 collider run with the D{null} detector using {ital p{anti p}} collisions at center-of-mass energy {radical}{ital s} = 1.8 TeV. These results are compared to next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD predictions and to two leading-log approximations (LLA) where the leading terms are resummed to all orders in {alpha}{sub s}. The final state jets as predicted by NLO QCD show less azimuthal decorrelation than the data. The parton showering LLA Monte Carlo HERWIG describes the data well; an analytical LLA calculation based on Balitsky-Faclin-Kuraev-Lipatov resummation predicts more decorrelation than is present in the data.

  14. Theoretical study of reactive and nonreactive turbulent coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Wakelyn, N. T.

    1976-01-01

    The hydrodynamic properties and the reaction kinetics of axisymmetric coaxial turbulent jets having steady mean quantities are investigated. From the analysis, limited to free turbulent boundary layer mixing of such jets, it is found that the two-equation model of turbulence is adequate for most nonreactive flows. For the reactive flows, where an allowance must be made for second order correlations of concentration fluctuations in the finite rate chemistry for initially inhomogeneous mixture, an equation similar to the concentration fluctuation equation of a related model is suggested. For diffusion limited reactions, the eddy breakup model based on concentration fluctuations is found satisfactory and simple to use. The theoretical results obtained from these various models are compared with some of the available experimental data.

  15. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  16. Zwitterionic biphenyl quinone methides in photodehydration reactions of 3-hydroxybiphenyl derivatives: laser flash photolysis and antiproliferation study.

    PubMed

    Basarić, Nikola; Cindro, Nikola; Bobinac, Damir; Uzelac, Lidija; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata; Kralj, Marijeta; Wan, Peter

    2012-02-01

    In aqueous media, photochemical excitation to S(1) of 3-phenylphenols 4-8 leads to deprotonation of the phenol OH, coupled with protonation of the benzyl alcohol and overall dehydration that delivers zwitterions 17-21. The zwitterions react with nucleophiles (CH(3)OH, CF(3)CH(2)OH and ethanolamine) converting them in high quantum yields to the corresponding adducts and photosolvolysis products (for photomethanolysis Φ~0.1-0.5). Zwitterions 20 and 21 were characterized by laser flash photolysis in CH(3)CN-H(2)O (τ~7.5 and 25 μs, respectively) and the associated quenching rate constants with nucleophiles azide and ethanolamine determined. In vitro studies of antiproliferative activity of the photochemicaly generated QMs and zwitterions formed from 2-, 3- and 4-phenylphenols were carried out on three human cancer cell lines HCT 116 (colon), MCF-7 (breast), and H 460 (lung). Irradiation of cells incubated with 3, 6, and 26 showed enhanced antiproliferative activity compared to the cells that were not irradiated. PMID:22212815

  17. Predictability of prototype flash flood events in the Western Mediterranean under uncertainties of the precursor upper-level disturbance: the HYDROPTIMET case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, R.; Martín, A.; Homar, V.; Alonso, S.; Ramis, C.

    2005-07-01

    The HYDROPTIMET case studies (9-10 June 2000 Catalogne, 8-9 September 2002 Cévennes and 24-26 November 2002 Piémont) appear to encompass a sort of prototype flash-flood situations in the western Mediterranean attending to the relevant synoptic and mesoscale signatures identified on the meteorological charts. In Catalogne, the convective event was driven by a low-pressure system of relatively small dimensions developed over the mediterranean coast of Spain that moved into southern France. For Cévennes, the main circulation pattern was a synoptic-scale Atlantic low which induced a persistent southerly low-level jet (LLJ) over the western Mediterranean, strengthened by the Alps along its western flank, which guaranteed continuous moisture supply towards southern France where the long-lived, quasistationary convective system developed. The long Piémont episode, very representative of the most severe alpine flash flood events, shares some similarities with the Cévennes situation during its first stage in that it was controlled by a southerly moist LLJ associated with a large-scale disturbance located to the west. However, these circulation features were transient aspects and during the second half of the episode the situation was dominated by a cyclogenesis process over the Mediterranean which gave place to a mesoscale-size depression at surface that acted to force new heavy rain over the slopes of the Alps and maritime areas. That is, the Piémont episode can be catalogued as of mixed type with regard to the responsible surface disturbance, evolving from a large-scale pattern with remote action (like Cévennes) to a mesoscale pattern with local action (like Catalogne). A prominent mid-tropospheric trough or cut-off low can be identified in all events prior and during the period of heavy rain, which clearly served as the precursor agent for the onset of the flash-flood conditions and the cyclogenesis at low-levels. Being aware of the uncertainty in the

  18. Laboratory Studies of Magnetically Driven, Radiatively Cooled Supersonic Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergey V.

    2010-05-01

    Results of the recent experiments with radiatively cooled jets performed on the pulsed power MAGPIE facility (1.5MA, 250ns) at Imperial College will be presented. The experiments are scalable to astrophysical flows in that critical dimensionless numbers such as the plasma collisionality, the plasma beta, Reynolds number and the magnetic Reynolds number are all in the astrophysically appropriate ranges. The experimental results will be compared with computer simulations performed with laboratory plasma codes and with astrophysical codes. The main part of the presentation will concentrate on the dynamics of magnetically driven jets, in particular on formation of episodic outflows [1]. The experimental results show the periodic ejections of magnetic bubbles naturally evolving into a heterogeneous jet propagating inside a channel made of self-collimated magnetic cavities. Experimental data on the energy balance in the magnetically driven jets, the conversion of the Poynting flux energy into kinetic energy of the outflow, will be also presented. *) In collaboration with A. CIARDI, F.A. SUZUKI-VIDAL, S.N. BLAND, M. BOCCHI, G. BURDIAK, J.P. CHITTENDEN, P. de GROUCHY, G. HALL, A. HARVEY-THOMSON, A. MAROCCHINO, G. SWADLING, A. FRANK, E. G. BLACKMAN, C. STEHLE, M. CAMENZIND. This research was sponsored by EPSRC, by the OFES DOE, by the NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-02NA00057 and by the European Community's Marie Curie Actions within the JETSET network under Contract No. MRTNCT- 2004 005592. References [1] A. Ciardi, S.V. Lebedev, A. Frank et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 691: L147-L150 (2009).

  19. Long Penetration Mode Counterflowing Jets for Supersonic Slender Configurations - A Numerical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary; Chang, Chau-Layn; Zichettello, Benjamin; Bilyeu, David L.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach of using counterflowing jets positioned strategically on the aircraft and exploiting its long penetration mode (LPM) of interaction towards sonic-boom mitigation forms the motivation for this study. Given that most previous studies on the counterflowing LPM jet have all been on blunt bodies and at high supersonic or hypersonic flow conditions, exploring the feasibility to obtain a LPM jet issuing from a slender body against low supersonic freestream conditions is the main focus of this study. Computational fluid dynamics computations of axisymmetric models (cone-cylinder and quartic geometry), of relevance to NASA's High Speed project, are carried out using the space-time conservation element solution element viscous flow solver with unstructured meshes. A systematic parametric study is conducted to determine the optimum combination of counterflowing jet size, mass flow rate, and nozzle geometry for obtaining LPM jets. Details from these computations will be used to assess the potential of the LPM counterflowing supersonic jet as a means of active flow control for enabling supersonic flight over land and to establish the knowledge base for possible future implementation of such technologies.

  20. An experimental study on jets issuing from elliptic inclined nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New, T. H.

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on an experimental flow visualisation and digital particle image velocimetry investigation on forced jets exhausting from aspect ratio equal to three elliptic nozzles with exits inclined at 30° and 60°. Flow images show that shear layer instabilities and subsequent vortex roll-ups are formed parallel to the inclined nozzle exits at 30° incline and that rapid re-orientation of the vortex roll-ups occurs at 60° incline. Flow observations also show that strong axis-switching occurs in a non-inclined elliptic nozzle. However, 30° and 60° elliptic inclined nozzles produce significant distortions to and suppression of the axis-switching behaviour, respectively. As a result, flow stresses and turbulent kinetic energy distributions become increasingly asymmetric. Their coherency and magnitudes along the shorter nozzle lengths also vary significantly. This can be attributed to the dissimilar formations of vortex roll-ups and rib structures, as well as unequal mutual interactions between them as the incline-angle increases. Lastly, results also show that unlike circular inclined nozzles, elliptic inclined nozzles do not produce serpentine-shaped jet columns nor lead to significant lateral jet-spread at large incline-angles.

  1. Study of lubricant jet flow phenomena in spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.; Mross, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Lubricant jet flow impingement and penetration depth into a gear tooth space were measured at 4920 and 2560 rpm using a 8.89 cm (3.5 inch) pitch diameter 8 pitch spur gear at oil pressures from 70,000 to 410,000 n/sqm (10 psi to 60 psi). A high speed motion picture camera was used with xenon and high speed stroboscopic lights to slow down and stop the motion of the oil jet. An analytical model was developed for the vectorial impingement dept and for the impingement depth with tooth space windage effects included. The windage effects for oil drop size greater than .0076 cm (.003 inches). The analytical impingement dept compared favorably with experimental results above an oil jet pressure of 70,000 n/sqm (10psi). There was further penetration into the tooth space after impingement, but much of this oil was thrown out of the tooth space without further contacting the gear teeth.

  2. Establishing a mountain flash flood forecasting/warning strategy through case studies in different climatic regions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qinghua; Yang, Dawen

    2015-04-01

    Flash flood is one of the most common natural hazards in China, particularly in mountainous areas, causing heavy damages and casualties. However, mountain flash flood forecast remains challenging due to its short response time and the limited monitoring capacity over ungauged regions. This paper aims at assessing the predictability of flash flood in mountainous watersheds in humid, semi-humid and semi-arid regions of China. To access the applicability of flood forecast based on the rain-gauge network, we implement a distributed hydrological model (GBHM) over several mountainous catchments in China with drainage area of 5 to 2882 km2. The response time of flood is first derived using typical rainstorm, and the low limit of catchment area for flash flood forecast based on the rain-gauge network is determined through the intercomparison over different spatial scales. For those catchments smaller than the lowest limit, people can only escape from the flash floods by warning rather than by forecast due to the short response time. Hence the flash flood warning (FFN) method is introduced. Implement of the FFN needs to determine the rainfall threshold that may be different due to the antecedent soil moisture status. Based on the GBHM simulation using the historical rainfall data, we introduced an appropriate method to determine the FFN rainfall threshold in different climatic regions in China. The results show that the rainfall threshold decreases significantly with the antecedent soil moisture in the humid regions, while it keeps constant approximately in different soil wet conditions in the semi-arid regions.

  3. Flash-Type Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  4. Statistical Evolution of the Lightning Flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Cohen, M.; Said, R.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Natural lightning is one of the most fascinating and powerful electrical processes on Earth. To date, the physics behind this natural phenomenon are not fully understood, due primarily to the difficulty of obtaining measurements inside thunderstorms and to the wide range of timescales involved (from nanoseconds to seconds). Our aim is to use accurate lightning geo-location data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) to study statistical patterns in lightning, taking advantage of the fact that millions of lightning flashes occur around the globe every day. We present two sets of results, one involving the patterns of flashes in a storm, and a second involving the patterns of strokes in a flash. These patterns can provide a surrogate measure of the timescales and the spatial extents of the underlying physical processes. First, we study the timescales of charge buildup inside thunderstorms. We find that, following a lightning flash, the probability of another neighboring flash decreases and takes tens of seconds to recover. We find that this suppression effect is a function of flash type, stroke peak current, cloud-to-ground (CG) stroke multiplicity, and other lightning and geographical parameters. We find that the probabilities of subsequent flashes are more suppressed following oceanic lightning, or following flashes with higher peak currents and/or higher multiplicities (for CG flashes). Second, we use NLDN data to study the evolution of the strokes within a CG flash. A CG flash typically includes multiple return strokes, which can occur in the same channel or in multiple channels within a few kilometers. We cluster NLDN stroke data into flashes and produce the probability density function of subsequent strokes as a function of distance and time-delays relative to the previous stroke. Using this technique, we investigate processes which occur during the CG lightning flash with nanosecond to millisecond timescales. For instance, our results suggest

  5. Theoretical study of refraction effects on noise produced by turbulent jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, E. W.; Graham, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    The transmission of acoustic disturbances from the interior of a jet into the ambient air is studied. The jet is assumed infinitely long with mean velocity profile independent of streamwise location. The noise generator is a sequence of transient sources drifting with the local fluid and confined to a short length of the jet. In Part 1, supersonic jets are considered. Numerical results for mean-square pressure versus angle in the far-field show unexpected peaks which are very sharp. Analysis of simplified models indicates that these are complex quasi-resonant effects which appear to the stationary observer in a high frequency range. The peaks are real for the idealized model, but would be smoothed by mathematical integration over source position, velocity, and frequency. Subsonic jets were considered in part 2, and a preliminary study of the near-field was attempted. Mean-square radial displacements (or mean radial energy flow or space-time correlations of radial pressure gradient) are first found for very simple cases. The most difficult case studied is a sequence of transient sources at the center of a uniform-velocity circular cylindrical jet. Here a numerical triple integration is required and seems feasible although only preliminary results for mean square radial displacement are now available. These preliminary results show disturbances decreasing with increasing radial distance, and with increasing distance upstream and downstream from the source. A trend towards greater downstream disturbances appears even in the near field.

  6. An experimental study of the autoignition characteristics of conventional jet fuel/oxidizer mixtures: Jet-A and JP-8

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2010-04-15

    Ignition delay times of Jet-A/oxidizer and JP-8/oxidizer mixtures are measured using a heated rapid compression machine at compressed charge pressures corresponding to 7, 15, and 30 bar, compressed temperatures ranging from 650 to 1100 K, and equivalence ratios varying from 0.42 to 2.26. When using air as the oxidant, two oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratios of 13 and 19 are investigated. To achieve higher compressed temperatures for fuel lean mixtures (equivalence ratio of {proportional_to}0.42), argon dilution is also used and the corresponding oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratio is 84.9. For the conditions studied, experimental results show two-stage ignition characteristics for both Jet-A and JP-8. Variations of both the first-stage and overall ignition delays with compressed temperature, compressed pressure, and equivalence ratio are reported and correlated. It is noted that the negative temperature coefficient phenomenon becomes more prominent at relatively lower pressures. Furthermore, the first-stage-ignition delay is found to be less sensitive to changes in equivalence ratio and primarily dependent on temperature. (author)

  7. Numerical Study of a Continuum Sonic Jet Interacting with a Rarefield Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christoper E.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a numerical study with flow and boundary conditions based on an experiment of a continuum sonic jet interacting with rarefied flow about a sharp leading edge flat plate at zero incidence are presented. Comparisons are made between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solutions which provide an assessment of applying each technique to the flow conditions of the experiment. An analysis of the CFD results revealed a correlation between the interaction interface of the jet continuum breakdown surface and a non-dimensional parameter derived from jet and free stream flow conditions. Using the breakdown surface from the correlation, the continuum jet was uncoupled from the interaction, thus allowing an uncoupled CFD-DSMC solution to be obtained. Also, a nearest neighbor collision algorithm, similar to the subcell technique, was implemented in the DSMC solution technique. The comparison between CFD and DSMC results shows good qualitative agreement in the interaction region and good quantitative agreement elsewhere.

  8. Unconditional jetting.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2008-08-01

    Capillary jetting of a fluid dispersed into another immiscible phase is usually limited by a critical capillary number, a function of the Reynolds number and the fluid property ratios. Critical conditions are set when the minimum spreading velocity of small perturbations v_{-};{*} along the jet (marginal stability velocity) is zero. Here we identify and describe parametric regions of high technological relevance, where v_{-};{*}>0 and the jet flow is always supercritical independently of the dispersed liquid flow rate; within these relatively broad regions, the jet does not undergo the usual dripping-jetting transition, so that either the jet can be made arbitrarily thin (yielding droplets of any imaginably small size), or the issuing flow rate can be made arbitrarily small. In this work, we provide illustrative analytical studies of asymptotic cases for both negligible and dominant inertia forces. In this latter case, requiring a nonzero jet surface velocity, axisymmetric perturbation waves "surf" downstream for all given wave numbers, while the liquid bulk can remain static. In the former case (implying small Reynolds flow) we found that the jet profile small slope is limited by a critical value; different published experiments support our predictions. PMID:18850933

  9. Impact of septal flash and left ventricle contractile reserve on positive remodeling during 1 year cardiac resynchronization therapy: the multicenter ViaCRT study

    PubMed Central

    Gąsior, Zbigniew; Płońska-Gościniak, Edyta; Wita, Krystian; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Szwed, Hanna; Kasprzak, Jarosław; Tomaszewski, Andrzej; Sinkiewicz, Władysław; Wojciechowska, Celina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure (HFREF). However, the relatively high non-responder rate results in a need for more precise qualification for CRT. The ViaCRT study was designed to determine the role of contractile reserve and dyssynchrony parameters in predicting CRT response. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the effect of baseline septal flash and contractile reserve (CR) on clinical and echocardiographic parameters of response to CRT in 12-month follow-up. Material and methods One hundred thirty-three guideline-selected CRT candidates (both ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction) were enrolled in the study. Baseline study population characteristics were: left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) 25 ±6%, QRS 165 ±25 ms, NYHA class III (90%) and IV (10%). Results In subjects with septal flash (SF) registered before CRT implantation improvement in LVEF (14 ±2% vs. 8 ±1%, p < 0.05) and left ventricle (LV) systolic (63 ±10 ml vs. 36 ±6 ml, p < 0.05) and diastolic (46 ±10 ml vs. 32 ±7, p < 0.05) volumes was more pronounced than in patients without SF. In patients with CR (defined as LVEF increase by 20% or 4 viable segments) improvement in echo parameters was not significantly different then in the CR– group. Neither SF nor CR was associated with improvement in NYHA class. Subgroup analysis revealed that only in non-ischemic HF patients is presence of septal flash associated with LV function improvement after CRT. Conclusions In non-ischemic HF patients septal flash is a helpful parameter in prediction of LV remodeling after 12 months of resynchronization therapy. PMID:27186179

  10. Compilation and Review of Supersonic Business Jet Studies from 1963 through 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides a compilation of all known supersonic business jet studies/activities conducted from 1963 through 1995 by university, industry and the NASA. First, an overview is provided which chronologically displays all known supersonic business jet studies/activities conducted by universities, industry, and the NASA along with the key features of the study vehicles relative to configuration, planform, operation parameters, and the source of study. This is followed by a brief description of each study along with some comments on the study. Mention will be made as to whether the studies addressed cost, market needs, and the environmental issues of airport-community noise, sonic boom, and ozone.