Science.gov

Sample records for flavin reductase component

  1. Structural Basis of Free Reduced Flavin Generation by Flavin Reductase from Thermus thermophilus HB8*

    PubMed Central

    Imagawa, Takahito; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Sugimoto, Yasushi; Aki, Kenji; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Tsuge, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Free reduced flavins are involved in a variety of biological functions. They are generated from NAD(P)H by flavin reductase via co-factor flavin bound to the enzyme. Although recent findings on the structure and function of flavin reductase provide new information about co-factor FAD and substrate NAD, there have been no reports on the substrate flavin binding site. Here we report the structure of TTHA0420 from Thermus thermophilus HB8, which belongs to flavin reductase, and describe the dual binding mode of the substrate and co-factor flavins. We also report that TTHA0420 has not only the flavin reductase motif GDH but also a specific motif YGG in C terminus as well as Phe-41 and Arg-11, which are conserved in its subclass. From the structure, these motifs are important for the substrate flavin binding. On the contrary, the C terminus is stacked on the NADH binding site, apparently to block NADH binding to the active site. To identify the function of the C-terminal region, we designed and expressed a mutant TTHA0420 enzyme in which the C-terminal five residues were deleted (TTHA0420-ΔC5). Notably, the activity of TTHA0420-ΔC5 was about 10 times higher than that of the wild-type enzyme at 20–40 °C. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal region of TTHA0420 may regulate the alternative binding of NADH and substrate flavin to the enzyme. PMID:22052907

  2. Expression and characterization of ferredoxin and flavin adenine dinucleotide binding domains of the reductase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Blazyk, Jessica L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2002-12-31

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) catalyzes the selective oxidation of methane to methanol, the first step in the primary catabolic pathway of methanotrophic bacteria. A reductase (MMOR) mediates electron transfer from NADH through its FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors to the dinuclear non-heme iron sites housed in a hydroxylase (MMOH). The structurally distinct [2Fe-2S], FAD, and NADH binding domains of MMOR facilitated division of the protein into its functional ferredoxin (MMOR-Fd) and FAD/NADH (MMOR-FAD) component domains. The 10.9 kDa MMOR-Fd (MMOR residues 1-98) and 27.6 kDa MMOR-FAD (MMOR residues 99-348) were expressed and purified from recombinant Escherichia coli systems. The Fd and FAD domains have absorbance spectral features identical to those of the [2Fe-2S] and flavin components, respectively, of MMOR. Redox potentials, determined by reductive titrations that included indicator dyes, for the [2Fe-2S] and FAD cofactors in the domains are as follows: -205.2 +/- 1.3 mV for [2Fe-2S](ox/red), -172.4 +/- 2.0 mV for FAD(ox/sq), and -266.4 +/- 3.5 mV for FAD(sq/hq). Kinetic and spectral properties of intermediates observed in the reaction of oxidized MMOR-FAD (FAD(ox)) with NADH at 4 degrees C were established with stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy. Analysis of the influence of pH on MMOR-FAD optical spectra, redox potentials, and NADH reaction kinetics afforded pK(a) values for the semiquinone (FAD(sq)) and hydroquinone (FAD(hq)) MMOR-FAD species and two protonatable groups near the flavin cofactor. Electron transfer from MMOR-FAD(hq) to oxidized MMOR-Fd is extremely slow (k = 1500 M(-1) s(-1) at 25 degrees C, compared to 90 s(-1) at 4 degrees C for internal electron transfer between cofactors in MMOR), indicating that cofactor proximity is essential for efficient interdomain electron transfer. PMID:12501207

  3. Unusual folded conformation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide bound to flavin reductase P.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J. J.; Tu, S. C.; Barbour, L. J.; Barnes, C. L.; Krause, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    The 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of flavin reductase P with the inhibitor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) bound in the active site has been determined. NAD adopts a novel, folded conformation in which the nicotinamide and adenine rings stack in parallel with an inter-ring distance of 3.6 A. The pyrophosphate binds next to the flavin cofactor isoalloxazine, while the stacked nicotinamide/adenine moiety faces away from the flavin. The observed NAD conformation is quite different from the extended conformations observed in other enzyme/NAD(P) structures; however, it resembles the conformation proposed for NAD in solution. The flavin reductase P/NAD structure provides new information about the conformational diversity of NAD, which is important for understanding catalysis. This structure offers the first crystallographic evidence of a folded NAD with ring stacking, and it is the first enzyme structure containing an FMN cofactor interacting with NAD(P). Analysis of the structure suggests a possible dynamic mechanism underlying NADPH substrate specificity and product release that involves unfolding and folding of NADP(H). PMID:10493573

  4. Conversion of NfsA, the Major Escherichia coli Nitroreductase, to a Flavin Reductase with an Activity Similar to That of Frp, a Flavin Reductase in Vibrio harveyi, by a Single Amino Acid Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Zenno, Shuhei; Kobori, Toshiro; Tanokura, Masaru; Saigo, Kaoru

    1998-01-01

    NfsA is the major oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase of Escherichia coli, similar in amino acid sequence to Frp, a flavin reductase of Vibrio harveyi. Here, we show that a single amino acid substitution at position 99, which may destroy three hydrogen bonds in the putative active center, transforms NfsA from a nitroreductase into a flavin reductase that is as active as the authentic Frp and a tartrazine reductase that is 30-fold more active than wild-type NfsA. PMID:9440535

  5. Fre Is the Major Flavin Reductase Supporting Bioluminescence from Vibrio harveyi Luciferase in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Zachary T.; Baldwin, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike the vast majority of flavoenzymes, bacterial luciferase requires an exogenous source of reduced flavin mononucleotide for bioluminescence activity. Within bioluminescent bacterial cells, species-specific oxidoreductases are believed to provide reduced flavin for luciferase activity. The source of reduced flavin in Escherichia coli-expressing bioluminescence is not known. There are two candidate proteins potentially involved in this process in E. coli, a homolog of the Vibrio harveyi Frp oxidoreductase, NfsA, and a luxG type oxidoreductase, Fre. Using single gene knock-out strains, we show that deletion of fre decreased light output by greater than two orders of magnitude, yet had no effect on luciferase expression in E. coli. Purified Fre is capable of supporting bioluminescence in vitro with activity comparable to that with the endogenous V. harveyi reductase (Frp), using either FMN or riboflavin as substrate. In a pull-down experiment, we found that neither Fre nor Frp co-purify with luciferase. In contrast to prior work, we find no evidence for stable complex formation between luciferase and oxidoreductase. We conclude that in E. coli, an enzyme primarily responsible for riboflavin reduction (Fre) can also be utilized to support high levels of bioluminescence. PMID:19139094

  6. Distinguishing two groups of flavin reductases by analyzing the protonation state of an active site carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Cortez, Néstor; Matthias Ullmann, G

    2011-07-01

    Flavin-containing reductases are involved in a wide variety of physiological reactions such as photosynthesis, nitric oxide synthesis, and detoxification of foreign compounds, including therapeutic drugs. Ferredoxin-NADP(H)-reductase (FNR) is the prototypical enzyme of this family. The fold of this protein is highly conserved and occurs as one domain of several multidomain enzymes such as the members of the diflavin reductase family. The enzymes of this family have emerged as fusion of a FNR and a flavodoxin. Although the active sites of these enzymes are very similar, different enzymes function in opposite directions, that is, some reduce oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) and some oxidize reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). In this work, we analyze the protonation behavior of titratable residues of these enzymes through electrostatic calculations. We find that a highly conserved carboxylic acid in the active site shows a different titration behavior in different flavin reductases. This residue is deprotonated in flavin reductases present in plastids, but protonated in bacterial counterparts and in diflavin reductases. The protonation state of the carboxylic acid may also influence substrate binding. The physiological substrate for plastidic enzymes is NADP(+), but it is NADPH for the other mentioned reductases. In this article, we discuss the relevance of the environment of this residue for its protonation and its importance in catalysis. Our results allow to reinterpret and explain experimental data. PMID:21538544

  7. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Recombinant Flavin Reductase from the Luminescent Marine Bacterium "Photobacterium Leiognathi": A Set of Exercises for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    In "Photobacterium," the flavin reductase encoded by "lux"G regenerates the reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Reduced FMN is one of the substrates of the luciferase enzyme that catalyzes a light-emitting reaction. A set of experiments, that employs a "lux"G-expression plasmid construct (pGhis) and is suitable for an undergraduate…

  8. Role of active site loop in coenzyme binding and flavin reduction in cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Mothersole, Robert G; Meints, Carla E; Louder, Alex; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2016-09-15

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) contains a loop within the active site (comprising Asp(634), Ala(635), Arg(636) and Asn(637); human CPR numbering) that relocates upon NADPH binding. Repositioning of the loop triggers the reorientation of an FAD-shielding tryptophan (Trp(679)) to a partially stacked conformer, reducing the energy barrier for displacement of the residue by the NADPH nicotinamide ring: an essential step for hydride transfer. We used site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis to investigate if the amino acid composition of the loop influences the catalytic properties of CPR. The D634A and D634N variants elicited a modest increase in coenzyme binding affinity coupled with a 36- and 10-fold reduction in cytochrome c(3+) turnover and a 17- and 3-fold decrease in the pre-steady state rate of flavin reduction. These results, in combination with a reduction in the kinetic isotope effect for hydride transfer, suggest that diminished activity is due to destabilization of the partially stacked conformer of Trp(677) and slower release of NADP(+). In contrast, R636A, R636S and an A635G/R636S double mutant led to a modest increase in cytochrome c(3+) reduction, which is linked to weaker coenzyme binding and faster interflavin electron transfer. A potential mechanism by which Arg(636) influences catalysis is discussed. PMID:27461959

  9. NMR structure of the flavin domain from soluble methane monooxygenase reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Chatwood, Lisa L; Müller, Jens; Gross, John D; Wagner, Gerhard; Lippard, Stephen J

    2004-09-28

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the hydroxylation of methane by dioxygen to methanol, the first step in carbon assimilation by methanotrophs. This multicomponent system transfers electrons from NADH through a reductase component to the non-heme diiron center in the hydroxylase where O(2) is activated. The reductase component comprises three distinct domains, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin domain along with FAD- and NADH-binding domains. We report the solution structure of the reduced 27.6 kDa FAD- and NADH-binding domains (MMOR-FAD) of the reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). The FAD-binding domain consists of a six-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel and one alpha-helix, with the first 10 N-terminal residues unstructured. In the interface between the two domains, the FAD cofactor is tightly bound in an unprecedented extended conformation. The NADH-binding domain consists of a five-stranded parallel beta-sheet with four alpha-helices packing closely around this sheet. MMOR-FAD is structurally homologous to other FAD-containing oxidoreductases, and we expect similar structures for the FAD/NADH-binding domains of reductases that occur in other multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:15379538

  10. Electron transfer from flavin to iron in the Pseudomonas oleovorans rubredoxin reductase-rubredoxin electron transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Basran, J; Scrutton, N S

    1998-11-01

    Rubredoxin reductase (RR) and rubredoxin form a soluble and physiological eT complex. The complex provides reducing equivalents for a membrane-bound omega-hydroxylase, required for the hydroxylation of alkanes and related compounds. The gene (alkT) encoding RR has been overexpressed and the enzyme purified in amounts suitable for studies of eT by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The eT reactions from NADH to the flavin of RR and from reduced RR to the 1Fe and 2Fe forms of rubredoxin have been characterized by transient kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. The reductive half-reaction proceeds in a one-step reaction involving oxidized enzyme and a two-electron-reduced enzyme-NAD+ charge-transfer complex. Flavin reduction is observed at 450 nm and charge-transfer formation at 750 nm; both steps are hyperbolically dependent on NADH concentration. The limiting flavin reduction rate (180 +/- 4 s-1) is comparable to the limiting rate for charge-transfer formation (189 +/- 7 s-1) and analysis at 450 and 750 nm yielded enzyme-NADH dissociation constants of 36 +/- 2 and 43 +/- 5 microM, respectively. Thermodynamic analysis of the reductive half-reaction yielded values for changes in entropy (DeltaS = -65.8 +/- 2.2 J mol-1 K-1), enthalpy (DeltaH = 37.8 +/- 0.6 kJ mol-1) and Gibbs free energy (DeltaG = 57.5 +/- 0.7 kJ mol-1 at 298 K) during hydride ion transfer to the flavin N5 atom. Spectral analysis of mixtures of 1Fe or 2Fe rubredoxin and RR suggest that conformational changes accompany eT complex assembly. Both the 1Fe (nonphysiological) and 2Fe (physiological) forms of rubredoxin were found to oxidize two electron-reduced rubredoxin reductase with approximately equal facility. Rates for the reduction of rubredoxin are hyperbolically dependent on rubredoxin concentration and the limiting rates are 72. 7 +/- 0.6 and 55.2 +/- 0.3 s-1 for the 1Fe and 2Fe forms, respectively. Analysis of the temperature dependence of eT to rubredoxin using eT theory revealed that the reaction is not

  11. Structural and biochemical characterization of EDTA monooxygenase and its physical interaction with a partner flavin reductase.

    PubMed

    Jun, Se-Young; Lewis, Kevin M; Youn, Buhyun; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2016-06-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is currently the most abundant organic pollutant due to its recalcitrance and extensive use. Only a few bacteria can degrade it, using EDTA monooxygenase (EmoA) to initiate the degradation. EmoA is an FMNH2 -dependent monooxygenase that requires an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase (EmoB) to provide FMNH2 as a cosubstrate. Although EmoA has been identified from Chelativorans (ex. Mesorhizobium) sp. BNC1, its catalytic mechanism is unknown. Crystal structures of EmoA revealed a domain-like insertion into a TIM-barrel, which might serve as a flexible lid for the active site. Docking of MgEDTA(2-) into EmoA identified an intricate hydrogen bond network connected to Tyr(71) , which should potentially lower its pKa. Tyr(71) , along with nearby Glu(70) and a peroxy flavin, facilitates a keto-enol transition of the leaving acetyl group of EDTA. Further, for the first time, the physical interaction between EmoA and EmoB was observed by ITC, molecular docking and enzyme kinetic assay, which enhanced both EmoA and EmoB activities probably through coupled channelling of FMNH2 . PMID:26928990

  12. Purification and properties of the NADH reductase component of alkene monooxygenase from Mycobacterium strain E3.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, F J; van Berkel, W J; Hartmans, S; de Bont, J A

    1992-01-01

    Alkene monooxygenase, a multicomponent enzyme system which catalyzes the epoxidation of short-chain alkenes, is induced in Mycobacterium strain E3 when it is grown on ethene. We purified the NADH reductase component of this enzyme system to homogeneity. Recovery of the enzyme was 19%, with a purification factor of 920-fold. The enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 56 kDa as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It is yellow-red with absorption maxima at 384, 410, and 460 nm. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) was identified as a prosthetic group at a FAD-protein ratio of 1:1. Tween 80 prevented irreversible dissociation of FAD from the enzyme during chromatographic purification steps. Colorimetric analysis revealed 2 mol each of iron and acid-labile sulfide, indicating the presence of a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The presence of this cluster was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (g values at 2.011, 1.921, and 1.876). Anaerobic reduction of the reductase by NADH resulted in formation of a flavin semiquinone. Images PMID:1315734

  13. Defining the Role of the NADH-Cytochrome-b5 Reductase 3 in the Mitochondrial Amidoxime Reducing Component Enzyme System.

    PubMed

    Plitzko, Birte; Havemeyer, Antje; Bork, Bettina; Bittner, Florian; Mendel, Ralf; Clement, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The importance of the mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC)-containing enzyme system in N-reductive metabolism has been studied extensively. It catalyzes the reduction of various N-hydroxylated compounds and therefore acts as the counterpart of cytochrome P450- and flavin-containing monooxygenase-catalyzed oxidations at nitrogen centers. This enzyme system was found to be responsible for the activation of amidoxime and N-hydroxyguanidine prodrugs in drug metabolism. The synergy of three components (mARC, cytochrome b5, and the appropriate reductase) is crucial to exert the N-reductive catalytic effect. Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of the specific isoforms of the molybdoenzyme mARC and the electron transport protein cytochrome b5 in N-reductive metabolism. To date, the corresponding reductase involved in N-reductive metabolism has yet to be defined because previous investigations have presented ambiguous results. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown in human cells and assessing the stoichiometry of the enzyme system reconstituted in vitro, we provide evidence that NADH-cytochrome-b5 reductase 3 is the principal reductase involved in the mARC enzyme system and is an essential component of N-reductive metabolism in human cells. In addition, only minimal levels of cytochrome-b5 reductase 3 protein are sufficient for catalysis, which impeded previous attempts to identify the reductase. PMID:27469001

  14. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and thioredoxin reductase are involved in 5-nitroimidazole activation while flavin metabolism is linked to 5-nitroimidazole resistance in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Burgess, Anita G.; Dunn, Linda A.; Krauer, Kenia G.; Tan, Kevin; Duchêne, Michael; Upcroft, Peter; Eckmann, Lars; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mechanism of action of, and resistance to, metronidazole in the anaerobic (or micro-aerotolerant) protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia has long been associated with the reduction of ferredoxin (Fd) by the enzyme pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the subsequent activation of metronidazole by Fd to toxic radical species. Resistance to metronidazole has been associated with down-regulation of PFOR and Fd. The aim of this study was to determine whether the PFOR/Fd couple is the only pathway involved in metronidazole activation in Giardia. Methods PFOR and Fd activities were measured in extracts of highly metronidazole-resistant (MTRr) lines and activities of recombinant G. lamblia thioredoxin reductase (GlTrxR) and NADPH oxidase were assessed for their involvement in metronidazole activation and resistance. Results We demonstrated that several lines of highly MTRr G. lamblia have fully functional PFOR and Fd indicating that PFOR/Fd-independent mechanisms are involved in metronidazole activation and resistance in these cells. Flavin-dependent GlTrxR, like TrxR of other anaerobic protozoa, reduces 5-nitroimidazole compounds including metronidazole, although expression of TrxR is not decreased in MTRr Giardia. However, reduction of flavins is suppressed in highly MTRr cells, as evidenced by as much as an 80% decrease in NADPH oxidase flavin mononucleotide reduction activity. This suppression is consistent with generalized impaired flavin metabolism in highly MTRr Trichomonas vaginalis. Conclusions These data add to the mounting evidence against the dogma that PFOR/Fd is the only couple with a low enough redox potential to reduce metronidazole in anaerobes and point to the multi-factorial nature of metronidazole resistance. PMID:21602576

  15. Camphor pathway redux: functional recombinant expression of 2,5- and 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenases of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453 with their cognate flavin reductase catalyzing Baeyer-Villiger reactions.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Hiroaki; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Leisch, Hannes; Morley, Krista; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C K

    2013-05-01

    Whereas the biochemical properties of the monooxygenase components that catalyze the oxidation of 2,5-diketocamphane and 3,6-diketocamphane (2,5-DKCMO and 3,6-DKCMO, respectively) in the initial catabolic steps of (+) and (-) isomeric forms of camphor (CAM) metabolism in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453 are relatively well characterized, the actual identity of the flavin reductase (Fred) component that provides the reduced flavin to the oxygenases has hitherto been ill defined. In this study, a 37-kDa Fred was purified from a camphor-induced culture of P. putida ATCC 17453 and this facilitated cloning and characterization of the requisite protein. The active Fred is a homodimer with a subunit molecular weight of 18,000 that uses NADH as an electron donor (Km = 32 μM), and it catalyzes the reduction of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) (Km = 3.6 μM; kcat = 283 s(-1)) in preference to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) (Km = 19 μM; kcat = 128 s(-1)). Sequence determination of ∼40 kb of the CAM degradation plasmid revealed the locations of two isofunctional 2,5-DKCMO genes (camE25-1 for 2,5-DKCMO-1 and camE25-2 for 2,5-DKCMO-2) as well as that of a 3,6-DKCMO-encoding gene (camE36). In addition, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the CAM plasmid was established to be linear and ∼533 kb in length. To enable functional assessment of the two-component monooxygenase system in Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, recombinant plasmids expressing Fred in tandem with the respective 2,5-DKCMO- and 3,6-DKCMO-encoding genes in Escherichia coli were constructed. Comparative substrate profiling of the isofunctional 2,5-DCKMOs did not yield obvious differences in Baeyer-Villiger biooxidations, but they are distinct from 3,6-DKCMO in the stereoselective oxygenations with various mono- and bicyclic ketone substrates. PMID:23524667

  16. Role of a novel dual flavin reductase (NR1) and an associated histidine triad protein (DCS-1) in menadione-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kwasnicka-Crawford, Dorota A.; Vincent, Steven R. . E-mail: svincent@interchg.ubc.ca

    2005-10-21

    Microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase catalyzes the one-electron transfer from NADPH via FAD and FMN to various electron acceptors, such as cytochrome P450s or to some anti-cancer quinone drugs. This results in generation of free radicals and toxic oxygen metabolites, which can contribute to the cytotoxicity of these compounds. Recently, a cytosolic NADPH-dependent flavin reductase, NR1, has been described which is highly homologous to the microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we show that over-expression of NR1 in human embryonic kidney cells enhances the cytotoxic action of the model quinone, menadione. Furthermore, we show that a novel human histidine triad protein DCS-1, which is expressed together with NR1 in many tissues, can significantly reduce menadione-induced cytotoxicity in these cells. We also show that DCS-1 binds NF1 and directly modulates its activity. These results suggest that NR1 may play a role in carcinogenicity and cell death associated with one-electron reductions.

  17. Identification of Up- and Down-Regulated Proteins in Pemetrexed-Resistant Human Lung Adenocarcinoma: Flavin Reductase and Calreticulin Play Key Roles in the Development of Pemetrexed-Associated Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, Jing-Yi; Lin, Dai-Ying; Wen, Yueh-Feng; Lin, Chi-Chen; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Chung, Ting-Wen; Liao, En-Chi; Chen, Ying-Jen; Wei, Yu-Shan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2015-11-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major causes of cancer chemotherapy failure. In the current study, we used a pair of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, A549 and the pemetrexed-resistant A549/PEM cells, as a model to monitor resistance-dependent cellular responses and identify potential therapeutic targets. By means of 2D differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we investigated the global protein expression alterations induced by pemetrexed treatment and resistance. The proteomic result revealed that pemetrexed exposure obviously altered the expression of 81 proteins in the A549 cells, whereas no significant response was observed in the similarly treated A549/PEM cells, hence implying an association between these proteins and the drug-specific response. Moreover, 72 proteins including flavin reductase and calreticulin demonstrated differential expression between the A549 and A549/PEM cells, indicating baseline resistance. Additional tests employed siRNA silencing, protein overexpression, cell viability analysis, and analysis of apoptosis to examine and confirm the potency of flavin reductase and calreticulin proteins in the development of pemetrexed resistance. In summary, by using a proteomic approach, we identified numerous proteins, including flavin reductase and calreticulin, involved in pemetrexed drug resistance-developing mechanisms. Our results provide useful diagnostic markers and therapeutic candidates for pemetrexed-resistant lung cancer treatment. PMID:26452990

  18. Domain engineering of the reductase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Blazyk, Jessica L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2004-02-13

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is a three-component enzyme system that catalyzes the conversion of methane to methanol. A reductase (MMOR), which contains [2Fe-2S] and FAD cofactors, facilitates electron transfer from NADH to the hydroxylase diiron active sites where dioxygen activation and substrate hydroxylation take place. By separately expressing the ferredoxin (MMORFd, MMOR residues 1-98) and FAD/NADH (MMOR-FAD, MMOR residues 99-348) domains of the reductase, nearly all biochemical properties of full-length MMOR are retained, except for interdomain electron transfer rates. To investigate the extent to which rapid electron transfer between domains might be restored and further to explore the modularity of MMOR, MMOR-Fd and MMOR-FAD were connected in a non-native fashion. Four different linker sequences were employed to create MMOR reversed-domain (MMOR-RD) constructs, MMOR(99-342)-linker-MMOR(2-98), with a domain connectivity observed in other homologous oxidoreductases. The optical, redox, and electron transfer properties of the four MMOR-RD proteins were characterized and compared with those of wild-type MMOR. The linker sequence plays a key role in controlling solvent accessibility to the FAD cofactor, as evidenced by perturbed flavin optical spectra, decreased FADox/FADsq redox potentials, and increased steady-state oxidase activities in three of the constructs. Stopped-flow optical spectroscopy revealed slow interdomain electron transfer (k < 0.04 s(-1) at 4 degrees C, compared with 90 s(-1) for wild-type MMOR) for all three MMOR-RD proteins with 7-residue linkers. A long (14-residue), flexible linker afforded much faster electron transfer between the FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors (k = 0.9 s(-1) at 4 degrees C). PMID:14613937

  19. Suppression of electron transfer to dioxygen by charge transfer and electron transfer complexes in the FAD-dependent reductase component of toluene dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzong-Yuan; Werther, Tobias; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger

    2012-11-01

    The three-component toluene dioxygenase system consists of an FAD-containing reductase, a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a Rieske-type dioxygenase. The task of the FAD-containing reductase is to shuttle electrons from NADH to the ferredoxin, a reaction the enzyme has to catalyze in the presence of dioxygen. We investigated the kinetics of the reductase in the reductive and oxidative half-reaction and detected a stable charge transfer complex between the reduced reductase and NAD(+) at the end of the reductive half-reaction, which is substantially less reactive toward dioxygen than the reduced reductase in the absence of NAD(+). A plausible reason for the low reactivity toward dioxygen is revealed by the crystal structure of the complex between NAD(+) and reduced reductase, which shows that the nicotinamide ring and the protein matrix shield the reactive C4a position of the isoalloxazine ring and force the tricycle into an atypical planar conformation, both factors disfavoring the reaction of the reduced flavin with dioxygen. A rapid electron transfer from the charge transfer complex to electron acceptors further reduces the risk of unwanted side reactions, and the crystal structure of a complex between the reductase and its cognate ferredoxin shows a short distance between the electron-donating and -accepting cofactors. Attraction between the two proteins is likely mediated by opposite charges at one large patch of the complex interface. The stability, specificity, and reactivity of the observed charge transfer and electron transfer complexes are thought to prevent the reaction of reductase(TOL) with dioxygen and thus present a solution toward conflicting requirements. PMID:22992736

  20. Recombinant expression and biochemical characterization of an NADPH:flavin oxidoreductase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Bruchhaus, I; Richter, S; Tannich, E

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding a putative NADPH:flavin oxidoreductase of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (Eh34) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant protein (recEh34) has a molecular mass of about 35 kDa upon SDS/PAGE analysis, exhibits a flavoprotein-like absorption spectrum and contains 1 mol of non-covalently bound FMN per mol of protein. RecEh34 reveals two different enzymic activities. It catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well as of disulphides such as 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and cystine. The disulphide reductase but not the H2O2-forming NADPH oxidase activity is inhibitable by sulphydryl-active compounds, indicating that a thiol component is part of the active site for the disulphide reductase activity, whereas for the H2O2-forming NADPH oxidase activity only the flavin is required. Compared with the recombinant protein, similar activities are present in amoebic extracts. Native Eh34 is active in a monomeric as well as in a dimeric state. In contrast to recEh34, no flavin was associated with the native protein. However, both NADPH oxidase as well as DTNB reductase activity were found to be dependent on the addition of FAD or FMN. PMID:9494088

  1. Enhancement of photophysical and photosensitizing properties of flavin adenine dinucleotide by mutagenesis of the C-terminal extension of a bacterial flavodoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Valle, Lorena; Abatedaga, Inés; Vieyra, Faustino E Morán; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2015-03-16

    The role of the mobile C-terminal extension present in Rhodobacter capsulatus ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (RcFPR) was evaluated using steady-state and dynamic spectroscopies for both intrinsic Trp and FAD in a series of mutants in the absence of NADP(H). Deletion of the six C-terminal amino acids beyond Ala266 was combined with the replacement A266Y to emulate the structure of plastidic reductases. Our results show that these modifications of the wild-type RcFPR produce subtle global conformational changes, but strongly reduce the local rigidity of the FAD-binding pocket, exposing the isoalloxazine ring to the solvent. Thus, the ultrafast charge-transfer quenching of (1) FAD* by the conserved Tyr66 residue was absent in the mutant series, producing enhancement of the excited singlet- and triplet-state properties of FAD. This work highlights the delicate balance of the specific interactions between FAD and the surrounding amino acids, and how the functionality and/or photostability of redox flavoproteins can be modified. PMID:25641205

  2. Identification of the genes encoding NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductases that are similar in sequence to Escherichia coli Fre in four species of luminous bacteria: Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio orientalis.

    PubMed Central

    Zenno, S; Saigo, K

    1994-01-01

    Genes encoding NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductases (flavin reductases) similar in both size and sequence to Fre, the most abundant flavin reductase in Escherichia coli, were identified in four species of luminous bacteria, Photorhabdus luminescens (ATCC 29999), Vibrio fischeri (ATCC 7744), Vibrio harveyi (ATCC 33843), and Vibrio orientalis (ATCC 33934). Nucleotide sequence analysis showed Fre-like flavin reductases in P. luminescens and V. fischeri to consist of 233 and 236 amino acids, respectively. As in E. coli Fre, Fre-like enzymes in luminous bacteria preferably used riboflavin as an electron acceptor when NADPH was used as an electron donor. These enzymes also were good suppliers of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) to the bioluminescence reaction. In V. fischeri, the Fre-like enzyme is a minor flavin reductase representing < 10% of the total FMN reductase. That the V. fischeri Fre-like enzyme has no appreciable homology in amino acid sequence to the major flavin reductase in V. fischeri, FRase I, indicates that at least two different types of flavin reductases supply FMNH2 to the luminescence system in V. fischeri. Although Fre-like flavin reductases are highly similar in sequence to luxG gene products (LuxGs), Fre-like flavin reductases and LuxGs appear to constitute two separate groups of flavin-associated proteins. Images PMID:8206831

  3. Biochemical Characterization of Inducible 'Reductase' Component of Benzoate Dioxygenase and Phthalate Isomer Dioxygenases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4.

    PubMed

    Karandikar, Rohini; Badri, Abinaya; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-09-01

    The first step involved in the degradation of phthalate isomers (phthalate, isophthalate and terephthalate) is the double hydroxylation by respective aromatic-ring hydroxylating dioxygenases. These are two component enzymes consisting of 'oxygenase' and 'reductase' components. Soil isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4 degrades phthalate isomers via protocatechuate and benzoate via catechol 'ortho' ring cleavage pathway. Metabolic studies suggest that strain PP4 has carbon source-specific inducible phthalate isomer dioxygenase and benzoate dioxygenase. Thus, it was of interest to study the properties of reductase components of these enzymes. Reductase activity from phthalate isomer-grown cells was 3-5-folds higher than benzoate grown cells. In-gel activity staining profile showed a reductase activity band of R f 0.56 for phthalate isomer-grown cells as compared to R f 0.73 from benzoate-grown cells. Partially purified reductase components from phthalate isomer grown cells showed K m in the range of 30-40 μM and V max = 34-48 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). However, reductase from benzoate grown cells showed K m = 49 μM and V max = 10 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). Strikingly similar molecular and kinetic properties of reductase component from phthalate isomer-grown cells suggest that probably the same reductase component is employed in three phthalate isomer dioxygenases. However, reductase component is different, with respect to kinetic properties and zymogram analysis, from benzoate-grown cells when compared to that from phthalate isomer grown cells of PP4. PMID:26201480

  4. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, J S; Gaines, C G; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1982-01-01

    Reduction of the iron in ferriagrobactin by the cytoplasmic fraction of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strictly required NaDH as the reductant. Addition of flavin mononucleotide and anaerobic conditions were necessary for the reaction; when added with flavin mononucleotide, magnesium was stimulatory. This ferrisiderophore reductase activity may be a part of the iron assimilation process in A. tumefaciens. PMID:7056702

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Naphthalenediimide-Functionalized Flavin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Zainalabdeen, Nada; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Kareem, Mohanad Mousa; Nandwana, Vikas; Cooke, Graeme; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Two acceptor–acceptor dyads have been synthesized featuring a flavin moiety and a naphthalenediimide (NDI) unit. The NDI unit is linked to the flavin through a short spacer group via either the N(3) or N(10) positions of the flavin. We have investigated the UV-Vis and redox properties of these multi-electron accepting systems which indicate that these materials display the collective properties of their component systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements have revealed that their emission properties are dominated by the flavin unit. PMID:23552831

  6. Synthesis and characterization of naphthalenediimide-functionalized flavin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zainalabdeen, Nada; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Kareem, Mohanad Mousa; Nandwana, Vikas; Cooke, Graeme; Rotello, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    Two acceptor-acceptor dyads have been synthesized featuring a flavin moiety and a naphthalenediimide (NDI) unit. The NDI unit is linked to the flavin through a short spacer group via either the N(3) or N(10) positions of the flavin. We have investigated the UV-Vis and redox properties of these multi-electron accepting systems which indicate that these materials display the collective properties of their component systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements have revealed that their emission properties are dominated by the flavin unit. PMID:23552831

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a ferredoxin reductase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ying; Xu, Feng; Bell, Stephen G.; Wong, Luet-Lok; Rao, Zihe

    2007-05-01

    Palustrisredoxin reductase (RPA3782, PuR), a flavin-dependent ferredoxin reductase, is an essential component of the Class I cytochrome P450 systems in Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009. Crystals of PuR that diffract to 2.2 Å resolution have been obtained. Palustrisredoxin reductase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009, a member of the oxygenase-coupled NADH-dependent ferredoxin reductase (ONFR) family, catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ferredoxins. It is an essential component of the cytochrome P450 systems in R. palustris CGA009, a model organism with diverse metabolic pathways. Here, the crystallization of palustrisredoxin reductase is reported. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.5, b = 107.5, c = 69.9 Å, and diffract to 2.2 Å resolution on a synchrotron source.

  8. Vibrio harveyi NADPH-flavin oxidoreductase: cloning, sequencing and overexpression of the gene and purification and characterization of the cloned enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Lei, B; Liu, M; Huang, S; Tu, S C

    1994-01-01

    NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductases (flavin reductases) from luminous bacteria catalyze the reduction of flavin by NAD(P)H and are believed to provide the reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) for luciferase in the bioluminescence reaction. By using an oligonucleotide probe based on the partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Vibrio harveyi NADPH-FMN oxidoreductase (flavin reductase P), a recombinant plasmid, pFRP1, was obtained which contained the frp gene encoding this enzyme. The DNA sequence of the frp gene was determined; the deduced amino acid sequence for flavin reductase P consists of 240 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 26,312. The frp gene was overexpressed, apparently through induction, in Escherichia coli JM109 cells harboring pFRP1. The cloned flavin reductase P was purified to homogeneity by following a new and simple procedure involving FMN-agarose chromatography as a key step. The same chromatography material was also highly effective in concentrating diluted flavin reductase P. The purified enzyme is a monomer and is unusual in having a tightly bound FMN cofactor. Distinct from the free FMN, the bound FMN cofactor showed a diminished A375 peak and a slightly increased 8-nm red-shifted A453 peak and was completely or nearly nonfluorescent. The Kms for FMN and NADPH and the turnover number of this flavin reductase were determined. In comparison with other flavin reductases and homologous proteins, this flavin reductase P shows a number of distinct features with respect to primary sequence, redox center, and/or kinetic mechanism. Images PMID:8206832

  9. Inhibitory effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe derived components on aldose reductase activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kato, Atsushi; Higuchi, Yasuko; Goto, Hirozo; Kizu, Haruhisa; Okamoto, Tadashi; Asano, Naoki; Hollinshead, Jackie; Nash, Robert J; Adachi, Isao

    2006-09-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) continues to be used as an important cooking spice and herbal medicine around the world. Scientific research has gradually verified the antidiabetic effects of ginger. Especially gingerols, which are the major components of ginger, are known to improve diabetes including the effect of enhancement against insulin-sensitivity. Aldose reductase inhibitors have considerable potential for the treatment of diabetes, without increased risk of hypoglycemia. The assay for aldose reductase inhibitors in ginger led to the isolation of five active compounds including 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanol (2) and 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanoic acid (3). Compounds 2 and 3 were good inhibitors of recombinant human aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 19.2 +/- 1.9 and 18.5 +/- 1.1 microM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds significantly suppressed not only sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes but also lens galactitol accumulation in 30% of galactose-fed cataract rat model. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the applicable side alkyl chain length and the presence of a C3 OCH3 group in the aromatic ring are essential features for enzyme recognition and binding. These results suggested that it would contribute to the protection against or improvement of diabetic complications for a dietary supplement of ginger or its extract containing aldose reductase inhibitors. PMID:16939321

  10. Flavins secreted by roots of iron-deficient Beta vulgaris enable mining of ferric oxide via reductive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sisó-Terraza, Patricia; Rios, Juan J; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Álvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is abundant in soils but generally poorly soluble. Plants, with the exception of Graminaceae, take up Fe using an Fe(III)-chelate reductase coupled to an Fe(II) transporter. Whether or not nongraminaceous species can convert scarcely soluble Fe(III) forms into soluble Fe forms has deserved little attention so far. We have used Beta vulgaris, one among the many species whose roots secrete flavins upon Fe deficiency, to study whether or not flavins are involved in Fe acquisition. Flavins secreted by Fe-deficient plants were removed from the nutrient solution, and plants were compared with Fe-sufficient plants and Fe-deficient plants without flavin removal. Solubilization of a scarcely soluble Fe(III)-oxide was assessed in the presence or absence of flavins, NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form) or plant roots, and an Fe(II) trapping agent. The removal of flavins from the nutrient solution aggravated the Fe deficiency-induced leaf chlorosis. Flavins were able to dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide in the presence of NADH. The addition of extracellular flavins enabled roots of Fe-deficient plants to reductively dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide. We concluded that root-secretion of flavins improves Fe nutrition in B. vulgaris. Flavins allow B. vulgaris roots to mine Fe from Fe(III)-oxides via reductive mechanisms. PMID:26351005

  11. Electron-transfer reactions of the reductase component of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Kopp, D A; Gassner, G T; Blazyk, J L; Lippard, S J

    2001-12-11

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the hydroxylation of methane by dioxygen to afford methanol and water, the first step of carbon assimilation in methanotrophic bacteria. This enzyme comprises three protein components: a hydroxylase (MMOH) that contains a dinuclear nonheme iron active site; a reductase (MMOR) that facilitates electron transfer from NADH to the diiron site of MMOH; and a coupling protein (MMOB). MMOR uses a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor and a [2Fe-2S] cluster to mediate electron transfer. The gene encoding MMOR was cloned from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and expressed in Escherichia coli in high yield. Purified recombinant MMOR was indistinguishable from the native protein in all aspects examined, including activity, mass, cofactor content, and EPR spectrum of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Redox potentials for the FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors, determined by reductive titrations in the presence of indicator dyes, are FAD(ox/sq), -176 +/- 7 mV; FAD(sq/hq), -266 +/- 15 mV; and [2Fe-2S](ox/red), -209 +/- 14 mV. The midpoint potentials of MMOR are not altered by the addition of MMOH, MMOB, or both MMOH and MMOB. The reaction of MMOR with NADH was investigated by stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy, and the kinetic and spectral properties of intermediates are described. The effects of pH on the redox properties of MMOR are described and exploited in pH jump kinetic studies to measure the rate constant of 130 +/- 17 s(-)(1) for electron transfer between the FAD and [2Fe-2S] cofactors in two-electron-reduced MMOR. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters determined significantly extend our understanding of the sMMO system. PMID:11732913

  12. Biochemical predetermination of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase components of the nitric oxide cycle.

    PubMed

    Reutov, V P

    1999-05-01

    This review presents some aspects of a concept of cellular evolution bearing a relationship to nitrate--nitrite respiration, the endosymbiosis theory, and the origin of NO synthase and nitrite reductase activity in heme-containing proteins. Analysis of structural and functional unity of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase systems suggests that these systems did not arise without any relation to evolutionarily ancient energetic systems of cells. The use of symmetry principles reveals commonalities among many electron transport chains which in the language of physics is called "invariance". This work also comparatively analyzes the nitric oxide cycle and the known nitrogen cycle. The ideas about evolution of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase systems developed here are clearly compatible with the endosymbiotic theory and the hypothesis that nitrate--nitrite respiration was a precursor of oxygen-dependent respiration. PMID:10381613

  13. The Diverse Roles of Flavin Coenzymes - Nature’s Most Versatile Thespians

    PubMed Central

    Mansoorabadi, Steven O.; Thibodeaux, Christopher J.; Liu, Hung-wen

    2008-01-01

    Flavin coenzymes play a variety of roles in biological systems. This Perspective highlights the chemical versatility of flavins by reviewing research on five flavoenzymes that have been studied in our laboratory. Each of the enzymes discussed in this review (the acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACDs), CDP-6-deoxy-L-threo-D-glycero-4-hexulose-3-dehydrase reductase (E3), CDP-4-aceto-3,6-dideoxygalactose synthase (YerE), UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM), and type II isopentenyl diphosphate:dimethylallyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI-2)) utilize flavin in a distinct role. In particular, the catalytic mechanisms of two of these enzymes, UGM and IDI-2, may involve novel flavin chemistry. PMID:17580897

  14. Ratiometric detection of enzyme turnover and flavin reduction using rare-earth upconverting phosphors.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Peter; Oakland, Chloë; Driscoll, Max D; Hay, Sam; Natrajan, Louise S

    2014-04-14

    Gd4O2S:Yb:Tm rare-earth upconversion phosphors have been utilised to monitor the redox behaviour of flavin mononucleotide and report on the turnover of a flavo-protein, (pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase). The presence of two bands separated by over 300 nm in the UCP emission spectra allows ratiometric signalling of these processes with high sensitivity. PMID:24531569

  15. Thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system of Streptomyces clavuligerus: sequences, expression, and organization of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Yanko, M; Mislovati, M; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Av-Gay, Y; Aharonowitz, Y

    1993-01-01

    The genes that encode thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase of Streptomyces clavuligerus were cloned, and their DNA sequences were determined. Previously, we showed that S. clavuligerus possesses a disulfide reductase with broad substrate specificity that biochemically resembles the thioredoxin oxidoreductase system and may play a role in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics. It consists consists of two components, a 70-kDa NADPH-dependent flavoprotein disulfide reductase with two identical subunits and a 12-kDa heat-stable protein general disulfide reductant. In this study, we found, by comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences, that the 35-kDa protein is in fact thioredoxin reductase; it shares 48.7% amino acid sequence identity with Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase, the 12-kDa protein is thioredoxin, and it shares 28 to 56% amino acid sequence identity with other thioredoxins. The streptomycete thioredoxin reductase has the identical cysteine redox-active region--Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys--and essentially the same flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADPH dinucleotide-binding sites as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and is partially able to accept E. coli thioredoxin as a substrate. The streptomycete thioredoxin has the same cysteine redox-active segment--Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys--that is present in virtually all eucaryotic and procaryotic thioredoxins. However, in vivo it is unable to donate electrons to E. coli methionine sulfoxide reductase and does not serve as a substrate in vitro for E. coli thioredoxin reductase. The S. clavuligerus thioredoxin (trxA) and thioredoxin reductase (trxB) genes are organized in a cluster. They are transcribed in the same direction and separated by 33 nucleotides. In contrast, the trxA and trxB genes of E. coli, the only other organism in which both genes have been characterized, are physically widely separated. Images PMID:8349555

  16. Methemoglobinemia and eccentrocytosis in equine erythrocyte flavin adenine dinucleotide deficiency.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J W; Stockham, S L; Scott, M A; Johnson, P J; Donald, J J; Chandler, C J

    2003-11-01

    This report describes erythrocyte biochemical findings in an adult Spanish mustang mare that exhibited persistent methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis that were not related to the consumption or administration of an exogenous oxidant. The methemoglobinemia was attributed to a deficiency in cytochrome-b5 reductase (Cb5R) activity, and the eccentrocytes and pyknocytes were attributed to a marked deficiency in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutathione reductase (GR) activity that resulted in decreased reduced glutathione concentration within erythrocytes. The GR activity increased to a near-normal value after addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to the enzyme assay, indicating a deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes. The methemoglobinemia, eccentrocytosis, and pyknocytosis were attributed to deficiency of FAD in erythrocytes because the GR and Cb5R enzymes use FAD as a cofactor. This deficiency in FAD results from a defect in erythrocyte riboflavin metabolism, which has not been documented previously in animals. PMID:14608016

  17. Biosynthesis of flavin cofactors in man: implications in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Barile, Maria; Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Brizio, Carmen; Panebianco, Concetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Galluccio, Michele; Vergani, Lodovica; Eberini, Ivano; Gianazza, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2, i.e. riboflavin, in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, reductases and oxidases involved in energetic metabolism, redox homeostasis and protein folding as well as in diverse regulatory events. Deficiency of riboflavin in men and experimental animal models has been linked to several diseases, including neuromuscular and neurological disorders and cancer. Riboflavin at pharmacological doses has been shown to play unexpected and incompletely understood regulatory roles. Besides a summary on riboflavin uptake and a survey on riboflavin-related diseases, the main focus of this review is on discovery and characterization of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) and other components of the cellular networks that ensure flavin cofactor homeostasis.Special attention is devoted to the problem of sub-cellular compartmentalization of cofactor synthesis in eukaryotes, made possible by the existence of different FAD synthase isoforms and specific molecular components involved in flavin trafficking across sub-cellular membranes.Another point addressed in this review is the mechanism of cofactor delivery to nascent apo-proteins, especially those localized into mitochondria, where they integrate FAD in a process that involves additional mitochondrial protein(s) still to be identified. Further efforts are necessary to elucidate the role of riboflavin/FAD network in human pathologies and to exploit the structural differences between human and microbial/fungal FAD synthase as the rational basis for developing novel antibiotic/antimycotic drugs. PMID:23116402

  18. Response surface optimization of the critical medium components for carbonyl reductase production by Candida viswanathii MTCC 5158.

    PubMed

    Soni, Pankaj; Singh, Manpreet; Kamble, Ashwini L; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2007-03-01

    Culture conditions were optimized for the growth and carbonyl reductase production by a novel yeast strain Candida viswanathii. Response surface methodology was applied for the critical medium components (initial pH, mannitol, yeast extract and calcium chloride) identified earlier by one-factor-at-a-time approach. Central composite design was used for the optimization studies. Using this methodology, the optimal values for the concentration of mannitol, initial pH, yeast extract and calcium chloride were 1.9, 7.5, 1.6 and 4, respectively. This medium was projected to produce, theoretically, growth having an optical density of 1.1 (600 nm) and an enzyme activity of 81.5 U/ml. Using this optimized medium, an experimental growth of 1.1 OD (600 nm) and enzyme activity 80.9 U/ml verified the applied methodology. This approach for medium optimization led to an enhancement of the growth and enzyme activity by 1.3 and 2.3 times higher, respectively, as compared to the unoptimized media. PMID:16697185

  19. UbiX is a flavin prenyltransferase required for bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Mark D.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Fisher, Karl; Marshall, Stephen A.; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Trivedi, Drupad K.; Goodacre, Royston; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquinone (also known as coenzyme Q) is a ubiquitous lipid-soluble redox cofactor that is an essential component of electron transfer chains. Eleven genes have been implicated in bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis, including ubiX and ubiD, which are responsible for decarboxylation of the 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate precursor. Despite structural and biochemical characterization of UbiX as a flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding protein, no decarboxylase activity has been detected. Here we report that UbiX produces a novel flavin-derived cofactor required for the decarboxylase activity of UbiD. UbiX acts as a flavin prenyltransferase, linking a dimethylallyl moiety to the flavin N5 and C6 atoms. This adds a fourth non-aromatic ring to the flavin isoalloxazine group. In contrast to other prenyltransferases, UbiX is metal-independent and requires dimethylallyl-monophosphate as substrate. Kinetic crystallography reveals that the prenyltransferase mechanism of UbiX resembles that of the terpene synthases. The active site environment is dominated by π systems, which assist phosphate-C1' bond breakage following FMN reduction, leading to formation of the N5-C1' bond. UbiX then acts as a chaperone for adduct reorientation, via transient carbocation species, leading ultimately to formation of the dimethylallyl C3'-C6 bond. Our findings establish the mechanism for formation of a new flavin-derived cofactor, extending both flavin and terpenoid biochemical repertoires.

  20. Flavin Redox Switching of Protein Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Moxley, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Flavin cofactors impart remarkable catalytic diversity to enzymes, enabling them to participate in a broad array of biological processes. The properties of flavins also provide proteins with a versatile redox sensor that can be utilized for converting physiological signals such as cellular metabolism, light, and redox status into a unique functional output. The control of protein functions by the flavin redox state is important for transcriptional regulation, cell signaling pathways, and environmental adaptation. A significant number of proteins that have flavin redox switches are found in the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain family and include flavoproteins that act as photosensors and respond to changes in cellular redox conditions. Biochemical and structural studies of PAS domain flavoproteins have revealed key insights into how flavin redox changes are propagated to the surface of the protein and translated into a new functional output such as the binding of a target protein in a signaling pathway. Mechanistic details of proteins unrelated to the PAS domain are also emerging and provide novel examples of how the flavin redox state governs protein–membrane interactions in response to appropriate stimuli. Analysis of different flavin switch proteins reveals shared mechanistic themes for the regulation of protein structure and function by flavins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1079–1091. PMID:21028987

  1. Characterization of the second prosthetic group of the flavoenzyme NADH-acceptor reductase (component C) of the methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-01-01

    1. A new two-step purification is described that routinely yields 100mg quantities of component C for biochemical studies. 2. Chemical analyses show component C purified by this procedure to contain 2 g-atoms of iron, 2 mol of acid-labile sulphide (S) and 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein. 3. The Fe-S core of component C was extruded by treating the protein with p-methoxybenzenethiol in hexamethyl phosphoramide/50mM-Tris/HCl buffer, pH 8.5 (4:1, v/v), under anaerobic conditions. The spectral properties of the extruded core suggest that component C contains 1 mol of [2Fe-2S(S-Cys)4] centre per mol of protein. 4. E.p.r. spectroscopy confirms the presence of a Fe-S centre in component C. 5. Component C catalyses the reduction by NADH of ferricyanide, 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol or horse heart cytochrome c, with specific activities of 50--230 units/mg of protein. 6. The optimum pH for the NADH-acceptor reductase activity is 8.5--9.0, and the apparent Km values for NADH and NADPH are 0.05mM and 15.5mM respectively. 7. Unlike methane mono-oxygenase activity, NADH-acceptor reductase activity of component C is not inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline or by acetylene. PMID:220953

  2. Loss of nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 impairs stomatal closure by altering genes of core ABA signaling components in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenchen; Cai, Shengguan; Wang, Yizhou; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 determine NO production in plants and are critical to abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure. However, the role for NIA1 and NIA2 in ABA signaling has not been paid much attention in nitrate reductase loss-of-function mutant nia1nia2. Recently, we have demonstrated that ABA-inhibited K(+)in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for stomatal closure in nia1nia2. In this study, we found that mutating NIA1 and NIA2 impaired nearly all the key components of guard cell ABA signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. We also propose a simplified model for ABA signaling in the nia1nia2 mutant. PMID:27171851

  3. Loss of nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 impairs stomatal closure by altering genes of core ABA signaling components in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenchen; Cai, Shengguan; Wang, Yizhou; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 determine NO production in plants and are critical to abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure. However, the role for NIA1 and NIA2 in ABA signaling has not been paid much attention in nitrate reductase loss-of-function mutant nia1nia2. Recently, we have demonstrated that ABA-inhibited K+in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for stomatal closure in nia1nia2. In this study, we found that mutating NIA1 and NIA2 impaired nearly all the key components of guard cell ABA signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. We also propose a simplified model for ABA signaling in the nia1nia2 mutant. PMID:27171851

  4. Secretion of flavins by three species of methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Levinson, Benjamin T; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2010-11-01

    We detected flavins in the growth medium of the methanotrophic bacterium Methylocystis species strain M. Flavin secretion correlates with growth stage and increases under iron starvation conditions. Two other methanotrophs, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), secrete flavins, suggesting that flavin secretion may be common to many methanotrophic bacteria. PMID:20833792

  5. Flavin-sensitized photooxidation of substituted phenols in natural water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Kenji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Wada, Shinji

    1992-01-01

    Photooxidation of substituted phenols in the presence of flavins as sensitizers was investigated under aerobic conditions to determine the fate of synthetic chemicals in the environment. Riboflavin was easily decomposed: lumichrome formed after several minutes of illumination with simulated sunlight. In contrast, lumichrome was extremely stable toward sunlight, and was found to be a major flavin component in natural water. From the result of the lumichrome-sensitized photodecomposition of substituted phenols, the order of photolysis rate is p- methoxyphenol > p- chlorophenol > phenol > p- nitrophenol. A decrease in total organic carbon (TOC) from the reaction solutions of all phenols except for p- nitrophenol was observed, and the carbon released was found to mainly originate from phenols. The compound p- chlorophenol has been shown to degrade readily by lumichrome-sensitized photooxidation, but the transformation occurs only by dechlorination. Polychlorophenols were completely dechlorinated in ˜ 1 hr after lumichrome-sensitized photolysis, and the rate increased with chlorine content on the aromatic ring.

  6. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  7. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins

    PubMed Central

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  8. Coenzyme A disulfide reductase, the primary low molecular weight disulfide reductase from Staphylococcus aureus. Purification and characterization of the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    delCardayre, S B; Stock, K P; Newton, G L; Fahey, R C; Davies, J E

    1998-03-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus does not utilize the glutathione thiol/disulfide redox system employed by eukaryotes and many bacteria. Instead, this organism produces CoA as its major low molecular weight thiol. We report the identification and purification of the disulfide reductase component of this thiol/disulfide redox system. Coenzyme A disulfide reductase (CoADR) catalyzes the specific reduction of CoA disulfide by NADPH. CoADR has a pH optimum of 7.5-8.0 and is a dimer of identical subunits of Mr 49,000 each. The visible absorbance spectrum is indicative of a flavoprotein with a lambdamax = 452 nm. The liberated flavin from thermally denatured enzyme was identified as flavin adenine dinucleotide. Steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that CoADR catalyzes the reduction of CoA disulfide by NADPH at pH 7.8 with a Km for NADPH of 2 muM and for CoA disulfide of 11 muM. In addition to CoA disulfide CoADR reduces 4,4'-diphosphopantethine but has no measurable ability to reduce oxidized glutathione, cystine, pantethine, or H2O2. CoADR demonstrates a sequential kinetic mechanism and employs a single active site cysteine residue that forms a stable mixed disulfide with CoA during catalysis. These data suggest that S. aureus employs a thiol/disulfide redox system based on CoA/CoA-disulfide and CoADR, an unorthodox new member of the pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductase superfamily. PMID:9488707

  9. Fluorescence quenching of flavins by reductive agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Bansal, A. K.; Song, S.-H.; Dick, B.

    2007-07-01

    The fluorescence behaviour of the flavins riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and lumiflavin in aqueous solution at pH 8 in the presence of the reducing agents β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME), dithiothreitol (DTT), and sodium nitrite (NaNO 2) is studied under aerobic conditions. The fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes are determined as a function of the reducing agent concentration. For all three reducing agents diffusion controlled dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed which is thought to be due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. For DTT additionally static fluorescence quenching occurs.

  10. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    PubMed

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation. PMID:26644464

  11. Reversible dissociation of flavin mononucleotide from the mammalian membrane-bound NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I)

    PubMed Central

    Gostimskaya, Irina S.; Grivennikova, Vera G.; Cecchini, Gary; Vinogradov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Conditions for the reversible dissociation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from the membrane-bound mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) are described. The catalytic activities of the enzyme, i.e. rotenone-insensitive NADH:hexaammineruthenium III reductase and rotenone-sensitive NADH:quinone reductase decline when bovine heart submitochondrial particles are incubated with NADH in the presence of rotenone or cyanide at alkaline pH. FMN protects and fully restores the NADH-induced inactivation whereas riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide do not. The data show that the reduction of complex I significantly weakens the binding of FMN to protein thus resulting in its dissociation when the concentration of holoenzyme is comparable with Kd (~10−8 M at pH 10.0). PMID:18037377

  12. Effect of thiol compounds and flavins on mercury and organomercurial degrading enzymes in mercury resistant aquatic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pahan, K.; Ray, S.; Gachhui, R.; Chaudhuri, J.; Mandal, A. )

    1990-02-01

    Plasmid-determined mercuric and organomercurial resistance in microorganisms has been studied by several workers. Mercury reductase, catalyzing the reduction of mercury depends on sulfhydryl compounds. Organomercurial lyase that catalyzes the splitting of C-Hg linkages also needs thiol compounds for its activity. Until recently, no study has been reported on thiol specificity of these enzymes from various sources. In the present study, the authors report on enzymatic volatilization of HgCl{sub 2} by fourteen Hg-resistant bacterial strains. They have also studied thiol specificity of Hg-reductases and organomercurial lyases isolated from the above bacterial species. Hg-reductase is known to have FAD-moiety which stimulates enzyme activity whereas FMN and riboflavin are ineffective in this regard. The effect of flavins, namely FAD, FMN and riboflavin, on Hg-reductase and organomercurial lyase activity is also reported here.

  13. Component A2 of methylcoenzyme M reductase system from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H: nucleotide sequence and functional expression by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhner, C H; Lindenbach, B D; Wolfe, R S

    1993-01-01

    The gene for component A2 of the methylcoenzyme M reductase system from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene for A2, designated atwA, encodes an acidic protein of 59,335 Da. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed partial homology of A2 to a number of eucaryotic and bacterial proteins in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport systems. Component A2 possesses two ATP-binding domains. A 2.2-kb XmaI-BamHI fragment containing atwA and the surrounding open reading frames was cloned into pGEM-7Zf(+). A cell extract from this strain replaced purified A2 from M. thermoautotrophicum delta H in an in vitro methylreductase assay. Images PMID:8491734

  14. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  15. Policosanol safely down-regulates HMG-CoA reductase - potential as a component of the Esselstyn regimen.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2002-09-01

    Many of the wide-ranging health benefits conferred by statin therapy are mediated, not by reductions in LDL cholesterol, but rather by inhibition of isoprenylation reactions essential to the activation of Rho family GTPases; this may be the mechanism primarily responsible for the favorable impact of statins on risk for ischemic stroke, senile dementia, and fractures, as well as the anti-hypertensive and platelet-stabilizing actions of these drugs. Indeed, the extent of these benefits is such as to suggest that most adults would be wise to take statins; however, owing to the significant expense of statin therapy, as well as to the potential for dangerous side effects that mandates regular physician follow-up, this strategy appears impractical. However, policosanol, a mixture of long-chain aliphatic alcohols extractable from sugar cane wax, has shown cholesterol-lowering potency comparable to that of statins, and yet appears to be devoid of toxic risk. Recent evidence indicates that policosanol down-regulates cellular expression of HMG-CoA reductase, and thus has the potential to suppress isoprenylation reactions much like statins do. Consistent with this possibility, the results of certain clinical and animal studies demonstrate that policosanol has many effects analogous to those of statins that are not likely explained by reductions of LDL cholesterol. However, unlike statins, policosanol does not directly inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, and even in high concentrations it fails to down-regulate this enzyme by more than 50% - thus likely accounting for the safety of this nutraceutical. In light of the fact that policosanol is quite inexpensive and is becoming available as a non-prescription dietary supplement, it may represent a practical resource that could enable the general public to enjoy health benefits comparable to those conferred by statins. In a long-term clinical study enrolling patients with significant symptomatic coronary disease, Esselstyn has demonstrated

  16. Catalytic Cycle of Human Glutathione Reductase Near 1 Å Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Faber, H. Richard; Savvides, Savvas N.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2008-09-08

    Efficient enzyme catalysis depends on exquisite details of structure beyond those resolvable in typical medium- and high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Here we report synchrotron-based cryocrystallographic studies of natural substrate complexes of the flavoenzyme human glutathione reductase (GR) at nominal resolutions between 1.1 and 0.95 {angstrom} that reveal new aspects of its mechanism. Compression in the active site causes overlapping van der Waals radii and distortion in the nicotinamide ring of the NADPH substrate, which enhances catalysis via stereoelectronic effects. The bound NADPH and redox-active disulfide are positioned optimally on opposite sides of the flavin for a 1,2-addition across a flavin double bond. The new structures extend earlier observations to reveal that the redox-active disulfide loop in GR is an extreme case of sequential peptide bonds systematically deviating from planarity -- a net deviation of 53 deg. across five residues. But this apparent strain is not a factor in catalysis, as it is present in both oxidized and reduced structures. Intriguingly, the flavin bond lengths in oxidized GR are intermediate between those expected for oxidized and reduced flavin, but we present evidence that this may not be due to the protein environment but instead due to partial synchrotron reduction of the flavin by the synchrotron beam. Finally, of more general relevance, we present evidence that the structures of synchrotron-reduced disulfide bonds cannot generally be used as reliable models for naturally reduced disulfide bonds.

  17. UbiX is a flavin prenyltransferase required for bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    White, Mark D.; Payne, Karl A.P.; Fisher, Karl; Marshall, Stephen A.; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J.W.; Trivedi, Drupad K.; Goodacre, Royston; Rigby, Stephen E.J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinone, or coenzyme Q, is a ubiquitous lipid-soluble redox cofactor that is an essential component of electron transfer chains1. Eleven genes have been implicated in bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis, including ubiX and ubiD, which are responsible for decarboxylation of the 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate precursor2. Despite structural and biochemical characterization of UbiX as an FMN-binding protein, no decarboxylase activity has been detected3–4. We report here that UbiX produces a novel flavin-derived cofactor required for the decarboxylase activity of UbiD5. UbiX acts as a flavin prenyltransferase, linking a dimethylallyl moiety to the flavin N5 and C6 atoms. This adds a fourth non-aromatic ring to the flavin isoalloxazine group. In contrast to other prenyltransferases6–7, UbiX is metal-independent and requires dimethylallyl-monophosphate as substrate. Kinetic crystallography reveals that the prenyl transferase mechanism of UbiX resembles that of the terpene synthases8. The active site environment is dominated by π-systems, which assist phosphate-C1’ bond breakage following FMN reduction, leading to formation of the N5-C1’ bond. UbiX then acts as a chaperone for adduct reorientation, via transient carbocation species, leading ultimately to formation of the dimethylallyl C3’-C6 bond. The study establishes the mechanism for formation of a new flavin-derived cofactor, extending both flavin and terpenoid biochemical repertoire. PMID:26083743

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the ferredoxin reductase component in the Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase system carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, Yuji; Uchimura, Hiromasa; Fujimoto, Zui; Inoue, Kengo; Noguchi, Haruko; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2007-06-01

    The NAD(P)H:ferredoxin oxidoreductase in carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from Janthinobacterium sp. J3 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.60 Å resolution. Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO), which consists of an oxygenase component (CARDO-O) and the electron-transport components ferredoxin (CARDO-F) and ferredoxin reductase (CARDO-R), catalyzes dihydroxylation at the C1 and C9a positions of carbazole. CARDO-R was crystallized at 277 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with the precipitant PEG 8000. Two crystal types (types I and II) were obtained. The type I crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 2.80 Å and belonged to space group P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 158.7, c = 81.4 Å. The type II crystal was obtained in drops from which type I crystals had been removed; it diffracted to 2.60 Å resolution and belonged to the same space group, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 161.8, c = 79.5 Å.

  19. Probing protonation sites of isolated flavins using IR spectroscopy: from lumichrome to the cofactor flavin mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    Langer, Judith; Günther, Alan; Seidenbecher, Sophie; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Dopfer, Otto

    2014-08-25

    Infrared spectra of the isolated protonated flavin molecules lumichrome, lumiflavin, riboflavin (vitamin B2), and the biologically important cofactor flavin mononucleotide are measured in the fingerprint region (600-1850 cm(-1)) by means of IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. Using density functional theory calculations, the geometries, relative energies, and linear IR absorption spectra of several low-energy isomers are calculated. Comparison of the calculated IR spectra with the measured IRMPD spectra reveals that the N10 substituent on the isoalloxazine ring influences the protonation site of the flavin. Lumichrome, with a hydrogen substituent, is only stable as the N1-protonated tautomer and protonates at N5 of the pyrazine ring. The presence of the ribityl unit in riboflavin leads to protonation at N1 of the pyrimidinedione moiety, and methyl substitution in lumiflavin stabilizes the tautomer that is protonated at O2. In contrast, flavin mononucleotide exists as both the O2- and N1-protonated tautomers. The frequencies and relative intensities of the two C=O stretch vibrations in protonated flavins serve as reliable indicators for their protonation site. PMID:24895155

  20. Biochemical characterization of NfsA, the Escherichia coli major nitroreductase exhibiting a high amino acid sequence homology to Frp, a Vibrio harveyi flavin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Zenno, S; Koike, H; Kumar, A N; Jayaraman, R; Tanokura, M; Saigo, K

    1996-01-01

    We identified the nfsA gene, encoding the major oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase in Escherichia coli, and determined its position on the E. coli map to be 19 min. We also purified its gene product, NfsA, to homogeneity. It was suggested that NfsA is a nonglobular protein with a molecular weight of 26,799 and is associated tightly with a flavin mononucleotide. Its amino acid sequence is highly similar to that of Frp, a flavin oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi (B. Lei, M. Liu, S. Huang, and S.-C. Tu, J. Bacteriol. 176:3552-3558, 1994), an observation supporting the notion that E. coli nitroreductase and luminescent-bacterium flavin reductase families are intimately related in evolution. Although no appreciable sequence similarity was detected between two E. coli nitroreductases, NfsA and NfsB, NfsA exhibited a low level of the flavin reductase activity and a broad electron acceptor specificity similar to those of NfsB. NfsA reduced nitrofurazone by a ping-pong Bi-Bi mechanism possibly to generate a two-electron transfer product. PMID:8755878

  1. The ferredoxin-thioredoxin system of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: identification and characterization of thioredoxins and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; de Lamotte-Guery, F.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    The components of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (FT) system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been purified and characterized. The system resembled that of higher plants in consisting of a ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and two types of thioredoxin, a single f and two m species, m1 and m2. The Chlamydomonas m and f thioredoxins were antigenically similar to their higher-plant counterparts, but not to one another. The m thioredoxins were recognized by antibodies to both higher plant m and bacterial thioredoxins, whereas the thioredoxin f was not. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f reacted, although weakly, with the antibody to spinach thioredoxin f. The algal thioredoxin f differed from thioredoxins studied previously in behaving as a basic protein on ion-exchange columns. Purification revealed that the algal thioredoxins had molecular masses (Mrs) typical of thioredoxins from other sources, m1 and m2 being 10700 and f 11500. Chlamydomonas FTR had two dissimilar subunits, a feature common to all FTRs studied thus far. One, the 13-kDa ("similar") subunit, resembled its counterpart from other sources in both size and antigenicity. The other, 10-kDa ("variable") subunit was not recognized by antibodies to any FTR tested. When combined with spinach, (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes, the components of the FT system functioned in the light activation of the standard target enzymes from chloroplasts, corn (Zea mays L.) NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) and spinach fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) as well as the chloroplast-type fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas. Activity was greatest if ferredoxin and other components of the FT system were from Chlamydomonas. The capacity of the Chlamydomonas FT system to activate autologous FBPase indicates that light regulates the photosynthetic carbon metabolism of green algae as in other oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  2. Structure and comparative analysis of the genes encoding component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase in the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Methanothermus fervidus.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, C F; Cram, D S; Sherf, B A; Reeve, J N

    1988-01-01

    A 6-kilobase-pair (kbp) region of the genome of the extremely thermophilic arachaebacterium Methanothermus fervidus which encodes the alpha, beta, and gamma subunit polypeptides of component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase was cloned and sequenced. Genes encoding the beta (mcrB) and gamma (mcrG) subunits were separated by two open reading frames (designated mcrC and mcrD) which encode unknown gene products. The M. fervidus genes were preceded by ribosome-binding sites, separated by short A + T-rich intergenic regions, contained unexpectedly few NNC codons, and exhibited inflexible codon usage at some locations. Sites of transcription initiation and termination flanking the mcrBDCGA cluster of genes in M. fervidus were identified. The sequences of the genes, the encoded polypeptides, and transcription regulatory signals in M. fervidus were compared with the functionally equivalent sequences from two mesophilic methanogens (Methanococcus vannielii and Methanosarcina barkeri) and from a moderate thermophile (Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Marburg). The amino acid sequences of the polypeptides encoded by the mcrBCGA genes in the two thermophiles were approximately 80% identical, whereas all other pairs of these gene products contained between 50 and 60% identical amino acid residues. The mcrD gene products have diverged more than the products of the other mcr genes. Identification of highly conserved regions within mcrA and mcrB suggested oligonucleotide sequences which might be developed as hybridization probes which could be used for identifying and quantifying all methanogens. Images PMID:3170483

  3. Structural changes induced by catalytic turnover at the molybdenum site of arabidopsis nitrate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Mertens, J.A.; Campbell, W.H.

    1999-10-20

    Assimilatory nitrate reductases catalyze the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrogen assimilation in algae, fungi, and higher plants. The nitrate reductase from the thale cress, Arabidopsis thaliana, is a dimer, with each of the {approximately} 103,000 molecular weight monomers containing one molybdenum associated with a single pterin dithiolene cofactor, a flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor, and a cytochrome b-type heme. During the catalytic cycle, reducing equivalents in the form of NADH enter the enzyme at the flavin site and are subsequently transferred by intramolecular electron transfer via the heme to the molybdenum center, where the two-electron reduction of nitrate takes place. In this paper the authors present the Mo K-edge EXAFS of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase in three different forms: oxidized as-isolated, reduced, and oxidized after catalytic turnover of excess nitrate (nitrate-oxidized).

  4. Genetic control of biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin and flavin nucleotides and construction of robust biotechnological producers.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Charles A; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2011-06-01

    Riboflavin [7,8-dimethyl-10-(1'-d-ribityl)isoalloxazine, vitamin B₂] is an obligatory component of human and animal diets, as it serves as the precursor of flavin coenzymes, flavin mononucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, which are involved in oxidative metabolism and other processes. Commercially produced riboflavin is used in agriculture, medicine, and the food industry. Riboflavin synthesis starts from GTP and ribulose-5-phosphate and proceeds through pyrimidine and pteridine intermediates. Flavin nucleotides are synthesized in two consecutive reactions from riboflavin. Some microorganisms and all animal cells are capable of riboflavin uptake, whereas many microorganisms have distinct systems for riboflavin excretion to the medium. Regulation of riboflavin synthesis in bacteria occurs by repression at the transcriptional level by flavin mononucleotide, which binds to nascent noncoding mRNA and blocks further transcription (named the riboswitch). In flavinogenic molds, riboflavin overproduction starts at the stationary phase and is accompanied by derepression of enzymes involved in riboflavin synthesis, sporulation, and mycelial lysis. In flavinogenic yeasts, transcriptional repression of riboflavin synthesis is exerted by iron ions and not by flavins. The putative transcription factor encoded by SEF1 is somehow involved in this regulation. Most commercial riboflavin is currently produced or was produced earlier by microbial synthesis using special selected strains of Bacillus subtilis, Ashbya gossypii, and Candida famata. Whereas earlier RF overproducers were isolated by classical selection, current producers of riboflavin and flavin nucleotides have been developed using modern approaches of metabolic engineering that involve overexpression of structural and regulatory genes of the RF biosynthetic pathway as well as genes involved in the overproduction of the purine precursor of riboflavin, GTP. PMID:21646432

  5. Genetic Control of Biosynthesis and Transport of Riboflavin and Flavin Nucleotides and Construction of Robust Biotechnological Producers†

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Charles A.; Sibirny, Andriy A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Riboflavin [7,8-dimethyl-10-(1′-d-ribityl)isoalloxazine, vitamin B2] is an obligatory component of human and animal diets, as it serves as the precursor of flavin coenzymes, flavin mononucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, which are involved in oxidative metabolism and other processes. Commercially produced riboflavin is used in agriculture, medicine, and the food industry. Riboflavin synthesis starts from GTP and ribulose-5-phosphate and proceeds through pyrimidine and pteridine intermediates. Flavin nucleotides are synthesized in two consecutive reactions from riboflavin. Some microorganisms and all animal cells are capable of riboflavin uptake, whereas many microorganisms have distinct systems for riboflavin excretion to the medium. Regulation of riboflavin synthesis in bacteria occurs by repression at the transcriptional level by flavin mononucleotide, which binds to nascent noncoding mRNA and blocks further transcription (named the riboswitch). In flavinogenic molds, riboflavin overproduction starts at the stationary phase and is accompanied by derepression of enzymes involved in riboflavin synthesis, sporulation, and mycelial lysis. In flavinogenic yeasts, transcriptional repression of riboflavin synthesis is exerted by iron ions and not by flavins. The putative transcription factor encoded by SEF1 is somehow involved in this regulation. Most commercial riboflavin is currently produced or was produced earlier by microbial synthesis using special selected strains of Bacillus subtilis, Ashbya gossypii, and Candida famata. Whereas earlier RF overproducers were isolated by classical selection, current producers of riboflavin and flavin nucleotides have been developed using modern approaches of metabolic engineering that involve overexpression of structural and regulatory genes of the RF biosynthetic pathway as well as genes involved in the overproduction of the purine precursor of riboflavin, GTP. PMID:21646432

  6. Cloning, purification and characterization of two components of phenol hydroxylase from Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1.

    PubMed

    Saa, Laura; Jaureguibeitia, Arrate; Largo, Eneko; Llama, María J; Serra, Juan L

    2010-03-01

    Phenol hydroxylase that catalyzes the conversion of phenol to catechol in Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1 was identified as a two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase. The two proteins are encoded by the genes pheA1 and pheA2, located very closely in the genome. The sequenced pheA1 gene was composed of 1,629 bp encoding a protein of 542 amino acids, whereas the pheA2 gene consisted of 570 bp encoding a protein of 189 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequences of both genes showed high homology with several two-component aromatic hydroxylases. The genes were cloned separately in cells of Escherichia coli M15 as hexahistidine-tagged proteins, and the recombinant proteins His(6)PheA1 and His(6)PheA2 were purified and its catalytic activity characterized. His(6)PheA1 exists as a homotetramer of four identical subunits of 62 kDa that has no phenol hydroxylase activity on its own. His(6)PheA2 is a homodimeric flavin reductase, consisting of two identical subunits of 22 kDa, that uses NAD(P)H in order to reduce flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), according to a random sequential kinetic mechanism. The reductase activity was strongly inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents. The hydroxylation of phenol in vitro requires the presence of both His(6)PheA1 and His(6)PheA2 components, in addition to NADH and FAD, but the physical interaction between the proteins is not necessary for the reaction. PMID:19787347

  7. A VOLTAMMETRIC FLAVIN MICROELECTRODE FOR USE IN BIOFILMS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hung Duc; Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Ahmed, Bulbul; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms used in bioelectrochemical systems are expected to transfer electrons using electron transfer mediators. One mediator type, flavins, which includes flavin mononucleotide, riboflavin, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, has been found to be endogenously produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, the presence and concentration of flavins inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm have never been reported. The goal of this study was to develop a flavin microelectrode capable of measuring flavins inside a living biofilm and apply it to a biofilm which produces flavins. Because flavins are electrochemically active molecules, the flavin microelectrode was based on detection via square-wave voltammetry. The microelectrode consisted of a carbon working electrode with a 10–30 μm tip diameter, a built-in platinum counter electrode, and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode, all enclosed in a glass outer case. The microelectrode was calibrated between 0.1 μM and 10 μM flavins and showed a linear correlation between flavin concentration and peak currents located at −424 mVAg/AgCl on a square-wave voltammogram. We also developed a model to explain the electrochemical mechanism of flavin detection, and to determine the effective surface area of the microelectrode, the standard reduction potential, and the transfer coefficient. We found that the effective surface area of the microelectrode was close to 100 times the projected surface area. The model predicted a standard reduction potential for RF/RFH2 of −419 mVAg/AgCl at 20 °C and a transfer coefficient of 0.45. Lastly, we measured flavin concentration inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm grown on a glass surface using oxygen as the electron acceptor. The flavin concentration reached 0.7 μM, increasing near the bottom of the biofilm, where no oxygen was present. This shows the possibility that flavins are produced in the anaerobic zone to act as intermediate electron acceptors in the deeper parts of the biofilm, where

  8. A VOLTAMMETRIC FLAVIN MICROELECTRODE FOR USE IN BIOFILMS.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung Duc; Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Ahmed, Bulbul; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms used in bioelectrochemical systems are expected to transfer electrons using electron transfer mediators. One mediator type, flavins, which includes flavin mononucleotide, riboflavin, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, has been found to be endogenously produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, the presence and concentration of flavins inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm have never been reported. The goal of this study was to develop a flavin microelectrode capable of measuring flavins inside a living biofilm and apply it to a biofilm which produces flavins. Because flavins are electrochemically active molecules, the flavin microelectrode was based on detection via square-wave voltammetry. The microelectrode consisted of a carbon working electrode with a 10-30 μm tip diameter, a built-in platinum counter electrode, and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode, all enclosed in a glass outer case. The microelectrode was calibrated between 0.1 μM and 10 μM flavins and showed a linear correlation between flavin concentration and peak currents located at -424 mV(Ag/AgCl) on a square-wave voltammogram. We also developed a model to explain the electrochemical mechanism of flavin detection, and to determine the effective surface area of the microelectrode, the standard reduction potential, and the transfer coefficient. We found that the effective surface area of the microelectrode was close to 100 times the projected surface area. The model predicted a standard reduction potential for RF/RFH2 of -419 mV(Ag/AgCl) at 20 °C and a transfer coefficient of 0.45. Lastly, we measured flavin concentration inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm grown on a glass surface using oxygen as the electron acceptor. The flavin concentration reached 0.7 μM, increasing near the bottom of the biofilm, where no oxygen was present. This shows the possibility that flavins are produced in the anaerobic zone to act as intermediate electron acceptors in the deeper parts of the biofilm, where there

  9. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-02-15

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  10. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina Maria; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone". The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.-) and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4), respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  11. Quantitive determination of flavin nucleotide using the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Photometric method based on the use of bacterial luminiscent reaction quantitatively detects the presence of flavin compounds in all forms of life. Aqueous cellular dispersion of a biological sample with an aqueous perchloric acid ruptures the cells and frees the flavin coenzymes from their proteins.

  12. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  13. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E.; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A.; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  14. Ultrafast excited-state deactivation of flavins bound to dodecin.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Heike; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Grininger, Martin; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2012-05-18

    Dodecins, a group of flavin-binding proteins with a dodecameric quaternary structure, are able to incorporate two flavins within each of their six identical binding pockets building an aromatic tetrade with two tryptophan residues. Dodecin from the archaeal Halobacterium salinarum is a riboflavin storage device. We demonstrate that unwanted side reactions induced by reactive riboflavin species and degradation of riboflavin are avoided by ultrafast depopulation of the reactive excited state of riboflavin. Intriguingly, in this process, the staggered riboflavin dimers do not interact in ground and photoexcited states. Rather, within the tetrade assembly, each riboflavin is kept under the control of the respective adjacent tryptophan, which suggests that the stacked arrangement is a matter of optimizing the flavin load. We further identify an electron transfer in combination with a proton transfer as a central element of the effective excited state depopulation mechanism. Structural and functional comparisons of the archaeal dodecin with bacterial homologs reveal diverging evolution. Bacterial dodecins bind the flavin FMN instead of riboflavin and exhibit a clearly different binding pocket design with inverse incorporations of flavin dimers. The different adoption of flavin changes photochemical properties, making bacterial dodecin a comparably less efficient quencher of flavins. This supports a functional role different for bacterial and archaeal dodecins. PMID:22451648

  15. A Flavin-dependent Monooxygenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Involved in Cholesterol Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Dresen, Carola; Lin, Leo Y.-C.; D'Angelo, Igor; Tocheva, Elitza I.; Strynadka, Natalie; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 have similar cholesterol catabolic pathways. This pathway contributes to the pathogenicity of Mtb. The hsaAB cholesterol catabolic genes have been predicted to encode the oxygenase and reductase, respectively, of a flavin-dependent mono-oxygenase that hydroxylates 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione (3-HSA) to a catechol. An hsaA deletion mutant of RHA1 did not grow on cholesterol but transformed the latter to 3-HSA and related metabolites in which each of the two keto groups was reduced: 3,9-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-17-one (3,9-DHSA) and 3,17-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9-one (3,17-DHSA). Purified 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione 4-hydroxylase (HsaAB) from Mtb had higher specificity for 3-HSA than for 3,17-DHSA (apparent kcat/Km = 1000 ± 100 m−1 s−1 versus 700 ± 100 m−1 s−1). However, 3,9-DHSA was a poorer substrate than 3-hydroxybiphenyl (apparent kcat/Km = 80 ± 40 m−1 s−1). In the presence of 3-HSA the Kmapp for O2 was 100 ± 10 μm. The crystal structure of HsaA to 2.5-Å resolution revealed that the enzyme has the same fold, flavin-binding site, and catalytic residues as p-hydroxyphenyl acetate hydroxylase. However, HsaA has a much larger phenol-binding site, consistent with the enzyme's substrate specificity. In addition, a second crystal form of HsaA revealed that a C-terminal flap (Val367–Val394) could adopt two conformations differing by a rigid body rotation of 25° around Arg366. This rotation appears to gate the likely flavin entrance to the active site. In docking studies with 3-HSA and flavin, the closed conformation provided a rationale for the enzyme's substrate specificity. Overall, the structural and functional data establish the physiological role of HsaAB and provide a basis to further investigate an important class of monooxygenases as well as the bacterial catabolism of steroids. PMID

  16. A flavin-dependent monooxygenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis involved in cholesterol catabolism.

    PubMed

    Dresen, Carola; Lin, Leo Y-C; D'Angelo, Igor; Tocheva, Elitza I; Strynadka, Natalie; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2010-07-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 have similar cholesterol catabolic pathways. This pathway contributes to the pathogenicity of Mtb. The hsaAB cholesterol catabolic genes have been predicted to encode the oxygenase and reductase, respectively, of a flavin-dependent mono-oxygenase that hydroxylates 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione (3-HSA) to a catechol. An hsaA deletion mutant of RHA1 did not grow on cholesterol but transformed the latter to 3-HSA and related metabolites in which each of the two keto groups was reduced: 3,9-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-17-one (3,9-DHSA) and 3,17-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9-one (3,17-DHSA). Purified 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione 4-hydroxylase (HsaAB) from Mtb had higher specificity for 3-HSA than for 3,17-DHSA (apparent k(cat)/K(m) = 1000 +/- 100 M(-1) s(-1) versus 700 +/- 100 M(-1) s(-1)). However, 3,9-DHSA was a poorer substrate than 3-hydroxybiphenyl (apparent k(cat)/K(m) = 80 +/- 40 M(-1) s(-1)). In the presence of 3-HSA the K(m)(app) for O(2) was 100 +/- 10 microM. The crystal structure of HsaA to 2.5-A resolution revealed that the enzyme has the same fold, flavin-binding site, and catalytic residues as p-hydroxyphenyl acetate hydroxylase. However, HsaA has a much larger phenol-binding site, consistent with the enzyme's substrate specificity. In addition, a second crystal form of HsaA revealed that a C-terminal flap (Val(367)-Val(394)) could adopt two conformations differing by a rigid body rotation of 25 degrees around Arg(366). This rotation appears to gate the likely flavin entrance to the active site. In docking studies with 3-HSA and flavin, the closed conformation provided a rationale for the enzyme's substrate specificity. Overall, the structural and functional data establish the physiological role of HsaAB and provide a basis to further investigate an important class of monooxygenases as well as the bacterial

  17. Complexation of cyclodextrins with flavines in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhova, I. V.

    2014-01-01

    Data on the binding mode and thermodynamics of complex formation for various cyclodextrins (CDs) with flavines are summarized. It is shown that the governing factors of complexation are the size, degree of hydration, and hydrophobicity of the guest molecule. It is found that the presence of small hydrophobic substituents in a flavine's structure increases their affinity toward cyclodextrin cavities, raising the stability of a complex. In contrast, the presence of bulky and polar side groups in a flavine's structure prevents its inclusion in a macrocyclic cavity and weakens complexation. The size of a CD cavity plays a minor role in the interaction between CDs and flavines, since the inclusion of a guest molecule is only partial.

  18. The reduced flavin-dependent monooxygenase SfnG converts dimethylsulfone to methanesulfinate.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Denyce K

    2016-08-15

    The biochemical pathway through which sulfur may be assimilated from dimethylsulfide (DMS) is proposed to proceed via oxidation of DMS to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and subsequent conversion of DMSO to dimethylsulfone (DMSO2). Analogous chemical oxidation processes involving biogenic DMS in the atmosphere result in the deposition of DMSO2 into the terrestrial environment. Elucidating the enzymatic pathways that involve DMSO2 contribute to our understanding of the global sulfur cycle. Dimethylsulfone monooxygenase SfnG and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase MsuE from the genome of the aerobic soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 were produced in Escherichia coli, purified, and biochemically characterized. The enzyme MsuE functions as a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent FMN reductase with apparent steady state kinetic parameters of Km = 69 μM and kcat/Km = 9 min(-1) μM (-1) using NADH as the variable substrate, and Km = 8 μM and kcat/Km = 105 min(-1) μM (-1) using FMN as the variable substrate. The enzyme SfnG functions as a flavoprotein monooxygenase and converts DMSO2 to methanesulfinate in the presence of FMN, NADH, and MsuE, as evidenced by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results suggest that methanesulfinate is a biochemical intermediate in sulfur assimilation. PMID:27392454

  19. Cloned and expressed nitric oxide synthase structurally resembles cytochrome P-450 reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredt, David S.; Hwang, Paul M.; Glatt, Charles E.; Lowenstein, Charles; Reed, Randall R.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric oxide is a messenger molecule, mediating the effect of endothelium-derived relaxing factor in blood vessels and the cytotoxic actions of macrophages, and playing a part in neuronal communication in the brain. Cloning of a complementary DNA for brain nitric oxide synthase reveals recognition sites for NADPH, FAD, flavin mononucleotide and calmodulin as well as phosphorylation sites, indicating that the synthase is regulated by many different factors. The only known mammalian enzyme with close homology is cytochrome P-450 reductase.

  20. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of electron transfer in the reductase domain of neuronal nitric oxide synthase: re-evaluation of the kinetic mechanism reveals new enzyme intermediates and variation with cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Kirsty; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2002-01-01

    The reduction by NADPH of the FAD and FMN redox centres in the isolated flavin reductase domain of calmodulin-bound rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) has been studied by anaerobic stopped-flow spectroscopy using absorption and fluorescence detection. We show by global analysis of time-dependent photodiode array spectra, single wavelength absorption and NADPH fluorescence studies, that at least four resolvable steps are observed in stopped-flow studies with NADPH and that flavin reduction is reversible. The first reductive step represents the rapid formation of an equilibrium between an NADPH-enzyme charge-transfer species and two-electron-reduced enzyme bound to NADP(+). The second and third steps represent further reduction of the enzyme flavins and NADP(+) release. The fourth step is attributed to the slow accumulation of an enzyme species that is inferred not to be relevant catalytically in steady-state reactions. Stopped-flow flavin fluorescence studies indicate the presence of slow kinetic phases, the timescales of which correspond to the slow phase observed in absorption and NADPH fluorescence transients. By analogy with stopped-flow studies of cytochrome P450 reductase, we attribute these slow fluorescence and absorption changes to enzyme disproportionation and/or conformational change. Unlike for the functionally related cytochrome P450 reductase, transfer of the first hydride equivalent from NADPH to nNOS reductase does not generate the flavin di-semiquinoid state. This indicates that internal electron transfer is relatively slow and is probably gated by NADP(+) release. Release of calmodulin from the nNOS reductase does not affect the kinetics of inter-flavin electron transfer under stopped-flow conditions, although the observed rate of formation of the equilibrium between the NADPH-oxidized enzyme charge-transfer species and two-electron-reduced enzyme bound to NADP(+) is modestly slower in calmodulin-depleted enzyme. Our studies indicate the

  1. Evidence for a hexaheteromeric methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in Moorella thermoacetica.

    PubMed

    Mock, Johanna; Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2014-09-01

    Moorella thermoacetica can grow with H₂ and CO₂, forming acetic acid from 2 CO₂ via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. All enzymes involved in this pathway have been characterized to date, except for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF). We report here that the M. thermoacetica gene that putatively encodes this enzyme, metF, is part of a transcription unit also containing the genes hdrCBA, mvhD, and metV. MetF copurified with the other five proteins encoded in the unit in a hexaheteromeric complex with an apparent molecular mass in the 320-kDa range. The 40-fold-enriched preparation contained per mg protein 3.1 nmol flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), 3.4 nmol flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and 110 nmol iron, almost as predicted from the primary structure of the six subunits. It catalyzed the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with reduced benzyl viologen but not with NAD(P)H in either the absence or presence of oxidized ferredoxin. It also catalyzed the reversible reduction of benzyl viologen with NADH (diaphorase activity). Heterologous expression of the metF gene in Escherichia coli revealed that the subunit MetF contains one FMN rather than FAD. MetF exhibited 70-fold-higher methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity with benzyl viologen when produced together with MetV, which in part shows sequence similarity to MetF. Heterologously produced HdrA contained 2 FADs and had NAD-specific diaphorase activity. Our results suggested that the physiological electron donor for methylenetetrahydrofolate reduction in M. thermoacetica is NADH and that the exergonic reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADH is coupled via flavin-based electron bifurcation with the endergonic reduction of an electron acceptor, whose identity remains unknown. PMID:25002540

  2. Evidence for a Hexaheteromeric Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase in Moorella thermoacetica

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Johanna; Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Moorella thermoacetica can grow with H2 and CO2, forming acetic acid from 2 CO2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. All enzymes involved in this pathway have been characterized to date, except for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF). We report here that the M. thermoacetica gene that putatively encodes this enzyme, metF, is part of a transcription unit also containing the genes hdrCBA, mvhD, and metV. MetF copurified with the other five proteins encoded in the unit in a hexaheteromeric complex with an apparent molecular mass in the 320-kDa range. The 40-fold-enriched preparation contained per mg protein 3.1 nmol flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), 3.4 nmol flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and 110 nmol iron, almost as predicted from the primary structure of the six subunits. It catalyzed the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with reduced benzyl viologen but not with NAD(P)H in either the absence or presence of oxidized ferredoxin. It also catalyzed the reversible reduction of benzyl viologen with NADH (diaphorase activity). Heterologous expression of the metF gene in Escherichia coli revealed that the subunit MetF contains one FMN rather than FAD. MetF exhibited 70-fold-higher methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity with benzyl viologen when produced together with MetV, which in part shows sequence similarity to MetF. Heterologously produced HdrA contained 2 FADs and had NAD-specific diaphorase activity. Our results suggested that the physiological electron donor for methylenetetrahydrofolate reduction in M. thermoacetica is NADH and that the exergonic reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADH is coupled via flavin-based electron bifurcation with the endergonic reduction of an electron acceptor, whose identity remains unknown. PMID:25002540

  3. Redox State of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Drives Substrate Binding and Product Release in Escherichia coli Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Victor W.T.; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A.; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising the respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyze reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, the soluble fumarate reductases (e.g. that from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and the FAD was examined. The variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y, that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (−87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The “free” and “occupied” states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of the FAD, respectively. Our data allows for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  4. Redox state of flavin adenine dinucleotide drives substrate binding and product release in Escherichia coli succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Victor W T; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H

    2015-02-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyzes reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, soluble fumarate reductases (e.g., those from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and FAD was examined. Variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in the assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (-87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The "free" and "occupied" states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of FAD, respectively. Our data allow for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  5. Purification and characterization of NADPH--cytochrome c reductase from the midgut of the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania).

    PubMed

    Crankshaw, D L; Hetnarski, K; Wilkinson, C F

    1979-09-01

    1. NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was solubilized with bromelain and purified about 400-fold from sucrose/pyrophosphate-washed microsomal fractions from southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania) larval midguts. 2. The enzyme has a mol.wt. of 70 035 +/- 1300 and contained 2 mol of flavin/mol of enzyme consisting of almost equimolar amounts of FMN and FAD. 3. Aerobic titration of the enzyme with NADPH caused the formation of a stable half-reduced state at 0.5 mol of NADPH/mol of flavin. 4. Kinetic analysis showed that the reduction of cytochrome c proceeded by a Bi Bi Ping Pong mechanism. 5. Apparent Km values for NADPH and cytochrome c and Ki values for NADP+ and 2'-AMP were considerably higher for the insect reductase than for the mammalian liver enzyme. 6. These are discussed in relation to possible differences in the active sites of the enzymes. PMID:117798

  6. Purification and characterization of NADPH--cytochrome c reductase from the midgut of the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania).

    PubMed Central

    Crankshaw, D L; Hetnarski, K; Wilkinson, C F

    1979-01-01

    1. NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was solubilized with bromelain and purified about 400-fold from sucrose/pyrophosphate-washed microsomal fractions from southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania) larval midguts. 2. The enzyme has a mol.wt. of 70 035 +/- 1300 and contained 2 mol of flavin/mol of enzyme consisting of almost equimolar amounts of FMN and FAD. 3. Aerobic titration of the enzyme with NADPH caused the formation of a stable half-reduced state at 0.5 mol of NADPH/mol of flavin. 4. Kinetic analysis showed that the reduction of cytochrome c proceeded by a Bi Bi Ping Pong mechanism. 5. Apparent Km values for NADPH and cytochrome c and Ki values for NADP+ and 2'-AMP were considerably higher for the insect reductase than for the mammalian liver enzyme. 6. These are discussed in relation to possible differences in the active sites of the enzymes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:117798

  7. Characterization of the two-component, FAD-dependent monooxygenase SgcC that requires carrier protein-tethered substrates for the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuangjun; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2008-05-21

    C-1027 is a potent antitumor antibiotic composed of an apoprotein (CagA) and a reactive enediyne chromophore. The chromophore has four distinct chemical moieties, including an ( S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine moiety, the biosynthesis of which from l-alpha-tyrosine requires five proteins: SgcC, SgcC1, SgcC2, SgcC3, and SgcC4; a sixth protein, SgcC5, catalyzes the incorporation of this beta-amino acid moiety into C-1027. Biochemical characterization of SgcC has now revealed that (i) SgcC is a two-component, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase, (ii) SgcC is only active with SgcC2 (peptidyl carrier protein)-tethered substrates, (iii) SgcC-catalyzed hydroxylation requires O 2 and FADH 2, the latter supplied by the C-1027 pathway-specific flavin reductase SgcE6 or Escherichia coli flavin reductase Fre, and (iv) SgcC efficiently catalyzes regioselective hydroxylation of 3-substituted beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 analogues, including the chloro-, bromo-, iodo-, fluoro-, and methyl-substituted analogues, but does not accept 3-hydroxy-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as a substrate. Together with the in vitro data for SgcC4, SgcC1, and SgcC3, the results establish that SgcC catalyzes the hydroxylation of ( S)-3-chloro-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as the final step in the biosynthesis of the ( S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine moiety prior to incorporation into C-1027. SgcC now represents the first biochemically characterized two-component, FAD-dependent monooxygenase that acts on a carrier-protein-tethered aromatic substrate. PMID:18426211

  8. Ascorbate free radical reductase mRNA levels are induced by wounding.

    PubMed Central

    Grantz, A A; Brummell, D A; Bennett, A B

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) was isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and its mRNA levels were analyzed. The cDNA encoded a deduced protein of 433 amino acids and possessed amino acid domains characteristic of flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD(P)H-binding proteins but did not possess typical eukaryotic targeting sequences, suggesting that it encodes a cytosolic form of AFR reductase. Low-stringency genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated that a single nuclear gene encoded this enzyme. Total ascorbate contents were greatest in leaves, with decreasing amounts in stems and roots and relatively constant levels in all stages of fruit. AFR reductase activity was inversely correlated with total ascorbate content, whereas the relative abundance of AFR reductase mRNA was directly correlated with enzyme activity in tissues examined. AFR reductase mRNA abundance increased dramatically in response to wounding, a treatment that is known to also induce ascorbate-dependent prolyl hydroxylation required for the accumulation of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. In addition, AFR reductase may contribute to maintaining levels of ascorbic acid for protection against wound-induced free radical-mediated damage. Collectively, the results suggest that AFR reductase activity is regulated at the level of mRNA abundance by low ascorbate contents or by factors that promote ascorbate utilization. PMID:7784511

  9. Excited flavin and pterin coenzyme molecules in evolution.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, M S; Telegina, T A; Vechtomova, Y L; Kolesnikov, M P; Lyudnikova, T A; Golub, O A

    2010-10-01

    Excited flavin and pterin molecules are active in intermolecular energy transfer and in photocatalysis of redox reactions resulting in conservation of free energy. Flavin-containing pigments produced in models of the prebiotic environment are capable of converting photon energy into the energy of phosphoanhydride bonds of ATP. However, during evolution photochemical reactions involving excited FMN or FAD molecules failed to become participants of bioenergy transfer systems, but they appear in enzymes responsible for repair of UV-damaged DNA (DNA photolyases) and also in receptors of blue and UV-A light regulating vital functions of organisms. The families of these photoproteins (DNA-photolyases and cryptochromes, LOV-domain- and BLUF-domain-containing proteins) are different in the structure and in mechanisms of the photoprocesses. The excited flavin molecules are involved in photochemical processes in reaction centers of these photoproteins. In DNA photolyases and cryptochromes the excitation energy on the reaction center flavin is supplied from an antenna molecule that is bound with the same polypeptide. The role of antenna is played by MTHF or by 8-HDF in some DNA photolyases, i.e. also by molecules with known coenzyme functions in biocatalysis. Differences in the structure of chromophore-binding domains suggest an independent origin of the photoprotein families. The analysis of structure and properties of coenzyme molecules reveals some specific features that were significant in evolution for their being selected as chromophores in these proteins. PMID:21166638

  10. Cofactor Trapping, a New Method To Produce Flavin Mononucleotide ▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Ulrich; Svensson, Vera; Wirtz, Astrid; Knieps-Grünhagen, Esther; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2011-01-01

    We have purified flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from a flavoprotein-overexpressing Escherichia coli strain by cofactor trapping. This approach uses an overexpressed flavoprotein to trap FMN, which is thus removed from the cascade regulating FMN production in E. coli. This, in turn, allows the isolation of highly pure FMN. PMID:21131527

  11. Theoretical study of the structures of flavin in different oxidation and protonation states

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1996-10-02

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory was used to investigate the structure of flavin in different oxidation and protonation states using lumiflavin as a model compound. According to our study. oxidized flavin is planar no matter what its protonation state or whether it participates in hydrogen bonding. The structures of flavin semiquinone radicals are planar or very close to planar, but the reduced flavin H{sub 3}Fl{sub red} (9) is bent with a ring puckering angle of 27.3{degree} along the N5 and N10 axis. The calculations indicate that N1 is the site of protonation for oxidized flavin, which is in agreement with several crystallographic studies. The calculated spin density distribution for flavin semiquinone radicals is also consistent with experimental results. Electrostatic potential derived charges at the RHF/6-31G{sup *} level of theory are also provided for both oxidized and reduced flavins. 34 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  13. Identification and Characterization of Catabolic para-Nitrophenol 4-Monooxygenase and para-Benzoquinone Reductase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain WBC-3▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Hong; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Xian-En; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain WBC-3 utilizes para-nitrophenol (PNP) as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. In order to identify the genes involved in this utilization, we cloned and sequenced a 12.7-kb fragment containing a conserved region of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase genes. Of the products of the 13 open reading frames deduced from this fragment, PnpA shares 24% identity to the large component of a 3-hydroxyphenylacetate hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida U and PnpB is 58% identical to an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli. Both PnpA and PnpB were purified to homogeneity as His-tagged proteins, and they were considered to be a monomer and a dimer, respectively, as determined by gel filtration. PnpA is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent single-component PNP 4-monooxygenase that converts PNP to para-benzoquinone in the presence of NADPH. PnpB is a flavin mononucleotide-and NADPH-dependent p-benzoquinone reductase that catalyzes the reduction of p-benzoquinone to hydroquinone. PnpB could enhance PnpA activity, and genetic analyses indicated that both pnpA and pnpB play essential roles in PNP mineralization in strain WBC-3. Furthermore, the pnpCDEF gene cluster next to pnpAB shares significant similarities with and has the same organization as a gene cluster responsible for hydroquinone degradation (hapCDEF) in Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB (M. J. Moonen, N. M. Kamerbeek, A. H. Westphal, S. A. Boeren, D. B. Janssen, M. W. Fraaije, and W. J. van Berkel, J. Bacteriol. 190:5190-5198, 2008), suggesting that the genes involved in PNP degradation are physically linked. PMID:19218392

  14. Purification and Properties of Flavin- and Molybdenum-Containing Aldehyde Oxidase from Coleoptiles of Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, T.; Saito, E.; Ono, N.; Yamamoto, N.; Sato, M.

    1996-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO; EC 1.2.3.1) that could oxidize indole-3-acetaldehyde into indole-3-acetic acid was purified approximately 2000-fold from coleoptiles of 3-d-old maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. The apparent molecular mass of the native enzyme was about 300 kD as estimated by gel-filtration column chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the enzyme was composed of 150-kD subunits. It contained flavin adenine dinucleotide, iron, and molybdenum as prosthetic groups and had absorption peaks in the visible region (300-600 nm). To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and metals in plant AO. Other aromatic aldehydes such as indole-3-aldehyde and benzaldehyde also served as good substrates, but N-methylnicotinamide, a good substrate for animal AO, was not oxidized. 2-Mercaptoethanol, p-chloromercu-ribenzoate, and iodoacetate partially inhibited the activity, but well-known inhibitors of animal AO, such as menadione and estradiol, caused no reduction in activity. These results indicate that, although maize AO is similar to animal enzymes in molecular mass and cofactor components, it differs in substrate specificity and susceptibility to inhibitors. Immunoblotting analysis with mouse polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified maize AO showed that the enzyme was relatively rich in the apical region of maize coleoptiles. The possible role of this enzyme is discussed in relation to phytohormone biosynthesis in plants. PMID:12226218

  15. Deprotonations in the Reaction of Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick W; Bernard, Steffen M; Sapra, Aparna; Smith, Janet L; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Palfey, Bruce A

    2016-06-14

    Many microorganisms use flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS) to synthesize the essential nucleotide 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP) from 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (dUMP), 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), and NADPH. FDTSs have a structure that is unrelated to the thymidylate synthase used by humans and a very different mechanism. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance evidence that FDTS ionizes N3 of dUMP using an active-site arginine. The ionized form of dUMP is largely responsible for the changes in the flavin absorbance spectrum of FDTS upon dUMP binding. dUMP analogues also suggest that the phosphate of dUMP acts as the base that removes the proton from C5 of the dUMP-methylene intermediate in the FDTS-catalyzed reaction. These findings establish additional differences between the mechanisms of FDTS and human thymidylate synthase. PMID:27214228

  16. Monooxygenase Substrates Mimic Flavin to Catalyze Cofactorless Oxygenations.

    PubMed

    Machovina, Melodie M; Usselman, Robert J; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2016-08-19

    Members of the antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenase family catalyze O2-dependent oxidations and oxygenations in the absence of any metallo- or organic cofactor. How these enzymes surmount the kinetic barrier to reactions between singlet substrates and triplet O2 is unclear, but the reactions have been proposed to occur via a flavin-like mechanism, where the substrate acts in lieu of a flavin cofactor. To test this model, we monitored the uncatalyzed and enzymatic reactions of dithranol, a substrate for the nogalamycin monooxygenase (NMO) from Streptomyces nogalater As with flavin, dithranol oxidation was faster at a higher pH, although the reaction did not appear to be base-catalyzed. Rather, conserved asparagines contributed to suppression of the substrate pKa The same residues were critical for enzymatic catalysis that, consistent with the flavoenzyme model, occurred via an O2-dependent slow step. Evidence for a superoxide/substrate radical pair intermediate came from detection of enzyme-bound superoxide during turnover. Small molecule and enzymatic superoxide traps suppressed formation of the oxygenation product under uncatalyzed conditions, whereas only the small molecule trap had an effect in the presence of NMO. This suggested that NMO both accelerated the formation and directed the recombination of a superoxide/dithranyl radical pair. These catalytic strategies are in some ways flavin-like and stand in contrast to the mechanisms of urate oxidase and (1H)-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, both cofactor-independent enzymes that surmount the barriers to direct substrate/O2 reactivity via markedly different means. PMID:27307041

  17. A novel mammalian flavin-dependent histone demethylase.

    PubMed

    Karytinos, Aristotele; Forneris, Federico; Profumo, Antonella; Ciossani, Giuseppe; Battaglioli, Elena; Binda, Claudia; Mattevi, Andrea

    2009-06-26

    Methylation of Lys residues on histone proteins is a well known and extensively characterized epigenetic mark. The recent discovery of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) demonstrated that lysine methylation can be dynamically controlled. Among the histone demethylases so far identified, LSD1 has the unique feature of functioning through a flavin-dependent amine oxidation reaction. Data base analysis reveals that mammalian genomes contain a gene (AOF1, for amine-oxidase flavin-containing domain 1) that is homologous to the LSD1-coding gene. Here, we demonstrate that the protein encoded by AOF1 represents a second mammalian flavin-dependent histone demethylase, named LSD2. The new demethylase is strictly specific for mono- and dimethylated Lys4 of histone H3, recognizes a long stretch of the H3 N-terminal tail, senses the presence of additional epigenetic marks on the histone substrate, and is covalently inhibited by tranylcypromine. As opposed to LSD1, LSD2 does not form a biochemically stable complex with the C-terminal domain of the corepressor protein CoREST. Furthermore, LSD2 contains a CW-type zinc finger motif with potential zinc-binding sites that are not present in LSD1. We conclude that mammalian LSD2 represents a new flavin-dependent H3-Lys4 demethylase that features substrate specificity properties highly similar to those of LSD1 but is very likely to be part of chromatin-remodeling complexes that are distinct from those involving LSD1. PMID:19407342

  18. Abiotic photophosphorylation model based on abiogenic flavin and pteridine pigments.

    PubMed

    Telegina, Taisiya A; Kolesnikov, Michael P; Vechtomova, Yulia L; Buglak, Andrey A; Kritsky, Mikhail S

    2013-05-01

    A model for abiotic photophosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate by orthophosphate with the formation of adenosine triphosphate was studied. The model was based on the photochemical activity of the abiogenic conjugates of pigments with the polymeric material formed after thermolysis of amino acid mixtures. The pigments formed showed different fluorescence parameters depending on the composition of the mixture of amino acid precursors. Thermolysis of the mixture of glutamic acid, glycine, and lysine (8:3:1) resulted in a predominant formation of a pigment fraction which had the fluorescence maximum at 525 nm and the excitation band maxima at 260, 375, and 450 nm and was identified as flavin. When glycine in the initial mixture was replaced with alanine, a product formed whose fluorescence parameters were typical to pteridines (excitation maximum at 350 nm, emission maximum at 440 nm). When irradiated with the quasi-monochromatic light (over the range 325-525 nm), microspheres in which flavin pigments were prevailing showed a maximum photophosphorylating activity at 375 and 450 nm, and pteridine-containing chromoproteinoid microspheres were most active at 350 nm. The positions and the relative height of maxima in the action spectra correlate with those in the excitation spectra of the pigments, which point to the involvement of abiogenic flavins and pteridines in photophosphorylation. PMID:23689512

  19. Metabolic pathway involved in 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline degradation by Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 and cloning of the novel flavin-dependent monooxygenase system meaBA.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-12-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02' in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase. PMID:26386060

  20. Metabolic Pathway Involved in 2-Methyl-6-Ethylaniline Degradation by Sphingobium sp. Strain MEA3-1 and Cloning of the Novel Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase System meaBA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02′ in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase. PMID:26386060

  1. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  2. Chloramphenicol Biosynthesis: The Structure of CmlS, a Flavin-Dependent Halogenase Shwing a Covalent Flavin-Aspartate Bond

    SciTech Connect

    Podzelinska, K.; Latimer, R; Bhattacharya, A; Vining, L; Zechel, D; Jia, Z

    2010-01-01

    Chloramphenicol is a halogenated natural product bearing an unusual dichloroacetyl moiety that is critical for its antibiotic activity. The operon for chloramphenicol biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae encodes the chloramphenicol halogenase CmlS, which belongs to the large and diverse family of flavin-dependent halogenases (FDH's). CmlS was previously shown to be essential for the formation of the dichloroacetyl group. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of CmlS determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a flavin monooxygenase domain shared by all FDHs, but also a unique 'winged-helix' C-terminal domain that creates a T-shaped tunnel leading to the halogenation active site. Intriguingly, the C-terminal tail of this domain blocks access to the halogenation active site, suggesting a structurally dynamic role during catalysis. The halogenation active site is notably nonpolar and shares nearly identical residues with Chondromyces crocatus tyrosyl halogenase (CndH), including the conserved Lys (K71) that forms the reactive chloramine intermediate. The exception is Y350, which could be used to stabilize enolate formation during substrate halogenation. The strictly conserved residue E44, located near the isoalloxazine ring of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, is optimally positioned to function as a remote general acid, through a water-mediated proton relay, which could accelerate the reaction of the chloramine intermediate during substrate halogenation, or the oxidation of chloride by the FAD(C4{alpha})-OOH intermediate. Strikingly, the 8{alpha} carbon of the FAD cofactor is observed to be covalently attached to D277 of CmlS, a residue that is highly conserved in the FDH family. In addition to representing a new type of flavin modification, this has intriguing implications for the mechanism of FDHs. Based on the crystal structure and in analogy to known halogenases, we propose a reaction mechanism for CmlS.

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic study of flavin fluorescence in purified enzymes of bioluminescent bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrova, Elena; Kudryasheva, N.; Cheng, K.

    2006-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay measurements have been used to study the environment and rotational mobility of endogenous flavin in two purified enzymes of bioluminescent bacteria, Luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase from Vibrio fischeri. We compared the time-resolved fluorescence parameters, intensity decay lifetimes, rotational correlation times, and their fractional contribution, of the endogeneous flavin fluorescence in each of the two enzymes in the presence or absence of quinones of different structures and redox potentials. The endogeneous flavin exhibited multi-exponential decay characteristics as compared to a single decay lifetime of around 5 ns for free flavin, suggesting a complex and heterogeneous environment of flavin bound to the enzyme. In addition, a significant increase in the rotational correlation time and a certain degree of ordering of the molecule were observed for endogenous flavin when compared to a single and fast rotational correlation time of 150 ps of free flavin. Quinone significantly altered both the lifetime and rotational characteristics of endogenous flavin suggesting specific interactions of quinones to the endogeneous flavin in the bacterial enzyme.

  4. Key Residues Regulating the Reductase Activity of the Human Mitochondrial Apoptosis Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Raquel; Ferreira, Patricia; Marcuello, Carlos; Usón, Alejandro; Miramar, M Dolores; Peleato, M Luisa; Lostao, Anabel; Susin, Santos A; Medina, Milagros

    2015-08-25

    The human Apoptosis Inducing Factor (hAIF) is a bifunctional NAD(P)H-dependent flavoreductase involved in both mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent cell death. Even though several studies indicate that both functions are redox controlled by NADH binding, the exact role of hAIF as a reductase in healthy mitochondria remains unknown. Upon reduction by NADH, hAIF dimerizes and produces very stable flavin/nicotinamide charge transfer complexes (CTC), by stacking of the oxidized nicotinamide moiety of the NAD(+) coenzyme against the re-face of the reduced flavin ring of its FAD cofactor. Such complexes are critical to restrict the hAIF efficiency as a reductase. The molecular basis of the hAIF reductase activity is here investigated by analyzing the role played by residues contributing to the interaction of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and of the nicotinamide moiety of NADH at the active site. Mutations at K177 and E314 produced drastic effects on the hAIF ability to retain the FAD cofactor, indicating that these residues are important to set up the holo-enzyme active site conformation. Characterization of P173G hAIF indicates that the stacking of P173 against the isoalloxazine ring is relevant to determine the flavin environment and to modulate the enzyme affinity for NADH. Finally, the properties of the F310G and H454S hAIF mutants indicate that these two positions contribute to form a compact active site essential for NADH binding, CTC stabilization, and NAD(+) affinity for the reduced state of hAIF. These features are key determinants of the particular behavior of hAIF as a NADH-dependent oxidoreductase. PMID:26237213

  5. COMPARISON OF THE METHYL REDUCTASE GENES AND GENE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA sequences encoding component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcr genes) in Methanothermus fervidus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanococcus vannielii, and Methanosarcina barkeri have been published. omparisons of transcription initiation and termination site...

  6. The Mtr Respiratory Pathway Is Essential for Reducing Flavins and Electrodes in Shewanella oneidensis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Coursolle, Dan; Baron, Daniel B.; Bond, Daniel R.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mtr respiratory pathway of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is required to effectively respire both soluble and insoluble forms of oxidized iron. Flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide) recently have been shown to be excreted by MR-1 and facilitate the reduction of insoluble substrates. Other Shewanella species tested accumulated flavins in supernatants to an extent similar to that of MR-1, suggesting that flavin secretion is a general trait of the species. External flavins have been proposed to act as both a soluble electron shuttle and a metal chelator; however, at biologically relevant concentrations, our results suggest that external flavins primarily act as electron shuttles for MR-1. Using deletion mutants lacking various Mtr-associated proteins, we demonstrate that the Mtr extracellular respiratory pathway is essential for the reduction of flavins and that decaheme cytochromes found on the outer surface of the cell (MtrC and OmcA) are required for the majority of this activity. Given the involvement of external flavins in the reduction of electrodes, we monitored current production by Mtr respiratory pathway mutants in three-electrode bioreactors under controlled flavin concentrations. While mutants lacking MtrC were able to reduce flavins at 50% of the rate of the wild type in cell suspension assays, these strains were unable to grow into productive electrode-reducing biofilms. The analysis of mutants lacking OmcA suggests a role for this protein in both electron transfer to electrodes and attachment to surfaces. The parallel phenotypes of Mtr mutants in flavin and electrode reduction blur the distinction between direct contact and the redox shuttling strategies of insoluble substrate reduction by MR-1. PMID:19897659

  7. Structure and Mechanism of Styrene Monooxygenase Reductase: New Insight into the FAD–Transfer Reaction†

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    The two–component flavoprotein styrene monooxygenase (SMO) from Pseudomonas putida S12 catalyzes the NADH– and FAD–dependent epoxidation of styrene to styrene oxide. In this study we investigate the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer from the reductase (SMOB) to epoxidase (NSMOA) component and report our findings in light of the 2.2–Å crystal structure of SMOB. Upon rapidly mixing with NADH, SMOB forms an NADH→FADox charge–transfer intermediate and catalyzes a hydride–transfer reaction from NADH to FAD, with a rate constant of 49.1 ± 1.4 s−1, in a step that is coupled to the rapid dissociation of NAD+. Electrochemical and equilibrium–binding studies indicate that NSMOA binds FADhq ~13–times more tightly than SMOB, which supports a vectoral transfer of FADhq from the reductase to the epoxidase. After binding to NSMOA, FADhq rapidly reacts with molecular oxygen to form a stable C(4a)–hydroperoxide intermediate. The half–life of apoSMOB generated in the FAD–transfer reaction is increased ~21–fold, supporting the model of a protein–protein interaction between apoSMOB and NSMOA with the peroxide intermediate. The mechanisms of FAD–dissociation and transport from SMOB to NSMOA were probed by monitoring the competitive reduction of cytochrome c in the presence and absence of pyridine nucleotides. Based on these studies, we propose a model in which reduced FAD binds to SMOB in equilibrium between an unreactive, sequestered state (S–state) and more reactive, transfer state (T–state). Dissociation of NAD+ after the hydride transfer–reaction transiently populates the T–state, promoting the transfer of FADhq to NSMOA. The binding of pyridine nucleotides to SMOB–FADhq shifts the FADhq–binding equilibrium from the T–state to the S–state. Additionally, the 2.2–Å crystal structure of SMOB–FADox reported in this work is discussed in light of the pyridine nucleotide–gated flavin–transfer and electron

  8. The effect of flavin electron shuttles in microbial fuel cells current production.

    PubMed

    Velasquez-Orta, Sharon B; Head, Ian M; Curtis, Thomas P; Scott, Keith; Lloyd, Jonathan R; von Canstein, Harald

    2010-02-01

    The effect of electron shuttles on electron transfer to microbial fuel cell (MFC) anodes was studied in systems where direct contact with the anode was precluded. MFCs were inoculated with Shewanella cells, and flavins used as the electron shuttling compound. In MFCs with no added electron shuttles, flavin concentrations monitored in the MFCs' bulk liquid increased continuously with FMN as the predominant flavin. The maximum concentrations were 0.6 microM for flavin mononucleotide and 0.2 microM for riboflavin. In MFCs with added flavins, micro-molar concentrations were shown to increase current and power output. The peak current was at least four times higher in MFCs with high concentrations of flavins (4.5-5.5 microM) than in MFCs with low concentrations (0.2-0.6 microM). Although high power outputs (around 150 mW/m(2)) were achieved in MFCs with high concentrations of flavins, a Clostridium-like bacterium along with other reactor limitations affected overall coulombic efficiencies (CE) obtained, achieving a maximum CE of 13%. Electron shuttle compounds (flavins) permitted bacteria to utilise a remote electron acceptor (anode) that was not accessible to the cells allowing current production until the electron donor (lactate) was consumed. PMID:19697021

  9. Enhancing Bidirectional Electron Transfer of Shewanella oneidensis by a Synthetic Flavin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun; Ding, Yuanzhao; Hu, Yidan; Cao, Bin; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Song, Hao

    2015-07-17

    Flavins regulate the rate and direction of extracellular electron transfer (EET) in Shewanella oneidensis. However, low concentration of endogenously secreted flavins by the wild-type S. oneidensis MR-1 limits its EET efficiency in bioelectrochemical systems (BES). Herein, a synthetic flavin biosynthesis pathway from Bacillus subtilis was heterologously expressed in S. oneidensis MR-1, resulting in ∼25.7 times' increase in secreted flavin concentration. This synthetic flavin module enabled enhanced bidirectional EET rate of MR-1, in which its maximum power output in microbial fuel cells increased ∼13.2 times (from 16.4 to 233.0 mW/m(2)), and the inward current increased ∼15.5 times (from 15.5 to 255.3 μA/cm(2)). PMID:25621739

  10. Structure Determination of an FMN Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 using Sulfur Anomalous Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal,R.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    The availability of high-intensity synchrotron facilities, technological advances in data-collection techniques and improved data-reduction and crystallographic software have ushered in a new era in high-throughput macromolecular crystallography. Here, the de novo automated crystal structure determination at 1.28 Angstroms resolution of an NAD(P)H-dependent FMN reductase flavoprotein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01-derived protein Q9I4D4 using the anomalous signal from an unusually small number of S atoms is reported. Although this protein lacks the flavodoxin key fingerprint motif [(T/S)XTGXT], it has been confirmed to bind flavin mononucleotide and the binding site was identified via X-ray crystallography. This protein contains a novel flavin mononucleotide-binding site GSLRSGSYN, which has not been previously reported. Detailed statistics pertaining to sulfur phasing and other factors contributing to structure determination are discussed. Structural comparisons of the apoenzyme and the protein complexed with flavin mononucleotide show conformational changes on cofactor binding. NADPH-dependent activity has been confirmed with biochemical assays.

  11. The N-Reductive System Composed of Mitochondrial Amidoxime Reducing Component (mARC), Cytochrome b5 (CYB5B) and Cytochrome b5 Reductase (CYB5R) Is Regulated by Fasting and High Fat Diet in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Heyka H.; Mikula, Michal; Havemeyer, Antje; Strzalkowska, Adriana; Borowa-Chmielak, Monika; Dzwonek, Artur; Gajewska, Marta; Hennig, Ewa E.; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Clement, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component mARC is the fourth mammalian molybdenum enzyme. The protein is capable of reducing N-oxygenated structures, but requires cytochrome b5 and cytochrome b5 reductase for electron transfer to catalyze such reactions. It is well accepted that the enzyme is involved in N-reductive drug metabolism such as the activation of amidoxime prodrugs. However, the endogenous function of the protein is not fully understood. Among other functions, an involvement in lipogenesis is discussed. To study the potential involvement of the protein in energy metabolism, we tested whether the mARC protein and its partners are regulated due to fasting and high fat diet in mice. We used qRT-PCR for expression studies, Western Blot analysis to study protein levels and an N-reductive biotransformation assay to gain activity data. Indeed all proteins of the N-reductive system are regulated by fasting and its activity decreases. To study the potential impact of these changes on prodrug activation in vivo, another mice experiment was conducted. Model compound benzamidoxime was injected to mice that underwent fasting and the resulting metabolite of the N-reductive reaction, benzamidine, was determined. Albeit altered in vitro activity, no changes in the metabolite concentration in vivo were detectable and we can dispel concerns that fasting alters prodrug activation in animal models. With respect to high fat diet, changes in the mARC proteins occur that result in increased N-reductive activity. With this study we provide further evidence that the endogenous function of the mARC protein is linked with lipid metabolism. PMID:25144769

  12. Crystal Structure of ChrR -- A Quinone Reductase with the Capacity to Reduce Chromate

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy S.; Poulain, S.; Hienerwadel, R.; Bremond, N.; Sylvester, M. D.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Berthomieu, C.; van der Lelie, D.; Matin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Escherichia coli ChrR enzyme is an obligatory two-electron quinone reductase that has many applications, such as in chromate bioremediation. Its crystal structure, solved at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, shows that it belongs to the flavodoxin superfamily in which flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is firmly anchored to the protein. ChrR crystallized as a tetramer, and size exclusion chromatography showed that this is the oligomeric form that catalyzes chromate reduction. Within the tetramer, the dimers interact by a pair of two hydrogen bond networks, each involving Tyr128 and Glu146 of one dimer and Arg125 and Tyr85 of the other; the latter extends to one of the redox FMN cofactors. Changes in each of these amino acids enhanced chromate reductase activity of the enzyme, showing that this network is centrally involved in chromate reduction.

  13. Crystal Structure of ChrR—A Quinone Reductase with the Capacity to Reduce Chromate

    PubMed Central

    Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bremond, Nicolas; Sylvester, Matthew D.; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Berthomieu, Catherine; Van Der Lelie, Daniel; Matin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ChrR enzyme is an obligatory two-electron quinone reductase that has many applications, such as in chromate bioremediation. Its crystal structure, solved at 2.2 Å resolution, shows that it belongs to the flavodoxin superfamily in which flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is firmly anchored to the protein. ChrR crystallized as a tetramer, and size exclusion chromatography showed that this is the oligomeric form that catalyzes chromate reduction. Within the tetramer, the dimers interact by a pair of two hydrogen bond networks, each involving Tyr128 and Glu146 of one dimer and Arg125 and Tyr85 of the other; the latter extends to one of the redox FMN cofactors. Changes in each of these amino acids enhanced chromate reductase activity of the enzyme, showing that this network is centrally involved in chromate reduction. PMID:22558308

  14. Role of flavin-containing monooxygenase in drug development.

    PubMed

    Cashman, John R

    2008-12-01

    This review summarizes some recent observations and information related to the role of the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) in preclinical drug development. Flavin-containing monooxygenase is a complimentary enzyme system to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family of enzymes and oxygenates several soft, highly polarizable nucleophilic heteroatom-containing chemicals and drugs. The products of FMO-mediated metabolism are generally benign and highly polar, readily excreted materials. There may be some advantages in designing drugs that are metabolized in part by FMO and not exclusively by CYP. In this review, I describe the practical aspects for the participation of FMO in drug and chemical metabolism including: i) the study of FMO using in vitro preparations; ii) some observations about metabolism of drugs and chemicals by FMO in vivo; and iii) the consequences of studying FMO-related metabolism in various small animal models. Some of the preclinical research and development areas related to FMO are not fully mature areas and there are certain gaps in our knowledge. However, I include discussion of these areas to stimulate further work and invite further discussion. PMID:19040327

  15. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of a gene cluster from Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600 encoding nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase and NADH:flavin mononucleotide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Mortimer, M W; Fisher, T S; Kahn, M L; Brockman, F J; Xun, L

    1997-01-01

    Nitrilotriacetate (NTA) is an important chelating agent in detergents and has also been used extensively in processing radionuclides. In Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600, biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase that oxidizes NTA to iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. The NTA monooxygenase activity requires two component proteins, component A and component B, but the function of each component is unclear. We have cloned and sequenced a gene cluster encoding components A and B (nmoA and nmoB) and two additional open reading frames, nmoR and nmoT, downstream of nmoA. Based on sequence similarities, nmoR and nmoT probably encode a regulatory protein and a transposase, respectively. The NmoA sequence was similar to a monooxygenase that uses reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) as reductant; NmoB was similar to an NADH:flavin mononucleotide (FMN) oxidoreductase. On the basis of this information, we tested the function of each component. Purified component B was shown to be an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase, and its activity could be separated from that of component A. When the Photobacterium fischeri NADH:FMN oxidoreductase was substituted for component B in the complete reaction, NTA was oxidized, showing that the substrate specificity of the reaction resides in component A. Component A is therefore an NTA monooxygenase that uses FMNH2 and O2 to oxidize NTA, and component B is an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase that provides FMNH2 for NTA oxidation. PMID:9023192

  16. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury. PMID:20561902

  17. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  18. An electron-bifurcating caffeyl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Johannes; Parthasarathy, Anutthaman; Buckel, Wolfgang; Müller, Volker

    2013-04-19

    A low potential electron carrier ferredoxin (E0' ≈ -500 mV) is used to fuel the only bioenergetic coupling site, a sodium-motive ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase (Rnf) in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. Because ferredoxin reduction with physiological electron donors is highly endergonic, it must be coupled to an exergonic reaction. One candidate is NADH-dependent caffeyl-CoA reduction. We have purified a complex from A. woodii that contains a caffeyl-CoA reductase and an electron transfer flavoprotein. The enzyme contains three subunits encoded by the carCDE genes and is predicted to have, in addition to FAD, two [4Fe-4S] clusters as cofactor, which is consistent with the experimental determination of 4 mol of FAD, 9 mol of iron, and 9 mol of acid-labile sulfur. The enzyme complex catalyzed caffeyl-CoA-dependent oxidation of reduced methyl viologen. With NADH as donor, it catalyzed caffeyl-CoA reduction, but this reaction was highly stimulated by the addition of ferredoxin. Spectroscopic analyses revealed that ferredoxin and caffeyl-CoA were reduced simultaneously, and a stoichiometry of 1.3:1 was determined. Apparently, the caffeyl-CoA reductase-Etf complex of A. woodii uses the novel mechanism of flavin-dependent electron bifurcation to drive the endergonic ferredoxin reduction with NADH as reductant by coupling it to the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of caffeyl-CoA. PMID:23479729

  19. Time- and spectrally resolved characteristics of flavin fluorescence in U87MG cancer cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horilova, Julia; Cunderlikova, Beata; Marcek Chorvatova, Alzbeta

    2015-05-01

    Early detection of cancer is crucial for the successful diagnostics of its presence and its subsequent treatment. To improve cancer detection, we tested the progressive multimodal optical imaging of U87MG cells in culture. A combination of steady-state spectroscopic methods with the time-resolved approach provides a new insight into the native metabolism when focused on endogenous tissue fluorescence. In this contribution, we evaluated the metabolic state of living U87MG cancer cells in culture by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence. Confocal microscopy and time-resolved fluorescence imaging were employed to gather spectrally and time-resolved images of the flavin fluorescence. We observed that flavin fluorescence in U87MG cells was predominantly localized outside the cell nucleus in mitochondria, while exhibiting a spectral maximum under 500 nm and fluorescence lifetimes under 1.4 ns, suggesting the presence of bound flavins. In some cells, flavin fluorescence was also detected inside the cell nuclei in the nucleoli, exhibiting longer fluorescence lifetimes and a red-shifted spectral maximum, pointing to the presence of free flavin. Extra-nuclear flavin fluorescence was diminished by 2-deoxyglucose, but failed to increase with 2,4-dinitrophenol, the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, indicating that the cells use glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation for functioning. These gathered data are the first step toward monitoring the metabolic state of U87MG cancer cells.

  20. Why Flavins Are not Competitors of Chlorophyll in the Evolution of Biological Converters of Solar Energy

    PubMed Central

    Kritsky, Mikhail S.; Telegina, Taisiya A.; Vechtomova, Yulia L.; Buglak, Andrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Excited flavin molecules can photocatalyze reactions, leading to the accumulation of free energy in the products, and the data accumulated through biochemical experiments and by modeling prebiological processes suggest that flavins were available in the earliest stages of evolution. Furthermore, model experiments have shown that abiogenic flavin conjugated with a polyamino acid matrix, a pigment that photocatalyzes the phosphorylation of ADP to form ATP, could have been present in the prebiotic environment. Indeed, excited flavin molecules play key roles in many photoenzymes and regulatory photoreceptors, and the substantial structural differences between photoreceptor families indicate that evolution has repeatedly used flavins as chromophores for photoreceptor proteins. Some of these photoreceptors are equipped with a light-harvesting antenna, which transfers excitation energy to chemically reactive flavins in the reaction center. The sum of the available data suggests that evolution could have led to the formation of a flavin-based biological converter to convert light energy into energy in the form of ATP. PMID:23271372

  1. Why flavins are not competitors of chlorophyll in the evolution of biological converters of solar energy.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, Mikhail S; Telegina, Taisiya A; Vechtomova, Yulia L; Buglak, Andrey A

    2012-01-01

    Excited flavin molecules can photocatalyze reactions, leading to the accumulation of free energy in the products, and the data accumulated through biochemical experiments and by modeling prebiological processes suggest that flavins were available in the earliest stages of evolution. Furthermore, model experiments have shown that abiogenic flavin conjugated with a polyamino acid matrix, a pigment that photocatalyzes the phosphorylation of ADP to form ATP, could have been present in the prebiotic environment. Indeed, excited flavin molecules play key roles in many photoenzymes and regulatory photoreceptors, and the substantial structural differences between photoreceptor families indicate that evolution has repeatedly used flavins as chromophores for photoreceptor proteins. Some of these photoreceptors are equipped with a light-harvesting antenna, which transfers excitation energy to chemically reactive flavins in the reaction center. The sum of the available data suggests that evolution could have led to the formation of a flavin-based biological converter to convert light energy into energy in the form of ATP. PMID:23271372

  2. Comparative Studies on the Induction and Inactivation of Nitrate Reductase in Corn Roots and Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad; Oaks, Ann

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of induction and inactivation of nitrate reductase and two of its component activities, namely FMNH2-nitrate reductase and NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase, was made in roots and leaves of corn (Zea mays L. var. W64A × 182E). The three activities were induced in parallel in both tissues when NO3− was supplied. WO4= suppressed the induction of NADH- and FMNH2-nitrate reductase activities in root tips and leaves. The NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity showed a normal increase in roots treated with WO4=. In leaves, on the other hand, there was a marked superinduction of the NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase in the presence of WO4=. The half-life values of NADH-nitrate reductase and FMNH2-nitrate reductase measured by removing NO3− and adding WO4= to the medium, were 4 hours in root tips and 6 hours in excised leaves. Addition of NO3− in the induction medium together with WO4= gave partial protection of NADH-nitrate reductase and FMNH2-nitrate reductase activities in both root tips and leaves with a t0.5 of 6 and 8 hours, respectively. NO3− also reduced the loss of nitrate reductase activity from mature root sections. In the presence of cycloheximide, both NADH-nitrate reductase and NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were lost at similar rates in root tips. NO3− protected the loss of NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase to the same extent as that of NADH-nitrate reductase. PMID:16659529

  3. Chaperone properties of Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Renée; Malki, Abderrahim; Holmgren, Arne; Richarme, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase and NADPH form the thioredoxin system and are the major cellular protein disulphide reductase. We report here that Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase interact with unfolded and denatured proteins, in a manner similar to that of molecular chaperones that are involved in protein folding and protein renaturation after stress. Thioredoxin and/or thioredoxin reductase promote the functional folding of citrate synthase and alpha-glucosidase after urea denaturation. They also promote the functional folding of the bacterial galactose receptor, a protein without any cysteines. Furthermore, redox cycling of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase in the presence of NADPH and cystine stimulates the renaturation of the galactose receptor, suggesting that the thioredoxin system functions like a redox-powered chaperone machine. Thioredoxin reductase prevents the aggregation of citrate synthase under heat-shock conditions. It forms complexes that are more stable than those formed by thioredoxin with several unfolded proteins such as reduced carboxymethyl alpha-lactalbumin and unfolded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. These results suggest that the thioredoxin system, in addition to its protein disulphide isomerase activity possesses chaperone-like properties, and that its thioredoxin reductase component plays a major role in this function. PMID:12549977

  4. Dibenzothiophene Catabolism Proceeds via a Flavin-N5-oxide Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Adak, Sanjoy; Begley, Tadhg P

    2016-05-25

    The dibenzothiophene catabolic pathway converts dibenzothiophene to 2-hydroxybiphenyl and sulfite. The third step of the pathway, involving the conversion of dibenzothiophene sulfone to 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-benzenesulfinic acid, is catalyzed by a unique flavoenzyme DszA. Mechanistic studies on this reaction suggest that the C2 hydroperoxide of dibenzothiophene sulfone reacts with flavin to form a flavin-N5-oxide. The intermediacy of the flavin-N5-oxide was confirmed by LC-MS analysis, a co-elution experiment with chemically synthesized FMN-N5-oxide and (18)O2 labeling studies. PMID:27120486

  5. Production of flavin mononucleotide by metabolically engineered yeast Candida famata.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshyn, Valentyna Y; Ishchuk, Olena P; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Fedorovych, Daria V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2009-05-01

    Recombinant strains of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata able to overproduce flavin mononucleotide (FMN) that contain FMN1 gene encoding riboflavin (RF) kinase driven by the strong constitutive promoter TEF1 (translation elongation factor 1alpha) were constructed. Transformation of these strains with the additional plasmid containing the FMN1 gene under the TEF1 promoter resulted in the 200-fold increase in the riboflavin kinase activity and 100-fold increase in FMN production as compared to the wild-type strain (last feature was found only in iron-deficient medium). Overexpression of the FMN1 gene in the mutant that has deregulated riboflavin biosynthesis pathway and high level of riboflavin production in iron-sufficient medium led to the 30-fold increase in the riboflavin kinase activity and 400-fold increase in FMN production of the resulted transformants. The obtained C. famata recombinant strains can be used for the further construction of improved FMN overproducers. PMID:19558965

  6. Surface enhanced Raman scattering investigation of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskevich, S. A.; Strekal, N. D.; Artsukevich, I. M.; Kivach, L. N.; Chernikevich, I. P.

    1995-04-01

    The SERS spectra of alcohol oxidase from Pichia pastoris adsorbed on a silver electrode were obtained. The similarities and differences of these spectra with the SERS spectrum of free flavin adenine dinucleiotide were considered. The dependence of relative intensity of 1258 cm -1 band from the electrode potential in the protein SERS spectra differed from that of free flavin. From the data on this band being sensitive to the protein-flavin interaction a suggestion was made about incomplete dissociation of flavin from the protein. This conclusion is confirmed both by the fluorescence data and the SERS data on alcohol oxidase purified from Candida boidinii. The results of the SERS investigation of the interaction between the substrate, ethanol and the cofactor, FAD, as well as between protein-bound cofactor with the substrate are presented. The problem of retaining the protein enzyme activity is discussed.

  7. Flavin-sensitized electrode system for oxygen evolution using photo-electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Rupam; Sloan, Madison J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2016-07-01

    Fabrication of bio-electrode systems decorated with redox active biomolecules, flavins, is demonstrated. Exploiting the photochemistry and electrochemistry of flavins, we explored the photo-electrochemical activity of flavin-functionalized electrode systems to assess their potential utility for sustainable energy production. As model systems, lumiflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide were immobilized on carbon electrodes by dropcasting and covalent grafting techniques. Activity of these bio-electrodes towards generation of O2 from H2O in 0.5 M potassium phosphate buffer at pH 7.1 was demonstrated. Irradiation of the electrode system with visible light led to increased activity of the electrodes with a 3-fold enhancement of oxidation of H2O. PMID:27346375

  8. Biochemical establishment and characterization of EncM's flavin-N5-oxide cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Teufel, Robin; Stull, Frederick; Meehan, Michael J.; Michaudel, Quentin; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Palfey, Bruce; Moore, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous flavin-dependent monooxygenases commonly catalyze oxygenation reactions by means of a transient C4a-peroxyflavin. A recent study, however, suggested an unprecedented flavin-oxygenating species - proposed as the flavin-N5-oxide (FlN5[O]) - as key to an oxidative Favorskii-type rearrangement in the biosynthesis of the bacterial polyketide antibiotic enterocin. This stable superoxidized flavin is covalently tethered to the enzyme EncM and converted into FADH2 (Flred) during substrate turnover. Subsequent reaction of Flred with molecular oxygen restores the postulated FlN5[O] via an unknown pathway. Here we provide direct evidence for the FlN5[O] species via isotope labeling, proteolytic digestion, and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry of EncM. We propose that formation of this species occurs by hydrogen-transfer from Flred to molecular oxygen, allowing radical coupling of the formed protonated superoxide and anionic flavin semiquinone at N5, before elimination of water affords the FlN5[O] cofactor. Further biochemical and spectroscopic investigations reveal important features of the FlN5[O] species and the EncM catalytic mechanism. We speculate that flavin-N5-oxides may be intermediates or catalytically active species in other flavoproteins that form the anionic semiquinone and promote access of oxygen to N5. PMID:26067765

  9. Human brain aldehyde reductases: relationship to succinic semialdehyde reductase and aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-08-01

    Human brain contains multiple forms of aldehyde-reducing enzymes. One major form (AR3), as previously shown, has properties that indicate its identity with NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase isolated from brain and other organs of various species; i.e., low molecular weight, use of NADPH as the preferred cofactor, and sensitivity to inhibition by barbiturates. A second form of aldehyde reductase ("SSA reductase") specifically reduces succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to produce gamma-hydroxybutyrate. This enzyme form has a higher molecular weight than AR3, and uses NADH as well as NADPH as cofactor. SSA reductase was not inhibited by pyrazole, oxalate, or barbiturates, and the only effective inhibitor found was the flavonoid quercetine. Although AR3 can also reduce SSA, the relative specificity of SSA reductase may enhance its in vivo role. A third form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, appears to be comparable to aldose reductases characterized in several species, on the basis of its activity pattern with various sugar aldehydes and its response to characteristic inhibitors and activators, as well as kinetic parameters. This enzyme is also the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of biogenic amines. These studies suggest that the various forms of human brain aldehyde reductases may have specific physiological functions. PMID:6778961

  10. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  11. KDM1 Class Flavin-Dependent Protein Lysine Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Jonathan M.; Link, Jennifer E.; Morgan, Brittany S.; Heller, Frederick J.; Hargrove, Amanda E.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-dependent, lysine-specific protein demethylases (KDM1s) are a subfamily of amine oxidases that catalyze the selective posttranslational oxidative demethylation of methyllysine side chains within protein and peptide substrates. KDM1s participate in the widespread epigenetic regulation of both normal and disease state transcriptional programs. Their activities are central to various cellular functions, such as hematopoietic and neuronal differentiation, cancer proliferation and metastasis, and viral lytic replication and establishment of latency. Interestingly, KDM1s function as catalytic subunits within complexes with coregulatory molecules that modulate enzymatic activity of the demethylases and coordinate their access to specific substrates at distinct sites within the cell and chromatin. Although several classes of KDM1 -selective small molecule inhibitors have been recently developed, these pan-active site inhibition strategies lack the ability to selectively discriminate between KDM1 activity in specific, and occasionally opposing, functional contexts within these complexes. Here we review the discovery of this class of demethylases, their structures, chemical mechanisms, and specificity. Additionally, we review inhibition of this class of enzymes as well as emerging interactions with coregulatory molecules that regulate demethylase activity in highly specific functional contexts of biological and potential therapeutic importance. PMID:25787087

  12. Controlling the reactivity of chlorinated ethylenes with flavin mononucleotide hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Ciptadjaya, Christopher G E; Guo, Wen; Angeli, Jayni M; Obare, Sherine O

    2009-03-01

    Reduction rate constants of the chlorinated ethylenes cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) reacted with flavin mononucleotide hydroquinone (FMNH2) under anoxic conditions were investigated. FMNH2 was produced in methanol solvent by the photoreduction of FMN. In aqueous solution, FMN was not fully reduced to FMNH2 but instead yielded the semiquinone radical FMNH*. However, when FMN was anchored to nanocrystalline TiO2, band gap irradiation resulted in electron transfer from the TiO2 conduction band to FMN, thus yielding FMNH2. The FMNH2 generated in aqueous solution on the TiO2 surface was a stronger reductant toward chlorinated ethylenes, relative to FMNH2 in solution. Furthermore, by combining the reactivity of the TiO2 conduction band electrons [TiO2(e-(CB)] with FMNH2, reduction rate constants for the chlorinated ethylenes increased by 2 orders of magnitude relative to FMNH2 alone. The results show how biological molecules such as FMNH2 could have significant effects toward the remediation of organic pollutants. PMID:19350940

  13. Photo-induced reduction of flavin mononucleotide in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.-H.; Dick, B.; Penzkofer, A.

    2007-01-01

    The photo-induced reduction of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in aqueous solutions is studied by absorption spectra measurement under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Samples without exogenous reducing agent and with the exogenous reducing agents ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) are investigated. Under anaerobic conditions the photo-induced reduction with and without reducing agents is irreversible. Under aerobic conditions the photo-reduction without added reducing agent is small compared to the photo-degradation, and the photo-reduction of FMN by the reducing agents is reversible (re-oxidation in the dark). During photo-excitation of FMN the dissolved oxygen is consumed by singlet oxygen formation and subsequent chemical reaction. After light switch-off slow re-oxidation (slow absorption recovery) occurs due to air in-diffusion from surface. EDTA degradation by FMN excitation leads to oxygen scavenging. The quantum efficiencies of photo-reduction under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are determined. The re-oxidation of reduced FMN under aerobic conditions and due to air injection is investigated.

  14. KDM1 class flavin-dependent protein lysine demethylases.

    PubMed

    Burg, Jonathan M; Link, Jennifer E; Morgan, Brittany S; Heller, Frederick J; Hargrove, Amanda E; McCafferty, Dewey G

    2015-07-01

    Flavin-dependent, lysine-specific protein demethylases (KDM1s) are a subfamily of amine oxidases that catalyze the selective posttranslational oxidative demethylation of methyllysine side chains within protein and peptide substrates. KDM1s participate in the widespread epigenetic regulation of both normal and disease state transcriptional programs. Their activities are central to various cellular functions, such as hematopoietic and neuronal differentiation, cancer proliferation and metastasis, and viral lytic replication and establishment of latency. Interestingly, KDM1s function as catalytic subunits within complexes with coregulatory molecules that modulate enzymatic activity of the demethylases and coordinate their access to specific substrates at distinct sites within the cell and chromatin. Although several classes of KDM1-selective small molecule inhibitors have been recently developed, these pan-active site inhibition strategies lack the ability to selectively discriminate between KDM1 activity in specific, and occasionally opposing, functional contexts within these complexes. Here we review the discovery of this class of demethylases, their structures, chemical mechanisms, and specificity. Additionally, we review inhibition of this class of enzymes as well as emerging interactions with coregulatory molecules that regulate demethylase activity in highly specific functional contexts of biological and potential therapeutic importance. PMID:25787087

  15. Mechanism of Action of a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy,S.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Elimination of nonnutritional and insoluble compounds is a critical task for any living organism. Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) attach an oxygen atom to the insoluble nucleophilic compounds to increase solubility and thereby increase excretion. Here we analyze the functional mechanism of FMO from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the crystal structures of the wild type and protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes. The structure of the wild-type FMO revealed that the prosthetic group FAD is an integral part of the protein. FMO needs NADPH as a cofactor in addition to the prosthetic group for its catalytic activity. Structures of the protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes provide insights into mechanism of action. We propose that FMOs exist in the cell as a complex with a reduced form of the prosthetic group and NADPH cofactor, readying them to act on substrates. The 4{alpha}-hydroperoxyflavin form of the prosthetic group represents a transient intermediate of the monooxygenation process. The oxygenated and reduced forms of the prosthetic group help stabilize interactions with cofactor and substrate alternately to permit continuous enzyme turnover.

  16. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  17. Interactions of flavins with melanin. Studies on equilibrium binding of riboflavin to dopa-melanin and some spectroscopic characteristics of flavin-melanin complex.

    PubMed

    Kozik, A; Korytowski, W; Sarna, T; Bloom, A S

    1990-10-01

    Natural melanins are photoprotective pigments that in mammals are principally found in the skin, hair, and eyes. Although the molecular mechanism of photoprotection of pigmented cells has not yet been established, several hypotheses have been proposed with melanin acting as a light filter, free radical scavenger, and quencher of electronically excited states of reactive intermediates. It can be expected that the detoxicating efficiency of melanin should be enhanced if the melanin and potentially cytotoxic species are brought close together. Such a situation may occur for a number of photosensitizing dyes that have the ability to bind to melanin. The interaction of melanin with flavins has been studied under strictly controlled experimental conditions. The equilibrium dialysis method has been employed to determine dissociation constants and the number of binding sites in melanin at pH 5-9. The data reveal that synthetic DOPA-melanin has two different classes of binding sites with dissociation constants of 10(-6) and 10(-5) M, respectively. The overall binding capacity of melanin, at pH 7, is 250 nmol RF/mg melanin. The amount of bound-to-melanin RF increases with pH. The absorption spectra of melanin complexes with RF and lumiflavin indicate that hydrophobic interaction may be involved in the binding of these flavins by melanin. No changes in flavin fluorescence have been detected after binding of flavin to melanin. It appears that, contrary to cationic photosensitizing dyes, the singlet excited state of flavin molecules is not quenched by melanin. PMID:2128193

  18. Phenol hydroxylase from Bacillus thermoglucosidasius A7, a two-protein component monooxygenase with a dual role for FAD.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Ulrike; Westphal, Adrie H; Müller, Rudolf; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2003-11-28

    A novel phenol hydroxylase (PheA) that catalyzes the first step in the degradation of phenol in Bacillus thermoglucosidasius A7 is described. The two-protein system, encoded by the pheA1 and pheA2 genes, consists of an oxygenase (PheA1) and a flavin reductase (PheA2) and is optimally active at 55 degrees C. PheA1 and PheA2 were separately expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) pLysS cells and purified to apparent homogeneity. The pheA1 gene codes for a protein of 504 amino acids with a predicted mass of 57.2 kDa. PheA1 exists as a homodimer in solution and has no enzyme activity on its own. PheA1 catalyzes the efficient ortho-hydroxylation of phenol to catechol when supplemented with PheA2 and FAD/NADH. The hydroxylase activity is strictly FAD-dependent, and neither FMN nor riboflavin can replace FAD in this reaction. The pheA2 gene codes for a protein of 161 amino acids with a predicted mass of 17.7 kDa. PheA2 is also a homodimer, with each subunit containing a highly fluorescent FAD prosthetic group. PheA2 catalyzes the NADH-dependent reduction of free flavins according to a Ping Pong Bi Bi mechanism. PheA2 is structurally related to ferric reductase, an NAD(P)H-dependent reductase from the hyperthermophilic Archaea Archaeoglobus fulgidus that catalyzes the flavin-mediated reduction of iron complexes. However, PheA2 displays no ferric reductase activity and is the first member of a newly recognized family of short-chain flavin reductases that use FAD both as a substrate and as a prosthetic group. PMID:12968028

  19. Flavin Derivatives with Tailored Redox Properties: Synthesis, Characterization, and Electrochemical Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kormányos, Attila; Hossain, Mohammad S; Ghadimkhani, Ghazaleh; Johnson, Joe J; Janáky, Csaba; de Tacconi, Norma R; Foss, Frank W; Paz, Yaron; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2016-06-27

    This study establishes structure-property relationships for four synthetic flavin molecules as bioinspired redox mediators in electro- and photocatalysis applications. The studied flavin compounds were disubstituted with polar substituents at the N1 and N3 positions (alloxazine) or at the N3 and N10 positions (isoalloxazines). The electrochemical behavior of one such synthetic flavin analogue was examined in detail in aqueous solutions of varying pH in the range from 1 to 10. Cyclic voltammetry, used in conjunction with hydrodynamic (rotating disk electrode) voltammetry, showed quasi-reversible behavior consistent with freely diffusing molecules and an overall global 2e(-) , 2H(+) proton-coupled electron transfer scheme. UV/Vis spectroelectrochemical data was also employed to study the pH-dependent electrochemical behavior of this derivative. Substituent effects on the redox behavior were compared and contrasted for all the four compounds, and visualized within a scatter plot framework to afford comparison with prior knowledge on mostly natural flavins in aqueous media. Finally, a preliminary assessment of one of the synthetic flavins was performed of its electrocatalytic activity toward dioxygen reduction as a prelude to further (quantitative) studies of both freely diffusing and tethered molecules on various electrode surfaces. PMID:27243969

  20. A major integral protein of the plant plasma membrane binds flavin.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Astrid; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Hertel, Rainer

    2003-05-01

    Abundant flavin binding sites have been found in membranes of plants and fungi. With flavin mononucleotide-agarose affinity columns, riboflavin-binding activity from microsomes of Cucurbita pepoL. hypocotyls was purified and identified as a specific PIP1-homologous protein of the aquaporin family. Sequences such as gi|2149955 in Phaseolus vulgaris, PIP1b of Arabidopsis thaliana, and NtAQP1 of tobacco are closely related. The identification as a riboflavin-binding protein was confirmed by binding tests with an extract of Escherichia coli cells expressing the tobacco NtAQP1 as well as leaves of transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress NtAQP1 or were inhibited in PIP1 expression by antisense constructs. When binding was assayed in the presence of dithionite, the reduced flavin formed a relatively stable association with the protein. Upon dilution under oxidizing conditions, the adduct was resolved, and free flavin reappeared with a half time of about 30 min. Such an association can also be induced photochemically, with oxidized flavin by blue light at 450 nm, in the presence of an electron donor. Several criteria, localization in the plasma membrane, high abundance, affinity to roseoflavin, and photochemistry, argue for a role of the riboflavin-binding protein PIP1 as a photoreceptor. PMID:12768338

  1. Resolution of strongly competitive product channels with optimal dynamic discrimination: Application to flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslund, Jonathan; Roth, Matthias; Guyon, Laurent; Boutou, Véronique; Courvoisier, Francois; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental molecular selectivity limits are probed by exploiting laser-controlled quantum interferences for the creation of distinct spectral signatures in two flavin molecules, erstwhile nearly indistinguishable via steady-state methods. Optimal dynamic discrimination (ODD) uses optimally shaped laser fields to transiently amplify minute molecular variations that would otherwise go unnoticed with linear absorption and fluorescence techniques. ODD is experimentally demonstrated by combining an optimally shaped UV pump pulse with a time-delayed, fluorescence-depleting IR pulse for discrimination amongst riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide in aqueous solution, which are structurally and spectroscopically very similar. Closed-loop, adaptive pulse shaping discovers a set of UV pulses that induce disparate responses from the two flavins and allows for concomitant flavin discrimination of ˜16σ. Additionally, attainment of ODD permits quantitative, analytical detection of the individual constituents in a flavin mixture. The successful implementation of ODD on quantum systems of such high complexity bodes well for the future development of the field and the use of ODD techniques in a variety of demanding practical applications.

  2. Biotransformation of lepidocrocite in the presence of quinones and flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (γ-FeIIIOOH) and its mineral transformation in the presence of exogenous (quinones) and endogenous (flavins) electron transfer mediators (ETMs) at low concentrations of the ETMs and bacterial cells (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32). It is very important to investigate the bioreduction of lepidocrocite in the presence of different ETMs because biotransformation of Fe(III)-containing minerals can be stimulated by ETMs and affect fate and transport of contaminants in contaminated environments. In the absence of phosphate, green rust formation was observed with fast Fe(II) production rate (0.44-0.56 mM d-1) during the bioreduction of lepidocrocite with exogenous ETMs, while goethite formed at slow Fe(II) production rate (0.24-0.29 mM d-1) with endogenous ETMs. In the presence of phosphate, formation of green rust and vivianite was observed with fast Fe(II) production rate (0.54-0.74 mM d-1) during the bioreduction of lepidocrocite with exogenous ETMs, while vivianite formed at moderate Fe(II) production rate (0.36-0.40 mM d-1) with endogenous ETMs. Vivianite formed in all experimental cases with phosphate in a broad range of Fe(II) production rates (0.23-0.74 mM d-1). Our results (1) suggest that exogenous and endogenous ETMs can significantly but differently affect the biotransformation of lepidocrocite, especially at low concentrations of the ETMs and bacterial cells, (2) highlight the importance of Fe(II) production rate to determine the formation of specific biogenic minerals, (3) provide additional evidence that phosphate can significantly affect the bioreduction rate and the mineral transformation, and (4) help to understand the basic knowledge about complex interactions among microbial cell, soil mineral, and ETM in natural environments and engineered systems.

  3. Reductive Dissolution of Goethite and Hematite by Reduced Flavins

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-10-02

    The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron transfer mediators (ETM) secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. In contrast to the rapid redox reaction rate observed for ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite (Shi et al., 2012), the reductive dissolution of crystalline goethite and hematite was slower, with the extent of reaction limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic ETM anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions, despite the fact that FMNH2 was a more effective reductant than AH2DS for ferryhydrite and lepidocrocite. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a broad range of half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear, parabolic relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reducants at pH 7.0, as predicted by Marcus theory for electron transfer. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear parabolic relationship as well.

  4. Characterization of Flavin-Containing Opine Dehydrogenase from Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Seiya; Sueda, Rui; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Opines, in particular nopaline and octopine, are specific compounds found in crown gall tumor tissues induced by infections with Agrobacterium species, and are synthesized by well-studied NAD(P)H-dependent dehydrogenases (synthases), which catalyze the reductive condensation of α-ketoglutarate or pyruvate with L-arginine. The corresponding genes are transferred into plant cells via a tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid. In addition to the reverse oxidative reaction(s), the genes noxB-noxA and ooxB-ooxA are considered to be involved in opine catabolism as (membrane-associated) oxidases; however, their properties have not yet been elucidated in detail due to the difficulties associated with purification (and preservation). We herein successfully expressed Nox/Oox-like genes from Pseudomonas putida in P. putida cells. The purified protein consisted of different α-, β-, and γ-subunits encoded by the OdhA, OdhB, and OdhC genes, which were arranged in tandem on the chromosome (OdhB-C-A), and exhibited dehydrogenase (but not oxidase) activity toward nopaline in the presence of artificial electron acceptors such as 2,6-dichloroindophenol. The enzyme contained FAD, FMN, and [2Fe-2S]-iron sulfur as prosthetic groups. On the other hand, the gene cluster from Bradyrhizobium japonicum consisted of OdhB1-C-A-B2, from which two proteins, OdhAB1C and OdhAB2C, appeared through the assembly of each β-subunit together with common α- and γ-subunits. A poor phylogenetic relationship was detected between OdhB1 and OdhB2 in spite of them both functioning as octopine dehydrogenases, which provided clear evidence for the acquisition of novel functions by “subunit-exchange”. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to have examined flavin-containing opine dehydrogenase. PMID:26382958

  5. Synthesis of 10-Ethyl Flavin: A Multistep Synthesis Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Division Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sichula, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    A multistep synthesis of 10-ethyl flavin was developed as an organic chemistry laboratory experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Students synthesize 10-ethyl flavin as a bright yellow solid via a five-step sequence. The experiment introduces students to various hands-on experimental organic synthetic techniques, such as column…

  6. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  7. Site-Selective Synthesis of (15)N- and (13)C-Enriched Flavin Mononucleotide Coenzyme Isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Neti, Syam Sundar; Poulter, C Dale

    2016-06-17

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a coenzyme for numerous proteins involved in key cellular and physiological processes. Isotopically labeled flavin is a powerful tool for studying the structure and mechanism of flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions by a variety of techniques, including NMR, IR, Raman, and mass spectrometry. In this report, we describe the preparation of labeled FMN isotopologues enriched with (15)N and (13)C isotopes at various sites in the pyrazine and pyrimidine rings of the isoalloxazine core of the cofactor from readily available precursors by a five-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis. PMID:27176708

  8. Whence flavins? Redox-active ribonucleotides link metabolism and genome repair to the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khiem Van; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2012-12-18

    Present-day organisms are under constant environmental stress that damages bases in DNA, leading to mutations. Without DNA repair processes to correct these errors, such damage would be catastrophic. Organisms in all kingdoms have repair processes ranging from direct reversal to base excision and nucleotide excision repair, and the recently characterized giant viruses also include these mechanisms. At what point in the evolution of genomes did active repair mechanisms become critical? In particular, how did early RNA genomes protect themselves from UV photodamage that would have hampered nonenzymatic replication and led to a mutation rate too high to pass on accurate sequence information from one generation to the next? Photolyase is a widespread and phylogenetically ancient enzyme that utilizes longer wavelength light to cleave thymine dimers in DNA produced via photodamage. The protein serves as a binding scaffold but does not contribute to the catalytic chemistry; the action of the dinucleotide cofactor FADH(2) breaks the chemical bonds. This small bit of RNA, hailed as a "fossil of the RNA World," contains the flavin heterocycle, whose redox activity has been harnessed for myriad functions of life from metabolism to DNA repair. In present-day biochemistry, flavin biosynthesis begins with guanosine and proceeds through seven steps catalyzed by protein-based enzymes. This leads to the question of how flavins originally evolved. Did the RNA world include ancestral RNA bases with greater redox activity than G, A, C, and U that were capable of photorepair of uracil dimers? Could those ancestral bases have chemically evolved to the current flavin structure? Or did flavins already exist from prebiotic chemical synthesis? And were they then co-opted as catalysts for repair sometime after metabolism was established? In this Account, we analyze simple derivatives of guanosine and other bases that show two prerequisites for flavin-like photolyase activity: a significantly

  9. Two divergent MET10 genes, one from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, encode the alpha subunit of sulfite reductase and specify potential binding sites for FAD and NADPH.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J; Cherest, H; Kielland-Brandt, M C

    1994-01-01

    The yeast assimilatory sulfate reductase is a complex enzyme that is responsible for conversion of sulfite into sulfide. To obtain information on the nature of this enzyme, we isolated and sequenced the MET10 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a divergent MET10 allele from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. The polypeptides deduced from the identically sized open reading frames (1,035 amino acids) of both MET10 genes have molecular masses of around 115 kDa and are 88% identical to each other. The transcript of S. cerevisiae MET10 has a size comparable to that of the open reading frame and is transcriptionally repressed by methionine in a way similar to that seen for other MET genes of S. cerevisiae. Distinct homology was found between the putative MET10-encoded polypeptide and flavin-interacting parts of the sulfite reductase flavoprotein subunit (encoded by cysJ) from Escherichia coli and several other flavoproteins. A significant N-terminal homology to pyruvate flavodoxin oxidoreductase (encoded by nifJ) from Klebsiella pneumoniae, together with a lack of obvious flavin mononucleotide-binding motifs in the MET10 deduced amino acid sequence, suggests that the yeast assimilatory sulfite reductase is a distinct type of sulfite reductase. Images PMID:7928966

  10. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine G.; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Henriksen, Anette

    2009-09-01

    The first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, a protein involved in seed development and germination, has been determined. The structure is in a conformation that excludes NADPH binding and indicates that a domain reorientation facilitated by Trx binding precedes NADPH binding in the reaction mechanism. Thioredoxins (Trxs) are protein disulfide reductases that regulate the intracellular redox environment and are important for seed germination in plants. Trxs are in turn regulated by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), which provide reducing equivalents to Trx using NADPH to recycle Trxs to the active form. Here, the first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, HvNTR2 from Hordeum vulgare (barley), is presented, which is also the first structure of a monocot plant NTR. The structure was determined at 2.6 Å resolution and refined to an R{sub cryst} of 19.0% and an R{sub free} of 23.8%. The dimeric protein is structurally similar to the structures of AtNTR-B from Arabidopsis thaliana and other known low-molecular-weight NTRs. However, the relative position of the two NTR cofactor-binding domains, the FAD and the NADPH domains, is not the same. The NADPH domain is rotated by 25° and bent by a 38% closure relative to the FAD domain in comparison with AtNTR-B. The structure may represent an intermediate between the two conformations described previously: the flavin-oxidizing (FO) and the flavin-reducing (FR) conformations. Here, analysis of interdomain contacts as well as phylogenetic studies lead to the proposal of a new reaction scheme in which NTR–Trx interactions mediate the FO to FR transformation.

  11. Reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by reduced flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-11-01

    The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron shuttles secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. At pH 7.0, the reductive dissolution rates of goethite were 3.5 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM FMNH2 and 0.27 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM RBFH2; the reductive dissolution rates of hematite were 29 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM FMNH2 and 151 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM RBFH2. The extent of reaction was limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a large range in half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reductants at pH 7.0. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear relationship as well.

  12. A highly efficient ADH-coupled NADH-recycling system for the asymmetric bioreduction of carbon-carbon double bonds using enoate reductases.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Katharina; Hall, Melanie; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Fabian, Walter M F; Faber, Kurt; Glueck, Silvia M

    2011-06-01

    The asymmetric bioreduction of activated alkenes catalyzed by flavin-dependent enoate reductases from the OYE-family represents a powerful method for the production of optically active compounds. For its preparative-scale application, efficient and economic NADH-recycling is crucial. A novel enzyme-coupled NADH-recycling system is proposed based on the concurrent oxidation of a sacrificial sec-alcohol catalyzed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-A). Due to the highly favorable position of the equilibrium of ene-reduction versus alcohol-oxidation, the cosubstrate is only required in slight excess. PMID:21328323

  13. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  14. Defining a novel cis element in the 3'-untranslated region of mammalian ribonucleotide reductase component R2 mRNA: role in transforming growth factor-beta 1 induced mRNA stabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Amara, F M; Chen, F Y; Wright, J A

    1995-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase R2 gene expression is elevated in BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts treated with transforming growth factor beta 1. We investigated the possibility that the 3'-UTR of ribonucleotide reductase R2 mRNA contains regulatory information for TGF-beta 1 induced message stability. Using end-labeled RNA fragments in gel shift assays and UV cross-linking analyses, we detected in the 3'-UTR a novel 9 nucleotide (nt) cis element, 5'-GAGUUUGAG-3' site, which interacted specifically with a cytosolic protease sensitive factor to form a 75 kDa complex. The cis element protein binding activity was inducible and markedly up-regulated cross-link 4 h after TGF-beta 1 treatment of mouse BALB/c 3T3 cells. Other 3'-UTRs [IRE, GM-CSF, c-myc and homopolymer (U)] were poor competitors to the cis element with regard to forming the TGF-beta 1 dependent RNA-protein complex. However, the cis element effectively competed out the formation of the R2 3'-UTR protein complex. Cytosolic extracts from a variety of mammalian cell lines (monkey Cos7, several mouse fibrosarcomas and human HeLa S3) demonstrated similar TGF-beta 1 dependent RNA-protein band shifts as cell extract from BALB/c 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Binding was completely prevented by several different mutations within the cis element, and by substitution mutagenesis, we were able to predict the consensus sequences, 5'-GAGUUUNNN-3' and 5'-NNNUUUGAG-3' for optimal protein binding. These results support a model in which the 9 nt region functions in cis to destabilize R2 mRNA in cells; and upon activation, a TGF-beta 1 responsive protein is induced and interacts with the 9 nt cis element in a mechanism that leads to stabilization of the mRNA. This appears to be the first example of a mRNA binding site that is involved in TGF-beta 1-mediated effects. Images PMID:7784197

  15. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  16. Natural variation in arsenate tolerance identifies an arsenate reductase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Castrillo, Gabriel; del Llano, Bárbara; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Martinez-Herrera, Dannys Jorge; Leo-del Puerto, Yolanda; Muñoz, Riansares; Cámara, Carmen; Paz-Ares, Javier; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Leyva, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The enormous amount of environmental arsenic was a major factor in determining the biochemistry of incipient life forms early in the Earth's history. The most abundant chemical form in the reducing atmosphere was arsenite, which forced organisms to evolve strategies to manage this chemical species. Following the great oxygenation event, arsenite oxidized to arsenate and the action of arsenate reductases became a central survival requirement. The identity of a biologically relevant arsenate reductase in plants nonetheless continues to be debated. Here we identify a quantitative trait locus that encodes a novel arsenate reductase critical for arsenic tolerance in plants. Functional analyses indicate that several non-additive polymorphisms affect protein structure and account for the natural variation in arsenate reductase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. This study shows that arsenate reductases are an essential component for natural plant variation in As(V) tolerance. PMID:25099865

  17. Discovery and Characterization of the First Archaeal Dihydromethanopterin Reductase, an Iron-Sulfur Flavoprotein from Methanosarcina mazei

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sixi; Tiongson, Joane

    2014-01-01

    The microbial production of methane by methanogenic archaea is dependent on the synthesis of the pterin-containing cofactor tetrahydromethanopterin (H4MPT). The enzyme catalyzing the last step of H4MPT biosynthesis (dihydromethanopterin reductase) has not previously been identified in methane-producing microorganisms. Previous complementation studies with the methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens have indicated that an uncharacterized archaeal-flavoprotein-like flavoprotein (AfpA) from Methylobacillus flagellatus or Burkholderia xenovorans can replace the activity of a phylogenetically unrelated bacterial dihydromethanopterin reductase (DmrA). We propose that MM1854, a homolog of AfpA from Methanosarcina mazei, catalyzes the last step of H4MPT biosynthesis in methane-producing microorganisms. To test this hypothesis, a six-histidine (His6)-tagged version of MM1854 was produced. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of one flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding site and two iron-sulfur cluster sites, consistent with an oxidoreductase enzyme. Purified His6-MM1854 occurred as a homodimer of 29-kDa subunits, and the UV-visible spectrum of the purified protein showed absorbance peaks at 380 and 460 nm, characteristic of oxidized FMN. NAD(P)H was incapable of directly reducing the flavin cofactor, but dithionite eliminated the FMN peaks, indicating successful electron transfer to MM1854. An electron transfer system of NADPH, spinach NADPH-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and ferredoxin could also reduce the FMN peaks. A newly developed assay indicated that dithiothreitol-reduced MM1854 could transfer electrons to dihydromethanopterin. This assay was also effective with a heat-stable DmrX analog from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MJ0208). These results provide the first biochemical evidence that MM1854 and MJ0208 function as archaeal dihydromethanopterin reductases (DmrX) and that ferredoxin may serve as an electron donor. PMID:23995635

  18. Ferric reductase activity in Azotobacter vinelandii and its inhibition by Zn2+.

    PubMed

    Huyer, M; Page, W J

    1989-07-01

    Ferric reductase activity was examined in Azotobacter vinelandii and was found to be located in the cytoplasm. The specific activities of soluble cell extracts were not affected by the iron concentration of the growth medium; however, activity was inhibited by the presence of Zn2+ during cell growth and also by the addition of Zn2+ to the enzyme assays. Intracellular Fe2+ levels were lower and siderophore production was increased in Zn2+-grown cells. The ferric reductase was active under aerobic conditions, had an optimal pH of approximately 7.5, and required flavin mononucleotide and Mg2+ for maximum activity. The enzyme utilized NADH to reduce iron supplied as a variety of iron chelates, including the ferrisiderophores of A. vinelandii. The enzyme was purified by conventional protein purification techniques, and the final preparation consisted of two major proteins with molecular weights of 44,600 and 69,000. The apparent Km values of the ferric reductase for Fe3+ (supplied as ferric citrate) and NADH were 10 and 15.8 microM, respectively, and the data for the enzyme reaction were consistent with Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetics. The approximate Ki values resulting from inhibition of the enzyme by Zn2+, which was a hyperbolic (partial) mixed-type inhibitor, were 25 microM with respect to iron and 1.7 microM with respect to NADH. These results suggested that ferric reductase activity may have a regulatory role in the processes of iron assimilation in A. vinelandii. PMID:2525550

  19. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called steroid 5-alpha reductase 2. This enzyme is involved ... external genitalia. Mutations in the SRD5A2 gene prevent steroid 5-alpha reductase 2 from effectively converting testosterone ...

  20. Photoreception in Neurospora crassa: correlation of reduced light sensitivity with flavin deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Paietta, J; Sargent, M L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of flavin deficiency on blue light responses in Neurospora crassa was studied through the use of two riboflavin mutants (rib-1 and rib-2). The photoresponses assayed were the suppression of circadian conidiation, the phase shifting of the circadian conidiation rhythm, and the induction of carotenoid synthesis. Flavin deficiency was induced in the rib-1 mutant by restrictive growth temperatures and in the rib-2 mutant by low levels of supplemental riboflavin. At 26 degrees C, a semirestrictive growth temperature, the rib-1 mutant is about 1/80th as sensitive to light for the photosuppression of circadian conidiation. Flavin deficiency in the rib-1 and rib-2 strains was effective in reducing the photosensitivity for phase shifting and carotenogenesis to about 1/16th and 1/4th of normal, respectively. Experiments with permissive temperatures, riboflavin supplementation, and revertants at the rib locus all indicated that the effects on light sensitivity were due solely to the presence of the rib mutations. These results provide evidence that one or more flavin photoreceptors are involved in the blue light responses of Neurospora. Images PMID:6458042

  1. Human Cryptochrome-1 Confers Light Independent Biological Activity in Transgenic Drosophila Correlated with Flavin Radical Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Jacqueline; Jones, Alex R.; Danon, Antoine; Sakuma, Michiyo; Hoang, Nathalie; Robles, David; Tait, Shirley; Heyes, Derren J.; Picot, Marie; Yoshii, Taishi; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Klarsfeld, André; Rouyer, Francois; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Ahmad, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes are conserved flavoprotein receptors found throughout the biological kingdom with diversified roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in animals. Light perception is proposed to occur through flavin radical formation that correlates with biological activity in vivo in both plants and Drosophila. By contrast, mammalian (Type II) cryptochromes regulate the circadian clock independently of light, raising the fundamental question of whether mammalian cryptochromes have evolved entirely distinct signaling mechanisms. Here we show by developmental and transcriptome analysis that Homo sapiens cryptochrome - 1 (HsCRY1) confers biological activity in transgenic expressing Drosophila in darkness, that can in some cases be further stimulated by light. In contrast to all other cryptochromes, purified recombinant HsCRY1 protein was stably isolated in the anionic radical flavin state, containing only a small proportion of oxidized flavin which could be reduced by illumination. We conclude that animal Type I and Type II cryptochromes may both have signaling mechanisms involving formation of a flavin radical signaling state, and that light independent activity of Type II cryptochromes is a consequence of dark accumulation of this redox form in vivo rather than of a fundamental difference in signaling mechanism. PMID:22427812

  2. Dodecin Is the Key Player in Flavin Homeostasis of ArchaeaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Grininger, Martin; Staudt, Heike; Johansson, Patrik; Wachtveitl, Josef; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Flavins are employed to transform physical input into biological output signals. In this function, flavins catalyze a variety of light-induced reactions and redox processes. However, nature also provides flavoproteins with the ability to uncouple the mediation of signals. Such proteins are the riboflavin-binding proteins (RfBPs) with their function to store riboflavin for fast delivery of FMN and FAD. Here we present in vitro and in vivo data showing that the recently discovered archaeal dodecin is an RfBP, and we reveal that riboflavin storage is not restricted to eukaryotes. However, the function of the prokaryotic RfBP dodecin seems to be adapted to the requirement of a monocellular organism. While in eukaryotes RfBPs are involved in trafficking riboflavin, and dodecin is responsible for the flavin homeostasis of the cell. Although only 68 amino acids in length, dodecin is of high functional versatility in neutralizing riboflavin to protect the cellular environment from uncontrolled flavin reactivity. Besides the predominant ultrafast quenching of excited states, dodecin prevents light-induced riboflavin reactivity by the selective degradation of riboflavin to lumichrome. Coordinated with the high affinity for lumichrome, the directed degradation reaction is neutral to the cellular environment and provides an alternative pathway for suppressing uncontrolled riboflavin reactivity. Intriguingly, the different structural and functional properties of a homologous bacterial dodecin suggest that dodecin has different roles in different kingdoms of life. PMID:19224924

  3. Flavin-mediated dual oxidation controls an enzymatic Favorskii-type rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Gordon; Noel, Joseph P.; Baran, Phil S.; Palfey, Bruce; Moore, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    Flavoproteins catalyze a diversity of fundamental redox reactions and are one of the most studied enzyme families1,2. As monooxygenases, they are universally thought to control oxygenation by means of a peroxyflavin species that transfers a single atom of molecular oxygen to an organic substrate1,3,4. Here we report that the bacterial flavoenzyme EncM5,6 catalyzes the peroxyflavin-independent oxygenation-dehydrogenation dual oxidation of a highly reactive poly(β-carbonyl). The crystal structure of EncM with bound substrate mimics coupled with isotope labeling studies reveal previously unknown flavin redox biochemistry. We show that EncM maintains an unanticipated stable flavin oxygenating species, proposed to be a flavin-N5-oxide, to promote substrate oxidation and trigger a rare Favorskii-type rearrangement that is central to the biosynthesis of the antibiotic enterocin. This work provides new insight into the fine-tuning of the flavin cofactor in offsetting the innate reactivity of a polyketide substrate to direct its efficient electrocyclization. PMID:24162851

  4. Flavin-mediated dual oxidation controls an enzymatic Favorskii-type rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Teufel, Robin; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Michaudel, Quentin; Stull, Frederick; Louie, Gordon; Noel, Joseph P; Baran, Phil S; Palfey, Bruce; Moore, Bradley S

    2013-11-28

    Flavoproteins catalyse a diversity of fundamental redox reactions and are one of the most studied enzyme families. As monooxygenases, they are universally thought to control oxygenation by means of a peroxyflavin species that transfers a single atom of molecular oxygen to an organic substrate. Here we report that the bacterial flavoenzyme EncM catalyses the peroxyflavin-independent oxygenation-dehydrogenation dual oxidation of a highly reactive poly(β-carbonyl). The crystal structure of EncM with bound substrate mimics and isotope labelling studies reveal previously unknown flavin redox biochemistry. We show that EncM maintains an unexpected stable flavin-oxygenating species, proposed to be a flavin-N5-oxide, to promote substrate oxidation and trigger a rare Favorskii-type rearrangement that is central to the biosynthesis of the antibiotic enterocin. This work provides new insight into the fine-tuning of the flavin cofactor in offsetting the innate reactivity of a polyketide substrate to direct its efficient electrocyclization. PMID:24162851

  5. Purification and characterization of the Comamonas testosteroni B-356 biphenyl dioxygenase components.

    PubMed Central

    Hurtubise, Y; Barriault, D; Powlowski, J; Sylvestre, M

    1995-01-01

    In this report, we describe some of the characteristics of the Comamonas testosteroni B-356 biphenyl (BPH)-chlorobiphenyl dioxygenase system, which includes the terminal oxygenase, an iron-sulfur protein (ISPBPH) made up of an alpha subunit (51 kDa) and a beta subunit (22 kDa) encoded by bphA and bphE, respectively; a ferredoxin (FERBPH; 12 kDa) encoded by bphF; and a ferredoxin reductase (REDBPH; 43 kDa) encoded by bphG. ISPBPH subunits were purified from B-356 cells grown on BPH. Since highly purified FERBPH and REDBPH were difficult to obtain from strain B-356, these two components were purified from recombinant Escherichia coli strains by using the His tag purification system. These His-tagged fusion proteins were shown to support BPH 2,3-dioxygenase activity in vitro when added to preparations of ISPBPH in the presence of NADH. FERBPH and REDBPH are thought to pass electrons from NADH to ISPBPH, which then activates molecular oxygen for insertion into the aromatic substrate. The reductase was found to contain approximately 1 mol of flavin adenine dinucleotide per mol of protein and was specific for NADH as an electron donor. The ferredoxin was found to contain a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] center (epsilon 460, 7,455 M-1 cm-1) which was readily lost from the protein during purification and storage. In the presence of REDBPH and FERBPH, ISPBPH was able to convert BPH into both 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl and 3,4-dihydro-3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl. The significance of this observation is discussed. PMID:7592440

  6. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the plasmid-encoded genes for the two-component 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS.

    PubMed

    Haak, B; Fetzner, S; Lingens, F

    1995-02-01

    The two-component nonheme iron dioxygenase system 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS catalyzes the double hydroxylation of 2-halobenzoates with concomitant release of halogenide and carbon dioxide, yielding catechol. The gene cluster encoding this enzyme, cbdABC, was localized on a 70-kbp conjugative plasmid designated pBAH1. The nucleotide sequences of cbdABC and flanking regions were determined. In the deduced amino acid sequence of the large subunit of the terminal oxygenase component (CbdA), a conserved motif proposed to bind the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster was identified. In the NADH:acceptor reductase component (CbdC), a putative binding site for a chloroplast-type [2Fe-2S] center and possible flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD-binding domains were identified. The cbdABC sequences show significant homology to benABC, which encode benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (52% identity at the deduced amino acid level), and to xylXYZ, which encode toluate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (51% amino acid identity). Recombinant pkT231 harboring cbdABC and flanking regions complemented a plasmid-free mutant of wild-type P. cepacia 2CBS for growth on 2-chlorobenzoate, and it also allowed recombinant P. putida KT2440 to metabolize 2-chlorobenzoate. Functional NADH:acceptor reductase and oxygenase components of 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase were enriched from recombinant Pseudomonas clones. PMID:7530709

  7. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the plasmid-encoded genes for the two-component 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS.

    PubMed Central

    Haak, B; Fetzner, S; Lingens, F

    1995-01-01

    The two-component nonheme iron dioxygenase system 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas cepacia 2CBS catalyzes the double hydroxylation of 2-halobenzoates with concomitant release of halogenide and carbon dioxide, yielding catechol. The gene cluster encoding this enzyme, cbdABC, was localized on a 70-kbp conjugative plasmid designated pBAH1. The nucleotide sequences of cbdABC and flanking regions were determined. In the deduced amino acid sequence of the large subunit of the terminal oxygenase component (CbdA), a conserved motif proposed to bind the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster was identified. In the NADH:acceptor reductase component (CbdC), a putative binding site for a chloroplast-type [2Fe-2S] center and possible flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD-binding domains were identified. The cbdABC sequences show significant homology to benABC, which encode benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (52% identity at the deduced amino acid level), and to xylXYZ, which encode toluate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (51% amino acid identity). Recombinant pkT231 harboring cbdABC and flanking regions complemented a plasmid-free mutant of wild-type P. cepacia 2CBS for growth on 2-chlorobenzoate, and it also allowed recombinant P. putida KT2440 to metabolize 2-chlorobenzoate. Functional NADH:acceptor reductase and oxygenase components of 2-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase were enriched from recombinant Pseudomonas clones. PMID:7530709

  8. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-07-21

    Synthetic flavin molecules were anchored on Degussa P25 titanium dioxide (TiO2). The effect of their presence on the photocatalytic (PC) activity of TiO2 was studied. Under UV light, an increase in the degradation rate of ethanol was observed. This increase was accompanied by stabilization of the anchored flavin against self-degradation. The unprecedented stabilization effect was found also in the absence of a reducing agent such as ethanol. In contrast, under the less energetic visible light, fast degradation of the anchored flavin was observed. These rather surprising observations were attributed to the propensity for charge transport from excited flavin molecules to the semiconductor and to the role that such charge transfer may play in stabilizing the overall assembly. Anchored flavins excited by UV light to their S2, S3 electronic states were able to transfer the excited electrons to the TiO2 phase whereas anchored flavin molecules that were excited by visible light to the S1 state were less likely to transfer the photo-excited electrons and therefore were destabilized. These findings may be relevant not only to anchored flavins in general but to other functionalized photocatalysts, and may open up new vistas in the implementation of sensitizers in PC systems. PMID:27346787

  9. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa A.; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M.; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD “chaperone.” The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  10. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa A; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone." The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  11. The g-tensor of the flavin cofactor in (6-4) photolyase: a 360 GHz/12.8 T electron paramagnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, A.; Kay, C. W. M.; Schleicher, E.; Hitomi, K.; Todo, T.; Möbius, K.; Weber, S.

    2006-05-01

    The g-tensor of the neutral radical form of the flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor FADH• of (6-4) photolyase from Xenopus laevis has been determined by very high-magnetic-field/high-microwave-frequency electron-paramagnetic resonance (EPR) performed at 360 GHz/12.8 T. Due to the high spectral resolution the anisotropy of the g-tensor could be fully resolved in the frozen-solution continuous-wave EPR spectrum. By least square fittings of spectral simulations to experimental data, the principal values of the g-tensor have been established: gX = 2.00433(5), gY = 2.00368(5), gZ = 2.00218(7). A comparison of very high-field EPR data and proton and deuteron electron-nuclear double resonance measurements yielded precise information concerning the orientation of the g-tensor with respect to the molecular frame. This data allowed a comparison to be made between the principal values of the g-tensors of the FADH• cofactors of photolyases involved in the repair of two different DNA lesions: the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and the (6-4) photoproduct. It was found that gX and gZ are similar in both enzymes, whereas the gY component is slightly larger in (6-4) photolyase. This result clearly shows the sensitivity of the g-tensor to subtle differences in the protein environment experienced by the flavin.

  12. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases. PMID:12626517

  13. Human Augmenter of Liver Regeneration; probing the catalytic mechanism of a flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer-Ramadan, Stephanie; Gannon, Shawn A.; Thorpe, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Augmenter of liver regeneration is a member of the ERV family of small flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidases that contain a redox-active CxxC disulfide bond in redox communication with the isoalloxazine ring of bound FAD. These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of thiol substrates with the reduction of molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. This work studies the catalytic mechanism of the short, cytokine, form of augmenter of liver regeneration (sfALR) using model thiol substrates of the enzyme. The redox potential of the proximal disulfide in sfALR was found to be approximately 57 mV more reducing than the flavin chromophore, in agreement with titration experiments. Rapid reaction studies show that dithiothreitol (DTT) generates a transient mixed disulfide intermediate with sfALR signaled by a weak charge-transfer interaction between the thiolate of C145 and the oxidized flavin. The subsequent transfer of reducing equivalents to the flavin ring is relatively slow, with a limiting apparent rate constant of 12.4 s−1. However, reoxidation of the reduced flavin by molecular oxygen is even slower (2.3 s−1 at air saturation), and thus largely limits turnover at 5 mM DTT. The nature of the charge-transfer complexes observed with DTT was explored using a range of simple monothiols to mimic the initial nucleophilic attack on the proximal disulfide. While β–mercaptoethanol is a very poor substrate of sfALR (~ 0.3 min−1 at 100 mM thiol), it rapidly generates a mixed disulfide intermediate allowing the thiolate of C145 to form a strong charge-transfer complex with the flavin. Unlike the other monothiols tested, glutathione is unable to form charge-transfer complexes and is an undetectable substrate of the oxidase. These data are rationalized on the basis of the stringent steric requirements for thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. The inability of the relatively bulky glutathione to attain the in-line geometry required for efficient disulfide exchange in sfALR may be

  14. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  15. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R.; Jung, In J.; Kang, Sun B.; Park, Hee J.; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OXC85S plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OXC85S plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  16. X-ray Crystallography Reveals a Reduced Substrate Complex of UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Poised for Covalent Catalysis by Flavin

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Todd D.; Westler, William M.; Kiessling, Laura L.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2009-11-04

    The flavoenzyme uridine 5'-diphosphate galactopyranose mutase (UGM or Glf) catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactopyranose and UDP-galactofuranose. The latter is a key building block for cell wall construction in numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanistic studies of UGM suggested a novel role for the flavin, and we previously provided evidence that the catalytic mechanism proceeds through a covalent flavin-galactose iminium. Here, we describe 2.3 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structures of the substrate-bound enzyme in oxidized and reduced forms, respectively. In the latter, C1 of the substrate is 3.6 {angstrom} from the nucleophilic flavin N5 position. This orientation is consistent with covalent catalysis by flavin.

  17. Correction: Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Shaham-Waldmann, Nurit; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-09-14

    Correction for 'Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface' by Manjula Pandiri et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18575-18583. PMID:27509005

  18. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: evidence for spatially distinct subunit domains obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy and limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.G.; Vanoni, M.A.; Hainfeld, J.F.; Wall, J.

    1984-10-10

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of individual unfixed molecules of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase has been used to determine the molecular mass distribution of the protein. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, which has a subunit molecular mass of 77 kilodaltons, was found to exist predominantly as a dimer with an apparent molecular mass of 136 +/- 29 kilodaltons. The mass distribution of the enzyme molecules was unchanged in the presence of the allosteric inhibitor S-adenosylmethionine. Examination of negatively stained protein molecules suggested that each subunit of the dimer consists of two globular domains of approximately equal size. Limited proteolysis of the enzyme by trypsin gave results which were entirely consistent with that view. In the presence of 1% trypsin, the enzyme was cleaved into two fragments. The masses of these fragments were 39 and 36 kilodaltons as assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Tryptic cleavage did not lead to loss of NADPH-menadione or NADPH-methylenetetrahydrofolate oxidoreductase activity, and the flavin prosthetic group remained bound to the protein. However, the cleaved protein was completely desensitized with respect to inhibition by S-adenosylmethionine. These results suggest that each subunit of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase contains two domains and that allosteric inhibition requires specific interactions between these domains. The region between these two domains appears to be very sensitive to proteolysis, while the domains themselves are relatively resistant to further degradation. 14 references, 3 figures.

  19. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  20. Distortion of Flavin Geometry Is Linked to Ligand Binding in Cholesterol Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, A.Y.; Heard, K.; Tang, H.; Sampson, N.S.; Vrielink, A.

    2009-06-03

    Two high-resolution structures of a double mutant of bacterial cholesterol oxidase in the presence or absence of a ligand, glycerol, are presented, showing the trajectory of glycerol as it binds in a Michaelis complex-like position in the active site. A group of three aromatic residues forces the oxidized isoalloxazine moiety to bend along the N5-N10 axis as a response to the binding of glycerol in the active site. Movement of these aromatic residues is only observed in the glycerol-bound structure, indicating that some tuning of the FAD redox potential is caused by the formation of the Michaelis complex during regular catalysis. This structural study suggests a possible mechanism of substrate-assisted flavin activation, improves our understanding of the interplay between the enzyme, its flavin cofactor and its substrate, and is of use to the future design of effective cholesterol oxidase inhibitors.

  1. Atomic-resolution structure of an N5 flavin adduct in D-arginine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T

    2011-07-26

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 Å atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct. PMID:21707047

  2. Crystal Structures of the Tryptophan Repressor binding Protein WrbA and complexes with Flavin Mononucleotide

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman,J.; Shapiro, L.

    2005-01-01

    The tryptophan repressor binding protein WrbA binds to the tryptophan repressor protein TrpR. Although the biological role of WrbA remains unclear, it has been proposed to function in enhancing the stability of TrpR-DNA complexes. Sequence database analysis has identified WrbA as a founding member of a flavodoxin-like family of proteins. Here we present crystal structures of WrbA from Deinococcus radiodurans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and their complexes with flavin mononucleotide. The protomer structure is similar to that of previously determined long-chain flavodoxins; however, each contains a conserved inserted region unique to the WrbA family. Interestingly, each WrbA protein forms a homotetramer with 222 symmetry, unique among flavodoxin-like proteins, in which each protomer binds one flavin mononucleotide cofactor molecule.

  3. Role of Valine 464 in the Flavin Oxidation Reaction Catalyzed by Choline Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, Steffan; Agniswamy, Johnson; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2010-11-03

    The oxidation of reduced flavin cofactors by oxygen is a very important reaction that is central to the chemical versatility of hundreds of flavoproteins classified as monooxygenases and oxidases. These enzymes are characterized by bimolecular rate constants {ge} 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and produce water and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. A hydrophobic cavity close to the reactive flavin C(4a) atom has been previously identified in the 3D structure of monooxygenases but not in flavoprotein oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated by X-ray crystallography, mutagenesis, steady-state, and rapid reaction approaches the role of Val464, which is <6 {angstrom} from the flavin C(4a) atom in choline oxidase. The 3D structure of the Val464Ala enzyme was essentially identical to that of the wild-type enzyme as shown by X-ray crystallography. Time-resolved anaerobic substrate reduction of the enzymes showed that replacement of Val464 with alanine or threonine did not affect the reductive half-reaction. Steady-state and rapid kinetics as well as enzyme-monitored turnovers indicated that the oxidative half-reaction in the Ala464 and Thr464 enzymes was decreased by 50-fold with respect to the wild-type enzyme. We propose that the side chain of Val464 in choline oxidase provides a nonpolar site that is required to guide oxygen in proximity of the C(4a) atom of the flavin, where it will subsequently react via electrostatic catalysis. Visual analysis of available structures suggests that analogous nonpolar sites are likely present in most flavoprotein oxidases. Mechanistic considerations provide rationalization for the differences between sites in monooxygenases and oxidases.

  4. Role of key residues at the flavin mononucleotide (FMN):adenylyltransferase catalytic site of the bifunctional riboflavin kinase/flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) Synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    In mammals and in yeast the conversion of Riboflavin (RF) into flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is catalysed by the sequential action of two enzymes: an ATP:riboflavin kinase (RFK) and an ATP:FMN adenylyltransferase (FMNAT). However, most prokaryotes depend on a single bifunctional enzyme, FAD synthetase (FADS), which folds into two modules: the C-terminal associated with RFK activity and the N-terminal associated with FMNAT activity. Sequence and structural analysis suggest that the 28-HxGH-31, 123-Gx(D/N)-125 and 161-xxSSTxxR-168 motifs from FADS must be involved in ATP stabilisation for the adenylylation of FMN, as well as in FAD stabilisation for FAD phyrophosphorolysis. Mutants were produced at these motifs in the Corynebacterium ammoniagenes FADS (CaFADS). Their effects on the kinetic parameters of CaFADS activities (RFK, FMNAT and FAD pyrophosphorilase), and on substrates and product binding properties indicate that H28, H31, N125 and S164 contribute to the geometry of the catalytically competent complexes at the FMNAT-module of CaFADS. PMID:23203077

  5. Modifying the collagen framework of costal cartilage under the impact of UV and a flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'eva, N. Yu.; Zakharkina, O. L.; Semchishen, V. A.; Molchanov, M. D.; Lunin, V. V.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    Modifications of the matrix of the tissue of costal cartilage under the impact of UV (λ = 365 nm) and a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is studied. The changes in the macroscopic properties of the tissue are detected by means of differential scanning calorimetry and under the conditions of uniaxial compression during mechanical testing. The endothermic effects of the denaturation of the collagen framework of the tissue and the Young's modulus are determined. It is shown that the presence of a flavin mononucleotide in the interstitial fluid leads lowers the temperature of collagen denaturation by 2.5°C and doubles the Young's modulus. It is found that the temperature of denaturation and the Young's modulus grow gradually after treating the tissue with the UV radiation, and their values ultimately exceed by far the corresponding values for intact samples. It is concluded that the obtained data indicate the possibility of stabilizing the framework of the matrix of costal cartilage under the impact of UV radiation and a flavin mononucleotide.

  6. FAD synthesis and degradation in the nucleus create a local flavin cofactor pool.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Busco, Giovanni; Panebianco, Concetta; Carmone, Claudia; Miccolis, Angelica; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Colella, Matilde; Barile, Maria

    2013-10-01

    FAD is a redox cofactor ensuring the activity of many flavoenzymes mainly located in mitochondria but also relevant for nuclear redox activities. The last enzyme in the metabolic pathway producing FAD is FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2), a protein known to be localized both in cytosol and in mitochondria. FAD degradation to riboflavin occurs via still poorly characterized enzymes, possibly belonging to the NUDIX hydrolase family. By confocal microscopy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrate here the existence of FAD synthase in the nucleus of different experimental rat models. HPLC experiments demonstrated that isolated rat liver nuclei contain ∼300 pmol of FAD·mg(-1) protein, which was mainly protein-bound FAD. A mean FAD synthesis rate of 18.1 pmol·min(-1)·mg(-1) protein was estimated by both HPLC and continuous coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assays. Rat liver nuclei were also shown to be endowed with a FAD pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD with an optimum at alkaline pH and is significantly inhibited by adenylate-containing nucleotides. The coordinate activity of these FAD forming and degrading enzymes provides a potential mechanism by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is created in the nucleus. These data, which significantly add to the biochemical comprehension of flavin metabolism and its subcellular compartmentation, may also provide the basis for a more detailed comprehension of the role of flavin homeostasis in biologically and clinically relevant epigenetic events. PMID:23946482

  7. FAD Synthesis and Degradation in the Nucleus Create a Local Flavin Cofactor Pool*

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Busco, Giovanni; Panebianco, Concetta; Carmone, Claudia; Miccolis, Angelica; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Colella, Matilde; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    FAD is a redox cofactor ensuring the activity of many flavoenzymes mainly located in mitochondria but also relevant for nuclear redox activities. The last enzyme in the metabolic pathway producing FAD is FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2), a protein known to be localized both in cytosol and in mitochondria. FAD degradation to riboflavin occurs via still poorly characterized enzymes, possibly belonging to the NUDIX hydrolase family. By confocal microscopy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrate here the existence of FAD synthase in the nucleus of different experimental rat models. HPLC experiments demonstrated that isolated rat liver nuclei contain ∼300 pmol of FAD·mg−1 protein, which was mainly protein-bound FAD. A mean FAD synthesis rate of 18.1 pmol·min−1·mg−1 protein was estimated by both HPLC and continuous coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assays. Rat liver nuclei were also shown to be endowed with a FAD pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD with an optimum at alkaline pH and is significantly inhibited by adenylate-containing nucleotides. The coordinate activity of these FAD forming and degrading enzymes provides a potential mechanism by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is created in the nucleus. These data, which significantly add to the biochemical comprehension of flavin metabolism and its subcellular compartmentation, may also provide the basis for a more detailed comprehension of the role of flavin homeostasis in biologically and clinically relevant epigenetic events. PMID:23946482

  8. Human and Drosophila Cryptochromes Are Light Activated by Flavin Photoreduction in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Nathalie; Schleicher, Erik; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Picot, Marie; Wu, William; Berndt, Albrecht; Wolf, Eva; Bittl, Robert; Ahmad, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Cryptochromes are a class of flavoprotein blue-light signaling receptors found in plants, animals, and humans that control plant development and the entrainment of circadian rhythms. In plant cryptochromes, light activation is proposed to result from photoreduction of a protein-bound flavin chromophore through intramolecular electron transfer. However, although similar in structure to plant cryptochromes, the light-response mechanism of animal cryptochromes remains entirely unknown. To complicate matters further, there is currently a debate on whether mammalian cryptochromes respond to light at all or are instead activated by non–light-dependent mechanisms. To resolve these questions, we have expressed both human and Drosophila cryptochrome proteins to high levels in living Sf21 insect cells using a baculovirus-derived expression system. Intact cells are irradiated with blue light, and the resulting cryptochrome photoconversion is monitored by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate that light induces a change in the redox state of flavin bound to the receptor in both human and Drosophila cryptochromes. Photoreduction from oxidized flavin and subsequent accumulation of a semiquinone intermediate signaling state occurs by a conserved mechanism that has been previously identified for plant cryptochromes. These results provide the first evidence of how animal-type cryptochromes are activated by light in living cells. Furthermore, human cryptochrome is also shown to undergo this light response. Therefore, human cryptochromes in exposed peripheral and/or visual tissues may have novel light-sensing roles that remain to be elucidated. PMID:18597555

  9. Inactivation of monoamine oxidase by allylamine does not result in flavin attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, R.B.; Hiebert, C.K.; Vazquez, M.L.

    1985-11-25

    (1-TH)Allylamine was synthesized by sodium boro(TH)hydride reduction of acrolein followed by direct conversion of the (1-TH)allyl alcohol to N-allylphthalimide with triphenylphosphine, diethylazodicarboxylate, and phthalimide. The protecting group was removed with hydrazine. Inactivation of beef liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase with (1-TH)allylamine led to incorporation of 1-6 eq of inactivator/active site depending upon the length of incubation time. Inactivation and radioactivity incorporation coincided; however, after 1 eq of tritium was incorporated and 5% enzyme activity remained, additional radioactivity continued to become incorporated into the enzyme. The optical spectrum of the FAD coenzyme changed during inactivation from that of oxidized to reduced flavin. Following dialysis of the inactivated enzyme, the spectrum remained reduced, but denaturation in urea rapidly resulted in reoxidation of the flavin. Under these same denaturing conditions, 96% of the radioactivity associated with the enzyme remained bound, therefore indicating that allylamine attachment is not to the flavin coenzyme but rather to an active site amino acid residue. The adduct also was stable to base and, to a lesser degree, acid treatment. Although allylamine and N-cyclopropylbenzylamine appear to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase to give 3-(amino acid residue) propanal adducts, two different amino acids seem to be involved because of a difference in stability of the adducts. The mechanisms for inactivation of monoamine oxidase by allylamine and reactivation by benzylamine are discussed in relation to previously reported results.

  10. Detoxification of hexavalent chromium by Leucobacter sp. uses a reductase with specificity for dihydrolipoamide.

    PubMed

    Sarangi, Abhipsa; Krishnan, Chandraraj

    2016-02-01

    Leucobacter sp. belongs to the metal stressed community and possesses higher tolerance to metals including chromium and can detoxify toxic hexavalent chromium by reduction to less toxic trivalent chromium. But, the mechanism of reduction of hexavalent chromium by Leucobacter sp. has not been studied. Understanding the enzyme catalyzing reduction of chromium is important to improve the species for application in bioremediation. Hence, a soluble reductase catalyzing the reduction of hexavalent chromium was purified from a Leucobacter sp. and characterized. The pure chromate reductase was obtained from the cell-free extract through hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration column chromatographic methods. It was a monomeric enzyme and showed similar molecular weights in both gel filtration (∼68 KDa) and SDS-PAGE (64 KDa). It reduced Cr(VI) using both NADH and NADPH as the electron donor, but exhibited higher activity with NADH. The optimal activity was found at pH 5.5 and 30 °C. The K(m) and V(max) for Cr(VI) reduction with NADH were 46.57 μM and 0.37 μmol min(-1) (mg protein) (-1), respectively. The activity was inhibited by p-hydroxy mercury benzoate, Ag(2+) and Hg(2+) indicating the role of thiol groups in the catalysis. The spectrophotometric analysis of the purified enzyme showed the absence of bound flavin in the enzyme. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and LC/MS analysis of trypsin digested purified enzyme showed similarity to dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase. The purified enzyme had dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase activity with dihydrolipoamide as the substrate, which suggested that Leucobacter sp. uses reductase with multiple substrate specificity for reduction of Cr(VI) detoxification. PMID:26377775

  11. Expression and characterization of truncated human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) and a fusion protein of hHO-1 with human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Wilks, A; Black, S M; Miller, W L; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1995-04-01

    A human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) gene without the sequence coding for the last 23 amino acids has been expressed in Escherichia coli behind the pho A promoter. The truncated enzyme is obtained in high yields as a soluble, catalytically-active protein, making it available for the first time for detailed mechanistic studies. The purified, truncated hHO-1/heme complex is spectroscopically indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme and converts heme to biliverdin when reconstituted with rat liver cytochrome P450 reductase. A self-sufficient heme oxygenase system has been obtained by fusing the truncated hHO-1 gene to the gene for human cytochrome P450 reductase without the sequence coding for the 20 amino acid membrane binding domain. Expression of the fusion protein in pCWori+ yields a protein that only requires NADPH for catalytic turnover. The failure of exogenous cytochrome P450 reductase to stimulate turnover and the insensitivity of the catalytic rate toward changes in ionic strength establish that electrons are transferred intramolecularly between the reductase and heme oxygenase domains of the fusion protein. The Vmax for the fusion protein is 2.5 times higher than that for the reconstituted system. Therefore, either the covalent tether does not interfere with normal docking and electron transfer between the flavin and heme domains or alternative but equally efficient electron transfer pathways are available that do not require specific docking. PMID:7703255

  12. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  13. The conserved baculovirus protein p33 (Ac92) is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C.M.; Rohrmann, G.F.; Merrill, G.F.

    2009-06-05

    Open reading frame 92 of the Autographa californica baculovirus (Ac92) is one of about 30 core genes present in all sequenced baculovirus genomes. Computer analyses predicted that the Ac92 encoded protein (called p33) and several of its baculovirus orthologs were related to a family of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-linked sulfhydryl oxidases. Alignment of these proteins indicated that, although they were highly diverse, a number of amino acids in common with the Erv1p/Alrp family of sulfhydryl oxidases are present. Some of these conserved amino acids are predicted to stack against the isoalloxazine and adenine components of FAD, whereas others are involved in electron transfer. To investigate this relationship, Ac92 was expressed in bacteria as a His-tagged fusion protein, purified, and characterized both spectrophotometrically and for its enzymatic activity. The purified protein was found to have the color (yellow) and absorption spectrum consistent with it being a FAD-containing protein. Furthermore, it was demonstrated to have sulfhydryl oxidase activity using dithiothreitol and thioredoxin as substrates.

  14. Aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Xanthium strumarium.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ha Na; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-09-01

    As part of our ongoing search for natural sources of therapeutic and preventive agents for diabetic complications, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of components of the fruit of Xanthium strumarium (X. strumarium) on aldose reductase (AR) and galactitol formation in rat lenses with high levels of glucose. To identify the bioactive components of X. strumarium, 7 caffeoylquinic acids and 3 phenolic compounds were isolated and their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with published data. The abilities of 10 X. strumarium-derived components to counteract diabetic complications were investigated by means of inhibitory assays with rat lens AR (rAR) and recombinant human AR (rhAR). From the 10 isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed the most potent inhibition, with IC₅₀ values of 0.30 and 0.67 μM for rAR and rhAR, respectively. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed competitive inhibition of rhAR. Furthermore, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate inhibited galactitol formation in the rat lens and in erythrocytes incubated with a high concentration of glucose, indicating that this compound may be effective in preventing diabetic complications. PMID:23604720

  15. Structure of Dihydromethanopterin Reductase, a Cubic Protein Cage for Redox Transfer*

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Dan E.; Cascio, Duilio; Jorda, Julien; Bustos, Cheene; Wang, Tzu-Chi; Rasche, Madeline E.; Yeates, Todd O.; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydromethanopterin reductase (Dmr) is a redox enzyme that plays a key role in generating tetrahydromethanopterin (H4MPT) for use in one-carbon metabolism by archaea and some bacteria. DmrB is a bacterial enzyme understood to reduce dihydromethanopterin (H2MPT) to H4MPT using flavins as the source of reducing equivalents, but the mechanistic details have not been elucidated previously. Here we report the crystal structure of DmrB from Burkholderia xenovorans at a resolution of 1.9 Å. Unexpectedly, the biological unit is a 24-mer composed of eight homotrimers located at the corners of a cubic cage-like structure. Within a homotrimer, each monomer-monomer interface exhibits an active site with two adjacently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) ligands, one deeply buried and tightly bound and one more peripheral, for a total of 48 ligands in the biological unit. Computational docking suggested that the peripheral site could bind either the observed FMN (the electron donor for the overall reaction) or the pterin, H2MPT (the electron acceptor for the overall reaction), in configurations ideal for electron transfer to and from the tightly bound FMN. On this basis, we propose that DmrB uses a ping-pong mechanism to transfer reducing equivalents from FMN to the pterin substrate. Sequence comparisons suggested that the catalytic mechanism is conserved among the bacterial homologs of DmrB and partially conserved in archaeal homologs, where an alternate electron donor is likely used. In addition to the mechanistic revelations, the structure of DmrB could help guide the development of anti-obesity drugs based on modification of the ecology of the human gut. PMID:24523405

  16. Covalent Binding of Flavins to RnfG and RnfD in the Rnf Complex from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Backiel, Julianne; Juárez, Oscar; Zagorevski, Dmitri V.; Wang, Zhenyu; Nilges, Mark J.; Barquera, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes of the Rnf family are believed to be bacterial redox-driven ion pumps, coupling an oxidoreduction process to the translocation of Na+ across the cell membrane. Here we show for the first time that Rnf is a flavoprotein, with FMN covalently bound to threonine-175 in RnfG and a second flavin bound to threonine-187 in RnfD. Rnf subunits D and G are homologous to subunits B and C of Na+-NQR, respectively. Each of these Na+-NQR subunits includes a conserved S(T)GAT motif, with FMN covalently bound to the final threonine. RnfD and RnfG both contain the same motif, suggesting that they bind flavins in a similar way. In order to investigate this, the genes for RnfD and RnfG from Vibrio cholerae were cloned and expressed individually in that organism. In both cases the produced protein fluoresced under UV illumination on an SDS gel, further indicating the presence of flavin. However, analysis of the mutants RnfG-T175L, RnfD-T278L, and RnfD-T187V showed that RnfG-T175 and RnfD-T187 are the likely flavin ligands. This indicates that, in the case of RnfD, the flavin is bound, not to the SGAT sequence but to the final residues of a TMAT sequence, a novel variant of the flavin binding motif. In the case of RnfG, flavin analysis, followed by MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry, showed that an FMN is covalently attached to threonine-175, the final threonine of the S(T)GAT sequence. Studies by visible, EPR, and ENDOR spectroscopy showed that, upon partial reduction, the isolated RnfG produces a neutral semiquinone intermediate. The semiquinone species disappeared upon full reduction and was not observed in the denatured protein. A topological analysis combining reporter protein fusion and computer predictions indicated that the flavins in RnfG and RnfD are localized in the periplasmic space. In contrast, in NqrC and NqrB the flavins are located in a cytoplasmic loop. This topological analysis suggests that there may be mechanistic differences between the Rnf and Na

  17. Dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, S G; Shaw, D C; Armarego, W L

    1988-01-01

    A dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a dimeric enzyme with identical subunits (Mr 27000) and a free N-terminal group. It can use NADH (Vmax./Km 3.36 s-1) and NADPH (Vmax./Km 1.07 s-1) when 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin is the second substrate, as well as quinonoid dihydro-(6H)-biopterin (Vmax./Km 0.69 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-neopterin (Vmax./Km 0.58 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-monapterin 0.66 s-1), 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin and cis-6,7-dimethyldihydro-(6H)-pterin (Vmax./Km 0.66 s-1) when NADH is the second substrate. The pure reductase has a yellow colour and contains bound FAD. The enzyme also has pterin-independent NADH and NADPH oxidoreductase activities when potassium ferricyanide is the electron acceptor. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3060113

  18. Production of a covalent flavin linkage in lipoamide dehydrogenase. Reaction with 8-Cl-FAD.

    PubMed

    Moore, E G; Cardemil, E; Massey, V

    1978-09-25

    A method is described for preparation of apolipoamide dehydrogenase which gives quantitative removal of FAD. Active holoenzyme can be reconstituted by incubation with FAD. Reconstitution of apoenzyme with 8-Cl-FAD results in the fixation of most of the flavin to the protein in a covalently bound form. The portion noncovalently bound was shown to be unmodified 8-Cl-FAD. The covalently bound flavin has an absorption spectrum quite different from that of 8-Cl-FAD. It has a single band in the visible with a maximum at 459 nm (extinction coefficient of 22 mM-1 cm-1) and a shoulder at 480 nm. Model reactions between 8-Cl-Flavin (riboflavin or FAD) and organic thiols (thiophenol, beta-mercaptoethanol, or N-acetylcysteine) give products with spectra which are similar to that of FAD covalently bound to lipoamide dehydrogenase. The products of the model reactions have a single visible band with a maximum at 480 nm (extinction coefficient of 23.6 mM-1 cm-1 to 28.4 mM-1 cm-1) and a shoulder at 460 nm. The products of the model reaction and the covalently bound FAD of lipoamide dehydrogenase appear to be the result of a nucleophilic attack on the carbon at position 8 of the flavin ring by a thiolate anion, displacing the chloride. Thus, the product of the model reaction is 8-(RS)-flavin, and the product of the reaction between 8-Cl-FAD and protein probably has a cysteinyl residue covalently attacked at position 8 of FAD. Reconstitution of apoliopoamide dehydrogenase with 8-Cl-FAD gives two enzyme products which are fractionated by ammonium sulfate. Enzyme fractionating between 20% and 45% ammonium sulfate is monomeric and contains covanently bound FAD. Enzyme fractionating between 55% and 75% ammonium sulfate is dimeric and contains both covalently bound FAD and noncovalently bound 8-Cl-FAD. Both protein fractions contain one FAD per protein subunit and both are active with physiological substrates with Km values for NAD and dihydrolipoamide similar to those of native lipoamide

  19. Flavin-derived self-organization and chirality separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Sang-Yong

    2008-07-01

    Formed by rolling up a two-dimensional sheet of one or more layer of graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are the marvel materials of modern materials science. They are phenomenally strong and stiff, and have the unusual property of being excellent conductors of heat along the tube's axis, but good thermal insulators across it. But it is their electrical characteristics that excite the most interest. Especially, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs), formed by one layer of cylindrical graphene, has better physical properties over multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) having over two layer of graphene. Depending on the precise way they are rolled up, which is defined by ( n,m) vector, SWNTs can be made into either metals or semiconductors. So far, SWNTs can generally only be fabricated in batches that vary widely, both in the diameter of the individual tubes and in the orientation of their graphene lattice relative to the tube axis, the property known as chirality. Separating out these various conformations is a challenging, but one that must be solved if nanotubes are ever to fulfill their electrifying potential in devices. This thesis presents that flavin-based helical self-assembly can impart multi degrees of SWNTs separation (i.e., metallicity, diameter, chirality, and handedness). As opening chapters for carbon nanotube and flavin derivative, Chapter 1 provide the introduction of carbon nanotubes, especially single-walled tubes, and the current state-of-the-art nanotube separation. Also, Chapter 1 presents a variety of naturally-occurring flavin derivatives, their redox behavior, and their biological utilization as cofactors for various proteins. Motivated by chemoluminescence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) with bacterial luciferase, Chapter 2 discuss about the synthesis and covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) analogue to oxidized SWNTs. Along with nine step synthesis

  20. Regioselectivity of nitroglycerin denitration by flavoprotein nitroester reductases purified from two Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed Central

    Blehert, D S; Knoke, K L; Fox, B G; Chambliss, G H

    1997-01-01

    Two species of Pseudomonas capable of utilizing nitroglycerin (NG) as a sole nitrogen source were isolated from NG-contaminated soil and identified as Pseudomonas putida II-B and P. fluorescens I-C. While 9 of 13 laboratory bacterial strains that presumably had no previous exposure to NG could degrade low concentrations of NG (0.44 mM), the natural isolates tolerated concentrations of NG that were toxic to the lab strains (1.76 mM and higher). Whole-cell studies revealed that the two natural isolates produced different mixtures of the isomers of dinitroglycerol (DNG) and mononitroglycerol (MNG). A monomeric, flavin mononucleotide-containing NG reductase was purified from each natural isolate. These enzymes catalyzed the NADPH-dependent denitration of NG, yielding nitrite. Apparent kinetic constants were determined for both reductases. The P. putida enzyme had a Km for NG of 52 +/- 4 microM, a Km for NADPH of 28 +/- 2 microM, and a Vmax of 124 +/- 6 microM x min(-1), while the P. fluorescens enzyme had a Km for NG of 110 +/- 10 microM, a Km for NADPH of 5 +/- 1 microM, and a Vmax of 110 +/- 11 microM x min(-1). Anaerobic titration experiments confirmed the stoichiometry of NADPH consumption, changes in flavin oxidation state, and multiple steps of nitrite removal from NG. The products formed during time-dependent denitration reactions were consistent with a single enzyme being responsible for the in vivo product distributions. Simulation of the product formation kinetics by numerical integration showed that the P. putida enzyme produced an approximately 2-fold molar excess of 1,2-DNG relative to 1,3-DNG. This result could be fortuitous or could possibly be consistent with a random removal of the first nitro group from either the terminal (C-1 and C-3) positions or middle (C-2) position. However, during the denitration of 1,2-DNG, a 1.3-fold selectivity for the C-1 nitro group was determined. Comparable simulations of the product distributions from the P. fluorescens

  1. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emrys W; Kattnig, Daniel R; Henbest, Kevin B; Hore, P J; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R

    2016-08-28

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ∼500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes. PMID:27586950

  2. The biochemical mechanism of auxin biosynthesis by an arabidopsis YUCCA flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xinhua; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Chen, Qingguo; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Yuji; Ojha, Sunil; DuBois, Jennifer; Ballou, David; Zhao, Yunde

    2013-01-18

    Auxin regulates every aspect of plant growth and development. Previous genetic studies demonstrated that YUCCA (YUC) flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) catalyze a rate-limiting step in auxin biosynthesis and that YUCs are essential for many developmental processes. We proposed that YUCs convert indole-3-pyruvate (IPA) to indole-3-acetate (IAA). However, the exact biochemical mechanism of YUCs has remained elusive. Here we present the biochemical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis YUC6. Expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli, YUC6 contains FAD as a cofactor, which has peaks at 448 nm and 376 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. We show that YUC6 uses NADPH and oxygen to convert IPA to IAA. The first step of the YUC6-catalyzed reaction is the reduction of the FAD cofactor to FADH(-) by NADPH. Subsequently, FADH(-) reacts with oxygen to form a flavin-C4a-(hydro)peroxy intermediate, which we show has a maximum absorbance at 381 nm in its UV-visible spectrum. The final chemical step is the reaction of the C4a-intermediate with IPA to produce IAA. Although the sequences of the YUC enzymes are related to those of the mammalian FMOs, which oxygenate nucleophilic substrates, YUC6 oxygenates an electrophilic substrate (IPA). Nevertheless, both classes of enzymes form quasi-stable C4a-(hydro)peroxyl FAD intermediates. The YUC6 intermediate has a half-life of ∼20 s whereas that of some FMOs is >30 min. This work reveals the catalytic mechanism of the first known plant flavin monooxygenase and provides a foundation for further investigating how YUC activities are regulated in plants. PMID:23188833

  3. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves. PMID:26345717

  4. The structure of flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenase RebH

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Huang, Yu; Bingman, Craig A.; Singh, Shanteri; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-19

    Enzyme catalyzed regio- and stereo-specific halogenations influence the biological activity of a diverse array of therapeutically important natural products, including the antibiotics vancomycin and chloramphenicol as well as the anticancer agents calicheamicin and rebeccamycin. The major class of enzymes responsible for this challenging synthetic reaction, the flavin-dependent halogenases, catalyzes the formation of carbon-halogen bonds using flavin, a halide ion (Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -} or I{sup -}), and O{sub 2}. Recent mechanistic and structural advances achieved with the model flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases PrnA and RebH have greatly enhanced the level of understanding of this unique reaction. According to these studies, the mechanism for tryptophan halogenation proceeds via FAD(C4a)-OOH activation of a chloride ion into the transient chlorinating species HOCl. The key evidence for the requirement of a transient chlorinating species is the discovery that a {approx}10-{angstrom}-long tunnel separates FAD and tryptophan in the ligand-bound form of PrnA. In a recent compelling study to elucidate the strategy by which RebH controls this highly reactive and indiscriminant oxidant, a Lys79-{var_epsilon}NH-Cl chloramine intermediate was implicated as the actual chlorinating species within RebH and a structural investigation of RebH was reported. Here we report our independent structural analysis of Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes RebH (Uni-Prot accession number Q8KHZ8, 530 amino acids) in its apo-form as well as in a complex with both tryptophan and FAD.

  5. Photosensitization of singlet oxygen formation by pterins and flavins. Time-resolved studies of oxygen phosphorescence under laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Egorov, S Y; Krasnovsky, A A; Bashtanov, M Y; Mironov, E A; Ludnikova, T A; Kritsky, M S

    1999-10-01

    To elucidate the biochemical roles of singlet molecular oxygen (1(O2)) in the light-dependent reactions photosensitized by biological blue-light photoreceptors, time-resolved measurements of photosensitized 1O2 phosphorescence (1270 nm) were performed in air-saturated aqueous ((D2)O) solutions of pterins (2-amino-4-hydroxy-6,7-dimethylpteridine (DMP) and 2-amino-4-hydroxy-6-tetrahydroxybutyl-(D-arabo)pteridine (TOP)) and flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) under excitation with nitrogen laser (337.1 nm) pulses. The 1(O2) quantum yields were found to be 0.16, 0.20, 0.50, and 0.50 for DMP, TOP, riboflavin, and FMN, respectively. The data indicate that pterins and flavins are rather efficient photosensitizers of 1(O2) production that might be important for their photobiological functions. PMID:10561557

  6. Highly fluorescent flavins: rational molecular design for quenching protection based on repulsive and attractive control of molecular alignment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Haruka; Inoue, Ryo; Kawamorita, Soichiro; Komiya, Naruyoshi; Imada, Yasushi; Naota, Takeshi

    2015-06-15

    Unprecedented intense fluorescent emission was observed for a variety of flavin compounds bearing a perpendicular cyclic imide moiety at the C7 position of an isoalloxazine platform. A series of alloxan-substituted flavins was prepared selectively by reduction of the corresponding N-aryl-2-nitro-5-alkoxyanilines with zinc dust and subsequent reaction with alloxan monohydrate in the presence of boric acid. Analogues bearing oxazolidine-2,4-dione functionality were obtained on methylation of the alloxan-substituted flavins with methyl iodide and subsequent rearrangement in the presence of an inorganic base. The flavin compounds exhibit intense white-green fluorescent emission in the solution state under UV excitation at 298 K, with emission efficiencies Φ298 K greater than 0.55 in CH3 CN, which are higher than the values for all reported flavin compounds under similar conditions. The highest Φ298 K value of 0.70 was obtained in CH3 CN for isoalloxazine bearing C7-alloxan and N10-2,6-diisopropylphenyl groups. The temperature dependence of the emission intensities indicates that the pronounced emission properties at 298 K are attributable to the highly heat resistant properties towards emission decay with increasing temperature. Mechanistic studies, including X-ray diffraction analysis, revealed that the good emission properties and high heat resistance of the alloxan-substituted flavins are due to a synergetic effect of the associative nature of the C7-alloxan unit and the repulsive nature of the perpendicular bulky substituents at the C7 and N10 positions. PMID:25962532

  7. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  8. Characterization of Chlorophenol 4-Monooxygenase (TftD) and NADH:Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidoreductase (TftC) of Burkholderia cepacia AC1100

    PubMed Central

    Gisi, Michelle R.; Xun, Luying

    2003-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 uses 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, an environmental pollutant, as a sole carbon and energy source. Chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase is a key enzyme in the degradation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and it was originally characterized as a two-component enzyme (TftC and TftD). Sequence analysis suggests that they are separate enzymes. The two proteins were separately produced in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. TftC was an NADH:flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) oxidoreductase. A C-terminally His-tagged fusion TftC used NADH to reduce either FAD or flavin mononucleotide (FMN) but did not use NADPH or riboflavin as a substrate. Kinetic and binding property analysis showed that FAD was a better substrate than FMN. TftD was a reduced FAD (FADH2)-utilizing monooxygenase, and FADH2 was supplied by TftC. It converted 2,4,5-trichlorophenol to 2,5-dichloro-p-quinol and then to 5-chlorohydroxyquinol but converted 2,4,6-trichlorophenol only to 2,6-dichloro-p-quinol as the final product. TftD interacted with FADH2 and retarded its rapid oxidation by O2. A spectrum of possible TftD-bound FAD-peroxide was identified, indicating that the peroxide is likely the active oxygen species attacking the aromatic substrates. The reclassification of the two enzymes further supports the new discovery of FADH2-utilizing enzymes, which have homologues in the domains Bacteria and Archaea. PMID:12700257

  9. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  10. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-04-29

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities.

  11. Chopping and Changing: the Evolution of the Flavin-dependent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano; Furnham, Nicholas; Thornton, Janet M; Laskowski, Roman A

    2016-07-31

    Flavin-dependent monooxygenases play a variety of key physiological roles and are also very powerful biotechnological tools. These enzymes have been classified into eight different classes (A-H) based on their sequences and biochemical features. By combining structural and sequence analysis, and phylogenetic inference, we have explored the evolutionary history of classes A, B, E, F, and G and demonstrate that their multidomain architectures reflect their phylogenetic relationships, suggesting that the main evolutionary steps in their divergence are likely to have arisen from the recruitment of different domains. Additionally, the functional divergence within in each class appears to have been the result of other mechanisms such as a complex set of single-point mutations. Our results reinforce the idea that a main constraint on the evolution of cofactor-dependent enzymes is the functional binding of the cofactor. Additionally, a remarkable feature of this family is that the sequence of the key flavin adenine dinucleotide-binding domain is split into at least two parts in all classes studied here. We propose a complex set of evolutionary events that gave rise to the origin of the different classes within this family. PMID:27423402

  12. A fluorescence polarization binding assay to identify inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jun; Kizjakina, Karina; Robinson, Reeder; Tolani, Karishma; Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    N-Hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are essential for pathogenesis in fungi and bacteria. NMOs catalyze the hydroxylation of sine and ornithine in the biosynthesis of hydroxamate-containing siderophores. Inhibition of kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), which catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, alleviates neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases and brain infections caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. These enzymes are examples of flavin-dependent monooxygenases, which are validated drug targets. Here, we describe the development and optimization of a fluorescence polarization assay to identify potential inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Fluorescently labeled ADP molecules were synthesized and tested. An ADP-TAMRA chromophore bound to KMO with a K(d) value of 0.60 ± 0.05 μM and to the NMOs from Aspergillus fumigatus and Mycobacterium smegmatis with K(d) values of 2.1 ± 0.2 and 4.0 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. The assay was tested in competitive binding experiments with substrates and products of KMO and an NMO. Furthermore, we show that this assay can be used to identify inhibitors of NMOs. A Z' factor of 0.77 was calculated, and we show that the assay exhibits good tolerance to temperature, incubation time, and dimethyl sulfoxide concentration. PMID:22410281

  13. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The process known as “adaptive response” allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 ± 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure in space group P32 that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB. PMID:22004173

  14. Old chromophores, new photoactivation paradigms, trendy applications: flavins in blue light-sensing photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge on the mechanisms by which blue light (BL) is sensed by diverse and numerous organisms, and of the physiological responses elicited by the BL photoreceptors, has grown remarkably during the last two decades. The basis for this "blue revival" was set by the identification and molecular characterization of long sought plant BL sensors, employing flavins as chromophores, chiefly cryptochromes and phototropins. The latter photosensors are the foundation members of the so-called light, oxygen, voltage (LOV)-protein family, largely spread among archaea, bacteria, fungi and plants. The accumulation of sequenced microbial genomes during the last years has added the BLUF (Blue Light sensing Using FAD) family to the BL photoreceptors and yielded the opportunity for intense "genome mining," which has presented to us the intriguing wealth of BL sensing in prokaryotes. In this contribution we provide an update of flavin-based BL sensors of the LOV and BLUF type, from prokaryotic microorganisms, with special emphasis to their light-activation pathways and molecular signal-transduction mechanisms. Rather than being a fully comprehensive review, this research collects the most recent discoveries and aims to unveil and compare signaling pathways and mechanisms of BL sensors. PMID:21352235

  15. Effects of 3G cell phone exposure on the structure and function of the human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Tanvir, Shazia; Thuróczy, György; Selmaoui, Brahim; Silva Pires Antonietti, Viviane; Sonnet, Pascal; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Lévêque, Philippe; Pulvin, Sylviane; de Seze, René

    2016-10-01

    Cell phones increase exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Whether EMFs exert specific effects on biological systems remains debatable. This study investigated the effect of cell phone exposure on the structure and function of human NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). CPR plays a key role in the electron transfer to cytochrome P450, which takes part in a wide range of oxidative metabolic reactions in various organisms from microbes to humans. Human CPR was exposed for 60min to 1966-MHz RF inside a transverse electromagnetic cell (TEM-cell) placed in an incubator. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was 5W·kg(-1). Conformation changes have been detected through fluorescent spectroscopy of flavin and tryptophan residues, and investigated through circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and microelectrophoresis. These showed that CPR was narrowed. By using cytochrome C reductase activity to assess the electron flux through the CPR, the Michaelis Menten constant (Km) and the maximum initial velocity (Vmax) decreased by 22% as compared with controls. This change was due to small changes in the tertiary and secondary structures of the protein at 37°C. The relevance of these findings to an actual RF exposure scenario demands further biochemical and in-vivo confirmation. PMID:27243445

  16. Identification and characterization of two families of F420H2-dependent reductases from Mycobacteria that catalyse aflatoxin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew C; Jackson, Colin J; Tattersall, David B; French, Nigel; Peat, Thomas S; Newman, Janet; Briggs, Lyndall J; Lapalikar, Gauri V; Campbell, Peter M; Scott, Colin; Russell, Robyn J; Oakeshott, John G

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are polyaromatic mycotoxins that contaminate a range of food crops as a result of fungal growth and contribute to serious health problems in the developing world because of their toxicity and mutagenicity. Although relatively resistant to biotic degradation, aflatoxins can be metabolized by certain species of Actinomycetales. However, the enzymatic basis for their breakdown has not been reported until now. We have identified nine Mycobacterium smegmatis enzymes that utilize the deazaflavin cofactor F420H2 to catalyse the reduction of the α,β-unsaturated ester moiety of aflatoxins, activating the molecules for spontaneous hydrolysis and detoxification. These enzymes belong to two previously uncharacterized F420H2 dependent reductase (FDR-A and -B) families that are distantly related to the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) dependent pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate oxidases (PNPOxs). We have solved crystal structures of an enzyme from each FDR family and show that they, like the PNPOxs, adopt a split barrel protein fold, although the FDRs also possess an extended and highly charged F420H2 binding groove. A general role for these enzymes in xenobiotic metabolism is discussed, including the observation that the nitro-reductase Rv3547 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is responsible for the activation of bicyclic nitroimidazole prodrugs belongs to the FDR-A family. PMID:20807200

  17. The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Aeromonas caviae ST exhibits NADH-dependent tellurite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel E; Molina, Roberto; Díaz, Waldo; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2008-10-10

    Potassium tellurite (K(2)TeO(3)) is extremely toxic for most forms of life and only a limited number of organisms are naturally resistant to the toxic effects of this compound. Crude extracts prepared from the environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST catalize the in vitro reduction of TeO32- in a NADH-dependent reaction. Upon fractionation by ionic exchange column chromatography three major polypeptides identified as the E1, E2, and E3 components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were identified in fractions exhibiting tellurite-reducing activity. Tellurite reductase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities co-eluted from a Sephadex gel filtration column. To determine which component(s) of the PDH complex has tellurite reductase activity, the A. caviae ST structural genes encoding for E1 (aceE), E2 (aceF), and E3 (lpdA) were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their gene products purified. Results indicated that tellurite reductase activity lies almost exclusively in the E3 component, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The E3 component of the PDH complex from E. coli, Zymomonas mobilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus also showed NADH-dependent tellurite reductase in vitro suggesting that this enzymatic activity is widely distributed among microorganisms. PMID:18675788

  18. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... reductase enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (also known as ... is responsible for the last step in the production of tetrahydrobiopterin. Tetrahydrobiopterin helps process several building blocks ...

  19. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  20. Multiple aldehyde reductases of human brain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-01-01

    Human brain contains four forms of aldehyde reducing enzymes. One major activity, designated AR3, has properties indicating its identity with the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase, EC 1.1.1.2. The other major form of human brain enzyme, AR1, which is also NADPH-dependent, reduces both aldehyde and ketone-containing substrates, including vitamin K3 (menadione) and daunorubicin, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. This enzyme is very sensitive to inhibition by the flavonoids quercitrin and quercetine, and may be analogous to a daunorubicin reductase previously described in liver of other species. One minor form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, demonstrates substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity which suggest its similarity to aldose reductases found in lens and other tissues of many species. This enzyme, which can also use NADH as cofactor to some extent, is the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of the biogenic amines. The fourth human brain enzyme ("SSA reductase") differs from the other forms in its ability to use NADH as well as or better than NADPH as cofactor, and in its molecular weight, which is nearly twice that of the other forms. It is quite specific for succinic semialdehyde (SSA) as substrate, and was found to be significantly inhibited only by quercetine and quercitrin. AR3 can also reduce SSA, and both enzymes may contribute to the production of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in vivo. These results indicate that the human brain aldehyde reductases can play relatively specific physiologic roles. PMID:7424738

  1. Dual role of NADP(H) in the reaction of a flavin dependent N-hydroxylating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Romero, Elvira; Fedkenheuer, Michael; Chocklett, Samuel W; Qi, Jun; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus siderophore A (Af SidA) is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of ornithine, producing N(5)-hydroxyornithine. This is the first step in the biosynthesis of hydroxamate-containing siderophores in A. fumigatus. Af SidA is essential for virulence, validating this enzyme as a drug target. Af SidA can accept reducing equivalents from either NADPH or NADH and displays similar kinetic parameters when using either coenzyme. When the enzyme is reduced with NADPH and reacted with molecular oxygen, a C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate is observed. When the enzyme is reduced with NADH, the intermediate is 2-fold less stable. Steady-state kinetic isotope effect values of 3 and 2 were determined for NADPH and NADH, respectively. The difference in the isotope effect values is due to differences in the rate of flavin reduction by these coenzymes. A difference in the binding mode between these coenzymes was observed by monitoring flavin fluorescence. Limited proteolysis studies show that NADP(+), and not NAD(+), protects Af SidA from proteolysis, suggesting that it induces conformational changes upon binding. Together, these results are consistent with NADPH having a role in flavin reduction and in the modulation of conformational changes, which positions NADP(+) to also play a role in stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin. PMID:22465572

  2. Urocanate reductase: identification of a novel anaerobic respiratory pathway in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Bogachev, Alexander V; Bertsova, Yulia V; Bloch, Dmitry A; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2012-12-01

    Interpretation of the constantly expanding body of genomic information requires that the function of each gene be established. Here we report the genomic analysis and structural modelling of a previously uncharacterized redox-metabolism protein UrdA (SO_4620) of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which led to a discovery of the novel enzymatic activity, urocanate reductase. Further cloning and expression of urdA, as well as purification and biochemical study of the gene's product UrdA and redox titration of its prosthetic groups confirmed that the latter is indeed a flavin-containing enzyme catalysing the unidirectional reaction of two-electron reduction of urocanic acid to deamino-histidine, an activity not reported earlier. UrdA exhibits both high substrate affinity and high turnover rate (K(m)  < 10 μM, k(cat)  = 360 s(-1) ) and strong specificity in favour of urocanic acid. UrdA homologues are present in various bacterial genera, such as Shewanella, Fusobacterium and Clostridium, the latter including the human pathogen Clostridium tetani. The UrdA activity in S. oneidensis is induced by its substrate under anaerobic conditions and it enables anaerobic growth with urocanic acid as a sole terminal electron acceptor. The latter capability can provide the cells of UrdA-containing bacteria with a niche where no other bacteria can compete and survive. PMID:23078170

  3. Biochemical Characterization of the Tetrachlorobenzoquinone Reductase Involved in the Biodegradation of Pentachlorophenol

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lifeng; Yang, Jian

    2008-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP), a xenobiocide used to preserve lumbers, is a major environmental pollutant in North America. In spite of an expected high resistance to biodegradation, a number of aquatic and soil bacteria can degrade PCP. In this study, we cloned, expressed and purified tetrachlorobenzoquinone reductase (PcpD), the second enzyme in the PCP biodegradation pathway in Sphingobium chlorophenolicum. PcpD, present mainly as a homo-trimer, exhibited low but statistically significant activity in the reduction of tetrachlorobenzoquinone to tetrachlorohydroquinone. The optimal pH for PcpD activity was 7.0. PcpD was stimulated by tetrachlorohydroquinone at low concentrations but inhibited at high concentrations. Because of the constitutive expression and relatively high catalytic efficiency of downstream enzyme tetrachlorohydroquinone reductive dehalogenase, tetrachlorohydroquinone was unlikely to accumulate in high concentrations, suggesting that PcpD would only be stimulated by tetrachlorohydroquinone under in vivo conditions. It was also shown that PcpD was inhibited by PCP in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, PcpD was regulated by tetrachlorohydroquinone and PCP using a possible “Yin-Yang” mechanism, which maintained tetrachlorobeanzoquinone at a level that would neither significantly decrease the biodegradation of PCP nor cause cytotoxicity in S. chlorophenolicum cells. Structural model of PcpD showed that the putative tetrachlorobenzoquinone binding site, adjacent to the cofactor flavin mononucleotide and the 2Fe2S cluster, was situated in a deep pit on the surface and slightly positively charged. PMID:19325743

  4. Association of C677T transition of the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with male infertility.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Mohammad; Colagar, Abasalt Hosseinzadeh

    2016-04-01

    The human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene encodes one of the key enzymes in folate metabolism. This gene is located on chromosome 1 (1p36.3), which has 12 exons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of the two (C677T and A1298C) polymorphisms of this gene with male infertility. In a case-control study, 250 blood samples were collected from IVF centres in Sari and Babol (Iran): 118 samples were from oligospermic men and 132 were from controls. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms of the MTHFR genotype were detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. There was no association found between the A1298C variant and male infertility. However, carriers of the 677T allele (CT and TT genotypes) were at a higher risk of infertility than individuals with other genotypes (odds ratio 1.84; 95% confidence interval 1.11-3.04; P=0.0174). Structural analysis of human MTHFR flavoprotein showed that C677T transition played an important role in the change in affinity of the MTHFR-Flavin adenine dinucleotide binding site. Based on our results, we suggest that C677T transition in MTHFR may increase the risk of male infertility, and detection of the C677T polymorphism biomarker may be helpful in the screening of idiopathic male infertility. PMID:25412139

  5. Flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide metabolism in rat liver--the occurrence of FAD pyrophosphatase and FMN phosphohydrolase in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Barile, M; Brizio, C; De Virgilio, C; Delfine, S; Quagliariello, E; Passarella, S

    1997-11-01

    In order to gain some insight into mitochondrial flavin biochemistry, rat liver mitochondria essentially free of lysosomal and microsomal contamination were prepared and their capability to metabolise externally added and endogenous FAD and FMN tested both spectroscopically and via HPLC. The existence of two novel mitochondrial enzymes, namely FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18) and FMN phosphohydrolase (EC 3.1.3.2), which catalyse FAD-->FMN and FMN-->riboflavin conversion, respectively, is shown. They differ from each other and from extramitochondrial enzymes, as judged by their pH profile and inhibitor sensitivity, and can be separated in a partial FAD pyrophosphatase purification. Digitonin titration and subfractionation experiments show that FAD pyrophosphatase is located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and FMN phosphohydrolase in the intermembrane space. Since these enzymes can metabolise endogenous FAD and FMN, which are made available by using both Triton X-100 and the effector oxaloacetate, a proposal is made that FAD pyrophosphatase and FMN phosphohydrolase play a major role in mitochondrial flavoprotein turnover. PMID:9395326

  6. Synthesis and structural studies of flavin and alloxazine adducts with O-nucleophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménová, Petra; Eigner, Václav; Čejka, Jan; Dvořáková, Hana; Šanda, Miloslav; Cibulka, Radek

    2011-10-01

    Five flavin (isoalloxazine) and alloxazine adducts with O-nucleophiles, 5-ethyl-4a-hydroxy-3,7,8,10-tetramethyl-4a,5-dihydroisoalloxazine ( 1a-OH), 5-ethyl-4a-hydroxy-3,10-dimethyl-4a,5-dihydroisoalloxazine ( 1b-OH), 5-ethyl-4a-methoxy-3,10-dimethyl-4a,5-dihydroisoalloxazine ( 1b-OMe), 5-ethyl-4a-hydroxy-1,3-dimethyl-4a,5-dihydroalloxazine ( 2a-OH) and 5-ethyl-4a-methoxy-1,3-dimethyl-4a,5-dihydroalloxazine ( 2a-OMe) were prepared from the corresponding salts, 5-ethyl-3,7,8,10-tetramethylisoalloxazinium ( 1a), 5-ethyl-3,10-dimethylisoalloxazinium ( 1b) and 5-ethyl-1,3-dimethylalloxazinium ( 2a) perchlorates by the addition of a nucleophile (water or methanol) and triethylamine as a base. The prepared adducts represent artificial analogs of flavin cofactor derivatives which are essential for the functioning of flavoenzymes. They were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, HR-MS and UV-VIS spectra. In the cases of 1a-OH, 1b-OH, and 2a-OMe, the crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. Flavinium and alloxazinium salts are in rapid equilibria with their adducts in water or methanolic solutions without the presence of a base. It was found that the equilibrium constants for flavin adduct formation is higher by six orders of magnitude than those for alloxazine derivatives. The presence of the sp 3 hybridized C4a atom in the molecule of the adducts causes deviation from planarity. The interplanar angles between benzene and the pyrimidine ring were found to be 31.5°, 23.64° and 15.62° for 1a-OH, 1b-OH and 2a-OMe, respectively, which are much higher than those of previously published adducts of C-nucleophiles. In isoalloxazine adducts, delocalization of π electrons between the N10-C10a and C10a-N1 bonds was detected while the length of the N10-C10a and C10a-N1 bonds in the alloxazine adducts corresponds to a double and single bond, respectively.

  7. Characterization of Flavin-Based Fluorescent Proteins: An Emerging Class of Fluorescent Reporters

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP)–namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4–11), thermal stability (up to 60°C), and rapid maturation of fluorescence (<3 min.). In addition, the FbFP derived from Arabidopsis thaliana (iLOV) emerged as a stable and nonperturbative reporter of promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that FbFP-based reporters have the potential to address key limitations associated with the use of GFP, such as pH-sensitive fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10–40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery). From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to enable

  8. The anaerobic ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase from Escherichia coli requires S-adenosylmethionine as a cofactor.

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, R; Fontecave, M; Jörnvall, H; Krook, M; Pontis, E; Reichard, P

    1990-01-01

    Extracts from anaerobically grown Escherichia coli contain an oxygen-sensitive activity that reduces CTP to dCTP in the presence of NADPH, dithiothreitol, Mg2+ ions, and ATP, different from the aerobic ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase (2'-deoxyribonucleoside-diphosphate: oxidized-thioredoxin 2'-oxidoreductase, EC 1.17.4.1) present in aerobically grown E. coli. After fractionation, the activity required at least five components, two heat-labile protein fractions and several low molecular weight fractions. One protein fraction, suggested to represent the actual ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase was purified extensively and on denaturing gel electrophoresis gave rise to several defined protein bands, all of which were stained by a polyclonal antibody against one of the two subunits (protein B1) of the aerobic reductase but not by monoclonal anti-B1 antibodies. Peptide mapping and sequence analyses revealed partly common structures between two types of protein bands but also suggested the presence of an additional component. Obviously, the preparations are heterogeneous and the structure of the reductase is not yet established. The second, crude protein fraction is believed to contain several ancillary enzymes required for the reaction. One of the low molecular weight components is S-adenosylmethionine; a second component is a loosely bound metal. We propose that S-adenosylmethionine together with a metal participates in the generation of the radical required for the reduction of carbon 2' of the ribosyl moiety of CTP. Images PMID:2185465

  9. Specific labelling of a constituent polypeptide of bovine heart mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone reductase by the inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, C I; Bloxham, D P

    1977-01-01

    1. NADH-ubiquinone-1 and NADH-menadione reductase activities of Complex I were inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium (apparent Ki 23 and 30 nmol/mg of protein respectively). Reduction of K3Fe(CN)6 and juglone was relatively unaffected. 2. Iodoniumdiphenyl and derivatives were much less effective inhibitors. Compounds with similar ring structures to diphenyleneiodonium, in particular dibenzofuran, were inhibitors of NADH-ubiquinone-1 oxidoreductase. 3. Diphenylene[125I]iodonium specifically labelled a polypeptide of mol.wt. 23500. Maximum incorporation was 1 mol/mol of Complex-I flavin or 1 mol/mol of the 23500-mol.wt. polypeptide. 4. The label associated with this polypeptide was of limited stability, especially at lower pH. 5. Complete inhibition of ubiquinone reduction was achieved when 1 mol of inhibitor was incorporated/mol of Complex-I flavin, but the relationship between inhibition and labelling was not linear. 6. No evidence for covalent interaction between diphenyleneiodonium and the phospholipids of Complex I was obtained. 7. Rotenone increased the apparent affinity of diphenyleneiodonium for the 23500-mol.wt. polypeptide without affecting the maximum incorporation. 8. The 23500-mol.wt. polypeptide was not solubilized by chaotropic agents. Prior treatment of Complex I with chaotropic agents or sodium dodecyl sulphate prevented incorporation of diphenyleneiodonium into this polypeptide. PMID:18140

  10. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  11. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  12. Characterization of Cupriavidus metallidurans CYP116B1--a thiocarbamate herbicide oxygenating P450-phthalate dioxygenase reductase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Warman, Ashley J; Robinson, Jacob W; Luciakova, Dominika; Lawrence, Andrew D; Marshall, Ker R; Warren, Martin J; Cheesman, Myles R; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W; McLean, Kirsty J

    2012-05-01

    The novel cytochrome P450/redox partner fusion enzyme CYP116B1 from Cupriavidus metallidurans was expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli. Isolated CYP116B1 exhibited a characteristic Fe(II)CO complex with Soret maximum at 449 nm. EPR and resonance Raman analyses indicated low-spin, cysteinate-coordinated ferric haem iron at both 10 K and ambient temperature, respectively, for oxidized CYP116B1. The EPR of reduced CYP116B1 demonstrated stoichiometric binding of a 2Fe-2S cluster in the reductase domain. FMN binding in the reductase domain was confirmed by flavin fluorescence studies. Steady-state reduction of cytochrome c and ferricyanide were supported by both NADPH/NADH, with NADPH used more efficiently (K(m[NADPH]) = 0.9 ± 0.5 μM and K(m[NADH]) = 399.1 ± 52.1 μM). Stopped-flow studies of NAD(P)H-dependent electron transfer to the reductase confirmed the preference for NADPH. The reduction potential of the P450 haem iron was -301 ± 7 mV, with retention of haem thiolate ligation in the ferrous enzyme. Redox potentials for the 2Fe-2S and FMN cofactors were more positive than that of the haem iron. Multi-angle laser light scattering demonstrated CYP116B1 to be monomeric. Type I (substrate-like) binding of selected unsaturated fatty acids (myristoleic, palmitoleic and arachidonic acids) was shown, but these substrates were not oxidized by CYP116B1. However, CYP116B1 catalysed hydroxylation (on propyl chains) of the herbicides S-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC) and S-propyl dipropylthiocarbamate (vernolate), and the subsequent N-dealkylation of vernolate. CYP116B1 thus has similar thiocarbamate-oxidizing catalytic properties to Rhodoccocus erythropolis CYP116A1, a P450 involved in the oxidative degradation of EPTC. PMID:22356105

  13. Real-time analysis of conformational control in electron transfer reactions of human cytochrome P450 reductase with cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Hedison, Tobias M; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-11-01

    Protein domain dynamics and electron transfer chemistry are often associated, but real-time analysis of domain motion in enzyme-catalysed reactions and the elucidation of mechanistic schemes that relate these motions to the reaction chemistry are major challenges for biological catalysis research. Previously we suggested that reduction of human cytochrome P450 reductase with the reducing coenzyme NADPH is accompanied by major structural re-orientation of the FMN- and FAD-binding domains through an inferred dynamic cycle of 'open' and 'closed' conformations of the enzyme (PLoS Biol, 2011, e1001222). However, these studies were restricted to stopped-flow/FRET analysis of the reductive half-reaction, and were compromised by fluorescence quenching of the acceptor by the flavin cofactors. Here we have improved the design of the FRET system, by using dye pairs with near-IR fluorescence, and extended studies on human cytochrome P450 reductase to the oxidative half-reaction using a double-mixing stopped-flow assay, thereby analysing in real-time conformational dynamics throughout the complete catalytic cycle. We correlate redox changes accompanying the reaction chemistry with protein dynamic changes observed by FRET, and show that redox chemistry drives a major re-orientation of the protein domains in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions. Our studies using the tractable (soluble) surrogate electron acceptor cytochrome c provide a framework for analysing mechanisms of electron transfer in the endoplasmic reticulum between cytochrome P450 reductase and cognate P450 enzymes. More generally, our work emphasizes the importance of protein dynamics in intra- and inter-protein electron transfer, and establishes methodology for real-time analysis of structural changes throughout the catalytic cycle of complex redox proteins. PMID:26307151

  14. Directed evolution of bright mutants of an oxygen-independent flavin-binding fluorescent protein from Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fluorescent reporter proteins have revolutionized our understanding of cellular bioprocesses by enabling live cell imaging with exquisite spatio-temporal resolution. Existing fluorescent proteins are predominantly based on the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related analogs. However, GFP-family proteins strictly require molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which precludes their application for investigating biological processes in low-oxygen environments. A new class of oxygen-independent fluorescent reporter proteins was recently reported based on flavin-binding photosensors from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. However, flavin-binding fluorescent proteins show very limited brightness, which restricts their utility as biological imaging probes. Results In this work, we report the discovery of bright mutants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein from P. putida using directed evolution by site saturation mutagenesis. We discovered two mutations at a chromophore-proximal amino acid (F37S and F37T) that confer a twofold enhancement in brightness relative to the wild type fluorescent protein through improvements in quantum yield and holoprotein fraction. In addition, we observed that substitution with other aromatic amino acids at this residue (F37Y and F37W) severely diminishes fluorescence emission. Therefore, we identify F37 as a key amino acid residue in determining fluorescence. Conclusions To increase the scope and utility of flavin-binding fluorescent proteins as practical fluorescent reporters, there is a strong need for improved variants of the wild type protein. Our work reports on the application of site saturation mutagenesis to isolate brighter variants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein, which is a first-of-its-kind approach. Overall, we anticipate that the improved variants will find pervasive use as fluorescent reporters for biological studies in low-oxygen environments. PMID:23095243

  15. Conformational change in cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at a Au(110)—phosphate buffer interface induced by interaction with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. I.; Convery, J. H.; Harrison, P.; Khara, B.; Scrutton, N. S.; Weightman, P.

    2014-08-01

    Changes observed in the reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) profiles of monolayers of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at Au(110)-electrolyte interfaces at 0.056 V following the addition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) are explained in terms of a simple model as arising from changes in the orientation of an isoalloxazine ring located in the flavin mononucleotide binding domain of the protein. The model also accounts for the changes observed in the RAS as the potential applied to the Au(110) surface is varied and suggests that differences in the dependence of the RAS profile of the adsorbed protein on the potential applied to the electrode in the absence and presence of NADP+ are explicable as arising from a competition between the applied potential acting to reduce the protein and the NADP+ to oxidize it.

  16. Cell Non-Autonomous Activation of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase Promotes Longevity and Healthspan

    PubMed Central

    Leiser, Scott F.; Fletcher, Marissa; Leonard, Alison; Primitivo, Melissa; Rintala, Nicholas; Ramos, Fresnida J.; Miller, Dana L.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) increases lifespan and healthspan in nematodes through an unknown mechanism. We report that neuronal stabilization of HIF-1 mediates these effects in C. elegans through a cell non-autonomous signal to the intestine resulting in activation of the xenobiotic detoxification enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2). This pro-longevity signal requires the serotonin biosynthetic enzyme TPH-1 in neurons and the serotonin receptor SER-7 in the intestine. Intestinal FMO-2 is also activated by dietary restriction (DR) and necessary for DR-mediated lifespan extension, suggesting that this enzyme represents a point of convergence for two distinct longevity pathways. FMOs are conserved in eukaryotes and induced by multiple lifespan-extending interventions in mice, suggesting that these enzymes may play a critical role in promoting health and longevity across phyla. PMID:26586189

  17. Nitronate monooxygenase, a model for anionic flavin semiquinone intermediates in oxidative catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gadda, Giovanni; Francis, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Nitronate monooxygenase (NMO), formerly referred to as 2-nitropropane dioxygenase, is an FMN-dependent enzyme that uses molecular oxygen to oxidize (anionic) alkyl nitronates and, in the case of the enzyme from Neurospora crassa, (neutral) nitroalkanes to the corresponding carbonyl compounds and nitrite. Over the past 5 years, a resurgence of interest on the enzymology of NMO has driven several studies aimed at the elucidation of the mechanistic and structural properties of the enzyme. This review article summarizes the knowledge gained from these studies on NMO, which has been emerging as a model system for the investigation of anionic flavosemiquinone intermediates in the oxidative catalysis of organic molecules, and for the effect that branching of reaction intermediates has on both the kinetic parameters and isotope effects associated with enzymatic reactions. A comparison of the catalytic mechanism of NMO with other flavin-dependent enzymes that oxidize nitroalkane and nitronates is also presented. PMID:19577534

  18. Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 as a potential player in diabetes-associated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ji; Ling, Alisha V; Manthena, Praveen V; Gearing, Mary E; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Croce, Kevin J; Esquejo, Ryan M; Clish, Clary B; Vicent, David; Biddinger, Sudha B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented association between insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease, the key targets of insulin relevant to the development of cardiovascular disease are not known. Here, using non-biased profiling methods, we identify the enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) to be a target of insulin. FMO3 produces trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which has recently been suggested to promote atherosclerosis in mice and humans. We show that FMO3 is suppressed by insulin in vitro, increased in obese/insulin resistant male mice and increased in obese/insulin-resistant humans. Knockdown of FMO3 in insulin-resistant mice suppresses FoxO1, a central node for metabolic control, and entirely prevents the development of hyperglycaemia, hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Taken together, these data indicate that FMO3 is required for FoxO1 expression and the development of metabolic dysfunction. PMID:25849138

  19. Fullerene-Assisted Photoinduced Charge Transfer of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through a Flavin Helix.

    PubMed

    Mollahosseini, Mehdi; Karunaratne, Erandika; Gibson, George N; Gascón, Jose A; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2016-05-11

    One of the greatest challenges with single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) photovoltaics and nanostructured devices is maintaining the nanotubes in their pristine state (i.e., devoid of aggregation and inhomogeneous doping) so that their unique spectroscopic and transport characteristics are preserved. To this effect, we report on the synthesis and self-assembly of a C60-functionalized flavin (FC60), composed of PCBM and isoalloxazine moieties attached on either ends of a linear, C-12 aliphatic spacer. Small amounts of FC60 (up to 3 molar %) were shown to coassembly with an organic soluble derivative of flavin (FC12) around SWNTs and impart effective dispersion and individualization. A key annealing step was necessary to perfect the isoalloxazine helix and expel the C60 moiety away from the nanotubes. Steady-state and transient absorption spectroscopy illustrate that 1% or higher incorporation of FC60 allows for an effective photoinduced charge transfer quenching of the encased SWNTs through the seamless helical encase. This is enabled via the direct π-π overlap between the graphene sidewalls, isoalloxazine helix, and the C60 cage that facilitates SWNT exciton dissociation and electron transfer to the PCBM moiety. Atomistic molecular simulations indicate that the stability of the complex originates from enhanced van der Waals interactions of the flexible spacer wrapped around the fullerene that brings the C60 in π-π overlap with the isoalloxazine helix. The remarkable spectral purity (in terms of narrow E(S)ii line widths) for the resulting ground-state complex signals a new class of highly organized supramolecular nanotube architecture with profound importance for advanced nanostructured devices. PMID:27127896

  20. Kinetics of electron transfer in the complex of cytochrome P450 3A4 with the flavin domain of cytochrome P450BM-3 as evidence of functional heterogeneity of the heme protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Harshica; Halpert, James R.; Davydov, Dmitri R.

    2008-01-01

    We used a rapid scanning stop-flow technique to study the kinetics of reduction of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) by the flavin domain of cytochrome P450-BM3 (BMR), which was shown to form a stoichiometric complex (KD = 0.48 µM) with CYP3A4. In the absence of substrates only about 50% of CYP3A4 was able to accept electrons from BMR. Whereas the high-spin fraction was completely reducible, the reducibility of the low-spin fraction did not exceed 42%. Among four substrates tested (testosterone, 1-pyrenebutanol, bromocriptine, or α-naphthoflavone (ANF)) only ANF is capable of increasing the reducibility of the low-spin fraction to 75%. Our results demonstrate that the pool of CYP3A4 is heterogeneous, and not all P450 is competent for electron transfer in the complex with reductase. The increase in the reducibility of the enzyme in the presence of ANF may represent an important element of the mechanism of action of this activator. PMID:18086551

  1. The C-terminal extension of bacterial flavodoxin-reductases: involvement in the hydride transfer mechanism from the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Ana; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Maya, Celia M; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Hermoso, Juan A; Medina, Milagros; Cortez, Néstor

    2014-01-01

    To study the role of the mobile C-terminal extension present in bacterial class of plant type NADP(H):ferredoxin reductases during catalysis, we generated a series of mutants of the Rhodobacter capsulatus enzyme (RcFPR). Deletion of the six C-terminal amino acids beyond alanine 266 was combined with the replacement A266Y, emulating the structure present in plastidic versions of this flavoenzyme. Analysis of absorbance and fluorescence spectra suggests that deletion does not modify the general geometry of FAD itself, but increases exposure of the flavin to the solvent, prevents a productive geometry of FAD:NADP(H) complex and decreases the protein thermal stability. Although the replacement A266Y partially coats the isoalloxazine from solvent and slightly restores protein stability, this single change does not allow formation of active charge-transfer complexes commonly present in the wild-type FPR, probably due to restraints of C-terminus pliability. A proton exchange process is deduced from ITC measurements during coenzyme binding. All studied RcFPR variants display higher affinity for NADP(+) than wild-type, evidencing the contribution of the C-terminus in tempering a non-productive strong (rigid) interaction with the coenzyme. The decreased catalytic rate parameters confirm that the hydride transfer from NADPH to the flavin ring is considerably hampered in the mutants. Although the involvement of the C-terminal extension from bacterial FPRs in stabilizing overall folding and bent-FAD geometry has been stated, the most relevant contributions to catalysis are modulation of coenzyme entrance and affinity, promotion of the optimal geometry of an active complex and supply of a proton acceptor acting during coenzyme binding. PMID:24016470

  2. Heterotrimeric NADH-Oxidizing Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase from the Acetogenic Bacterium Acetobacterium woodii

    PubMed Central

    Bertsch, Johannes; Öppinger, Christian; Hess, Verena; Langer, Julian D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) of acetogenic bacteria catalyzes the reduction of methylene-THF, which is highly exergonic with NADH as the reductant. Therefore, the enzyme was suggested to be involved in energy conservation by reducing ferredoxin via electron bifurcation, followed by Na+ translocation by the Rnf complex. The enzyme was purified from Acetobacterium woodii and shown to have an unprecedented subunit composition containing the three subunits RnfC2, MetF, and MetV. The stable complex contained 2 flavin mononucleotides (FMN), 23.5 ± 1.2 Fe and 24.5 ± 1.5 S, which fits well to the predicted six [4Fe4S] clusters in MetV and RnfC2. The enzyme catalyzed NADH:methylviologen and NADH:ferricyanide oxidoreductase activity but also methylene-tetrahydrofolate (THF) reduction with NADH as the reductant. The NADH:methylene-THF reductase activity was high (248 U/mg) and not stimulated by ferredoxin. Furthermore, reduction of ferredoxin, alone or in the presence of methylene-THF and NADH, was never observed. MetF or MetVF was not able to catalyze the methylene-THF-dependent oxidation of NADH, but MetVF could reduce methylene-THF using methyl viologen as the electron donor. The purified MTHFR complex did not catalyze the reverse reaction, the endergonic oxidation of methyl-THF with NAD+ as the acceptor, and this reaction could not be driven by reduced ferredoxin. However, addition of protein fractions made the oxidation of methyl-THF to methylene-THF coupled to NAD+ reduction possible. Our data demonstrate that the MTHFR of A. woodii catalyzes methylene-THF reduction according to the following reaction: NADH + methylene-THF → methyl-THF + NAD+. The differences in the subunit compositions of MTHFRs of bacteria are discussed in the light of their different functions. IMPORTANCE Energy conservation in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii involves ferredoxin reduction followed by a chemiosmotic mechanism involving Na

  3. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  4. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin. However, the exact mechanism of flavin involvement is unclear; while some indicate that flavins mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008), others point to flavin serving as co-factors to outer membrane proteins (Okamoto et al., 2013). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MVrad +)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of microbially produced flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 μM) by MELs ([MVrad +] ∼ 40 μM and MtrABC ⩽ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MVrad + and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where (i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and (ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 s. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (⩽1 μM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. For LEP, with the highest reduction

  5. Distribution of seawater fluorescence and dissolved flavins in the Almeria-Oran front (Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momzikoff, A.; Dallot, S.; Gondry, G.

    1994-08-01

    Seawater fluorescence in the blue region of the spectrum (excitation at 360 nm) due to fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM), and dissolved flavins were investigated in the Almeria-Oran geostrophic front (western Mediterranean) in the 0-200 m layer. Seawater fluorescence increased with depth from a minimum in the jet divergence, increasing towards the oligotrophic waters located outside the jet zone, and reaching a maximum in the right side of the jet, a convergence zone. Comparisons with other recorded parameters suggested both physical and biological factors were involved in its distribution along the transect. Photodegradation due to light-penetration and seawater enrichment with FDOM due to biological activity appeared as driving factors of fluorescence distribution. Fluorescence increase along the secondary circulation of the jet was attributed to the combined effects of aging of a bloom (where it was suggested that both auto- and heterotrophic populations were involved) and photodegradation. FDOM of deeper waters (found in the divergence zone) was inferred to be less photodegradable than that generated in the productive layers (the convergence zone). From these data fluorescence in the oligotrophic sites was deduced to originate from prevaling biological activity. Three flavins were investigated: riboflavin and its photoproducts (lumichrome and lumiflavin). The vertical distribution of flavins was marked by a stratification into two layers of enhanced concentrations. The upper one was found to coincide with the upper chlorophyll layer (DCM or DCM1), the lower one with the lower chlorophyll layer (DCM2, where it occurred) and/or with the base of the halocline. From these depth coincidences both auto- and heterotrophic populations were inferred to be sources of flavins although their respective contributions were hard to determine. As for fluorescence, an increase of flavins was found in the jet zone. However significant differences were found between the

  6. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  7. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 ; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  8. Phylogenomics of Mycobacterium Nitrate Reductase Operon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    NarGHJI operon encodes a nitrate reductase that can reduce nitrate to nitrite. This process enhances bacterial survival by nitrate respiration under anaerobic conditions. NarGHJI operon exists in many bacteria, especially saprophytic bacteria living in soil which play a key role in the nitrogen cycle. Most actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess NarGHJI operons. M. tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that expands in macrophages and has the ability to persist in a non-replicative form in granuloma lifelong. Nitrogen and nitrogen compounds play crucial roles in the struggle between M. tuberculosis and host. M. tuberculosis can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions to enhance its survival. In this article, we reviewed the mechanisms regulating nitrate reductase expression and affecting its activity. Potential genes involved in regulating the nitrate reductase expression in M. tuberculosis were identified. The conserved NarG might be an alternative mycobacterium taxonomic marker. PMID:25980349

  9. [Properties of 2,5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'- phosphate reductase, a enzyme of the second stage of flavinogenesis in Pichia guilliermondii yeasts].

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, E M; Shavlovskiĭ, G M; Zakal'skiĭ, A E; Kontorovskaia, N Iu

    1989-01-01

    2,5-Diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'-phosphate reductase has been isolated from cells of Pichia guilliermondii and subjected to 20-fold purification by treating extracts with streptomycin sulphate, frationating proteins (NH4)2SO4 at 45-75% of saturation and chromatography on blue sepharose CL-6B. The use of gel filtration through Sephadex G-150 and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose proved to be less effective for the enzyme purification. It has been established that it is 2,5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5-phosphate but not its dephosphorylated form that is the substrate of the given reductase; Km is equal to 7.10(-5) M. The reaction proceeds in the presence of NADPH or NADH. The enzyme affinity to NADPH (Km = 4.7.10(-5) M) is approximately one order higher than that to NADPH (Km = 5.5.10(-4) M). The enzyme manifests the optimum of action at pH 7.2 and the temperature of 37 degrees C; the molecular weight is 140 kD. EDTA as well as flavins in the concentration of 1.10(-3) M exert no effect on the reductase activity. The enzyme is labile at 4 degrees C and is inactivated in the frozen state at -15 degrees C. The 2.5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'-phosphate reductase has been also revealed in Torulopsis candida, Debaryomyces klöckeri, Schwanniomyces occidentalis, Eremothecium ashbyii (flavinogenic species) and Candida utilis. Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa (nonflavinogenic species). The synthesis of this enzyme contrary to other enzymes of the riboflavin biosynthesis is not regulated in flavinogenic yeast by iron ions. PMID:2511652

  10. Electron transfer reactions in the NADPH oxidase system of neutrophils--involvement of an NADPH-cytochrome c reductase in the oxidase system.

    PubMed

    Fujii, H; Kakinuma, K

    1991-11-12

    Membrane-bound NADPH oxidase of pig blood neutrophils was solubilized with heptylthioglucoside in a high yield. The solubilized preparation from myristate-stimulated cells (sample S) showed high O2- generating activity, and the preparation from resting cells (sample R) had no activity, but the two samples had equal amounts of flavins and cytochrome b-558 (cyt b-558). The electron transfer reactions to exogenous cytochrome c (cyt c) or cyt b-558 in samples S and R were examined. Under anaerobic conditions, NADPH-dependent cyt c reductase activity appeared higher in sample S than in sample R, and the addition of FMN and FAD greatly enhanced the reductase activity of sample S, but not that of sample R. No marked difference between the reductase activities of samples S and R was seen with NADH. Photoreduction of the NADPH oxidase system was examined in the absence of NADPH under anaerobic conditions by monitoring the reduction rates of exogenous cyt c using a flashlight with cut-off filters between 400 and 500 nm. Cyt c reduction was much higher in sample S than in sample R on photoexcitation at about 450 nm. Photoreduction was carried out with a band-pass filter for selective irradiation at 450 nm. Marked reduction of exogenous cyt c was observed only in sample S: the small reduction of cyt c by sample R was independent of the light wavelength and was equal to the blank level. In contrast, no difference in the reduction of cyt b-558 by the two samples was found by either NADPH or photoreduction. Under aerobic conditions, no direct reduction of either cyt c or cyt b-558 was observed. These results suggest that an NADPH-cyt c reductase (a membrane-bound flavoprotein) is involved in the NADPH oxidase system of stimulated neutrophils. PMID:1659905

  11. IN VITRO INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE BY ARSENOTRI-GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenotriglutathione, a product of the reduction of arsenate and the complexation of arsenite by glutathione, is a mixed type inhibitor of the reduction of glutathione disulfide by purified yeast glutathione reductase or the glutathione reductase activity in rabbit erythrocyte ly...

  12. A theoretical multiscale treatment of protein-protein electron transfer: The ferredoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase and flavodoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase systems.

    PubMed

    Saen-Oon, Suwipa; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Masone, Diego; Medina, Milagros; Guallar, Victor

    2015-12-01

    In the photosynthetic electron transfer (ET) chain, two electrons transfer from photosystem I to the flavin-dependent ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) via two sequential independent ferredoxin (Fd) electron carriers. In some algae and cyanobacteria (as Anabaena), under low iron conditions, flavodoxin (Fld) replaces Fd as single electron carrier. Extensive mutational studies have characterized the protein-protein interaction in FNR/Fd and FNR/Fld complexes. Interestingly, even though Fd and Fld share the interaction site on FNR, individual residues on FNR do not participate to the same extent in the interaction with each of the protein partners, pointing to different electron transfer mechanisms. Despite of extensive mutational studies, only FNR/Fd X-ray structures from Anabaena and maize have been solved; structural data for FNR/Fld remains elusive. Here, we present a multiscale modelling approach including coarse-grained and all-atom protein-protein docking, the QM/MM e-Pathway analysis and electronic coupling calculations, allowing for a molecular and electronic comprehensive analysis of the ET process in both complexes. Our results, consistent with experimental mutational data, reveal the ET in FNR/Fd proceeding through a bridge-mediated mechanism in a dominant protein-protein complex, where transfer of the electron is facilitated by Fd loop-residues 40-49. In FNR/Fld, however, we observe a direct transfer between redox cofactors and less complex specificity than in Fd; more than one orientation in the encounter complex can be efficient in ET. PMID:26385068

  13. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  14. The TP0796 Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum Is a Bimetal-dependent FAD Pyrophosphatase with a Potential Role in Flavin Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, an obligate parasite of humans and the causative agent of syphilis, has evolved the capacity to exploit host-derived metabolites for its survival. Flavin-containing compounds are essential cofactors that are required for metabolic processes in all living organisms, and riboflavin is a direct precursor of the cofactors FMN and FAD. Unlike many pathogenic bacteria, Treponema pallidum cannot synthesize riboflavin; we recently described a flavin-uptake mechanism composed of an ABC-type transporter. However, there is a paucity of information about flavin utilization in bacterial periplasms. Using a discovery-driven approach, we have identified the TP0796 lipoprotein as a previously uncharacterized Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase within the ApbE superfamily. TP0796 probably plays a central role in flavin turnover by hydrolyzing exogenously acquired FAD, yielding AMP and FMN. Biochemical and structural investigations revealed that the enzyme has a unique bimetal Mg2+ catalytic center. Furthermore, the pyrophosphatase activity is product-inhibited by AMP, indicating a possible role for this molecule in modulating FMN and FAD levels in the treponemal periplasm. The ApbE superfamily was previously thought to be involved in thiamine biosynthesis, but our characterization of TP0796 prompts a renaming of this superfamily as a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein (Ftp). TP0796 is the first structurally and biochemically characterized FAD pyrophosphate enzyme in bacteria. This new paradigm for a bacterial flavin utilization pathway may prove to be useful for future inhibitor design. PMID:23447540

  15. A flavin-dependent halogenase catalyzes the chlorination step in the biosynthesis of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Christopher S.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Kay, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor 1 (DIF-1) is a polyketide-derived morphogen which drives stalk cell formation in the developmental cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum. Previous experiments demonstrated that the biosynthetic pathway proceeds via dichlorination of the precursor molecule THPH, but the enzyme responsible for this transformation has eluded characterization. Our recent studies on prokaryotic flavin-dependent halogenases and insights from the sequenced Dd genome led us to a candidate gene for this transformation. In this work, we present in vivo and in vitro evidence that chlA from Dd encodes a flavin-dependent halogenase capable of catalyzing both chlorinations in the biosynthesis of DIF-1. The results provide in vitro characterization of a eukaryotic oxygen-dependent halogenase and demonstrate a broad reach in biology for this molecular tailoring strategy, notably its involvement in the differentiation program of a social amoeba. PMID:20231486

  16. Flavin fluorescence lifetime imaging of living peripheral blood mononuclear cells on micro and nano-structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplicky, T.; Horilova, J.; Bruncko, J.; Gladine, C.; Lajdova, I.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvat, D.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2015-03-01

    Fabricated micro- and nano-structured surfaces were evaluated for use with living cells. Metabolic state was tested by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence of living peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) positioned on a coverslip, non-covered, or covered with micro- or nano-structured surfaces (OrmoComp polymer structures produced by 2-photon photopolymerisation, or Zinc Oxide (ZnO) layer fabricated by pulsed laser deposition). Confocal microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) were employed to gather flavin fluorescence lifetime images of living PBMC on structured surfaces. Gathered data are the first step towards monitoring of the live cell interaction with different micro/nano-structured surfaces and thus evaluate their potential applicability in the biomedical field.

  17. Vibrational assignment of the flavin-cysteinyl adduct in a signaling state of the LOV domain in FKF1.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Sadato; Unno, Masashi; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Yamauchi, Seigo

    2009-03-01

    LOV domains belong to the PAS domain superfamily, which are found in a variety of sensor proteins in organism ranging from archaea to eukaryotes, and they noncovalently bind a single flavin mononucleotide as a chromophore. We report the Raman spectra of the dark state of LOV domain in FKF1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Spectra have been also measured for the signaling state, where a cysteinyl-flavin adduct is formed upon light irradiation. Most of the observed Raman bands are assigned on the basis of normal mode calculations using a density functional theory. We also discuss implication for the analysis of the infrared spectra of LOV domains. The comprehensive assignment provides a satisfactory framework for future investigations of the photocycle mechanism in LOV domains by vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:19708118

  18. Investigations of blue light-induced reactive oxygen species from flavin mononucleotide on inactivation of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ji-Yuan; Cheng, Chien-Wei; Yu, Chin-Hao; Chen, Liang-Yü

    2015-02-01

    The micronutrients in many cellular processes, riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are photo-sensitive to UV and visible light for generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Produced from phosphorylation of riboflavin, FMN is more water-soluble and rapidly transformed into free riboflavin after ingestion. This study investigated the application of visible blue light with FMN to development of an effective antimicrobial treatment. The photosensitization of bacterial viability with FMN was investigated by light quality, intensity, time, and irradiation dosage. The blue light-induced photochemical reaction with FMN could inactivate Escherichiacoli by the generated ROS in damaging nucleic acids, which was validated. This novel photodynamic technique could be a safe practice for photo-induced inactivation of environmental microorganism to achieve hygienic requirements in food processing. PMID:25617617

  19. Protein Tyrosine Nitration of the Flavin Subunit Is Associated with Oxidative Modification of Mitochondrial Complex II in the Post-ischemic Myocardium*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chwen-Lih; Chen, Jingfeng; Rawale, Sharad; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Kaumaya, Pravin P. T.; Zweier, Jay L.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2008-01-01

    Increased \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2}^{\\overline{.}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and NO production is a key mechanism of mitochondrial dysfunction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. A crucial segment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is succinate ubiquinone reductase (SQR or Complex II). In SQR, oxidative impairment and deglutathionylation of the 70-kDa flavin protein occurs in the post-ischemic heart (Chen, Y. R., Chen, C. L., Pfeiffer, D. R., and Zweier, J. L. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282,32640 -3265417848555). To gain insights into the oxidative modification of the 70-kDa protein in the post-ischemic myocardium, we used the identified S-glutathionylated peptide (77AAFGLSEAGFNTACVTK93) of the 70-kDa protein as a chimeric epitope incorporating a “promiscuous” T cell epitope to generate a high titer polyclonal antibody, AbGSC90. Purified AbGSC90 showed a high binding affinity to isolated SQR. Antibodies of AbGSC90 moderately inhibited the electron transfer and superoxide generation activities of SQR. To test for protein nitration, rats were subjected to 30 min of coronary ligation followed by 24 h of reperfusion. Tissue homogenates were immunoprecipitated with AbGSC90 and probed with antibodies against 3-nitrotyrosine. Enhancement of protein tyrosine nitration was detected in the post-ischemic myocardium. Isolated SQR was subjected to in vitro protein nitration with peroxynitrite, leading to site-specific nitration at the 70-kDa polypeptide and impairment of SQR electron transfer activity. Protein nitration of SQR further impaired its protein-protein interaction with Complex III. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis indicated that Tyr-56 and Tyr

  20. Mechanistic studies on the flavin-dependent N⁶-lysine monooxygenase MbsG reveal an unusual control for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Reeder M; Rodriguez, Pedro J; Sobrado, Pablo

    2014-05-15

    The mechanism of Mycobacterium smegmatis G (MbsG), a flavin-dependent l-lysine monooxygenase, was investigated under steady-state and rapid reaction conditions using primary and solvent kinetic isotope effects, substrate analogs, pH and solvent viscosity effects as mechanistic probes. The results suggest that l-lysine binds before NAD(P)H, which leads to a decrease in the rate constant for flavin reduction. l-lysine binding has no effect on the rate of flavin oxidation, which occurs in a one-step process without the observation of a C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. Similar effects were determined with several substrate analogs. Flavin oxidation is pH independent while the kcat/Km and kred/KD pH profiles for NAD(P)H exhibit single pKa values of ∼6.0, with increasing activity as the pH decreases. At lower pH, the enzyme becomes more uncoupled, producing more hydrogen peroxide and superoxide. Hydride transfer is partially rate-limiting at neutral pH and becomes more rate-limiting at low pH. An inverse solvent viscosity effect on kcat/Km for NAD(P)H was observed at neutral pH whereas a normal solvent viscosity effect was observed at lower pH. Together, the results indicate a unique mechanism where a rate-limiting and pH-sensitive conformational change occurs in the reductive half-reaction, which affects the efficiency of lysine hydroxylation. PMID:24769337

  1. Mevalonic acid-dependent degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Correll, C C; Edwards, P A

    1994-01-01

    The microsomal enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is subject to rapid degradation when cells are incubated with sterols or mevalonic acid (MVA). It has been shown that this rapid degradation is dependent upon both a sterol and another MVA-derived metabolite (Nakanishi, M., Goldstein, J. L., and Brown, M. S. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 8929-8937). In the current study, inhibitors of the isoprene biosynthetic pathway were used to define further this mevalonic acid derivative involved in the accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. The accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase in met-18b-2 cells, which is induced by the addition of MVA, was inhibited by the presence of the squalene synthase inhibitor, zaragozic acid/squalestatin, or the squalene epoxidase inhibitor, NB-598. Accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase was observed when NB-598-treated cells were incubated with both MVA and sterols. In contrast, the addition of MVA and sterols to zaragozic acid/squalestatin-treated cells did not result in rapid enzyme degradation. This MVA- and sterol-dependent degradation of HMG-CoA reductase persisted in cells permeabilized with reduced streptolysin O. Finally, the selective degradation of HMG-CoA reductase was also observed in rat hepatic microsomes incubated in vitro in the absence of ATP and cytosol. We conclude that the MVA-derived component that is required for the accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase is derived from farnesyl disphosphate and/or squalene in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. We propose that this component has a permissive effect and does not, by itself, induce the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. We also conclude that the degradation of HMG-CoA occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum, and, once the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase has been initiated by MVA and sterols, all necessary components for the continued degradation of HMG-CoA reductase reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:8276863

  2. Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase (NapABC Enzyme) Supports Anaerobic Respiration by Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Valley; Lu, Yiran; Darwin, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapABC enzyme) has been characterized from a variety of proteobacteria, especially Paracoccus pantotrophus. Whole-genome sequencing of Escherichia coli revealed the structural genes napFDAGHBC, which encode NapABC enzyme and associated electron transfer components. E. coli also expresses two membrane-bound proton-translocating nitrate reductases, encoded by the narGHJI and narZYWV operons. We measured reduced viologen-dependent nitrate reductase activity in a series of strains with combinations of nar and nap null alleles. The napF operon-encoded nitrate reductase activity was not sensitive to azide, as shown previously for the P. pantotrophus NapA enzyme. A strain carrying null alleles of narG and narZ grew exponentially on glycerol with nitrate as the respiratory oxidant (anaerobic respiration), whereas a strain also carrying a null allele of napA did not. By contrast, the presence of napA+ had no influence on the more rapid growth of narG+ strains. These results indicate that periplasmic nitrate reductase, like fumarate reductase, can function in anaerobic respiration but does not constitute a site for generating proton motive force. The time course of Φ(napF-lacZ) expression during growth in batch culture displayed a complex pattern in response to the dynamic nitrate/nitrite ratio. Our results are consistent with the observation that Φ(napF-lacZ) is expressed preferentially at relatively low nitrate concentrations in continuous cultures (H. Wang, C.-P. Tseng, and R. P. Gunsalus, J. Bacteriol. 181:5303-5308, 1999). This finding and other considerations support the hypothesis that NapABC enzyme may function in E. coli when low nitrate concentrations limit the bioenergetic efficiency of nitrate respiration via NarGHI enzyme. PMID:11844760

  3. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases – pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, d-amino acid oxidase, and l-lactate oxidase – was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  4. Crystallographic, Spectroscopic, and Computational Analysis of a Flavin-C4a-Oxygen Adduct in Choline Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Orville, A.M.; Lountos, G. T.; Finnegan, S.; Gadda, G.; Prabhakar, R.

    2009-02-03

    Flavin C4a-OO(H) and C4a-OH adducts are critical intermediates proposed in many flavoenzyme reaction mechanisms, but they are rarely detected even by rapid transient kinetics methods. We observe a trapped flavin C4a-OH or C4a-OO(H) adduct by single-crystal spectroscopic methods and in the 1.86 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of choline oxidase. The microspectrophotometry results show that the adduct forms rapidly in situ at 100 K upon exposure to X-rays. Density functional theory calculations establish the electronic structures for the flavin C4a-OH and C4a-OO(H) adducts and estimate the stabilization energy of several active site hydrogen bonds deduced from the crystal structure. We propose that the enzyme-bound FAD is reduced in the X-ray beam. The aerobic crystals then form either a C4a-OH or C4a-OO(H) adduct, but an insufficient proton inventory prevents their decay at cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Crystallographic, Spectroscopic, and Computational Analysis of a Flavin C4a-Oxygen Adduct in Choline Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Orville, A.; Lountos, G; Finnegan, S; Gadda, G; Prabhakar, R

    2009-01-01

    Flavin C4a-OO(H) and C4a-OH adducts are critical intermediates proposed in many flavoenzyme reaction mechanisms, but they are rarely detected even by rapid transient kinetics methods. We observe a trapped flavin C4a-OH or C4a-OO(H) adduct by single-crystal spectroscopic methods and in the 1.86 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of choline oxidase. The microspectrophotometry results show that the adduct forms rapidly in situ at 100 K upon exposure to X-rays. Density functional theory calculations establish the electronic structures for the flavin C4a-OH and C4a-OO(H) adducts and estimate the stabilization energy of several active site hydrogen bonds deduced from the crystal structure. We propose that the enzyme-bound FAD is reduced in the X-ray beam. The aerobic crystals then form either a C4a-OH or C4a-OO(H) adduct, but an insufficient proton inventory prevents their decay at cryogenic temperatures.

  6. Bound Flavin-Cytochrome Model of Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis: Analysis by Free Energy Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gongyi; Pachter, Ruth

    2016-06-30

    Flavins are known to enhance extracellular electron transfer (EET) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacteria, which reduce electron acceptors through outer-membrane (OM) cytochromes c. Free-shuttle and bound-redox cofactor mechanisms were proposed to explain this enhancement, but recent electrochemical reports favor a flavin-bound model, proposing two one-electron reductions of flavin, namely, oxidized (Ox) to semiquinone (Sq) and semiquinone to hydroquinone (Hq), at anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. In this work, to provide a mechanistic understanding of riboflavin (RF) binding at the multiheme OM cytochrome OmcA, we explored binding configurations at hemes 2, 5, 7, and 10. Subsequently, on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, binding free energies and redox potential shifts upon RF binding for the Ox/Sq and Sq/Hq reductions were analyzed. Our results demonstrated an upshift in the Ox/Sq and a downshift in the Sq/Hq redox potentials, consistent with a bound RF-OmcA model. Furthermore, binding free energy MD simulations indicated an RF binding preference at heme 7. MD simulations of the OmcA-MtrC complex interfacing at hemes 5 revealed a small interprotein redox potential difference with an electron transfer rate of 10(7)-10(8)/s. PMID:27266856

  7. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  8. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1-AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1-AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'. PMID:25500069

  9. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  10. Curcumin is a tight-binding inhibitor of the most efficient human daunorubicin reductase--Carbonyl reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Hornung, Jan; Ebert, Bettina; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund

    2015-06-01

    Curcumin is a major component of the plant Curcuma longa L. It is traditionally used as a spice and coloring in foods and is an important ingredient in curry. Curcuminoids have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and gained increasing attention as potential neuroprotective and cancer preventive compounds. In the present study, we report that curcumin is a potent tight-binding inhibitor of human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1, Ki=223 nM). Curcumin acts as a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate 2,3-hexandione as revealed by plotting IC50-values against various substrate concentrations and most likely as a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH. Molecular modeling supports the finding that curcumin occupies the cofactor binding site of CBR1. Interestingly, CBR1 is one of the most effective human reductases in converting the anthracycline anti-tumor drug daunorubicin to daunorubicinol. The secondary alcohol metabolite daunorubicinol has significantly reduced anti-tumor activity and shows increased cardiotoxicity, thereby limiting the clinical use of daunorubicin. Thus, inhibition of CBR1 may increase the efficacy of daunorubicin in cancer tissue and simultaneously decrease its cardiotoxicity. Western-blots demonstrated basal expression of CBR1 in several cell lines. Significantly less daunorubicin reduction was detected after incubating A549 cell lysates with increasing concentrations of curcumin (up to 60% less with 50 μM curcumin), suggesting a beneficial effect in the co-treatment of anthracycline anti-tumor drugs together with curcumin. PMID:25541467

  11. The nitrate-sensing NasST system regulates nitrous oxide reductase and periplasmic nitrate reductase in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Cristina; Itakura, Manabu; Okubo, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Gotoh, Aina; Hidaka, Masafumi; Uchida, Takafumi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-10-01

    The soybean endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum is able to scavenge the greenhouse gas N2O through the N2O reductase (Nos). In previous research, N2O emission from soybean rhizosphere was mitigated by B. japonicum Nos(++) strains (mutants with increased Nos activity). Here, we report the mechanism underlying the Nos(++) phenotype. Comparative analysis of Nos(++) mutant genomes showed that mutation of bll4572 resulted in Nos(++) phenotype. bll4572 encodes NasS, the nitrate (NO3(-))-sensor of the two-component NasST regulatory system. Transcriptional analyses of nosZ (encoding Nos) and other genes from the denitrification process in nasS and nasST mutants showed that, in the absence of NO3(-) , nasS mutation induces nosZ and nap (periplasmic nitrate reductase) via nasT. NO3(-) addition dissociated the NasS-NasT complex in vitro, suggesting the release of the activator NasT. Disruption of nasT led to a marked decrease in nosZ and nap transcription in cells incubated in the presence of NO3(-). Thus, although NasST is known to regulate the NO3(-)-mediated response of NO3(-) assimilation genes in bacteria, our results show that NasST regulates the NO3(-) -mediated response of nosZ and napE genes, from the dissimilatory denitrification pathway, in B. japonicum. PMID:24947409

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the oxygenase component (HpaB) of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-monooxygenase from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seong-Hoon; Miyatake, Hideyuki; Hisano, Tamao; Iwasaki, Wakana; Ebihara, Akio; Miki, Kunio

    2007-07-01

    Crystals of the oxygenase component (HpaB) of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-monooxygenase from T. thermophilus HB8 were obtained which diffracted synchrotron X-rays to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4HPA) 3-monooxygenase enzyme catalyzes the hydroxylation of 4HPA to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate in the initial step of the degradation pathway of 4HPA. This enzyme consists of two components: an oxygenase (HpaB) and a reductase (HpaC). HpaB hydroxylates 4HPA using an oxygen molecule and a reduced flavin, which is supplied by HpaC. HpaB from Thermus thermophilus HB8 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized. Crystals of HpaB were grown in 0.4 M 1,6-hexanediol, 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 5.0 and 25%(v/v) glycerol and diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 1.60 Å. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 91.8, b = 99.6, c = 131.1 Å. The asymmetric unit volume provides space for only one subunit of the tetrameric HpaB molecule, giving a Matthews coefficient V{sub M} of 2.8 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 55.1%. Platinum-derivatized crystals of HpaB were prepared by soaking native crystals in a solution containing 1 mM ammonium tetrachloroplatinate(II) for 1 d and diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.50 Å. MAD data were successfully collected for structural determination using these crystals.

  13. Cloning and sequence analysis demonstrate the chromate reduction ability of a novel chromate reductase gene from Serratia sp

    PubMed Central

    DENG, PENG; TAN, XIAOQING; WU, YING; BAI, QUNHUA; JIA, YAN; XIAO, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The ChrT gene encodes a chromate reductase enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of Cr(VI). The chromate reductase is also known as flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase (FMN_red). The aim of the present study was to clone the full-length ChrT DNA from Serratia sp. CQMUS2 and analyze the deduced amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure. The putative ChrT gene fragment of Serratia sp. CQMUS2 was isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), according to the known FMN_red gene sequence from Serratia sp. AS13. The flanking sequences of the ChrT gene were obtained by high efficiency TAIL-PCR, while the full-length gene of ChrT was cloned in Escherichia coli for subsequent sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of ChrT was submitted onto GenBank under the accession number, KF211434. Sequence analysis of the gene and amino acids was conducted using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, and open reading frame (ORF) analysis was performed using ORF Finder software. The ChrT gene was found to be an ORF of 567 bp that encodes a 188-amino acid enzyme with a calculated molecular weight of 20.4 kDa. In addition, the ChrT protein was hypothesized to be an NADPH-dependent FMN_red and a member of the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. The amino acid sequence of ChrT showed high sequence similarity to the FMN reductase genes of Klebsiella pneumonia and Raoultella ornithinolytica, which belong to the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. Furthermore, ChrT was shown to have a 85.6% similarity to the three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli ChrR, sharing four common enzyme active sites for chromate reduction. Therefore, ChrT gene cloning and protein structure determination demonstrated the ability of the gene for chromate reduction. The results of the present study provide a basis for further studies on ChrT gene expression and protein function. PMID:25667630

  14. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  15. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. How can EPR spectroscopy help to unravel molecular mechanisms of flavin-dependent photoreceptors?

    PubMed Central

    Nohr, Daniel; Rodriguez, Ryan; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established spectroscopic method for the examination of paramagnetic molecules. Proteins can contain paramagnetic moieties in form of stable cofactors, transiently formed intermediates, or spin labels artificially introduced to cysteine sites. The focus of this review is to evaluate potential scopes of application of EPR to the emerging field of optogenetics. The main objective for EPR spectroscopy in this context is to unravel the complex mechanisms of light-active proteins, from their primary photoreaction to downstream signal transduction. An overview of recent results from the family of flavin-containing, blue-light dependent photoreceptors is given. In detail, mechanistic similarities and differences are condensed from the three classes of flavoproteins, the cryptochromes, LOV (Light-oxygen-voltage), and BLUF (blue-light using FAD) domains. Additionally, a concept that includes spin-labeled proteins and examination using modern pulsed EPR is introduced, which allows for a precise mapping of light-induced conformational changes. PMID:26389123

  17. A regulatory role of NAD redox status on flavin cofactor homeostasis in S. cerevisiae mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Locato, Vittoria; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD(+) and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  18. Light signal transduction pathway from flavin chromophore to the J alpha helix of Arabidopsis phototropin1.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Iwata, Tatsuya; Sato, Yoshiaki; Matsuoka, Daisuke; Tokutomi, Satoru; Kandori, Hideki

    2009-04-01

    In the plant blue-light sensor phototropin, illumination of the chromophoric LOV domains causes activation of the serine/threonine kinase domain. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a chromophore molecule in the two LOV domains (LOV1 and LOV2), but only LOV2 is responsible for kinase activation. Previous studies reported an important role of an additional helix connected to the C-terminal of LOV2 (Jalpha helix) for the function of phototropin; however, it remains unclear how the Jalpha helix affects light-induced structural changes in LOV2. In this study we compared light-induced protein structural changes of the LOV2 domain of Arabidopsis phot1 in the absence (LOV2-core) and presence (LOV2-Jalpha) of the Jalpha helix by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Prominent peaks were observed only in the amide-I region (1650 (-)/1625 (+) cm(-1)) of LOV2-Jalpha at physiological temperatures (>/=260 K), corresponding to structural perturbation of the alpha-helix. The peaks were diminished by point mutation of functionally important amino acids such as Phe-556 between FMN and the beta-sheet, Gln-575 being hydrogen-bonded with FMN, and Ile-608 on the Jalpha helix. We thus conclude that a light signal is relayed from FMN through these amino acids and eventually changes the interaction between LOV2-core and the Jalpha helix in Arabidopsis phot1. PMID:19348760

  19. Redox Linked Flavin Sites in Extracellular Decaheme Proteins Involved in Microbe-Mineral Electron Transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX8C disulfide that, when substituted for AX8A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen. PMID:26126857

  20. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T.; Petalcorin, Mark I. R.; Dolphin, Colin T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney – an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  1. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation ofmore » a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.« less

  2. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.

  3. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs): An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs) are enzymes belonging to the “Class B” of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga) and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi) for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other “Class B” monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases –FMOs – and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases – NMOs) was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all “Class B” monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes. PMID:26161776

  4. Yeast flavin-containing monooxygenase is induced by the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung-Keun; Robertus, Jon D.

    2000-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase from yeast (yFMO) carries out the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of biological thiols, including oxidizing glutathione to glutathione disulfide. FMO provides a large fraction of the oxidizing necessary for proper folding of disulfide bond-containing proteins; deletion of the enzyme reduces proper folding of endogenous carboxypeptidase Y by about 40%. The enzyme is not essential to cell viability because other enzymes can generate a significant fraction of the oxidizing equivalents required by the cell. However, yFMO is vital to the yeast response to reductive stress. FMO1 deletion mutants grow poorly under reductive stress, and carboxypeptidase Y activity is less than 10% of that in a stressed wild type. The FMO1 gene appears to be under control of an unfolded protein response element and is inducible by factors, such as reductive stress, that elicit the unfolded protein response. Reductive stress can increase yFMO activity at least 6-fold. This increased activity allows the cell to process endogenous disulfide bond-containing proteins and also to allow correct folding of disulfide-bonded proteins expressed from multicopy plasmids. The unfolded protein response is mediated by the Hac1p transcription factor that mediates virtually all of the induction of yFMO triggered by exogenous reducing agents. PMID:10618381

  5. Flavin containing monooxygenase 3 exerts broad effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Diana M; Wang, Zeneng; Lee, Richard; Meng, Yonghong; Che, Nam; Charugundla, Sarada; Qi, Hannah; Wu, Judy; Pan, Calvin; Brown, J Mark; Vallim, Thomas; Bennett, Brian J; Graham, Mark; Hazen, Stanley L; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-01-01

    We performed silencing and overexpression studies of flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3 in hyperlipidemic mouse models to examine its effects on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of hepatic FMO3 in LDL receptor knockout mice using an antisense oligonucleotide resulted in decreased circulating TMAO levels and atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, we also observed significant decreases in hepatic lipids and in levels of plasma lipids, ketone bodies, glucose, and insulin. FMO3 overexpression in transgenic mice, on the other hand, increased hepatic and plasma lipids. Global gene expression analyses suggested that these effects of FMO3 on lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis may be mediated through the PPARα and Kruppel-like factor 15 pathways. In vivo and in vitro results were consistent with the concept that the effects were mediated directly by FMO3 rather than trimethylamine/TMAO; in particular, overexpression of FMO3 in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, resulted in significantly increased glucose secretion and lipogenesis. Our results indicate a major role for FMO3 in modulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in vivo, and they suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of FMO3 to reduce TMAO levels would be confounded by metabolic interactions. PMID:25378658

  6. A Regulatory Role of NAD Redox Status on Flavin Cofactor Homeostasis in S. cerevisiae Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD+ and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  7. Flavin containing monooxygenase 3 exerts broad effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Diana M.; Wang, Zeneng; Lee, Richard; Meng, Yonghong; Che, Nam; Charugundla, Sarada; Qi, Hannah; Wu, Judy; Pan, Calvin; Brown, J. Mark; Vallim, Thomas; Bennett, Brian J.; Graham, Mark; Hazen, Stanley L.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    We performed silencing and overexpression studies of flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3 in hyperlipidemic mouse models to examine its effects on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of hepatic FMO3 in LDL receptor knockout mice using an antisense oligonucleotide resulted in decreased circulating TMAO levels and atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, we also observed significant decreases in hepatic lipids and in levels of plasma lipids, ketone bodies, glucose, and insulin. FMO3 overexpression in transgenic mice, on the other hand, increased hepatic and plasma lipids. Global gene expression analyses suggested that these effects of FMO3 on lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis may be mediated through the PPARα and Kruppel-like factor 15 pathways. In vivo and in vitro results were consistent with the concept that the effects were mediated directly by FMO3 rather than trimethylamine/TMAO; in particular, overexpression of FMO3 in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, resulted in significantly increased glucose secretion and lipogenesis. Our results indicate a major role for FMO3 in modulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in vivo, and they suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of FMO3 to reduce TMAO levels would be confounded by metabolic interactions. PMID:25378658

  8. The Evolution and Functional Role of Flavin-based Prokaryotic Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Losi, Aba; Mandalari, Carmen; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-based photoreceptor proteins of the LOV (light, oxygen and voltage) superfamily are ubiquitous and appear to be essential blue-light sensing systems not only in plants, algae and fungi, but also in prokaryotes, where they are represented in more than 10% of known species. Despite their broad occurrence, only in few cases LOV proteins have been correlated with important phenomena such as bacterial infectivity, selective growth patterns or/and stress responses; nevertheless these few known roles are helping us understand the multiple ways by which prokaryotes can exploit these soluble blue-light photoreceptors. Given the large number of sequences now deposited in databases, it becomes meaningful to define a signature for bona fide LOV domains, a procedure that facilitates identification of proteins with new properties and phylogenetic analysis. The latter clearly evidences that a class of LOV proteins from alpha-proteobacteria is the closest prokaryotic relative of eukaryotic LOV domains, whereas cyanobacterial sequences cluster with the archaeal and the other bacterial LOV domains. Distance trees built for LOV domains suggest complex evolutionary patterns, possibly involving multiple horizontal gene transfer events. Based on available data, the in vivo relevance and evolution of prokaryotic LOV is discussed. PMID:26138219

  9. Performance of Protein-Ligand Force Fields for the Flavodoxin-Flavin Mononucleotide System.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Michael J; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-08-01

    The ability to accurately perform molecular dynamics and free energy perturbation calculations for protein-ligand systems is of broad interest to the biophysical and pharmaceutical sciences. In this work, several popular force fields are evaluated for reproducing experimental properties of the flavodoxin/flavin mononucleotide system. Calculated (3)J couplings from molecular dynamics simulations probing φ and χ1 dihedral angles are compared to over 1000 experimental measurements. Free energy perturbation calculations were also executed between different protein mutants for comparison with experimental data for relative free energies of binding. Newer versions of popular protein force fields reproduced (3)J backbone and side chain couplings with good accuracy, with RMSD values near or below one hertz in most cases. OPLS-AA/M paired with CM5 charges for the ligand performed particularly well, both for the (3)J couplings and FEP results, with a mean unsigned error for relative free energies of binding of 0.36 kcal/mol. PMID:27441982

  10. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress.

    PubMed

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T; Petalcorin, Mark I R; Dolphin, Colin T

    2016-01-01

    Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney - an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  11. NCB5OR Is a Novel Soluble NAD(P)H Reductase Localized in the Endoplasmic Reticulum*S

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Larade, Kevin; Jackson, Timothy A.; Xie, Jianxin; Ladoux, Annie; Acker, Helmut; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta; Fandrey, Joachim; Cross, Andrew R.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Bunn, H. Franklin

    2011-01-01

    The NAD(P)H cytochrome b5 oxidoreductase, Ncb5or (previously named b5+b5R), is widely expressed in human tissues and broadly distributed among the animal kingdom. NCB5OR is the first example of an animal flavohemoprotein containing cytochrome b5 and cytochrome b5 reductase domains. We initially reported human NCB5OR to be a 487-residue soluble protein that reduces cytochrome c, methemoglobin, ferricyanide, and molecular oxygen in vitro. Bioinformatic analysis of genomic sequences suggested the presence of an upstream start codon. We confirm that endogenous NCB5OR indeed has additional NH2-terminal residues. By performing fractionation of subcellular organelles and confocal microscopy, we show that NCB5OR colocalizes with calreticulin, a marker for endoplasmic reticulum. Recombinant NCB5OR is soluble and has stoichiometric amounts of heme and flavin adenine dinucleotide. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of NCB5OR presents typical signatures of a six-coordinate low-spin heme similar to those found in other cytochrome b5 proteins. Kinetic measurements showed that full-length and truncated NCB5OR reduce cytochrome c actively in vitro. However, both full-length and truncated NCB5OR produce superoxide from oxygen with slow turnover rates: kcat = ~0.05 and ~1 s−1, respectively. The redox potential at the heme center of NCB5OR is −108 mV, as determined by potentiometric titrations. Taken together, these data suggest that endogenous NCB5OR is a soluble NAD(P)H reductase preferentially reducing substrate(s) rather than transferring electrons to molecular oxygen and therefore not an NAD(P)H oxidase for superoxide production. The subcellular localization and redox properties of NCB5OR provide important insights into the biology of NCB5OR and the phenotype of the Ncb5or-null mouse. PMID:15131110

  12. Purification and Properties of NADH-Dependent 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MetF) from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Christal A.; Trimmer, Elizabeth E.; Matthews, Rowena G.

    1999-01-01

    A K-12 strain of Escherichia coli that overproduces methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF) has been constructed, and the enzyme has been purified to apparent homogeneity. A plasmid specifying MetF with six histidine residues added to the C terminus has been used to purify histidine-tagged MetF to homogeneity in a single step by affinity chromatography on nickel-agarose, yielding a preparation with specific activity comparable to that of the unmodified enzyme. The native protein comprises four identical 33-kDa subunits, each of which contains a molecule of noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). No additional cofactors or metals have been detected. The purified enzyme catalyzes the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate to methyltetrahydrofolate, using NADH as the reductant. Kinetic parameters have been determined at 15°C and pH 7.2 in a stopped-flow spectrophotometer; the Km for NADH is 13 μM, the Km for CH2-H4folate is 0.8 μM, and the turnover number under Vmax conditions estimated for the reaction is 1,800 mol of NADH oxidized min−1 (mol of enzyme-bound FAD)−1. NADPH also serves as a reductant, but exhibits a much higher Km. MetF also catalyzes the oxidation of methyltetrahydrofolate to methylenetetrahydrofolate in the presence of menadione, which serves as an electron acceptor. The properties of MetF from E. coli differ from those of the ferredoxin-dependent methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase isolated from the homoacetogen Clostridium formicoaceticum and more closely resemble those of the NADH-dependent enzyme from Peptostreptococcus productus and the NADPH-dependent enzymes from eukaryotes. PMID:9922232

  13. Isolation and characterization of nitric oxide reductase from Paracoccus halodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, N; Sakurai, T

    1997-11-11

    Nitric oxide reductase was isolated from the membrane fraction of a denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus halodenitrificans, in the presence of n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside. A relatively simple and effective procedure to purify NO reductase using DEAE-Toyopearl and hydroxyapatite (ceramic) chromatographies has been developed. The enzyme consisted of two subunits with molecular masses of 20 and 42 kDa associated with the c-type heme and two b-type hemes, respectively. The optical and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of the oxidized (as isolated) and reduced enzymes indicated that the heme c is in the low-spin state and the hemes b are in the high- and low-spin states. The EPR spectrum also showed the presence of the split high-spin component (g perpendicular = 6.6, 6.0) and two low spin components (gz,y,x = 2.96, 2.26, 1.46, gz = 3.59). Although the presence of an extra iron was suggested from atomic absorption spectroscopy, a non-heme iron could not be detected by colorimetric titrations using ferene and 2-(5-nitro-2-pyridylazo)- 5-(N-propyl-N-sulfopropylamino)phenolate (PAPS). One of the extra signals at g = 4.3 and 2.00 might come from a non-heme iron, while they may originate from an adventitious iron and a certain nonmetallic radical, respectively. When CO acted on the reduced enzyme, both of the low-spin hemes were not affected, and when NO acted on the reduced enzyme, the optical and MCD spectra were of a mixture of the oxidized and reduced enzymes. Consequently, the reduction of NO was supposed to take place at the high-spin heme b. The heme c and the low-spin heme b centers were considered to function as electron mediators during the intermolecular and intramolecular processes. PMID:9374857

  14. Structure of Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase from Staphylococcus aureus at 1.54 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett,T.; Wallen, J.; Karplus, P.; Sakai, H.; Tsukihara, T.; Claiborne, A.

    2006-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoASH) replaces glutathione as the major low molecular weight thiol in Staphylococcus aureus; it is maintained in the reduced state by coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR), a homodimeric enzyme similar to NADH peroxidase but containing a novel Cys43-SSCoA redox center. The crystal structure of S. aureus CoADR has been solved using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at a resolution of 1.54 {angstrom}. The resulting electron density maps define the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide conformation, with Cys43-S{gamma} located at the flavin si face, 3.2 {angstrom} from FAD-C4aF, and the CoAS- moiety lying in an extended conformation within a cleft at the dimer interface. A well-ordered chloride ion is positioned adjacent to the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide and receives a hydrogen bond from Tyr361'-OH of the complementary subunit, suggesting a role for Tyr361' as an acid-base catalyst during the reduction of CoAS-disulfide. Tyr419'-OH is located 3.2 {angstrom} from Tyr361'-OH as well and, based on its conservation in known functional CoADRs, also appears to be important for activity. Identification of residues involved in recognition of the CoAS-disulfide substrate and in formation and stabilization of the Cys43-SSCoA redox center has allowed development of a CoAS-binding motif. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that CoADR enzymes are broadly distributed in both bacterial and archaeal kingdoms, suggesting an even broader significance for the CoASH/CoAS-disulfide redox system in prokaryotic thiol/disulfide homeostasis.

  15. Structure Determination and Functional Analysis of a Chromate Reductase from Gluconacetobacter hansenii

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Varnum, Susan M.; Robinson, Howard; Squier, Thomas C.; Long, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental protection through biological mechanisms that aid in the reductive immobilization of toxic metals (e.g., chromate and uranyl) has been identified to involve specific NADH-dependent flavoproteins that promote cell viability. To understand the enzyme mechanisms responsible for metal reduction, the enzyme kinetics of a putative chromate reductase from Gluconacetobacter hansenii (Gh-ChrR) was measured and the crystal structure of the protein determined at 2.25 Å resolution. Gh-ChrR catalyzes the NADH-dependent reduction of chromate, ferricyanide, and uranyl anions under aerobic conditions. Kinetic measurements indicate that NADH acts as a substrate inhibitor; catalysis requires chromate binding prior to NADH association. The crystal structure of Gh-ChrR shows the protein is a homotetramer with one bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) per subunit. A bound anion is visualized proximal to the FMN at the interface between adjacent subunits within a cationic pocket, which is positioned at an optimal distance for hydride transfer. Site-directed substitutions of residues proposed to involve in both NADH and metal anion binding (N85A or R101A) result in 90–95% reductions in enzyme efficiencies for NADH-dependent chromate reduction. In comparison site-directed substitution of a residue (S118A) participating in the coordination of FMN in the active site results in only modest (50%) reductions in catalytic efficiencies, consistent with the presence of a multitude of side chains that position the FMN in the active site. The proposed proximity relationships between metal anion binding site and enzyme cofactors is discussed in terms of rational design principles for the use of enzymes in chromate and uranyl bioremediation. PMID:22879982

  16. Structure of aldose reductase from Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, M.; Abendroth, J.; Zhang, Y.; Sankaran, B.; Edwards, T. E.; Staker, B. L.; Van Voorhis, W. C.; Stewart, L. J.; Myler, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an anaerobic aerotolerant eukaryotic parasite of the intestines. It is believed to have diverged early from eukarya during evolution and is thus lacking in many of the typical eukaryotic organelles and biochemical pathways. Most conspicuously, mitochondria and the associated machinery of oxidative phosphorylation are absent; instead, energy is derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. Here, the 1.75 Å resolution crystal structure of G. lamblia aldose reductase heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli is reported. As in other oxidoreductases, G. lamblia aldose reductase adopts a TIM-barrel conformation with the NADP+-binding site located within the eight β-strands of the interior. PMID:21904059

  17. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: importance of early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fattal-Valevski, A; Bassan, H; Korman, S H; Lerman-Sagie, T; Gutman, A; Harel, S

    2000-08-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency is the most common inborn error of folate metabolism and should be suspected when homocystinuria is combined with hypomethioninemia. The main clinical findings are neurologic signs such as severe developmental delay, marked hypotonia, seizures, microcephaly, apnea, and coma. Most patients present in early life. The infantile form is severe, with rapid deterioration leading to death usually within 1 year. Treatment with betaine has been shown to be efficient in lowering homocysteine concentrations and returning methionine to normal, but the clinical response is variable. We report two brothers with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: the first was undiagnosed and died at 8 months of age from neurologic deterioration and apnea, while his brother, who was treated with betaine from the age of 4 months, is now 3 years old and has developmental delay. PMID:10961793

  18. Flavodoxin: a compromise between efficiency and versatility in the electron transfer from Photosystem I to Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina; Herguedas, Beatriz; Hervás, Manuel; Peregrina, José R; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Navarro, José A; Hermoso, Juan A; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2009-03-01

    Under iron-deficient conditions Flavodoxin (Fld) replaces Ferredoxin in Anabaena as electron carrier from Photosystem I (PSI) to Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR). Several residues modulate the Fld interaction with FNR and PSI, but no one appears as specifically critical for efficient electron transfer (ET). Fld shows a strong dipole moment, with its negative end directed towards the flavin ring. The role of this dipole moment in the processes of interaction and ET with positively charged surfaces exhibited by PSI and FNR has been analysed by introducing single and multiple charge reversal mutations on the Fld surface. Our data confirm that in this system interactions do not rely on a precise complementary surface of the reacting molecules. In fact, they indicate that the initial orientation driven by the alignment of dipole moment of the Fld molecule with that of the partner contributes to the formation of a bunch of alternative binding modes competent for the efficient ET reaction. Additionally, the fact that Fld uses different interaction surfaces to dock to PSI and to FNR is confirmed. PMID:19150326

  19. A novel thiol-reductase activity of Arabidopsis YUC6 confers drought tolerance independently of auxin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Kang, Sun Bin; Kim, Jeong Im; Baek, Dongwon; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Mi Ri; Li, Ning; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asami, Tadao; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J.; Bressan, Ray A.; Pardo, Jose M.; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    YUCCA (YUC) proteins constitute a family of flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), with an important role in auxin (IAA) biosynthesis. Here we report that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing YUC6 display enhanced IAA-related phenotypes and exhibit improved drought stress tolerance, low rate of water loss and controlled ROS accumulation under drought and oxidative stresses. Co-overexpression of an IAA-conjugating enzyme reduces IAA levels but drought stress tolerance is unaffected, indicating that the stress-related phenotype is not based on IAA overproduction. YUC6 contains a previously unrecognized FAD- and NADPH-dependent thiol-reductase activity (TR) that overlaps with the FMO domain involved in IAA biosynthesis. Mutation of a conserved cysteine residue (Cys-85) preserves FMO but suppresses TR activity and stress tolerance, whereas mutating the FAD- and NADPH-binding sites, that are common to TR and FMO domains, abolishes all outputs. We provide a paradigm for a single protein playing a dual role, regulating plant development and conveying stress defence responses. PMID:26314500

  20. A novel thiol-reductase activity of Arabidopsis YUC6 confers drought tolerance independently of auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Kang, Sun Bin; Kim, Jeong Im; Baek, Dongwon; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Mi Ri; Li, Ning; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asami, Tadao; Sabir, Jamal S M; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J; Bressan, Ray A; Pardo, Jose M; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    YUCCA (YUC) proteins constitute a family of flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), with an important role in auxin (IAA) biosynthesis. Here we report that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing YUC6 display enhanced IAA-related phenotypes and exhibit improved drought stress tolerance, low rate of water loss and controlled ROS accumulation under drought and oxidative stresses. Co-overexpression of an IAA-conjugating enzyme reduces IAA levels but drought stress tolerance is unaffected, indicating that the stress-related phenotype is not based on IAA overproduction. YUC6 contains a previously unrecognized FAD- and NADPH-dependent thiol-reductase activity (TR) that overlaps with the FMO domain involved in IAA biosynthesis. Mutation of a conserved cysteine residue (Cys-85) preserves FMO but suppresses TR activity and stress tolerance, whereas mutating the FAD- and NADPH-binding sites, that are common to TR and FMO domains, abolishes all outputs. We provide a paradigm for a single protein playing a dual role, regulating plant development and conveying stress defence responses. PMID:26314500

  1. Solvent as a probe of active site motion and chemistry during the hydrogen tunnelling reaction in morphinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Hay, Sam; Pudney, Christopher R; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2008-09-15

    The reductive half-reaction of morphinone reductase involves a hydride transfer from enzyme-bound beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to a flavin mononucleotide (FMN). We have previously demonstrated that this step proceeds via a quantum mechanical tunnelling mechanism. Herein, we probe the effect of the solvent on the active site chemistry. The pK(a) of the reduced FMN N1 is 7.4+/-0.7, based on the pH-dependence of the FMN midpoint potential. We rule out that protonation of the reduced FMN N1 is coupled to the preceding H-transfer as both the rate and temperature-dependence of the reaction are insensitive to changes in solution pH above and below this pK(a). Further, the solvent kinetic isotope effect is approximately 1.0 and both the 1 degrees and 2 degrees KIEs are insensitive to solution pH. The effect of the solvent's dielectric constant is investigated and the rate of H-transfer is found to be unaffected by changes in the dielectric constant between approximately 60 and 80. We suggest that, while there is crystallographic evidence for some water in the active site, the putative promoting motion involved in the H-tunnelling reaction is insensitive to such changes. PMID:18668493

  2. Insights into severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: molecular genetic and enzymatic characterization of 76 patients.

    PubMed

    Burda, Patricie; Schäfer, Alexandra; Suormala, Terttu; Rummel, Till; Bürer, Céline; Heuberger, Dorothea; Frapolli, Michele; Giunta, Cecilia; Sokolová, Jitka; Vlášková, Hana; Kožich, Viktor; Koch, Hans Georg; Fowler, Brian; Froese, D Sean; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2015-06-01

    5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is the most common inherited disorder of folate metabolism and causes severe hyperhomocysteinaemia. To better understand the relationship between mutation and function, we performed molecular genetic analysis of 76 MTHFR deficient patients, followed by extensive enzymatic characterization of fibroblasts from 72 of these. A deleterious mutation was detected on each of the 152 patient alleles, with one allele harboring two mutations. Sixty five different mutations (42 novel) were detected, including a common splicing mutation (c.1542G>A) found in 21 alleles. Using an enzyme assay in the physiological direction, we found residual activity (1.7%-42% of control) in 42 cell lines, of which 28 showed reduced affinity for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), one reduced affinity for methylenetetrahydrofolate, five flavin adenine dinucleotide-responsiveness, and 24 abnormal kinetics of S-adenosylmethionine inhibition. Missense mutations causing virtually absent activity were found exclusively in the N-terminal catalytic domain, whereas missense mutations in the C-terminal regulatory domain caused decreased NADPH binding and disturbed inhibition by S-adenosylmethionine. Characterization of patients in this way provides a basis for improved diagnosis using expanded enzymatic criteria, increases understanding of the molecular basis of MTHFR dysfunction, and points to the possible role of cofactor or substrate in the treatment of patients with specific mutations. PMID:25736335

  3. Characterization of erythrose reductases from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Birgit; Mach, Robert L; Mach-Aigner, Astrid R

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with putative erythrose reductase activity have been identified in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium graminearum by in silico analysis. The proteins found in T. reesei and A. niger had earlier been characterized as glycerol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase, respectively. Corresponding genes from all three fungi were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Subsequently, they were used to establish optimal enzyme assay conditions. All three enzymes strictly require NADPH as cofactor, whereas with NADH no activity could be observed. The enzymatic characterization of the three enzymes using ten substrates revealed high substrate specificity and activity with D-erythrose and D-threose. The enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger herein showed comparable activities, whereas the one from F. graminearum reached only about a tenth of it for all tested substrates. In order to proof in vivo the proposed enzyme function, we overexpressed the erythrose reductase-encoding gene in T. reesei. An increased production of erythritol by the recombinant strain compared to the parental strain could be detected. PMID:23924507

  4. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases as a detoxification mechanism in insects: new insights from the arctiids (lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Sehlmeyer, Sven; Wang, Linzhu; Langel, Dorothee; Heckel, David G; Mohagheghi, Hoda; Petschenka, Georg; Ober, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera) indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST) data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs) are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects and the

  5. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K.; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC–MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with K{sub m}s ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min{sup −1}. The product formed was identified by LC–MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1.

  6. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates—S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates—was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes. PMID:27621741

  7. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates-S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates-was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes. PMID:27621741

  8. Photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer in an electronically modified flavin derivative: roseoflavin.

    PubMed

    Karasulu, Bora; Thiel, Walter

    2015-01-22

    The photophysical properties of a push-pull flavin derivative, roseoflavin (RoF), are investigated in different surroundings at the molecular level, with focus on intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT, CAM-B3LYP functional) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) are used to compute excited-state energies and one-electron properties of a truncated RoF model, roseolumiflavin (RoLF). Solvent effects are taken into account implicitly by the conductor-like polarizable continuum model and explicitly through a microsolvation scheme. In the gas phase, the calculations predict no crossing between the lowest locally excited (LE) and charge-transfer (CT) states upon twisting the dimethylamine donor group relative to the plane of the isoalloxazine acceptor moiety, whereas this crossing is found to be facile in solution (i.e., in water or benzene). Crossing of the LE and CT states facilitates ICT, which is the main cause of the fluorescence quenching and dual fluorescence character experimentally observed for roseoflavin in solution. The barrier for the ICT process is computed to be lower in water than in benzene, consistent with the enhanced ICT rates observed in more polar solvents. We present a detailed study of the molecular mechanism of the photoinduced ICT process in RoLF. For a typical donor-acceptor chromophore, three such mechanisms are discussed in the literature, which differ in the alignment of the donor and acceptor planes, namely, planar ICT (PICT), perpendicular-twisted ICT (TICT), and wagging ICT (WICT). Our theoretical results suggest that the TICT mechanism is favored in RoLF. PMID:25214319

  9. Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase S-Oxygenation of a Series of Thioureas and Thiones

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Ken; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC-MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with Kms ranging from 7–160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min−1. The product formed was identified by LC-MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1. PMID:24727368

  10. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Marilyn C; Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Stevens, J Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC-MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2-7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with Kms ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30-40 min(-1). The product formed was identified by LC-MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1. PMID:24727368

  11. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) as a source of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Henderson, Marilyn C; Williams, David E

    2014-05-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs/xenobiotics containing a soft nucleophile through a C4a hydroperoxy-FAD intermediate. Human FMOs 1, 2 and 3, expressed in Sf9 insect microsomes, released 30-50% of O₂ consumed as H₂O₂ upon addition of NADPH. Addition of substrate had little effect on H₂O₂ production. Two common FMO2 (the major isoform in the lung) genetic polymorphisms, S195L and N413K, were examined for generation of H₂O₂. FMO2 S195L exhibited higher "leakage", producing much greater amounts of H₂O₂, than ancestral FMO2 (FMO2.1) or the N413K variant. S195L was distinct in that H₂O₂ generation was much higher in the absence of substrate. Addition of superoxide dismutase did not impact H₂O₂ release. Catalase did not reduce levels of H₂O₂ with either FMO2.1 or FMO3 but inhibited H₂O₂ generated by FMO2 allelic variants N413K and S195L. These data are consistent with FMO molecular models. S195L resides in the GxGxSG/A NADP(+) binding motif, in which serine is highly conserved (76/89 known FMOs). We hypothesize that FMO, especially allelic variants such as FMO2 S195L, may enhance the toxicity of xenobiotics such as thioureas/thiocarbamides both by generation of sulfenic and sulfinic acid metabolites and enhanced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the form of H₂O₂. PMID:24561181

  12. Nitrogen and oxygen regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF encoding NADH-dependent nitrite reductase by TnrA and ResDE.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M M; Hoffmann, T; Zhu, Y; Jahn, D

    1998-10-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and catabolic nitrogen metabolism, respectively. However, as reported herein, a single NADH-dependent, soluble nitrite reductase encoded by the nasDE genes is required for both catabolic and anabolic processes. The nasDE genes, together with nasBC (encoding assimilatory nitrate reductase) and nasF (required for nitrite reductase siroheme cofactor formation), constitute the nas operon. Data presented show that transcription of nasDEF is driven not only by the previously characterized nas operon promoter but also from an internal promoter residing between the nasC and nasD genes. Transcription from both promoters is activated by nitrogen limitation during aerobic growth by the nitrogen regulator, TnrA. However, under conditions of oxygen limitation, nasDEF expression and nitrite reductase activity were significantly induced. Anaerobic induction of nasDEF required the ResDE two-component regulatory system and the presence of nitrite, indicating partial coregulation of NasDEF with the respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI during nitrate respiration. PMID:9765565

  13. Nitrogen and Oxygen Regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF Encoding NADH-Dependent Nitrite Reductase by TnrA and ResDE

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Michiko M.; Hoffmann, Tamara; Zhu, Yi; Jahn, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and catabolic nitrogen metabolism, respectively. However, as reported herein, a single NADH-dependent, soluble nitrite reductase encoded by the nasDE genes is required for both catabolic and anabolic processes. The nasDE genes, together with nasBC (encoding assimilatory nitrate reductase) and nasF (required for nitrite reductase siroheme cofactor formation), constitute the nas operon. Data presented show that transcription of nasDEF is driven not only by the previously characterized nas operon promoter but also from an internal promoter residing between the nasC and nasD genes. Transcription from both promoters is activated by nitrogen limitation during aerobic growth by the nitrogen regulator, TnrA. However, under conditions of oxygen limitation, nasDEF expression and nitrite reductase activity were significantly induced. Anaerobic induction of nasDEF required the ResDE two-component regulatory system and the presence of nitrite, indicating partial coregulation of NasDEF with the respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI during nitrate respiration. PMID:9765565

  14. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  15. Crystal structure of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals the binding mode of an inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Saito, Jun; Yamada, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Iida, Maiko; Kitagawa, Hideo; Takahata, Sho; Ozawa, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ohsawa, Fukuichi

    2008-04-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductases are critical for bacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis and thus are attractive targets for developing novel antibiotics. We determined the crystal structure of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae at 1.7 A resolution. There was one dimer per asymmetric unit. Each subunit formed a triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel structure, and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) was bound as a cofactor in the active site. The overall structure was similar to the enoyl-ACP reductase (ER) of fungal fatty acid synthase and to 2-nitropropane dioxygenase (2-ND) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although there were some differences among these structures. We determined the crystal structure of FabK in complex with a phenylimidazole derivative inhibitor to envision the binding site interactions. The crystal structure reveals that the inhibitor binds to a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of FabK, and this is accompanied by induced-fit movements of two loop regions. The thiazole ring and part of the ureido moiety of the inhibitor are involved in a face-to-face pi-pi stacking interaction with the isoalloxazine ring of FMN. The side-chain conformation of the proposed catalytic residue, His144, changes upon complex formation. Lineweaver-Burk plots indicate that the inhibitor binds competitively with respect to NADH, and uncompetitively with respect to crotonoyl coenzyme A. We propose that the primary basis of the inhibitory activity is competition with NADH for binding to FabK, which is the first step of the two-step ping-pong catalytic mechanism. PMID:18305197

  16. Redox Reactions of Reduced Flavin Mononucleotide (FMN), Riboflavin (RBF), and Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with Ferrihydrite and Lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-09-17

    Flavins are secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella and can function as endogenous electron transfer mediators (ETM). In order to assess the potential importance of flavins in Fe(III) bioreduction, we investigated the redox reaction kinetics of reduced flavins (FMNH2 and RBFH2) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. The organic reductants rapidly reduced and dissolved ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite in the pH range 4-8. The rate constant k for 2-line ferrihydrite reductive dissolution by FMNH2 was 87.5 ± 3.5 M-1∙s-1 at pH 7.0 in batch reactors, and the k was similar for RBFH2. For lepidocrocite, the k was 500 ± 61 M-1∙s-1 for FMNH2, and 236 ± 22 M-1∙s-1 for RBFH2. The surface area normalized initial reaction rates (ra) were between 0.08 and 77 μmoles∙m-2∙s-1 for various conditions in stopped-flow experiments. Initial rates (ro) were first-order with respect to Fe(III) oxide concentration, and ra increased with decreasing pH. Poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite yielded the highest ra, followed by more crystalline 6-line ferrihydrite, and crystalline lepidocrocite. Compared to a previous whole-cell study with Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, our findings suggest that ETM reduction by the Mtr pathway coupled to lactate oxidation are rate limiting, rather than heterogeneous electron transfer to the Fe(III) oxide.

  17. A flavin-mononucleotide-binding site in Hansenula anomala nicked flavocytochrome b2, requiring the association of two domains.

    PubMed

    Gervais, M; Labeyrie, F; Risler, Y; Vergnes, O

    1980-10-01

    Previous experiments in our laboratory with Saccharomyces cervisiae flavocytochrom b2 indicated that both fragments alpha and beta of the enzyme after cleavage by yeast proteases are required to form the flavin site. More detailed experiments have not been carried out on the nicked Hansenula anomala enzyme obtained by tryptic cleavage. A method has been devised that gives a quantitative separation in 4 M urea of beta, and alpha with its heme still bound. The characteristics of the various species: isolated alpha and beta and mixed alpha + beta were studied in 4 M urea and after elimination of this reagent by dialysis in the presence of FMN and 2-mercaptoethanol. Several methods, including heme spectroscopy, tryptophan fluorescence, sedimentation studies, and titration of bound flavin, were used. The results indicate that isolated alpha and beta have a folded globular structure after renaturation. The flavin binding to the alpha + beta mixture was important (50-100%) with recovery of the flavodehydrogenase activity. In contrast, binding was not detectable (< 0.5%, Kf > 10 mM) for isolated alpha and beta. As far as mononucleotide binding is concerned, such a cooperative requirement for two folding domains has never been reported in other enzymes. The present results are discussed together with others obtained in our laboratory which demonstrate that, as deduced from their sensitivity to trypsin, the structure of S. cerevisiae and H. anomala flavocytochrome b2 protomers is triglobular 'n-x-beta' (n and x combined within alpha). The tetramer assembly, which remains intact as a nicked enzyme (alpha beta)4 after the first trypsin cleavage, is broken down following a second cleavage of the chain into four cytochrome cores (n) and a functional T-flavodehydrogenase entity, a tetramer of the type (x beta)4. PMID:7439181

  18. Biochemical characterization of a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent monooxygenase, ornithine hydroxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggests a novel reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Lamb, Audrey L

    2007-10-23

    Pyoverdin is the hydroxamate siderophore produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa under the iron-limiting conditions of the human host. This siderophore includes derivatives of ornithine in the peptide backbone that serve as iron chelators. PvdA is the ornithine hydroxylase, which performs the first enzymatic step in preparation of these derivatives. PvdA requires both flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for activity; it was found to be a soluble monomer most active at pH 8.0. The enzyme demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics in an NADPH oxidation assay, but a hydroxylation assay indicated substrate inhibition at high ornithine concentration. PvdA is highly specific for both substrate and coenzyme, and lysine was shown to be a nonsubstrate effector and mixed inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to ornithine. Chloride is a mixed inhibitor of PvdA with respect to ornithine but a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH, and a bulky mercurial compound (p-chloromercuribenzoate) is a mixed inhibitor with respect to ornithine. Steady-state experiments indicate that PvdA/FAD forms a ternary complex with NADPH and ornithine for catalysis. PvdA in the absence of ornithine shows slow substrate-independent flavin reduction by NADPH. Biochemical comparison of PvdA to p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH, from Pseudomonas fluorescens) and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs, from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and hog liver microsomes) leads to the hypothesis that PvdA catalysis proceeds by a novel reaction mechanism. PMID:17900176

  19. Relationships between laser powers and photoacoustic signal intensities of flavin adenine dinucleotide and beta-carotene dissolved in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imakubo, Keiichi

    1994-10-01

    Ar ion laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy has been performed on 0.01 mu M flavin adenine dinucleotide in H2O and 0.01 mu M beta-carotene in n-hexane where the optical absorption spectroscopy is not applicable. On the basis of the linear relationships between laser powers and photoacoustic signal intensities up to 500 mW, it may be concluded that laser power ranging from 10 to 50 mW is required for the successful observation of photoacoustic signals without any photochemical or photobiological effects.

  20. Monoterpene Metabolism. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of Menthone Reductases from Peppermint1

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; McConkey, Marie E.; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-01-01

    activities of these menthone reductases account for all of the menthol isomers found in the essential oil of peppermint. Biotechnological exploitation of these genes could lead to improved production yields of (−)-menthol, the principal and characteristic flavor component of peppermint. PMID:15728344

  1. Redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and Fe(III)-bleomycin by thioredoxin reductase: specificity of enzymatic redox centers and analysis of reactive species formation by ESR spin trapping

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Judith M.; Cheng, Qing; Antholine, William E.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Arnér, ArnerElias S.J.; Myers, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones such as triapine (Tp) and Dp44mT are tridentate iron (Fe) chelators that have well-documented anti-neoplastic activity. While Fe-thiosemicarbazones can undergo redox-cycling to generate reactive species that may have important roles in their cytotoxicity, there is only limited insight into specific cellular agents that can rapidly reduce Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and thereby promote their redox activity. Here we report that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione reductase (GR) have this activity, and that there is considerable specificity to the interactions between specific redox centers in these enzymes and different Fe(III) complexes. Site-directed variants of TrxR1 demonstrate that the selenocysteine (Sec) of the enzyme is not required, whereas the C59 residue and the flavin have important roles. While TrxR1 and GR have analogous C59/flavin motifs, TrxR is considerably faster than GR. For both enzymes, Fe(III)(Tp)2 is reduced faster than Fe(III)(Dp44mT)2. This reduction promotes redox cycling and the generation of hydroxyl radical (HO•) in a peroxide-dependent manner, even with low μM levels of Fe(Tp)2. TrxR also reduces Fe(III)-bleomycin and this activity is Sec-dependent. TrxR cannot reduce Fe(III)-EDTA at significant rates. Our findings are the first to demonstrate pro-oxidant reductive activation of Fe(III)-based antitumor thiosemicarbazones by interactions with specific enzyme species. The marked elevation of TrxR in many tumors could contribute to the selective tumor toxicity of these drugs by enhancing the redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and the generation of reactive oxygen species such as HO• PMID:23485585

  2. The modulation of carbonyl reductase 1 by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Boušová, Iva; Skálová, Lenka; Souček, Pavel; Matoušková, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), an enzyme belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, has been detected in all human tissues. CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of many xenobiotics, including important drugs (e.g. anthracyclines, nabumetone, bupropion, dolasetron) and harmful carbonyls and quinones. Moreover, it participates in the metabolism of a number of endogenous compounds and it may play a role in certain pathologies. Plant polyphenols are not only present in many human food sources, but are also a component of many popular dietary supplements and herbal medicines. Many studies reviewed herein have demonstrated the potency of certain flavonoids, stilbenes and curcuminoids in the inhibition of the activity of CBR1. Interactions of these polyphenols with transcriptional factors, which regulate CBR1 expression, have also been reported in several studies. As CBR1 plays an important role in drug metabolism as well as in the protection of the organism against potentially harmful carbonyls, the modulation of its expression/activity may have significant pharmacological and/or toxicological consequences. Some polyphenols (e.g. luteolin, apigenin and curcumin) have been shown to be very potent CBR1 inhibitors. The inhibition of CBR1 seems useful regarding the increased efficacy of anthracycline therapy, but it may cause the worse detoxification of reactive carbonyls. Nevertheless, all known information about the interactions of polyphenols with CBR1 have only been based on the results of in vitro studies. With respect to the high importance of CBR1 and the frequent consumption of polyphenols, in vivo studies would be very helpful for the evaluation of risks/benefits of polyphenol interactions with CBR1. PMID:26415702

  3. Bacteriophage T4 Virion Baseplate Thymidylate Synthetase and Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Kozloff, L. M.; Lute, M.; Crosby, L. K.

    1977-01-01

    Additional evidence is presented that both the phage T4D-induced thymidylate synthetase (gp td) and the T4D-induced dihydrofolate reductase (gp frd) are baseplate structural components. With regard to phage td it has been found that: (i) low levels of thymidylate synthetase activity were present in highly purified preparations of T4D ghost particles produced after infection with td+, whereas particles produced after infection with td− had no measurable enzymatic activity; (ii) a mutation of the T4D td gene from tdts to td+ simultaneously produced a heat-stable thymidylate synthetase enzyme and heat-stable phage particles (it should be noted that the phage baseplate structure determines heat lability); (iii) a recombinant of two T4D mutants constructed containing both tdts and frdts genes produced particles whose physical properties indicate that these two molecules physically interact in the baseplate. With regard to phage frd it has been found that two spontaneous revertants each of two different T4D frdts mutants to frd+ not only produced altered dihydrofolate reductases but also formed phage particles with heat sensitivities different from their parents. Properties of T4D particles produced after infection with parental T4D mutants presumed to have a deletion of the td gene and/or the frd gene indicate that these particles still retain some characteristics associated with the presence of both the td and the frd molecules. Furthermore, the particles produced by the deletion mutants have been found to be physically different from the parent particles. PMID:894793

  4. Purification and characterization of salicylate 5-hydroxylase, a three-component monooxygenase from Ralstonia sp. strain U2.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ti; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Salicylate is an important intermediate in the bacterial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and salicylate hydroxylases play essential roles in linking the peripheral and ring-cleavage catabolic pathways. Unlike the well-characterized salicylate 1-hydroxylases, the rarely occurred salicylate 5-hydroxylase (S5H) has not been characterized in detail. In this study, the three-component Fe-S protein complex (NagAaGHAb) of S5H from Ralstonia sp. strain U2 was purified, and its biochemical and catalytic properties were characterized. The oxygenase component NagGH exhibited an α₃β₃ heterohexameric structure and contained one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster and one mononuclear iron per α subunit. NagAa is the ferredoxin-NADP⁺ reductase component containing flavin and plant type [2Fe-2S] cluster. The ferredoxin component NagAb was characterized as a [2Fe-2S] dimer which remains remarkably stable in denaturing gel electrophoresis after being heated at 100 °C for 1 h. Purified NagAa and NagAb, NagGH catalyzed the hydroxylation of salicylate to gentisate with a specific activity of 107.12 ± 14.38 U/g and showed an apparent K(m) for salicylate of 102.79 ± 27.20 μM and a similar K(m) value for both NADH and NADPH (59.76 ± 7.81 μM versus 56.41 ± 12.76 μM). The hydroxylase exhibited different affinities for two hydroxysalicylates (2,4-dihydroxybenzoate K(m) of 93.54 ± 18.50 μM versus 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate K(m) of 939.80 ± 199.46 μM). Interestingly, this S5H also showed catalytic activity to the pollutant 2-nitrophenol and exhibited steady-state kinetic data of the same order of magnitude as those for salicylate. This study will allow further comparative studies of structure-function relationships of the ring hydroxylating mono- and di-oxygenase systems. PMID:23624660

  5. Isolation and Expression Analysis of CYP9A11 and Cytochrome P450 Reductase Gene in the Beet Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunqing; Feng, Xiaoyun; Tang, Tao; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), as an enzyme superfamily, is widely distributed in organisms and plays a vital function in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds by interacting with its obligatory redox partner, CYP reductase (CPR). A novel CYP gene (CYP9A11) and CPR gene from the agricultural pest insect Spodoptera exigua were cloned and characterized. The complete cDNA sequences of SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR are 1,931 and 3,919 bp in length, respectively, and contain open reading frames of 1,593 and 2,070 nucleotides, respectively. Analysis of the putative protein sequences indicated that SeCYP9A11 contains a heme-binding domain and the unique characteristic sequence (SRFALCE) of the CYP9 family, in addition to a signal peptide and transmembrane segment at the N-terminal. Alignment analysis revealed that SeCYP9A11 shares the highest sequence similarity with CYP9A13 from Mamestra brassicae, which is 66.54%. The putative protein sequence of SeCPR has all of the classical CPR features, such as an N-terminal membrane anchor; three conserved domain flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) domain; and characteristic binding motifs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SeCPR shares the highest identity with HaCPR, which is 95.21%. The SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR genes were detected in the midgut, fat body, and cuticle tissues, and throughout all of the developmental stages of S. exigua. The mRNA levels of SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR decreased remarkably after exposure to plant secondary metabolites quercetin and tannin. The results regarding SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR genes in the current study provide foundation for the further study of S. exigua P450 system. PMID:26320261

  6. Isolation and Expression Analysis of CYP9A11 and Cytochrome P450 Reductase Gene in the Beet Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunqing; Feng, Xiaoyun; Tang, Tao; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), as an enzyme superfamily, is widely distributed in organisms and plays a vital function in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds by interacting with its obligatory redox partner, CYP reductase (CPR). A novel CYP gene (CYP9A11) and CPR gene from the agricultural pest insect Spodoptera exigua were cloned and characterized. The complete cDNA sequences of SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR are 1,931 and 3,919 bp in length, respectively, and contain open reading frames of 1,593 and 2,070 nucleotides, respectively. Analysis of the putative protein sequences indicated that SeCYP9A11 contains a heme-binding domain and the unique characteristic sequence (SRFALCE) of the CYP9 family, in addition to a signal peptide and transmembrane segment at the N-terminal. Alignment analysis revealed that SeCYP9A11 shares the highest sequence similarity with CYP9A13 from Mamestra brassicae, which is 66.54%. The putative protein sequence of SeCPR has all of the classical CPR features, such as an N-terminal membrane anchor; three conserved domain flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) domain; and characteristic binding motifs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SeCPR shares the highest identity with HaCPR, which is 95.21%. The SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR genes were detected in the midgut, fat body, and cuticle tissues, and throughout all of the developmental stages of S. exigua. The mRNA levels of SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR decreased remarkably after exposure to plant secondary metabolites quercetin and tannin. The results regarding SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR genes in the current study provide foundation for the further study of S. exigua P450 system. PMID:26320261

  7. The 1.6 Å Crystal Structure of Pyranose Dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris Rationalizes Substrate Specificity and Reveals a Flavin Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Krondorfer, Iris; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Peterbauer, Clemens K.; Divne, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenases (PDHs) are extracellular flavin-dependent oxidoreductases secreted by litter-decomposing fungi with a role in natural recycling of plant matter. All major monosaccharides in lignocellulose are oxidized by PDH at comparable yields and efficiencies. Oxidation takes place as single-oxidation or sequential double-oxidation reactions of the carbohydrates, resulting in sugar derivatives oxidized primarily at C2, C3 or C2/3 with the concomitant reduction of the flavin. A suitable electron acceptor then reoxidizes the reduced flavin. Whereas oxygen is a poor electron acceptor for PDH, several alternative acceptors, e.g., quinone compounds, naturally present during lignocellulose degradation, can be used. We have determined the 1.6-Å crystal structure of PDH from Agaricus meleagris. Interestingly, the flavin ring in PDH is modified by a covalent mono- or di-atomic species at the C(4a) position. Under normal conditions, PDH is not oxidized by oxygen; however, the related enzyme pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) activates oxygen by a mechanism that proceeds via a covalent flavin C(4a)-hydroperoxide intermediate. Although the flavin C(4a) adduct is common in monooxygenases, it is unusual for flavoprotein oxidases, and it has been proposed that formation of the intermediate would be unfavorable in these oxidases. Thus, the flavin adduct in PDH not only shows that the adduct can be favorably accommodated in the active site, but also provides important details regarding the structural, spatial and physicochemical requirements for formation of this flavin intermediate in related oxidases. Extensive in silico modeling of carbohydrates in the PDH active site allowed us to rationalize the previously reported patterns of substrate specificity and regioselectivity. To evaluate the regioselectivity of D-glucose oxidation, reduction experiments were performed using fluorinated glucose. PDH was rapidly reduced by 3-fluorinated glucose, which has the C2 position accessible

  8. Metabolism of the Synthetic Progestogen Norethynodrel by Human Ketosteroid Reductases of the Aldo-Keto Reductase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yi; Duan, Ling; Chen, Mo; Penning, Trevor M; Kloosterboer, Helenius J.

    2012-01-01

    Human ketosteroid reductases of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, i.e. AKR1C1-4, are implicated in the biotransformation of synthetic steroid hormones. Norethynodrel (NOR, 17α-ethynyl-17β-hydroxy-estra-5(10)-en-3-one), the progestin component of the first marketed oral contraceptive, is known to undergo rapid and extensive metabolism to 3α- and 3β-hydroxy metabolites. The ability of the four human AKR1C enzymes to catalyze the metabolism of NOR has now been characterized. AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 almost exclusively converted NOR to 3β-hydroxy NOR, while AKR1C3 gave 3β-hydroxy NOR as the main product and AKR1C4 predominantly formed 3α-hydroxy NOR. Individual AKR1C enzymes also displayed distinct kinetic properties in the reaction of NOR. In contrast, norethindrone (NET), the Δ4-isomer of NOR and the most commonly used synthetic progestin, was not a substrate for the AKR1C enzymes. NOR is also structurally identical to the hormone replacement therapeutic tibolone (TIB), except TIB has a methyl group at the 7α-position. Product profiles and kinetic parameters for the reduction of NOR catalyzed by each individual AKR1C isoform were identical to those for the reduction of TIB catalyzed by the respective isoform. These data suggest that the presence of the 7α-methyl group has a minimal effect on the stereochemical outcome of the reaction and kinetic behavior of each enzyme. Results indicate a role of AKR1C in the hepatic and peripheral metabolism of NOR to 3α- and 3β-hydroxy NOR and provide insights into the differential pharmacological properties of NOR, NET and TIB. PMID:22210085

  9. Cloning, characterization and expression of OsFMO(t) in rice encoding a flavin monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jicai; Liu, Lanna; Cao, Youpei; Li, Jiazuo; Mei, Mantong

    2013-12-01

    Flavin monooxygenases (FMO) play a key role in tryptophan (Trp)-dependent indole-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis in plants and regulate plant growth and development. In this study, the full-length genomic DNA and cDNA of OsFMO(t), a FMO gene that was originally identified from a rolled-leaf mutant in rice, was isolated and cloned from wild type of the rolled-leaf mutant. OsFMO(t) was found to have four exons and three introns, and encode a protein with 422 amino acid residues that contains two basic conserved motifs, with a 'GxGxxG' characteristic structure. OsFMO(t) showed high amino acid sequence identity with FMO proteins from other plants, in particular with YUCCA from Arabidopsis, FLOOZY from Petunia, and OsYUCCA1 from rice. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that OsFMO(t) and the homologous FMO proteins belong to the same clade in the evolutionary tree. Overexpression of OsFMO(t) in transformed rice calli produced IAA-excessive phenotypes that showed browning and lethal effects when exogenous auxins such as naphthylacetic acid (NAA) were added to the medium. These results suggested that the OsFMO(t) protein is involved in IAA biosynthesis in rice and its overexpression could lead to the malformation of calli. Spatio-temporal expression analysis using RT-PCR and histochemical analysis for GUS activity revealed that expression of OsFMO(t) was totally absent in the rolled-leaf mutant. However, in the wild type variety, this gene was expressed at different levels temporally and spatially, with the highest expression observed in tissues with fast growth and cell division such as shoot apexes, tender leaves and root tips. Our results demonstrated that IAA biosynthesis regulated by OsFMO(t) is likely localized and might play an essential role in shaping local IAA concentrations which, in turn, is critical for regulating normal growth and development in rice. PMID:24371168

  10. A Flavin Binding Cryptochrome Photoreceptor Responds to Both Blue and Red Light in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W

    PubMed Central

    Beel, Benedikt; Prager, Katja; Spexard, Meike; Sasso, Severin; Weiss, Daniel; Müller, Nico; Heinnickel, Mark; Dewez, David; Ikoma, Danielle; Grossman, Arthur R.; Kottke, Tilman; Mittag, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that act as sensory blue light receptors in insects, plants, fungi, and bacteria. We have investigated a cryptochrome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with sequence homology to animal cryptochromes and (6-4) photolyases. In response to blue and red light exposure, this animal-like cryptochrome (aCRY) alters the light-dependent expression of various genes encoding proteins involved in chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis, light-harvesting complexes, nitrogen metabolism, cell cycle control, and the circadian clock. Additionally, exposure to yellow but not far-red light leads to comparable increases in the expression of specific genes; this expression is significantly reduced in an acry insertional mutant. These in vivo effects are congruent with in vitro data showing that blue, yellow, and red light, but not far-red light, are absorbed by the neutral radical state of flavin in aCRY. The aCRY neutral radical is formed following blue light absorption of the oxidized flavin. Red illumination leads to conversion to the fully reduced state. Our data suggest that aCRY is a functionally important blue and red light–activated flavoprotein. The broad spectral response implies that the neutral radical state functions as a dark form in aCRY and expands the paradigm of flavoproteins and cryptochromes as blue light sensors to include other light qualities. PMID:22773746

  11. Structure and reactivity of hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase in fosfomycin biosynthesis by a cation- and flavin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    McLuskey, Karen; Cameron, Scott; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich; Hunter, William N

    2005-10-01

    The biosynthesis of fosfomycin, an oxirane antibiotic in clinical use, involves a unique epoxidation catalyzed by (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase (HPPE). The reaction is essentially dehydrogenation of a secondary alcohol. A high-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that the HPPE subunit displays a two-domain combination. The C-terminal or catalytic domain has the cupin fold that binds a divalent cation, whereas the N-terminal domain carries a helix-turn-helix motif with putative DNA-binding helices positioned 34 A apart. The structure of HPPE serves as a model for numerous proteins, of ill-defined function, predicted to be transcription factors but carrying a cupin domain at the C terminus. Structure-reactivity analyses reveal conformational changes near the catalytic center driven by the presence or absence of ligand, that HPPE is a Zn(2+)/Fe(2+)-dependent epoxidase, proof that flavin mononucleotide is required for catalysis, and allow us to propose a simple mechanism that is compatible with previous experimental data. The participation of the redox inert Zn(2+) in the mechanism is surprising and indicates that Lewis acid properties of the metal ions are sufficient to polarize the substrate and, aided by flavin mononucleotide reduction, facilitate the epoxidation. PMID:16186494

  12. Structure and reactivity of hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase in fosfomycin biosynthesis by a cation- and flavin-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    McLuskey, Karen; Cameron, Scott; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich; Hunter, William N.

    2005-01-01

    The biosynthesis of fosfomycin, an oxirane antibiotic in clinical use, involves a unique epoxidation catalyzed by (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase (HPPE). The reaction is essentially dehydrogenation of a secondary alcohol. A high-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that the HPPE subunit displays a two-domain combination. The C-terminal or catalytic domain has the cupin fold that binds a divalent cation, whereas the N-terminal domain carries a helix-turn-helix motif with putative DNA-binding helices positioned 34 Å apart. The structure of HPPE serves as a model for numerous proteins, of ill-defined function, predicted to be transcription factors but carrying a cupin domain at the C terminus. Structure-reactivity analyses reveal conformational changes near the catalytic center driven by the presence or absence of ligand, that HPPE is a Zn2+/Fe2+-dependent epoxidase, proof that flavin mononucleotide is required for catalysis, and allow us to propose a simple mechanism that is compatible with previous experimental data. The participation of the redox inert Zn2+ in the mechanism is surprising and indicates that Lewis acid properties of the metal ions are sufficient to polarize the substrate and, aided by flavin mononucleotide reduction, facilitate the epoxidation. PMID:16186494

  13. Microbial Flavoprotein Monooxygenases as Mimics of Mammalian Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases for the Enantioselective Preparation of Drug Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gul, Turan; Krzek, Marzena; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Fraaije, Marco W; Bischoff, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases, which are difficult to obtain and study, play a major role in detoxifying various xenobiotics. To provide alternative biocatalytic tools to generate flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO)-derived drug metabolites, a collection of microbial flavoprotein monooxygenases, sequence-related to human FMOs, was tested for their ability to oxidize a set of xenobiotic compounds. For all tested xenobiotics [nicotine, lidocaine, 3-(methylthio)aniline, albendazole, and fenbendazole], one or more monooxygenases were identified capable of converting the target compound. Chiral liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analyses of the conversions of 3-(methylthio)aniline, albendazole, and fenbendazole revealed that the respective sulfoxides are formed in good to excellent enantiomeric excess (e.e.) by several of the tested monooxygenases. Intriguingly, depending on the chosen microbial monooxygenase, either the (R)- or (S)-sulfoxide was formed. For example, when using a monooxygenase from Rhodococcus jostii the (S)-sulfoxide of albendazole (ricobendazole) was obtained with a 95% e.e. whereas a fungal monooxygenase yielded the respective (R)-sulfoxide in 57% e.e. For nicotine and lidocaine, monooxygenases could be identified that convert the amines into their respective N-oxides. This study shows that recombinantly expressed microbial monooxygenases represent a valuable toolbox of mammalian FMO mimics that can be exploited for the production of FMO-associated xenobiotic metabolites. PMID:26984198

  14. Crystallographic Evidence of Drastic Conformational Changes in the Active Site of a Flavin-Dependent N-Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The soil actinomycete Kutzneria sp. 744 produces a class of highly decorated hexadepsipeptides, which represent a new chemical scaffold that has both antimicrobial and antifungal properties. These natural products, known as kutznerides, are created via nonribosomal peptide synthesis using various derivatized amino acids. The piperazic acid moiety contained in the kutzneride scaffold, which is vital for its antibiotic activity, has been shown to derive from the hydroxylated product of l-ornithine, l-N5-hydroxyornithine. The production of this hydroxylated species is catalyzed by the action of an FAD- and NAD(P)H-dependent N-hydroxylase known as KtzI. We have been able to structurally characterize KtzI in several states along its catalytic trajectory, and by pairing these snapshots with the biochemical and structural data already available for this enzyme class, we propose a structurally based reaction mechanism that includes novel conformational changes of both the protein backbone and the flavin cofactor. Further, we were able to recapitulate these conformational changes in the protein crystal, displaying their chemical competence. Our series of structures, with corroborating biochemical and spectroscopic data collected by us and others, affords mechanistic insight into this relatively new class of flavin-dependent hydroxylases and adds another layer to the complexity of flavoenzymes. PMID:25184411

  15. Crystallographic evidence of drastic conformational changes in the active site of a flavin-dependent N-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Setser, Jeremy W; Heemstra, John R; Walsh, Christopher T; Drennan, Catherine L

    2014-09-30

    The soil actinomycete Kutzneria sp. 744 produces a class of highly decorated hexadepsipeptides, which represent a new chemical scaffold that has both antimicrobial and antifungal properties. These natural products, known as kutznerides, are created via nonribosomal peptide synthesis using various derivatized amino acids. The piperazic acid moiety contained in the kutzneride scaffold, which is vital for its antibiotic activity, has been shown to derive from the hydroxylated product of l-ornithine, l-N(5)-hydroxyornithine. The production of this hydroxylated species is catalyzed by the action of an FAD- and NAD(P)H-dependent N-hydroxylase known as KtzI. We have been able to structurally characterize KtzI in several states along its catalytic trajectory, and by pairing these snapshots with the biochemical and structural data already available for this enzyme class, we propose a structurally based reaction mechanism that includes novel conformational changes of both the protein backbone and the flavin cofactor. Further, we were able to recapitulate these conformational changes in the protein crystal, displaying their chemical competence. Our series of structures, with corroborating biochemical and spectroscopic data collected by us and others, affords mechanistic insight into this relatively new class of flavin-dependent hydroxylases and adds another layer to the complexity of flavoenzymes. PMID:25184411

  16. Reaction of organic nitrate esters and S-nitrosothiols with reduced flavins: a possible mechanism of bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Wong, P S; Fukuto, J M

    1999-04-01

    Organic nitrate esters, such as glyceryl trinitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, are a class of compounds used to treat a variety of vascular ailments. Their effectiveness relies on their ability to be bioactivated to nitric oxide (NO) which, in turn, relaxes vascular smooth muscle. Although there have been many biological studies that indicate that NO can be formed from organic nitrate esters in a biological environment, the chemical mechanism by which this occurs has yet to be established. Previous studies have implicated both flavins and thiols in organic nitrate ester bioactivation. Thus, we examined the chemical interactions of flavins and thiols with organic nitrate esters as a means of determining the role these species may play in NO production. Based on these studies we concluded that a reasonable chemical mechanism for organic nitrate ester bioactivation involves reduction to the organic nitrite ester followed by conversion to a nitrosothiol. The release of NO from nitrosothiols can occur via a variety of processes including reaction with dihydroflavins and NADH. PMID:10232931

  17. Flavin-based quasi-epitaxial organization on single walled carbon nanotubes: Separation, characterization and device integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanulo, Darlington C.

    Canonically defined as one atomically thin sheet of graphite (i.e. graphene), rolled up in a tube at a specific vector designated by a pair of indices ( n,m), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have generated much enthusiasm in the scientific community for their promise to revolutionize materials and their functionalities. Due to their exceptional electrical, optical, mechanical, chemical, thermal and electronic properties, SWNTs have already began and continue to be exploited in a number of new multi-faceted technologies in a broad range of applications. This thesis presents a working model for taking nanotubes from dispersions to devices. Utilizing comprehensive characterization and molecular simulations, we highlight the unique abilities of outfitting SWNTs with a seamless flavin sheath. The precise organization of flavin moieties on the nanotube lattice in forming a perfect helical coating around the nanotube led to the discovery of the first ever-reported quasi-epitaxial based separation scheme. We also present in this thesis the molecular origin for such selection, as well as other consequential ramifications such as enantioselection, superhelical formation and supramolecular assembly. Last but not least, the viability of FMN/SWNT integration in devices such as thin film transistors and other potential sensory applications is also discussed from a design standpoint.

  18. Reduction of tetrathionate by mammalian thioredoxin reductase

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Kudva, Avinash K.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Tetrathionate, a polythionate oxidation product of microbial hydrogen sulfide and reactive oxygen species from immune cells in the gut, serves as a terminal electron acceptor to confer growth advantage for Salmonella and other enterobacteria. Here we show that the rat liver selenoen-zyme thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd1; TR1) efficiently reduces tetrathionate in vitro. Furthermore, lysates of selenium-supplemented murine macrophages also displayed activity towards tetrathionate, while cells lacking TR1 were unable to reduce tetrathionate. These studies suggest that upregulation of TR1 expression, via selenium supplementation, may modulate the gut microbiome, particularly during inflammation, by regulating the levels of tetrathionate. PMID:26252619

  19. Biphasic Kinetic Behavior of Nitrate Reductase from Heterocystous, Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacteria 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Nieto, José; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity from filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria showed a biphasic kinetic behavior with respect to nitrate as the variable substrate. Two kinetic components were detected, the first showing a higher affinity for nitrate (Km, 0.05-0.25 mm) and a lower catalytic activity and the second showing a lower affinity for nitrate (Km, 5-25 mm) and a higher (3- to 5-fold) catalytic activity. In contrast, among unicellular cyanobacteria, most representatives studied exhibited a monophasic, Michaelis-Menten kinetic pattern for nitrate reductase activity. Biphasic kinetics remained unchanged with the use of different assay conditions (i.e. cell disruption or permeabilization, two different electron donors) or throughout partial purification of the enzyme. PMID:16652939

  20. Biliverdin reductase: a target for cancer therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Miralem, Tihomir; Maines, Mahin D.

    2015-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase (BVR) is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s) of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1, and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ, and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26089799

  1. Flavodiiron Oxygen Reductase from Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Vera L.; Vicente, João B.; Pinto, Liliana; Romão, Célia V.; Frazão, Carlos; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Teixeira, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) are a family of enzymes endowed with bona fide oxygen- and/or nitric-oxide reductase activity, although their substrate specificity determinants remain elusive. After a comprehensive comparison of available three-dimensional structures, particularly of FDPs with a clear preference toward either O2 or NO, two main differences were identified near the diiron active site, which led to the construction of site-directed mutants of Tyr271 and Lys53 in the oxygen reducing Entamoeba histolytica EhFdp1. The biochemical and biophysical properties of these mutants were studied by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies coupled to potentiometry. Their reactivity with O2 and NO was analyzed by stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy and amperometric methods. These mutations, whereas keeping the overall properties of the redox cofactors, resulted in increased NO reductase activity and faster inactivation of the enzyme in the reaction with O2, pointing to a role of the mutated residues in substrate selectivity. PMID:25151360

  2. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection is Associated with Induction of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a low hepatotoxic dose in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in...

  3. EXPRESSION OF BRANCHIAL FLAVIN-CONTAINING MONOOXYGENASE IS DIRECTLY CORRELATED WITH SALINITY-INDUCED ALDICARB TOXICITY IN THE EURYHALINE FISH (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R826109)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Earlier studies in our laboratory have demonstrated a reduction of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) activity when salt-water adapted euryhaline fish were transferred to water of less salinity. Since FMOs have been shown to be responsible for the bioact...

  4. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-25

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, some evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin that are proposed to mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MV•+)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of secreted flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 µM) by MELs ([MV•+] ~ 42 µM and MtrABC ≤ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MV•+ and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 seconds. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (≤ 1 µM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. However, at higher FMN concentrations (> 1 µM), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer

  5. Evidence from studies with acifluorfen for participation of a flavin-cytochrome complex in blue light photoreception for phototropism of oat coleoptiles.

    PubMed

    Leong, T Y; Briggs, W R

    1982-09-01

    The diphenyl ether acifluorfen enhances the blue light-induced absorbance change in Triton X100-solubilized crude membrane preparations from etiolated oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Lodi) coleoptiles. Enhancement of the spectral change is correlated with a change in rate of dark reoxidation of a b-type cytochrome. Similar, although smaller, enhancement was obtained with oxyfluorfen, nitrofen, and bifenox. Light-minus-dark difference spectra in the presence and absence of acifluorfen, and the dithionite-reduced-minus oxidized difference spectrum indicate that acifluorfen is acting specifically at a blue light-sensitive cytochrome-flavin complex. Sodium azide, a flavin inhibitor, decreases the light-induced absorbance change significantly, but does not affect the dark reoxidation of the cytochrome. Hence, it is acting on the light reaction, suggesting that the photoreceptor itself is a flavin. Acifluorfen sensitizes phototropism in dark-grown oat seedlings such that the first positive response occurs with blue light fluences as little as one-third of those required to elicit the same response in seedlings grown in the absence of the herbicide. Both this increase in sensitivity to light and the enhancement of the light-induced cytochrome reduction vary with the applied acifluorfen concentration in a similar manner. The herbicide is without effect either on elongation or on the geotropic response of dark-grown oat seedlings, indicating that acifluorfen is acting specifically close to, or at the photoreceptor end of, the stimulus-response chain. It seems likely that the flavin-cytochrome complex serves to transduce the light signal into curvature in phototropism in oats, with the flavin moiety itself serving as the photoreceptor. PMID:16662593

  6. Evidence from Studies with Acifluorfen for Participation of a Flavin-Cytochrome Complex in Blue Light Photoreception for Phototropism of Oat Coleoptiles 12

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Ta-Yan; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1982-01-01

    The diphenyl ether acifluorfen enhances the blue light-induced absorbance change in Triton X100-solubilized crude membrane preparations from etiolated oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Lodi) coleoptiles. Enhancement of the spectral change is correlated with a change in rate of dark reoxidation of a b-type cytochrome. Similar, although smaller, enhancement was obtained with oxyfluorfen, nitrofen, and bifenox. Light-minus-dark difference spectra in the presence and absence of acifluorfen, and the dithionite-reduced-minus oxidized difference spectrum indicate that acifluorfen is acting specifically at a blue light-sensitive cytochrome-flavin complex. Sodium azide, a flavin inhibitor, decreases the light-induced absorbance change significantly, but does not affect the dark reoxidation of the cytochrome. Hence, it is acting on the light reaction, suggesting that the photoreceptor itself is a flavin. Acifluorfen sensitizes phototropism in dark-grown oat seedlings such that the first positive response occurs with blue light fluences as little as one-third of those required to elicit the same response in seedlings grown in the absence of the herbicide. Both this increase in sensitivity to light and the enhancement of the light-induced cytochrome reduction vary with the applied acifluorfen concentration in a similar manner. The herbicide is without effect either on elongation or on the geotropic response of dark-grown oat seedlings, indicating that acifluorfen is acting specifically close to, or at the photoreceptor end of, the stimulus-response chain. It seems likely that the flavin-cytochrome complex serves to transduce the light signal into curvature in phototropism in oats, with the flavin moiety itself serving as the photoreceptor. PMID:16662593

  7. A high-throughput assay format for determination of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, N.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Choudary, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a microplate-based high-throughput procedure for rapid assay of the enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, using extremely small volumes of reagents. The new procedure offers the advantages of rapidity, small sample size-nanoliter volumes, low cost, and a dramatic increase in the throughput sample number that can be analyzed simultaneously. Additional advantages can be accessed by using microplate reader application software packages that permit assigning a group type to the wells, recording of the data on exportable data files and exercising the option of using the kinetic or endpoint reading modes. The assay can also be used independently for detecting nitrite residues/contamination in environmental/food samples. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  9. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  10. Discovery of epoxyqueuosine (oQ) reductase reveals parallels between halorespiration and tRNA modification

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Zachary D.; McCarty, Reid M.; Molnar, Gabriella; Bandarian, Vahe

    2011-01-01

    Transfer RNA is one of the most richly modified biological molecules. Biosynthetic pathways that introduce these modifications are underexplored, largely because their absence does not lead to obvious phenotypes under normal growth conditions. Queuosine (Q) is a hypermodified base found in the wobble positions of tRNA Asp, Asn, His, and Tyr from bacteria to mankind. Using liquid chromatography MS methods, we have screened 1,755 single gene knockouts of Escherichia coli and have identified the key final step in the biosynthesis of Q. The protein is homologous to B12-dependent iron-sulfur proteins involved in halorespiration. The recombinant Bacillus subtilis epoxyqueuosine (oQ) reductase catalyzes the conversion of oQ to Q in a synthetic substrate, as well as undermodified RNA isolated from an oQ reductase knockout strain. The activity requires inclusion of a reductant and a redox mediator. Finally, exogenously supplied cobalamin stimulates the activity. This work provides the framework for studies of the biosynthesis of other modified RNA components, where lack of accessible phenotype or obvious gene clustering has impeded discovery. Moreover, discovery of the elusive oQ reductase protein completes the biosynthetic pathway of Q. PMID:21502530

  11. Redox-Linked Domain Movements in the Catalytic Cycle of Cytochrome P450 Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Cheng; Ellis, Jacqueline; Moody, Peter C.E.; Raven, Emma L.; Roberts, Gordon C.K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase is a key component of the P450 mono-oxygenase drug-metabolizing system. There is evidence for a conformational equilibrium involving large-scale domain motions in this enzyme. We now show, using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering, that delivery of two electrons to cytochrome P450 reductase leads to a shift in this equilibrium from a compact form, similar to the crystal structure, toward an extended form, while coenzyme binding favors the compact form. We present a model for the extended form of the enzyme based on nuclear magnetic resonance and SAXS data. Using the effects of changes in solution conditions and of site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the conversion to the extended form leads to an enhanced ability to transfer electrons to cytochrome c. This structural evidence shows that domain motion is linked closely to the individual steps of the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450 reductase, and we propose a mechanism for this. PMID:23911089

  12. Ribonucleotide reductase metallocofactor: assembly, maintenance and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Caiguo; LIU, Guoqi; HUANG, Mingxia

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) supplies cellular deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTP) pools by converting ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxy forms using radical-based chemistry. Eukaryotic RNR comprises α and β subunits: α contains the catalytic and allosteric sites; β houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical cofactor (FeIII2-Y•) that is required to initiates nucleotide reduction in α. Cells have evolved multi-layered mechanisms to regulate RNR level and activity in order to maintain the adequate sizes and ratios of their dNTP pools to ensure high-fidelity DNA replication and repair. The central role of RNR in nucleotide metabolism also makes it a proven target of chemotherapeutics. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of eukaryotic RNRs, with a focus on studies revealing the cellular machineries involved in RNR metallocofactor biosynthesis and its implication in RNR-targeting therapeutics. PMID:24899886

  13. Dynamics of trimethoprim bound to dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, M.S.; Forster, M.J.; Birdsall, B.; Roberts, G.C.K.; Feeney, J.; Cheung, H.T.A.; Kompis, I.; Geddes, A.J. )

    1988-06-01

    The conformation of a small molecule in its binding site on a protein is a major factor in the specificity of the interaction between them. In this paper, the authors report the use of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy to study the fluctuations in conformation of the anti-bacterial drug trimethoprim when it is bound to its target, dihydrofolate reductase. {sup 13}C relaxation measurements reveal dihedral angle changes of {plus minus}25{degree} to {plus minus}35{degree} on the subnanosecond time scale, while {sup 13}C line-shape analysis demonstrates dihedral angle changes of at least {plus minus}65{degree} on the millisecond time scale. {sup 1}H NMR shows that a specific hydrogen bond between the inhibitor and enzyme, which is believed to make an important contribution to binding, makes and breaks rapidly at room temperature.

  14. Localization of human flavin-containing monooxygenase genes FMO2 and FMO5 to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, R.R.; Shephard, E.A.; Dolphin, C.T.

    1996-06-15

    The human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene family comprises at least five distinct members (FMO1 to FMO5) that code for enzymes responsible for the oxidation of a wide variety of soft nucleophilic substrates, including drugs and environmental pollutants. Three of these genes (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO4) have previously been localized to human chromosome 1q, raising the possibility that the entire gene family is clustered in this chromosomal region. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction of DNA isolated from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids demonstrates that the two remaining identified members of the FMO gene family, FMO2 and FMO5, also are located on chromosome 1q. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Identification of the Lomofungin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster and Associated Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase Gene in Streptomyces lomondensis S015

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxiao; Sheng, Chaolan; Wang, Wei; Hu, Hongbo; Peng, Huasong; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces lomondensis S015 synthesizes the broad-spectrum phenazine antibiotic lomofungin. Whole genome sequencing of this strain revealed a genomic locus consisting of 23 open reading frames that includes the core phenazine biosynthesis gene cluster lphzGFEDCB. lomo10, encoding a putative flavin-dependent monooxygenase, was also identified in this locus. Inactivation of lomo10 by in-frame partial deletion resulted in the biosynthesis of a new phenazine metabolite, 1-carbomethoxy-6-formyl-4,9-dihydroxy-phenazine, along with the absence of lomofungin. This result suggests that lomo10 is responsible for the hydroxylation of lomofungin at its C-7 position. This is the first description of a phenazine hydroxylation gene in Streptomyces, and the results of this study lay the foundation for further investigation of phenazine metabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces. PMID:26305803

  16. Nitrite Reductase Activity in Engineered Azurin Variants.

    PubMed

    Berry, Steven M; Strange, Jacob N; Bladholm, Erika L; Khatiwada, Balabhadra; Hedstrom, Christine G; Sauer, Alexandra M

    2016-05-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) activity was examined in a series of dicopper P.a. azurin variants in which a surface binding copper site was added through site-directed mutagenesis. Four variants were synthesized with copper binding motifs inspired by the catalytic type 2 copper binding sites found in the native noncoupled dinuclear copper enzymes nitrite reductase and peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase. The four azurin variants, denoted Az-NiR, Az-NiR3His, Az-PHM, and Az-PHM3His, maintained the azurin electron transfer copper center, with the second designed copper site located over 13 Å away and consisting of mutations Asn10His,Gln14Asp,Asn16His-azurin, Asn10His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, Gln8Met,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, and Gln8His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, respectively. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry of the sites demonstrate copper binding as well as interaction with small exogenous ligands. The nitrite reduction activity of the variants was determined, including the catalytic Michaelis-Menten parameters. The variants showed activity (0.34-0.59 min(-1)) that was slower than that of native NiRs but comparable to that of other model systems. There were small variations in activity of the four variants that correlated with the number of histidines in the added copper site. Catalysis was found to be reversible, with nitrite produced from NO. Reactions starting with reduced azurin variants demonstrated that electrons from both copper centers were used to reduce nitrite, although steady-state catalysis required the T2 copper center and did not require the T1 center. Finally, experiments separating rates of enzyme reduction from rates of reoxidation by nitrite demonstrated that the reaction with nitrite was rate limiting during catalysis. PMID:27055058

  17. Molecular evolution of nitrate reductase genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Kleinhofs, A

    1996-04-01

    To understand the evolutionary mechanisms and relationships of nitrate reductases (NRs), the nucleotide sequences encoding 19 nitrate reductase (NR) genes from 16 species of fungi, algae, and higher plants were analyzed. The NR genes examined show substantial sequence similarity, particularly within functional domains, and large variations in GC content at the third codon position and intron number. The intron positions were different between the fungi and plants, but conserved within these groups. The overall and nonsynonymous substitution rates among fungi, algae, and higher plants were estimated to be 4.33 x 10(-10) and 3.29 x 10(-10) substitutions per site per year. The three functional domains of NR genes evolved at about one-third of the rate of the N-terminal and the two hinge regions connecting the functional domains. Relative rate tests suggested that the nonsynonymous substitution rates were constant among different lineages, while the overall nucleotide substitution rates varied between some lineages. The phylogenetic trees based on NR genes correspond well with the phylogeny of the organisms determined from systematics and other molecular studies. Based on the nonsynonymous substitution rate, the divergence time of monocots and dicots was estimated to be about 340 Myr when the fungi-plant or algae-higher plant divergence times were used as reference points and 191 Myr when the rice-barley divergence time was used as a reference point. These two estimates are consistent with other estimates of divergence times based on these reference points. The lack of consistency between these two values appears to be due to the uncertainty of the reference times. PMID:8642612

  18. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  19. Distance-tree analysis, distribution and co-presence of bilin- and flavin-binding prokaryotic photoreceptors for visible light.

    PubMed

    Mandalari, Carmen; Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly evident that prokaryotic organisms can sense and react to light stimuli via a variety of photosensory receptors and signal transduction pathways. There are two main superfamilies of non-membrane-bound photoreceptors: the bilin-binding phytochrome-related proteins based on GAF (cGMP-specific phosphodiesterases, cyanobacterial adenylate cyclases, and transcription activator FhlA) domains (bilin-GAF proteins), and the flavin-binding proteins (FL-Blues), photoperceptive thanks to their LOV (Light, Oxygen and Voltage) and BLUF (Blue Light sensing Using Flavins) domains. In this manuscript we present a comprehensive scenario of the existence of bilin-GAF, LOV and BLUF proteins in the prokaryotic world and inspect possible phylogenetic pathways, also defining novel criteria for identifying gene (and protein) sequences based on experimentally assessed photochemical events. As a whole we have inspected almost 2000 proteins recovered in 985 bacteria and 16 archaea. For LOV and BLUF proteins, ten and, respectively, twelve superconserved amino acids have been identified, which were used as criterion for selection. A similarly strict parameter cannot be applied to the more variegate family of bilin-GAF domains. The co-presence of bilin-GAF and FL-Blues occurs in 22% of the analyzed bacteria, with emphasis on the bilin-GAF/LOV co-presence in cyanobacteria and of bilin-GAF/BLUF in the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi group. For construction of phylogeny/distance-trees we used the neighboring-method to obtain a branching pattern, limited to photosensing domains. We observed that in many cases organisms belonging to the same phylum are neighbors, but clustering mostly occurs according to the type of functional domain associated with the photosensing modules. PMID:23467500

  20. Carboxylation mechanism and stereochemistry of crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, a carboxylating enoyl-thioester reductase

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Brecht, Volker; Fuchs, Georg; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemo- and stereoselective reductions are important reactions in chemistry and biology, and reductases from biological sources are increasingly applied in organic synthesis. In contrast, carboxylases are used only sporadically. We recently described crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA but also the reductive carboxylation of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to ethylmalonyl-CoA. In this study, the complete stereochemical course of both reactions was investigated in detail. The pro-(4R) hydrogen of NADPH is transferred in both reactions to the re face of the C3 position of crotonyl-CoA. In the course of the carboxylation reaction, carbon dioxide is incorporated in anti fashion at the C2 atom of crotonyl-CoA. For the reduction reaction that yields butyryl-CoA, a solvent proton is added in anti fashion instead of the CO2. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase is a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and shares the same phylogenetic origin. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from NAD(P)H within this superfamily is highly conserved, although the substrates and reduction reactions catalyzed by its individual representatives differ quite considerably. Our findings led to a reassessment of the stereospecificity of enoyl(-thioester) reductases and related enzymes with respect to their amino acid sequence, revealing a general pattern of stereospecificity that allows the prediction of the stereochemistry of the hydride transfer for enoyl reductases of unknown specificity. Further considerations on the reaction mechanism indicated that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase may have evolved from enoyl-CoA reductases. This may be useful for protein engineering of enoyl reductases and their application in biocatalysis. PMID:19458256

  1. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  2. Functional expression system for cytochrome P450 genes using the reductase domain of self-sufficient P450RhF from Rhodococcus sp. NCIMB 9784.

    PubMed

    Nodate, Miho; Kubota, Mitsutoshi; Misawa, Norihiko

    2006-07-01

    Cytochrome P450RhF from Rhodococcus sp. NCIMB 9784 is a self-sufficient P450 monooxygenase. We report here a simple system for the functional expression of various P450 genes using the reductase domain of this P450RhF, which comprises flavin mononucleotide- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate binding motifs and a [2Fe2S] ferredoxin-like center. Vector pRED was constructed, which carried the T7 promoter, cloning sites for a P450, a linker sequence, and the P450RhF reductase domain, in this order. The known P450 genes, encoding P450cam from Pseudomonas putida (CYP101A) and P450bzo from an environmental metagenome library (CYP203A), were expressed on vector pRED as soluble fusion enzymes with their natural spectral features in Escherichia coli. These E. coli cells expressing the P450cam and P450bzo genes could convert (+)-camphor and 4-hydroxybenzoate into 5-exo-hydroxycamphor and protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate), respectively (the expected products). Using this system, we also succeeded in directly identifying the function of P450 CYP153A as alkane 1-monooxygenase for the first time, i.e., E. coli cells expressing a P450 CYP153A gene named P450balk, which was isolated form Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2, converted octane into 1-octanol with high efficiency (800 mg/l). The system presented here may be applicable to the functional identification of a wide variety of bacterial cytochromes P450. PMID:16195793

  3. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  4. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  5. Structural features of the ribonucleotide reductase of Aujeszky's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, A V; Boldogköi, Z; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    A gene construct of the Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) genome was prepared and the DNA fragment encoding the ribonucleotide reductase was structurally characterized. We determined the entire DNA sequence of two adjacent open reading frames of the ribonucleotide reductase genes with the intergenic sequence of nine base pairs. From the sequence analysis we predict that Aujeszky's disease virus encodes a ribonucleotide reductase which comprises two polypeptides--large and small subunits, with sizes of 835 and 303 amino acids, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the large and small subunits of the Aujeszky's disease virus ribonucleotide reductase have been compared with that of other herpesviruses, and structural features of both proteins have been characterized. PMID:7810419

  6. High levels of expression of the Iron-Sulfur Proteins Phthalate Dioxygenase and Phthalate Dioxygenase Reductase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jaganaman, Sunil; Pinto, Alex; Tarasev, Michael; Ballou, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Phthalate dioxygenase (PDO), a hexamer with one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] and one Fe (II) - mononuclear center per monomer, and its reductase (PDR), which contains flavin mononucleotide and a plant-type ferredoxin [2Fe-2S] center, are expressed by Burkholderia cepacia at ∼30 mg of crude PDO and ∼1 mg of crude PDR per liter of cell culture when grown with phthalate as the main carbon source. A high level expression system in Escherichia coli was developed for PDO and PDR. Optimization relative to Escherichia coli cell line, growth parameters, time of induction, media composition, and iron-sulfur additives resulted in yields of about 1 g/L for PDO and about 0.2 g/L for PDR. Protein expression was correlated to the increase in pH of the cell culture and exhibited a pronounced (variable from 5 to 20 hours) lag after the induction. The specific activity of purified PDO did not depend on the pH of the cell culture when harvested. However, when the pH of the culture reached 8.5-9, a large fraction of the PDR that was expressed lacked its ferredoxin domain, presumably because of proteolysis. Termination of growth while the pH of the cell culture was < 8 decreased the fraction of proteolyzed enzyme, whereas yields of the unclipped PDR were only marginally lower. Overall, changes in pH of the cell culture were found to be an excellent indicator of the overall level of native protein expression. Its monitoring allowed the real time tracking of the protein expression and made it possible to tailor the expression times to achieve a combination of high quality and high yield of protein. PMID:17049880

  7. FMN binding site of yeast NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase exposed at the surface is highly specific

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexis S.; Gnedenko, Oksana V.; Molnar, Andrey A.; Archakov, Alexander I.; Podust, Larissa M.

    2010-01-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) transfers two reducing equivalents derived from NADPH via FAD and FMN to microsomal P450 monooxygenases in one-electron transfer steps. The crystal structure of yeast CPR (yCPR) contains a surface-exposed FMN binding site (FMN2 site) at the interface of the FMN binding and connecting domains, in addition to the single buried site that has been observed in rat CPR. This finding provides a testable hypothesis of how intramolecular (between FAD and FMN) and intermolecular (between FMN and P450) electron transfer may occur in CPR. To verify that occupancy of the FMN2 site is not an artifact of crystallization, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technique has been applied to probe the selectivity of this site under functional conditions. A series of kinetic and equilibrium binding experiments involving yCPR immobilized on different sensor chip surfaces was performed using FMN and FAD, as well as FMN-derived compounds, including riboflavin, dimethylalloxazine, and alloxazine, and other molecules which resemble the planar isoalloxazine ring structure. Only FMN and FAD showed stoichiometric binding responses. Binding affinity for FMN was in the submicromolar range, thirty times higher than that for FAD. Association kinetic rates for the yCPR/FMN complex were up to 60-fold higher than for the yCPR/FAD complex. Taken together, these data indicate that (i) the surface-exposed site in yCPR is highly selective toward binding flavins, (ii) binding of FMN in this site is notably favored, and finally, (iii) both the phosphate group and the isoalloxazine ring of FMN are essential for binding. PMID:20557022

  8. Expression of bacterial mercuric ion reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, C; Kües, U; Stahl, U; Nies, D H; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    The gene merA coding for bacterial mercuric ion reductase was cloned under the control of the yeast promoter for alcohol dehydrogenase I in the yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle plasmid pADH040-2 and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH22. The resulting transformant harbored stable copies of the merA-containing hybrid plasmid, displayed a fivefold increase in the MIC of mercuric chloride, and synthesized mercuric ion reductase activity. Images PMID:1735719

  9. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  10. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems. PMID:8694757

  11. Low apparent aldose reductase activity produced by monosaccharide autoxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, S P; Crabbe, M J

    1985-01-01

    Low apparent aldose reductase activity, as measured by NADPH oxidation, can be produced by the spontaneous autoxidation of monosaccharides. NADPH is oxidized to metabolically active NADP+ in a solution of autoxidizing DL-glyceraldehyde at rates of up to 15 X 10(-4) A340/min. The close parallelism between the effects of buffer salt type and concentration, monosaccharide structure and temperature activation on autoxidation and NADPH oxidation imply that autoxidation is a prerequisite for the NADPH oxidation, probably via the hydroperoxy radical. Nucleotide-binding proteins enhanced NADPH oxidation induced by DL-glyceraldehyde, up to 10.6-fold with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Glutathione reductase-catalysed NADPH oxidation in the presence of autoxidizing monosaccharide showed many characteristics of the aldose reductase reaction. Aldose reductase inhibitors acted as antioxidants in inhibiting this NADPH oxidation. These results indicate that low apparent aldose reductase activities may be due to artifacts of monosaccharide autoxidation, and could provide an explanation for the non-linear steady-state kinetics observed with DL-glyceraldehyde and aldose reductase. PMID:2985042

  12. Reaction mechanism and regulation of mammalian thioredoxin/glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Su, Dan; Novoselov, Sergey V; Carlson, Bradley A; Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2005-11-01

    Thioredoxin/glutathione reductase (TGR) is a recently discovered member of the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase family in mammals. In contrast to two other mammalian thioredoxin reductases, it contains an N-terminal glutaredoxin domain and exhibits a wide spectrum of enzyme activities. To elucidate the reaction mechanism and regulation of TGR, we prepared a recombinant mouse TGR in the selenoprotein form as well as various mutants and individual domains of this enzyme. Using these proteins, we showed that the glutaredoxin and thioredoxin reductase domains of TGR could independently catalyze reactions normally associated with each domain. The glutaredoxin domain is a monothiol glutaredoxin containing a CxxS motif at the active site, which could receive electrons from either the thioredoxin reductase domain of TGR or thioredoxin reductase 1. We also found that the C-terminal penultimate selenocysteine was required for transfer of reducing equivalents from the thiol/disulfide active site of TGR to the glutaredoxin domain. Thus, the physiologically relevant NADPH-dependent activities of TGR were dependent on this residue. In addition, we examined the effects of selenium levels in the diet and perturbations in selenocysteine tRNA function on TGR biosynthesis and found that expression of this protein was regulated by both selenium and tRNA status in liver, but was more resistant to this regulation in testes. PMID:16262253

  13. Effects of thioredoxin reductase-1 deletion on embryogenesis and transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Bondareva, Alla A.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Iverson, Sonya V.; Li, Yan; Lopez, Nathan I.; Lucas, Olivier; Merrill, Gary F.; Prigge, Justin R.; Siders, Ashley M.; Wakamiya, Maki; Wallin, Stephanie L.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductases (Txnrd)1 maintain intracellular redox homeostasis in most organisms. Metazoans Txnrds also participate in signal transduction. Mouse embryos homozygous for a targeted null mutation of the txnrd1 gene, encoding the cytosolic thioredoxin reductase, were viable at embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) but not at E9.5. Histology revealed that txnrd1−/− cells were capable of proliferation and differentiation; however, mutant embryos were smaller than wild-type littermates and failed to gastrulate. In situ marker gene analyses indicated primitive streak mesoderm did not form. Microarray analyses on E7.5 txnrd−/− and txnrd+/+ littermates showed similar mRNA levels for peroxiredoxins, glutathione reductases, mitochondrial Txnrd2, and most markers of cell proliferation. Conversely, mRNAs encoding sulfiredoxin, IGF-binding protein 1, carbonyl reductase 3, glutamate cysteine ligase, glutathione S-transferases, and metallothioneins were more abundant in mutants. Many gene expression responses mirrored those in thioredoxin reductase 1-null yeast; however mice exhibited a novel response within the peroxiredoxin catalytic cycle. Thus, whereas yeast induce peroxiredoxin mRNAs in response to thioredoxin reductase disruption, mice induced sulfiredoxin mRNA. In summary, Txnrd1 was required for correct patterning of the early embryo and progression to later development. Conserved responses to Txnrd1 disruption likely allowed proliferation and limited differentiation of the mutant embryo cells. PMID:17697936

  14. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  15. Regulation of the Neurospora crassa assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, P A; Zeeb, D D; Owens, M S

    1977-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-nitrate reductase from Neurospora crassa was purified and found to be stimulated by certain amino acids, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Stimulation by citrate and the amino acids was dependent upon the prior removal of EDTA from the enzyme preparations, since low quantities of EDTA resulted in maximal stimulation. Removal of EDTA from enzyme preparations by dialysis against Chelex-containing buffer resulted in a loss of nitrate reductase activity. Addition of alanine, arginine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, histidine, tryptophan, and citrate restored and stimulated nitrate reductase activity from 29- to 46-fold. The amino acids tested altered the Km of NADPH-nitrate reductase for NADPH but did not significantly change that for nitrate. The Km of nitrate reductase for NADPH increased with increasing concentrations of histidine but decreased with increasing concentrations of glutamine. Amino acid modulation of NADPH-nitrate reductase activity is discussed in relation to the conservation of energy (NADPH) by Neurospora when nitrate is the nitrogen source. PMID:19423

  16. Anaerobic degradation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) in a denitrifying bacterium: purification and characterization of the NTA dehydrogenase-nitrate reductase enzyme complex.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal-Wanner, U; Egli, T

    1993-01-01

    The initial step in the anoxic metabolism of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was investigated in a denitrifying member of the gamma subgroup of the Proteobacteria. In membrane-free cell extracts, the first step of NTA oxidation was catalyzed by a protein complex consisting of two enzymes, NTA dehydrogenase (NTADH) and nitrate reductase (NtR). The products formed were iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. Electrons derived from the oxidation of NTA were transferred to nitrate only via the artificial dye phenazine methosulfate, and nitrate was stoichiometrically reduced to nitrite. NTADH activity could be measured only in the presence of NtrR and vice versa. The NTADH-NtrR enzyme complex was purified and characterized. NTADH and NtrR were both alpha 2 dimers and had molecular weights of 170,000 and 105,000, respectively. NTADH contained covalently bound flavin cofactor, and NtrR contained a type b cytochrome. Optimum NTA-oxidizing activity was achieved at a molar ratio of NTADH to NtrR of approximately 1:1. So far, NTA is the only known substrate for NTADH. This is the first report of a redox enzyme complex catalyzing the oxidation of a substrate and concomitantly reducing nitrate. Images PMID:8250558

  17. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  18. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress, and diabetic mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  19. Extracellular Electron Transport-Mediated Fe(III) Reduction by a Community of Alkaliphilic Bacteria That Use Flavins as Electron Shuttles

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Samuel J.; McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Renz, Marc B.; Schmidt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical and molecular mechanisms used by alkaliphilic bacterial communities to reduce metals in the environment are currently unknown. We demonstrate that an alkaliphilic (pH > 9) consortium dominated by Tissierella, Clostridium, and Alkaliphilus spp. is capable of using iron (Fe3+) as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. Iron reduction is associated with the production of a freely diffusible species that, upon rudimentary purification and subsequent spectroscopic, high-performance liquid chromatography, and electrochemical analysis, has been identified as a flavin species displaying properties indistinguishable from those of riboflavin. Due to the link between iron reduction and the onset of flavin production, it is likely that riboflavin has an import role in extracellular metal reduction by this alkaliphilic community. PMID:24141133

  20. Amidoxime Reductase System Containing Cytochrome b5 Type B (CYB5B) and MOSC2 Is of Importance for Lipid Synthesis in Adipocyte Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Etienne P. A.; Nordling, Åsa; Andersson, Tommy B.; Hellman, Ulf; Diczfalusy, Ulf; Johansson, Inger; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of hydroxylamines and amidoximes is important for drug activation and detoxification of aromatic and heterocyclic amines. Such a reductase system was previously found to be of high activity in adipose tissue and liver, and furthermore, in vitro studies using recombinant truncated and purified enzymes suggested the participation of cytochrome b5 reductase (CYB5R), cytochrome b5 (CYB5), and molybdenum cofactor sulfurase C-terminal containing 1 and 2 (MOSC1 and -2). Here, we show that purified rat liver outer mitochondrial membrane contains high amidoxime reductase activity and that MOSC2 is exclusively localized to these membranes. Moreover, using the same membrane fraction, we could show direct binding of a radiolabeled benzamidoxime substrate to MOSC2. Following differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells into mature adipocytes, the MOSC2 levels as well as the amidoxime reductase activity were increased, indicating that the enzyme is highly regulated under lipogenic conditions. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of MOSC2 and the mitochondrial form of cytochrome b5 type B (CYB5B) significantly inhibited the reductase activity in the differentiated adipocytes, whereas down-regulation of MOSC1, cytochrome b5 type A (CYB5A), CYB5R1, CYB5R2, or CYB5R3 had no effect. Down-regulation of MOSC2 caused impaired lipid synthesis. These results demonstrate for the first time the direct involvement of MOSC2 and CYB5B in the amidoxime reductase activity in an intact cell system. We postulate the presence of a novel reductive enzyme system of importance for lipid synthesis that is exclusively localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane and is composed of CYB5B, MOSC2, and a third unknown component (a CYB5B reductase). PMID:22203676

  1. Amidoxime reductase system containing cytochrome b5 type B (CYB5B) and MOSC2 is of importance for lipid synthesis in adipocyte mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Neve, Etienne P A; Nordling, Asa; Andersson, Tommy B; Hellman, Ulf; Diczfalusy, Ulf; Johansson, Inger; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2012-02-24

    Reduction of hydroxylamines and amidoximes is important for drug activation and detoxification of aromatic and heterocyclic amines. Such a reductase system was previously found to be of high activity in adipose tissue and liver, and furthermore, in vitro studies using recombinant truncated and purified enzymes suggested the participation of cytochrome b(5) reductase (CYB5R), cytochrome b(5) (CYB5), and molybdenum cofactor sulfurase C-terminal containing 1 and 2 (MOSC1 and -2). Here, we show that purified rat liver outer mitochondrial membrane contains high amidoxime reductase activity and that MOSC2 is exclusively localized to these membranes. Moreover, using the same membrane fraction, we could show direct binding of a radiolabeled benzamidoxime substrate to MOSC2. Following differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells into mature adipocytes, the MOSC2 levels as well as the amidoxime reductase activity were increased, indicating that the enzyme is highly regulated under lipogenic conditions. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of MOSC2 and the mitochondrial form of cytochrome b(5) type B (CYB5B) significantly inhibited the reductase activity in the differentiated adipocytes, whereas down-regulation of MOSC1, cytochrome b(5) type A (CYB5A), CYB5R1, CYB5R2, or CYB5R3 had no effect. Down-regulation of MOSC2 caused impaired lipid synthesis. These results demonstrate for the first time the direct involvement of MOSC2 and CYB5B in the amidoxime reductase activity in an intact cell system. We postulate the presence of a novel reductive enzyme system of importance for lipid synthesis that is exclusively localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane and is composed of CYB5B, MOSC2, and a third unknown component (a CYB5B reductase). PMID:22203676

  2. Co-Expression of Monodehydroascorbate Reductase and Dehydroascorbate Reductase from Brassica rapa Effectively Confers Tolerance to Freezing-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sun-Young; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yul-Ho; Park, Hyang-Mi; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to various environmental stresses and have therefore developed antioxidant enzymes and molecules to protect their cellular components against toxicity derived from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ascorbate is a very important antioxidant molecule in plants, and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR; EC 1.6.5.4) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR; EC 1.8.5.1) are essential to regeneration of ascorbate for maintenance of ROS scavenging ability. The MDHAR and DHAR genes from Brassica rapa were cloned, transgenic plants overexpressing either BrMDHAR and BrDHAR were established, and then, each transgenic plant was hybridized to examine the effects of co-expression of both genes conferring tolerance to freezing. Transgenic plants co-overexpressing BrMDHAR and BrDHAR showed activated expression of relative antioxidant enzymes, and enhanced levels of glutathione and phenolics under freezing condition. Then, these alteration caused by co-expression led to alleviated redox status and lipid peroxidation and consequently conferred improved tolerance against severe freezing stress compared to transgenic plants overexpressing single gene. The results of this study suggested that although each expression of BrMDHAR or BrDHAR was available to according tolerance to freezing, the simultaneous expression of two genes generated synergistic effects conferring improved tolerance more effectively even severe freezing. PMID:24170089

  3. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  4. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  5. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  6. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Round, Ekaterina; Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  7. Structure of the Proline Utilization A Proline Dehydrogenase Domain Inactivated by N-propargylglycine Provides Insight into Conformational Changes Induced by Substrate Binding and Flavin Reduction†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Dhiraj; Zhu, Weidong; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) from Escherichia coli is a flavoprotein that has mutually exclusive roles as a transcriptional repressor of the put regulon and a membrane-associated enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate. Previous studies have shown that the binding of proline in the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) active site and subsequent reduction of the FAD trigger global conformational changes that enhance PutA-membrane affinity. These events cause PutA to switch from its repressor to enzymatic role, but the mechanism by which this signal is propagated from the active site to the distal membrane-binding domain is largely unknown. Here, it is shown that N-propargylglycine irreversibly inactivates PutA by covalently linking the flavin N(5) atom to the ε-amino of Lys329. Furthermore, inactivation locks PutA into a conformation that may mimic the proline reduced, membrane-associated form. The 2.15 Å resolution structure of the inactivated PRODH domain suggests that the initial events involved in broadcasting the reduced flavin state to the distal membrane binding domain include major reorganization of the flavin ribityl chain, severe (35 degree) butterfly bending of the isoalloxazine ring, and disruption of an electrostatic network involving the flavin N(5), Arg431, and Asp370. The structure also provides information about conformational changes associated with substrate binding. This analysis suggests that the active site is incompletely assembled in the absence of the substrate, and the binding of proline draws together conserved residues in helix 8 and the β1-αl loop to complete the active site. PMID:19994913

  8. Potential Role for Extracellular Glutathione-Dependent Ferric Reductase in Utilization of Environmental and Host Ferric Compounds by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Michelle M.; Woods, Jon P.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian host specifically limits iron during Histoplasma capsulatum infection, and fungal acquisition of iron is essential for productive infection. H. capsulatum expresses several iron acquisition mechanisms under iron-limited conditions in vitro. These components include hydroxamate siderophores, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase enzyme, extracellular nonproteinaceous ferric reductant(s), and cell surface ferric reducing agent(s). We examined the relationship between these mechanisms and a potential role for the extracellular ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds through the production of free, soluble Fe(II). Siderophores and ferric reducing agents were coproduced under conditions of iron limitation. The H. capsulatum siderophore dimerum acid and the structurally similar basidiomycete siderophore rhodotorulic acid acted as substrates for the ferric reductase, and rhodotorulic acid removed Fe(III) bound by transferrin. The mammalian Fe(III)-binding compounds hemin and transferrin served both as substrates for the ferric reductase and as iron sources for yeast-phase growth at neutral pH. In the case of transferrin, there was a correlation between the level of iron saturation and efficacy for both of these functions. Our data are not consistent with an entirely pH-dependent mechanism of iron acquisition from transferrin, as has been suggested to occur in the macrophage phagolysosome. The foreign siderophore ferrioxamine B also acted as a substrate for the ferric reductase, while the foreign siderophore ferrichrome did not. Both ferrioxamine and ferrichrome served as iron sources for yeast- and mold-phase growth, the latter presumably by some other acquisition mechanism(s). PMID:11705947

  9. Isolation and Characterization of cDNAs Encoding Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Anthocyanidin Reductase from Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wanxiang; Yang, Li; Karim, Abdul; Luo, Keming

    2013-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA) and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+)-catechin and (−)-epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus. PMID:23741362

  10. Photoelectric Properties Based on Electric Field Modulation of Photoinduced Electron Transfer Processes in Flavin-Porphyrin Hetero-type Langmuir-Blodgett Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoda, Satoru; Hanazato, Yoshio; Ueyama, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Akiyama, Kouich

    2004-05-01

    Metal-insulator-meal devices composed of flavin-porphyrin hetero-type Langmuir-Blodgett films showed highly efficient photoelectric properties mainly attributable to the fast charge separation process at a molecular heterojunction (MHJ) between flavin and porphyrin. The photoelectric properties of the MHJ devices showed different characteristics depending on the redox state of the central metal of porphyrin, i.e., Ru(III) or Ru(II). The rectifying behavior of the photocurrent was observed for the Ru(III)-MHJ device, whereas the Ru(II)-MHJ device did not show the rectifying behavior. We concluded that the rectifying behavior was mainly controlled by the electric field dependence of the charge recombination process. Furthermore, a bell-shaped photocurrent-voltage curve was observed for the Ru(II)-MHJ device. The mechanism underlying the negative resistance might be based on the electric field dependence of the charge shift process in flavin monolayers controlled by the inverted region mechanism of the Marcus electron transfer theory.

  11. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies. PMID:27466384

  12. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-01-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidase activity in yeast strains containing the RNR2-lacZ fusion was inducible in response to DNA-damaging agents (UV light, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide [4-NQO], and methyl methanesulfonate [MMS]) and agents that block DNA replication (hydroxyurea [HU] and methotrexate) but not heat shock. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 by alpha-factor, RNR2 mRNA was still inducible by DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction can occur outside of S phase. In addition, RNR2 induction was not blocked by the presence of cycloheximide and is therefore likely to be independent of protein synthesis. A mutation, rnr2-314, was found to confer hypersensitivity to HU and increased sensitivity to MMS. In rnr2-314 mutant strains, the DNA damage stress response was found to be partially constitutive as well as hypersensitive to induction by HU but not MMS. The induction properties of RNR2 were examined in a rad4-2 mutant background; in this genetic background, RNR2 was hypersensitive to induction by 4-NQO but not MMS. Induction of the RNR2-lacZ fusion in a RAD(+) strain in response to 4-NQO was not enhanced by the presence of an equal number of rad4-2 cells that lacked the fusion, implying that the DNA damage stress response in cell autonomous. Images PMID:2513480

  13. Glutathione Reductase Is Essential for Host Defense against Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Ralston, Melissa M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Bongiovanni, Kathleen D.; Jones, Amanda L.; Benndorf, Rainer; Nelin, Leif D.; Frazier, W. Joshua; Rogers, Lynette K.; Smith, Charles V.; Liu, Yusen

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (Gsr)1 catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide to glutathione, a major cellular antioxidant. We have recently shown that Gsr is essential for host defense against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli in a mouse model of sepsis. While we have demonstrated that Gsr is required for sustaining the oxidative burst and the development of neutrophil extracellular traps, the role of Gsr in other phagocytic functions remains unclear. It is also unclear whether Gsr-deficient mice exhibit host defense defects against Gram-positive bacteria. In the present study, we characterized the effects of Gsr deficiency on the innate immune responses to a Gram-positive bacterium, group B Streptococcus, and to the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that like, E. coli, group B Streptococcus resulted in a substantially more robust cytokine response and a markedly higher morbidity and mortality in Gsr-deficient mice than in wildtype mice. The increased morbidity and mortality were associated with greater bacterial burden in the Gsr-deficient mice. Interestingly, Gsr-deficient mice did not exhibit a greater sensitivity to LPS than did wildtype mice. Analysis of the neutrophils of Gsr-deficient mice revealed impaired phagocytosis. In response to thioglycollate stimulation, Gsr-deficient mice mobilized far fewer phagocytes, including neutrophils, macrophages, and eosinophils, into their peritoneal cavities than did wildtype mice. The defective phagocyte mobilization is associated with profound oxidation and aggregation of ascitic proteins, particularly albumin. Our results indicate that the oxidative defense mechanism mediated by Gsr is required for an effective innate immune response against bacteria, likely by preventing phagocyte dysfunction due to oxidative damage. PMID:23623936

  14. Tertiary amines related to brompheniramine: preferred conformations for N-oxygenation by the hog liver flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Celestial, J R; Leach, A; Newdoll, J; Park, S B

    1993-08-01

    The metabolism of racemic, (D)- and (L)-brompheniramine, a widely used antihistamine, was studied with microsomes and with highly purified flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) from hog liver. In addition, a number of other similar tertiary amines were evaluated as substrates for FMO activity from hog liver and the kinetic constants obtained were compared with brompheniramine. Although some N-demethylation was observed, the major metabolite of brompheniramine and the other tertiary amines examined in hog liver microsomes was the metabolite containing an aliphatic nitrogen N-oxide. Brompheniramine was extensively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. N-Oxygenation of brompheniramine in both microsomes and with highly purified FMO from hog liver was enantioselective. The Km for N-oxygenation of (D)-brompheniramine was markedly lower than the Km for (L)-brompheniramine. (E)- and (Z)-zimeldine are less conformationally flexible model compounds of brompheniramine, and these compounds were also examined and were found to be stereoselectively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. The similarities and differences in Km and Vmax values were evaluated in terms of possible conformations of the substrates determined by SYBYL molecular mechanics calculations. Distance map data indicated that FMO preferentially accommodated selected conformations of tertiary amines. Thus, (D)-brompheniramine and (Z)-zimeldine presumably have the aliphatic tertiary amine nitrogen atom and aromatic ring center at a defined distance and geometry and were more efficiently N-oxygenated than their respective isomers. PMID:8415393

  15. Insights into Flavin-based Electron Bifurcation via the NADH-dependent Reduced Ferredoxin:NADP Oxidoreductase Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, Julius K.; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Shuning; Demmer, Ulrike; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Ermler, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (NfnAB) is found in the cytoplasm of various anaerobic bacteria and archaea. The enzyme reversibly catalyzes the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADPH driven by the exergonic transhydrogenation from NADPH onto NAD+. Coupling is most probably accomplished via the mechanism of flavin-based electron bifurcation. To understand this process on a structural basis, we heterologously produced the NfnAB complex of Thermotoga maritima in Escherichia coli, provided kinetic evidence for its bifurcating behavior, and determined its x-ray structure in the absence and presence of NADH. The structure of NfnAB reveals an electron transfer route including the FAD (a-FAD), the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NfnA and the FAD (b-FAD), and the two [4Fe-4S] clusters of NfnB. Ferredoxin is presumably docked onto NfnB close to the [4Fe-4S] cluster distal to b-FAD. NAD(H) binds to a-FAD and NADP(H) consequently to b-FAD, which is positioned in the center of the NfnAB complex and the site of electron bifurcation. Arg187 is hydrogen-bonded to N5 and O4 of the bifurcating b-FAD and might play a key role in adjusting a low redox potential of the FADH•/FAD pair required for ferredoxin reduction. A mechanism of FAD-coupled electron bifurcation by NfnAB is proposed. PMID:26139605

  16. Interaction of Flavin-Dependent Fructose Dehydrogenase with Cytochrome c as Basis for the Construction of Biomacromolecular Architectures on Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Christoph; Kano, Kenji; Schäfer, Daniel; Wollenberger, Ulla; Lisdat, Fred

    2016-06-21

    The creation of electron transfer (ET) chains based on the defined arrangement of enzymes and redox proteins on electrode surfaces represents an interesting approach within the field of bioelectrocatalysis. In this study, we investigated the ET reaction of the flavin-dependent enzyme fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) with the redox protein cytochrome c (cyt c). Two different pH optima were found for the reaction in acidic and neutral solutions. When cyt c was adsorbed on an electrode surface while the enzyme remained in solution, ET proceeded efficiently in media of neutral pH. Interprotein ET was also observed in acidic media; however, it appeared to be less efficient. These findings suggest that two different ET pathways between the enzyme and cyt c may occur. Moreover, cyt c and FDH were immobilized in multiple layers on an electrode surface by means of another biomacromolecule: DNA (double stranded) using the layer-by-layer technique. The biprotein multilayer architecture showed a catalytic response in dependence on the fructose concentration, indicating that the ET reaction between both proteins is feasible even in the immobilized state. The electrode showed a defined response to fructose and a good storage stability. Our results contribute to the better understanding of the ET reaction between FDH and cyt c and provide the basis for the creation of all-biomolecule based fructose sensors the sensitivity of which can be controlled by the layer preparation. PMID:27213223

  17. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Flavin Dependent Thymidylate Synthase (MtbThyX) at 2.0 Å Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Turley, Stewart; Ulmer, Jonathan E.; Rhie, Ho Gun; Hopkins Sibley, Carol; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-07-20

    A novel flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase was identified recently as an essential gene in many archaebacteria and some pathogenic eubacteria. This enzyme, ThyX, is a potential antibacterial drug target, since humans and most eukaryotes lack the thyX gene and depend upon the conventional thymidylate synthase (TS) for their dTMP requirements. We have cloned and overexpressed the thyX gene (Rv2754c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Escherichia coli. The M. tuberculosis ThyX (MtbThyX) enzyme complements the E. coli {chi}2913 strain that lacks its conventional TS activity. The crystal structure of the homotetrameric MtbThyX was determined in the presence of the cofactor FAD and the substrate analog, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (BrdUMP). In the active site, which is formed by three monomers, FAD is bound in an extended conformation with the adenosine ring in a deep pocket and BrdUMP in a closed conformation near the isoalloxazine ring. Structure-based mutational studies have revealed a critical role played by residues Lys165 and Arg168 in ThyX activity, possibly by governing access to the carbon atom to be methylated of a totally buried substrate dUMP.

  18. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Juliane K; Wakatake, Takanori; Yoshida, Satoko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W; Namba, Shigetou; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  19. The first step in polyethylene glycol degradation by sphingomonads proceeds via a flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase containing flavin adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, M; Tanabe, M; Hataya, M; Enokibara, S; Duine, J A; Kawai, F

    2001-11-01

    Several Sphingomonas spp. utilize polyethylene glycols (PEGs) as a sole carbon and energy source, oxidative PEG degradation being initiated by a dye-linked dehydrogenase (PEG-DH) that oxidizes the terminal alcohol groups of the polymer chain. Purification and characterization of PEG-DH from Sphingomonas terrae revealed that the enzyme is membrane bound. The gene encoding this enzyme (pegA) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme was vulnerable to aggregation and inactivation, but this could be prevented by addition of detergent. It is as a homodimeric protein with a subunit molecular mass of 58.8 kDa, each subunit containing 1 noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide but not Fe or Zn. PEG-DH recognizes a broad variety of primary aliphatic and aromatic alcohols as substrates. Comparison with known sequences revealed that PEG-DH belongs to the group of glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) flavoprotein oxidoreductases and that it is a novel type of flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase related (percent identical amino acids) to other, so far uncharacterized bacterial, membrane-bound, dye-linked dehydrogenases: alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oleovorans (46%); choline dehydrogenase from E. coli (40%); L-sorbose dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans (38%); and 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from a Pseudomonas species (35%). PMID:11673442

  20. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  1. 1H NMR study of the hetero-association of flavin-mononucleotide with mutagenic dyes: ethidium bromide and proflavine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Mukhina, Yu. V.; Davies, D. B.

    The hetero-association of the vitamin B2 derivative, flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), with a mutagenic dye, ethidium bromide (EB) or proflavine (PF), has been studied by 1D and 2D 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The variations of proton chemical shifts of both the vitamin and dye as a function of concentration and temperature were analysed in terms of the structural and thermodynamical properties of the FMN-EB and FMN-PF complexes in solution. The structures of the complexes were also investigated by observed intermolecular ROE contacts and molecular mechanics calculations. The results show that the 1 : 1 hetero-association complexes in solution are more stable than the self-association complexes, which is consistent with formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond in the hetero-complexes of FMN-EB and FMN-PF. Hence it is possible that the toxicity of aromatic molecules such as EB and PF may be reduced in vitro by the presence of FMN, partly because of the known antimutagenic action of FMN and partly because it has been shown in this work that there is an effective intermolecular association between the mutagens and the vitamin.

  2. Crystal structure of 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase: radical catalysis involving a [4Fe-4S] cluster and flavin.

    PubMed

    Martins, Berta M; Dobbek, Holger; Cinkaya, Irfan; Buckel, Wolfgang; Messerschmidt, Albrecht

    2004-11-01

    Dehydratases catalyze the breakage of a carbon-oxygen bond leading to unsaturated products via the elimination of water. The 1.6-A resolution crystal structure of 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase from the gamma-aminobutyrate-fermenting Clostridium aminobutyricum represents a new class of dehydratases with an unprecedented active site architecture. A [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster, coordinated by three cysteine and one histidine residues, is located 7 A from the Re-side of a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) moiety. The structure provides insight into the function of these ubiquitous prosthetic groups in the chemically nonfacile, radical-mediated dehydration of 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. The substrate can be bound between the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster and the FAD with both cofactors contributing to its radical activation and catalytic conversion. Our results raise interesting questions regarding the mechanism of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, which are involved in fatty acid oxidation, and address the divergent evolution of the ancestral common gene. PMID:15496473

  3. Diversity of assimilatory nitrate reductase genes from plankton and epiphytes associated with a seagrass bed.

    PubMed

    Adhitya, Anita; Thomas, Florence I M; Ward, Bess B

    2007-11-01

    Assimilatory nitrate reductase gene fragments were isolated from epiphytes and plankton associated with seagrass blades collected from Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Nitrate reductase genes from diatoms (NR) and heterotrophic bacteria (nasA) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two sets of degenerate primers. A total of 129 NR and 75 nasA clones from four clone libraries, two from each of epiphytic and planktonic components, were sequenced and aligned. In addition, genomic DNA sequences for the NR fragment were obtained from Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira weissflogii diatom cultures. Rarefaction analysis with an operational taxonomic unit cut-off of 6% indicated that diversity of the NR and nasA clone libraries were similar, and that sequencing of the clone libraries was not yet saturated. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 121 of the 129 NR clones sequenced were similar to diatom sequences. Of the eight non-diatom sequences, four were most closely related to the sequence of Chlorella vulgaris. Introns were found in 8% of the Tampa Bay NR sequences; introns were also observed in S. costatum, but not T. weissflogii. Introns from within the same clone library exhibited close similarity in nucleotide sequence, position and length; the corresponding exon sequences were unique. Introns from within the same component were similar in position and length, but not in nucleotide sequence. These findings raise questions about the function of introns, and mechanisms or time evolution of intron formation. A large cluster of 14 of the 75 nasA sequences was similar to sequences from Vibrio species; other sequences were closely related to sequences from Alteromonas, alpha-proteobacteria and Marinomonas-like species. Biogeographically consistent patterns were observed for the nasA Tampa Bay sequences compared with sequences from other locations: for example, Tampa Bay sequences were similar to those from the South Atlantic Bight, but not the Barents Sea. The

  4. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Trigoso, Yvonne D.; Evans, Russell C.; Karsten, William E.; Chooback, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(P)H dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5’and 3’ terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3). The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40–50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification. PMID:26815040

  5. A novel arsenate reductase from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27: its role in arsenic detoxification.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Immacolata; Limauro, Danila; Pedone, Emilia; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Fiorentino, Gabriella

    2013-10-01

    Microorganisms living in arsenic-rich geothermal environments act on arsenic with different biochemical strategies, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance to the harmful effects of the metalloid have only partially been examined. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic resistance in the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27. This strain, originally isolated from a Japanese hot spring, exhibited tolerance to concentrations of arsenate and arsenite up to 20mM and 15mM, respectively; it owns in its genome a putative chromosomal arsenate reductase (TtarsC) gene encoding a protein homologous to the one well characterized from the plasmid pI258 of the Gram+bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Differently from the majority of microorganisms, TtarsC is part of an operon including genes not related to arsenic resistance; qRT-PCR showed that its expression was four-fold increased when arsenate was added to the growth medium. The gene cloning and expression in Escherichia coli, followed by purification of the recombinant protein, proved that TtArsC was indeed a thioredoxin-coupled arsenate reductase with a kcat/KM value of 1.2×10(4)M(-1)s(-1). It also exhibited weak phosphatase activity with a kcat/KM value of 2.7×10(-4)M(-1)s(-1). The catalytic role of the first cysteine (Cys7) was ascertained by site-directed mutagenesis. These results identify TtArsC as an important component in the arsenic resistance in T. thermophilus giving the first structural-functional characterization of a thermophilic arsenate reductase. PMID:23800470

  6. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiering, N.; Kabsch, W.; Moore, M. J.; Distefano, M. D.; Walsh, C. T.; Pai, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    SEVERAL hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere1. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase2 and mercuric ion reductase (MerA) 3-5. The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases6, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II) --> NADP+ + H+Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase7,8 serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure9 and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), pI258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved10,11. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn5Ol and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon11. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency3. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  7. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase.

    PubMed

    Trigoso, Yvonne D; Evans, Russell C; Karsten, William E; Chooback, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(P)H dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5'and 3' terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3). The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40-50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification. PMID:26815040

  8. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  9. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  10. The inhibitory activity of aldose reductase in vitro by constituents of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati, Sri; Ersam, Taslim; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-15

    We investigated aldose reductase inhibition of Garcinia mangostana Linn. from Indonesia. Dichloromethane extract of the root bark of this tree was found to demonstrate an IC50 value of 11.98 µg/ml for human aldose reductase in vitro. From the dichloromethane fraction, prenylated xanthones were isolated as potent human aldose reductase inhibitors. We discovered 3-isomangostin to be most potent against aldose reductase, with an IC50 of 3.48 µM. PMID:25636870

  11. Compensatory periplasmic nitrate reductase activity supports anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in the absence of membrane nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Van Alst, Nadine E; Sherrill, Lani A; Iglewski, Barbara H; Haidaris, Constantine G

    2009-10-01

    Nitrate serves as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite generates a transmembrane proton motive force allowing ATP synthesis and anaerobic growth. The inner membrane-bound nitrate reductase NarGHI is encoded within the narK1K2GHJI operon, and the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapAB is encoded within the napEFDABC operon. The roles of the 2 dissimilatory nitrate reductases in anaerobic growth, and the regulation of their expressions, were examined by use of a set of deletion mutants in P. aeruginosa PAO1. NarGHI mutants were unable to grow anaerobically, but plate cultures remained viable up to 120 h. In contrast, the nitrate sensor-response regulator mutant DeltanarXL displayed growth arrest initially, but resumed growth after 72 h and reached the early stationary phase in liquid culture after 120 h. Genetic, transcriptional, and biochemical studies demonstrated that anaerobic growth recovery by the NarXL mutant was the result of NapAB periplasmic nitrate reductase expression. A novel transcriptional start site for napEFDABC expression was identified in the NarXL mutant grown anaerobically. Furthermore, mutagenesis of a consensus NarL-binding site monomer upstream of the novel transcriptional start site restored anaerobic growth recovery in the NarXL mutant. The data suggest that during anaerobic growth of wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1, the nitrate response regulator NarL directly represses expression of periplasmic nitrate reductase, while inducing maximal expression of membrane nitrate reductase. PMID:19935885

  12. Identification of an NADH-Cytochrome b5 Reductase Gene from an Arachidonic Acid-Producing Fungus, Mortierella alpina 1S-4, by Sequencing of the Encoding cDNA and Heterologous Expression in a Fungus, Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Sakuradani, Eiji; Kobayashi, Michihiko; Shimizu, Sakayu

    1999-01-01

    Based on the sequence information for bovine and yeast NADH-cytochrome b5 reductases (CbRs), a DNA fragment was cloned from Mortierella alpina 1S-4 after PCR amplification. This fragment was used as a probe to isolate a cDNA clone with an open reading frame encoding 298 amino acid residues which show marked sequence similarity to CbRs from other sources, such as yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), bovine, human, and rat CbRs. These results suggested that this cDNA is a CbR gene. The results of a structural comparison of the flavin-binding β-barrel domains of CbRs from various species and that of the M. alpina enzyme suggested that the overall barrel-folding patterns are similar to each other and that a specific arrangement of three highly conserved amino acid residues (i.e., arginine, tyrosine, and serine) plays a role in binding with the flavin (another prosthetic group) through hydrogen bonds. The corresponding genomic gene, which was also cloned from M. alpina 1S-4 by means of a hybridization method with the above probe, had four introns of different sizes. These introns had GT at the 5′ end and AG at the 3′ end, according to a general GT-AG rule. The expression of the full-length cDNA in a filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, resulted in an increase (4.7 times) in ferricyanide reduction activity involving the use of NADH as an electron donor in the microsomes. The M. alpina CbR was purified by solubilization of microsomes with cholic acid sodium salt, followed by DEAE-Sephacel, Mono-Q HR 5/5, and AMP-Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatographies; there was a 645-fold increase in the NADH-ferricyanide reductase specific activity. The purified CbR preferred NADH over NADPH as an electron donor. This is the first report of an analysis of this enzyme in filamentous fungi. PMID:10473389

  13. Menthofuran regulates essential oil biosynthesis in peppermint by controlling a downstream monoterpene reductase

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Soheil S.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2003-01-01

    (+)-Pulegone is a central intermediate in the biosynthesis of (-)-menthol, the most significant component of peppermint essential oil. Depending on environmental conditions, this branch point metabolite may be reduced to (-)-menthone en route to menthol, by pulegone reductase (PR), or oxidized to (+)-menthofuran, by menthofuran synthase (MFS). To elucidate regulation of pulegone metabolism, we modified the expression of mfs under control of the CaMV 35S promoter in transformed peppermint plants. Overexpression and cosuppression of mfs resulted in the respective increase or decrease in the production of menthofuran, indicating that the control of MFS resides primarily at the level of transcription. Significantly, in both WT peppermint as well as in all transformed plants, the flux of (+)-pulegone through PR correlated negatively with the essential oil content of menthofuran, such that menthofuran, and pulegone increased, or decreased, in concert. These results suggested that menthofuran itself might influence the reduction of pulegone. Although (+)-menthofuran did not inhibit (+)-PR activity, stem feeding with menthofuran selectively decreased pr transcript levels in immature leaves, thereby accounting for decreased reductase activity and increased pulegone content. These data demonstrate that the metabolic fate of (+)-pulegone is controlled through transcriptional regulation of mfs and that menthofuran, either directly or indirectly, influences this process by down-regulating transcription from pr and/or decreasing pr message stability. The ability to reduce both menthofuran and pulegone levels is of commercial significance in improving essential oil quality; however, the physiological rationale for such complex regulation is presently unclear. PMID:14623962

  14. Cloning, expression and enzymatic properties analysis of dihydrofolate reductase gene from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Gao, Junshan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chaoliang; Meng, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for aromatic acid hydroxylases, which control the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters. BH4 deficiency has been associated with many neuropsychological disorders. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) can catalyze 7,8-dihydrobiopterin to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) in the salvage pathway of BH4 synthesis from sepiapterin (SP), a major pigment component contained in the integument of silkworm Bombyx mori mutant lemon (lem) in high concentration. In this study, we report the cloning of DHFR gene from the silkworm B. mori (BmDhfr) and identification of enzymatic properties of BmDHFR. BmDhfr is located on scaffold Bm_199 with a predicted gene model BGIBMGA013340, which encodes a 185-aa polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of about 21 kDa. Biochemical analyses showed that the recombinant BmDHFR protein exhibited high enzymatic activity and suitable parameters to substrate. Together with our previous studies on SP reductase of B. mori (BmSPR) and the lem mutant, it may be an effective way to industrially extract SP from the lem silkworms in large scale to produce BH4 in vitro by co-expressing BmSPR and BmDHFR and using the extracted SP as a substrate in the future. PMID:23065260

  15. Molecular characterization of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase involved in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in apple

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Liao; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Wei, Guochao; Zhou, Hui; Korban, Schuyler S.; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are the major component of phenolics in apple, but mechanisms involved in PA biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, the relationship between the PA biosynthesis and the expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) was investigated in fruit skin of one apple cultivar and three crabapples. Transcript levels of LAR1 and ANR2 genes were significantly correlated with the contents of catechin and epicatechin, respectively, which suggests their active roles in PA synthesis. Surprisingly, transcript levels for both LAR1 and LAR2 genes were almost undetectable in two crabapples that accumulated both flavan-3-ols and PAs. This contradicts the previous finding that LAR1 gene is a strong candidate regulating the accumulation of metabolites such as epicatechin and PAs in apple. Ectopic expression of apple MdLAR1 gene in tobacco suppresses expression of the late genes in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, resulting in loss of anthocyanin in flowers. Interestingly, a decrease in PA biosynthesis was also observed in flowers of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the MdLAR1 gene, which could be attributed to decreased expression of both the NtANR1 and NtANR2 genes. Our study not only confirms the in vivo function of apple LAR1 gene, but it is also helpful for understanding the mechanism of PA biosynthesis. PMID:25914714

  16. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Induction of Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase mRNAs in Mouse LiverS

    PubMed Central

    Celius, Trine; Roblin, Steven; Harper, Patricia A.; Matthews, Jason; Boutros, Paul C.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Okey, Allan B.

    2016-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are important in detoxication but generally are considered not to be inducible by xenobiotics. Our recent microarray studies revealed induction of FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in liver of mice with wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) but not in Ahr-null mice. The aim of the present study was to delineate mechanisms of FMO regulation. In adult male mice, basal FMO3 mRNA is low but was induced 6-fold at 4 h and 6000-fold at 24 h. The ED50 was approximately 1 μg/kg for FMO2 and FMO3, similar to that for the classic AHR-regulated gene, Cyp1a1. In adult female mice basal FMO3 mRNA is high and was not induced at 4 h but was elevated 8-fold at 24 h. FMO5 mRNA was significantly down-regulated by TCDD in both male and female adult mice. Juvenile mice show no sex difference in response to TCDD; FMO3 was induced 4 to 6-fold by TCDD in both sexes. Chromatin immuno-precipitation demonstrated recruitment of AHR and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator proteins to Fmo3 regulatory regions, suggesting that induction by TCDD is a primary AHR-mediated event. Although FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced by TCDD in adult males, overall FMO catalytic activity increased only modestly. In contrast to the striking up-regulation of FMO2 and FMO3 in mouse liver, TCDD has little effect on FMO mRNA in rat liver. However, FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced in transgenic mice that express wild-type rat AHR, indicating that lack of induction in rat is not due to an incompetent AHR in this species. PMID:18765683

  17. Relationships between flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 3 (FMO3) genotype and trimethylaminuria phenotype in a Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Makiko; Allerston, Charles K; Shephard, Elizabeth A; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Phillips, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 3 (FMO3) genotype and phenotype (conversion of odorous trimethylamine into non-odorous trimethylamine N-oxide) in a large Japanese cohort suffering from trimethylaminuria. Methods Urinary excretion of trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide was determined for 102 volunteers with self-reporting symptoms of trimethylaminuria. For each we determined the sequence of the entire coding region, plus 1.3 kb of flanking intronic and 2.5 kb of the upstream region of the FMO3 gene. The affect of upstream variants on transcription was determined with a reporter gene assay. Results Seventy-eight subjects were diagnosed as suffering from trimethylaminuria, based on urinary excretion of <90% of total TMA as TMA N-oxide. Of these, 13 were classified as severe, 56 as moderate and nine as mild cases, excreting <43%, 48–70% and 73–83% of trimethylamine as trimethylamine N-oxide, respectively. Twenty-seven mutations were identified in FMO3, 15 in the coding region, of which eight abolish or severely impair FMO3 activity (Pro70Leu, Cys197fsX, Thr201Lys, Arg205Cys, Met260Val, Trp388Ter, Gln470Ter and Arg500Ter), and 12 in the upstream region. The mutations segregate into 19 haplotypes, including four different combinations of upstream mutations, each of which reduces transcriptional activity in comparison with the ancestral upstream sequence of FMO3. Conclusions Comparisons of genotype and phenotype reveal that severe trimethylaminuria is caused by loss of function mutations in FMO3. For moderate and mild cases the situation is more complex, with most resulting from factors other than FMO3 genotype. Our results have implications for the diagnosis and management of the disorder. PMID:24028545

  18. The metabolomics of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide in the mouse and its formation by human flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sarbani; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2007-02-15

    The alkaloid arecoline is a main constituent of areca nuts that are chewed by approximately 600 million persons worldwide. A principal metabolite of arecoline is arecoline 1-oxide whose metabolism has been poorly studied. To redress this, synthetic (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide was administered to mice (20mg/kg p.o.) and a metabolomic study performed on 0-12h urine using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOFMS) with multivariate data analysis. A total of 16 mass/retention time pairs yielded 13 metabolites of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide, most of them novel. Identity of metabolites was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. The principal pathways of metabolism of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide were mercapturic acid formation, with catabolism to mercaptan and methylmercaptan metabolites, apparent CC double-bond reduction, carboxylic acid reduction to the aldehyde (a novel pathway in mammals), N-oxide reduction, and de-esterification. Relative percentages of metabolites were determined directly from the metabolomic data. Approximately, 50% of the urinary metabolites corresponded to unchanged (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide, 25% to other N-oxide metabolites, while approximately, 30% corresponded to mercapturic acids or their metabolites. Many metabolites, principally mercapturic acids and their derivatives, were excreted as diastereomers that could be resolved by UPLC-TOFMS. Arecoline was converted to arecoline 1-oxide in vitro by human flavin-containing monooxygenases FMO1 (K(M): 13.6+/-4.9muM; V(MAX): 0.114+/-0.01nmolmin(-1)microg(-1) protein) and FMO3 (K(M): 44.5+/-8.0microM; V(MAX): 0.014+/-0.001nmolmin(-1)microg(-1) protein), but not by FMO5 or any of 11 human cytochromes P450. This report underscores the power of metabolomics in drug metabolite mining. PMID:17123469

  19. Tobacco Nectarin V Is a Flavin-Containing Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Protein with Glucose Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Clay J.; Thornburg, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Ornamental tobacco (Nicotiana langsdorffii X N. sanderae) secretes a limited array of proteins (nectarins) into its floral nectar. Careful sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of tobacco nectar revealed that a broad protein band from 61 to 65 kD actually consists of five discrete protein bands. N-terminal sequencing and tryptic peptide mass spectrometry fingerprint analysis demonstrated that the upper three bands are isoforms of the same protein, NEC5 (Nectarin V), whereas the lower two bands, NEC4 (Nectarin IV), are related to each other but not to NEC5. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) based upon N-terminal sequence of NEC5 generated a short cDNA that encoded the N terminus of the NEC5 protein. Two rounds of inverse-PCR using genomic DNA permitted the isolation of approximately one-half of the coding region of the nec5 gene along with 787 nucleotides of the 5′-flanking region. This DNA fragment was used as a probe to isolate a near full-length nec5 clone from a nectary-derived cDNA library. BLAST analysis identified the nec5 cDNA as a berberine bridge enzyme-like protein. Approximately 40% of the cDNA sequence corresponded to peptides that were identified by tryptic peptide mass spectrometry fingerprint analysis of the NEC5 protein, thereby confirming that this cDNA encoded the NEC5 protein. In-gel assays also demonstrated that NEC5 contains a covalently linked flavin, and it possesses glucose oxidase activity. RT-PCR-based expression analyses showed that nec5 expression is limited exclusively to the nectary gland during late stages of floral development. PMID:14730073

  20. Novel Riboswitch-Binding Flavin Analog That Protects Mice against Clostridium difficile Infection without Inhibiting Cecal Flora

    PubMed Central

    Megyola, Cynthia; Plummer, Mark; Osterman, David; O'Connell, Tim; Aristoff, Paul; Quinn, Cheryl; Chrusciel, R. Alan; Poel, Toni J.; Schostarez, Heinrich J.; Stewart, Catherine A.; Walker, Daniel P.; Wuts, Peter G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Novel mechanisms of action and new chemical scaffolds are needed to rejuvenate antibacterial drug discovery, and riboswitch regulators of bacterial gene expression are a promising class of targets for the discovery of new leads. Herein, we report the characterization of 5-(3-(4-fluorophenyl)butyl)-7,8-dimethylpyrido[3,4-b]quinoxaline-1,3(2H,5H)-dione (5FDQD)—an analog of riboflavin that was designed to bind riboswitches that naturally recognize the essential coenzyme flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and regulate FMN and riboflavin homeostasis. In vitro, 5FDQD and FMN bind to and trigger the function of an FMN riboswitch with equipotent activity. MIC and time-kill studies demonstrated that 5FDQD has potent and rapidly bactericidal activity against Clostridium difficile. In C57BL/6 mice, 5FDQD completely prevented the onset of lethal antibiotic-induced C. difficile infection (CDI). Against a panel of bacteria representative of healthy bowel flora, the antibacterial selectivity of 5FDQD was superior to currently marketed CDI therapeutics, with very little activity against representative strains from the Bacteroides, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Actinomyces, and Prevotella genera. Accordingly, a single oral dose of 5FDQD caused less alteration of culturable cecal flora in mice than the comparators. Collectively, these data suggest that 5FDQD or closely related analogs could potentially provide a high rate of CDI cure with a low likelihood of infection recurrence. Future studies will seek to assess the role of FMN riboswitch binding to the mechanism of 5FDQD antibacterial action. In aggregate, our results indicate that riboswitch-binding antibacterial compounds can be discovered and optimized to exhibit activity profiles that merit preclinical and clinical development as potential antibacterial therapeutic agents. PMID:26169403

  1. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the anti-tuberculosis drug ethionamide in a flavin-containing monooxygenase null mouse.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Amy L; Leykam, Virginia L; Larkin, Andrew; Krueger, Sharon K; Phillips, Ian R; Shephard, Elizabeth A; Williams, David E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mTB), the causative agent for tuberculosis (TB), has led to increased use of second-line drugs, including ethionamide (ETA). ETA is a prodrug bioactivated by mycobacterial and mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). FMO2 is the major isoform in the lungs of most mammals, including primates. In humans a polymorphism exists in the expression of FMO2. FMO2.2 (truncated, inactive) protein is produced by the common allele, while the ancestral allele, encoding active FMO2.1, has been documented only in individuals of African and Hispanic origin, at an incidence of up to 50% and 7%, respectively. We hypothesized that FMO2 variability in TB-infected individuals would yield differences in concentrations and ratios of ETA prodrug and metabolites. In this study we assessed the impact of the FMO2 genetic polymorphism on the pharmacokinetics of ETA after administration of a single oral dose of ETA (125 mg/kg) to wild type and triple Fmo1/2/4-null mice, measuring levels of prodrug vs. metabolites in plasma collected from 0 to 3.5 h post-gavage. All mice metabolized ETA to ETA S-oxide (ETASO) and 2-ethyl-4-amidopyridine (ETAA). Wild type mice had higher plasma concentrations of metabolites than of parent compound (p = 0.001). In contrast, Fmo1/2/4-null mice had higher plasma concentrations of parent compound than of metabolites (p = 0.0001). Thus, the human FMO2 genotype could impact the therapeutic efficacy and/or toxicity of ETA. PMID:23580869

  2. Exceptionally high glucose current on a hierarchically structured porous carbon electrode with "wired" flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Seiya; Murata, Kazuki; Akatsuka, Wataru

    2014-10-15

    This article introduces a carbon electrode designed to achieve efficient enzymatic electrolysis by exploiting a hierarchical pore structure based on macropores for efficient mass transfer and mesopores for high enzyme loading. Magnesium oxide-templated mesoporous carbon (MgOC, mean pore diameter 38 nm) was used to increase the effective specific surface area for enzyme immobilization. MgOC particles were deposited on a current collector by an electrophoretic deposition method to generate micrometer-scale macropores to improve the mass transfer of glucose and electrolyte (buffer) ions. To create a glucose bioanode, the porous-carbon-modified electrode was further coated with a biocatalytic hydrogel composed of a conductive redox polymer, deglycosylated flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (d-FAD-GDH), and a cross-linker. Carbohydrate chains on the peripheral surfaces of the FAD-GDH molecules were removed by periodate oxidation before cross-linking. The current density for the oxidation of glucose was 100 mA cm(-2) at 25 °C and pH 7, with a hydrogel loading of 1.0 mg cm(-2). For the same hydrogel composition and loading, the current density on the MgOC-modified electrode was more than 30 times higher than that on a flat carbon electrode. On increasing the solution temperature to 45 °C, the catalytic current increased to 300 mA cm(-2), with a hydrogel loading of 1.6 mg cm(-2). Furthermore, the stability of the hydrogel electrode was improved by using the mesoporous carbon materials; more than 95% of the initial catalytic current remained after a 220-day storage test in 4 °C phosphate buffer, and 80% was observed after 7 days of continuous operation at 25 °C. PMID:25244161

  3. Inhibition of Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence by cerulenin: In vivo evidence for covalent modification of the reductase enzyme involved in aldehyde synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M. ); Meighen, E.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence is very sensitive to cerulenin, a fungal antibiotic which is known to inhibit fatty acid synthesis. When Vibrio harveyi cells pretreated with cerulenin were incubated with ({sup 3}H)myristic acid in vivo, acylation of the 57-kilodalton reductase subunit of the luminescence-specific fatty acid reductase complex was specifically inhibited. Light emission of wild-type V. harveyi was 20-fold less sensitive to cerulenin at low concentrations (10{mu}g/ml) than that of the dark mutant strain M17, which requires exogenous myristic acid for luminescence because of a defective transferase subunit. The sensitivity of myristic acid-stimulated luminescence in the mutant strain M17 exceeded that of phospholipid synthesis from ({sup 14}C)acetate, whereas uptake and incorporation of exogenous ({sup 14}C)myristic acid into phospholipids was increased by cerulenin. The reductase subunit could be labeled by incubating M17 cells with ({sup 3}H)tetrahydrocerulenin; this labeling was prevented by preincubation with either unlabeled cerulenin or myristic acid. Labeling of the reductase subunit with ({sup 3}H)tetrahydrocerulenin was also noted in an aldehyde-stimulated mutant (A16) but not in wild-type cells or in another aldehyde-stimulated mutant (M42) in which ({sup 3}H)myristoyl turnover at the reductase subunit was found to be defective. These results indicate that (i) cerulenin specifically and covalently inhibits the reductase component of aldehyde synthesis, (ii) this enzyme is partially protected from cerulenin inhibition in the wild-type strain in vivo, and (iii) two dark mutants which exhibit similar luminescence phenotypes (mutants A16 and M42) are blocked at different stages of fatty acid reduction.

  4. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  5. The Kinetics and Inhibition of the Enzyme Methemoglobin Reductase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, A. G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry experiment which involves the preparation and kinetics of an oxidation-reduction enzyme system, methemoglobin reductase. A crude enzyme extract is prepared and assayed spectrophotometrically. The enzyme system obeys Michaelis-Menton kinetics with respect to both substrate and the NADH cofactor. (MLH)

  6. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  11. Domain Evolution and Functional Diversification of Sulfite Reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Ashita; Goswami, Sulip; Riley, Monica; Teske, Andreas; Sogin, Mitchell

    2005-02-01

    Sulfite reductases are key enzymes of assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfur metabolism, which occur in diverse bacterial and archaeal lineages. They share a highly conserved domain "C-X5-C-n-C-X3-C" for binding siroheme and iron-sulfur clusters that facilitate electron transfer to the substrate. For each sulfite reductase cluster, the siroheme-binding domain is positioned slightly differently at the N-terminus of dsrA and dsrB, while in the assimilatory proteins the siroheme domain is located at the C-terminus. Our sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the siroheme-binding domain shows that sulfite reductase sequences diverged from a common ancestor into four separate clusters (aSir, alSir, dsr, and asrC) that are biochemically distinct; each serves a different assimilatory or dissimilatory role in sulfur metabolism. The phylogenetic distribution and functional grouping in sulfite reductase clusters (dsrA and dsrB vs. aSiR, asrC, and alSir) suggest that their functional diversification during evolution may have preceded the bacterial/archaeal divergence.

  12. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction. PMID:26412036

  13. Activated and unactivated forms of human erythrocyte aldose reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, S K; Hair, G A; Das, B

    1985-01-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21) has been partially purified from human erythrocytes by DEAE-cellulose (DE-52) column chromatography. This enzyme is activated severalfold upon incubation with 10 microM each glucose 6-phosphate, NADPH, and glucose. The activation of the enzyme was confirmed by following the oxidation of NADPH as well as the formation of sorbitol with glucose as substrate. The activated form of aldose reductase exhibited monophasic kinetics with both glyceraldehyde and glucose (Km of glucose = 0.68 mM and Km of glyceraldehyde = 0.096 mM), whereas the native (unactivated) enzyme exhibited biphasic kinetics (Km of glucose = 9.0 and 0.9 mM and Km of glyceraldehyde = 1.1 and 0.14 mM). The unactivated enzyme was strongly inhibited by aldose reductase inhibitors such as sorbinil, alrestatin, and quercetrin, and by phosphorylated intermediates such as ADP, glycerate 3-phosphate, glycerate 1,3-bisphosphate, and glycerate 2,3-trisphosphate. The activated form of the enzyme was less susceptible to inhibition by aldose reductase inhibitors and phosphorylated intermediates. PMID:3933003

  14. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J. . E-mail: Robert.Hondal@uvm.edu

    2006-08-04

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k {sub cat} of 610 min{sup -1} and a K {sub m} of 610 {mu}M using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k {sub cat} is 25% of the k {sub cat} of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate.

  15. 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-11-01

    We measured the 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of (/sup 3/H) dihydrotestosterone from (/sup 3/H) testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10/sup -8/ M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity in each tissue studied.

  16. The coordinated increased expression of biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-2 promotes cardiomyocyte survival: a reductase-based peptide counters β-adrenergic receptor ligand-mediated cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Brookes, Paul S.; Maines, Mahin D.

    2011-01-01

    HO-2 oxidizes heme to CO and biliverdin; the latter is reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase (BVR). In addition, HO-2 is a redox-sensitive K/Ca2-associated protein, and BVR is an S/T/Y kinase. The two enzymes are components of cellular defense mechanisms. This is the first reporting of regulation of HO-2 by BVR and that their coordinated increase in isolated myocytes and intact heart protects against cardiotoxicity of β-adrenergic receptor activation by isoproterenol (ISO). The induction of BVR mRNA, protein, and activity and HO-2 protein was maintained for ≥96 h; increase in HO-1 was modest and transient. In isolated cardiomyocytes, experiments with cycloheximide, proteasome inhibitor MG-132, and siBVR suggested BVR-mediated stabilization of HO-2. In both models, activation of BVR offered protection against the ligand's stimulation of apoptosis. Two human BVR-based peptides known to inhibit and activate the reductase, KKRILHC281 and KYCCSRK296, respectively, were tested in the intact heart. Perfusion of the heart with the inhibitory peptide blocked ISO-mediated BVR activation and augmented apoptosis; conversely, perfusion with the activating peptide inhibited apoptosis. At the functional level, peptide-mediated inhibition of BVR was accompanied by dysfunction of the left ventricle and decrease in HO-2 protein levels. Perfusion of the organ with the activating peptide preserved the left ventricular contractile function and was accompanied by increased levels of HO-2 protein. Finding that BVR and HO-2 levels, myocyte apoptosis, and contractile function of the heart can be modulated by small human BVR-based peptides offers a promising therapeutic approach for treatment of cardiac dysfunctions.—Ding, B., Gibbs, P. E. M., Brookes, P. S., Maines, M. D. The coordinated increased expression of biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-2 promotes cardiomyocyte survival; a reductase-based peptide counters β-adrenergic receptor ligand-mediated cardiac dysfunction

  17. Native fluorescence detection of flavin derivatives by microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence intensified charge-coupled device detection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jianhua; Fung, Yingsing; Zhu, Derong; Lin, Bingcheng

    2004-02-20

    To widen the scope of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for detection in microchip capillary electrophoresis (CE), a microchip CE LIF-ICCD (intensified charge-coupled device) system based on a tunable wavelength dye laser pumped by a pico-second pulse nitrogen laser for excitation and a spectrograph with ICCD for detection had developed to demonstrate the enhancement in detection sensitivity by the following three approaches: direct detection of native fluorescence, improvement of signal-to-noise ratio by pulse laser excitation and time delay detection, and selective spectral acquisition by multi-channel detection. Riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) have been selected as they are dietetically important and microchip CE provides a promising onsite detection method. The results indicate a strong effect of wavelength on detection sensitivity and the need to tune wavelength for direct detection. Under optimized conditions (excitation 450 nm, emission 520 nm, gate delay time 45 ns, 20 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.1), the following results were obtained under static condition: Working ranges (0.6-350 microg/l, r > 0.99), detection limits (0.15-1.0 microg/l) and peak height repeatability (1.8-2.2% R.S.D.), all within the applicability range for body fluids or beverages such as human urine and cow milk. Baseline separation of three flavins was obtained under dynamic condition and the fluorescence spectra acquired assist the identification of alkaline-degraded products of riboflavin. Thus, the capability to check peak purity and identify unknown peaks has been demonstrated. PMID:14971506

  18. Mechanism of the Novel Prenylated Flavin-Containing Enzyme Ferulic Acid Decarboxylase Probed by Isotope Effects and Linear Free-Energy Relationships.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Kyle L; Arunrattanamook, Nattapol; Marsh, E Neil G

    2016-05-24

    Ferulic acid decarboxylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalyzes the decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acid to form styrene using a newly described prenylated flavin mononucleotide cofactor. A mechanism has been proposed, involving an unprecedented 1,3-dipolar cyclo-addition of the prenylated flavin with the α═β bond of the substrate that serves to activate the substrate toward decarboxylation. We measured a combination of secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) at the α- and β-positions of phenylacrylic acid together with solvent deuterium KIEs. The solvent KIE is 3.3 on Vmax/KM but is close to unity on Vmax, indicating that proton transfer to the product occurs before the rate-determining step. The secondary KIEs are normal at both the α- and β-positions but vary in magnitude depending on whether the reaction is performed in H2O or D2O. In D2O, the enzyme catalyzed the exchange of deuterium into styrene; this reaction was dependent on the presence of bicarbonate. This observation implies that CO2 release must occur after protonation of the product. Further information was obtained from a linear free-energy analysis of the reaction through the use of a range of para- and meta-substituted phenylacrylic acids. Log(kcat/KM) for the reaction correlated well with the Hammett σ(-) parameter with ρ = -0.39 ± 0.03; r(2) = 0.93. The negative ρ value and secondary isotope effects are consistent with the rate-determining step being the formation of styrene from the prenylated flavin-product adduct through a cyclo-elimination reaction. PMID:27119435

  19. Differential molecular response of monodehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase by nitration and S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Valderrama, Raquel; Padilla, María N; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Luque, Francisco; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2015-09-01

    The ascorbate-glutathione cycle is a metabolic pathway that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide and involves enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Proteomic studies have shown that some enzymes in this cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) are potential targets for post-translational modifications (PMTs) mediated by nitric oxide-derived molecules. Using purified recombinant pea peroxisomal MDAR and cytosolic and chloroplastic GR enzymes produced in Escherichia coli, the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) which are known to mediate protein nitration and S-nitrosylation processes, respectively, were analysed. Although ONOO(-) and GSNO inhibit peroxisomal MDAR activity, chloroplastic and cytosolic GR were not affected by these molecules. Mass spectrometric analysis of the nitrated MDAR revealed that Tyr213, Try292, and Tyr345 were exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by ONOO(-). The location of these residues in the structure of pea peroxisomal MDAR reveals that Tyr345 is found at 3.3 Å of His313 which is involved in the NADP-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Tyr345 as the primary site of nitration responsible for the inhibition of MDAR activity by ONOO(-). These results provide new insights into the molecular regulation of MDAR which is deactivated by nitration and S-nitrosylation. However, GR was not affected by ONOO(-) or GSNO, suggesting the existence of a mechanism to conserve redox status by maintaining the level of reduced GSH. Under a nitro-oxidative stress induced by salinity (150mM NaCl), MDAR expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels) was increased, probably to compensate the inhibitory effects of S-nitrosylation and nitration on the enzyme. The present data show the modulation of the antioxidative response of key enzymes in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle by nitric oxide (NO)-PTMs, thus indicating the close involvement of

  20. Differential molecular response of monodehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase by nitration and S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Valderrama, Raquel; Padilla, María N.; Luque, Francisco; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The ascorbate–glutathione cycle is a metabolic pathway that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide and involves enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Proteomic studies have shown that some enzymes in this cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) are potential targets for post-translational modifications (PMTs) mediated by nitric oxide-derived molecules. Using purified recombinant pea peroxisomal MDAR and cytosolic and chloroplastic GR enzymes produced in Escherichia coli, the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO–) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) which are known to mediate protein nitration and S-nitrosylation processes, respectively, were analysed. Although ONOO– and GSNO inhibit peroxisomal MDAR activity, chloroplastic and cytosolic GR were not affected by these molecules. Mass spectrometric analysis of the nitrated MDAR revealed that Tyr213, Try292, and Tyr345 were exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by ONOO–. The location of these residues in the structure of pea peroxisomal MDAR reveals that Tyr345 is found at 3.3 Å of His313 which is involved in the NADP-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Tyr345 as the primary site of nitration responsible for the inhibition of MDAR activity by ONOO–. These results provide new insights into the molecular regulation of MDAR which is deactivated by nitration and S-nitrosylation. However, GR was not affected by ONOO– or GSNO, suggesting the existence of a mechanism to conserve redox status by maintaining the level of reduced GSH. Under a nitro-oxidative stress induced by salinity (150mM NaCl), MDAR expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels) was increased, probably to compensate the inhibitory effects of S-nitrosylation and nitration on the enzyme. The present data show the modulation of the antioxidative response of key enzymes in the ascorbate–glutathione cycle by nitric oxide (NO)-PTMs, thus indicating the close involvement

  1. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N/sub 2/O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N/sub 2/O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N/sub 2/O reductase activity was inhibited by 0/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 ..mu..M) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 ..mu..M) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N/sub 2/O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater, estuarine, and alkaline-saline environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N/sub 2/O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N/sub 2/O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  2. Nickel site of methane catalysis in the methyl reductase enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Shiemke, A.K.; Scott, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methyl reductase is the enzyme of methanogenic bacteria that catalyzed the two-electron reduction of the methyl group of 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid (methyl-S-CoM) to methane and HS-CoM. The methyl group of methyl-S-CoM ultimately comes from the six-electron reduction of CO/sub 2/ by hydrogen, which also provides the reducing equivalents needed by methyl reductase. The nature of the catalytic site of methyl reductase is of current interest from the point of view of developing biomimetic C/sub 1/, chemistries directed toward methane synthesis and activation. In particular, Sandia is using molecular graphics and energy optimization techniques to design macromolecular catalysts that mimic the structure of sites of proteins that carry out C/sub 1/ chemistry. The goal is to produce catalysts whose function is the oxidation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases to generate liquid fuels or, alternatively, the reduction of abundant inorganic resources such as CO/sub 2/ to generate gaseous fuels. Unfortunately, the catalytic sites of many of the enzymes of interest, e.g., methyl reductase and methane monooxygenase, have not been characterized by X-ray crystallography and other structural techniques. With the goal of learning more about the structure of one of these naturally occurring sites of C/sub 1/ chemistry, we have obtained the first resonance Raman spectra of the nickel-macrocycle, called F/sub 430/, at the site of catalysis in methyl reductase. To help us structurally interpret the Raman spectra of the enzyme we have also obtained Raman spectra of solutions of the major forms of F/sub 430/ (salt-extracted and cytosol-free) at room temperature and at 77/degree/K and also, under similar solution conditions, spectra of a nickel-corphinoid derivative that is related to F/sub 430/.

  3. Mandelonitrile lyase from Ximenia americana L.: stereospecificity and lack of flavin prosthetic group.

    PubMed Central

    Kuroki, G W; Conn, E E

    1989-01-01

    A mandelonitrile lyase (EC 4.1.2.10) that catalyzes the dissociation of (S)-(-)-mandelonitrile to benzaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide has been purified to apparent homogeneity from leaves of Ximenia americana L. (Olacaceae). The lyase was purified 122-fold with 38% yield by chromatography on carboxymethyl-cellulose and chromatofocusing. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 5.5, with a Km value of 280 microM. Activity toward 4-hydroxy-(R,S)-mandelonitrile was 77% of that observed with the endogenous substrate; no activity was observed toward the aliphatic substrate acetone cyanohydrin. The enzyme was stable at 4 degrees C and at room temperature for at least 1 month. Native and subunit molecular weights of 38,000 and 36,500, respectively, suggest the enzyme is a monomer. The isoelectric point was pH 3.9 as determined by isoelectric focusing. Staining with periodic acid-Schiff and fluorescein-labeled concanavalin A reagents indicate this enzyme is a glycoprotein. In contrast to (R)-mandelonitrile lyases isolated from Prunus species, the Ximenia lyase does not appear to be a flavoprotein. A second enzyme that eluted from the chromatofocusing column at pH 4.0 was also active toward mandelonitrile. However, this form accounted for less than 10% of the total activity, and its specific activity was only 6% of that of the major component. Additional physical and kinetic studies suggested this activity may be due to a nonspecific enzyme that is active toward mandelonitrile. Images PMID:2780553

  4. New Functional Sulfide Oxidase-Oxygen Reductase Supercomplex in the Membrane of the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Aquifex aeolicus*

    PubMed Central

    Prunetti, Laurence; Infossi, Pascale; Brugna, Myriam; Ebel, Christine; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus, a hyperthermophilic and microaerophilic bacterium, obtains energy for growth from inorganic compounds alone. It was previously proposed that one of the respiratory pathways in this organism consists of the electron transfer from hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to molecular oxygen. H2S is oxidized by the sulfide quinone reductase, a membrane-bound flavoenzyme, which reduces the quinone pool. We have purified and characterized a novel membrane-bound multienzyme supercomplex that brings together all the molecular components involved in this bioenergetic chain. Our results indicate that this purified structure consists of one dimeric bc1 complex (complex III), one cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), and one or two sulfide quinone reductases as well as traces of the monoheme cytochrome c555 and quinone molecules. In addition, this work strongly suggests that the cytochrome c oxidase in the supercomplex is a ba3-type enzyme. The supercomplex has a molecular mass of about 350 kDa and is enzymatically functional, reducing O2 in the presence of the electron donor, H2S. This is the first demonstration of the existence of such a respirasome carrying a sulfide oxidase-oxygen reductase activity. Moreover, the kinetic properties of the sulfide quinone reductase change slightly when integrated in the supercomplex, compared with the free enzyme. We previously purified a complete respirasome involved in hydrogen oxidation and sulfur reduction from Aquifex aeolicus. Thus, two different bioenergetic pathways (sulfur reduction and sulfur oxidation) are organized in this bacterium as supramolecular structures in the membrane. A model for the energetic sulfur metabolism of Aquifex aeolicus is proposed. PMID:20971847

  5. The occurrence of NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase in Corbula caribea, from a natural oil seep at La Brea, Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Azad; Agard, John

    2004-04-01

    Corbula caribea is the most common non-polychaete macrofaunal organism identified at a large natural oil seep at La Brea in south Trinidad. It is hypothesized that these animals may possess (NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase) a component of the Mixed Function Oxygenase system (MFO), which may allow them to ameliorate the potentially deleterious effects resulting from exposure to the high levels of petroleum hydrocarbons within this environment. This study was designed to determine whether organisms from the seep site showed greater enzyme activity when compared to organisms from a non-seep reference site. NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase activity was determined by incubating 10 microm cryostat sections with nitro-blue tetrazolium. The reaction product was determined by visual assessment and quantified by measuring the relative mean stain intensity. The intense staining, indicative of enzyme activity was evident in the digestive epithelia of seep animals. Observations indicated that organisms from the seep showed more intense staining, indicating greater enzyme activity, when compared to animals from a non-seep reference site. The relative stain intensity of NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase determined for organisms from the seep was 61.30. This was significantly higher than the stain intensity determined for organisms from the non-seep reference site (7.11). This supported visual assessments, which suggested that the seep organisms showed higher enzyme activity than organisms from the non-seep site. The results suggest that NADPH-ferrihemoprotein reductase may be present in Corbula caribea from the seep site and not in those from the non-seep site. It is possible that this enzyme may contribute to these animals ability to tolerate chronic exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons and offer then a selective advantage for survival the seep environment. PMID:15041435

  6. Characterization of recombinant glutathione reductase from the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mikyoung; Barnwell, Callie V; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Glutathione reductases catalyze the reduction of oxidized glutathione (glutathione disulfide, GSSG) using NADPH as the substrate to produce reduced glutathione (GSH), which is an important antioxidant molecule that helps maintain the proper reducing environment of the cell. A recombinant form of glutathione reductase from Colwellia psychrerythraea, a marine psychrophilic bacterium, has been biochemically characterized to determine its molecular and enzymatic properties. C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was shown to be a homodimer with a molecular weight of 48.7 kDa using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and gel filtration. The C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase sequence shows significant homology to that of Escherichia coli glutathione reductase (66 % identity), and it possesses the FAD and NADPH binding motifs, as well as absorption spectrum features which are characteristic of flavoenzymes such as glutathione reductase. The psychrophilic C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase exhibits higher k cat and k cat/K m at lower temperatures (4 °C) compared to mesophilic Baker's yeast glutathione reductase. However, C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was able to complement an E. coli glutathione reductase deletion strain in oxidative stress growth assays, demonstrating the functionality of C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase over a broad temperature range, which suggests its potential utility as an antioxidant enzyme in heterologous systems. PMID:26101017

  7. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases.

    PubMed

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K; Gang, David R; Halls, Steven C; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-12-12

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed. PMID:13129921

  8. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  9. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  10. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki , Gang; David R. , Sarkanen; Simo , Ford; Joshua D.

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  11. Tungstate, a Molybdate Analog Inactivating Nitrate Reductase, Deregulates the Expression of the Nitrate Reductase Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingde; Moureaux, Thérèse; Caboche, Michel

    1989-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1) from higher plants is a homodimeric enzyme carrying a molybdenum cofactor at the catalytic site. Tungsten can be substituted for molybdenum in the cofactor structure, resulting in an inactive enzyme. When nitratefed Nicotiana tabacum plants were grown on a nutrient solution in which tungstate was substituted for molybdate, NR activity in the leaves decreased to a very low level within 24 hours while NR protein accumulated progressively to a level severalfold higher than the control after 6 days. NR mRNA level in molybdate-grown plants exhibited a considerable day-night fluctuation. However, when plants were treated with tungstate, NR mRNA level remained very high. NR activity and protein increased over a 24-hour period when nitrate was added back to N-starved molybdate-grown plants. NR mRNA level increased markedly during the first 2 hours and then decreased. In the presence of tungstate, however, the induction of NR activity by nitrate was totally abolished while high levels of NR protein and mRNA were both induced, and the high level of NR mRNA was maintained over a 10-hour period. These results suggest that the substitution of tungsten for molybdenum in NR complex leads to an overexpression of the NR structural gene. Possible mechanisms involved in this deregulation are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667015

  12. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase as a cytosolic arsenate reductase.

    PubMed

    Gregus, Zoltán; Németi, Balázs

    2002-11-01

    The findings of the accompanying paper (Németi and Gregus, Toxicol: Sci. 70, 4-12) indicate that the arsenate (AsV) reductase activity of rat liver cytosol is due to an SH enzyme that uses phosphate (or its analogue, arsenate, AsV) and a purine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine) as substrates. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is such an enzyme. It catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of 6-oxopurine nucleosides according to the following scheme: guanosine (or inosine) + phosphate <--> guanine (or hypoxanthine) + ribose-1-phosphate. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that PNP is responsible for the thiol- and purine nucleoside-dependent reduction of AsV to AsIII by rat liver cytosol. AsIII formed from AsV was quantified by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis of the deproteinized incubates. The following findings support the conclusion that PNP reduces AsV to AsIII, using AsV instead of phosphate in the reaction above: (1) Specific PNP inhibitors (CI-1000, BCX-1777) at a concentration of 1 microM completely inhibited cytosolic AsV reductase activity. (2) During anion-exchange chromatography of cytosolic proteins, PNP activity perfectly coeluted with the AsV reductase activity, suggesting that both activities belong to the same protein. (3) PNP purified from calf spleen catalyzed reduction of AsV to AsIII in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) and a 6-oxopurine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine). (4) AsV reductase activity of purified PNP, like the cytosolic AsV reductase activity, was inhibited by phosphate (a substrate of PNP alternative to AsV), guanine and hypoxanthine (products of PNP favoring the reverse reaction), mercurial thiol reagents (nonspecific inhibitors of PNP), as well as CI-1000 and BCX-1777 (specific PNP inhibitors). Thus, PNP appears to be responsible for the AsV reductase activity of rat liver cytosol in the presence of DTT. Further research should clarify the mechanism and the in vivo significance of PNP

  13. Effects of salinity acclimation on the pesticide-metabolizing enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Lavado, Ramon; Aparicio-Fabre, Rosaura; Schlenk, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Thioether-containing pesticides are more toxic in certain anadromous and catadromous fish species that have undergone acclimation to hypersaline environments. Enhanced toxicity has been shown to be mediated through the bioactivation of these xenobiotics by one or more flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), which are induced by hyperosmotic conditions. To better understand the number of FMO genes that may be regulated by hyperosmotic conditions, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were maintained and acclimated to freshwater (<0.5 g/L salinity) and to 18 g/L salinity. The expression of 3 different FMO transcripts (A, B and C) and associated enzymatic activities methyl p-tolyl sulfoxidation (MTSO) and benzydamine N-oxigenation (BZNO) were measured in four tissues. In freshwater-acclimated organisms FMO catalytic activities were as follows: liver>kidney>gills=olfactory tissues; in hypersaline-acclimated animals activities were higher in liver>gills>olfactory tissues>kidney. Acclimation to 18 g/L caused a significant induction in the stereoselective formation of R-MTSO in gill. In olfactory tissues, stereoselective (100%) formation of S-MTSO was observed and was unaltered by acclimation to hypersaline water. When specific transcripts were evaluated, salinity-acclimation increased FMO A in liver (up to 2-fold) and kidney (up to 3-fold) but not in olfactory tissues and gills. FMO B mRNA was significantly down-regulated in all tissues, and FMO C was unchanged by hypersaline acclimation. FMO B and C failed to correlate with any FMO catalytic activity, but FMO A mRNA expression linearly correlated to both FMO catalytic activities (MTSO and BZNO) in liver (r2=0.92 and r2=0.88) and kidney microsomes (r2=0.93 and r2=90). FMO A only correlated with MTSO activity in gills (r2=0.93). These results indicate unique tissue specific expression of FMO genes in salmonids and are consistent with salinity-mediated enhancement of thioether-containing pesticide bioactivation by FMO which

  14. Species Differences in the Oxidative Desulfurization of a Thiouracil-Based Irreversible Myeloperoxidase Inactivator by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Di, Li; Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Conn, Edward L; Dalvie, Deepak K; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-08-01

    N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils, represented by compound 1 [6-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-4(1H)-one], are a novel class of selective irreversible inhibitors of human myeloperoxidase. The present account is a summary of our in vitro studies on the facile oxidative desulfurization in compound 1 to a cyclic ether metabolite M1 [5-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-7H-oxazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-one] in NADPH-supplemented rats (t1/2 [half-life = mean ± S.D.] = 8.6 ± 0.4 minutes) and dog liver microsomes (t1/2 = 11.2 ± 0.4 minutes), but not in human liver microsomes (t1/2 > 120 minutes). The in vitro metabolic instability also manifested in moderate-to-high plasma clearances of the parent compound in rats and dogs with significant concentrations of M1 detected in circulation. Mild heat deactivation of liver microsomes or coincubation with the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) inhibitor imipramine significantly diminished M1 formation. In contrast, oxidative metabolism of compound 1 to M1 was not inhibited by the pan cytochrome P450 inactivator 1-aminobenzotriazole. Incubations with recombinant FMO isoforms (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) revealed that FMO1 principally catalyzed the conversion of compound 1 to M1. FMO1 is not expressed in adult human liver, which rationalizes the species difference in oxidative desulfurization. Oxidation by FMO1 followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Michaelis-Menten constant, maximum rate of oxidative desulfurization, and intrinsic clearance values of 209 μM, 20.4 nmol/min/mg protein, and 82.7 μl/min/mg protein, respectively. Addition of excess glutathione essentially eliminated the conversion of compound 1 to M1 in NADPH-supplemented rat and dog liver microsomes, which suggests that the initial FMO1-mediated S-oxygenation of compound 1 yields a sulfenic acid intermediate capable of redox cycling to the parent compound in a glutathione-dependent fashion or undergoing further oxidation to a more

  15. Haplotype and functional analysis of four flavin-containing monooxygenase isoform 2 (FMO2) polymorphisms in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Andreasen, Eric A.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Pereira, Clifford B.; Cabacungan, Erwin T.; Hines, Ronald N.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Previous work defined two flavin-containing monooxygenase 2 (FMO2) alleles. The major allele, FMO2*2 (g.23,238C> T), encodes truncated inactive protein (p.X472) whereas the minor allele, FMO2*1, present in African- and Hispanic-American populations, encodes active protein (p.Q472). Recently, four common (27 to 51% incidence) FMO2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in African-Americans (N= 50); they encode the following protein variants: p.71Ddup, p.V113fs, p.S195L and p.N413 K. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the incidence of these SNPs in 29 Hispanic individuals previously genotyped as g.23,238C (p.Q472) and 124 previously genotyped as homozygous g.23,238 T (p.X472); (2) determine FMO2 haplotypes in this population; and (3) assess the functional impact of SNPs in expressed proteins. Methods SNPs were detected via allele-specific oligonucleotide amplification coupled with real-time or electrophoretic product detection, or single strand conformation polymorphism. Results The g.7,700_7,702dupGAC SNP (p.71Ddup) was absent. The remaining SNPs were present but, except for g.13,732C > T (p.S195L), were less common in the current Hispanic study population versus the previously described African-Americans. Only expressed p.N413K was as active as p.Q472, as determined by methimazole- and ethylenethiourea-dependent oxidation. Haplotype determination demonstrated that the g.10,951delG (p.V113fs), g.13,732C > T (p.S195L) and g.22,060T >G (p.N413 K) variants segregated with g.23,238C> T (p.X472). Conclusions SNPs would not alter FMO2 activity in individuals possessing at least one FMO2*1 allele. It is likely that these SNPs will segregate similarly in African-American populations. Therefore, estimates that 26% of African-Americans and 2–7% of Hispanic- Americans have at least one FMO2*1 allele should closely reflect the percentages producing active FMO2 protein. PMID:15864117

  16. Photochemical properties of the flavin mononucleotide-binding domains of the phototropins from Arabidopsis, rice, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Swartz, Trevor E; Olney, Margaret A; Onodera, Akihiko; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Asamizu, Erika; Tabata, Satoshi; Kanegae, Hiromi; Takano, Makoto; Christie, John M; Nagatani, Akira; Briggs, Winslow R

    2002-06-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2, formerly designated nph1 and npl1) are blue-light receptors that mediate phototropism, blue light-induced chloroplast relocation, and blue light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Phototropins contain two light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains at their N termini (LOV1 and LOV2), each a binding site for the chromophore flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Their C termini contain a serine/threonine protein kinase domain. Here, we examine the kinetic properties of the LOV domains of Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2, rice (Oryza sativa) phot1 and phot2, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii phot. When expressed in Escherichia coli, purified LOV domains from all phototropins examined bind FMN tightly and undergo a self-contained photocycle, characterized by fluorescence and absorption changes induced by blue light (T. Sakai, T. Kagawa, M. Kasahara, T.E. Swartz, J.M. Christie, W.R. Briggs, M. Wada, K. Okada [2001] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98: 6969-6974; M. Salomon, J.M. Christie, E. Knieb, U. Lempert, W.R. Briggs [2000] Biochemistry 39: 9401-9410). The photocycle involves the light-induced formation of a cysteinyl adduct to the C(4a) carbon of the FMN chromophore, which subsequently breaks down in darkness. In each case, the relative quantum efficiencies for the photoreaction and the rate constants for dark recovery of LOV1, LOV2, and peptides containing both LOV domains are presented. Moreover, the data obtained from full-length Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2 expressed in insect cells closely resemble those obtained for the tandem LOV-domain fusion proteins expressed in E. coli. For both Arabidopsis and rice phototropins, the LOV domains of phot1 differ from those of phot2 in their reaction kinetic properties and relative quantum efficiencies. Thus, in addition to differing in amino acid sequence, the phototropins can be distinguished on the basis of the photochemical cycles of their LOV domains. The LOV domains of C. reinhardtii phot also undergo light

  17. Cell-secreted flavins bound to membrane cytochromes dictate electron transfer reactions to surfaces with diverse charge and pH.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Kalathil, Shafeer; Deng, Xiao; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2014-01-01

    The variety of solid surfaces to and from which microbes can deliver electrons by extracellular electron transport (EET) processes via outer-membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) expands the importance of microbial respiration in natural environments and industrial applications. Here, we demonstrate that the bifurcated EET pathway of OM c-Cyts sustains the diversity of the EET surface in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 via specific binding with cell-secreted flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin (RF). Microbial current production and whole-cell differential pulse voltammetry revealed that RF and FMN enhance EET as bound cofactors in a similar manner. Conversely, FMN and RF were clearly differentiated in the EET enhancement by gene-deletion of OM c-Cyts and the dependency of the electrode potential and pH. These results indicate that RF and FMN have specific binding sites in OM c-Cyts and highlight the potential roles of these flavin-cytochrome complexes in controlling the rate of electron transfer to surfaces with diverse potential and pH. PMID:25012073

  18. Cell-secreted Flavins Bound to Membrane Cytochromes Dictate Electron Transfer Reactions to Surfaces with Diverse Charge and pH

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Kalathil, Shafeer; Deng, Xiao; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    The variety of solid surfaces to and from which microbes can deliver electrons by extracellular electron transport (EET) processes via outer-membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) expands the importance of microbial respiration in natural environments and industrial applications. Here, we demonstrate that the bifurcated EET pathway of OM c-Cyts sustains the diversity of the EET surface in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 via specific binding with cell-secreted flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin (RF). Microbial current production and whole-cell differential pulse voltammetry revealed that RF and FMN enhance EET as bound cofactors in a similar manner. Conversely, FMN and RF were clearly differentiated in the EET enhancement by gene-deletion of OM c-Cyts and the dependency of the electrode potential and pH. These results indicate that RF and FMN have specific binding sites in OM c-Cyts and highlight the potential roles of these flavin-cytochrome complexes in controlling the rate of electron transfer to surfaces with diverse potential and pH. PMID:25012073

  19. Structure and Ligand Binding Properties of the Epoxidase Component of Styrene Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Kantz, Auric; Beaton, Michelle; Gassner, George T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-23

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase that transforms styrene to styrene oxide in the first step of the styrene catabolic and detoxification pathway of Pseudomonas putida S12. The crystal structure of the N-terminally histidine-tagged epoxidase component of this system, NSMOA, determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, indicates the enzyme exists as a homodimer in which each monomer forms two distinct domains. The overall architecture is most similar to that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH), although there are some significant differences in secondary structure. Structural comparisons suggest that a large cavity open to the surface forms the FAD binding site. At the base of this pocket is another cavity that likely represents the styrene binding site. Flavin binding and redox equilibria are tightly coupled such that reduced FAD binds apo NSMOA {approx}8000 times more tightly than the oxidized coenzyme. Equilibrium fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry data using benzene as a substrate analogue indicate that the oxidized flavin and substrate analogue binding equilibria of NSMOA are linked such that the binding affinity of each is increased by 60-fold when the enzyme is saturated with the other. A much weaker {approx}2-fold positive cooperative interaction is observed for the linked binding equilibria of benzene and reduced FAD. The low affinity of the substrate analogue for the reduced FAD complex of NSMOA is consistent with a preferred reaction order in which flavin reduction and reaction with oxygen precede the binding of styrene, identifying the apoenzyme structure as the key catalytic resting state of NSMOA poised to bind reduced FAD and initiate the oxygen reaction.

  20. The N-terminal Domain of Escherichia coli Assimilatory NADPH-Sulfite Reductase Hemoprotein Is an Oligomerization Domain That Mediates Holoenzyme Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Askenasy, Isabel; Pennington, Joseph M.; Tao, Yeqing; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Shang, Weifeng; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Assimilatory NADPH-sulfite reductase (SiR) from Escherichia coli is a structurally complex oxidoreductase that catalyzes the six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Two subunits, one a flavin-binding flavoprotein (SiRFP, the α subunit) and the other an iron-containing hemoprotein (SiRHP, the β subunit), assemble to make a holoenzyme of about 800 kDa. How the two subunits assemble is not known. The iron-rich cofactors in SiRHP are unique because they are a covalent arrangement of a Fe4S4 cluster attached through a cysteine ligand to an iron-containing porphyrinoid called siroheme. The link between cofactor biogenesis and SiR stability is also ill-defined. By use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange and biochemical analysis, we show that the α8β4 SiR holoenzyme assembles through the N terminus of SiRHP and the NADPH binding domain of SiRFP. By use of small angle x-ray scattering, we explore the structure of the SiRHP N-terminal oligomerization domain. We also report a novel form of the hemoprotein that occurs in the absence of its cofactors. Apo-SiRHP forms a homotetramer, also dependent on its N terminus, that is unable to assemble with SiRFP. From these results, we propose that homotetramerization of apo-SiRHP serves as a quality control mechanism to prevent formation of inactive holoenzyme in the case of limiting cellular siroheme. PMID:26088143

  1. Pyridine Nucleotide Complexes with Bacillus anthracis Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase: A Structural Analysis of Dual NAD(P)H Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen,J.; Paige, C.; Mallett, T.; Karplus, P.; Claiborne, A.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported that CoASH is the major low-molecular weight thiol in Bacillus anthracis, and we have now characterized the kinetic and redox properties of the B. anthracis coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR, BACoADR) and determined the crystal structure at 2.30 Angstroms resolution. While the Staphylococcus aureus and Borrelia burgdorferi CoADRs exhibit strong preferences for NADPH and NADH, respectively, B. anthracis CoADR can use either pyridine nucleotide equally well. Sequence elements within the respective NAD(P)H-binding motifs correctly reflect the preferences for S. aureus and Bo. burgdorferi CoADRs, but leave questions as to how BACoADR can interact with both pyridine nucleotides. The structures of the NADH and NADPH complexes at ca. 2.3 Angstroms resolution reveal that a loop consisting of residues Glu180-Thr187 becomes ordered and changes conformation on NAD(P)H binding. NADH and NADPH interact with nearly identical conformations of this loop; the latter interaction, however, involves a novel binding mode in which the 2'-phosphate of NADPH points out toward solvent. In addition, the NAD(P)H-reduced BACoADR structures provide the first view of the reduced form (Cys42-SH/CoASH) of the Cys42-SSCoA redox center. The Cys42-SH side chain adopts a new conformation in which the conserved Tyr367'-OH and Tyr425'-OH interact with the nascent thiol(ate) on the flavin si-face. Kinetic data with Y367F, Y425F, and Y367, 425F BACoADR mutants indicate that Tyr425' is the primary proton donor in catalysis, with Tyr367' functioning as a cryptic alternate donor in the absence of Tyr425'.

  2. Crystallographic and solution studies of NAD(+)- and NADH-bound alkylhydroperoxide reductase subunit F (AhpF) from Escherichia coli provide insight into sequential enzymatic steps.

    PubMed

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Nartey, Wilson; Eisenhaber, Frank; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    Redox homeostasis is significant for the survival of pro- and eukaryotic cells and is crucial for defense against reactive oxygen species like superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. In Escherichia coli, the reduction of peroxides occurs via the redox active disulfide center of the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C subunit (AhpC), whose reduced state becomes restored by AhpF. The 57kDa EcAhpF contains an N-terminal domain (NTD), which catalyzes the electron transfer from NADH via an FAD of the C-terminal domain into EcAhpC. The NTD is connected to the C-terminal domain via a linker. Here, the first crystal structure of E. coli AhpF bound with NADH and NAD(+) has been determined at 2.5Å and 2.4Å resolution, respectively. The NADH-bound form of EcAhpF reveals that the NADH-binding domain is required to alter its conformation to bring a bound NADH to the re-face of the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin, and thereby render the NADH-domain dithiol center accessible to the NTD disulfide center for electron transfer. The NAD(+)-bound form of EcAhpF shows conformational differences for the nicotinamide end moieties and its interacting residue M467, which is proposed to represent an intermediate product-release conformation. In addition, the structural alterations in EcAhpF due to NADH- and NAD(+)-binding in solution are shown by small angle X-ray scattering studies. The EcAhpF is revealed to adopt many intermediate conformations in solution to facilitate the electron transfer from the substrate NADH to the C-terminal domain, and subsequently to the NTD of EcAhpF for the final step of AhpC reduction. PMID:26092085

  3. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  4. Involvement of nitrate reductase in auxin-induced NO synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Erdei, L

    2008-01-01

    It is well known for a long time, that nitric oxide (NO) functions in variable physiological and developmental processes in plants, however the source of this signaling molecule in the diverse plant responses is very obscure.1 Although existance of nitric oxide sythase (NOS) in plants is still questionable, LNMMA (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine)-sensitive NO generation was observed in different plant species.2,3 In addition, nitrate reductase (NR) is confirmed to have a major role as source of NO.4,5 This multifaced molecule acts also in auxin-induced lateral root (LR) formation, since exogenous auxin enhanced NO levels in regions of Arabidopsis LR initiatives. Our results pointed out the involvement of nitrate reductase enzyme in auxin-induced NO formation. In this addendum, we speculate on auxin-induced NO production in lateral root primordial formation. PMID:19704423

  5. Involvement of nitrate reductase in auxin-induced NO synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Erdei, L

    2008-11-01

    It is well known for a long time, that nitric oxide (NO) functions in variable physiological and developmental processes in plants, however the source of this signaling molecule in the diverse plant responses is very obscure.1 Although existance of nitric oxide sythase (NOS) in plants is still questionable, LNMMA (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine)-sensitive NO generation was observed in different plant species.2,3 In addition, nitrate reductase (NR) is confirmed to have a major role as source of NO.4,5 This multifaced molecule acts also in auxin-induced lateral root (LR) formation, since exogenous auxin enhanced NO levels in regions of Arabidopsis LR initiatives. Our results pointed out the involvement of nitrate reductase enzyme in auxin-induced NO formation. In this addendum, we speculate on auxin-induced NO production in lateral root primordial formation. PMID:19704423

  6. Methyltetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism influences onset of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Brune, N; Andrich, J; Gencik, M; Saft, C; Müller, Th; Valentin, S; Przuntek, H; Epplen, J T

    2004-01-01

    Onset of Huntington's disease (HD) negatively correlates with CAG repeat length of the HD gene, which encodes the protein huntingtin. This protein interacts with the homocysteine metabolizing enzyme cystathionine betasynthase (CBS). Objective of this study was to analyze the impact of CAG repeats, polymorphisms of various homocysteine metabolizing enzymes, like CBS, Methyltetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHTR), Methionine Synthase Reductase (MSR) and methionine synthase (MS) on HD onset in 171 patients. The significant impact of CAG repeats on HD onset (chi2= 25.54, FG = 4, p<0.0001) with a significant correlation between both (R= -0.521, p=0.01) was obvious. HD patients with the homozygous MTHFR-1298-CC significantly (p = 0.024) earlier experienced HD symptoms. There was no influence demonstrable of CBS, MSR and MS. Determination of MTHFR polymorphisms and CAG repeats enables screening for subjects with putative early HD onset in order to study neuroprotective compounds in their efficacy to delay HD symptoms. PMID:15354395

  7. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Human Monomeric Carbonyl Reductases

    PubMed Central

    El-Hawari, Yasser; Dunford, James E.; Kochan, Grazyna; Wsol, Vladimir; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Maser, Edmund; Oppermann, Udo

    2009-01-01

    Carbonyl reduction constitutes a phase I reaction for many xenobiotics and is carried out in mammals mainly by members of two protein families, namely aldo-keto reductases and short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases. In addition to their capacity to reduce xenobiotics, several of the enzymes act on endogenous compounds such as steroids or eicosanoids. One of the major carbonyl reducing enzymes found in humans is carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) with a very broad substrate spectrum. A paralog, carbonyl reductase 3 (CBR3) has about 70% sequence identity and has not been sufficiently characterized to date. Screening of a focused xenobiotic compound library revealed that CBR3 has narrower substrate specificity and acts on several orthoquinones, as well as isatin or the anticancer drug oracin. To further investigate structure-activity relationships between these enzymes we crystallized CBR3, performed substrate docking, site-directed mutagenesis and compared its kinetic features to CBR1. Despite high sequence similarities, the active sites differ in shape and surface properties. The data reveal that the differences in substrate specificity are largely due to a short segment of a substrate binding loop comprising critical residues Trp229/Pro230, Ala235/Asp236 as well as part of the active site formed by Met141/Gln142 in CBR1 and CBR3, respectively. The data suggest a minor role in xenobiotic metabolism for CBR3. Enhanced version This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1. PMID:19841672

  8. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken'Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective 'single pgFARs' produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a 'single reductase' can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  9. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity of compounds from Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1-7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8-12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC(50), 4.78 μ M). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  10. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A. Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions. PMID:27499746

  11. Using chemical approaches to study selenoproteins - focus on thioredoxin reductases

    PubMed Central

    Hondal, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The study of selenocysteine-containing proteins is difficult due to the problems associated with the heterologous production of these proteins. These problems are due to the intricate recoding mechanism used by cells to translate the UGA codon as a sense codon for selenocysteine. The process is further complicated by the fact that eukaryotes and prokaryotes have different UGA recoding machineries. This review focuses on chemical approaches to produce selenoproteins and study the mechanism of selenoenzymes. The use of intein-mediated peptide ligation is discussed with respect to the production of the mammalian selenoenzymes thioredoxin reductase and selenoprotein R, also known as methionine sulfoxide reductase B1. New methods for removing protecting groups from selenocysteine post-synthesis and methods for selenosulfide/diselenide formation are also reviewed. Chemical approaches have also been used to study the enzymatic mechanism of thioredoxin reductase. The approach divides the enzyme into two modules, a large protein module lacking selenocysteine and a small, synthetic selenocysteine-containing peptide. Study of this semisynthetic enzyme has revealed three distinct enzymatic pathways that depend on the properties of the substrate. The enzyme utilizes a macromolecular mechanism for protein substrates, a second mechanism for small molecule substrates and a third pathway for selenium-containing substrates such as selenocystine. PMID:19406205

  12. Electron transport to periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) of Wolinella succinogenes is independent of a NapC protein.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Sänger, Monica; Schuster, Stephan C; Gross, Roland

    2003-07-01

    The rumen bacterium Wolinella succinogenes grows by respiratory nitrate ammonification with formate as electron donor. Whereas the enzymology and coupling mechanism of nitrite respiration is well known, nitrate reduction to nitrite has not yet been examined. We report here that intact cells and cell fractions catalyse nitrate and chlorate reduction by reduced viologen dyes with high specific activities. A gene cluster encoding components of a putative periplasmic nitrate reductase system (napA, G, H, B, F, L, D) was sequenced. The napA gene was inactivated by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette. The resulting mutant did not grow by nitrate respiration and did not reduce nitrate during growth by fumarate respiration, in contrast to the wild type. An antigen was detected in wild-type cells using an antiserum raised against the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) from Paracoccus pantotrophus. This antigen was absent in the W. succinogenes napA mutant. It is concluded that the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA is the only respiratory nitrate reductase in W. succinogenes, although a second nitrate-reducing enzyme is apparently induced in the napA mutant. The nap cluster of W. succinogenes lacks a napC gene whose product is thought to function in quinol oxidation and electron transfer to NapA in other bacteria. The W. succinogenes genome encodes two members of the NapC/NirT family, NrfH and FccC. Characterization of corresponding deletion mutants indicates that neither of these two proteins is required for nitrate respiration. A mutant lacking the genes encoding respiratory nitrite reductase (nrfHA) had wild-type properties with respect to nitrate respiration. A model of the electron transport chain of nitrate respiration is proposed in which one or more of the napF, G, H and L gene products mediate electron transport from menaquinol to the periplasmic NapAB complex. Inspection of the W. succinogenes genome sequence suggests that ammonia formation from

  13. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  14. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (uplc-ms/ms) for the rapid, simultaneous analysis of thiamin, riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide and pyridoxal in human milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel, rapid and sensitive Ultra Performance Liquid-Chromatography tandem Mass-Spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of several B-vitamins in human milk was developed. Resolution by retention time or multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) for thiamin, riboflavin, flavin a...

  15. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  16. A flavone from Manilkara indica as a specific inhibitor against aldose reductase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2003-09-01

    Isoaffinetin (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavone-6-C-glucoside) was isolated from Manilkara indica as a potent inhibitor of lens aldose reductase by bioassay-directed fractionation. This C-glucosyl flavone showed specific inhibition against aldose reductases (rat lens, porcine lens and recombinant human) with no inhibition against aldehyde reductase and NADH oxidase. Kinetic analysis showed that isoaffinetin exhibited uncompetitive inhibition against both dl-glyceraldehyde and NADPH. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the increasing number of hydroxy groups in the B-ring contributes to the increase in aldose reductase inhibition by C-glucosyl flavones. PMID:14598214

  17. Purification and partial characterization of an aldo-keto reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, A; van Zyl, C; van Tonder, A; Prior, B A

    1995-01-01

    A cytosolic aldo-keto reductase was purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26602 to homogeneity by affinity chromatography, chromatofocusing, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. The relative molecular weights of the aldo-keto reductase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography were 36,800 and 35,000, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is monomeric. Amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence analysis revealed that the enzyme is closely related to the aldose reductases of xylose-fermenting yeasts and mammalian tissues. The enzyme was apparently immunologically unrelated to the aldose reductases of other xylose-fermenting yeasts. The aldo-keto reductase