Science.gov

Sample records for flavour research symposium

  1. Research Symposium I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The proceedings of this symposium consist of abstracts of talks presented by interns at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The interns assisted researchers at GRC in projects which primarily address the following topics: aircraft engines and propulsion, spacecraft propulsion, fuel cells, thin film photovoltaic cells, aerospace materials, computational fluid dynamics, aircraft icing, management, and computerized simulation.

  2. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  3. Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The third Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS) was held 12-16 Jul. 1993, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. More than 800 presentations were made, and those abstracts are included in this publication.

  4. Qualitative research with a Kenyan flavour.

    PubMed

    Mburu, J; Cogswell, L; Crane, E; Todreas, I L

    1991-01-01

    The Essential Drugs Program in Kenya's Ministry of Health included a qualitative research phase of focus group discussions (FGDs) to assess the communication needs in educating the public about responsible essential drug use. This article discusses the general parameters of FGDs, and specific outcomes of essential drug FGDs and the evaluation of the health education tools generated in the FGDs. The purpose of the pilot project was to develop effective materials on the correct use of drug regimens and promoting authorized drug providers. FGDs were used as a quick and relatively inexpensive means of gauging a target audience's beliefs and practices. The facilitator of the group directed discussion and probed for participants views on the community's needs, and forms of expression. (Drawing on positive social customs within a culture helps bridge the difference between local perceptions and knowledge.) Pretesting of draft materials in FGDs assured the ability to reach the target audience. These 2 methods contributed to the project's success by involving the target group as experts in providing useful information, fostering a sense of ownership and commitment, and building a relationship between the staff and target group that renewed dedication and willingness to cooperate. Program staff conducted 19 FGDs with 171 clients and 9 FGDs with 63 providers, and also interviewed 36 providers and observed in 4 locations client/provider exchanges. The results showed that client were unaware of the importance of strict compliance with a drug regimen, and consequences of ineffectiveness. Clients were uneasy about side effects, and purchased drugs from unauthorized dealers. The 3 messages to be promoted were 1) return to the clinic or hospital if drug problems arise, 2) use only authorized providers, and 3) follow directions carefully and completely. It was also decided that posters and audio cassette were the communication modes. A description of the materials developed is

  5. Approaches to Research in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on approaches to research in human resource development (HRD). "HRD, Feminism, and Adult Education: A Foundation for Collaborative Approaches to Research and Practice" (Yvonne M. Johnson) identifies common interests among HRD professionals, feminists, and practitioners in the field of adult…

  6. Expanding Perspectives on HRD Research. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on expanding perspectives in human resource development (HRD) research. "The Concept of Culture in International and Comparative HRD Research: Methodological Problems and Possible Solutions" (Alexander Ardichvili, K. Peter Kuchinke) discusses the following topics: (1) alternative approaches to…

  7. International research symposium on Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fete, Timothy J; Fete, Mary

    2016-03-01

    The International Research Symposium on Goltz Syndrome was held at Texas Children's Hospital on July 22 and 23, 2013. This unique research, educational, and family-oriented symposium was sponsored by the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital. Goltz syndrome, or Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), is a highly variable X-linked dominant disorder with abnormalities in tissues derived from the ectoderm and mesoderm. Classic clinical features include patchy hypoplastic skin, split hand/foot deformities, and ocular manifestations. FDH is caused by PORCN gene mutations. PORCN is involved in the secretion and signaling of Wnt proteins, which play a role in embryonic tissue development. The purpose of the International Research Symposium on Goltz Syndrome was to review the progress that has been made in recent years in research related to this rare disorder and to explore potential future research directions and treatments. This issue of American Journal of Medical Genetics contains the research findings from the evaluations from multiple subspecialties. There is a recommendation for a new diagnostic guideline to aid clinicians in identifying individuals with Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. A tissue repository has been instituted at Texas Children's Hospital, to aid future researchers in this area. PMID:26834080

  8. Technology Education Research Symposium: An Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Chris; Cardon, Phillip L.; Helgeson, Kurt R.; Warner, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes and discusses the broad goals of the research program, "Technology Education Research Symposium Pilot Program: Growing the Research Base in Technology Education," that took place in 2002. This research effort was designed to introduce students to research at an early stage in their academic careers and encourage them to…

  9. SYMPOSIUM ON PROTECTING THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT: RESEARCH AND REGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The symposium focuses on the essential role of research and regulatory agencies in protecting marine ecosystems. The purpose of the symposium is to commemorate dedication of a new toxicological test facility at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Research Lab...

  10. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1992 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the 1992 Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Research Symposium held in Washington, DC, August 18-20, 1992. The symposium provided a forum for exchange of technical information on global change emissions and potential mitigation technologies. The primary ...

  11. Symposium on research advances in clinical PET. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael McGehee

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Clinical PET and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) co-sponsored a symposium entitled 'Research in PET: International and Institutional Perspectives' that highlighted the activities of many leading investigators in the U.S. and throughout the world. Research programs at the DOE were discussed as were potential directions of PET research. International as well as institutional perspectives on PET research were presented. This symposium was successful in reaching those interested in research advances of clinical PET.

  12. International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium (ISDRS-93)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this second biannual international meeting was to provide a congenial forum for the exchange of information and new ideas for researchers from university, industry and government laboratories in the field of semiconductor devices and device physics. To this end, we have an unusually short period between the submission of papers and the conference, a speedy publication of the proceedings, poster sessions, panel discussions, and a wide dissemination of the conference proceedings. Our other goal is to make this conference truly international. To achieve this, the symposium has sub-committees in Asia, Europe and the former Soviet Union. This conference is organized in cooperation with the IEEE MTT Society, the European Physical Society, the United States National Committee of URSI and the Russian Physical Society. Generous financial support has been provided by the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, the NASA Ames Research Center and the Soros International Science Foundation. Papers cover a broad range of topics, including novel and ultrasmall devices, photonics and optoelectronics, heterostructure and cryogenic devices, wide band gap semiconductors, thin film transistors, MOSFET technology and devices, carrier transport phenomena, materials and device characterization, simulation and modeling. It is hoped that such a broad range of topics will foster a cross-fertilization of the different fields related to semiconductor materials and devices.

  13. CPTAC Scientific Symposium - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data. All scientists who use, or wish to use CPTAC data are welcome to participate at this free event. The symposium will be held at the Natcher Conference Facility on the main campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

  14. The 2011 Medical Molecular Hydrogen Symposium: An inaugural symposium of the journal Medical Gas Research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a brief description/history of the Hydrogen Research Meetings as well as key presentations/oral abstracts delivered in the most recent symposium. Additionally, we introduced 38 diseases and physiological states for which hydrogen exhibits beneficial effects. PMID:22146082

  15. Longitudinal Research in Learning Disabilities: Report on an International Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raskind, Marshall H.; Gerber, Paul J.; Goldberg, Roberta J.; Higgins, Eleanor L.; Herman, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    Synthesizes information from a 1995 international symposium on longitudinal research in learning disabilities. Discussion of generic considerations of longitudinal research is followed by examination of issues specific to learning disabilities including definition, attrition, composition of research teams, ethical concerns, data collection, and…

  16. Research Issues in HRD. Symposium 34. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on research issues in human resource development (HRD) consists of three presentations. "The Influence of Theories of Action on Action Research Initiatives: One Dying Division's Case" (Linda Neavel Dickens) reports an interpretive case study to illuminate how individual, team, and organizational practices and theories of action…

  17. 2012 BRN Symposium - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Biospecimen Research Network Symposium brings together stakeholders including research investigators, clinicians, industry representatives, hospital administrators and patient advocates to discuss new developments in the field of biospecimen science that address the molecular changes that can occur during collection, processing, and storage of biospecimens.

  18. Measurement and Research Tools. Symposium 37. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on measurement and research tools consists of three presentations. "An Examination of the Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS)" (Albert Wiswell et al.) explores MIDAS's psychometric saliency. Findings indicates this instrument represents an incomplete attempt to develop a valid assessment of multiple…

  19. Social Research and Broadcasting. Proceedings of a Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern California, Los Angeles. Annenberg School of Communications.

    A special symposium held at the University of Southern California examined an agenda for action, "Social Research on Broadcasting--Proposals for Further Development," which was commissioned by the British Broadcasting Company and written by Professor Elihu Katz of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Participants included communications and…

  20. Research and Scholarly Work Symposium, 1996-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochse, Roger, Ed.

    This collection of papers for both the 1996 and 1997 Research and Scholarly Work Symposium includes: "Tip-of-the-Tongue Phenomenon in Older Adults" (Cheryl Anagnopoulos and Robert Johnson); "Beyond Being a Tool: Using Computer Technology in Secondary Schools to Create Meaning via Nonlinear Forms of Communication" (Mary-Ann Pomerleau); "Personal…

  1. Sport, Health, Fitness and Dance. AAHPER Research Consortium Symposium Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B., Ed.

    This collection of symposium papers provides current synthesis of research in the field of physical education and health. In this volume the physiological aspects of physical activities are discussed. The effects of chronic heavy physical training in swimming are examined, comparing age groups and males and females. Stress factors are also…

  2. First NASA/Industry High Speed Research Program Nozzle Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long-Davis, Mary Jo

    1999-01-01

    The First High Speed Research (HSR) Nozzle Symposium was hosted by NASA Lewis Research Center on November 17-19, 1992 in Cleveland, Ohio, and was sponsored by the HSR Source Noise Working Group. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a national forum for the government, industry, and university participants in the program to present and discuss important low noise nozzle research results and technology issues related to the development of appropriate nozzles for a commercially viable, environmentally compatible, U.S. High-Speed Civil Transport. The HSR Phase I research program was initiated in FY90 and is approaching the first major milestone (end of FY92) relative to an initial FAR 36 Stage 3 nozzle noise assessment. Significant research results relative to that milestone were presented. The opening session provided a brief overview of the Program and status of the Phase H plan. The next five sessions were technically oriented and highlighted recent significant analytical and experimental accomplishments. The last Session included a panel discussion by the Session Chairs, summarizing the progress seen to date and discussing issues relative to further advances in technology necessary to achieve the Program Goals. Attendance at the Symposium was by invitation only and included only industry, academic, and government participants who are actively involved in the High-Speed Research Program. The technology presented in this meeting is considered commercially sensitive.

  3. Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

  4. NASA Space Engineering Research Center Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) is proud to offer, at its second symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories and the electronics industry. These featured speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design. Questions of reliability in the space environment along with new directions in CAD and design are addressed by the featured speakers.

  5. Proceedings of the first energy research power supercomputer users symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Energy Research Power Supercomputer Users Symposium was arranged to showcase the richness of science that has been pursued and accomplished in this program through the use of supercomputers and now high performance parallel computers over the last year: this report is the collection of the presentations given at the Symposium. Power users'' were invited by the ER Supercomputer Access Committee to show that the use of these computational tools and the associated data communications network, ESNet, go beyond merely speeding up computations. Today the work often directly contributes to the advancement of the conceptual developments in their fields and the computational and network resources form the very infrastructure of today's science. The Symposium also provided an opportunity, which is rare in this day of network access to computing resources, for the invited users to compare and discuss their techniques and approaches with those used in other ER disciplines. The significance of new parallel architectures was highlighted by the interesting evening talk given by Dr. Stephen Orszag of Princeton University.

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2002-08-20

    This is the PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, which was Held at Oilheat Visions Conference, Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, Rhode Island, August 20-21, 2002. The specific objectives of this conference are to: (1) identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; and (2) foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  7. Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    During the past century, environmental hazards have become a major concern, not only to public health professionals, but also to the society at large because of their tremendous health, socio-cultural and economic impacts. Various anthropogenic or natural factors have been implicated in the alteration of ecosystem integrity, as well as in the development of a wide variety of acute and/or chronic diseases in humans. It has also been demonstrated that many environmental agents, acting either independently or in combination with other toxins, may induce a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Understanding the role played by the environment in the etiology of human diseases is critical to designing cost-effective control/prevention measures. This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health includes the proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium provided an excellent opportunity to discuss the scientific advances in biomedical, environmental, and public health research that addresses global environmental health issues. PMID:27153079

  8. Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    During the past century, environmental hazards have become a major concern, not only to public health professionals, but also to the society at large because of their tremendous health, socio-cultural and economic impacts. Various anthropogenic or natural factors have been implicated in the alteration of ecosystem integrity, as well as in the development of a wide variety of acute and/or chronic diseases in humans. It has also been demonstrated that many environmental agents, acting either independently or in combination with other toxins, may induce a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Understanding the role played by the environment in the etiology of human diseases is critical to designing cost-effective control/prevention measures. This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health includes the proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium provided an excellent opportunity to discuss the scientific advances in biomedical, environmental, and public health research that addresses global environmental health issues. PMID:27153079

  9. Final Report of the Bilingual Symposium: Building a Research Agenda. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Arlington, VA.

    This is the second of a series of three volumes containing papers from a bilingual symposium held in 1975. Presentations and discussion at the symposium dealt primarily with suggestions for research which linguists should undertake to assist bilingual programs. This volume contains the following papers: "A Survey of Research in Syntax," by Arnold…

  10. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1995 SYMPOSIUM ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the 1995 Symposium on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Research, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division (EPA/APPCD), in Washington, DC on June 27-29, 1995. The symposium provided a forum of...

  11. Proceedings of the Hydrogen Sulfide Health Research and Risk Assessment Symposium October 31-November 2, 2000.

    PubMed

    Woodall, George M; Smith, Roy L; Granville, Geoff C

    2005-10-01

    The Hydrogen Sulfide Health Research and Risk Assessment Symposium came about for several reasons: (1) increased interest by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and several state agencies in regulating hydrogen sulfide (H2S); (2) uncertainty about ambient exposure to H2S; (3) confusion and disagreement in the literature about possible health effects at low-level exposures; and (4) presentation of results of a series of recent animal bioassays. The American Petroleum Institute (API) proposed this symposium and the EPA became an early co-sponsor, with the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) and the American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) contributing expertise and funding assistance. The topics covered in this symposium included Animal Research, Human Research, Mode-of-Action and Dosimetry Issues, Environmental Exposure and Monitoring, Assessment and Regulatory Issues, and closed with a panel discussion. The overall goals of the symposium were to: gather together experts in H2S health effects research and individuals from governmental agencies charged with protecting the public health, provide a venue for reporting of recent research findings, identify gaps in the current information, and outline new research directions and promote research collaboration. During the course of the symposium, presenters provided comprehensive reviews of the state of knowledge for each topic. Several new research proposals discussed at the symposium have subsequently been initiated. This report provides a summary of the talks, poster presentations, and panel discussions that occurred at the Hydrogen Sulfide Health and Risk Assessment Symposium. PMID:16033755

  12. CPTAC Scientific Symposium Highlights - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The first CPTAC Public Scientific Symposium was recently held on November 13, 2013 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. The symposium brought together a record number of registrants, 450 scientists, who shared and discussed novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  13. Second International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium (ISDRS-1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael; Money, John M.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this second biannual international meeting was to provide a congenial forum for the exchange of information and new ideas for researchers from university, industry and government laboratories in the field of semiconductor devices and device physics. To this end, we have an unusually short period between the submission of papers and the conference, a speedy publication of the proceedings, poster sessions, panel discussions, and a wide dissemination of the conference proceedings. Our other goal is to make this conference truly international. To achieve this, the symposium has sub-committees in Asia, Europe and the former Soviet Union. This conference is organized in cooperation with the IEEE MTT Society, the European Physical Society, the United States National Committee of URSI and the Russian Physical Society. Generous financial support has been provided by the Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, the NASA Ames Research Center and the Soros International Science Foundation. Papers cover a broad range of topics, including novel and ultrasmall devices, photonics and optoelectronics, heterostructure and cryogenic devices, wide band gap semiconductors, thin film transistors, MOSFET technology and devices, carrier transport phenomena, materials and device characterization, simulation and modeling. It is hoped that such a broad range of topics will foster a cross-fertilization of the different fields related to semiconductor materials and devices.

  14. Sesame Street Research: A 20th Anniversary Symposium (Princeton, New Jersey, November 4, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Peter B., Ed.

    A research agenda has been at the core of "Sesame Street" and other Children's Television Workshop (CTW) educational projects since inception. This collection of presentations, from a symposium honoring the twentieth anniversary of Sesame Street's debut on national television, addresses research's role in the series, describing how research is…

  15. Innovating in the medical device industry - challenges & opportunities ESB 2015 translational research symposium.

    PubMed

    Bayon, Y; Bohner, M; Eglin, D; Procter, P; Richards, R G; Weber, J; Zeugolis, D I

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Biomaterials 2015 Translational Research Symposium focused on 'Innovating in the Medical Device Industry - Challenges & Opportunities' from different perspectives, i.e., from a non-profit research organisation to a syndicate of small and medium-sized companies and large companies. Lecturers from regulatory consultants, industry and research institutions described the innovation process and regulatory processes (e.g., 510K, PMA, combination product) towards market approval. The aim of the present article is to summarise and explain the main statements made during the symposium, in terms of challenges and opportunities for medical device industries, in a constantly changing customer and regulatory environment. PMID:27552808

  16. Student-Driven Approaches to Undergraduate Medical Research: A Peer-Led Symposium.

    PubMed

    Yee, Claudine; Wu, Annie M; Wu, Connie M; Thakore, Rachel V; Greenberg, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to research early in medical school facilitates the development of physician-scientists and competent clinicians. In the last decade, institutions have established programs and policies to address the physician- scientist shortage. However, student-led initiatives to promote medical student engagement in research remain unexplored. This paper presents the design and results of the third iteration of a symposium in which senior medical students provided guidance and advice to preclinical students interested in research. It also reviews the lessons learned from three years of conducting the symposium. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-08.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27472773

  17. Berries and human health: research highlights from the Fifth Biennial Berry Health Benefits Symposium.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Navindra P

    2014-05-01

    The fifth biennial Berry Health Benefits Symposium showcased recent research supporting the positive effects of berry consumption on human health and disease. Remarkably, the vast majority of oral papers covered data accumulated from in vivo studies, which underscores how berry health research has advanced since the inception of this symposium in 2005. Similar to the past, research presented at this meeting was primarily focused on the major commercially cultivated berries in North America, namely, blackberry, blueberry, black raspberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry. Despite this, on the basis of similar compositional chemistry, it is possible that similar biological effects may also be extended to other small soft-fleshed "berry-type" fruits popular in other parts of the world including Europe, Asia, and South America. Overall, this symposium continues to add to the growing body of data supporting the positive impact of berry fruit consumption on human health promotion and disease risk reduction. PMID:24148006

  18. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  19. Waiting for the Great Pumpkin? On the Whereabouts of Justification in Library Research: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henige, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This symposium report includes seven papers that address issues concerning the North American Collections Inventory Project (NCIP) Conspectus sponsored by the Research Libraries Group (RLG). Topics discussed include cooperative collection development; rigor and research in library and information science; decision making and uncertainty; and data…

  20. Simulation Models for Education. Fourth Annual Phi Delta Kappa Symposium on Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fattu, Nicholas A., Ed.; Elam, Stanley, Ed.

    This book opens with "An Introduction to Simulation" by Nicholas A. Fattu, Institute of Educational Research, Indiana University; he includes a survey of simulation, discussion of its potential for educational applications, and a 60-item bibliography. The remaining chapters are papers presented at the 1964 research symposium which dealt with…

  1. Teaching Behavior and Sport History. AAHPER Research Consortium Symposium Papers. Volume 1, Book 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B., Ed.

    This collection of symposium papers is published for members of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation with the intention of providing current synthesis of research in physical education. This volume contains papers discussing and analyzing research on teacher behaviors in the field of athletics and movement education…

  2. Children's Mental Health Problems and Early School: Research, Service, and Policy Issues Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    Four brief papers in this symposium examine clinical research, community mental health services, and policy issues of young children's mental health problems. First, "Risk Factors for Poor Mental Health Outcomes in Young Children Entering School" (Lynne C. Huffman, Sarah L. Mehlinger, and Amy S. Kerivan Marks) reviews the research and identifies…

  3. AAOS Research Symposium Updates and Consensus: Biologic Treatment of Orthopaedic Injuries.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Robert F; Dragoo, Jason L; Koh, Jason L; Murray, Iain R; Geeslin, Andrew G; Chu, Constance R

    2016-07-01

    Strategies that seek to enhance musculoskeletal tissue regeneration and repair by modulating the biologic microenvironment at the site of injury have considerable therapeutic potential. Current and emerging biologic approaches include the use of growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, stem cell therapy, and scaffolds. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons hosted a research symposium in November 2015 to review the current state-of-the-art biologic treatments of articular cartilage, muscle, tendon, and bone injuries and identify knowledge gaps related to these emerging treatments. This review outlines the findings of the symposium and summarizes the consensus reached on how best to advance research on biologic treatment of orthopaedic injuries. PMID:27227987

  4. The Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing: Proceedings of a Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This volume contains the prepared papers and discussions of a National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council Symposium on the Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the past, present, and future contributions of animals to human health…

  5. REMEDIAL ACTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL HAZARDOUS WASTE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sixteenth Annual Research Symposium on Remedial Action, Treatment and Disposal of Hazardous Waste was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 3-5, 1990. he purpose of this Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings from ongoing and recently completed projects f...

  6. REMEDIAL ACTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL HAZARDOUS WASTE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Seventeenth Annual RREL Research Symposium on Remedial Action, Treatment and Disposal of Hazardous Waste was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 9-11, 1991. he purpose of this Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings from ongoing and recently completed pr...

  7. Second Global Symposium on Health Systems Research: a conference impact evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Milko, Emily; Wu, Diane; Neves, Justin; Neubecker, Alexander Wolfgang; Lavis, John; Ranson, Michael Kent

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation researchers have confirmed the importance of conference evaluation, but there remains little research on the topic, perhaps in part because evaluation methodology related to conference impact is underdeveloped. We conducted a study evaluating a 4-day long health conference, the Second Global Symposium on Health Systems Research (HSR), which took place in Beijing in November 2012. Using a conference evaluation framework and a mixed-methods approach that involved in-conference surveys, in-conference interviews and 7-month post-conference interviews, we evaluated the impact of the Symposium on attendees’ work and the field of health systems research. The three major impacts on participants’ work were new knowledge, new skills and new networks, and many participants were able to provide examples of how obtaining new knowledge, skills or collaborations had changed the way they conduct their work. Participants noted that the Symposium influenced the field of HSR only in so far as it influenced the capacity of stakeholders, but did not lead to any high level agenda or policy changes, perhaps due to the insufficient length of time (7 months) between the Symposium and post-conference follow-up. This study provides an illustration of a framework useful for conference organizers in the evaluation of future conferences, and of a unique methodology for evaluation researchers. PMID:24920216

  8. Distance Education Symposium: Selected Papers, Part 3. Papers Presented at the American Symposium on Research in Distance Education (2nd, University Park, Pennsylvania, May 1991). ACSDE Research Monograph Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atman, Kathryn S.; And Others

    The purpose of this symposium on research in distance education was to continue the process of building the network of scholars and climate of cooperation and communication necessary for further development of distance education and to provide an opportunity for discussion. Four main areas of focus for the symposium were learning and…

  9. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Volume 339: Diamond, SiC and nitride wide bandgap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Calvin H.; Gildenblat, Gennady; Nakamura, Shuji; Nemanich, Robert J.

    1994-04-01

    This symposium was directed toward the potential of using diamond, SiC, and nitride wide bandgap semiconductors. The symposium emphasized materials issues related to the semiconducting properties of these wide bandgap materials. Both experimental and theoretical studies were presented. Solid advances were reported in the growth techniques of all three materials groups. Contributions demonstrated the critical importance of surfaces, interfaces, doping, defects, and impurities Reports demonstrated potential device applications ranging from unique electronic devices to blue/UV light emitters/detectors and even novel structures employing a negative electron affinity. The overall theme of the symposium was that materials research into wide bandgap semiconductors will make available exciting new applications, and that we are just beginning to understand the potential of these materials.

  10. Proceedings of the sixth annual symposium on explosives and blasting research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen papers were presented at this symposium. They dealt with properties and performance of chemical explosives, including two papers on underwater applications and another for use in flammable atmospheres (oil shale mines); control and mapping of ground vibrations; research on fragmentation of rock; and measurement of the velocity of detonation. Papers have been indexed separately.

  11. Research and VET Decision-Making: February 1997 Symposium (Melbourne, Australia, February 19-20, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Chris Selby, Ed.

    This document contains the speaking notes, spoken comments, and prepared papers of the participants in a 1997 symposium on utilization of vocational education and training (VET) research in VET decision making in Australia. The document begins with the "Introduction" (Chris Selby Smith). The next six sections contain the speaking notes and/or…

  12. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #12: U.S.-- CANADA SYMPOSIUM ON NORTH AMERICAN CLIMATE CHANGE AND WEATHER EXTREMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This edition reports on a U.S.-Canada Symposium onNorth American Climate Change and Weather Extremes that was held in Atlanta in October. This symposium was conducted by EPA's Global Change Research Program in partnership with Environment Canada and the U.S. National Weather Se...

  13. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  14. Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research Fifth Annual Technical Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Fifth Annual Technical Symposium, sponsored by the UT-Calspan Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research (CSTAR), is organized to provide an overview of the technical accomplishments of the Center's five Research and Technology focus areas during the past year. These areas include chemical propulsion, electric propulsion, commerical space transportation, computational methods, and laser materials processing. Papers in the area of artificial intelligence/expert systems are also presented.

  15. Language and Communication Research Problems. Proceedings of the Second Gallaudet Symposium on Research in Deafness. (October 30-31, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaudet Coll., Washington, DC.

    Presented are 22 papers given at a 1975 symposium on language and communication research problems with the deaf. Major papers have the following titles and authors: "Manual English--What We Know and What We'd Like to Know" (G. Gustason); "Communication with Foreign Deaf Signers--Attitudes, Experiences, and Observations" (R. Battison and K.…

  16. INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (8TH) AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON MARCH 8-10, 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Eighth Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, incineration and treatment of hazardous wastes was held in Ft. Mitchell, Kentucky, on March 8, 9, and 10, 1982. These Proceedings are a compilation of papers presented by the symposium speakers. The symposium proceedings are ...

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2004 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2004-08-31

    This meeting is the seventeenth oilheat industry technology meeting held since 1984 and the forth since the National Oilheat Research Alliance was formed. This year's symposium is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Program under the United States Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON MARINE POLLUTION RESEARCH HELD IN GULF BREEZE, FLORIDA ON JANUARY 27-29, 1976

    EPA Science Inventory

    The symposium papers discuss how man's activities have affected natural resources of a coastal environment. Participants, representing international aspects of coastal pollution, reviewed current status of research and procedures planned to minimize offshore coastal damage. Subje...

  19. Proceedings: Sixth Biennial Marketing Research Symposium: Blue sky to bottom line{hor_ellipsis}marketing research, customer value and utility performance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Sixth Biennial Electric Utility Marketing Research Symposium, cosponsored by EPRI and the Electric Utility Market Research Council, was held November 16--18, 1994, in Los Angeles, California. The symposium`s objectives were to: Illustrate the use and value of marketing and market research to utility operations; Provide insights on key issues in market research and its application to program selection, design, marketing, and evaluation; Provide a forum for utility professionals to exchange ideas and experiences both on market research and on customer satisfaction and loyalty; and Explore new directions in customer satisfaction research and its evolving role in utility operations. These proceedings contain the papers (available at the time of publication) presented at the symposium. Individual projects were processed separately for database entry.

  20. Conservation and Ecology of Marine Forage Fishes--Proceedings of a Research Symposium, September 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa; Gibson, Caroline; Lowry, Dayv; Fagergren, Duane

    2013-01-01

    Locally and globally, there is growing recognition of the critical roles that herring, smelt, sand lance, eulachon, and other forage fishes play in marine ecosystems. Scientific and resource management entities throughout the Salish Sea, agree that extensive information gaps exist, both in basic biological knowledge and parameters critical to fishery management. Communication and collaboration among researchers also is inadequate. Building on the interest and enthusiasm generated by recent forage fish workshops and symposia around the region, the 2012 Research Symposium on the Conservation and Ecology of Marine Forage Fishes was designed to elucidate practical recommendations for science and policy needs and actions, and spur further collaboration in support for the precautionary management of forage fish. This dynamic and productive event was a joint venture of the Northwest Straits Commission Forage Fish Program, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and The Puget Sound Partnership. The symposium was held on September 12–14, 2012, at the University of Washington, Friday Harbor Laboratories campus. Sixty scientists, graduate students, and fisheries policy experts convened; showcasing ongoing research, conservation, and management efforts targeting forage fish from regional and national perspectives. The primary objectives of this event were to: (1) review current research and management related to marine forage fish species; and (2) identify priority science and policy needs and actions for Washington, British Columbia, and the entire West Coast. Given the diversity of knowledge, interests, and disciplines surrounding forage fish on both sides of the international border, the organizing committee made a concerted effort to contact many additional experts who, although unable to attend, provided valuable insights and ideas to the symposium structure and discussions. The value of the symposium format was highlighted in

  1. Educational Imperatives of the Future Research Library: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodsworth, Anne; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Seven articles discuss the competencies needed by library and information science school graduates. Surveys of needed competencies are compared, a model of the information activities of a research library of the future is proposed, staffing and educational requirements are discussed, and a need for new philosophies of user services is suggested.…

  2. Viewpoints: A Symposium on the Usefulness of Literacy Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saks, A. L., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Presents the responses of several well-known scholars--David Bloome, Joanne M. Golden, Carol D. Lee, Susan Hynds, Michael Pressley, and Timothy Shanahan--to Alan C. Purves's criticism of educational research in the English language arts for its redundancy, its staleness, its reliance on jargon and labels, and its flawed methodology. (TB)

  3. LDA Educational Intervention Research Symposium Intervention Perspectives and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrill, Melinda; Satterfield, Jule

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes the journal's special issue on educational intervention research for students with learning disabilities and identifies the following common themes in the preceding papers: (1) effective teaching, (2) the match between teacher and learner characteristics, (3) flexibility in delivery and use, and (4) teacher and student…

  4. Symposium--Accentuating the Positive: Directions in Pronunciation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derwing, Tracey M.; Munro, Murray J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades perspectives on second language (L2) pronunciation have evolved from pessimistic appraisals of the capabilities of L2 learners and doubts about the value of instruction to a view of pronunciation teaching as an effective and important part of language pedagogy. Earlier research on the teaching of pronunciation dwelt…

  5. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches. PMID:24629305

  6. Symposium: Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4) "The Call of Research: A…

  7. The Symposium Proceedings of the 1998 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG). Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds-Feighan, Aisling (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The Air Transport Research Group of the World Conference on Transportation Research (WCTR) Society was formally launched as a special interest group at the 7th Triennial WCTR in Sydney, Australia in 1995. Since then, our membership base has expanded rapidly, and now includes over 400 active transportation researchers, policy-makers, industry executives, major corporations and research institutes from 28 countries. It became a tradition that the ATRG would hold an international conference at least once a year. In 1998, the ATRG organized a consecutive stream of 14 aviation sessions at the 8th Triennial WCTR Conference (July 12-17: Antwerp). Again, on 19-21 July, 1998, the ATRG Symposium was organized and executed very successfully by Dr. Aisling Reynolds-Feighan of the University College of Dublin. The Aviation Institute at the University of Nebraska at Omaha has published the Proceedings of the 1998 ATRG Dublin Symposium (being co-edited by Dr. Aisling Reynolds-Feighan and Professor Brent Bowen), and the Proceedings of the 1998 WCTR-ATRG Conference (being co-edited by Professors Tae H. Oum and Brent Bowen).

  8. Symposium Proceedings--Occupational Research and the Navy--Prospectus 1980. Technical Report No. 74-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Earl I., Ed.

    This five-section symposium report includes 22 papers assessing the state-of-the-art in occupational research. Section 1, Occupational Analysis, Structure, and Methods, contains four papers that discuss: the Air Force Occupational Research project, methodologies in job analysis, evaluation, structures and requirements, career development,…

  9. Proceedings of the National Symposium on Adult ESL Research and Practice (Washington, DC, September 4-7, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for ESL Literacy Education, Washington, DC.

    This publication offers summaries of presentations from a 2001 symposium on adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) research and practice. Presentations include the following: "Reading Research Synthesis" (Miriam Burt); "How Adults Learn to Read in English" (John Strucker); "Findings, Reactions to and Practitioner Implications of the 'What Works'…

  10. Coalition for Education in the Outdoors Research Symposium Proceedings (3rd, Bradford Woods, Indiana, January 12-14, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvoy, Leo H., Ed.; Stringer, L. Allison, Ed.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah, Ed.; Young, Anderson B., Ed.

    This proceedings includes 18 papers and abstracts of papers presented at the third biennial research symposium of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. Following an introduction, "Strengthening the Foundations of Outdoor Education" (Anderson B. Young, Leo H. McAvoy), the papers and abstracts are: "Research in Outdoor Education: Our Place on…

  11. Coalition for Education in the Outdoors Research Symposium Proceedings (4th, Bradford Woods, Indiana, January 9-11, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Karen M., Ed.; Foti, Pamela E., Ed.; McAvoy, Leo H., Ed.; Young, Anderson B., Ed.; Ryan, Sean, Ed.; Johnson, Rebecca, Ed.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 13 papers from the 1998 Research Symposium of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. Following a preface "Building the Research Foundations of Outdoor Education" (Karen M. Fox, Leo H. McAvoy, Anderson B. Young), the entries are: (1) "An Integrative Review of the Literature on Women in the Outdoors" (Karla A.…

  12. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  13. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (11TH) HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON APRIL 29-MAY 1, 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Eleventh Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, remedial action, incineration and treatment of hazardous waste was held in Cincinnati, OH April 29 through May 1, 1985. The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings of ongoing and rec...

  14. Family Literacy: Directions in Research and Implications for Practice. Summary and Papers of a National Symposium (Washington, DC, September 7-8, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, L. Ann, Ed.; Lord, Jerome, Ed.

    This document contains 10 commissioned papers presented at a research design symposium on family literacy. It also contains a summary of the symposium, which was structured around five themes: assumptions and perceptions about family literacy; what we know from research and practice and how we know it; defining the characteristics of family…

  15. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (10TH) AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY HELD ON APRIL 3-5, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tenth Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, remedial action, incineration and treatment of hazardous waste was held in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky April 3 through 5, 1984. The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings of ongoing and re...

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP CIRCUM-PAN-PACIFIC RIKEN SYMPOSIUM ON HIGH ENERGY SPIN PHYSICS, VOLUME 25

    SciTech Connect

    KUMANO,S.; SHIBATA,T.A.; YAZAKI,K.

    2000-06-28

    The Circum-Pan-Pacific Riken Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Oukouchi Memorial Hall in Riken from November 3 through 6, 1999. It was held as a joint meeting of the 2nd Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics and the 3rd of the series of Riken Symposia related to the RHIC-SPIN. The 1st Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Kobe in 1996 and the RHIC-SPIN Riken Symposia had been held every two years since 1995. As Prof. Ozaki mentioned in his talk at the beginning of this meeting, the RHIC was ready for the first beam, physics experiments scheduled in 2000, and the RHIC-SPIN would start in 2001. It was therefore considered to be very timely for the researchers in the field of high energy spin physics to get together, clarifying the present status of the field and discussing interesting and important topics as well as experimental subjects to be pursued. It is especially important for the success of the RHIC-SPIN project that the researchers in the neighboring countries surrounding the Pacific are actively involved in it. This is why the above two series were joined in this. symposium. The subjects discussed in the symposium include: Hard processes probing spin-structure functions, polarization mechanisms in high energy reactions, lattice studies of polarized structure functions, theoretical models for the nucleon and its spin structure, RHIC and RHIC-SPIN projects, results and future projects of existing experimental facilities. Totally 73 scientists participated in the symposium, 27 from abroad and 46 from Japan. it consisted of 13 main sessions, with 33 invited and contributed talks, and 4 discussion sessions covering recent experimental and theoretical developments and important topics in high energy spin physics and closely related fields.

  17. American Diabetes Association and JDRF Research Symposium: Diabetes and the Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, Clay F; Danska, Jayne; Darsow, Tamara; Dunne, Jessica L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Insel, Richard A; McElvaine, Allison T; Ratner, Robert E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    From 27-29 October 2014, more than 100 people gathered in Chicago, IL, to participate in a research symposium titled "Diabetes and the Microbiome," jointly sponsored by the American Diabetes Association and JDRF. The conference brought together international scholars and trainees from multiple disciplines, including microbiology, bioinformatics, endocrinology, metabolism, and immunology, to share the current understanding of host-microbe interactions and their influences on diabetes and metabolism. Notably, this gathering was the first to assemble specialists with distinct expertise in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, immunology, and microbiology with the goal of discussing and defining potential pathophysiologies linking the microbiome and diabetes. In addition to reviewing existing evidence in the field, speakers presented their own original research to provide a comprehensive view of the current understanding of the topics under discussion.Presentations and discussions throughout the conference reflected a number of important concepts. The microbiota in any host represent a complex ecosystem with a high degree of interindividual variability. Different microbial communities, comprising bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi, occupy separate niches in and on the human body. Individually and collectively, these microbes provide benefits to the host-including nutrient harvest from food and protection against pathogens. They are dynamically regulated by both host genes and the environment, and they critically influence both physiology and lifelong health. The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relationship between the host and the microbiome-the combination of microbiota and their biomolecular environment and ecology-specifically with regard to metabolic and immunological systems and to define the critical research needed to understand and potentially target the microbiome in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In this report, we present meeting

  18. Energy, Environment, Productivity. Proceedings of the First Symposium on RANN: Research Applied to National Needs, November 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Jay, Ed.

    This volume records the presentations made at the Symposium on Research Applied to National Needs. The three major problem areas of energy, the environment, and productivity serve as a focus for the papers. The 14 papers in the first section deal with energy programs; energy under the ocean; energy conversion and transmission systems; and…

  19. Research & Information on Employment & Training. Proceedings of a Symposium (Hershey Convention Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, October 14-15, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchak, Stephen J., Ed.

    A compilation of 21 presentations given at a symposium held to improve communications between individuals and agencies (education, government and private industry) which produce or use occupational research and information for program planning and decisionmaking contains the following titles: Some Thoughts on Economic Illiteracy; We Can Survive:…

  20. The New Engineering Research Centers: Purposes, Goals, and Expectations. Symposium (District of Columbia, April 29-30, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems.

    The sympoisum was held to describe the roots and future plans of the Engineering Research Center's (ERC's) concept and program. The first section of this symposium compilation describes the national goals that the ERCs represent. The second section presents the point of view of the National Science Foundation on the ERCs--the concept behind them,…

  1. INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NINTH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON MAY 2-4, 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ninth Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, incineration and treatment of hazardous waste was held in Ft. Mitchell, Kentucky, on May 2, 3 and 4, 1983. The purposes of the symposium were (1) to provide a forum for state-of-the-art review and discussion of ongoing and rec...

  2. Symposium on General Linear Model Approach to the Analysis of Experimental Data in Educational Research (Athens, Georgia, June 29-July 1, 1967). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashaw, W. L., Ed.; Findley, Warren G., Ed.

    This volume contains the five major addresses and subsequent discussion from the Symposium on the General Linear Models Approach to the Analysis of Experimental Data in Educational Research, which was held in 1967 in Athens, Georgia. The symposium was designed to produce systematic information, including new methodology, for dissemination to the…

  3. Proceedings of the Symposium on Research in Biology and Biotechnology in Developing Countries (National University of Singapore, November 2-4, 1983). Selected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, A. N., Ed.

    These proceedings of a symposium designed to increase public awareness of current research in biology and biotechnology include: welcoming addresses by Chau Sian Eng and S. Radhakrishna; an opening address by Tay Eng Soon; five papers; four abstracts; summary; symposium program; and list of participants. The five papers are: (1) "The Role of…

  4. Atomic-scale imaging of surfaces and interfaces. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, volume 295

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegelsen, David K.; Smith, David J.; Tong, S. Y.

    The gap between imagining and imaging is getting ever smaller. The Atomic-Scale Imaging of Surfaces and Interfaces, Symposium W at the 1992 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, brought together researchers using state-of-the-art imaging techniques capable of resolving atomic features. Methods represented were scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), transmission (TEM) and reflection (REM) electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM or POSAP), high and low energy external source electron holographies, and internal source electron holographies. Some highlights from the STM papers included discussions of the limitations and future potential of STM as well as current findings. Several papers presented work with STM at elevated temperatures. Jene Golovchenko reviewed STM work showing cooperative diffusion events (Pb on Ge) involving many tens of substrate atoms. Don Eigler focused on atomic manipulation and some of its uses to enable fundamental studies of small atomic clusters.

  5. Interactive Video Symposium: The Singer or the Song--An Extension of Clark's Media Research Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Barbara L.

    An introduction to a symposium on interactive video, this brief paper announces that the symposium will continue the debate on whether media are simply delivery vehicles for instruction by considering the inherent properties of interactive video and its impact on achievement, including the way in which the properties of this medium both dictate…

  6. Black Hills State University Research and Scholarly Work Symposium Proceedings (Spearfish, South Dakota, April 11, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnopoulos, Cheryl L., Ed.; Ochse, Roger, Ed.; Wolff, Roger, Ed.

    This proceedings contains papers from a symposium conducted to promote the professional sharing of scholarly accomplishments of Black Hills State University faculty and students. The symposium also provided a forum for discussion of current issues related to the presentations. The papers, representing a variety of disciplines, are as follows: "The…

  7. Black Hills State University Research and Scholarly Work Symposium Proceedings (Spearfish, South Dakota, May 2, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnopoulos, Cheryl, Ed.; Ochse, Roger, Ed.; Wolff, Roger, Ed.

    This proceedings contains papers from a symposium conducted to promote the professional sharing of scholarly accomplishments of Black Hills State University (South Dakota) faculty and students. The symposium also provided a forum for discussion of current issues related to the presentations. The papers, representing a variety of disciplines, are…

  8. Towards Creating an Inclusive Community of Researchers: The First Three Years of the North American Association for Environmental Education Research Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ronald B.; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Krasny, Marianne; Monroe, Martha; Russell, Constance; Wals, Arjen

    2007-01-01

    This article uses a series of interlinked, personal vignettes to discuss the first three years of the North American Association for Environmental Education research symposium, from the perspectives of the key organizers. Seven challenges in the field of environmental education research are identified in a recent historical context, and we…

  9. Research, Issues, and Practices. Proceedings of the Annual Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium (4th, Vermillion, South Dakota, April 26, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Univ., Vermillion. School of Education.

    The goals of the Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium are to promote the professional sharing of current education issues, provide a forum for dialogue concerning relevant educational topics, and share faculty research interests. The 10 papers presented at the 1996 conference are: (1) "Appreciative Listening: The Forgotten Art" (Connie…

  10. Executive summary of the CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: How to make research succeed in your department.

    PubMed

    Stiell, Ian G; Artz, Jennifer D; Perry, Jeffrey; Vaillancourt, Christian; Calder, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    The vision of the recently created Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section is to promote high-quality emergency patient care by conducting world-leading education and research in emergency medicine. The Academic Section plans to achieve this goal by enhancing academic emergency medicine primarily at Canadian medical schools and teaching hospitals. It seeks to foster and develop education, research, and academic leadership amongst Canadian emergency physicians, residents, and students. In this light, the Academic Section began in 2013 to hold the annual Academic Symposia to highlight best practices and recommendations for the three core domains of governance and leadership, education scholarship, and research. Each year, members of three panels are asked to review the literature, survey and interview experts, achieve consensus, and present their recommendations at the Symposium (2013, Education Scholarship; 2014, Research; and 2015, Governance and Funding). Research is essential to medical advancement. As a relatively young specialty, emergency medicine is rapidly evolving to adapt to new diagnostic tools, the challenges of crowding in emergency departments, and the growing needs of emergency patients. There is significant variability in the infrastructure, support, and productivity of emergency medicine research programs across Canada. All Canadians benefit from an investigation of the means to improve research infrastructure, training programs, and funding opportunities. Such an analysis is essential to identify areas for improvement, which will support the expansion of emergency medicine research. To this end, physician-scientist leaders were gathered from across Canada to develop pragmatic recommendations on the improvement of emergency medicine research through a comprehensive analysis of current best practices, systematic literature reviews, stakeholder surveys, and expert interviews. PMID:26034920

  11. RICIS Software Engineering 90 Symposium: Aerospace Applications and Research Directions Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers presented at RICIS Software Engineering Symposium are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: synthesis - integrating product and process; Serpent - a user interface management system; prototyping distributed simulation networks; and software reuse.

  12. 77 FR 13656 - Call for Papers: National Symposium on Moving Target Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... on technical rigor, application of scientific method, and contribution to the overall area of moving... 10-13, 2012. Objective: The central question of the symposium will be ``is there scientific...

  13. Review of the international symposium, sister chromatid exchanges: twenty-five years of experimental research

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, R.R.; Lambert, B.; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Hollaender, A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this symposium was to honor initial research at Brookhaven by bringing internationally recognized leaders in the fields of genetics, cytogenetics, carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, radiation biology, toxicology, and environmental health together into an open forum to present and discuss: (1) current knowledge of the induction and formation of SCEs and their relationship to other biological endpoints, including carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, transformation, clastogenesis, DNA damage and repair, and cellular toxicity; (2) the optimal strategies for the utilization of SCEs in genetic toxicology testing schemes involving in vitro and in vivo exposure situations; (3) the most valid statistical methods for analyzing SCE data obtained from cells in culture, from cells in intact organisms, and from cells in humans; (4) the relevance of SCEs as an indicator of human disease states, both inherited and acquired, and of progress in disease treatment; and (5) the use of SCEs as an indicator of human exposure to genotoxic agents and their relevance as a prognosticator of future adverse health outcomes. This report summarizes the presentations. 7 references. (ACR)

  14. Proceedings from the Turner Resource Network symposium: the crossroads of health care research and health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Backeljauw, Philippe F; Bondy, Carolyn; Chernausek, Steven D; Cernich, Joseph T; Cole, David A; Fasciano, Laura P; Foodim, Joan; Hawley, Scott; Hong, David S; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Kruszka, Paul; Lin, Angela E; Lippe, Barbara M; Lorigan, Gary A; Maslen, Cheryl L; Mauras, Nelly; Page, David C; Pemberton, Victoria L; Prakash, Siddharth K; Quigley, Charmian A; Ranallo, Kelly C; Reiss, Allan L; Sandberg, David E; Scurlock, Cindy; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome, a congenital condition that affects ∼1/2,500 births, results from absence or structural alteration of the second sex chromosome. There has been substantial effort by numerous clinical and genetic research groups to delineate the clinical, pathophysiological, cytogenetic, and molecular features of this multisystem condition. Questions about the molecular-genetic and biological basis of many of the clinical features remain unanswered, and health care providers and families seek improved care for affected individuals. The inaugural "Turner Resource Network (TRN) Symposium" brought together individuals with Turner syndrome and their families, advocacy group leaders, clinicians, basic scientists, physician-scientists, trainees and other stakeholders with interest in the well-being of individuals and families living with the condition. The goal of this symposium was to establish a structure for a TRN that will be a patient-powered organization involving those living with Turner syndrome, their families, clinicians, and scientists. The TRN will identify basic and clinical questions that might be answered with registries, clinical trials, or through bench research to promote and advocate for best practices and improved care for individuals with Turner syndrome. The symposium concluded with the consensus that two rationales justify the creation of a TRN: inadequate attention has been paid to the health and psychosocial issues facing girls and women who live with Turner syndrome; investigations into the susceptibility to common disorders such as cardiovascular or autoimmune diseases caused by sex chromosome deficiencies will increase understanding of disease susceptibilities in the general population. PMID:25920614

  15. Understanding flavour at the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Huge progress in flavour physics has been achieved by the two B-factories and the Tevatron experiments. This progress has, however, deepened the new physics flavour puzzle: If there is new physics at the TeV scale, why aren't flavour changing neutral current processes enhanced by orders of magnitude compared to the standard model predictions? The forthcoming ATLAS and CMS experiments can potentially solve this puzzle. Perhaps even more surprisingly, these experiments can potentially lead to progress in understanding the standard model flavour puzzle: Why is there smallness and hierarchy in the flavour parameters? Thus, a rich and informative flavour program is awaiting us not only in the flavour-dedicated LHCb experiment, but also in the high-pT ATLAS and CMS experiments.

  16. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Translational Research Program Stem Cell Symposium: Incorporating Stem Cell Hypotheses into Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Wendy A. Bristow, Robert G.; Clarke, Michael F.; Coppes, Robert P.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Duda, Dan G.; Fike, John R.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Hill, Richard P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Milas, Luka; Pajonk, Frank; Curran, Walter J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Chen Yuhchyau

    2009-08-01

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease sites. This report summarizes the major topics discussed and the future directions that research should take. Major conclusions of the symposium were that the flow cytometry of multiple markers in fresh tissue would remain the standard technique of evaluating cancer-initiating cells and that surrogates need to be developed for both experimental and clinical use.

  17. NNSA Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program 2008 Symposium--Focus on Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Kotta, P R; Sketchley, J A

    2008-08-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program was authorized by Congress in 1991 to fund leading-edge research and development central to the national laboratories core missions. LDRD anticipates and engages in projects on the forefront of science and engineering at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, and has a long history of addressing pressing national security needs at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories. LDRD has been a scientific success story, where projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published and cited in peer-reviewed journals, mainstream media coverage, and patents granted. The LDRD Program is also a powerful means to attract and retain top researchers from around the world, to foster collaborations with other prominent scientific and technological institutions, and to leverage some of the world's most technologically advanced assets. This enables the LDRD Program to invest in high-risk and potentially high-payoff research that creates innovative technical solutions for some of our nation's most difficult challenges. Worldwide energy demand is growing at an alarming rate, as developing nations continue to expand their industrial and economic base on the back of limited global resources. The resulting international conflicts and environmental consequences pose serious challenges not only to this nation, but to the international community as well. The NNSA and its national security laboratories have been increasingly called upon to devote their scientific and technological capabilities to help address issues that are not limited solely to the historic nuclear weapons core mission, but are more expansive and encompass a spectrum of national security missions, including energy security. This year's symposium highlights some of the exciting areas of research in alternative fuels and technology, nuclear power, carbon sequestration

  18. Proceedings: EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) Power Plant valves symposium II

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, B.; McCloskey, T.H.

    1989-07-01

    On October 11-12, 1988, an EPRI Power Plant Valves Symposium was conducted in Charlotte, North Carolina, to address significant current issues relating to valves in both nuclear and fossil fueled power plants. This was the second such meeting on this subject. The proceedings of the first meeting are published in EPRI Report CS/NP 5878-SR. Approximately 250 attendees, consisting of representatives from the utility industry, valve manufacturers and service organizations, and government, university and other organizations, participated in the symposium. A total of 14 technical papers was presented in the following three major categories: Check Valve Performance, Motor Operated Valve Performance, and Valve Improvement Programs. Separate from the formal presentations of the symposium, discussion groups were organized for each of these categories to provide a format for further discussion, description of experience, and exchange of ideas. 46 refs., 76 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Cerebellum: from Fundamentals to Translational Approaches. The Seventh International Symposium of the Society for Research on the Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2016-02-01

    In terms of cerebellar research and ataxiology, a most fascinating period is currently going on. Numerous academic groups are now focusing their innovative research on the so-called little brain, hidden at the bottom of our brain. Indeed, its unique anatomical features make the cerebellum a wonderful window to address major questions about the central nervous system. The seventh international symposium of the SRC was held in Brussels at the Palace of Academies from May 8 to 10, 2015. The main goal of this dense symposium was to gather in a 2-day meeting senior researchers of exceptional scientific quality and talented junior scientists from all over the world working in the multidisciplinary field of cerebellar research. Fundamental and clinical researchers shared the latest knowledge and developments in this rapidly growing field. New ideas, addressed in a variety of inspiring talks, provoked a vivid debate. Advances in genetics, development, electrophysiology, neuroimaging, neurocognition and affect, as well as in the cerebellar ataxias and the controversies on the roles and functions of the cerebellum were presented. The Ferdinando Rossi lecture and the key-note lecture were delivered by Jan Voogd and Chris De Zeeuw, respectively. Contacts between researchers of different neuroscientific disciplines established a robust basis for novel trends and promising new cooperations between researchers and their centers spread all over the world. PMID:26744149

  20. Culturally competent research with American Indians and Alaska Natives: findings and recommendations of the first symposium of the work group on American Indian Research and Program Evaluation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Joyce Y; Davis, Jamie D; Du Bois, Barbara; Echo-Hawk, Holly; Erickson, Jill Shephard; Goins, R Turner; Hill, Calvin; Hillabrant, Walter; Johnson, Sharon R; Johnson, Sharon R; Kendall, Elizabeth; Keemer, Kelly; Manson, Spero M; Marshall, Catherine A; Running Wolf, Paulette; Santiago, Rolando L; Schacht, Robert; Stone, Joseph B

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the collective experience of a multidisciplinary network of researchers, practitioners, and program evaluators who support appropriate research and evaluation methods in working with Native peoples. Our experience underlines the critical importance of culture in understanding and conducting research with the diverse populations of American Indians and Alaska Natives, and documents the need for community-based, collaborative, participatory action research. We discuss the major findings of the first American Indian Research and Program Evaluation Methodology national symposium, and articulate a set of 20 guiding principles for conducting research and program evaluation. PMID:17602391

  1. Future flavour physics experiments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The current status of flavour physics and the prospects for present and future experiments will be reviewed. Measurements in B‐physics, in which sensitive probes of new physics are the CKM angle γ, the Bs mixing phase ϕs, and the branching ratios of the rare decays B(s)0→μ+μ− , will be highlighted. Topics in charm and kaon physics, in which the measurements of ACP and the branching ratios of the rare decays K→πνν¯ are key measurements, will be discussed. Finally the complementarity of the future heavy flavour experiments, the LHCb upgrade and Belle‐II, will be summarised. PMID:26877543

  2. RICIS Software Engineering 90 Symposium: Aerospace Applications and Research Directions Proceedings Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers presented at RICIS Software Engineering Symposium are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: flight critical software; management of real-time Ada; software reuse; megaprogramming software; Ada net; POSIX and Ada integration in the Space Station Freedom Program; and assessment of formal methods for trustworthy computer systems.

  3. The Flavour of Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavala, I.

    2008-11-23

    A new class of particle physics models of inflation based on the phase transition associated with the spontaneous breaking of family symmetry is proposed. The Higgs fields responsible for the breaking of family symmetry, the flavons, are natural inflaton candidates or waterfall fields in hybrid inflation. This opens up a rich vein of possible inflation models, all linked to the physics of flavour, with several interesting cosmological implications.

  4. Solid state ionics 3. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, volume 293

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri, Gholam A.; Tarascon, Jean M.; Armand, Michel

    This proceedings volume includes most of the invited and contributed papers presented as Symposium U, Solid State Ionics, at the 1992 MRS Fall meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. The Symposium covered material aspects of solid state ionics, theory of ion transfer in solids, ionically and electronically conductive polymers and their application in solid state devices, and various in-situ and ex-situ techniques for materials characterization. The first part of this proceedings volume deals with physics and chemistry of insertion compounds and application of these in advanced solid state batteries. The optical and electrochemical properties of insertion compounds are also presented. The second part of the proceedings deals with ionic and electronic conductive polymers. A new class of rubbery phase polymer electrolytes and their structure-conductivity relationship are presented. Physical and chemical properties of polymer electrolytes and electrodes and their application in solid state devices are presented.

  5. Application of research findings and summary of research needs: Bud Britton Memorial Symposium on Metabolic Disorders of Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Galyean, M L; Eng, K S

    1998-01-01

    Updated research findings with acidosis, feedlot bloat, liver abscesses, and sudden death syndromes were presented at the Bud Britton Memorial Symposium on Metabolic Disorders of Feedlot Cattle. Possible industry applications include the need to establish guidelines for use of clostridial vaccines in feedlot cattle, further assessment of the relationship between acidosis and polioencephalomalacia, examination of the effects of various ionophores on the incidence of metabolic disorders, and evaluation of the effects of feed bunk management and limit- and restricted-feeding programs on the incidence of metabolic disorders. A multidisciplinary approach among researchers, consulting nutritionists and veterinarians, and feedlot managers will be required for effective progress in research and in the application of research findings. Areas suggested for further research include 1) assessment of feed consumption patterns and social behavior of cattle in large-pen, feedlot settings; 2) evaluation of the relationship between feed intake management systems (feed bunk management programs, limit- and programmed-feeding) and the incidence of metabolic disorders, including delineation of the role of variability in feed intake in the etiology of such disorders; 3) efforts to improve antemortem and postmortem diagnosis, and to establish standardized regional or national epidemiological databases for various metabolic disorders; 4) ascertaining the accuracy of diagnosis of metabolic disorders and determining the relationship of previous health history of animals to the incidence of metabolic disorders; 5) further defining ruminal and intestinal microbiology as it relates to metabolic disorders and deeper evaluation of metabolic changes that occur with such disorders; 6) continued appraisal of the effects of grain processing and specific feed ingredients and nutrients on metabolic disorders, and development of new feed additives to control or prevent these disorders; and 7

  6. Research Perspectives: The 2013 AAOS/ORS Research Symposium on Bone Quality and Fracture Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Eve; Lane, Joseph M.; Boskey, Adele L.

    2016-01-01

    Bone fracture resistance is determined by the amount of bone present (“bone quantity”) and by a number of other geometric and material factors grouped under the term “bone quality.” In May 2013, a workshop was convened among a group of clinicians and basic science investigators to review the current state of the art in Bone Quality and Fracture Prevention and to make recommendations for future directions for research. The AAOS/ORS/OREF workshop was attended by 64 participants, including two representatives of the National Institutes of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and 13 new investigators whose posters stimulated additional interest. A key outcome of the workshop was a set of recommendations regarding clinically relevant aspects of both bone quality and quantity that clinicians can use to inform decisions about patient care and management. The common theme of these recommendations was the need for more education of clinicians in areas of bone quality and for basic science studies to address specific topics of pathophysiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of altered bone quality. In this report, the organizers with the assistance of the speakers and other attendees highlight the major findings of the meeting that justify the recommendations and needs for this field. PMID:24700449

  7. Grand Unified Flavour Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Westhoff, Susanne

    2010-02-10

    We probe the unification of down quarks and leptons in a supersymmetric SO(10) GUT. The large atmospheric neutrino mixing angle induces b{sub R}-s{sub R} transitions, which can account for the sizeable CP phase oe{sub s} measured in B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing. Corrections to down-quark-lepton unification from higher-dimensional Yukawa terms translate neutrino mixing also into s{sub R}-d{sub R} and b{sub R}-d{sub R} currents. We find the flavour structure of Yukawa corrections to be strongly constrained by epsilon{sub K}.

  8. Technical Entrepreneurship: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Arnold C., Ed.; Komives, John L., Ed.

    Contained in this document are papers presented at the Symposium on Technical Entrepreneurship at Purdue University by researchers who were then or had previously been engaged in research in the area. Because formal research in this area was in its infancy, there was a particular need to afford investigators in the field opportunities to compare…

  9. Thematic Issue Symposium: What Criteria Should be Used to Judge the Admissibility of Evidence to Support Theoretical Propositions Regarding Communication Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Walter R., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    In response to an earlier symposium report, this journal presents six position papers dealing with the question, "What criteria should be used to judge the admissibility of evidence to support theoretical propositions regarding communication research?" The analyses and arguments include "The Research Process" by Wayne Brockriede, "The Reflexivity…

  10. Selected Works from the Proceedings of the Annual Communications Research Symposium (9th, Knoxville, Tennessee, April 10-11, 1986). Vol. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singletary, Michael W., Ed.

    Featuring 11 articles of original research, this collection presents selected works from the proceedings of the ninth Annual Communications Research Symposium. Following are the titles and authors of the articles included: (1) "Issues in Inferring Media Effects from Surveys" (S. H. Chaffee); (2) "Expectancy Value Theory and Multidimensional…

  11. The Lipman Papers: Appropriate Programs for Four-Year-Olds. Barbara K. Lipman Early Childhood Research Institute Symposium (1st, Memphis, Tennessee, May 22-23, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolner, Rosestelle B., Ed.

    Speakers at the Lipman Research Institute's inaugural symposium examined research and issues related to appropriate programs for 4-year-olds. David Weikart described the Perry Preschool Project, an ongoing study begun in 1962 of 123 black youths at risk of failing, and the High/Scope Preschool Curriculum Study. Jane Stallings covered short-term…

  12. State-of-the-Science Symposium on Postacute Rehabilitation: Setting a Research Agenda and Developing an Evidence Base for Practice and Public Policy--Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Measuring Rehabilitation Outcomes and Effectiveness along with academic, professional, provider, and accreditor organizations sponsored a symposium with the aim of serving as a catalyst for expanded research on postacute care (PAC) rehabilitation. The goals were to describe the state of…

  13. 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings of the 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Ames Research Center hosted the conference, which was held at the Four Points Sheraton, Sunnyvale, California, on May 9-11, 2001. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanisms Education Association. Technology areas covered included bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; and other mechanisms for spacecraft and large space structures.

  14. Values: A Symposium Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, T. A., Ed.

    This publication brings together a set of four papers prepared for a symposium on values at the 1972 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The first paper, by Fred N. Kerlinger, establishes a rationale for values research. The discussion focuses on the definition of values, relationship between values and attitudes,…

  15. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  16. SYSTEMS APPROACH IN DEAF EDUCATION, SYMPOSIUM ON RESEARCH AND UTILIZATION OF EDUCATIONAL MEDIA FOR TEACHING THE DEAF (LINCOLN, NEBRASKA, APRIL 4-6, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STEPP, ROBERT E.

    PROCEEDINGS FROM THE 1966 SYMPOSIUM ON RESEARCH AND UTILIZATION OF EDUCATIONAL MEDIA FOR TEACHING THE DEAF INCLUDE KEYNOTE ADDRESSES AND DISCUSSION PAPERS. A SUMMARY OF THE CONFERENCE'S ACTIVITIES AND PURPOSES IS FOLLOWED BY ROBERT HEINICH'S EXPLANATION OF "APPLICATION OF SYSTEMS CONCEPTS TO INSTRUCTION." DISCUSSION PAPERS ON INSTRUCTIONAL…

  17. Perspectives on Dissemination and Knowledge Utilization. Report of a Symposium Presented to the Mid-South Educational Research Association (November 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.; And Others

    Collected here are symposium reports addressing the dissemination of theory and research to educational practitioners, specifically considering the National Diffusion Network (NDN) as an example of effective information delivery. An introductory theoretical review by C. M. Achilles of the state-of-the-art in dissemination poses questions for…

  18. Developmental Studies of Computer Programming Skills. A Symposium: Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 23-27, 1984). Technical Report No. 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurland, D. Midian, Ed.

    The five papers in this symposium contribute to a dialog on the aims and methods of computer education, and indicate directions future research must take if necessary information is to be available to make informed decisions about the use of computers in schools. The first two papers address the question of what is required for a student to become…

  19. INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (10TH) HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON APRIL 3-5, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tenth Annual Research Symposium on Land Disposal, Remedial Action, Incineration and Treatment of Hazardous Waste was held April 3 through 5, 1984. This volume is a compilation of speakers' papers and poster presenters' abstracts for Session B, Hazardous Waste Incineration and...

  20. PROCEEDINGS: JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON DRY SO2 AND SIMULTANEOUS SO2/NOX CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (1ST). VOLUME 1. FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty six papers describing recent advances in dry sorbent injection technologies for SO2 control were presented at the 1st Joint Symposium on Dry SO2 and Simultaneous SO2/NOx Control Technologies. These papers covered the following topics: fundamental research; pilot-scale devel...

  1. Aspects of Reading Acquisition; Proceedings of the Annual Hyman Blumberg Symposium on Research in Early Childhood Education (5th, Johns Hopkins University, Nov. 13-14, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T., Ed.

    Papers collected in this volume were presented at the Fifth Annual Blumberg Symposium on Research in Early Childhood Education, held at Johns Hopkins University in 1974. Selections include "Alexia" (D. Frank Benson), "Young Children's Expectations for Reading" (Doris R. Entwisle), "Relations between Acquisition of Phonology and Reading" (Paula…

  2. Thematic Issue--Symposium: What Criteria Should Be Used to Judge the Admissibility of Evidence to Support Theoretical Propositions Regarding Communication Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Walter R., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This journal details the results of a symposium created to address the question, "What criteria should be used to judge the admissibility of evidence to support theoretical propositions regarding communication research?" Moderators Gary Cronkhite and Jo Liska provide both an introduction and a summary of the three position papers that form the…

  3. Criteria, Methods and Implications. Proceedings of the International Symposium on the Evaluation of Physics Education (Helsinki, Finland, June 25-29, 1990). Research Report 96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahtee, Maija, Ed.; And Others

    The main purpose of this symposium was to find new ideas and resources for the evaluation and improvement of physics education on all levels. The papers included in this document are entitled: (1) "Quality of Physics Teaching Through Building Models and Advancing Research Skills"; (2) "Evaluation of Physics Education in Terms of Its Long Term…

  4. Proceedings of a National Symposium on the Racquet Sports. An Exploration of Research Implications and Teaching Strategies (Urbana, Illinois, June 13-16, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groppel, Jack L., Ed.

    Conference proceedings from this national symposium on hard scientific research and developments in teaching tennis, squash, racquetball, and badminton are divided into several sections. The first deals with sports medicine and the biomechanics of the racquet sports. The second part discusses the pyschological and sociological aspects of…

  5. Every Voice Counts... Proceedings [of] the Annual African American and Latino/a American Adult Education Research Symposium (10th, Chicago, Illinois, April 21, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garth, Phyllis Ham, Ed.

    This symposium publication consists of 26 presentations. Papers are "'How to Eat an Oreo': Using African American Research through Personal Narrative To Analyze Ethnic Dysmorphic Phenomenon" (Ashford); "Authentic Members: Uncovering Adult Children" (Barnes); "What Good Is Government? Assessment of Government Official Impact on Black Businesses"…

  6. METHODOLOGIES AND PROTOCOLS IN CLINICAL RESEARCH: EVALUATING ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS IN MAN - PROCEEDINGS OF A SYMPOSIUM HELD AT CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA OCTOBER 26-28, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a proceedings of a symposium convened at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, October 26-28, 1977. Five major topics pertaining to the use of humans as experimental subjects are addressed in this volume: philosophy of clinical research, environmental and physical safety con...

  7. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (9TH) HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON MAY 2-4, 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purposes of the Symposium were (1) to provide a forum for a state-of-the-art review and discussion of ongoing and recently completed research projects dealing with land disposal, incineration, and treatment of hazardous wastes; (2) to bring together people concerned with haza...

  8. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (8TH), HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY, ON MARCH 8-10, 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the symposium was (1) to provide a forum for a state-of-the-art review and discussion of on-going and recently completed research projects dealing with the managment of solid and industrial wastes; (2) to bring together people concerned with municipal solid waste m...

  9. The Catholic High School Teacher: Building on Research. Proceedings of the Symposium Based upon the Study: Sharing the Faith: The Beliefs and Values of Catholic High School Teachers (New York, New York, March 5-7, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Catholic Educational Association, Washington, DC.

    This volume is the result of a national invitational symposium that sought to build on the research from "Sharing the Faith: The Beliefs and Values of Catholic High School Teachers." The full text of three major papers given at the symposium as well as excerpts from presentations by four Catholic high school teachers are presented. The first…

  10. Gateways, Gatekeepres, and Roles in the Information Omniverse. Proceedings of the Symposium of the Association of Research Libraries and Association of American University Presses (3rd, Washington, D.C., November 13-15, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okerson, Ann, Ed.; Mogge, Dru, Ed.

    This volume contains the proceedings of the third joint symposium of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Association of American University Presses (AAUP). The following papers were presented: "Opening Remarks for the ARL-AAUP Symposium" (Lisa Freeman); the keynote address, "We're All in this Together, Aren't We?" (Bruce Sterling);…

  11. Proceedings From the Turner Resource Network Symposium: The Crossroads of Health Care Research and Health Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Backeljauw, Philippe F.; Bondy, Carolyn; Chernausek, Steven D.; Cernich, Joseph T.; Cole, David A.; Fasciano, Laura P.; Foodim, Joan; Hawley, Scott; Hong, David S.; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.; Kruszka, Paul; Lin, Angela E.; Lippe, Barbara M.; Lorigan, Gary A.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Mauras, Nelly; Page, David C.; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Quigley, Charmian A.; Ranallo, Kelly C.; Reiss, Allan L.; Sandberg, David E.; Scurlock, Cindy; Silberbach, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome, a congenital condition that affects ∼1/2,500 births, results from absence or structural alteration of the second sex chromosome. There has been substantial effort by numerous clinical and genetic research groups to delineate the clinical, pathophysiological, cytogenetic, and molecular features of this multisystem condition. Questions about the molecular-genetic and biological basis of many of the clinical features remain unanswered, and health care providers and families seek improved care for affected individuals. The inaugural “Turner Resource Network (TRN) Symposium” brought together individuals with Turner syndrome and their families, advocacy group leaders, clinicians, basic scientists, physician-scientists, trainees and other stakeholders with interest in the well-being of individuals and families living with the condition. The goal of this symposium was to establish a structure for a TRN that will be a patient-powered organization involving those living with Turner syndrome, their families, clinicians, and scientists. The TRN will identify basic and clinical questions that might be answered with registries, clinical trials, or through bench research to promote and advocate for best practices and improved care for individuals with Turner syndrome. The symposium concluded with the consensus that two rationales justify the creation of a TRN: inadequate attention has been paid to the health and psychosocial issues facing girls and women who live with Turner syndrome;investigations into the susceptibility to common disorders such as cardiovascular or autoimmune diseases caused by sex chromosome deficiencies will increase understanding of disease susceptibilities in the general population. PMID:25920614

  12. Proceedings of the Symposium on Education Research and Development (Washington, D.C., December 11-12, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David, Ed.; Malin, Maureen, Ed.

    This symposium report presents the text of papers delivered at the symposium and outlines of discussions. The contents are as follows: a) "Knowledge in Education" by Sheldon H. White, Joan S. Bissell, and John Golenski; c) Comments on White-Bissell-Golenski Paper by David K. Cohen; c) General Discussion of White-Bissell-Golenski Paper and Cohen…

  13. Proceedings of the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, N. Jill

    1999-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, held 21-24 September 1999 in Las Vegas, Nevada. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  14. Issues of Gender. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on issues of gender in human resource development (HRD). "The Impact of Awareness and Action on the Implementation of a Women's Network" (Laura L. Bierema) reports on research to examine how gender consciousness emerges through the formation of in-company networks to promote corporate women's status. It…

  15. Work Group on American Indian Research and Program Evaluation Methodology, Symposium on Research and Evaluation Methodology: Lifespan Issues Related to American Indians/Alaska Natives with Disabilities (Washington, DC, April 26-27, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jamie D., Ed.; Erickson, Jill Shepard, Ed.; Johnson, Sharon R., Ed.; Marshall, Catherine A., Ed.; Running Wolf, Paulette, Ed.; Santiago, Rolando L., Ed.

    This first symposium of the Work Group on American Indian Research and Program Evaluation Methodology (AIRPEM) explored American Indian and Alaska Native cultural considerations in relation to "best practices" in research and program evaluation. These cultural considerations include the importance of tribal consultation on research projects and…

  16. Solid State Ionics 4. Proceedings of Materials Research Society Symposium, volume 369

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri, Gholam-Abbas; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Schreiber, Martha

    The proceeding of the 4th Solid State Ionics symposium is presented. This first part of the proceeding deals with the chemistry and physics of insertion materials, mostly from the viewpoint of applications as cathode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries, Ni/Cd, and Ni/metal hydride systems. Crystal chemistry and electrochemistry properties of potential oxides cathodes are discussed. The second part of the proceeding deals with sol-gel process for preparation of cathode materials for lithium batteries and other applications. Novel synthetic methods of preparation of high surface area transition metal oxides are presented. The third part deals with theory of ion conduction in solids, as well as mechanisms of ion conduction in glassy and polymeric materials. Part four deals with defect chemistry in solid electrolytes and the role of defect on ionic conductivity of ceramic electrolytes. The fifth part of the proceedings deals with polymer electrolytes and electrodes. Synthesis, characterization and performance of various polymer electrolytes and electrodes are discussed. The last part of the proceedings deals with characteristics and materials aspect of ionic devices. this includes advance solid state batteries, sensors, electrochromic devices, fuel cells, and the dynamic of ion exchange in high T(c) superconductors.

  17. Symposium Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Richard G.

    2016-02-01

    The Stern-Gerlach experiment and the origin of electron spin are described in historical context. SPIN 2014 occurs on the fortieth anniversary of the first International High Energy Spin Physics Symposium at Argonne in 1974. A brief history of the international spin conference series is presented.

  18. The first Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos Candeiro, Carlos Roberto; da Silva Marinho, Thiago

    2015-08-01

    The 1st Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium gathered paleontologists, geologists, and paleoartists in the city of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from April 21st to 24th, 2013. The Dinosaur Symposium in the Pontal Campus of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil provided an opportunity to share many new results of dinosaur research being conducted around the world. The symposium coincided with a new dawn of scientific advances in dinosaur paleontology further expanding its importance, interest and credibility worldwide.

  19. Research on Teaching and the Theory and Practice in Teacher Training. DPA Helsinki Investigations IV = Unterrichtsforschung und die Theorie und Praxis in der Lehrerausbildung. Papers presented at an International Symposium (Helsinki, October 2-3, 1980). Research Report 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komulainen, Erkki, Ed.; And Others

    Eight papers presented at an international symposium on teacher education research are featured in this document. Excerpts from the opening speech by Erkki A. Niskanen, Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Helsinki, outline research projects being carried out by teacher educators at the university. A paper by Yrjo Engestrom,…

  20. Research in Outdoor Education, Volume 6. A Peer-Reviewed Publication of Scholarship First Presented at the Biennial Research Symposium of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors (6th, Bradford Woods, Indiana, January 11-13, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bialeschki, M. Deborah, Ed.; Henderson, Karla A., Ed.; Young, Anderson B., Ed.; Andrejewski, Robert G., Ed.

    This volume contains peer-reviewed research articles and abstracts based on papers presented at the sixth biennial research symposium of the Coalition for Education in the Outdoors. Introductory materials include the editors' introduction, "Milestones in Outdoor Education" (Anderson B. Young), and a tribute to the founder of the Indiana University…

  1. Report on the 13th symposium on invertebrate neurobiology held 26-30 August 2015 at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for ecological research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Crisford, Anna; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes the lectures and posters presented at the International Society for Invertebrate Neurobiology's 13th symposium held 26-30 August 2015, at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Tihany, Hungary. The symposium provided an opportunity for scientists working on a range of topics in invertebrate neurobiology to meet and present their research and discuss ways to advance the discipline. PMID:27149972

  2. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  3. Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, September 9 to 10, 1986, focused on future research in the microgravity fluid management field. The symposium allowed researchers and managers to review space applications that require fluid management technology, to present the current status of technology development, and to identify the technology developments required for future missions. The 19 papers covered three major categories: (1) fluid storage, acquisition, and transfer; (2) fluid management applications, i.e., space power and thermal management systems, and environmental control and life support systems; (3) project activities and insights including two descriptions of previous flight experiments and a summary of typical activities required during development of a shuttle flight experiment.

  4. Electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of organic solid-state materials IV. Materials Research Society, symposium proceedings Volume 488

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.R.; Jen, A.K.Y.; Rubner, M.F.; Chiang, L.Y.; Dalton, L.R.

    1998-07-01

    The symposium, Electrical, Optical, and Magnetic Properties of Organic Solid-State Materials IV, was sponsored by the Materials Research Society and held December 1--5, 1997, in Boston, Massachusetts. Early studies of charge transport in conducting polymers have evolved from the elucidation of fundamental structure/function relationships to applications as batteries, simple electrical devices such as diodes, chemical sensors, antistatic coatings, microwave and millimeter wave-absorbing materials, and photochromic devices. A particularly exciting evolution has been the discovery and development of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) which appear to be nearing commercialization in an amazingly short period of time. This application is of particular interest because both electrical and optical properties must be considered, and these have been important parallel themes of the conference. Moreover, nanostructure control is important for OLEDs, and nanoscale architectural engineering has been an increasingly important theme of the conference. Indeed, not only has the study of conjugated (quasidelocalized) electrons in organic solid-state materials resulted in interesting physical properties and device applications, but the desire to exploit these properties has promoted the development of new synthesis and processing methodologies to achieve special nanoscale and microscale structures. One hundred five papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  5. Lifetime of heavy flavour particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1985-10-01

    Recent measurements of the lifetime of the tau leptons and charm and beauty hadrons are reviewed and their significance for the couplings of the charged weak current, flavour mixing, and models relating quarks to hadron decay are discussed. 70 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Report on the 2009 ESO Fellows Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsellem, Eric; West, Michael; Leibundgut, Bruno

    2009-09-01

    The fourth ESO Fellows Symposium took place in Garching from 8-10 June 2009. This year's symposium brought together 28 ESO Fellows from Chile and Germany to meet their colleagues from across the ocean, discuss their research and provide feedback on ESO's Fellowship programme. This year's symposium also included training workshops to enhance the practical skills of ESO Fellows in today's competitive job market.

  7. Second International Lygus Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Goodell, P. B.; Ellsworth, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    The Second International Lygus Symposium brought together 52 entomologists from six nations and 11 states representing universities, public agencies, and private entities to discuss the latest research on Lygus species and their relatives. Symposium topics included Lygus biology, behavior and ecology, IPM, insecticides and resistance, and biological control. Papers and posters dealt with Lygus as a pest of several crops, including cotton, strawberries, seed alfalfa, canola, dry beans, cucumbers, cereals, peaches, and new crops guayule and lesquerella. Intercrop movement of Lygus2008200820082008 species was another important topic of many presentations. In the capstone session, participants identified needs and priorities for ongoing Lygus research and education (available at http://ag.arizona.edu/apmc/Arid_SWPMC_RAMP.html). The conference was sponsored in part by FMC Corporation, the University of Arizona Arizona Pest Management Center, the University of California Statewide IPM Program, and a grant to Ellsworth et al. (CRIS# 0207436) from the USDA-CSREES, Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program (RAMP).

  8. School Improvement: Messages from Five Years of Research. Symposium Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (67th, San Francisco, California, April 16-20, 1986). R&D Report 3222.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sheila C.; And Others

    This document includes four papers presented at a symposium, based on a synthesis of five years of research--on the interaction of role groups and factors in the change process that are critical for school improvement in elementary and secondary schools. The papers identify elements of the change process crucial for the success of proposed changes…

  9. RESEARCH IN BLINDNESS AND SEVERE VISUAL IMPAIRMENT, PROCEEDINGS OF THE SYMPOSIUM (NEW YORK, OCTOBER 19, 1963).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEWELL, FRANK W.; AND OTHERS

    ON OCTOBER 19, 1963, SPECIALISTS REPORTED THE FINDINGS OF STUDIES THEN UNDERWAY AND OUTLINED THE RESEARCH POSSIBILITIES WITHIN THEIR RESPECTIVE AGENCIES. QUESTIONS WERE RAISED ABOUT THE DEFINITION OF BLINDNESS FOR RESEARCH AND SERVICE PURPOSES. SPEAKERS DISCUSSED THE POSSIBLE USE OF SUCH DATA SOURCES AS STATEWIDE REGISTERS OF THE BLIND, THE…

  10. AAHPER Research Consortium Symposium Papers: Health, Fitness, Recreation, and Dance. Volume II, Book 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard H., Ed.

    The titles included in this collection are: Biographical Research in Health Education; Historical Research as it Applies to Groups or Institutions; Water & Electrolytes and Other Aids; Limiting Factors of Endurance Performance: A Brief Review; Limiting Factors for Endurance Exercise: Carbohydrate and Fat Utilization; Hooked on Running: A…

  11. Center for Research Libraries: Meeting the Opportunity to Fulfill the Promise: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Donald B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The director of the Center for Research Libraries (CRL) provides historical perspective on CRL's development and discusses issues that have triggered debate on its objectives, programs, fees, and membership categories. Reactions to CRL by seven directors of research libraries, both members and nonmembers of CRL, are presented. (EJS)

  12. Proceedings of the 23rd Seismic Research Symposium: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, N. Jill; Chavez, Francesca C.

    2001-10-02

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 23rd Seismic Research Review: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions, held 2-5 October, 2001 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  13. Practical Lessons: The 1998 National Symposium on Homelessness Research (Arlington, Virginia, October 29-30, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosburg, Linda B., Ed.; Dennis, Deborah L., Ed.

    In 1998, one decade after the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act was implemented and research results on the impacts of funding were becoming available, an evaluation of the effectiveness of fifteen programs, which included services such as emergency shelter, primary health care, and education, was needed This report presents 13 papers…

  14. Processes for Determining Educational Needs of Adults. Symposium: Adult Education Research Conference (San Antonio, Texas, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.; Dowling, William D.

    Prepared for discussion at an Adult Education Research Conference, this paper offers commentary and summative evaluation of eleven doctoral dissertations on the process of determining educational or training needs of specific adult populations. As context for discussion Joe Ellis' definitions of needs--Felt, Real, and Education--are noted along…

  15. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium, 1986 (Columbus, Ohio, September 18, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Collaborative Research: Lessons from the Tower of Babel" (Baldwin); "Establishing a Data Base for Intrainstitutional Research in the Allied Health Professions" (Von Son, Beiley); "Determining Research Needs in a School of Allied Health Professions" (Bottjen et al.); "Surveying Research Interests and Needs of…

  16. Rare Earth Doped Semiconductors and Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Volume 301

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, John

    1994-02-01

    The properties of rare earth ions in solids were studied in detail for decades, but until recently this work was restricted to dominantly ionic hosts such as fluorides and oxides, and to a lesser extent to more covalently bonded hosts, such as tetrahedral 2-6 semiconductors. The idea of rare earth elements incorporated into covalent semiconductors such as GaAs and Si may be traced to a short communication in 1963 by R.L. Bell (J. Appl. Phys. 34, 1563 (1963)) proposing a dc-pumped rare earth laser. At about the same time, three unpublished technical reports appeared as a result of U.S. Department of Defense sponsored research in rare earth doped Si, GaAs, and InP to fabricate LED's. Attempts by other researchers to identify sharp 4f specific emissions in these hosts essentially failed.

  17. RICIS Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Integrated Environments for Large, Complex Systems is the theme for the RICIS symposium of 1988. Distinguished professionals from industry, government, and academia have been invited to participate and present their views and experiences regarding research, education, and future directions related to this topic. Within RICIS, more than half of the research being conducted is in the area of Computer Systems and Software Engineering. The focus of this research is on the software development life-cycle for large, complex, distributed systems. Within the education and training component of RICIS, the primary emphasis has been to provide education and training for software professionals.

  18. Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Harris L.; Beeman, Joseph J.; Barlow, Joel W.; Bourell, David L.; Crawford, Richard H.

    1993-09-01

    This Proceedings of the Fourth Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, held at The University of Texas in Austin on August 9-11, 1993, reaffirms the dynamic nature of the research area. The interest shown by researchers over the wide range of disciplines and subdisciplines that make up solid freeform fabrication (SFF) highlight this technical symposium. The speakers addressed problems in computer software, in machine design, materials synthesis and processing, and SFF in integrated manufacturing. The exponential growth in the research, application, and development of SFF approaches was readily apparent from the attendees from industrial users, SFF machine manufacturers, universities, and government. This symposium is the first where real progress toward structurally sound samples and parts was demonstrated as SFF moves from 'feelie' to 'nonstructural' to 'structural' real parts over a range of materials. This advancement in the state-of-the-art of SFF will continue to drive the exponential growth of the area. The excitement amongst the symposium participants will continue to serve as the catalyst for the continued growth and the availability of solid freeform fabrication. The symposium organizers look forward to its being a continued source of technical exchange among the growing body of researchers involved in SFF.

  19. The Second Annual Symposium of the NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    The second annual meeting of the NSCORT in Gravitational Biology was held at Kansas State University on September 29-October 1, 1992. Symposium presentations at the meeting included ones on basic gravitational cellular and developmental biology, spaceflight hardware for biological studies, studies on Space Shuttle, and special talks on Space Station Freedom and on life support systems.

  20. In Search of Diversity. Symposium on Minority Audiences and Programming Research: Approaches and Applications (Lenox, Massachusetts, October 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC. Office of Communication Research.

    This is the proceedings of a symposium organized by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for the purpose of focusing on exisiting problems in and future strategies for promoting television programming services to minority audiences. Included are a prologue, "In Search of Diversity," by Howard Myrick; a foreword, "Minorities in Public…

  1. Advances in clinical research in gynecologic radiation oncology: an RTOG symposium.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, David; Mundt, Arno; Schwarz, Julie; Eifel, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    There have been inexorable improvements in gynecologic radiation oncology through technologically advances, 3-dimensional imaging, and clinical research. Investment in these 3 critical areas has improved, and will continue to improve, the lives of patients with gynecologic cancer. Advanced technology delivery in gynecologic radiation oncology is challenging owing to the following: (1) setup difficulties, (2) managing considerable internal organ motion, and (3) responding to tumor volume reduction during treatment. Image guidance is a potential route to solve these problems and improve delivery to tumor and sparing organs at risk. Imaging with positron emission tomography-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are contributing significantly to improved accuracy in diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in cancer of the cervix. Functional imaging by exploiting tumor biology may improve prognosis and treatment. Clinical trials have been the greatest mechanism to improve and establish standards of care in women with vulvar, endometrial, and cervical cancer. There have been multiple technological advances and practice changing trials within the past several decades. Many important questions remain in optimizing care for women with gynecologic malignancies. The performance of clinical trials will be advanced with the use of consistent language (ie, similar staging system and criteria), eligibility criteria that fit the research question, end points that matter, adequate statistical power, complete follow-up, and prompt publication of mature results. PMID:22398709

  2. Flavour chemicals in electronic cigarette fluids

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Peyton A; Karpinski, Clarissa D; Brown, Jessica E; Luo, Wentai; Pankow, James F

    2016-01-01

    Background Most e-cigarette liquids contain flavour chemicals. Flavour chemicals certified as safe for ingestion by the Flavor Extracts Manufacturers Association may not be safe for use in e-cigarettes. This study identified and measured flavour chemicals in 30 e-cigarette fluids. Methods Two brands of single-use e-cigarettes were selected and their fluids in multiple flavour types analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. For the same flavour types, and for selected confectionary flavours (eg, bubble gum and cotton candy), also analysed were convenience samples of e-cigarette fluids in refill bottles from local ‘vape’ shops and online retailers. Results In many liquids, total flavour chemicals were found to be in the ∼1–4% range (10–40 mg/mL); labelled levels of nicotine were in the range of 0.6–2.4% (6 to 24 mg/mL). A significant number of the flavour chemicals were aldehydes, a compound class recognised as ‘primary irritants’ of mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Many of the products contained the same flavour chemicals: vanillin and/or ethyl vanillin was found in 17 of the liquids as one of the top three flavour chemicals, and/or at ≥0.5 mg/mL. Conclusions The concentrations of some flavour chemicals in e-cigarette fluids are sufficiently high for inhalation exposure by vaping to be of toxicological concern. Regulatory limits should be contemplated for levels of some of the more worrisome chemicals as well as for total flavour chemical levels. Ingredient labeling should also be required. PMID:25877377

  3. Eighth particulate control symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The Eighth Symposium on the Transfer and Utilization of Particulate Control Technology was held in San Diego, California, March 20 through 23, 1990. The symposium proceedings contain 80 papers presented by representatives of utility companies, equipment and process suppliers, university representatives, research and development companies, EPA and other federal and state agency representatives, and EPRI staff members. Electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters were the major topics discussed during the symposium. Papers from this conference are organized by session in two volumes. This Volume (2) contains papers presented in the sessions on: low ratio baghouse O M experience, pulse-jet baghouse experience, particulate control for AFBCs, particulate control for dry SO2 control processes, baghouse design and performance, fundamental baghouse studies, high temperature filtration, and control of emissions from RDF incinerators. Both fabric filters and ESPs are discussed in the AFBC and dry SO2 control papers. The high temperature filtration papers deal with ceramic barrier and granular bed filters. The rest of the papers in Volume 2 are concerned with fabric filters on pulverized-coal-fired boilers. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  4. PREFACE: Advanced Science Research Symposium 2009 Positron, Muon and other exotic particle beams for materials and atomic/molecular sciences (ASR2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higemoto, Wataru; Kawasuso, Atsuo

    2010-05-01

    It is our great pleasure to deliver the proceedings of ASR2009, the Advanced Science Research International Symposium 2009. ASR2009 is part of a series of symposia which is hosted by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (JAEA-ASRC), and held every year with different scientific topics. ASR2009 was held at Tokai in Japan from 10-12 November 2009. In total, 102 participants, including 29 overseas scientists, made 44 oral presentations and 64 poster presentations. In ASR2009 we have focused on material and atomic/molecular science research using positrons, muons and other exotic particle beams. The symposium covered all the fields of materials science which use such exotic particle beams. Positrons, muons and other beams have similar and different features. For example, although positrons and muons are both leptons having charge and spin, they give quite different information about materials. A muon mainly detects the local magnetic state of the solid, while a positron detects crystal imperfections and electron momenta in solids. Other exotic particle beams also provide useful information about materials which is not able to be obtained with muons or positrons. Therefore, the complementary use of particle beams, coupled with an understanding of their relative advantages, leads to greater excellence in materials research. This symposium crossed the fields of muon science, positron science, unstable-nuclei science, and other exotic particle-beam science. We therefore believe that ASR2009 became an especially important meeting for finding new science with exotic particle beams. Finally, we would like to extend our appreciation to all the participants, committee members, and support staff for their great efforts to make ASR2009 a fruitful symposium. ASR2009 Chairs Wataru Higemoto and Atsuo Kawasuso Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Organizing committee Y Hatano, JAEA (Director of ASRC) M Fujinami, Chiba Univ. R H

  5. Space 2000 Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  6. A Flavouring of Nuggets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media in Education and Development, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes four media-related reports, including: (1) a survey that explored the factors introduced by new technologies for distributing television in and across Europe; (2) an annual review of BBC broadcasting research findings; (3) the portrayal of violence on British television; and (4) an evaluation of primary school radio programs in…

  7. NHLBI state of the science symposium in therapeutic apheresis: Knowledge gaps and research opportunities in the area of hematology-oncology.

    PubMed

    Karafin, Matthew S; Sachais, Bruce S; Connelly-Smith, Laura; Field, Joshua J; Linenberger, Michael L; Padmanabhan, Anand

    2016-02-01

    The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) hosted a two-day state of the science symposium on therapeutic apheresis in Bethesda, MD on November 28th-29th, 2012. The purpose of the symposium was multifaceted, and included the following aims: (a) To discuss this state of research and key scientific questions in apheresis medicine; (b) To identify gaps in knowledge for relevant cardiovascular diseases, hematological and oncological diseases, infectious diseases and sepsis, renal diseases, and neurological diseases where there may be strong therapeutic rationale for the application of apheresis treatments; (c) To explore ways of coordinating therapeutic apheresis with other medical disciplines and treatment modalities; (d) To identify and prioritize the most important research questions to be answered in apheresis medicine; and (e) To offer NHLBI suggestions on how a structured research approach can be applied to the therapeutic apheresis research agenda in future years. The following document summarizes three such key proposals presented at the meeting for evaluating apheresis therapy for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease, heparin induced thrombocytopenia, and leukostasis from acute myeloid leukemia. The challenges and limitations regarding apheresis therapy for each disease are discussed, and avenues for future investigation for each disease are outlined. PMID:25940408

  8. Frank N. Bash Symposium 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The University of Texas at Austin Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory will be hosting the sixth biennial Frank N. Bash Symposium on the topic of New Horizons in Astronomy, October 18-20, 2015, on The University of Texas at Austin campus. This meeting will bring together young researchers at the cutting edge of astronomy and astrophysics, to promote the exchange of research ideas and visions for the future of astronomy. The symposium will focus on invited review talks, and will include discussions and contributed poster papers from postdocs and students.

  9. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    puzzlement. The apparent absence of hints in the LHC experimental data of new phenomena that could relate to dark matter, dark energy, the dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe, the unification of the strong and the electroweak interactions and their further unification with gravity left the Symposium with no guidance as to how to answer the question: what next? And in experimental fundamental science it is not the confirmation of already established theories that thrills the most; it is the appearance of the unexpected that creates the greatest excitement. However, the LHC is only at the beginning of its voyage into the uncharted territories of higher energies and smaller dimensions that it was built for, so the possibilities for unexpected discoveries are only starting to be explored. The LHC will start up again in 2015 with nearly twice its previous energy and with increased luminosity—new discoveries might then appear sooner than we even dare hope for! The LHC Nobel Symposium was attended by about 60 invited participants and lasted four days. The program was divided into seven sessions; QCD and Heavy Ion Physics, B Physics, Electroweak Physics, The Higgs Boson, Connections to Neutrino Physics and Astroparticle Physics, Beyond the Standard Model and Forward Look. There were 27 plenary invited talks given by participants, each followed by lively discussions. All but one of the speakers have submitted write-ups of their talks for these proceedings. We are hopeful that the remaining talk will be published in a forthcoming issue of Physica Scripta . I am gratified that Professor Roland Allen has agreed to write a paper on the essence of the Higgs boson discovery to be published in Physica Scripta , intended for undergraduate students and educated physicists, regardless of their field of research. I wish to express my deep gratitude to all Speakers and Participants in the Symposium, to the Members of the Local and International Organizing Committees, to the

  10. Research Symposium II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: High power density motors. The training process of the organization development and training office. Modeling and analysis of a regenerative fuel cell propulsion system for a high altitude long endurance. Increasing the thermal stability of aluminum titanate for solid oxide mJEL cell anodes. Microstructural evaluation of forging parameters for superalloy disks. Epoxy adgesives for stator magnet assembly in stirling radioisotope generator. Nickel-Hydrogen and lithium ion space batteries. Statistical and prediction modeling of the Ka band using experimental results from ACTS propagation terminals at 20.185 and 27.505 GHz.

  11. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium (Columbus, Ohio, September 20, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Consortia and Collaborative Research: Getting Started" (Hansen); "Coordination of the Health Care System in the State of Michigan" (Burian, Boyden, Herbert); "Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Allied Health" (Doiron, Douglas); "Interprofessional Collaboration in the Analysis of Public Policy" (Dunn);…

  12. AAHPER Research Consortium Symposium Papers: Socio-Psychological Dimensions, Research Design and Safety. Volume II, Book 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard H., Ed.

    This collection focuses on research topics in physical education and athletics and includes the following papers: Methodological Problems in the Assessment of Personality from the Psychoanalytic, Behavioral and Cognitive Positions; Some Factors Affecting the Performance of Women in Sports and Activity; Multivariate Considerations in Children's…

  13. Research, Issues, and Practices. Annual Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium Conference Proceedings (1st, Vermillion, South Dakota, April 22, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Univ., Vermillion. School of Education.

    The purpose of the conference reported in this document was to promote the professional sharing of current educational issues, to provide a forum for dialogue concerning relevant educational topics, and to share University of South Dakota faculty research interests. The proceedings are comprised of 10 presentations: (1) "Japan Related Education in…

  14. IAU Symposium 317 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of the halo yields fundamental information on the formation and evolution of galaxies: this was quite exhaustively discussed at this very important symposium. I present a brief personal summary of the meeting, outlining those points that I found more exciting and suggestive. I also remarked a few areas that were possibly not enough expanded. I found this research field extremely interesting and I think there are great expectations for new developments in the next few years, thanks to the new large spectroscopic surveys and the ESA GAIA satellite.

  15. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  16. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  17. Flavour Chemistry of Chicken Meat: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Ahn, Dong Uk; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2013-01-01

    Flavour comprises mainly of taste and aroma and is involved in consumers’ meat-buying behavior and preferences. Chicken meat flavour is supposed to be affected by a number of ante- and post-mortem factors, including breed, diet, post-mortem ageing, method of cooking, etc. Additionally, chicken meat is more susceptible to quality deterioration mainly due to lipid oxidation with resulting off-flavours. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to highlight the mechanisms and chemical compounds responsible for chicken meat flavour and off-flavour development to help producers in producing the most flavourful and consistent product possible. Chicken meat flavour is thermally derived and the Maillard reaction, thermal degradation of lipids, and interaction between these 2 reactions are mainly responsible for the generation of flavour and aroma compounds. The reaction of cysteine and sugar can lead to characteristic meat flavour specially for chicken and pork. Volatile compounds including 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-furfurylthiol, methionol, 2,4,5-trimethyl-thiazole, nonanol, 2-trans-nonenal, and other compounds have been identified as important for the flavour of chicken. However 2-methyl-3-furanthiol is considered as the most vital chemical compound for chicken flavour development. In addition, a large number of heterocyclic compounds are formed when higher temperature and low moisture conditions are used during certain cooking methods of chicken meat such as roasting, grilling, frying or pressure cooking compared to boiled chicken meat. Major volatile compounds responsible for fried chicken are 3,5-dimethyl-1,2,4-trithiolanes, 2,4,6-trimethylperhydro-1,3,5-dithiazines, 3,5-diisobutyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-butyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 3-methyl-5-pentyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2,4-decadienal and trans-4,5-epoxy-trans-2-decenal. Alkylpyrazines were reported in the flavours of fried chicken and roasted chicken but not in chicken broth. The main reason for flavour deterioration

  18. Support for a special symposium to highlight the research of early career women physical chemists at the 2011 fall ACS nationall meeting, Aug 28-Sept

    SciTech Connect

    Geraldine Richmond

    2012-12-19

    The symposium was well attended during the 4-day symposium. The invited speakers were primarily women in early career stage (~4-8 years) with a few senior women and men as invited speakers or session chairs. Included in each day was a Poster Session for graduate students and a lunch in which the turn out was strong and the posters presented encouraged much of dialogue with the invited speakers, guests and others attending the ACS meeting and wanted to discuss the student’s research and meet with the speakers. Most all speakers and participants were very positive about the sessions and expressed that the funding to cover some expenses made it possible for them to attend the conference and the poster session luncheon. There was a total of 51 presenters, below are the speakers and their abstracts, in order presented:

  19. Bolden Speaks at the URC Virtual Symposium

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden delivered a welcome address via video to support the NASA University Research Centers inaugural Virtual Poster Session and Symposium event November 8, 2012. A dive...

  20. Research, Issues, and Practices. Proceedings of the Annual Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium (3rd, Vermillion, South Dakota, April 28, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Univ., Vermillion.

    This monograph provides the following 11 papers presented at a 1995 symposium on curriculum and instruction: (1) "Early Children Education in Belarus: Kindergarten No. 490" (Linda A. Good) a case study of one school for 260 children, ages 2-7; (2) "How Parents Spend Their Time" (Timothy Lillie) an investigation of how parents of children with…

  1. Research, Issues, and Practices. Annual Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium Conference Proceedings, University of South Dakota (6th, Vermillion, SD, April 24, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Robert W., Ed.; Hoag, Constance L., Ed.; Zalud, Garreth, Ed.

    This report includes papers from a 1998 symposium to promote the professional sharing of current educational issues. The papers are: "A Tapestry of Authors" (Maurine Richardson and Margaret Miller); "Critical Thinking Strategies Across the Curriculum" (Constance L. Hoag and Sharon Andrews); "The Effect of Journal Writing on Teachers' Theory…

  2. Combining Flavour and CP Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio

    2013-07-01

    I shortly review the impact of the most recent neutrino oscillation data on our attempts to construct a realistic model for neutrino masses and mixing angles. Models based on anarchy and its variants remain an open possibility, reinforced by the latest experimental findings. Many models based on discrete symmetries no longer work in their simplest realizations. I illustrate several proposals that can rescue discrete symmetries. In particular I discuss the possibility of combining discrete flavour symmetries and CP, and I describe a recently proposed symmetry breaking pattern that allows to predict all mixing parameters, angles and phases, in terms of a single real unknown. I analyze several explicit examples of this construction, providing new realistic mixing patterns.

  3. Massive neutrinos and flavour violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Antonio; Vempati, Sudhir K.; Vives, Oscar

    2004-12-01

    In spite of the large lepton flavour violation (LFV) observed in neutrino oscillations, within the Standard Model, we do not expect any visible LFV in the charged lepton sector (μ → e, γ, τ → μ, γ, etc). On the contrary, the presence of new physics close to the electroweak scale can enhance the amplitudes of these processes. We discuss this in general and focus on a particularly interesting case: the marriage of low-energy supersymmetry (SUSY) and seesaw mechanism for neutrino masses (SUSY seesaw). Several ideas presented in this context are reviewed both in the bottom-up and top-down approaches. We show that there exist attractive models where the rate for LFV processes can attain values to be probed in pre-LHC experiments.

  4. Production of a transparent lavender flavour nanocapsule aqueous solution and pyrolysis characteristics of flavour nanocapsule.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangyong; Xiao, Zuobing; Zhou, Rujun; Feng, Nienie

    2015-07-01

    Flavour plays an important role and has been widely used in many products. Usually, the components of flavour are volatile and the sensory perception can be changed as a result of volatilization, heating, oxidation and chemical interactions. Encapsulation can prevent the loss of volatile aromatic ingredients, provide protection and enhance the stability of the core materials. This work concentrated on production of a transparent lavender flavour nanocapsule aqueous solution. The results showed that a transparent lavender flavour microcapsule aqueous solution can be produced using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) as wall material. The combination and interaction of flavour and wall materials were investigated by pyrolysis. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic parameters of the flavour nanocapsule were determined. During thermal degradation of blank HP-β-CD and flavour-HP-β-CD inclusion complex, three main stages can be distinguished. Due to the vaporization of lavender flavour encapsulated in HP-β-CD, the thermogravimetric (TG) curve of blank HP-β-CD shows a leveling-off from room temperature to 269 °C, while the TG curve of flavour-HP-β-CD inclusion complex is downward sloping in this temperature range. The kinetic parameters are helpful in understanding the mechanism of molecular recognition between hosts and guests. PMID:26139932

  5. A Bio-Inspired Herbal Tea Flavour Assessment Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Nur Zawatil Isqi; Masnan, Maz Jamilah; Zakaria, Ammar; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md

    2014-01-01

    Herbal-based products are becoming a widespread production trend among manufacturers for the domestic and international markets. As the production increases to meet the market demand, it is very crucial for the manufacturer to ensure that their products have met specific criteria and fulfil the intended quality determined by the quality controller. One famous herbal-based product is herbal tea. This paper investigates bio-inspired flavour assessments in a data fusion framework involving an e-nose and e-tongue. The objectives are to attain good classification of different types and brands of herbal tea, classification of different flavour masking effects and finally classification of different concentrations of herbal tea. Two data fusion levels were employed in this research, low level data fusion and intermediate level data fusion. Four classification approaches; LDA, SVM, KNN and PNN were examined in search of the best classifier to achieve the research objectives. In order to evaluate the classifiers' performance, an error estimator based on k-fold cross validation and leave-one-out were applied. Classification based on GC-MS TIC data was also included as a comparison to the classification performance using fusion approaches. Generally, KNN outperformed the other classification techniques for the three flavour assessments in the low level data fusion and intermediate level data fusion. However, the classification results based on GC-MS TIC data are varied. PMID:25010697

  6. A bio-inspired herbal tea flavour assessment technique.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Nur Zawatil Isqi; Masnan, Maz Jamilah; Zakaria, Ammar; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md

    2014-01-01

    Herbal-based products are becoming a widespread production trend among manufacturers for the domestic and international markets. As the production increases to meet the market demand, it is very crucial for the manufacturer to ensure that their products have met specific criteria and fulfil the intended quality determined by the quality controller. One famous herbal-based product is herbal tea. This paper investigates bio-inspired flavour assessments in a data fusion framework involving an e-nose and e-tongue. The objectives are to attain good classification of different types and brands of herbal tea, classification of different flavour masking effects and finally classification of different concentrations of herbal tea. Two data fusion levels were employed in this research, low level data fusion and intermediate level data fusion. Four classification approaches; LDA, SVM, KNN and PNN were examined in search of the best classifier to achieve the research objectives. In order to evaluate the classifiers' performance, an error estimator based on k-fold cross validation and leave-one-out were applied. Classification based on GC-MS TIC data was also included as a comparison to the classification performance using fusion approaches. Generally, KNN outperformed the other classification techniques for the three flavour assessments in the low level data fusion and intermediate level data fusion. However, the classification results based on GC-MS TIC data are varied. PMID:25010697

  7. The Third ACCLAIM Research Symposium. Mathematics Education: Reform and Resistance in the Life-Worlds of Rural Schools and Communities. A Proceedings Document (3rd, Newark, Ohio, May 18-20, 2006). Occasional Paper No. 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Collaborative Center for Learning, Assessment, and Instruction in Mathematics (ACCLAIM), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This document summarizes the proceedings of the Third ACCLAIM Research Symposium, which took place over three days from May 18 through May 20, 2006. The Center's doctoral students took prominent roles, especially the entire second cohort of doctoral students. Three members of the first cohort also participated in events. Overall, the symposium…

  8. People of Color Rising up and Speaking out: Oppression and Knowledge Production. Proceedings for the Annual African American & Latino/a American Adult Education Research Symposium (11th, Chicago, Illinois, April 6, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garth, Phyllis Ham, Ed.

    This document contains 14 papers from an annual symposium on research in adult education for African Americans and Latin Americans. Representative papers include the following: "Congressman Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Keeping the Faith and Representing the Race--From the Pulpit to Politics" (Roudell Kirkwood); "Religious Education and Slavery:…

  9. Diplomas or Dropout Statistics: Alternatives for At-Risk Students. A Symposium Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southwest Educational Research Association (Austin, Texas, January 25-27, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligon, Glynn; And Others

    Four essays and associated introductory text constituting the proceedings of a symposium on dropout research issues are presented. The introduction by Glynn Ligon makes a call for considering what is known about dropouts, what is needed to be known about dropouts, and how these findings can be communicated to educators, the public, and lawmakers.…

  10. The Role of Epidemiology in the Era of Molecular Epidemiology and Genomics: Summary of the 2013 AJE-sponsored Society of Epidemiologic Research Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Kuller, Lewis H.; Bracken, Michael B.; Ogino, Shuji; Prentice, Ross L.; Tracy, Russell P.

    2013-01-01

    On June 20, 2013, the American Journal of Epidemiology sponsored a symposium at the Society for Epidemiologic Research's 46th Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, entitled, “What Is the Role of Epidemiology in the Era of Molecular Biology and Genomics?” The future of epidemiology depends on innovation in generating interesting and important testable hypotheses that are relevant to population health. These new strategies will depend on new technology, both in measurement of agents and environment and in the fields of pathophysiology and outcomes, such as cellular epidemiology and molecular pathology. The populations to be studied, sample sizes, and study designs should be selected based on the hypotheses to be tested and include case-control, cohort, and clinical trials. Developing large mega cohorts without attention to specific hypotheses is inefficient, will fail to address many associations with high-quality data, and may well produce spurious results. PMID:24105654

  11. WIMP abundance and lepton (flavour) asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Stuke, Maik; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2012-03-01

    We investigate how large lepton asymmetries affect the evolution of the early universe at times before big bang nucleosynthesis and in particular how they influence the relic density of WIMP dark matter. In comparison to the standard calculation of the relic WIMP abundance we find a decrease, depending on the lepton flavour asymmetry. We find an effect of up to 20 per cent for lepton flavour asymmetries l{sub f} = O(0.1)

  12. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  13. AEROSOLS: RESEARCH, RISK ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL STRATEGIES. PROCEEDINGS OF THE U.S.-DUTCH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM, WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA, MAY 19-25, 1985 (2ND)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Second U.S.-Dutch International Symposium on Aerosols was one of many cooperative activities in environmental protection called for in a Memorandum of Understanding signed in 1980 between the U.S. and the Netherlands. The symposium focused on a wide range of topics concerning...

  14. Proceedings of the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, James W., LTC

    2000-09-15

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), held 13-15 September 2000 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  15. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

    2012-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  16. Two-Higgs-doublet models with Minimal Flavour Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlucci, Maria Valentina

    2010-12-22

    The tree-level flavour-changing neutral currents in the two-Higgs-doublet models can be suppressed by protecting the breaking of either flavour or flavour-blind symmetries, but only the first choice, implemented by the application of the Minimal Flavour Violation hypothesis, is stable under quantum corrections. Moreover, a two-Higgs-doublet model with Minimal Flavour Violation enriched with flavour-blind phases can explain the anomalies recently found in the {Delta}F = 2 transitions, namely the large CP-violating phase in B{sub s} mixing and the tension between {epsilon}{sub K} and S{sub {psi}KS}.

  17. High consequence operations safety symposium 2: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Isbell, D.

    1998-07-01

    From July 29 to 31, 1997, the Surety Assessment Center at Sandia National Laboratories hosted the second international symposium on High Consequence Operations Safety, HCOSSII. The two and one-half day symposium allowed participants to share strategies, methodologies, and experiences in high consequence engineering and system design. The symposium addressed organizational influences on high consequence safety, assessment and analysis processes, lessons-learned from high consequence events, human factors in safety, and software safety. A special session at the end of the symposium featured a presentation by Federal Nuclear Center--All Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics and Sandia National Laboratories personnel on their joint efforts to establish the International Surety Center for Energy Intensive and High Consequence Systems and Infrastructures.

  18. Ocular Stem Cell Research from Basic Science to Clinical Application: A Report from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Hong; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Chen, Shuyi; Li, Wei; Xu, Guo-Tong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Kang; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Liu, Yizhi; Xie, Ting; Chan, Chi-Chao; Zack, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold promise for treating a wide variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders of the eye. The eye is an ideal organ for stem cell therapy because of its relative immunological privilege, surgical accessibility, and its being a self-contained system. The eye also has many potential target diseases amenable to stem cell-based treatment, such as corneal limbal stem cell deficiency, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Among them, AMD and glaucoma are the two most common diseases, affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recent results on the clinical trial of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in treating dry AMD and Stargardt’s disease in the US, Japan, England, and China have generated great excitement and hope. This marks the beginning of the ocular stem cell therapy era. The recent Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium discussed the potential applications of various stem cell types in stem cell-based therapies, drug discoveries and tissue engineering for treating ocular diseases. PMID:27102165

  19. Symposium Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitherer, Claus

    2008-06-01

    I summarize the highlights of the conference. First I provide a brief history of the beach symposia series our massive star community has been organizing. Then I use most of my allocated space discussing what I believe are the main answered and open questions in the field. Finally I conclude with a perspective of the future of massive star research.

  20. Proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology was held February 14-16, 2001 in San Diego, California, USA. This symposium was jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The symposium featured sixty nine presentations covering a wide variety of technical topics relevant to Terahertz Technology. The presentations can be divided into five broad technology areas: Hot Electron Bolometers, superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) technology, local oscillator (LO) technology, Antennas and Measurements, and Direct Detectors. The symposium provides scientists, engineers, and researchers working in the terahertz technology and science fields to engineers their work and exchange ideas with colleagues.

  1. Flavour-dependent leptogenesis with reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan

    2007-11-20

    Upper bounds on the reheat temperature of the early universe, as they appear for example in classes of supergravity models, impose severe constraints on the thermal leptogenesis mechanism. To analyse these constraints, we extend the flavour-dependent treatment of leptogenesis to include reheating. We solve the flavour-dependent Boltzmann equations to obtain the leptogenesis efficiency as a function of the flavour dependent washout parameter m-tilde{sub 1,{alpha}} and of m{sub N{sub 1}}/T{sub RH}, the ratio of the mass of the lightest right-handed neutrino over the reheat temperature, and calculate the minimal values of the reheat temperature compatible with thermal leptogenesis in type I and type II seesaw scenarios.

  2. 38th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 38th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 38th AMs, hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center in Williamsburg, Virginia, was held May 17-19, 2006. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals, tribology, actuators, aircraft mechanisms, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  3. FIRST BH COCHRANE SYMPOSIUM HELD

    PubMed Central

    Mahmic-Kaknjo, Mersiha; Novo, Ahmed; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela

    2016-01-01

    The first BH Cochrane Symposium was held on 12 October 2015 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), organized by the Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Healthcare in Federation of BH (AKAZ) and Medical Faculty University of Sarajevo. A group of ten national and international experts presented the Cochrane organization and systematic reviews, as well as the IMPACT Observatory, development of guidelines in BH, and the role of AKAZ. Examples of the development and use of Cochrane reviews in evidence informed decision making in health as well as research integrity were presented and discussed. Major BH decision makers and interested professionals from all over BH participated in a symposium and its lively discussion, especially from the perspective of Cochrane and its activities in BH, and the collaboration with the Croatian Cochrane. It can be expected that this symposium will inspire further growth of participation and use of Cochrane in BH and increase the awareness of various aspects of evidence informed medicine and research integrity. PMID:27047274

  4. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    Scientists Meet in Antofagasta to Discuss Front-Line Astrophysics To mark the beginning of the VLT era, the European Southern Observatory is organizing a VLT Opening Symposium which will take place in Antofagasta (Chile) on 1-4 March 1999, just before the start of regular observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope on April 1, 1999. The Symposium occupies four full days and is held on the campus of the Universidad Catolica del Norte. It consists of plenary sessions on "Science in the VLT Era and Beyond" and three parallel Workshops on "Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift" , "Star-way to the Universe" and "From Extrasolar Planets to Brown Dwarfs" . There will be many presentations of recent work at the major astronomical facilities in the world. The meeting provides a very useful forum to discuss the latest developments and, in this sense, contributes to the planning of future research with the VLT and other large telescopes. The symposium will be opened with a talk by the ESO Director General, Prof. Riccardo Giacconi , on "Paranal - an observatory for the 21st century". It will be followed by reports about the first scientific results from the main astronomical instruments on VLT UT1, FORS1 and ISAAC. The Symposium participants will see the VLT in operation during special visits to the Paranal Observatory. Press conferences are being arranged each afternoon to inform about the highlights of the conference. After the Symposium, there will be an Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March Contributions from ESO ESO scientists will make several presentations at the Symposium. They include general reviews of various research fields as well as important new data and results from the VLT that show the great potential of this new astronomical facility. Some of the recent work is described in this Press Release, together with images and spectra of a large variety of objects. Note that all of these data will soon become publicly available via the VLT Archive

  5. Children's liking and wanting of snack products: Influence of shape and flavour

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Djin G; Zandstra, Liesbeth H

    2009-01-01

    Background Children's food choices are guided by their preferences. However, these preferences may change due to repeated exposure. Methods This study investigated children's (n = 242, 7–12 yrs-old) liking and wanting for snacks over 3 weeks of daily consumption. The snacks differed in size (small vs large) or flavour (sweet vs sweet-sour). Two conditions were designed: 1) a monotonous group in which children continuously consumed the same snack across the 3 weeks, and 2) a free choice group in which children were allowed to freely choose amongst 3 different flavours of the snack each day during 3 weeks. Results Shape influenced long-term liking, i.e. small shaped snacks remained stable in liking over repeated consumption, whereas large shaped snacks with the same flavour decreased in liking. Mean wanting ratings for all snack products decreased over 3 weeks daily consumption. Flavour did not significantly influence liking and wanting over time. The ability to freely choose amongst different flavours tended to decrease children's liking (p < 0.1) and wanting (p < 0.001) for these products. Changes in liking rather than initial liking was the best predictor of snack choice during the intervention. Conclusion Wanting rather than liking was most affected by repeated daily consumption of snack foods over three weeks. In order to increase the likelihood that children will repeatedly eat a food product, smaller sized healthy snacks are preferred to larger sized snacks. Future research should focus on stabilizing wanting over repeated consumption. PMID:19573228

  6. Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, January 1994-July 1995. Pacific Region Program Operations Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This informational packet contains the materials necessary to administer the annual Department of Defense Dependent Schools Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS) at the high school and middle school levels. The symposium program is a calendar year research program which includes one week symposium of students (grade 8-12)…

  7. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control was held March 25-28,1991 in Washington, DC. The sixth meeting in a biennial series, the Symposium was cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Approxima...

  8. CONFERENCE NOTE: Sixth Symposium on Temperature Scheduled for March 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-07-01

    The call for papers for the 6th Symposium on Temperature, Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry has been issued. The Symposium is scheduled to take place in Washington, DC, USA during the week of March 14 18, 1982. Like its predecessors held in the years 1919, 1939, 1954, 1961, and 1971, the 6th Symposium will stress advances in the measurement of thermodynamic values of temperature, in temperature reference points, in temperature sensors and instruments for the control of temperature, and in the development and use of temperature scales. For the first time, an exhibit of thermometry will be a part of the Symposium. Manuscripts to be submitted for inclusion in the Symposium should be sent to the 6th Temperature Symposium Program Chairman, National Bureau of Standards, by September 15, 1981. Those papers accepted for the Symposium will be due in camera-ready form by February 15, 1982. Original papers on all of the topics listed above, as well as reviews of the past decade's progress in thermometry and temperature control, are solicited by the Symposium organizers. The Symposium arrangements and registration are in the care of the Instrument Society of America (represented on the Symposium General Committee by Mr C T Glazer, 67 Alexander Drive, PO Box 12277, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA). Questions regarding the instrument exhibits should also be addressed to the ISA. The technical program for the Symposium is the responsibility of a committee headed by Dr J F Schooley, Room B-128 Physics Building, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC, 20234, USA. The Symposium proceedings will be published by the American Institute of Physics.

  9. Space Symposium/76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A symposium dealing with career opportunities in the aerospace program for minorities was conducted and evaluated. The symposium was attended by students from eleven predominantly minority colleges and universities in and around Washington, D. C. and the eastern region, and from high schools in five jurisdictions of the Washington metropolitan area. Speakers included representatives of Howard University, NASA, and private industry. On display during the symposium was a NASA exhibit of moon rocks, space shuttles, a lunar module, command module, pacemaker, LANDSAT, and other items of interest.

  10. Lepton Flavour Violation and electron EDM in SUSY with a non-abelian flavour symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Calibbi, Lorenzo

    2008-11-23

    We present the lepton sector phenomenology of a supersymmetric flavour model based on a SU(3) horizontal symmetry. This model successfully reproduces the observed fermion masses and mixings, without introducing unacceptably large SUSY sources of flavour and CP violation. We show that the model, which is at present weakly constrained, predicts the electron EDM and {mu}{yields}e,y to be within the final sensitivity of the currently running experiments, at least for SUSY masses within the reach of the LHC.

  11. SYNAPSE, Symposium for Young Neuroscientists and Professors of the Southeast: A One-day, Regional Neuroscience Meeting Focusing on Undergraduate Research

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Mark W.; Lom, Barbara; Silver, Wayne L.

    2011-01-01

    The Symposium for Young Neuroscientists and Professors of the Southeast (SYNAPSE; synapse.cofc.edu) was designed to encourage contacts among faculty and students interested in neuroscience. Since its inception in 2003, the SYNAPSE conference has consistently drawn faculty and undergraduate interest from the region. This unique meeting provides undergraduates with a valuable opportunity for neuroscience education; students interact with noted neuroscience faculty, present research results, obtain feedback from neuroscientists at other institutions, and form connections with other neuroscientists in the region. Additionally, SYNAPSE allows undergraduate students and faculty to attend workshops and panel discussions about issues related to professional skills and career options. The SYNAPSE conference currently travels among host institutions in the southeastern United States in two-year cycles. This article briefly describes the genesis of SYNAPSE and reviews SYNAPSE conferences from 2006 through 2010. The goal of this paper is to highlight key issues organizers have experienced launching, sustaining, and hosting this regional undergraduate neuroscience conference as well as assist faculty to develop similar conferences. PMID:23493950

  12. Proceedings for the Symposium on Research Needs for Extension Education (Columbus, Ohio, May 21-23, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Cooperative Extension Service.

    These proceedings consist of the following presentations and discussion papers: "Extension Research Needs in Evalaution" (Michael Patton); "Needed Research in Program Development" (Roger Lawrence); "The Cooperative Extension Service: A National Assessment" (Paul Warner); "National Study of Extension's Research Base: Implications for Extension…

  13. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20168679

  14. Symposium on Practical Knowledge and Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenstermacher, Gary D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This symposium presents eight articles discussing Fenstermacher's chapter, "Philosophy of Research on Teaching: Three Aspects" in ""Handbook of Research on Teaching" (1986). Topics dealt with are the concept of teaching, the connection between the study and the improvement of teaching, and the conduct of teacher education. (MT)

  15. Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  16. 1999 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on May 18-20, 1999. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  17. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  18. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    puzzlement. The apparent absence of hints in the LHC experimental data of new phenomena that could relate to dark matter, dark energy, the dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe, the unification of the strong and the electroweak interactions and their further unification with gravity left the Symposium with no guidance as to how to answer the question: what next? And in experimental fundamental science it is not the confirmation of already established theories that thrills the most; it is the appearance of the unexpected that creates the greatest excitement. However, the LHC is only at the beginning of its voyage into the uncharted territories of higher energies and smaller dimensions that it was built for, so the possibilities for unexpected discoveries are only starting to be explored. The LHC will start up again in 2015 with nearly twice its previous energy and with increased luminosity—new discoveries might then appear sooner than we even dare hope for! The LHC Nobel Symposium was attended by about 60 invited participants and lasted four days. The program was divided into seven sessions; QCD and Heavy Ion Physics, B Physics, Electroweak Physics, The Higgs Boson, Connections to Neutrino Physics and Astroparticle Physics, Beyond the Standard Model and Forward Look. There were 27 plenary invited talks given by participants, each followed by lively discussions. All but one of the speakers have submitted write-ups of their talks for these proceedings. We are hopeful that the remaining talk will be published in a forthcoming issue of Physica Scripta . I am gratified that Professor Roland Allen has agreed to write a paper on the essence of the Higgs boson discovery to be published in Physica Scripta , intended for undergraduate students and educated physicists, regardless of their field of research. I wish to express my deep gratitude to all Speakers and Participants in the Symposium, to the Members of the Local and International Organizing Committees, to the

  19. Summary of the IADR Cariology Research, Craniofacial Biology, and Mineralized Tissue Groups Symposium, Iguaçu Falls, Brazil, June 2012

    PubMed Central

    Modesto, Adriana; Klein, Ophir; Tenuta, Livia M.A.; Gerlach, Raquel F.; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2014-01-01

    Characteristics of enamel may influence or modulate individual susceptibility to caries and erosion. These characteristics are defined during development, which is under strict genetic control, but can easily be modified in many ways by environmental factors. In the symposium, translational aspects of embryology, biochemistry, and genetics of amelogenesis were presented. The symposium provided unique insight into how basic sciences integrate with clinically relevant problems. The need for improved understanding of risks at the individual level, taking into consideration both environmental exposures and genetic background, was presented. The symposium was divided into four stepwise and interconnected topics as follows: 1) The Many Faces of Enamel Development; 2) Enamel Pathogenesis: Biochemistry Lessons; 3) Environmental Factors on Enamel Formation; and, 4) Genetic Variation in Enamel Formation Genes. PMID:25392764

  20. Undergraduate Research as Chemical Education--A Symposium: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: The Total Synthesis of Maytansine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    An undergraduate research program in natural product synthesis was established at a small liberal arts college. Discusses program goals (including the total synthesis of maytansine), objectives, and accomplishments to date. Guidelines for establishing such programs are offered. (JN)

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF THE STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION SYMPOSIUM (3RD). VOLUME IV. FUNDAMENTAL COMBUSTION RESEARCH AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ;Contents: Fundamental combustion research--(NOx abatement in fossil fuel combustion--chemical kinetic considerations, Heterogeneous processes involved in the control of nitrogen oxide formation in fossil fuel flames, Transport processes and numerical model development--FCR progr...

  2. Novel flavours paired with glutamate condition increased intake in older adults in the absence of changes in liking.

    PubMed

    Dermiki, Maria; Prescott, John; Sargent, Laura J; Willway, Joanne; Gosney, Margot A; Methven, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Previous research on the repeat exposure to a novel flavour combined with monosodium glutamate (MSG) has shown an increase in liking and consumption for the particular flavour. The aim of the current work was to investigate whether this could also be observed in the case of older people, since they are most affected by undernutrition in the developed world and ways to increase consumption of food are of significant importance for this particular age group. For this study, 40 older adults (age 65-88) repeatedly consumed potato soup with two novel flavours (lemongrass and cumin) which were either with or without a high level of MSG (5% w/w). A randomized single blind within-subject design was implemented, where each participant was exposed to both soup flavours three times over 6 days, with one of the soup flavours containing MSG. After three repeat exposures, consumption increased significantly for the soups where the flavours had contained MSG during the repeated exposure (mean weight consumed increased from 123 to 164 g, p = 0.017), implying that glutamate conditioned for increased wanting and consumption, despite the fact that the liking for the soup had not increased. PMID:25754148

  3. International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    This proceeding is a compilation of peer reviewed papers presented at the 13th International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013) held from September 23-27, 2013, at Islamabad, Pakistan. In my capacity as ISAM-2013 Secretary, I feel honoured that the symposium has ended on a positive note. The ever increasing changes and intricacies that characterize modern industry necessitate a growing demand for technical information on advanced materials. ISAM and other similar forums serve to fulfill this need. The five day deliberations of ISAM 2013, consisted of 19 technical sessions and 2 poster sessions. In all, 277 papers were presented, inclusive of 80 contributory, invited and oral presentations. The symposium also hosted panel discussions led by renowned scientists and eminent researchers from foreign as well as local institutes. The ultimate aim of this proceeding is to record in writing the new findings in the field of advanced materials. I hope that the technical data available in this publication proves valuable to young scientists and researchers working in this area of science. At the same time, I wish to acknowledge Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing UK, for accepting the research papers from ISAM-2013 for publication in the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The proceeding will be available on the IOP website as an online open access document. I am profoundly thankful to the Symposium Chairman for his steadfast support and valuable guidance without which ISAM 2013 could not have been the mega event that it turned out to be. My gratitude to all our distinguished participants, session chairs/co-chairs, and reviewers for their active role in the symposium. I appreciate the entire organizing committee for the zest and ardor with which each committee fulfilled its obligations to ISAM. Last yet not the least, my thankfulness goes to all our sponsors for wilfully financing the event. Dr. Sara Qaisar Symposium Secretary Further

  4. Synthesis of Research Symposium at CLD's 34th International Conference on Learning Disabilities: Must Reads for 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah K.; Weiser, Beverly L.; Cummings, Kelli D.; Shapiro, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The members of the Council for Learning Disabilities' Research Committee convene annually to discuss what they have identified as "Must Read" articles published within the last year. For the 34th Annual International Conference, the members were asked to select articles that exemplified the conference theme: "Learning…

  5. Coalition for Education in the Outdoors Biennial Research Symposium Proceedings (Fifth, Bradford Woods, Indiana, January 14-16, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, L. Allison, Ed.; McAvoy, Leo H., Ed.; Young, Anderson B., Ed.

    This proceedings contains conference papers and abstracts of papers concerned with research into the processes and outcomes of outdoor and adventure education. Following a preface, "What Have We Been Doing?" (Anderson B. Young), the papers are: (1) "Components of the Outdoor Trip: What Really Happens?" (Alan Ewert, Jim Sibthorp, Erin K. Sharpe,…

  6. Issues in Research with Human Subjects. A Symposium (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, March 20-21, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This conference was designed to facilitate an exchange of information and experiences on the major issues in research with human subjects. In each session, a speaker from the United States and one from the United Kingdom reviewed procedures, progress, and problems related to a particular topic, leading to a thorough discussion of the advantages or…

  7. Progress toward Treatment and Cure of Epidermolysis Bullosa: Summary of the DEBRA International Research Symposium EB2015.

    PubMed

    Uitto, Jouni; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Christiano, Angela M; McGrath, John A; Has, Cristina; South, Andrew P; Kopelan, Brett; Robinson, E Clare

    2016-02-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a group of complex heritable blistering diseases, is the topic of triennial research meetings organized by DEBRA International, Vienna, Austria, the network of national EB patient advocacy organizations. The DEBRA 2015 Research Conference, held in May 2015, brought together investigators and clinicians from around the world working at the forefront of EB research. Discussing the state-of-the-art approaches from a wide range of disciplines, there was a palpable excitement at this conference brought about by the optimism about applying new sequencing techniques, genome editing, protein replacement, autologous and allogeneic stem cell therapy, innovations in cancer biology, revertant mosaicism, and induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, all of which are aimed at developing new therapies for EB. Many in the field who have participated in EB research for many years were especially enthusiastic and felt that, possibly for the first time, the field seems uniquely poised to bring these new tools to effectively tackle EB. Multiple complementary approaches are currently in motion toward improved quality of life and eventually a cure for patients suffering from EB, a currently intractable disease. PMID:26802230

  8. Progress Towards Treatment and Cure of Epidermolysis Bullosa: Summary of the DEBRA International Research Symposium EB2015

    PubMed Central

    Uitto, Jouni; Tuderman, Leena Bruckner; Christiano, Angela M.; McGrath, John A.; Has, Cristina; South, Andrew P.; Kopelan, Brett; Robinson, E. Clare

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a group of complex heritable blistering diseases, is the topic of triennial research meetings organized by DEBRA International, the umbrella of patient advocacy organizations. The DEBRA 2015 Research Conference, held in May 2015, brought together investigators and clinicians from around the world working at the forefront of EB research. Discussing the state-of-the-art approaches from a wide range of disciplines, there was a palpable excitement at this conference brought about by the optimism about applying new sequencing techniques, genome editing, protein replacement, autologous and allogeneic stem cell therapy, innovations in cancer biology, revertant mosaicism and iPSC techniques, all of which are aimed at developing new therapies for EB. Many in the field who have participated in EB research for many years were especially enthusiastic and felt that, possibly for the first time, the field seems uniquely poised to bring these new tools to effectively tackle EB using multiple complementary approaches towards improved quality of life and eventually a cure for patients suffering from EB, a currently intractable disease. PMID:26802230

  9. Synthesis of Research Symposium at CLD's 33rd International Conference on Learning Disabilities: "Must Reads for 2011"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiser, Beverly L.; Reed, Deborah K.; Kethley, Caroline I.; Mathes, Patricia G.

    2012-01-01

    In October 2011, Council for Learning Disabilities' (CLD's) research committee members (i.e., authors of this article) presented their "Must Reads" at the organization's 33rd Annual International Conference on Learning Disabilities. In this article, the presenters summarize a few of their selected articles and state why each article is a "Must…

  10. Neutrino observables from predictive flavour patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebola, Luís M.; Emmanuel-Costa, David; Felipe, Ricardo González

    2016-03-01

    We look for predictive flavour patterns of the effective Majorana neutrino mass matrix that are compatible with current neutrino oscillation data. Our search is based on the assumption that the neutrino mass matrix contains equal elements and a minimal number of parameters, in the flavour basis where the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal and real. Three unique patterns that can successfully explain neutrino observables at the 3\\upsigma confidence level with just three physical parameters are presented. Neutrino textures described by four and five parameters are also studied. The predictions for the lightest neutrino mass, the effective mass parameter in neutrinoless double beta decays and for the CP-violating phases in the leptonic mixing are given.

  11. IDEAL Symposium on the East African Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Kelts, K.; Lehman, J. T.; Wuest, A.

    A vast array of interdisciplinary problems presented by the African Great Lakes were highlighted at the International Symposium on the Limnology, Climatology and Paleoclimatology of the East African Lakes, organized by the International Decade for the East African Lakes (IDEAL) February 17-21 in Jinja, Uganda. Approximately 125 scientists attended from North America, Europe, Africa, and New Zealand. Jinja is located on the northern shore of Lake Victoria at the head-waters of the Nile and is the site of the host institution for the symposium, the Uganda Freshwater Fisheries Research Organization (UFFRO). The conveners of the symposium were Tom Johnson of Duke University, George Kitaka of UNESCO-ROSTA, and Eric Odada of the University of Nairobi.

  12. Symposium on New Materials for Nonlinear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Seth R.

    1991-01-01

    The New Materials for Nonlinear Optics Symposium was held at the American Chemical Society National Meeting, in Boston on April 22 to 26, 1990. The meeting was a success. Throughout the week the average attendance was over 150 people/session. Several speakers had attendance over 300. The ACS organized a press conference about the meeting, held on Wednesday April 25, 1990 at 2 pm. At the time, the organizers devoted considerable time to educating the press about the importance of NLO research and the potential impact the NLO devices will have on the average person. The American Chemical Society is publishing an ACS Symposium Series monograph edited by the symposium organizers, to provide a permanent record of the proceeding of this meeting.

  13. Heavy flavour physics from top to bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, M.; CDF and D0 Collaboration

    1998-02-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour physics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by summarizing recent top quark and B physics results from CDF and D0. In particular we discuss the measurement of the top quark mass and top production cross section as well as B meson lifetimes and time dependent B{anti B} mixing results. An outlook of perspectives for top and B physics in Run II starting in 1999 is also given.

  14. Heavy flavour physics from top to bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, M.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1997-01-01

    We review the status of heavy flavour physics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by summarizing recent top quark and B physics results from CDF and D0. In particular we discuss the measurement of the top quark mass and top production cross section as well as B meson lifetimes and time dependent B{bar B} mixing results. An outlook of perspectives for top and B physics in Run II starting in 1999 is also given. 38 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. 32nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, S. W. (Compiler); Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings of the 32nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium are reported. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) hosted the symposium that was held at the Hilton Oceanfront Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida on May 13-15, 1998. The symposium was cosponsored by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium Committee. During these days, 28 papers were presented. Topics included robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearing, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment.

  16. Biotechnology of flavours--the next generation.

    PubMed

    Berger, Ralf G

    2009-11-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (flavours, aromas) are the sensory principles of many consumer products and govern their acceptance and market success. Flavours from microorganisms compete with the traditional agricultural sources. Screening for overproducers, elucidation of metabolic pathways and precursors and application of conventional bioengineering has resulted in a set of more than 100 commercial aroma chemicals derived via biotechnology. Various routes may lead to volatile metabolites: De novo synthesis from elementary biochemical units, degradation of larger substrates such as lipids, and functionalization of immediate flavour precursor molecules. More recently, the field was stimulated by the increasing preference of alienated consumers for products bearing the label "natural", and by the vivid discussion on healthy and "functional" food ingredients. The unmistakable call for sustainable sources and environmentally friendly production is forcing the industry to move towards a greener chemistry. Progress is expected from the toolbox of genetic engineering which is expected to help in identifying metabolic bottlenecks and in creating novel high-yielding strains. Bioengineering, in a complementary way, provides promising technical options, such as improved substrate dosage, gas-phase or two-phase reactions and in situ product recovery. PMID:19609491

  17. Applications of Computerized Adaptive Testing. Proceedings of a Symposium presented at the Annual Convention of the Military Testing Association (18th, October 1976). Research Report 77-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J., Ed.

    This symposium consists of five papers and presents some recent developments in adaptive testing which have applications to several military testing problems. The overview, by James R. McBride, defines adaptive testing and discusses some of its item selection and scoring strategies. Item response theory, or item characteristic curve theory, is…

  18. The Transition from School to Work: A Report Based on the Princeton Manpower Symposium May 9-10, 1968. Research Report Series No. 111.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC.

    Approximately 60 experts from education, business, government, unions and associations participated in a symposium to summarize and review the dimensions of the youth unemployment problem and to discuss the roles and responsibilities of schools, private enterprise, trade unions, voluntary agencies, and various levels of government in developing…

  19. Fifth International Symposium on Liquid Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the fiollowing: Theme: Life-life Combustion Devices Technology. Technical Sessions: International Perspectives. System Level Effects. Component Level Processes. Material Considerations. Design Environments -- Predictions. Injector Design Technology. Design Environments -- Measurements. Panel Discussion: Views on future research and development needs and Symposium observations. Aquarium Welcome and Southern Belle Riverboat Recognition Banquet evening events.

  20. Organizational Change. Symposium 19. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on organizational change consists of three presentations. "Institutionalizing Organizational Change Through Cascade Training: Implications for Human Resource Development (HRD) Research" (Ronald L. Jacobs, Darlene Russ-Eft, Suhail Zidan) proposes the institutionalization of change should be addressed as a major part of the change…

  1. Values: Relations and Implications. Symposium V C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Wit, Jan; Keats, D. M.

    Reported at a symposium generally concerned with values and adolescents are discussions of (1) socialization issues and the impact of values on adolescents, and (2) dimensions of Asian youths' confrontation with the problem of modernization. In the first study (by Jan de Witt), the conceptual shift in socialization research to a focus on…

  2. The 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings of the 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held at the Cleveland Marriott Society Center on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  3. Characteristics Orientation, Needs and Expectations. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on characteristics orientation, needs, and expectations. "Characteristics Orientation of Emerging Professions: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice of Continuing Professional Education" (William H. Young, Margot B. Weinstein) reports on a qualitative study that examined emerging…

  4. The 22nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the symposium, which was held at the NASA Langley Research Center, on May 4 to 6, 1988, are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for space station docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  5. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  6. Leadership Development. Symposium 13. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on leadership development consists of three presentations. "Organizational Performance: The Future Focus of Leadership Development Programs" (Doris B. Collins) reports research that analyzed 54 leadership studies from 1984-2000 and confirmed that organizations have begun to take a more systemic approach to leadership development.…

  7. International Symposium on Karst Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, William

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) and the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) joined the Hacettepe University of Ankara, Turkey, in sponsoring the International Symposium on Karst Water Resources. The other sponsors of the symposium were the Karst Water Resources Research Center Project of Hacettepe University and the United Nations Development Program through the United Nations Department of Technical Cooperation for Development, in addition to the following government organizations of Turkey: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, State Hydraulic, Works (DSI), General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA), Electrical Power Resources Survey and Development Administration (EIE) and Geological Engineering Department of the Engineering Faculty and Karst Hydrogeology Research Group (KRG) at the Hacettepe University Earth Sciences Application and Research Center. Cooperating organizations included the Turkish National Committee of the International Hydrological Program, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the International Water Resources Association (IWRA). The symposium was divided into two parts: a paper presentation session held at the new Turkish National Library in Ankara during July 7-12, 1985, and a field trip from Ankara through Konya and Antalya to Izmir during July 13-18. The symposium chairman was Gultekin Gunay of the Hydrogeological Engineering Department of Ankara's Hacettepe University, and the cochairman was A. Ivan Johnson, a water resources consultant from Denver, Colo., and editor of WaterWatch. Scientists from 27 countries were represented among the 200 or so participants in attendance.

  8. (Attendance at the XIV Nuclear Physics Symposium)

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.

    1991-01-16

    This report includes background material on the long-standing series of annual symposia presented by the Mexican nuclear physics community, summarizes the highlights of the fourteenth symposium in the series, and records items learned by the traveler in subsequent visits to two research laboratories in Mexico.

  9. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  10. Symposium on Uranium Plasmas: Research and Applications, 2nd, Atlanta, Ga., November 15-17, 1971, Collection of Technical Papers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Results of theoretical and applied research related to fissioning uranium plasmas. Topics examined include uranium plasma instabilities, diagnostic techniques, radiant heat transfer characteristics, nuclear pumping of lasers, and various fission engine concepts. Engineering aspects considered for open-cycle gas core engines include effects of buoyancy on fuel containment, flow and criticality problems, effects of injection conditions, and radiation hazards. The nuclear light bulb engine, the mini-cavity reactor, the dust-bed reactor, and the colloid core reactor are also examined in terms of design and control considerations. Individual items are abstracted in this issue.

  11. PREFACE: Third International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumori, Atsuo

    2009-09-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Third Symposium (ISAT-3) was held on 5-6 March 2009 at the Tokyo International Exchange Center, Tokyo, Japan jointed with the Third Polyscale Technology Workshop (PTW-3). The ISAT-3 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies, which was successively held after ISAT-1 at Tsukuba and ISAT-2 at Awaji in 2007. The symposium was attended by 136 participants. There were 12 invited and 4 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 101. From all the contributions, 32 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The 'Atomic Technology Project' and the 'Polyscale Technology Project' were started in 2006 as the joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing atomic and polyscale technologies. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of these projects is to contribute to the development of atomic and polyscale science and technologies. In this symposium, four research fields were focused on: Biomedical Applications, Fabrication for Advanced Materials and Devices, Magnetic Applications, and Quantum and Molecular Engineering for Advanced Technologies. Atsuo Yasumori Conference Chair Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan.

  12. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium. PMID:20454228

  13. Clinostats and centrifuges: Their use, value, and limitations in gravitational biological research; Symposium, Washington, Oct. 19, 1991, Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor); Todd, Paul (Editor); Powers, Janet V. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume addresses physical phenomena and effects associated with clinostat and centrifuge operations as well as their physiological effects. Particular attention is given to the simulation of the gravity conditions on the ground, the internal dynamics of slowly rotating biological systems, and qualitative and quantitative aspects of the fast-rotating clinostat as a research tool. Also discussed are the development and use of centrifuges in gravitational biology, the use of centrifuges in plant gravitational biology and a comparison of ground-based and flight experiment results, the ability of clinostat to mimic the effect of microgravity on plant cells and organs, and the impact of altered gravity conditions on early EGF-induced signal transduction in human epidermal A431 cells.

  14. INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM IN ARCTIC EFFECTS OF AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Symposium on the Ecological Effects of Arctic Airborne Contaminants was structured to bring together researchers from throughout the world, particularly from the eight arctic countries, to share their ideas on the known and potential ecological effects of airbor...

  15. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, J.

    1999-06-01

    The beginning of the VLT era was marked by two major events: the VLT Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March 1999, preceded by the VLT Opening Symposium on 1-4 March. ESO is indebted to Professor J.A. Music Tomicic, Rector of the Universidad Católica del Norte, for hosting this symposium. Another major event occurred on the night of 4 March: First light was achieved ahead of schedule at Kueyen, the second 8.2-m VLT unit telescope.

  16. 2001 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on June 19-21, 2001. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to attitude/orbit determination, prediction and control; attitude simulation; attitude sensor calibration; theoretical foundation of attitude computation; dynamics model improvements; autonomous navigation; constellation design and formation flying; estimation theory and computational techniques; Earth environment mission analysis and design; and, spacecraft re-entry mission design and operations.

  17. Second Symposium on ``Current trends in international fusion research: review and assessment`` Chairman`s summary of session

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1998-02-26

    This session began with a keynote speech by B. Coppi of M.I.T., entitled: ``Physics of Fusion Burning Plasmas, Ignition, and Relevant Technology Issues.`` It continued with a second paper on the tokamak approach to fusion, presented by E. Mazzucato of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, entitled ``High Confinement Plasma Confinement Regime in TFTR Configurations with Reversed Magnetic Shear.`` The session continued with three talks discussing various aspects of the so-called ``Field Reversed Configuration`` (FRC), and concluded with a talk on a more general topic. The first of the three FRC papers, presented by J. Slough of the University of Washington, was entitled ``FRC Reactor for Deep Space Propulsion.`` This paper was followed by a paper by S. Goto of the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Osaka University in Japan, entitled ``Experimental Initiation of Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) Toward Helium-3 Fusion.`` The third of the FRC papers, authored by H. Mimoto and Y. Tomito of the National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya, Japan, and presented by Y. Tomita was entitled ``Helium-3 Fusion Based on a Field-Reversed Configuration.`` The session was concluded with a paper presented by D. Ryutov of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory entitled: ``A User Facility for Research on Fusion Systems with Dense Plasmas.``

  18. Preface: The Ninth International Flatfish Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loher, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume of the Journal of Sea Research, and in a second issue to be published subsequently, represent research findings that were presented in whole or in part at the Ninth International Flatfish Symposium (IFS), convened in Cle Elum, Washington, USA, in November of 2014. This conference represented the most recent in a series that was begun nearly three decades ago (see Berghahn, this issue), and established to bring together the world's leading flatfish scientists, as well as students and researchers just beginning to embark upon flatfish research, to share emerging results, exchange ideas, and foster greater international collaboration and understanding of this taxon. For each symposium, an overarching theme is chosen and papers are presented within a series of Topic Sessions that both encompass the general theme while allowing unfettered presentation of research that may lie outside of that primary focus.

  19. Tools in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on tools in human resource development (HRD). "Game Theory Methodology in HRD" (Thomas J. Chermack, Richard A. Swanson) explores the utility of game theory in helping the HRD profession address the complexity of integrating multiple theories for disciplinary understanding and fulfilling its…

  20. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of Agriculture that…

  1. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  2. Standards and Certification. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on standards and certification in human resource development (HRD). "Implementing Management Standards in the UK" (Jonathan Winterton, Ruth Winterton) reports on a study that explored the implementation of management standards in 16 organizations and identified 36 key themes and strategic issues…

  3. Globalism and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on globalization and human resource development (HRD). "Challenges and Strategies of Developing Human Resources in the Surge of Globalization: A Case of the People's Republic of China" (De Zhang, Baiyin Yang, Yichi Zhang) analyzes the challenges and strategies of HRD in China and discusses the…

  4. Online Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on online learning that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "An Instructional Strategy Framework for Online Learning Environments" (Scott D. Johnson, Steven R. Aragon) discusses the pitfalls of modeling online courses after traditional instruction instead…

  5. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  6. ASSA Symposium 2012 Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    of papers presented at the ASSA Symposium held in Cape Town 12-14 October 2012. Videos are available on You tube. See http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8odLrzpzMkHS-cSEfPFIr3YLPAq4d5MU for a playlist.

  7. Issues of HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on issues of human resource development (HRD). "The Complex Roots of Human Resource Development" (Monica Lee) discusses the roots of HRD within the framework of the following views of management: (1) classic (the view that managers must be able to create appropriate rules and procedures for…

  8. Competencies in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on competencies in human resource development (HRD). "The Development of a Competency Model and Assessment Instrument for Public Sector Leadership and Management Development" (Sharon S. Naquin, Elwood F. Holton III) reports on a streamlined methodology and process used to develop a competency model for…

  9. Quality of Life Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. New Mexico Environmental Inst.

    Comments, speeches, and questions delivered at the Quality of Life Symposium are compiled in these proceedings. As an exploratory session, the conference objectives were to (1) become better informed about New Mexico--its resource base, the economy, social and cultural base, and the environment; and (2) to evaluate and discuss the role of New…

  10. Team Based Work. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on team-based work in human resource development (HRD). "Toward Transformational Learning in Organizations: Effects of Model-II Governing Variables on Perceived Learning in Teams" (Blair K. Carruth) summarizes a study that indicated that, regardless of which Model-II variable (valid information,…

  11. Culturally Competent Research with American Indians and Alaska Natives: Findings and Recommendations of the First Symposium of the Work Group on American Indian Research and Program Evaluation Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Joyce Y.; Davis, Jamie D.; Du Bois, Barbara; Echo-Hawk, Holly; Erickson, Jill Shepard; Goins, R. Turner; Hill, Calvin; Hillabrant, Walter; Johnson, Sharon R.; Kendall, Elizabeth; Keemer, Kelly; Manson, Spero M.; Marshall, Catherine A.; Running Wolf, Paulette; Santiago, Rolando L.; Schacht, Robert; Stone, Joseph B.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the collective experience of a multidisciplinary network of researchers, practitioners, and program evaluators who support appropriate research and evaluation methods in working with Native peoples. Our experience underlines the critical importance of culture in understanding and conducting research with the diverse…

  12. International Symposium on Technology Management: Modeling, Simulation, and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiming

    2007-12-01

    This symposium provides a forum for scientists and researchers from academia and industry to exchange knowledge, ideas and results in computational aspects of social and management science. This symposium will cover theory and practice of computational methods, models and empirical analysis for decision making and forecasting in economics, finance, management, transportation, and related aspects of information and system engineering. Welcome to this interdisciplinary symposium in International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering (ICCMSE 2007). Look forward to seeing you in Corfu, Greece!

  13. Flavouring compounds in Indian potato snacks.

    PubMed

    Raigond, Pinky; Singh, Brajesh; Dhulia, Akshita; Chopra, Shelly; Dutt, Som

    2015-12-01

    Market for processed potato products is rising day by day. Flavour plays important role in decision making by consumers due to their preferences for better tasting food. In potato and potato products, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) are the major umami compounds which contribute towards flavour. Therefore, umami 5' nucleotides (AMP+GMP) were estimated from local potato products available as common fried products in the Indian markets and processed potato products being sold by the retailers. The analysis was also carried in raw, microwaved and pressure cooked tubers of forty seven Indian potato cultivars. Umami 5' nucleotide content ranged from 2.63 (Aloo seekh) to 8.26 μg/g FW (fried lachcha) in local potato products. In processed potato products, the content ranged from 2.72 μg/g FW (Smiles) to 14.75 μg/g FW (Aloo Bhujia). Along with aloo bhujia, umami 5' nucleotides were also high in dehydrated aloo lachcha (11.14 μg/g FW) and dehydrated potato chips (10.13 μg/g FW) and low in Smiles (2.72 μg/g FW) and Potato Shortz (3.40 μg/g FW). The study suggests that the potato products prepared solely from potato contained higher levels of umami 5' nucleotides compared to other products prepared by mixing potato with other cereals and vegetables. In Indian potato cultivars overall there was 14 % increase on microwave cooking and 31 % increase in flavouring compounds on pressure cooking. This type of study enabled in identifying better tasting cultivars for further product development and also to develop products with less addition of salt. PMID:26604408

  14. Flavour perception of oxidation in beef.

    PubMed

    Campo, M M; Nute, G R; Hughes, S I; Enser, M; Wood, J D; Richardson, R I

    2006-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is a major factor in meat quality. In order to relate human perceptions of lipid oxidation, as determined by a trained taste panel, to a chemical measurement of oxidation, we studied meat from animals with a wide range of potential oxidation through differences in their PUFA composition and by displaying the meat in high oxygen modified atmosphere packs for varying lengths of time. Meat was obtained from 73 Angus- and Charolais-cross steers from different trials that had been raised on 10 different diets: grass silage (high in C18:3, n-3), cereal concentrate (high in C18:2, n-6), three diets with 3% added fat consisting of three levels of protected lipid supplement (high in C18:2, n-6 and C18:3, n-3, ratio 1:1), a control with Megalac(®) (relatively saturated), three diets with three levels of inclusion of protected fish oil (high in C20:5 n-3 and C22:6 n-3) plus a constant amount of unprotected fish oil and a final diet with an unprotected fish oil control. The longissimus dorsi muscle was excised from the left carcass side, aged vacuum packaged for 10-13 days depending on the projects and frozen for less than eight months. TBARS and sensory analyses were performed on steaks displayed for 0, 4 or 9 days under simulated retail conditions, exposed to light in modified atmosphere packaging (CO(2):O(2); 25:75). Meat oxidation increased throughout display for each of the diets, as shown by a rise in TBARS values. This increase was not linear, differences between 0 and 4 days of display were smaller than between 4 and 9 days of display. The lowest TBARS and lowest increment occurred in the two control diets and the grass-fed animals, probably due to the more saturated fat of meat from animals fed the control diets and the higher content of vitamin E. Sensory attributes were also influenced by time of display. Positive attributes, such as beef flavour or overall liking, decreased throughout display, whereas negative attributes, such as abnormal and

  15. New Physics Search in Flavour Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hurth, Tobias; /CERN /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    With the running B, kaon and neutrino physics experiments, flavour physics takes centre stage within today's particle physics. We discuss the opportunities offered by these experiments in our search for new physics beyond the SM and discuss their complementarity to collider physics. We focus on rare B and kaon decays, highlighting specific observables in an exemplary mode. We also comment on the so-called B {yields} {pi}{pi} and B {yields} K{pi} puzzles. Moreover, we briefly discuss the restrictive role of long-distance strong interactions and some new tools such as QCD factorization and SCET to handle them.

  16. Tau Flavour Violation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Carquin, E.

    2009-04-17

    We study the relevance of neutrino oscillation data for sparticle decays that violate the {tau} lepton number at the LHC, in the context of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and in SU(5) extensions of the theory. We study the conditions required for {chi}{sub 2}{yields}{chi}+{tau}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}} decays to yield observable tau flavour violation, for cosmologically interesting values of the neutralino relic density. We present detailed studies of the relevant supersymmetric parameter space and pay particular emphasis to signals from tau hadronisation, that are analysed using PYTHIA event simulation.

  17. Linear flavour violation and anomalies in B physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Nardecchia, Marco; Renner, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    We propose renormalizable models of new physics that can explain various anomalies observed in decays of B-mesons to electron and muon pairs. The new physics states couple to linear combinations of Standard Model fermions, yielding a pattern of flavour violation that gives a consistent fit to the gamut of flavour data. Accidental symmetries prevent contributions to baryon- and lepton-number-violating processes, as well as enforcing a loop suppression of new physics contributions to flavour violating processes. Data require that the new flavour-breaking couplings are largely aligned with the Yukawa couplings of the SM and so we also explore patterns of flavour symmetry breaking giving rise to this structure.

  18. Research, Issues, and Practices. Conference Proceedings of the Annual Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium (2nd, Vermillion, South Dakota, April 15, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Univ., Vermillion. School of Education.

    The purpose of the conference reported in this document was to promote the professional sharing of current educational issues, provide a forum for dialogue concerning relevant educational topics, and share faculty research interests. The presentations are: (1) "Videotape Production: A Technological Form of Educational Research" (Linda Good); (2)…

  19. PREFACE: XV Chilean Physics Symposium, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, José; Ávila, Ricardo; Cubillos, Karla

    2008-02-01

    The Chilean Physics Symposium is the main gathering of Physics in Chile, and its organization is one of the central activities of the Chilean Physical Society (Sociedad Chilena de Física, SOCHIFI). The Symposium assembles the largest number of Chilean and foreign physicists resident in the country. Recent advances in the various research areas in Physics are presented, by researchers from Universities and national research centres. At the same time this is an occasion for the participation of Physics students from both the pre- and post-graduate programs. The Symposium has gathered continuously every two years, since 1978. The organization of the XV symposium was in charge of the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, and it took place on 15-17 November 2006, at La Reina Nuclear Studies Centre, in the city of Santiago, Chile. During this symposium the relation of research in Physics with education and with the productive sector in the country was also analysed. During the Symposium, 121 abstracts were submitted, from 255 authors. All authors were invited to submit articles for publication in the Symposium Proceedings. The articles received were reviewed by the Symposium Scientific Committee and by invited peers. The criteria for review focussed on the demand for a consistent piece of research, and a clear statement of results. Most of the articles received report the work of research groups where advanced students and young investigators are prominent. Thanks to their enthusiasm, 52 articles are presented in this issue. We would like to express our appreciation to their authors. Finally, my personal apology is in order regarding my delay in publishing these proceedings. A sequence of personal and professional highly demanding circumstances have been in the way. I would like to thank Journal of Physics: Conference Series for providing very fast publication of the proceedings, having published them online less than 4 weeks after my

  20. B decays and lepton flavour (universality) violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellin, A.

    2016-07-01

    LHCb found hints for physics beyond the standard model in Bto K^*μ^+μ^- , Bto K^*μ^+μ^-/Bto K^*e^+e^- and B_stoφμ^+μ^- . In addition, the BABAR results for Bto D^{(*)}τν and the CMS excess in htoτ^±μ^∓ also point towards lepton flavour (universality) violating new physics. While Bto D^{(*)}τν and htoτ^±μ^∓ can be naturally explained by an extended Higgs sector, the probably most promising explanation for the bto sμμ anomalies is a Z' boson. Furthermore, combining a 2HDM with a gauged L_μ-L_τ symmetry allows for explaining the bto sμ^+μ^- anomalies and htoτ^±μ^∓ simultaneously, with interesting correlations to τto3μ . In the light of these deviations from the SM we also discuss the possibilities of observing lepton flavour violating B decays ( e.g. Bto K^{(*)}τ^±μ^∓ and B_stoτ^±μ^∓ in Z^' models.

  1. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1988 SYMPOSIUM ON RADON AND RADON REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY. VOLUME 2. SYMPOSIUM POSTER PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings document the 1988 symposium on Radon and Radon Reduction Technology, jointly sponsored by EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) and Office of Radiation Programs (ORP), in Denver, CO, October 17-21, 1988. The objective of the sympo...

  2. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1988 SYMPOSIUM ON RADON AND RADON REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY--VOLUME 1. SYMPOSIUM ORAL PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings document the 1988 symposium on Radon and Radon Reduction Technology, jointly sponsored by EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) and Office of Radiation Programs (ORP), in Denver, CO, October 17-21, 1988. The objective of the sympo...

  3. Self-Directed and Incidental Learning. Symposium 26. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers on self-directed and incidental learning from a symposium on human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "Self-Directed Learning for Supervisory Development" (Judy O'Neil, Maria Lamattina), reports on a study that looks at what research says needs to be in place to engage workers in self-directed learning…

  4. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T.

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  5. Sixth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acevedo, Sara (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Chang, Sherwood (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The 6th Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life was convened at NASA Ames Research Center, November 17-20, 1997. This Symposium is convened every three years under the auspices of NASA's Exobiology Program Office. All Principal Investigators funded by this Program present their most recent research accomplishments at the Symposium. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of the biogenic elements, prebiotic evolution (both planetary and chemical), evolution of early organisms and evolution of organisms in extreme environments, solar system exploration, and star and planet formation. The Symposium was attended by over 200 scientists from NASA centers and Universities nationwide.

  6. The use of immobilised digestive lipase from Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to generate flavour compounds in milk.

    PubMed

    Kurtovic, Ivan; Marshall, Susan N; Cleaver, Helen L; Miller, Matthew R

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the potential of immobilised digestive lipase from Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to generate flavour compounds in milk. The lipase was immobilised on hydrophobic resin (Toyopearl® Butyl) and used to hydrolyse milk lipids in a batch reactor. The lipase was stable when immobilised and there was no significant resin fouling or enzyme inhibition between cycles. Eight cycles were achieved before the hydrolysis rate dropped significantly because of physical losses of the immobilised lipase. The immobilised lipase showed the highest specificity towards short-chain fatty acids butanoic and hexanoic acids, the main dairy product flavour and odour compounds. Based on the performance of the reactor, and the ability of the lipase to alter free fatty acid composition and sensory characteristics of milk, the immobilised salmon lipase has potential applications in developing dairy products with unique flavours. PMID:26775978

  7. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20333088

  8. A Symposium: Relevant Cue Research, a Program of Systematic Evaluation: Considerations for Sustaining Instructional Design Research Using an Integrated Learning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Barbara

    An intelligent videodisc system on which comprehensive instructional development research can be conducted has been developed. This integrated learning system combines all other existing media, except objects, using a videodisc, microcomputer, printer, single monitor, hard disc storage with CPU for random access digitized audio, and headphones.…

  9. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  10. NASA Space Sciences Symposium-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the symposium was to motivate American Indians and other minority youths and women to select science and engineering as viable career choices, thereby making them available to the technical work force. Other objectives were: (1) to determine how aerospace technology careers and aerospace activities can be made more relevant to minorities and women; (2) to provide an opportunity for key NASA officials to interact with teachers and counselors of the participating schools; (3) to stimulate a greater interest among American Indian organizations and students in NASA's research and development programs; (4) to help NASA's efforts in the recruiting of minorities and women into its work force; and (5) to provide opportunities for minority aerospace scientists and engineers to interact with the minority community, particularly with youths at the junior high school and high school levels.

  11. The 1992 4th NASA SERC Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the fourth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design, co-sponsored by the IEEE, are presented. Each year this symposium is organized by the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the University of Idaho and is held in conjunction with a quarterly meeting of the NASA Data System Technology Working Group (DSTWG). One task of the DSTWG is to develop new electronic technologies that will meet next generation electronic data system needs. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The NASA SERC is proud to offer, at its fourth symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories, the electronics industry, and universities. These speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  12. The Strong Interactions, Flavour Physics and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuberi, Saba

    In this thesis we use effective field theories of the strong interactions to improve our understanding of several quantities in the Standard Model of particle physics (SM). We also examine constraints on an extension of the SM scalar sector and study the implications for the Higgs mass. We first examine an approach to extracting the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| via the relationship between the B meson decays B → X uℓnul and B → Xsgamma, where Xi is any final state hadron containing a quark of flavour i. Model dependence is reduced in this approach since the non-perturbative shape function at leading order is universal and drops out; however the perturbative expansion at next-to-leading order is found to be poorly behaved. We carry out a renormalon analysis of the relationship between these spectra to examine higher order perturbative corrections and compare the fixed-order and log expansions. Our analysis can be used to estimate the perturbative uncertainty in the extraction of |Vub|, which we show to be relatively small. Next we take a step towards the broader goal of summing large phase space logarithms from a variety of jet algorithms using Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). We develop a consistent approach to implementing arbitrary phase space constraints in SCET and demonstrate the connection between cutoffs in SCET and phase space limits. By considering several jet algorithms at next-to-leading order, we gain some insight into factorization of final state jets. In particular, we point out the connection between the ultraviolet regulator and factorization. Finally we consider a scalar sector that contains a colour-octet electroweak-doublet scalar, in addition to the SM Higgs. This extension contains the only scalar representations that Yukawa-couple to quarks and are consistent with minimal flavour violation. We examine constraints from electroweak precision data, direct production from LEPII and the Tevatron, and from flavour

  13. An update on research priorities in hydrocephalus: overview of the third National Institutes of Health-sponsored symposium "Opportunities for Hydrocephalus Research: Pathways to Better Outcomes".

    PubMed

    McAllister, James P; Williams, Michael A; Walker, Marion L; Kestle, John R W; Relkin, Norman R; Anderson, Amy M; Gross, Paul H; Browd, Samuel R

    2015-12-01

    Building on previous National Institutes of Health-sponsored symposia on hydrocephalus research, "Opportunities for Hydrocephalus Research: Pathways to Better Outcomes" was held in Seattle, Washington, July 9-11, 2012. Plenary sessions were organized into four major themes, each with two subtopics: Causes of Hydrocephalus (Genetics and Pathophysiological Modifications); Diagnosis of Hydrocephalus (Biomarkers and Neuroimaging); Treatment of Hydrocephalus (Bioengineering Advances and Surgical Treatments); and Outcome in Hydrocephalus (Neuropsychological and Neurological). International experts gave plenary talks, and extensive group discussions were held for each of the major themes. The conference emphasized patient-centered care and translational research, with the main objective to arrive at a consensus on priorities in hydrocephalus that have the potential to impact patient care in the next 5 years. The current state of hydrocephalus research and treatment was presented, and the following priorities for research were recommended for each theme. 1) Causes of Hydrocephalus-CSF absorption, production, and related drug therapies; pathogenesis of human hydrocephalus; improved animal and in vitro models of hydrocephalus; developmental and macromolecular transport mechanisms; biomechanical changes in hydrocephalus; and age-dependent mechanisms in the development of hydrocephalus. 2) Diagnosis of Hydrocephalus-implementation of a standardized set of protocols and a shared repository of technical information; prospective studies of multimodal techniques including MRI and CSF biomarkers to test potential pharmacological treatments; and quantitative and cost-effective CSF assessment techniques. 3) Treatment of Hydrocephalus-improved bioengineering efforts to reduce proximal catheter and overall shunt failure; external or implantable diagnostics and support for the biological infrastructure research that informs these efforts; and evidence-based surgical standardization with

  14. 1st International Symposium on Stress-Associated RNA Granules in Human Disease and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Bruce W.; Mouland, Andrew J.; McCormick, Craig

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, important linkages have been made between RNA granules and human disease processes. On June 8-10 of this year, we hosted a new symposium, dubbed the 1st International Symposium on Stress-Associated RNA Granules in Human Disease and Viral Infection. This symposium brought together experts from diverse research disciplines ranging from cancer and neuroscience to infectious disease. This report summarizes speaker presentations and highlights current challenges in the field. PMID:25256393

  15. John B. Little Center Annual Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Demple, Bruce F.

    2007-11-02

    The Annual Symposium of the John B. Little Center for Radiation Sciences and Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health seeks to educate radiobiologists and biomedical scientists in related areas on the leading research related to the effects of ionizing radiation and related environmental agents in biological systems. This effort seeks to further the training of individuals in this field, and to foment productive interactions and collaborations among scientists at Harvard and with other institutions. The Symposium attracts world-class scientists as speakers, and a broad cross-section of attendees from academic, government, and industrial research centers, as well as editorial staff from leading scientific publications. In order to maintain this quality, funding to support the travel and local expenses of invited speakers is sought, along with funds to allow use of appropriate conference facilities.

  16. Vegetable oils as fuel alternatives - symposium overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pryde, E.H.

    1984-10-01

    Several encouraging statements can be made about the use of vegetable oil products as fuel as a result of the information presented in these symposium papers. Vegetable oil ester fuels have the greatest promise, but further engine endurance tests will be required. These can be carried out best by the engine manufacturers. Microemulsions appear to have promise, but more research and engine testing will be necessary before performance equivalent to the ester fuels can be developed. Such research effort can be justified because microemulsification is a rather uncomplicated physical process and might be adaptable to on-farm operations, which would be doubtful for the more involved transesterfication process. Although some answers have been provided by this symposium, others are still not available; engine testing is continuing throughout the world particularly in those countries that do not have access to petroleum. 9 references.

  17. Recreation Symposium Proceedings. The Forest Recreation Symposium (State University of New York College of Forestry, Syracuse, 12-14 October 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Syracuse. Coll. of Forestry.

    In this collection of 26 papers presented at the 1971 Forest Recreation Symposium held at Syracuse, N.Y., information is presented about the forest resource and forest recreation research. The symposium, designed to help meet the needs of the planner and the manager in both public and private areas o f the forest recreation resource, covered 5…

  18. 8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

  19. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium

    PubMed Central

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A.; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts. PMID:26770074

  20. Climate Symposium 2014: Findings and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Asrar, Ghassem; Bony, Sandrine; Boucher, Olivier; Busalacchi, Antonio; Cazenave, Anny; Dowell, Mark; Flato, Greg; Hegerl, Gabi; Kallen, Erland; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Ratier, Alain; Saunders, Roger; Slingo, Julia; Sohn, Byung -Ju; Schmetz, Johannes; Stevens, Bjorn; Zhang, Peiqun; Zwiers, Francis

    2015-10-05

    Here, the Climate Symposium 2014, organized by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) and the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), with support from the European Commission (EC), European Space Agency (ESA), and other agencies, took place in Darmstadt, Germany, from 13 to 17 October 2014. Around 500 participants from 49 countries attended the event and represented over 200 organizations. Another 500 individuals participated remotely via “live streaming.”

  1. CP violation versus flavour in supersymmetric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, S.; Branco, G. C.; Khalil, S.

    2003-09-01

    We show that the quark flavour structure and CP violating phenomena are strongly correlated in supersymmetric theories. For a generic pattern of supersymmetry breaking the two broad categories of Yukawa couplings, democratic and hierarchical textures, have entirely different phenomenological implications. With hierarchical Yukawas, the rephasing invariant phase, arg(VusVcbVcb∗Vcs∗), in the CKM mixing matrix has to be of order unity, while the SUSY CP violating phases are severely constrained by electric dipole moments, giving rise to the so-called SUSY CP problem. With democratic Yukawas, all experimental CP results can be accommodated with small values for the CKM and SUSY CP violating phases (i.e., CP can be considered as an approximate symmetry at the high energy scale). We also show that within this scenario, an entirely real CKM matrix in supersymmetric models is still allowed by the present experimental results.

  2. Land Subsidence International Symposium held in Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Third International Symposium on Land Subsidence was held March 18-25, 1984, in Venice, Italy. Sponsors were the Ground-Water Commission of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Italian National Research Council (CNR), the Italian Regions of Veneto and Emilia-Romagna, the Italian Municipalities of Venice, Ravenna, and Modena, the Venice Province, and the European Research Office. Cosponsors included the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH), the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering (ISSMFE), and the Association of Geoscientists for International Development (AGID).Organized within the framework of UNESCO's International Hydrological Program, the symposium brought together over 200 international interdisciplinary specialists in the problems of land subsidence due to fluid and mineral withdrawal. Because man's continuing heavy development of groundwater, gas, oil, and minerals is changing the natural regime and thus causing more and more subsiding areas in the world, there had been sufficient new land subsidence occurrence, problems, research, and remedial measures since the 1976 Second International Symposium held in Anaheim, California, to develop a most interesting program of nearly 100 papers from about 30 countries. The program consisted of papers covering case histories of fluid and mineral withdrawal, engineering theory and analysis, karst “sink-hole”-type subsidence, subsidence due to dewatering of organic deposits or due to application of water (hydrocompaction), instrumentation, legal, socioeconomic, and environmental effects of land subsidence, and remedial works.

  3. Food, flavouring and feed plant traditions in the Tyrrhenian sector of Basilicata, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Guarrera, Paolo Maria; Salerno, Giovanni; Caneva, Giulia

    2006-01-01

    Background: Research was carried out in the years 2002–2003 into food, flavouring and feed folk traditions of plants in the Tyrrhenian part of the Basilicata region (southern Italy). This area was colonized in ancient times by Greeks. Data was collected through field interviews, especially of farmers. Methods: Field data were collected through structured interviews. The informants, numbered 49, belonged to families which had strong links with the traditional activities of the area. Results: 61 taxa are cited, belonging to 26 botanical families, amongst which 44 used as food or flavouring and 22 for animal alimentation. Besides 7 taxa are involved in rituals especially connected with agriculture and plant growth. Conclusion: The preservation of some rituals especially concerning agricultural plants is noteworthy in the area, together with a certain degree of continuity in food uses. Knowledge and rediscovery of recipes in human and animal diet could represent an economic potential for the area. PMID:16959031

  4. 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    The proceedings of the 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held in Pasadena Hilton, Pasadena, California on May 16-18, 2012. Lockheed Martin Space Systems cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include gimbals and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and Mars Science Laboratory mechanisms.

  5. 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Litty, Edward C. (Compiler); Sevilla, Donald R. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held at the Pasadena Conference and Exhibition Center, Pasadena, California, on May 19-21, 1999. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  6. PREFACE: The International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Yasuharu

    2008-03-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Second Symposium (ISAT-2) was held on 1-2 October 2007 at the Awaji Yumebutai Conference Center, Awaji City, Japan presided by the `Atomic Technology Project'. The ISAT-2 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 106 delegates. There were 9 invited and 5 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 73. From all the contributions, 24 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The `Atomic Technology Project' was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and were developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and devices. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Yasuharu Shirai Conference Chair Center for Atomic Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph

  7. PREFACE: Fourth International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigefumi

    2010-04-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The 4th Symposium (ISAT-4) was held on November 18-19, 2009 at the Seaside Hotel MAIKO VILLA KOBE, Kobe City, Japan presided by the "Atomic Technology Project". The ISAT-4 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion on the latest progress in the atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 107 delegates. There were 10 invited and 6 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 69. From all the contributions, 22 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The "Atomic Technology Project" was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) the Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) the Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) the Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and was developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and device. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Shigefumi Okada Conference Chair Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph Kobe photograph

  8. Can we see tau-Flavour Violation at the LHC?

    SciTech Connect

    Carquin, E.; Gomez, M. E.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2010-02-10

    We study the conditions required for chi{sub 2}->chi+tau{sup +}-mu{sup +}- decays to yield observable tau flavour violation at the LHC, for cosmologically interesting values of the neutralino relic density.

  9. First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S. (Editor); Tcheng, Ping (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored and held at NASA Langley Research Center during October 22-25, 1996. The symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. Over 130 delegates from 15 countries were in attendance. The program opened with a panel discussion, followed by technical paper sessions, and guided tours of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) wind tunnel, a local commercial balance fabrication facility, and the LaRC balance calibration laboratory. The opening panel discussion addressed "Future Trends in Balance Development and Applications." Forty-six technical papers were presented in 11 technical sessions covering the following areas: calibration, automatic calibration, data reduction, facility reports, design, accuracy and uncertainty analysis, strain gauges, instrumentation, balance design, thermal effects, finite element analysis, applications, and special balances. At the conclusion of the Symposium, a steering committee representing most of the nations and several U.S. organizations attending the Symposium was established to initiate planning for a second international balance symposium, to be held in 1999 in the UK.

  10. First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S (Editor); Tcheng, Ping (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored and held at NASA Langley Research Center during October 22-25, 1996. The symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. Over 130 delegates from 15 countries were in attendance. The program opened with a panel discussion, followed by technical paper sessions, and guided tours of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) wind tunnel, a local commercial balance fabrication facility, and the LaRC balance calibration laboratory. The opening panel discussion addressed "Future Trends in Balance Development and Applications." Forty-six technical papers were presented in 11 technical sessions covering the following areas: calibration, automatic calibration, data reduction, facility reports, design, accuracy and uncertainty analysis, strain gauges, instrumentation, balance design, thermal effects, finite element analysis, applications, and special balances. At the conclusion of the Symposium, a steering committee representing most of the nations and several U.S. organizations attending the Symposium was established to initiate planning for a second international balance symposium, to be held in 1999 in the UK.

  11. What scientists can learn from Plato's Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Conferences and scientific meetings are as old as science itself. The ancient Greeks where (in)famous for organizing so-called symposiums. During a symposium (from Greek, drinking together), attendees followed a program that contained both social and scientific aspects, focused around a certain topic. Whilst drinking and eating, all participants were expected to share their vision on the topic of interest by giving an oral presentation. The goal of these meetings was to arrive at a new common understanding and to come closer to the truth. Plato et al. knew very well how to organize an effective scientific conference, which should make use overthink the way we are organizing present-day conferences. Scientific meetings aim to connect researchers, share research and unravel the truth. The question is now: how do we get this done effectively? Plato knew that discussing science with strangers is difficult and he believed that talking about heavy matter could be done best when combined with social events. What if we try to go back to the times of Plato and model our conferences after the ancient symposiums? We might drop laying on couches and covering ourselves in ivy and flowers. However, a mix of social and scientific events will contribute to achieving the ultimate goal of why scientists go to conferences: to connect, to share and to unravel the truth.

  12. Understanding Darjeeling tea flavour on a molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Bornali; Borchetia, Sangeeta; Bhorali, Priyadarshini; Agarwal, Niraj; Bhuyan, L P; Rahman, A; Sakata, K; Mizutani, M; Shimizu, B; Gurusubramaniam, G; Ravindranath, R; Kalita, M C; Hazarika, M; Das, Sudripta

    2012-04-01

    Darjeeling teas are the highest grown teas in the world and preferred for its flavour, aroma and quality. Apart from the genetic makeup of the plant, earlier reports suggest that insect infestation, particularly jassids and thrips triggers the aroma and flavour formation in Darjeeling tea. The present work encompasses the identification of the genes/transcriptomes responsible for the typical flavour of Darjeeling tea, besides understanding the role of jassids and thrips in particular, in producing the best cup character and quality. The quantitative real time PCR analysis was based on a suppression subtractive hybridisation forward library of B157 (tea clone infested with thrips), providing us transcripts related to aroma and flavour formation. We observed the expression of genes like leucine zipper, ntd, nced, geraniol synthase, raffinose synthase, trehalose synthase, amylase, farnesyl transferase, catalase, methyl transferase, linalool synthase, peroxidases, elicitor responsive proteins, linamarase, nerolidol linalool synthase 2, 12-oxophytodienoate reductase, glucosidase, MYB transcription factor, and alcohol dehydrogenase, highly regulated due to insect infestation, manufacturing stresses and mechanical injury. The first report on gene expression dynamics in thrips infested Darjeeling tea leaves can be extrapolated with increase in volatiles which is responsible for enhancing the quality of Darjeeling tea, specially the flavour and aroma of the infusion. We hope to model these responses in order to understand the molecular changes that occur during Darjeeling tea flavour formation. PMID:22328090

  13. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  14. Balancing macronutrient intake in a mammalian carnivore: disentangling the influences of flavour and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hewson-Hughes, Adrian K; Colyer, Alison; Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David

    2016-06-01

    There is a large body of research demonstrating that macronutrient balancing is a primary driver of foraging in herbivores and omnivores, and more recently, it has been shown to occur in carnivores. However, the extent to which macronutrient selection in carnivores may be influenced by organoleptic properties (e.g. flavour/aroma) remains unknown. Here, we explore the roles of nutritional and hedonic factors in food choice and macronutrient balancing in a mammalian carnivore, the domestic cat. Using the geometric framework, we determined the amounts and ratio of protein and fat intake in cats allowed to select from combinations of three foods that varied in protein : fat (P : F) composition (approx. 10 : 90, 40 : 60 and 70 : 30 on a per cent energy basis) to which flavours of different 'attractiveness' (fish, rabbit and orange) were added. In two studies, in which animal and plant protein sources were used, respectively, the ratio and amounts of protein and fat intake were very consistent across all groups regardless of flavour combination, indicating regulation of both protein and fat intake. Our results suggest that macronutrient balancing rather than hedonistic rewards based on organoleptic properties of food is a primary driver of longer-term food selection and intake in domestic cats. PMID:27429768

  15. Balancing macronutrient intake in a mammalian carnivore: disentangling the influences of flavour and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Hewson-Hughes, Adrian K.; Colyer, Alison; Simpson, Stephen J.; Raubenheimer, David

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of research demonstrating that macronutrient balancing is a primary driver of foraging in herbivores and omnivores, and more recently, it has been shown to occur in carnivores. However, the extent to which macronutrient selection in carnivores may be influenced by organoleptic properties (e.g. flavour/aroma) remains unknown. Here, we explore the roles of nutritional and hedonic factors in food choice and macronutrient balancing in a mammalian carnivore, the domestic cat. Using the geometric framework, we determined the amounts and ratio of protein and fat intake in cats allowed to select from combinations of three foods that varied in protein : fat (P : F) composition (approx. 10 : 90, 40 : 60 and 70 : 30 on a per cent energy basis) to which flavours of different ‘attractiveness’ (fish, rabbit and orange) were added. In two studies, in which animal and plant protein sources were used, respectively, the ratio and amounts of protein and fat intake were very consistent across all groups regardless of flavour combination, indicating regulation of both protein and fat intake. Our results suggest that macronutrient balancing rather than hedonistic rewards based on organoleptic properties of food is a primary driver of longer-term food selection and intake in domestic cats. PMID:27429768

  16. PREFACE: DISCRETE '08: Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Botella, Francisco J.; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.

    2009-07-01

    The Symposium DISCRETE'08 on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries was held at the Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC) in Valencia, Spain from 11 to 16 December 2008. IFIC is a joint centre of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) and the Universitat de València (UVEG). The aim of the Symposium was to bring together experts on the field of Discrete Symmetries in order to discuss its prospects on the eve of the LHC era. The general state of the art for CP, T and CPT symmetries was reviewed and their interplay with Baryogenesis, Early Cosmology, Quantum Gravity, String Theory and the Dark Sector of the Universe was emphasised. Connections with physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular Supersymmetry, were investigated. Experimental implications in current and proposed facilities received particular attention. The scientific programme consisted of 24 invited Plenary Talks and 93 contributions selected among the submitted papers. Young researchers, in particular, were encouraged to submit an abstract. The Special Lecture on ''CERN and the Future of Particle Physics'', given by the CERN Director General Rolf-Dieter Heuer to close the Symposium, was of particular relevance. On the last day of the Symposium, an open meeting took place between Professor Heuer and the Spanish community of particle physics. The Symposium covered recent developments on the subject of Discrete Symmetries in the following topics: Quantum Vacuum Entanglement, Symmetrisation Principle CPT in Quantum Gravity and String Theory, Decoherence, Lorentz Violation Ultra-high-energy Messengers Time Reversal CP violation in the SM and beyond Neutrino Mass, Mixing and CP Baryogenesis, Leptogenesis Family Symmetries Supersymmetry and other searches Experimental Prospects: LHC, Super-B Factories, DAΦNE-2, Neutrino Beams The excellence of most of the presentations during the Symposium was pointed out by many participants. The broad spectrum of topics under the

  17. The Global Thinking Project: Linking Schools in Environmental Understanding. Symposium Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, November 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golley, Priscilla, Ed.; Hassard, Jack, Ed.

    The Global Thinking Project at Georgia State University and the Department of Middle Secondary Education and Instructional Technology sponsored a Symposium on Global Thinking Research, in November, 1993. The following 11 papers were presented at the symposium: (1) "Teaching Students to Think Globally" (Jack Hassard); (2) "Introducing Global…

  18. FIFTH SYMPOSIUM ON FUGITIVE EMISSIONS: MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL (MAY 3-5, 1982, CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the Fifth Symposium on Fugitive Emissions: Measurement and Control, May 3-5, 1982, in Charleston, SC. The Symposium was sponsored by the U.S. EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (known then as the Industrial Environmental...

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1992 EPA/AWMA INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM MEASUREMENT OF TOXIC AND RELATED AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1992 USEPA/AWMA International Symposium Measurement of Toxic and Related Air Pollutants was held in Durham, NC on May 4-9, 1992. his yearly symposium is sponsored by the Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory and the Air & Waste Management Association. he tec...

  20. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: SUMMARY OF THE 1991 EPRI/EPA/DOE S02 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 SO2 Control Symposium was held December 3–6, 1991, in Washington, D.C. The symposium, jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), focused attention...

  1. Final technical report, Symposium on New Theoretical Concepts and Directions in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Metiu, Horia

    2014-08-22

    We organized in August 2013 a “Symposium on New Theoretical Concepts and Directions in Catalysis” with the participation of 20 invited distinguished quantum chemists and other researchers who use computations to study catalysis. Symposium website; http://catalysis.cnsi.ucsb.edu/

  2. Making the Geography Curriculum: Reflections on the IGU-CGE London Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Clare

    2013-01-01

    "Curriculum making", highlighted in the Geographical Association's Manifesto in 2009, was the focus of a research symposium held in London in April 2011. Using an auto-ethnographic approach, I reflect on and explore my experience of participating in that symposium. The analysis explores the "cultures of influence" and the "forms of…

  3. Summary and Findings of the EPA and CDC Symposium on Air Pollution Exposure and Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) co-organized a symposium on "Air Pollution Exposure and Health" at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on September 19–20, 2006. The symposium brought together health and environmenta...

  4. Implication of Higgs mediated Flavour Changing Neutral Currents with Minimal Flavour Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, M. N.

    2015-07-01

    We analise phenomenological implications of two Higgs doublet models with Higgs flavour changing neutral currents suppressed in the quark sector by small entries of the Cabibbo- Kokayashi-Maskawa matrix. This suppression occurs in a natural way since it is the result of a symmetry applied to the Lagrangian. These type of models were proposed some time ago by Branco Grimus and Lavoura. Our results clearly show that these class of models allow for new physical scalars, with masses which are reachable at the LHC. The imposed symmetry severely reduces the number of free parameters and allows for predictions. Therefore these models can eventually be proved right or eliminated experimentally.

  5. Women's technical and professional symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K; Mack, L

    1999-10-01

    This is the fourth LLNL-sponsored Women's Technical and Professional Symposium. This year's theme: ''Excellence through the Millennium,'' focuses on the cutting edge work being done at LLNL and the many contributions of women to our science and technology mission. We hope this Symposium gives each person attending a better idea of the broad scope of the Laboratory's mission and their place within the organization. It is easy to lose sight of the fact that we all work in support of science and technology despite the diversity of our experience. This Symposium provides an opportunity to reflect on our past and to begin to plan our future.

  6. Evaluation from an LEA Perspective: Proceedings from an AERA Symposium. Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (66th, New York, New York, March 19-23, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce; And Others

    The views of local education agency (LEA) evaluators tend to be underrepresented in the evaluation literature. This symposium was organized to fill this gap. The non-LEA symposium participants (Carol H. Weiss and Bruce Thompson) were asked to pose questions to the LEA participants (Steven Frankel, Montgomery County (MD) Public Schools; Freda…

  7. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino

  8. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20234423

  9. Flavour dependent gauged radiative neutrino mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwon; Okada, Hiroshi; Yagyu, Kei

    2015-04-01

    We propose a one-loop induced radiative neutrino mass model with anomaly free flavour dependent gauge symmetry: μ minus τ symmetry U(1) μ- τ . A neutrino mass matrix satisfying current experimental data can be obtained by introducing a weak isospin singlet scalar boson that breaks U(1) μ- τ symmetry, an inert doublet scalar field, and three right-handed neutrinos in addition to the fields in the standard model. We find that a characteristic structure appears in the neutrino mass matrix: two-zero texture form which predicts three non-zero neutrino masses and three non-zero CP-phases from five well measured experimental inputs of two squared mass differences and three mixing angles. Furthermore, it is clarified that only the inverted mass hierarchy is allowed in our model. In a favored parameter set from the neutrino sector, the discrepancy in the muon anomalous magnetic moment between the experimental data and the the standard model prediction can be explained by the additional neutral gauge boson loop contribution with mass of order 100 MeV and new gauge coupling of order 10-3.

  10. Flavour physics in the soft wall model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Paul R.; Huber, Stephan J.; Jäger, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    We extend the description of flavour that exists in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model to the soft wall (SW) model in which the IR brane is removed and the Higgs is free to propagate in the bulk. It is demonstrated that, like the RS model, one can generate the hierarchy of fermion masses by localising the fermions at different locations throughout the space. However, there are two significant differences. Firstly the possible fermion masses scale down, from the electroweak scale, less steeply than in the RS model and secondly there now exists a minimum fermion mass for fermions sitting towards the UV brane. With a quadratic Higgs VEV, this minimum mass is about fifteen orders of magnitude lower than the electroweak scale. We derive the gauge propagator and despite the KK masses scaling as m_n^2 ˜ n , it is demonstrated that the coefficients of four fermion operators are not divergent at tree level. FCNC's amongst kaons and leptons are considered and compared to calculations in the RS model, with a brane localised Higgs and equivalent levels of tuning. It is found that since the gauge fermion couplings are slightly more universal and the SM fermions typically sit slightly further towards the UV brane, the contributions to observables such as ɛ K and Δ m K , from the exchange of KK gauge fields, are significantly reduced.

  11. Relic neutrino decoupling with flavour oscillations revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Salas, Pablo F.; Pastor, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    We study the decoupling process of neutrinos in the early universe in the presence of three-flavour oscillations. The evolution of the neutrino spectra is found by solving the corresponding momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino density matrix, including for the first time the proper collision integrals for both diagonal and off-diagonal elements. This improved calculation modifies the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the neutrino density matrix and changes the deviation from equilibrium of the frozen neutrino spectra. However, it does not vary the contribution of neutrinos to the cosmological energy density in the form of radiation, usually expressed in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, Neff. We find a value of Neff = 3.045, in agreement with previous theoretical calculations and consistent with the latest analysis of Planck data. This result does not depend on the ordering of neutrino masses. We also consider the effect of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions (NSI), predicted in many theoretical models where neutrinos acquire mass. For two sets of NSI parameters allowed by present data, we find that Neff can be reduced down to 3.040 or enhanced up to 3.059.

  12. PREFACE: XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof

    2011-10-01

    In the present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the 'XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics', which was held from 4-7 January 2011 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings consist of 19 contributions that were presented as invited talks at the meeting. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. From the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium has been organized every year without interruption, which makes the present Symposium the 34th in a row. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks and 17 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear physics, ranging from the traditional fields of nuclear structure (Draayer, Pittel, Van Isacker, Fraser, Lerma, Cejnar, Hirsch, Stránský and Rath) and nuclear reactions (Aguilera, Gómez-Camacho, Scheid, Navrátil and Yennello) to radioactive beams (Padilla-Rodal and Galindo-Uribarri), nuclear astrophysics (Aprahamian, Civitarese and Escher), hadronic physics (Bijker, Valcarce and Hess), fundamental symmetries (Liu, Barrón-Palos and Baessler) and LHC physics (Menchaca-Rocha and Paic). The high quality of the talks, the prestige of the speakers and the broad spectrum of subjects covered in the meeting, shows that nuclear physics is a very active area at the frontier of scientific research which establishes bridges between many different disciplines. Libertad Barr

  13. Inclusion complexation of flavour compounds by dispersed high-amylose maize starch (HAMS) in an aqueous model system.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Lihe; Thompson, Donald B; Peterson, Devin G

    2016-05-15

    This study investigated how hydrophobicity, solubility and the concentration of flavour compounds related to inclusion complexation by dispersed native high amylose maize starch (HAMS). The effect of native lipid on flavour retention and the effect of time (one day to one month) on flavour retention and precipitated starch yield was also examined. Flavour-starch complexation was dependent on the flavour compound hydrophobicity, the flavour concentration in a dose-dependent manner and also influenced by time (increased during storage). Flavour composition also influenced starch complexation; no flavour complexes were reported with limonene by itself but were observed when added in binary flavour mixtures with menthone or thymol. Furthermore, no difference in flavour retention was observed for native and lipid-free starch dispersions. In summary, flavour inclusion complexes with HAMS exhibited cooperativity-type binding behaviour; with a critical ligand concentration needed for a stable physical association between flavour compounds and HAMS. PMID:26775987

  14. WE-A-16A-01: International Medical Physics Symposium: Increasing Access to Medical Physics Education/Training and Research Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Bortfeld, T; Ngoma, T; Odedina, F; Morgan, S; Wu, R; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2014-06-15

    In response to a world in which cancer is a growing global health challenge, there is now a greater need for US Medical Physicists and other Radiation Oncology professionals across institutions to work together and be more globally engaged in the fight against cancer. There are currently many opportunities for Medical Physicists to contribute to alleviating this pressing need, especially in helping enhance access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence across international boundaries, particularly for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), which suffer from a drastic shortage of accessible knowledge and quality training programs in radiotherapy. Many Medical Physicists are not aware of the range of opportunities that even with small effort could have a high impact. Faculty at the two CAMPEP-accredited Medical Physics Programs in New England: the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Harvard Medical School have developed a growing alliance to increase Access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence (AMPERE), and facilitate greater active involvement of U.S. Medical Physicists in helping the global fight against cancer and cancer disparities. In this symposium, AMPERE Alliance members and partners from Europe and Africa will present and discuss the growing global cancer challenge, the dearth of knowledge, research, and other barriers to providing life-saving radiotherapy in LMIC, mechanisms for meeting these challenges, the different opportunities for participation by Medical Physicists, including students and residents, and how participation can be facilitated to increase AMPERE for global health. Learning Objectives: To learn about the growing global cancer challenge, areas of greatest need and limitations to accessing knowledge and quality radiotherapy training programs, especially in LMIC; To learn about the range of opportunities for Medical Physicists, including students and residents, to work together in global

  15. High Precision in AN Imprecise World: the Importance of the Molecular Spectroscopy Symposium to the Army

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skatrud, David

    2010-06-01

    The Army Research Office has been a consistent supporter of the OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy for nearly 30 years. During this time, the Symposium has been of great value to the Army through a number of mechanisms. Not only have numerous specific research projects reported at the Symposium had major impacts on critical Army technologies; but in addition, an understanding of how to perform high-resolution spectroscopy research provides unique education and training on how to meaningfully model and explain many disparate complex phenomena. I will present historical examples, and also highlight related current Army research needs and thrusts.

  16. Frontiers in nuclear medicine symposium: Nuclear medicine & molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This document contains the abstracts from the American College of Nuclear Physicians 1993 Fall Meeting entitled, `Frontiers in Nuclear Medicine Symposium: Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology`. This meeting was sponsored by the US DOE, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The program chairman was Richard C. Reba, M.D.

  17. The 17th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the Seventeenth Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. Session titles include Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing; Applied Biological Research; Bioprocessing Research; Special Topics Discussion Groups; Process Economics and Commercialization; and Environmental Biotechnology.

  18. Career Development Issues. Symposium 33. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on career development issues consists of three presentations. "Career Development: What Is Its Role in Human Resource Development (HRD)?" (Mary Allyn Boudreaux) explores the role of career development theory and research in the field of HRD. Definitions of HRD are provided, and the status of career theory and research and its…

  19. Eighth Symposium on Biologic Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Dearth, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    The Eighth Symposium on Biologic Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine was held from 24 to 26 April 2014 at the Silverado Resort in Napa, CA, USA. The symposium was well attended by a diverse audience of academic scientists, industry members and physicians from around the world. The conference showcased the strong foundation of both basic and translational research utilizing biologic scaffolds in regenerative medicine applications across nearly all tissue systems and facilitated vibrant discussions among participants. This article provides an overview of the conference by providing a brief synopsis of selected presentations, each focused on a unique research and/or clinical investigation currently underway. PMID:25372075

  20. Frank N. Bash Symposium 2011: New Horizons in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salviander, S.; Green, J.; Pawlik, A.

    The University of Texas at Austin Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory will be hosting the fourth biennial Frank N. Bash Symposium on the topic of New Horizons in Astronomy, October 9-11, 2011. This meeting will bring together young researchers at the cutting edge of astronomy and astrophysics, to promote the exchange of research ideas and visions for the future of astronomy. The symposium will focus on invited review talks, and will include discussions and contributed poster papers from postdocs and graduate student

  1. Frank N. Bash Symposium 2013: New Horizons in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Meschiari, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    The University of Texas at Austin Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory hosted the fifth biennial Frank N. Bash Symposium on the topic of New Horizons in Astronomy, October 6-8, 2013, in the Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302 [map] on The University of Texas at Austin campus. This meeting brought together young researchers at the cutting edge of astronomy and astrophysics, to promote the exchange of research ideas and visions for the future of astronomy. The symposium focused on invited review talks, and included discussions and contributed poster papers from postdocs and students.

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2003 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, HELD AT THE 2003 NEW ENGLAND FUEL INSTITUTE CONVENTION AND 30TH NORTH AMERICAN HEATING AND ENERGY EXPOSITION, HYNES CONVENTION CENTER, PRUDENTIAL CENTER, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, JUNE 9 - 10, 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2003-06-09

    This meeting is the sixteenth oilheat industry technology meeting held since 1984 and the third since the National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA) was formed. This year's symposium is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Fuel Flexibility Program under the United States Department of Energy, Distributed Energy and Electricity Reliability Program (DEER). The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  3. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20203792

  4. PREFACE: XXXVIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics (Cocoyoc 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.

    2015-09-01

    The 38th edition of the Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 6-9, 2015. As in previous years, the Symposium brought together leading scientists from all around the world, working on: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee that covered, in a balanced way, the experimental and theoretical work that currently is undergoing in the research fields of the Symposium. Ten posters complemented the program, providing students with an opportunity to bring their work to the attention of visiting scientists. This year, the conference activities also included a special talk presented by Archaeologist Omar Espinosa Severino about the ancient ruins found in Chalcatzingo, a village located approximately a 40 minute drive from the conference venue. The talk was followed by a visit to the archaeological site, guided by the group led by Archaeologist Mario Cordova Tello. The present volume contains 14 research articles based on invited talks presented at the Symposium. I would like to thank all the authors for their enthusiastic contribution. Special thanks to the anonymous referees for the time devoted to the review process, their input helped to maintain a high standard of the Conference Proceedings. Finally I would also like to thank the Symposiums' International Advisory Committee and the Sponsoring Organizations that made this event possible.

  5. From autoantibody research to standardized diagnostic assays in the management of human diseases - report of the 12th Dresden Symposium on Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Conrad, K; Andrade, L E C; Chan, E K L; Mahler, M; Meroni, P L; Pruijn, G J M; Steiner, G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2016-07-01

    Testing for autoantibodies (AABs) is becoming more and more relevant, not only for diagnosing autoimmune diseases (AIDs) but also for the differentiation of defined AID subtypes with different clinical manifestations, course and prognosis as well as the very early diagnosis for adequate management in the context of personalized medicine. A major challenge to improve diagnostic accuracy is to harmonize or even standardize AAB analyses. This review presents the results of the 12th Dresden Symposium on Autoantibodies that focused on several aspects of improving autoimmune diagnostics. Topics that are addressed include the International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) and the International Autoantibody Standardization (IAS) initiatives, the optimization of diagnostic algorithms, the description and evaluation of novel disease-specific AABs as well as the development and introduction of novel assays into routine diagnostics. This review also highlights important developments of recent years, most notably the improvement in diagnosing and predicting the course of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, and of autoimmune neurological, gastrointestinal and liver diseases; the potential diagnostic role of anti-DFS70 antibodies and tumor-associated AABs. Furthermore, some hot topics in autoimmunity regarding disease pathogenesis and management are described. PMID:27252254

  6. True Neutrality as a New Type of Flavour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-06-01

    A classification of leptonic currents with respect to C-operation requires the separation of elementary particles into the two classes of vector C-even and axial-vector C-odd character. Their nature has been created so that to each type of lepton corresponds a kind of neutrino. Such pairs are united in families of a different C-parity. Unlike the neutrino of a vector type, any C-noninvariant Dirac neutrino must have his Majorana neutrino. They constitute the purely neutrino families. We discuss the nature of a corresponding mechanism responsible for the availability in all types of axial-vector particles of a kind of flavour which distinguishes each of them from others by a true charge characterized by a quantum number conserved at the interactions between the C-odd fermion and the field of emission of the corresponding types of gauge bosons. This regularity expresses the unidenticality of truly neutral neutrino and antineutrino, confirming that an internal symmetry of a C-noninvariant particle is described by an axial-vector space. Thereby, a true flavour together with the earlier known lepton flavour predicts the existence of leptonic strings and their birth in single and double beta decays as a unity of flavour and gauge symmetry laws. Such a unified principle explains the availability of a flavour symmetrical mode of neutrino oscillations.

  7. Chiral order and fluctuations in multi-flavour QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes-Genon, S.; Girlanda, L.; Stern, J.

    2003-03-01

    Multi-flavour (N_f ge 3) chiral perturbation theory (χPT) may exhibit instabilities due to vacuum fluctuations of sea bar q q pairs. Keeping the fluctuations small would require a very precise fine tuning of the low-energy constants L_4(μ) and L_6(μ) to L_4^{crit}(M_ρ) = - 0.51 \\cdot 10^{-3}, L_6^{crit}(M_ρ) = - 0.26 \\cdot 10^{-3}. A small deviation from these critical values - like the one suggested by the phenomenology of OZI-rule violation in the scalar channel - is amplified by huge numerical factors inducing large effects of vacuum fluctuations. This would lead in particular to a strong Nf dependence of chiral symmetry breaking (χSB) and a suppression of the multi-flavour chiral order parameters. A simple resummation is shown to cure the instability of N_fge 3 χPT, but it modifies the standard expressions of some O( p 2 ) and O( p 4 ) low-energy parameters in terms of observables. On the other hand, for r= m s / m & gt; 15, the two-flavour condensate is not suppressed, due to the contribution induced by massive vacuum bar ss pairs. Thanks to the latter, the standard two-flavour χPT is protected from multi-flavour instabilities and could provide a well-defined expansion scheme in powers of non-strange quark masses.

  8. Identification of loci affecting flavour volatile emissions in tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Tieman, Denise M; Zeigler, Michelle; Schmelz, Eric A; Taylor, Mark G; Bliss, Peter; Kirst, Matias; Klee, Harry J

    2006-01-01

    Fresh tomato fruit flavour is the sum of the interaction between sugars, acids, and a set of approximately 30 volatile compounds synthesized from a diverse set of precursors, including amino acids, lipids, and carotenoids. Some of these volatiles impart desirable qualities while others are negatively perceived. As a first step to identify the genes responsible for the synthesis of flavour-related chemicals, an attempt was made to identify loci that influence the chemical composition of ripe fruits. A genetically diverse but well-defined Solanum pennellii IL population was used. Because S. pennellii is a small green-fruited species, this population exhibits great biochemical diversity and is a rich source of genes affecting both fruit development and chemical composition. This population was used to identify multiple loci affecting the composition of chemicals related to flavour. Twenty-five loci were identified that are significantly altered in one or more of 23 different volatiles and four were altered in citric acid content. It was further shown that emissions of carotenoid-derived volatiles were directly correlated with the fruit carotenoid content. Linked molecular markers should be useful for breeding programmes aimed at improving fruit flavour. In the longer term, the genes responsible for controlling the levels of these chemicals will be important tools for understanding the complex interactions that ultimately integrate to provide the unique flavour of a tomato. PMID:16473892

  9. Signatures of top flavour-changing dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, Jorgen; Mariotti, Alberto; Mawatari, Kentarou; Moortgat, Seth; Tziveloglou, Pantelis; Van Onsem, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    We develop the phenomenology of scenarios in which a dark matter candidate interacts with a top quark through flavour-changing couplings, employing a simplified dark matter model with an s-channel vector-like mediator. We study in detail the top-charm flavour-changing interaction, by investigating the single top plus large missing energy signature at the LHC as well as constraints from the relic density and direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. We present strategies to distinguish between the top-charm and top-up flavour-changing models by taking advantage of the lepton charge asymmetry as well as by using charm-tagging techniques on an extra jet. We also show the complementarity between the LHC and canonical dark matter experiments in exploring the viable parameter space of the models.

  10. Impact of sterile neutrinos in lepton flavour violating processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Romeri, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    We discuss charged lepton flavour violating processes occurring in minimal extensions of the Standard Model via the addition of sterile fermions. We firstly investigate the possibility of their indirect detection at a future high-luminosity Z-factory (such as FCC-ee). Rare decays such as Z → l 1 ± l 2 ± can indeed be complementary to low-energy (high-intensity) observables of lepton flavour violation. We further consider a sterile neutrino-induced charged lepton flavour violating process occurring in the presence of muonic atoms: their (Coulomb enhanced) decay into a pair of electrons μ¯e¯ → e¯e¯. Our study reveals that, depending on their mass range and on the active-sterile mixing angles, sterile neutrinos can give significant contributions to the above mentioned observables, some of them even lying within present and future sensitivity of dedicated cLFV experiments and of FCC-ee.

  11. Local Hamiltonian Monte Carlo study of the massive schwinger model, the decoupling of heavy flavours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranft, J.

    1983-12-01

    The massive Schwinger model with two flavours is studied using the local hamiltonian lattice Monte Carlo method. Chiral symmetry breaking is studied using the fermion condensate as order parameter. For a small ratio of the two fermion masses, degeneracy of the two flavours is found. For a large ratio of the masses, the heavy flavour decouples and the light fermion behaves like in the one flavour Schwinger model. On leave from Sektion Physik, Karl-Marx-Universität, Leipzig, GDR.

  12. Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, N.; Fulton, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    This final report summarizes activities conducted for the National Academy of Sciences' Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science with support from the US Department of Energy for the period July 1, 1993 through May 31, 1998. During the report period, five Frontiers of Science symposia were held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. For each Symposium, an organizing committee appointed by the NAS President selected and planned the eight sessions for the Symposium and identified general participants for invitation by the NAS President. These Symposia accomplished their goal of bringing together outstanding younger (age 45 or less) scientists to hear presentations in disciplines outside their own and to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields in a format that encourages, and allows adequate time for, informal one-on-one discussions among participants. Of the 458 younger scientists who participated, over a quarter (124) were women. Participant lists for all symposia (1993--1997) are attached. The scientific participants were leaders in basic research from academic, industrial, and federal laboratories in such disciplines as astronomy, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, engineering, genetics, material sciences, mathematics, microbiology, neuroscience, physics, and physiology. For each symposia, the 24 speakers and discussants on the program were urged to focus their presentations on current cutting-edge research in their field for a scientifically sophisticated but non-specialist audience, and to provide a sense of the experimental data--what is actually measured and seen in the various fields. They were also asked to address questions such as: What are the major research problems and unique tools in their field? What are the current limitations on advances as well as the frontiers? Speakers were asked to provide a 2500- to

  13. Reaching the hip-hop generation: Final (symposium proceedings) report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The goal of this final (closing) report is to capture the flavor of the symposium held March 1 and 2, 1993 in New York City convened by Motivational Educational Entertainment, Inc. (MEE), a black-owned communications research, consulting, and video production company based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The mission of MEE is to understand, reach, and positively affect inner-city youth. Traditional communication approaches from mainstream sources to at-risk youth often don`t account for the unique way youth communicate among themselves and how they relate to the media. This understanding, however, is crucial. To understand youth communication, the people who create and send both entertaining and educational messages to urban youth must be brought into the dialogue. The meeting in New York was intended to provide an important opportunity for senders to meet and evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of their messages. In addition, the MEE symposium provided a forum for the continuing public debate about what needs to be done to reach today`s urban teens. Included in this document is a description of symposium goals/objectives, symposium activities, the reaction to and analysis of the symposium, recommendations for future MEE courses of action, and an appendix containing copies of press articles.

  14. Proceedings of the Second Shanthi V. Sitaraman Intestinal Pathobiology Symposium.

    PubMed

    Etienne-Mesmin, Lucie; Wang, Tanyu; Viennois, Emilie; Chassaing, Benoit; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Merlin, Didier

    2015-08-01

    On March 18 and 19, 2015, the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University hosted the Second Shanthi V. Sitaraman Intestinal Pathobiology Symposium in memory of Dr. Shanthi V. Sitaraman, an outstanding clinician and scientist in gastroenterology. The recent advances in basic and translational science related to gastroenterology, which makes the timely exchange of ideas critical; the need to recruit mentor and young MD, MD/PhD, and PhD scientists in the field; and the overwhelming success of the First Shanthi V. Sitaraman Intestinal Pathobiology Symposium (2012) in achieving similar goals motivated the project of a second edition of this symposium. Its overall aim was to provide scientific programming at the forefront of research in fields related to the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease. The symposium brought together investigators interested in basic and clinical aspects of gastrointestinal pathobiology in a venue that facilitated meaningful exchanges. This proceeding outlines the 2 days of the symposium and provides insights into recent advances in the field of digestive diseases, as reflected in the speakers' presentations. PMID:26389819

  15. 2nd PEGS Annual Symposium on Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mitchell; Royston, Ivor; Beck, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The 2nd Annual Antibodies for Cancer Therapy symposium, organized again by Cambridge Healthtech Institute as part of the Protein Engineering Summit, was held in Boston, USA from April 30th to May 1st, 2012. Since the approval of the first cancer antibody therapeutic, rituximab, fifteen years ago, eleven have been approved for cancer therapy, although one, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, was withdrawn from the market.  The first day of the symposium started with a historical review of early work for lymphomas and leukemias and the evolution from murine to human antibodies. The symposium discussed the current status and future perspectives of therapeutic antibodies in the biology of immunoglobulin, emerging research on biosimilars and biobetters, and engineering bispecific antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates. The tumor penetration session was focused on the understanding of antibody therapy using ex vivo tumor spheroids and the development of novel agents targeting epithelial junctions in solid tumors. The second day of the symposium discussed the development of new generation recombinant immunotoxins with low immunogenicity, construction of chimeric antigen receptors, and the proof-of-concept of ‘photoimmunotherapy’. The preclinical and clinical session presented antibodies targeting Notch signaling and chemokine receptors.  Finally, the symposium discussed emerging technologies and platforms for therapeutic antibody discovery. PMID:22864478

  16. PREFACE: 2nd International Symposium "Optics and its Applications"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Maria L.; Dolganova, Irina N.; Gevorgyan, Narine; Guzman, Angela; Papoyan, Aram; Sarkisyan, Hayk; Yurchenko, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    The ICTP smr2633: 2nd International Symposium "Optics and its Applications" (OPTICS-2014) http://indico.ictp.it/event/a13253/ was held in Yerevan and Ashtarak, Armenia, on 1-5 September 2014. The Symposium was organized by the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) with the collaboration of the SPIE Armenian Student Chapter, the Armenian TC of ICO, the Russian-Armenian University (RAU), the Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia (IPR of NAS), the Greek-Armenian industrial company LT-Pyrkal, and the Yerevan State University (YSU). The Symposium was co-organized by the BMSTU SPIE & OSA student chapters. The International Symposium OPTICS-2014 was dedicated to the 50th anniversary of the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics. This symposium "Optics and its Applications" was the First Official ICTP Scientific Event in Armenia. The presentations at OPTICS-2014 were centered on these topics: optical properties of nanostructures; quantum optics & information; singular optics and its applications; laser spectroscopy; strong field optics; nonlinear & ultrafast optics; photonics & fiber optics; optics of liquid crystals; and mathematical methods in optics.

  17. Crossmodal integration between visual linguistic information and flavour perception.

    PubMed

    Razumiejczyk, Eugenia; Macbeth, Guillermo; Marmolejo-Ramos, Fernando; Noguchi, Kimihiro

    2015-08-01

    Many studies have found processing interference in working memory when complex information that enters the cognitive system from different modalities has to be integrated to understand the environment and promote adjustment. Here, we report on a Stroop study that provides evidence concerned with the crossmodal processing of flavour perception and visual language. We found a facilitation effect in the congruency condition. Acceleration was observed for incomplete words and anagrams compared to complete words. A crossmodal completion account is presented for such findings. It is concluded that the crossmodal integration between flavour and visual language perception requires the active participation of top-down and bottom-up processing. PMID:25843936

  18. WATERBORNE TRANSMISSION OF GIARDIASIS: PROCEEDINGS OF A SYMPOSIUM HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON SEPTEMBER 18-20, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health Effects Research Laboratory and the Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a National Symposium on Waterborne Transmission of Giardiasis in Cincinnati on September 18-20, 1978. The symposium brought together sc...

  19. The Junior Science & Humanities Symposium: Management and Operations, 2003-2004. Theme--Atmosphere--The Other Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This document reviews the Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (PJSHS) program for 2003-2004 which is a 10-month, precollege student research program held in Japan. The theme is AtmosphereThe Other Ocean. The program includes a one-week symposium of student delegates who have completed research projects in the sciences or have…

  20. 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, on May 7-9, 1986, is documented herein. During the 3 days, 23 technical papers were presented by experts from the United States and Western Europe. A panel discussion by an International group of experts on future directions In mechanisms was also presented; this discussion, however, is not documented herein. The technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, thermal/mechanical/hydraulic actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and computerized mechanisms synthesis.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Symposium on Aeropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the considerable advances that have been made in computational fluid dynamics, the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored this symposium with the objective of providing a forum for exchanging information regarding recent developments in numerical methods, physical and chemical modeling, and applications. This conference publication is a compilation of 4 invited and 34 contributed papers presented in six sessions: algorithms one and two, turbomachinery, turbulence, components application, and combustors. Topics include numerical methods, grid generation, chemically reacting flows, turbulence modeling, inlets, nozzles, and unsteady flows.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics symposium on aeropropulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the considerable advances that have been made in computational fluid dynamics, the Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored this symposium with the objective of providing a forum for exchanging information regarding recent developments in numerical methods, physical and chemical modeling, and applications. This conference publication is a compilation of 4 invited and 34 contributed papers presented in six sessions: algorithms one and two, turbomachinery, turbulence, components application, and combustors. Topics include numerical methods, grid generation, chemically reacting flows, turbulence modeling, inlets, nozzles, and unsteady flows.

  3. Scientific Respiratory Symposium, Paris June 2010

    PubMed Central

    Dalglish, Gavin; Priestley, Graham

    2011-01-01

    At a 2010 Respiratory Symposium in Paris, chaired by Professors Bousquet and Roche of the University of Paris, recent trends in research, therapy and treatment guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were reviewed and discussed by a faculty of expert European and US respiratory physicians. This article reviews five key clinical presentations with particular emphasis given to the importance of small airways in the pathology and treatment of asthma and COPD. Further analysis of the economics of treatment in Europe and the US shows a wide variance in direct and indirect costs. PMID:21792320

  4. Niobium - Proceedings of the international symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on niobium. Topics considered at the symposium included niobium mining, ore processing, uses, fabrication, microstructure, mechanical properties, physical properties, corrosion, physical radiation effects, and marketing.

  5. The 1986 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1986 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium will provide a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that will be flown in the future.

  6. Third International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics with a Special Theme on Urban Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Don

    2002-01-01

    This is to report on the use of the funds provided by NASA to support the 'Third International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics with a Special Theme on Urban Fluid Dynamics'. The Symposium was held on the campus of Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA, from 5-8 December 2001. It proved to be a forum for the discussion of a wide range of applied and basic research being conducted in the general areas of water and air resources, with the latter focusing on air quality in urban areas associated with complex terrain. This aspect of the Symposium was highlighted by twelve invited papers given by distinguished international scientists and roughly three hundred contributed manuscripts. Owing primarily to the current international situation, roughly 20% of the authors canceled their plans to attend the Symposium; while this was unfortunate, the Symposium went ahead with the enthusiastic participation of more than 250 scientists from forty nations.

  7. Skin Regeneration Symposium Cambridge, 12-13 April 2016.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rosalind

    2016-07-01

    The Annual Skin Regeneration Symposium, held in Cambridge, UK, 12-13 April 2016, explored the latest advancements in skin repair, regeneration and restoration, and the impact this has on patients. With over 140 delegates from the disciplines of burn and trauma care, chronic wounds and esthetic medicine, the symposium sparked lively debate and the sharing of results from interesting case studies, clinical trials and basic research to support the use of a Regenerative Epithelial Suspension produced using the ReCell(®) technology. Furthermore, it enabled delegates and speakers alike to share ideas and discuss how to improve the quality of care for patients. PMID:27357476

  8. Fourth International Symposium on Long-Range Sound Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Long range sound propagation is an aspect of many acoustical problems ranging from en route aircraft noise to the acoustic detection of aircraft. Over the past decade, the University of Mississippi and the Open University of England, together with a third institution, have held a symposium approx. every 2 years so that experts in the field of long range propagation could exchange information on current research, identify areas needing additional work, and coordinate activities as much as possible. The Fourth International Symposium on Long Range Sound Propagation was jointly sponsored by the University of Mississippi, the Open University of England, and NASA. Papers were given in the following areas: ground effects on propagation; infrasound propagation; and meteorological effects on sound propagation. A compilation of the presentations made at the symposium is presented along with a list of attendees, and the agenda.

  9. Evaluation of non-volatile metabolites in beer stored at high temperature and utility as an accelerated method to predict flavour stability.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Sedin, Dana; Holbrook, Christian; Barr, Lindsay; Kirkpatrick, Kaylyn; Prenni, Jessica E

    2016-06-01

    Flavour stability is vital to the brewing industry as beer is often stored for an extended time under variable conditions. Developing an accelerated model to evaluate brewing techniques that affect flavour stability is an important area of research. Here, we performed metabolomics on non-volatile compounds in beer stored at 37 °C between 1 and 14 days for two beer types: an amber ale and an India pale ale. The experiment determined high temperature to influence non-volatile metabolites, including the purine 5-methylthioadenosine (5-MTA). In a second experiment, three brewing techniques were evaluated for improved flavour stability: use of antioxidant crowns, chelation of pro-oxidants, and varying plant content in hops. Sensory analysis determined the hop method was associated with improved flavour stability, and this was consistent with reduced 5-MTA at both regular and high temperature storage. Future studies are warranted to understand the influence of 5-MTA on flavour and aging within different beer types. PMID:26830592

  10. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20212622

  11. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  12. Summary of Sloan symposium: healthy buildings 2015-Europe.

    PubMed

    Levin, Hal; Täubel, Martin; Hernandez, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Symposium, "Microbiology of the Indoor Environment," was held to facilitate dialog on biological research between scientists and practitioners in the field which was complementary to the adjoining activities of the ISIAQ Healthy Buildings Europe conference, Eindhoven, Netherlands, on 20-21 May 2015. Multi-media archives of these special adjunct proceedings are presented. PMID:26627048

  13. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx (nitrous oxides) Control, held March 25-28, 1991, in Washington, DC. pproximately 500 attended, representing 53 domestic and 13 foreign utility companies, federal and state government agencies, research and deve...

  14. Growth and development symposium: Fetal programming in animal agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fetal programming is the ability to improve animal production and well-being by altering the maternal environment and holds enormous challenges and great opportunities for researchers and the animal industry. A symposium was held to provide an overview of current knowledge of fetal programming in re...

  15. Proceedings of the Ninth International Vaccinium Symposium Vol. 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ISHS 9th International Vaccinium Symposium had 51 oral and 86 poster presentations. Scientists from 35 countries participated in the meeting. From these 120 manuscripts were published in this book. This book contains the state of blueberry research and breeding from a global view. Volume 1 conta...

  16. Proceedings of the Ninth International Vaccinium Symposium Vol.2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ISHS 9th International Vaccinium Symposium had 51 oral and 86 poster presentations. Scientists from 35 countries participated in the meeting. From these 120 manuscripts were published in this book. This book contains the state of blueberry research and breeding from a global view. Volume 2 conta...

  17. NUC Symposium on Environmental Preservation, 20-21 May 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Undersea Center, San Diego, CA.

    This publication consists of papers presented at an in-house symposium held at the Naval Undersea Research and Development (R and D) Center, San Diego, in May 1970. The topics discussed in these presentations are as follows: principles of evolution and the ecological crisis; alternatives to overpopulation; examples of San Diego noise climate;…

  18. Biotechnology Symposium - In Memoriam, the Late Dr. Allan Zipf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one-day biotechnology symposium was held at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), Normal, AL on June 4, 2004 in memory of the late Dr. Allan Zipf (Sept 1953-Jan 2004). Dr. Zipf was a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, AAMU, who collaborated extensively with ARS/MS...

  19. Symposium Promotes Technological Literacy through STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havice, Bill; Marshall, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a symposium which promotes technological literacy through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The three-day symposium titled, "The Anderson, Oconee, Pickens Symposium on Teaching and Learning STEM Standards for the 21st Century," was held August 4-6, 2008 at the Tri-County Technical College (TCTC)…

  20. The Schoolwide Symposium: A Model for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottingham, Walt

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the first schoolwide symposium at Hendersonville High School (North Carolina) in which, for one week, students and faculty were immersed in the culture and history of the Vietnam War era. Explains that because this first symposium was so successful in gaining student enthusiasm, the school organized three more symposiums. (CMK)

  1. Keynote Symposium. Tomorrow’s Poultry: Genomics, Physiology, and Well-Being. Keynote Symposium welcome and introduction.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this symposium is to provide members and guests of the Poultry Science Association (PSA) with an opportunity to interact with industry and research leaders who are pursuing the use of functional genomic tools, basic physiology of the stress response, and traditional behavioral methodo...

  2. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Introduction to symposium: Arthropods and wildlife conservation: synergy in complex biological systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The symposium will discuss the effects of arthropods and other stressors on wildlife conservation programs. Speakers with affiliations in wildlife biology, parasitology and entomology will be included in the program. Research of national and international interest will be presented....

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF A SYMPOSIUM ON COOLING WATER INTAKE TECHNOLOGIES TO PROTECT AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Symposium brought together professionals from federal, state, and tribal regulatory agencies; industry; environmental organizations; engineering consulting firms; science and research organizations; academia; and other organizations concerned with mitigating harm to the aqua...

  5. The role of flavon cross couplings in leptonic flavour mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoli, Silvia; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2016-06-01

    In models with discrete flavour symmetries, flavons are critical to realise specific flavour structures. Leptonic flavour mixing originates from the misalignment of flavon vacuum expectation values which respect different residual symmetries in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors. Flavon cross couplings are usually forbidden, in order to protect these symmetries. Contrary to this approach, we show that cross couplings can play a key role and give raise to necessary corrections to flavour-mixing patterns, including a non-zero value for the reactor angle and CP violation. For definiteness, we present two models based on A 4. In the first model, all flavons are assumed to be real or pseudo-real, with 7 real degrees of freedom in the flavon sector in total. A sizable reactor angle associated with nearly maximal CP violation is achieved, and, as both originate from the same cross coupling, a sum rule results with a precise prediction for the value of the Dirac CP-violating phase. In the second model, the flavons are taken to be complex scalars, which can be connected with supersymmetric models and multi-Higgs models. The complexity properties of flavons provide new sources for generating the reactor angle. Models in this new approach introduce very few degrees of freedom beyond the Standard Model and can be more economical than those in the framework of extra dimension or supersymmetry.

  6. Chromomagnetism, flavour symmetry breaking and S-wave tetraquarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Høgaasen, H.; Richard, J.-M.; Sorba, P.

    2007-02-01

    The chromomagnetic interaction, with full account for flavour-symmetry breaking, is applied to S-wave configurations containing two quarks and two antiquarks. Phenomenological implications are discussed for light, charmed, charmed and strange, hidden-charm and double-charm mesons, and extended to their analogues with beauty.

  7. RESEARCH PROSPECTIVES FOR DOLPHIN MORTALITIES IN NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Second Gulf Breeze Symposium sponsored by EPA's Center for Marine and Estuarine Disease Research focused on scientific research related to dolphin mortalities. uring the symposium, four groups were formed to discuss and evaluate current scientific information, research strate...

  8. LHC Symposium 2003: Summary Talk

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2003-08-12

    This summary talk reviews the LHC 2003 Symposium, focusing on expectations as we prepare to leap over the current energy frontier into new territory. We may learn from what happened in the two most recent examples of leaping into new energy territory. Quite different scenarios appeared in those two cases. In addition, they review the status of the machine and experiments as reported at the Symposium. Finally, I suggest an attitude which may be most appropriate as they look forward to the opportunities anticipated for the first data from the LHC.

  9. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  10. Symposium on Plant Polyphenols: Nutrition, Health and Innovations, June 2009.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ann S; Yeong, Boon-Yee; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2010-04-01

    Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the Symposium on Plant Polyphenols: Nutrition, Health and Innovations, which was cosponsored by the Southeast Asia Region branch of the International Life Sciences Institute and the Nutrition Society of Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, June 22-23, 2009. The symposium provided a timely update of research regarding the protective effects of polyphenols in chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as the development of innovative polyphenol-containing food products with enhanced nutritive and health properties. Presentations covered polyphenols from a wide range of food sources such as tea, coffee, nuts and seeds, cocoa and chocolate, soy, and Asian fruits, vegetables, and spices. The symposium was attended by a large and diverse group of nutritionists, dietitians, researchers and allied health professionals, as well as management, research and development, and marketing personnel from the food and beverage industry. Their enthusiastic participation was a testament to the increasing awareness and interest in polyphenols in the prevention and control of chronic diseases. Presented here are some of the highlights and important information from the symposium. PMID:20416020

  11. February NICBR Symposium Highlights Careers in Science | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Poster Staff The first National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR) Exploring Careers in a Scientific Environment Symposium was held on Feb. 18 at the Advanced Technology Research Facility. The event drew more than 70 Frederick County public school teachers, who learned about the wide range of biomedical research being conducted by scientists in the NICBR agencies, as well as the variety of opportunities for students interested in pursuing careers in science and/or technology.

  12. The Third International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented that are relevant to the generation, detection, and use of the terahertz spectral region for space astronomy and remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The program included thirteen sessions covering a wide variety of topics including solid-state oscillators, power-combining techniques, mixers, harmonic multipliers, antennas and antenna arrays, submillimeter receivers, and measurement techniques.

  13. Kick-off symposium series to help New Ph.D.s is a success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernys, Michael; Roughan, Moninya

    The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) recently sponsored the first of what is expected to be many symposia to be held every couple of years to help new scientists begin their research careers. The inaugural dissertation symposium, Physical Oceanography Dissertation Symposium I (PODS I), provided a forum for new Ph.D.s and doctoral candidates soon to receive their degrees in physical oceanography or a related field, to discuss science and forge future professional relationships. The next symposium is expected to be in October 2003, in Hawaii, in concert with the Dissertation Symposium for Chemical Oceanographers (DISCO); information to be posted at http://spars.aibs.org/pods/. Applications from prospective participants were sought internationally, with the sponsoring agencies and coordinators advertising by e-mail, through personal communication with established researchers, and by informing degree-granting institutions in the related fields.

  14. PREFACE: 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shu; Sekino, Tohru; Tanaka, Shun-ichiro; Sato, Tsugio; Lu, Li; Xue, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    The 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011) was held in Sendai, Japan, on 2-6 August 2011. This Special Issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) consists of partial manuscripts which were presented at ISFM2011. Advanced materials have experienced a dramatic increase in demand for research, development and applications. The aim of the International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM) was to provide an overview of the present status with historical background and to foresee future trends in the field of functional materials. The 4th symposium, ISFM 2011, covered a wide variety of topics within state-of-the-art advanced materials science and technology, and focused especially on four major categories including: Environmental Materials, Electronic Materials, Energy Materials and Biomedical Materials. As you know, a massive earthquake and the Tsunami that followed occurred near the Tohoku region on 11 March 2011. After the earthquake, although there were many difficulties in continuing to organize the symposium, we received warm encouragement from many researchers and societies, especially from the members of the International Advisory Committee and Organizing Committee, so that ISFM2011 could be held on schedule. We are honored that ISFM2011 was the first formal international academic conference held in the Tohoku area of Japan after the 11 March earthquake. About 140 participants from 14 countries took part in the ISFM2011 symposium, which included five plenary talks by world-leading scientists, 32 invited talks, and many oral and poster presentations. We are delighted to see that many researchers are interested in the synthesis and the properties as well as the applications of functional materials. Many fruitful and exciting research achievements were presented in the symposium. We believe that this symposium provided a good chance for scientists to communicate and exchange opinions with each other. We would also like to

  15. Learning on the Job. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains two papers from a symposium on learning on the job. "Professional Crisis Workers: Impact of Repeated Exposure to Human Pain and Destructiveness" (Lynn Atkinson-Tovar) examines the following topics: (1) the secondary and vicarious traumatic stress disorder that affects many professional crisis workers who are repeatedly…

  16. Symposium on Dental Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W., Ed.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This document presents papers, critiques, and comments from a symposium which assessed the current status of preventive dental behavior. The field was divided into the following three major areas: (a) mass media programs, (b) school health programs, and (c) effect of the private practitioner. Each author was asked to review the literature, provide…

  17. Learning and Job Satisfaction. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on learning and job satisfaction. "The Relationship Between Workplace Learning and Job Satisfaction in United States Small to Mid-Sized Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden) reports findings that revealed sufficient evidence to conclude that learning is pervasive in the small to mid-sized businesses studied;…

  18. Learning at the Top. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on learning at the top that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Learning at the Top: An Investigation of Nonprofit CEOs' (Chief Executive Officers') Learning Experiences" (John J. Sherlock) reports on a study that used Mezirow's theory of adult learning as…

  19. Symposium: What Is College English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lynn Z.; White, Edward M.; Enoch, Jessica; Hawk, Byron

    2013-01-01

    This symposium explores the role(s) College English has (or has not) had in the scholarly work of four scholars. Lynn Bloom explores the many ways College English influenced her work and the work of others throughout their scholarly lives. Edward M. White examines four articles he has published in College English and draws connections between…

  20. Black Women in Film Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Describes a symposium sponsored in April of last year by the Afro-American and American Studies Departments at Boston University on "Black Image in Films, Stereotyping and Self-Perception"; participants included Susan Batson, Cynthia Belgrave, Ruby Dee, Beah Richards, and Cicely Tyson. (Author/JM)

  1. Technological Change and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on technological change and human resource development. "New Technologies, Cognitive Demands, and the Implications for Learning Theory" (Richard J. Torraco) identifies four specific characteristics of the tasks involved in using new technologies (contingent versus deterministic tasks, distancing…

  2. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were those of…

  3. 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerard (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a combined symposia of the Get Away Special (GAS), Space Experiment Module (SEM), and Hitchhiker programs, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  4. Foreign Language "Think Tank" Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kathleen H.

    At the Foreign Language"Think Tank" Symposium of April 1975, the following major problems of community college foreign language teachers were identified: (1) low enrollment; (2) attrition; (3) low achievers; (4) articulation with universities; and (5) lack of interest. Suggested solutions included: (Problem 1) advertisement, a foreign language…

  5. Copyright Law Symposium. No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, New York, NY.

    This book presents the five national prizewinning papers in the twenty-third copyright law symposium conducted by the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP). Titles of the papers are "The USSR Joins the Universal Copyright Convention" (first prize), "Copyright Misuse: Thirty Years Waiting for the Other Shoe" (second prize),…

  6. Cross-Cultural HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The first of three papers from this symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD), "Determinants of Supply of Technical Training Opportunities for Human Capital Development in Kenya" (Moses Waithanji Ngware, Fredrick Muyia Nafukho) reports findings from interviews of technical training institute department heads in Kenya who…

  7. Women and Career Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on women and career development. "Enhancing the Career Success of Women Faculty: Mentoring as a Human Resource Development (HRD) Initiative in Higher Education" (Sharon K. Gibson) explores mentoring of women faculty, focusing on the key dimensions of roles and functions, outcomes, gender, and formal and…

  8. Different Ways of Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on different ways of learning. "How Engineers Learn in the Face of Organizational Change" (Robert Reardon) reports on a qualitative study during which nine engineers described how they learned to perform their altered roles after a major reorganization. The study findings supported current…

  9. Meat science and muscle biology symposium: In utero factors that influence postnatal muscle growth, carcass composition, and meat quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Meat Science and Muscle Biology Symposium titled “In utero factors that influence postnatal muscle growth, carcass composition, and meat quality” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting in Phoenix, AZ, July 15 to 19, 2012. The goal of this symposium was to highlight research on the impact of fetal...

  10. International Symposium on the Effective Teaching of Racquet Sports. Proceedings (1st, Urbana, Illinois, June 11-14, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groppel, Jack L., Ed.; Sears, Ronald G., Ed.

    Researchers, coaches, and players of racquet sports were brought together for this symposium on four racquet sports. Although most of the papers presented at the symposium were written by Americans, one of the speakers was from Canada, and another was from Australia. The sports represented were badminton, racquetball, tennis, and squash. In Part…

  11. Developmental programming: State-of-the-science and future directions-summary from a Pennington biomedical symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On December 8-9, 2014, the Pennington Biomedical Research Center convened a scientific symposium to review the state-of-the-science and future directions for the study of developmental programming of obesity and chronic disease. The objectives of the symposium were to discuss: (i) past and current s...

  12. Interdisciplinarity. Papers Presented at the SRHE European Symposium on Interdisciplinary Courses in European Education, 13 September 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Research into Higher Education, Ltd., London (England).

    Papers are presented from the 1975 Society for Research into Higher Education European Symposium on Interdisciplinary (ID) Courses in European Education. Section one of the symposium on "philosophy and background" consists of an introduction by Professor Berger and discussion. Section two on "some ID courses" consists of the following papers: "The…

  13. Report from the Second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health: Critical Needs, Challenges and Potential Solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health held in Paris, France 31 May-2 June, 2010, assembled more than 140 participants representing research organizations from 40 countries. The symposium included a roundtable discussion on critical needs, challenges and opportunitie...

  14. Report from the second international symposium on animal genomics for animal health: critical needs, challenges and potential solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health held in Paris, France 31 May-2 June, 2010, assembled more than 140 participants representing research organizations from 40 countries. The symposium included a roundtable discussion on critical needs, challenges and opportunitie...

  15. Synthesis of Research Symposium at CLD's 35th International Conference on Learning Disabilities: Must Reads for 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah K.; Cummings, Kelli D.; Allen, Elizabeth A.; Weiser, Beverly L.; Hott, Brittany L.; Smolkowski, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The Council for Learning Disabilities' Research Committee hosted a "Must Read" session at the 35th Annual International Conference in which they discussed influential articles published between August 1, 2012, and July 31, 2013. Articles were selected in six areas relevant to learning disabilities research and practice: response to…

  16. Efforts to Bridge the Gap between Research and Practice in Social Work: Precedents and Prospects: Keynote Address at the Bridging the Gap Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Allen

    2015-01-01

    This keynote address discusses previous and ongoing efforts to reduce the persistent gap between research and practice in social work and offers recommendations for further bridging that gap. Key among those recommendations is the need to conduct descriptive outcome studies of efforts to adapt research-supported interventions in everyday practice…

  17. Li-Fraumeni syndrome: Discovery and future challenges - Joseph Fraumeni Symposium

    Cancer.gov

    In May 2014, NCI’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) hosted Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations, a scientific symposium honoring 50 years of visionary leadership by Dr. Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., the founding Director of DCEG. In this video, Dr. Stephen Chanock of NCI provides opening remarks. Dr. David Schottenfeld of the University of Michigan moderates a session on the search for cancer susceptibility genes. Dr. Louise Strong of University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center speaks about the discovery and future challenges of Li-Fraumeni syndrome research. For more information on this symposium, visit http://dceg.cancer.gov/news-events/Fraumeni-symposium-speakers.

  18. 32nd International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis (MSB 2016).

    PubMed

    Ramautar, Rawi

    2016-09-01

    32nd International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada, 3-7 April 2016 The 32nd edition of the International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis (MSB) was held in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada, from 3 to 7 April 2016. This article outlines the aim and the main distinctive features of the MSB symposium. A selection of the scientific research presented at MSB 2016 is highlighted with a special focus on microscale separation developments in the fields of sample preparation, (glyco)proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:27416852

  19. Overview of the International Symposium on Eurasian Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) Biology, Impacts, and Control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunderson, Jeffrey L.; Klepinger, Michael R.; Bronte, Charles R.; Marsden, J. Ellen

    1998-01-01

    The International Symposium on the Biology and Management of Ruffe was organized to address the potential threat ruffe pose to North American fisheries. Scientists in diverse disciplines from Eurasia and North America were brought together in an attempt to examine all aspects of the North American invasion of ruffe, and to highlight the effects of similar introductions in Europe and Asia. The symposium, sponsored by the Minnesota and Michigan Sea Grant College programs, featured 48 oral and poster presentations and was held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during 21-23 March 1997. Papers from the symposium are published in a special section of this issue of the Journal of Great Lakes Research.

  20. Recent developments in shock tube research; Proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., July 16-19, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, D. (Editor); Griffith, W.

    1973-01-01

    Recent advances in shock tube research are described in papers dealing with the design and performance features of new devices as well as applications in aerodynamic, chemical, and physics experiments. Topics considered include a cryogenic shock tube for studying liquid helium fluid mechanics, studies of shock focusing and nonlinear resonance in shock tubes, applications in gas laser studies, very-low and very-high temperature chemical kinetic measurements, shock tube studies of ionization and recombination phenomena, applications in bioacoustic research, shock-tube simulation studies of sonic booms, and plasma research. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  1. Proceedings: Tenth international ash use symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the 1993 International Coal Ash Use Symposium, the tenth in a series since 1967, is to publicize innovations in coal ash technology. These symposia support the mission of the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) to promote coal ash use in a variety of markets through technology transfer and commercialization. The two-volume publication contains 82 papers arranged in fourteen sections which include: waste solidification and stabilization; aggregate; agriculture; structural fill; mine reclamation; aquatic uses; environmental considerations; concrete and flowable fill; base stabilization; clean coal by-products; international and regional perspectives; research and development; fillers in plastic and aluminum; and manufactured products--marketable gypsum, masonry blocks, cast in-situ and precast houses, bricks, mineral wool fibers and ready-mixed concrete. The 82 papers were submitted to ACAA by authors from sixteen countries including. The symposium, with 45 percent of the papers from locations outside the USA, represents a truly international interest in the development of uses for coal ash. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF THE STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION SYMPOSIUM (2ND), HELD AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, ON AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 1, 1977. VOLUME IV. FUNDAMENTAL COMBUSTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contents: Fundamental combustion research applied to pollution control; Chemical reactions in the conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx--fuel pyrolysis studies; Fate of fuel nitrogen during pyrolysis and oxidation; Interactions between sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides in combustion...

  3. Cherry-flavoured electronic cigarettes expose users to the inhalation irritant, benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Kosmider, Leon; Sobczak, Andrzej; Prokopowicz, Adam; Kurek, Jolanta; Zaciera, Marzena; Knysak, Jakub; Smith, Danielle; Goniewicz, Maciej L

    2016-04-01

    Many non-cigarette tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, contain various flavourings, such as fruit flavours. Although many flavourings used in e-cigarettes are generally recognised as safe when used in food products, concerns have been raised about the potential inhalation toxicity of these chemicals. Benzaldehyde, which is a key ingredient in natural fruit flavours, has been shown to cause irritation of respiratory airways in animal and occupational exposure studies. Given the potential inhalation toxicity of this compound, we measured benzaldehyde in aerosol generated in a laboratory setting from flavoured e-cigarettes purchased online and detected benzaldehyde in 108 out of 145 products. The highest levels of benzaldehyde were detected in cherry-flavoured products. The benzaldehyde doses inhaled with 30 puffs from flavoured e-cigarettes were often higher than doses inhaled from a conventional cigarette. Levels in cherry-flavoured products were >1000 times lower than doses inhaled in the workplace. While e-cigarettes seem to be a promising harm reduction tool for smokers, findings indicate that using these products could result in repeated inhalation of benzaldehyde, with long-term users risking regular exposure to the substance. Given the uncertainty surrounding adverse health effects stemming from long-term inhalation of flavouring ingredients such as benzaldehyde, clinicians need to be aware of this emerging risk and ask their patients about use of flavoured e-cigarettes. PMID:26822067

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF THE JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL. VOLUME IV: NOX CONTROL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF INDUSTRIAL PROCESS EQUIPMENT, ENGINES, AND SMALL STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the approximately 50 presentations made during the symposium, October 6-9, 1980, in Denver, CO. The symposium was sponsored by the Combustion Research Branch of EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC, and the Electr...

  5. Repetition counts: repeated exposure increases intake of a novel vegetable in UK pre-school children compared to flavour-flavour and flavour-nutrient learning.

    PubMed

    Caton, Samantha J; Ahern, Sara M; Remy, Eloise; Nicklaus, Sophie; Blundell, Pam; Hetherington, Marion M

    2013-06-01

    Children are not consuming sufficient amounts of fruits and vegetables in their habitual diet. Methods derived from associative learning theories could be effective at promoting vegetable intake in pre-school children. The objective of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of different learning strategies in promoting the intake of a novel vegetable. Children aged between 9 and 38 months were recruited from UK nurseries. The children (n 72) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions (repeated exposure, flavour-flavour learning or flavour-nutrient learning). Each child was offered ten exposures to their respective version of a novel vegetable (artichoke). Pre- and post-intervention measures of artichoke purée and carrot purée (control vegetable) intake were taken. At pre-intervention, carrot intake was significantly higher than artichoke intake (P<0·05). Intake of both vegetables increased over time (P<0·001); however, when changes in intake were investigated, artichoke intake increased significantly more than carrot intake (P<0·001). Artichoke intake increased to the same extent in all three conditions, and this effect was persistent up to 5 weeks post-intervention. Five exposures were sufficient to increase intake compared to the first exposure (P<0·001). Repeated exposure to three variants of a novel vegetable was sufficient to increase intake of this vegetable, regardless of the addition of a familiar taste or energy. Repetition is therefore a critical factor for promoting novel vegetable intake in pre-school children. PMID:23110783

  6. The influence of different El Nino flavours on global average tempeature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, S. D.; Banholzer, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation is known to influence surface temperatures worldwide. El Niño conditions are thought to lead to anomalously warm global average surface temperature, absent other forcings. Recent research has identified distinct possible types or flavours of El Niño events, based on the location of peak sea surface temperature anomalies and other variables. Here we analyze the relationship between the type of El Niño event and the global surface average temperature anomaly, using three historical temperature data sets. Separating El Niño events into types or flavours reveals that the global average surface temperatures are anomalously warm during and after canonical eastern Pacific El Niño events or "super" El Ninos. However, the global average surface temperatures during and after central Pacific or "mixed" events, like the 2002-3 event, are not statistically distinct from that of neutral or other years. Historical analysis indicated that slowdowns in the rate of global surface warming since the late 1800s may be related to decadal variability in the frequency of different types of El Niño events.

  7. Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties at High Temperatures: A Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond F.

    1961-01-01

    This book contains the program and all available abstracts of the 90' invited and contributed papers to be presented at the TUPAC Symposium on Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties at High Temperatures. The Symposium will be held in conjunction with the XVIIIth IUPAC Congress, Montreal, August 6 - 12, 1961. It has been organized, by the Subcommissions on Condensed States and on Gaseous States of the Commission on High Temperatures and Refractories and by the Subcommission on Experimental Thermodynamics of the Commission on Chemical Thermodynamics, acting in conjunction with the Organizing Committee of the IUPAC Congress. All inquiries concerning participation In the Symposium should be directed to: Secretary, XVIIIth International Congress of Pure and Applied Chemistry, National Research Council, Ottawa, 'Canada. Owing to the limited time and facilities available for the preparation and printing of the book, it has not been possible to refer the proofs of the abstracts to the authors for checking. Furthermore, it has not been possible to subject the manuscripts to a very thorough editorial examination. Some obvious errors in the manuscripts have been corrected; other errors undoubtedly have been introduced. Figures have been redrawn only when such a step was essential for reproduction purposes. Sincere apologies are offered to authors and readers for any errors which remain; however, in the circumstances neither the IUPAC Commissions who organized the Symposium, nor the U. S. Government Agencies who assisted in the preparation of this book can accept responsibility for the errors.

  8. PREFACE: Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Yamanaka, H.

    2016-01-01

    This issue of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science contains selected papers presented at the Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI. The meeting was held from June 8 to 10, 2015, at the Bale-Sawala of Universitas Padjadjaran in Jatinangor, Indonesia. The PEDISGI is a symposium to accommodate communication between researchers, in particular geophysicists and related scientists, and to enable sharing of knowledge and research findings concerning local and global geophysical issues. The symposium was attended by 126 participants and 64 contributors from Indonesian universities and the neighbouring countries in four categories, viz. Theoretical and Computational Geophysics, Environmental Geophysics, Geophysical Explorations, and Geophysical Instrumentations and Methods. The symposium was accompanied by a dialog, discussing a chosen topic regarding environmental and geological problems of relevance for the Indonesian archipelago and the surrounding regions. For this first event the topic was ''The formation of Bandung-Basin between myths and facts: Exemplary cultural, geological and geophysical study on the evolution of the earth surface'', presented by invited speakers and local experts. This activity was aimed at extending our knowledge on this particular subject, which may have global impact. This topic was augmented by theoretical background lectures on the earth's surface formation, presented by the invited speakers of the symposium. The meeting would not have been successful without the assistance of the local organizing committee. We want to specially thank Irwan A. Dharmawan for managing the programme, Anggie Susilawati and Mia U. Hasanah for the conference administration, and Dini Fitriani for financial management. We also thank the National Geographic Indonesia for its support via the Business to Business Collaboration Program. The conference photograph can be viewed in the PDF.

  9. Matter inflation with A{sub 4} flavour symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Nolde, David E-mail: david.nolde@unibas.ch

    2013-10-01

    We discuss model building in tribrid inflation, which is a framework for realising inflation in the matter sector of supersymmetric particle physics models. The inflaton is a D-flat combination of matter fields, and inflation ends by a phase transition in which some Higgs field obtains a vacuum expectation value. We first describe the general procedure for implementing tribrid inflation in realistic models of particle physics that can be applied to a wide variety of BSM particle physics models around the GUT scale. We then demonstrate how the procedure works for an explicit lepton flavour model based on an A{sub 4} family symmetry. The model is both predictive and phenomenologically viable, and illustrates how tribrid inflation connects cosmological and particle physics parameters. In particular, it predicts a relation between the neutrino Yukawa coupling and the running of the spectral index α{sub s}. We also show how topological defects from the flavour symmetry breaking can be avoided automatically.

  10. Higgs and flavour as doors to new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    A natural solution to the hierarchy problem of the Fermi scale motivates signals of New Physics at current and near-future experiments. After a critical synthesis of this general motivation, we concentrate our attention on the interplay between LHC searches for new resonances, and precision measurements of both Higgs couplings and flavour violating observables. We do so for i) the Higgs sectors of the NMSSM and MSSM, as paradigmatic examples of theories providing extra scalars, and for ii) CKM-like flavour symmetries, with a focus on U(2)3. This article is mainly based on several papers by the author, but it also reviews other recent related results. Its goal is to provide a synthetic, yet comprehensive, orientation on these subjects, at the dawn of several (ATLAS and CMS, LHCb, NA62, etc.) forthcoming experimental results.

  11. Lepton flavour violating top decays at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Sacha; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Perries, Stéphane; Sordini, Viola

    2015-09-01

    We consider lepton-flavour violating decays of the top quark, mediated by 4-fermion operators. We compile constraints on a complete set of SU(3) × U(1)-invariant operators, arising from their loop contributions to rare decays and from HERA's single-top search. The bounds on e-μ flavour change are more restrictive than on ℓ -τ ; nonetheless the top could decay to a jet {+} e bar{μ } with a branching ratio of order 10^{-3}. We estimate that the currently available LHC data (20 fb^{-1} at 8 TeV) could be sensitive to BR(t → e bar{μ }+ jet) {˜ } 6× 10^{-5}, and we extrapolate that 100 fb^{-1} at 13 TeV could reach a sensitivity of {˜ } 1 × 10^{-5}.

  12. New physics searches with heavy flavour with the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupkova, Ina; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Flavour changing neutral currents and precision measurements of CP violation are investigated by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN as probes to physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper presents recent update of flavour tagged time- dependent analysis of Bs → J/ψ phi, angular analysis of Bd → K*μ+μ- and a search for the rare decay B0s → μ+μ- with measurement of upper limit on its branching fraction. All analyses use 4.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected in 2011 at centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and the results are in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  13. Comparison of flavour qualities of three sourced Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; He, Yu; Wang, Yayue; Tao, Ningping; Wu, Xugan; Wang, Xichang; Qiu, Weiqiang; Ma, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Flavour qualities of three edible parts of three types of Chinese mitten crab from different areas were examined. The flavour profiles detected by E-tongue and E-nose showed that differences existed in tastes and odours among wild-caught crabs (WC), Yangcheng crabs (YC) and Chongming crabs (CM). The total free amino acids contents of WC were all at the highest level in meat, gonads and hepatopancreas. Ovaries had the highest nucleotides content and equivalent umami concentration (EUC) than other tissues in both female and male. The EUC was the highest in all parts of WC, followed by YC and CM. The total content of nine key volatile compounds was the highest for WC in the gonads and hepatopancreas; in the muscle, they were the highest in female YC and male CM, but the lowest for WC. PMID:26830556

  14. Research and Information on Employment and Training: Local, State and Federal Communications, Results and Utilization. Proceedings of a symposium (Hershey, Pennsylvania, June 9-10, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchak, Stephen J., Ed.

    The document contains the proceedings of a conference on manpower research at the Federal, State, and local levels. Two papers from the opening general session focus on the interrelationship of economic, demographic, and educational changes based on its effects on occupational education. J. C. Pettinger's keynote speech presented issues regarding…

  15. Focus on Evaluation and Measurement. Proceedings of the National Research Symposium on Limited English Proficient Student Issues (Washington, D.C., September 1991). Volumes 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1992

    This document is comprised of a two-volume conference proceedings. The first volume includes the following papers: "Application of Multiple Intelligences: Research in Alternative Assessment" (Joseph Walters) Discussants: Vera John-Steiner, Sue Teele; "Improving Bilingual Education Programs through Evaluation" (Alan L. Ginsburg); "Language Testing…

  16. Lepton Flavour Violation in Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, F.F.; /Rutherford

    2011-11-07

    Recent results from {tau} physics studies at BABAR are presented with an emphasis on Lepton Flavour Violation measurements. The results from the current generation of B-meson Factories are already beginning to constrain the parameter space of models that go beyond the Standard Model. By the end of their data-taking, the current generation of B-meson factories will have produced nearly 2 billion {tau} pair decays. The physics potential of this legacy has only just begun to be exploited.

  17. An Overview of the RTO Symposium on Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2002-01-01

    In May of 2001 the Research and Technology Organization (RTO) sponsored a symposium on Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack aerodynamics. Forty-six papers, organized into nine sessions, addressed computational and experimental studies of vortex flows pertinent to both aircraft and maritime applications. The studies also ranged from fundamental fluids investigations to flight test results. Selected highlights are included in this paper to provide a perspective toward the scope of the full symposium.

  18. Scientific Overview: 2013 BBC Plenary Symposium on Tobacco Addiction

    PubMed Central

    De Biasi, M.; McLaughlin, I.; Perez, E.E.; Crooks, P.A.; Dwoskin, L.P.; Bardo, M.T.; Pentel, P.R.; Hatsukami, D.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine dependence plays a critical role in addiction to tobacco products, and thus contributes to a variety of devastating tobacco-related diseases (SGR 2014). Annual costs associated with smoking in the US are estimated to be between $289 and $333 billion. Effective interventions for nicotine dependence, especially in smokers, are a critical barrier to the eradication of tobacco-related diseases. This overview highlights research presented at the Plenary Symposium of Behavior, Biology and Chemistry: Translational Research in Addiction Conference (BBC), hosted by the UT Health Science Center San Antonio, on March 9–10, 2013. The Plenary Symposium focused on tobacco addiction, and covered topics ranging from basic science to national policy. As in previous years, the meeting brought together globally-renowned scientists, graduate student recruits, and young scientists from underrepresented populations in Texas and other states with the goal of fostering interest in drug addiction research in young generations. PMID:24934691

  19. A Grand Δ(96)×SU(5) Flavour Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph; Stuart, Alexander J.

    2013-02-01

    Recent results from the Daya Bay and RENO reactor experiments have measured the smallest lepton mixing angle and found it to have a value of θ13≈9°. This result presents a new challenge for the existing paradigms of discrete flavour symmetries which attempt to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing angles. Here we propose a Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory of Flavour based on Δ(96)×SU(5), together with a U(1)×Z3 symmetry, including a full discussion of Δ(96) in a convenient basis. The Grand Δ(96)×SU(5) Flavour Model relates the quark mixing angles and masses in the form of the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin relation and realises the Georgi-Jarlskog mass relations between the charged leptons and down-type quarks. We predict a Bi-trimaximal (not Tri-bimaximal) form of neutrino mixing matrix, which, after including charged lepton corrections with zero phase, leads to the following GUT scale predictions for the atmospheric, solar, and reactor mixing angles: θ23≈36.9°, θ12≈32.7° and θ13≈9.6°, in good agreement with recent global fits, and a zero Dirac CP phase δ≈0.

  20. Green tea flavour determinants and their changes over manufacturing processes.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhuo-Xiao; Rana, Mohammad M; Liu, Guo-Feng; Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Da-Xiang; Wu, Fu-Guang; Li, Xin-Bao; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Wei, Shu

    2016-12-01

    Flavour determinants in tea infusions and their changes during manufacturing processes were studied using Camellia sinensis cultivars 'Bai-Sang Cha' ('BAS') possessing significant floral scents and 'Fuding-Dabai Cha' ('FUD') with common green tea odour. Metabolite profiling based on odour activity threshold revealed that 'BAS' contained higher levels of the active odorants β-ionone, linalool and its two oxides, geraniol, epoxylinalool, decanal and taste determinant catechins than 'FUD' (p<0.05). Enhanced transcription of some terpenoid and catechin biosynthetic genes in 'BAS' suggested genetically enhanced production of those flavour compounds. Due to manufacturing processes, the levels of linalool and geraniol decreased whereas those of β-ionone, linalool oxides, indole and cis-jasmone increased. Compared with pan-fire treatment, steam treatment reduced the levels of catechins and proportion of geraniol, linalool and its derivatives, consequently, reducing catechin-related astringency and monoterpenol-related floral scent. Our study suggests that flavour determinant targeted modulation could be made through genotype and manufacturing improvements. PMID:27374591

  1. Meeting report from the 2nd International Symposium on New Frontiers in Cardiovascular Research. Protecting the cardiovascular system from ischemia: between bench and bedside.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Fuentes, Hector A; Alba-Alba, Corina; Aragones, Julian; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Boisvert, William A; Bøtker, Hans E; Cesarman-Maus, Gabriela; Fleming, Ingrid; Garcia-Dorado, David; Lecour, Sandrine; Liehn, Elisa; Marber, Michael S; Marina, Nephtali; Mayr, Manuel; Perez-Mendez, Oscar; Miura, Tetsuji; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Salinas-Estefanon, Eduardo M; Ong, Sang-Bing; Schnittler, Hans J; Sanchez-Vega, Jose T; Sumoza-Toledo, Adriana; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Yarullina, Dina; Yellon, Derek M; Preissner, Klaus T; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in basic cardiovascular research as well as their translation into the clinical situation were the focus at the last "New Frontiers in Cardiovascular Research meeting". Major topics included the characterization of new targets and procedures in cardioprotection, deciphering new players and inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic heart disease as well as uncovering microRNAs and other biomarkers as versatile and possibly causal factors in cardiovascular pathogenesis. Although a number of pathological situations such as ischemia-reperfusion injury or atherosclerosis can be simulated and manipulated in diverse animal models, also to challenge new drugs for intervention, patient studies are the ultimate litmus test to obtain unequivocal information about the validity of biomedical concepts and their application in the clinics. Thus, the open and bidirectional exchange between bench and bedside is crucial to advance the field of ischemic heart disease with a particular emphasis of understanding long-lasting approaches in cardioprotection. PMID:26667317

  2. 37th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is reporting problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 37th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 37th AMS, hosted by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Galveston, Texas, was held May 19, 20 and 21, 2004. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, tribology, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station and Mars Rover mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  3. 39th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

    2008-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 39th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the United States and abroad. The 39th AMS was held in Huntsville, Alabama, May 7-9, 2008. During these 3 days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals and positioning mechanisms, tribology, actuators, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and sensors. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  4. Ninth international symposium on radiopharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this Symposium is to provide a forum for those international scientists involved in applying the principles of pharmacology and radiation biology to the development of agents for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The program will highlight state-of-the-art progress in the development of those agents used in conjunction with some form of radiation such as radiopharmaceuticals, radiopaques, photo- and radiosensitizing drugs, and neutron capture agents. An underlying pharmacokinetic parameter associated with all these agents is the need for site-specific delivery to an organ or tumor. Therefore, a major goal of the symposium will be to address those pharmacologic principles for targeting molecules to specific tissue sites. Accordingly, session themes will include receptor-mediated processes, membrane transporters, antibody interactions, metabolic trapping, and oligonucleotide-antisense mechanisms.

  5. XXth Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In 2009, the Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian (France), on the shore of the Geneva Lake, from 16-20 November. It was jointly organised by CERN and the French HEP community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). This year's symposium come at an important time for both the Tevatron and LHC communities. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sample, and it allowed an in-depth review of the readiness of the LHC and its detectors just before first collisions. The programme includes sessions on top-quark and electro-weak physics, QCD, B physics, new phenomena, electro-weak symmetry breaking, heavy ions, and the status and commissioning of the LHC machine and its experiments. Conference website : http://hcp2009.in2p3.fr/

  6. The 1975 Ride Quality Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of papers reported at the 1975 Ride Quality Symposium held in Williamsburg, Virginia, August 11-12, 1975. The symposium, jointly sponsored by NASA and the United States Department of Transportation, was held to provide a forum for determining the current state of the art relative to the technology base of ride quality information applicable to current and proposed transportation systems. Emphasis focused on passenger reactions to ride environment and on implications of these reactions to the design and operation of air, land, and water transportation systems acceptable to the traveling public. Papers are grouped in the following five categories: needs and uses for ride quality technology, vehicle environments and dynamics, investigative approaches and testing procedures, experimental ride quality studies, and ride quality modeling and criteria.

  7. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung‐Jae V.; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-01-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age‐associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, including C. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016. PMID:26115541

  8. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II.

    PubMed

    Artan, Murat; Hwang, Ara B; Lee, Seung V; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-06-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age-associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, includingC. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016. PMID:26115541

  9. Ozone Depletion, Greenhouse Gases, and Climate Change. Proceedings of a Joint Symposium by the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and the Committee on Global Change, National Research Council (Washington, D.C., March 23, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The motivation for the organization of this symposium was the accumulation of evidence from many sources, both short- and long-term, that the global climate is in a state of change. Data which defy integrated explanation including temperature, ozone, methane, precipitation and other climate-related trends have presented troubling problems for…

  10. Thermodynamics of lattice QCD with 2 quark flavours : chiral symmetry and topology.

    SciTech Connect

    Lagae, J.-F.

    1998-06-09

    We have studied the restoration of chiral symmetry in lattice QCD at the finite temperature transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma. By measuring the screening masses of flavour singlet and non-singlet meson excitations, we have seen evidence that, although flavour chiral symmetry is restored at this transition, flavour singlet (U(1)) axial symmetry is not. We conclude that this indicates that instantons continue to play an important role in the quark-gluon plasma phase.

  11. Phased arrays 1985 symposium: Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyskal, H. P.

    1985-08-01

    The Phased Arrays '85 Symposium, sponsored by the Rome Air Development Center, the MITRE Corporation, and the University of Massachusetts, was held at the MITRE Corporation 15 to 18 October and reviewed the state-of-the-art of phased array antenna systems and of the technology for next generation systems. This report contains the full papers which were presented with clearance for unlimited distribution.

  12. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  13. Power sources 12: Research and development in non-mechanical electrical power sources; Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Symposium, Bournemouth, England, Sept. 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keily, T.; Baxter, B. W.

    Papers are presented on the effect of additives on gas recombining lead-acid batteries; a hygienic free-flowing granular oxide for improved lead-acid batteries; relaxation of potential, resistance, and capacity in flow-through PbO2 electrodes; an iron immune positive nickel hydroxide electrode; and the electrochemical activity of amorphous nickel. Attention is also given to air-MnO2/zinc cylindrical cells for high current applications, fuel cell research and development projects in Europe, nickel-hydrogen cells for satellite applications, and an advanced lithium-based anode material. Special consideration is given to the fabrication of discharged positive electrodes for sodium-metal chloride (Zebra) battery cells, new substrates and impregnation methods for nickel electrodes, a new class of electrolyte additives for efficient lithium cycling in lithium rechargeable batteries, and an air electrode with high current densities for zinc/air primary cells.

  14. Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing '99, World Scientific, New Jersey; Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing '00, World Scientific, New Jersey; Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing '01, World Scientific, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, R.B.; Dunker, A.K.; Hunter, L.; Klein, T.E.; Lauderdale, K.

    2003-04-28

    The Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing is an international, multidisciplinary conference covering current research in the theory and application of computational methods in problems of biological significance. Researchers from the United States, the Asian Pacific nations and around the world gather each year at PSB to exchange research results and discuss open issues in all aspects of computational biology. PSB provides a forum for work on databases, algorithms, interfaces, visualization, modeling and other computational methods, as applied to biological problems. The data-rich areas of molecular biology are emphasized.

  15. PREFACE: High Performance Computing Symposium 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talon, Suzanne; Mousseau, Normand; Peslherbe, Gilles; Bertrand, François; Gauthier, Pierre; Kadem, Lyes; Moitessier, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy; Wittig, Rod

    2012-02-01

    HPCS (High Performance Computing Symposium) is a multidisciplinary conference that focuses on research involving High Performance Computing and its application. Attended by Canadian and international experts and renowned researchers in the sciences, all areas of engineering, the applied sciences, medicine and life sciences, mathematics, the humanities and social sciences, it is Canada's pre-eminent forum for HPC. The 25th edition was held in Montréal, at the Université du Québec à Montréal, from 15-17 June and focused on HPC in Medical Science. The conference was preceded by tutorials held at Concordia University, where 56 participants learned about HPC best practices, GPU computing, parallel computing, debugging and a number of high-level languages. 274 participants from six countries attended the main conference, which involved 11 invited and 37 contributed oral presentations, 33 posters, and an exhibit hall with 16 booths from our sponsors. The work that follows is a collection of papers presented at the conference covering HPC topics ranging from computer science to bioinformatics. They are divided here into four sections: HPC in Engineering, Physics and Materials Science, HPC in Medical Science, HPC Enabling to Explore our World and New Algorithms for HPC. We would once more like to thank the participants and invited speakers, the members of the Scientific Committee, the referees who spent time reviewing the papers and our invaluable sponsors. To hear the invited talks and learn about 25 years of HPC development in Canada visit the Symposium website: http://2011.hpcs.ca/lang/en/conference/keynote-speakers/ Enjoy the excellent papers that follow, and we look forward to seeing you in Vancouver for HPCS 2012! Gilles Peslherbe Chair of the Scientific Committee Normand Mousseau Co-Chair of HPCS 2011 Suzanne Talon Chair of the Organizing Committee UQAM Sponsors The PDF also contains photographs from the conference banquet.

  16. BILL E. KUNKLE INTERDISCIPLINARY BEEF SYMPOSIUM: A meta-analysis of research efforts aimed at reducing the impact of fescue toxicosis on cattle weight gain and feed intake.

    PubMed

    Gadberry, M S; Hawley, J; Beck, P A; Jennings, J A; Kegley, E B; Coffey, K P

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a systematic review and meta-analysis of research efforts aimed at recovering cattle production losses attributed to toxic endophyte-infected [ (Morgan-Jones & Gams.) Glenn, Bacon, & Hanlin comb. Nov.] tall fescue [ (Schreb.) Darbysh.]. The strategies presented include those 1) applied with forage systems, 2) based on pharmacological compounds and functional foods, and 3) based on supplemental dietary nutrients. Cattle BW gain and DM intake was the dependent response evaluated. Among the forage systems reviewed, studies with nontoxic, endophyte-infected tall fescue as a total replacement forage system demonstrated the greatest improvement in per-hectare (152 ± 27.5 kg/ha) and per-animal (0.29 ± 0.03 kg/d) BW gain. Studies with interseeded legumes have exhibited a small and highly variable BW gain effect size per hectare (52 ± 24.1 kg/ha) and per animal (0.11 ± 0.03 kg/d). The legume response was seasonal, with summer exhibiting the greatest benefit. Studies with chemicals that suppress plant growth demonstrated BW gain responses (0.17 ± 0.06 kg/d) equal to or greater than the response observed with legume studies. Cattle grazing toxic tall fescue responded well to anthelmentics, antimicrobial feed additives, and steroid implants, and the use of these technologies may additively help recover production losses. As a group, functional foods have not improved BW gain ( = 0.85). Studies with cattle supplemented with highly digestible fiber supplements observed a 0.15 kg greater BW gain compared with studies using starch- and sugar-based supplements ( < 0.05). Weight gain was positively impacted by the level of supplementation (0.06 kg/DM intake as percent BW). Supplement feed conversion was estimated at 6:1 for the highly digestible fiber supplements compared with 11:1 for starch-based supplements. Tall fescue forage DM intake was predicted to maximize at a supplemental feeding rate of 0.24% BW with a breakpoint at 0.5% BW

  17. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in developing countries: a symposium report.

    PubMed

    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Purnat, Tina Dannemann; Phuong, Nguyen Thi Anh; Mwingira, Upendo; Schacht, Karsten; Fröschl, Günter

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have globally shown increasing impact on health status in populations with disproportionately higher rates in developing countries. NCDs are the leading cause of mortality worldwide and a serious public health threat to developing countries. Recognizing the importance and urgency of the issue, a one-day symposium was organized on NCDs in Developing Countries by the CIHLMU Center for International Health, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich on 22nd March 2014. The objective of the symposium was to understand the current situation of different NCDs public health programs and the current trends in NCDs research and policy, promote exchange of ideas, encourage scientific debate and foster networking, partnerships and opportunities among experts from different clinical, research, and policy fields. The symposium was attended by more than seventy participants representing scientists, physicians, academics and students from several institutes in Germany and abroad. Seven key note presentations were made at the symposium by experts from Germany, UK, France, Bangladesh and Vietnam. This paper highlights the presentations and discussions during the symposium on different aspects of NCDs in developing countries. The symposium elucidated the dynamics of NCDs in developing countries and invited the participants to learn about evidence-based practices and policies for prevention and management of major NCDs and to debate the way forward. PMID:25498459

  18. International Symposium on Optics and its Applications (OPTICS-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Calvo, Maria L.; Kazaryan, Eduard M.; Papoyan, Aram V.; Sarkisyan, Hayk A.

    2012-03-01

    OPTICS Logo PREFACE The papers selected for this volume were reported at the International Symposium 'Optics and its applications' (OPTICS-2011, Yerevan & Ashtarak, Armenia, September 5-9, 2011), http://www.ipr.sci.am/optics2011/. The Symposium was organized by the SPIE Armenian Student Chapter and major Armenian R&D organizations, universities and industrial companies working in the field of basic and applied optics: Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Yerevan State University, Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, and LT-PYRKAL Closed Joint Stock Company. OPTICS-2011 was primarily intended to support and promote the involvement of students and young scientists in various fields of modern optics, giving them the possibility to attend invited talks by prominent scientists and to present and discuss their own results. Furthermore, the Symposium allowed foreign participants from 14 countries to become acquainted with the achievements of optical science and technology in Armenia, which became a full member of the International Commission for Optics (ICO) in 2011. To follow this concept, the Symposium sessions were held in various host institutions. The creative and friendly ambience established at OPTICS-2011 promoted further international collaboration in the field and motivated many students to take up research in optics and photonics as a career. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series covers thematic sections of the Symposium (both oral and poster), which represent the main fields of interest in optics for Armenian scientists: quantum optics & information, laser spectroscopy, optical properties of nanostructures, photonics & fiber optics, and optics of liquid crystals. Such wide coverage is consistent with the general scope of the Symposium, allowing all the students involved in optics to present, discuss and publish their recent results, and for those who are making their first steps in science to choose

  19. Symposium on "The challenge of translating nutrition research into public health nutrition". Session 5: Nutrition communication. Obesity and social marketing: works in progress.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Georgina; Stead, Martine

    2009-02-01

    Internationally, socio-economic trends reinforce the complex physiological mechanisms that favour positive energy balance, leading to an accumulation of excess body weight and associated metabolic disorders. This so-called 'obesogenic environment' is characterised by increasing accessibility and affordability of energy-dense foods and declining levels of physical activity. In the face of such rapidly-rising obesity rates there is general consensus that strategies to address trends in weight gain must go forwards in the absence of complete evidence of cause or effective prevention strategy. Thus, strategy implementation and evaluation must contribute to, as well as be informed by, the evidence base. Social marketing research and practice has a track record that strongly indicates that it can contribute to both the evolving knowledge base on obesity and overweight control policy and the development of effective intervention strategies. Social marketing draws pragmatically on many disciplines to bring about voluntary behaviour change as well as requisite supporting policy and environmental change. Key objectives include: generating insights into the drivers of current behaviour patterns; important barriers to change; client-oriented approaches to new desirable diet and lifestyle choices. Social marketing recognises that target clients have the power to ensure success or failure of obesity control policies. Social marketing seeks to identify genuine exchange of benefits for target adopters of behaviour change and the advocates of change, and how they may be developed and offered within an appropriate relevant context. Social marketing adopts a cyclical approach of learning, strategic development and evaluation, and therefore is well placed to integrate with the multi-disciplinary demands of obesity prevention strategies. PMID:19012804

  20. Proceedings of the NASA Aerospace Technology Symposium 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Fink, Mary M. (Editor); Schaaf, Michaela M. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    Reports are presented from the NASA Aerospace Technology Symposium 2002 on the following: Geo-Referenced Altitude Hold For Latex Ballons; NASA Spaceport Research: Opportunities For space Grant and EPSCoR Involvement; Numerical Simulation Of The Combustion Of Fuel Droplets: Applications, Aircraft/Spacecraft Flight Control, Guidance Navigation; Expertise In System Dynamics and Control, Control Theory and Aerospace Education Ooutreach Opportunities; and Technology For The Improvement Of General Aviation Security: A Needs Assessmemt.

  1. Data take centre stage at disease modelling symposium.

    PubMed

    2016-04-23

    The APHA hosted its sixth annual mathematical modelling symposium in January at its headquarters in Weybridge. As Charlotte Cook of the APHA reports, this year's event, 'Animal, plant and aquatic health modelling: making best use of evidence', was the biggest yet, with 90 modellers, scientists and policymakers attending, from government agencies and academic and research institutes in the UK and elsewhere in Europe. PMID:27103690

  2. DIESEL EMISSIONS SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The high fuel efficiency of diesel engines is expected to result in a significant increase in the production of diesel-powered passenger cars. Major research programs were initiated in the late 1970s by governments, industry, and the academic community in order to understand the ...

  3. CP-1 70th Anniversary Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    Len Koch; Harold Agnew

    2013-06-05

    Dr. Harold Agnew, retired director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one of 49 people present on December 2, 1942 when the world?s first man-made controlled nuclear chain reaction was achieved with the CP-1 reactor, and Dr. Len Koch, one of Argonne?s earliest staff members and a designer of EBR-I, the first liquid metal-cooled fast reactor, spoke about their early work during ?The Dawn of the Nuclear Age?, a Director?s Special Symposium held as one of the events to commemorate the 70th anniversary year of CP-1 achieving criticality. The symposium was moderated by Dr. Charles Till, a retired Argonne associate laboratory director who led Argonne?s nuclear engineering programs throughout the 1980?s and ?90?s. Dr. Agnew painted a vivid picture of the challenges and rewards of working in Enrico Fermi?s group under strict security conditions and the complete faith all in the group had in Fermi?s analyses. He stated that no one ever doubted that CP-1 would achieve criticality, and when the moment came, those present acknowledged the accomplishment with little more than a subdued toast of chianti from a bottle provided by reactor physicist Eugene Wigner. This experimental work on nuclear reactors was continued in the Chicago area and led first by Fermi and then Walter Zinn, another member of Fermi?s CP-1 group, resulting in the formal establishment of Argonne National Laboratory on July 1, 1946. Dr. Koch described how much he enjoyed working at Argonne through the 1950?s and ?60?s and contributing to many of the research ?firsts? that Argonne achieved in the nuclear energy field and led to the foundation of the commercial nuclear power generation industry. His reminiscences about all that was achieved with EBR-I and how that work then led into Argonne?s design, building, and operation of EBR-II as a full demonstration of a fast reactor power plant brought Argonne?s nuclear energy legacy to life for everyone in the auditorium. These engaging presentations prompted a

  4. CP-1 70th Anniversary Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Len Koch; Harold Agnew

    2012-07-11

    Dr. Harold Agnew, retired director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one of 49 people present on December 2, 1942 when the world’s first man-made controlled nuclear chain reaction was achieved with the CP-1 reactor, and Dr. Len Koch, one of Argonne’s earliest staff members and a designer of EBR-I, the first liquid metal-cooled fast reactor, spoke about their early work during “The Dawn of the Nuclear Age”, a Director’s Special Symposium held as one of the events to commemorate the 70th anniversary year of CP-1 achieving criticality. The symposium was moderated by Dr. Charles Till, a retired Argonne associate laboratory director who led Argonne’s nuclear engineering programs throughout the 1980’s and ‘90’s. Dr. Agnew painted a vivid picture of the challenges and rewards of working in Enrico Fermi’s group under strict security conditions and the complete faith all in the group had in Fermi’s analyses. He stated that no one ever doubted that CP-1 would achieve criticality, and when the moment came, those present acknowledged the accomplishment with little more than a subdued toast of chianti from a bottle provided by reactor physicist Eugene Wigner. This experimental work on nuclear reactors was continued in the Chicago area and led first by Fermi and then Walter Zinn, another member of Fermi’s CP-1 group, resulting in the formal establishment of Argonne National Laboratory on July 1, 1946. Dr. Koch described how much he enjoyed working at Argonne through the 1950’s and ‘60’s and contributing to many of the research “firsts” that Argonne achieved in the nuclear energy field and led to the foundation of the commercial nuclear power generation industry. His reminiscences about all that was achieved with EBR-I and how that work then led into Argonne’s design, building, and operation of EBR-II as a full demonstration of a fast reactor power plant brought Argonne’s nuclear energy legacy to life for everyone in the auditorium. These

  5. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 2: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  6. The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Shuttle Small Payloads Symposium is a continuation of the Get Away Special Symposium convened from 1984 through 1988, and is proposed to continue as an annual conference. The focus of this conference is to educate potential Space Shuttle Payload Bay users as to the types of carrier systems provided and for current users to share experiment concepts.

  7. The 1988 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium was held to provide a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that have been flown on shuttle missions and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future. Experiment design and payload integration issues are also examined.

  8. The 21st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    During the symposium technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and automated mechanisms synthesis. A summary of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium panel discussions is included as an appendix. However, panel discussions on robotics for space and large space structures which were held are not presented herein.

  9. The 1987 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelme, Neal (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The 1987 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's symposium provides a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium was on payloads that were flown on Shuttle missions, and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future.

  10. The Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Summaries of the papers presented at the Second Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium are presented. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overwiew of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans.

  11. Twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report is the program and abstracts of the twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals, held on May 7--11, 1990, at Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The symposium, sponsored by the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Solar Energy Research Institute, Badger Engineers, Inc., Gas Research Institute, and American Chemical Society, consists of five sessions: Session 1, thermal, chemical, and biological processing; Session 2 and 3, applied biological research; Session 4, bioengineering research; and Session 5, biotechnology, bioengineering, and the solution of environmental problems. It also consists of a poster session of the same five subject categories.

  12. PREFACE: The Third 21COE Symposium: Astrophysics as Interdisciplinary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kei-ichi; Yamada, Shoichi; Daishido, Tsuneaki

    2006-03-01

    high energy compact objects, and that of dark matter and dark energy of the universe. This is in accord with the purpose of The 21st century COE program, "Holistic Research and Education Center for Physics of Self-organization Systems". We hope that the symposium and the discussions therein will be the first step for the productive collaborations in the 21st century. The symposium was sponsored by the Waseda University Grant for International Conference Operation and the 21st century COE program of Waseda University, "the Holistic Research and Education Center for Physics of Self-organization Systems". Tokyo, January, 2006

  13. Science education in partnership: the 2002 Australian American Fulbright Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, E.; Oliver, C.; Wilmoth, K.; Vozzo, L.

    The Australian American Fulbright 2002 Symposium: Science Education in Partnership was held in parallel--in partnership-- with the scientific meeting of the IAU 213 Bioastronomy 2002 Symposium: Life Among the Stars. In practice, the two meetings modeled partnership between educators and scientists, both professional events interacting while maintaining individual goals. Leading scientists attending the IAU meeting participated in the Fulbright with presentations based upon their work and their experiences. Educators and scientists interacted on how their work impacts science education and strategies for building direct connections between scientists and classrooms. Educators attending the Fulbright Symposium attended a number of scientific presentations in IAU meeting as well. A major issue in science education is teaching science in a way that is relevant to the student. Partnerships between scientists and teachers can provide real-life scientific research experience in the laboratory and the field for teachers and students. These partnerships enhance the quality of both teaching and learning, and engage students directly in projects and curricula that lead to a better understanding of the nature and practice of science. Scientists are often engaged in the development of new curricula as a part of the education and public outreach programs affiliated with research programs. Participants explored the similarities and differences between the approach to this endeavor in Australia and the US. Partnerships between all the professionals involved--scientists, teachers, and writers--creates an opportunity for innovative, cutting-edge research to reach the classroom. The excitement of seeking new knowledge, exploring the unknown, can motivate students to pursue science studies in high school and beyond at the university. Oral papers, posters and workshops presented the results of partnerships between scientists and educators in Australian and the US as well as

  14. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the present state of the art in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars was presented. The data acquired with the SEASAT SAR (1978) and Shuttle Imaging Radar, SIR-A (1981) clearly demonstrated the important emphasis in the 80's is going to be on in-depth research investigations conducted with the more flexible and sophisticated SIR series instruments and on long term monitoring of geophysical phenomena conducted from free-flying platforms such as ERS-1 and RADARSAT.

  15. Collider Aspects of Flavour Physics at High Q

    SciTech Connect

    del Aguila, F.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Allanach, B.C.; Alwall, J.; Andreev, Yu.; Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Bartl, A.; Beccaria, M.; Bejar, S.; Benucci, L.; Bityukov, S.; Borjanovic, I.; Bozzi, G.; Burdman, G.; Carvalho, J.; Castro, N.; Clerbaux, B.; de Campos, F.; de Gouvea, A.; Dennis, C.; Djouadi, A.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Louvain U., CP3 /Moscow, INR /Valencia U. /Vienna U. /Salento U. /INFN, Lecce /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Karlsruhe U. /Sao Paulo U. /LIP, Coimbra /Brussels U. /Sao Paulo U., Guaratingueta /Northwestern U. /Oxford U. /Orsay, LPT /Athens U. /Lisbon U.

    2008-03-07

    This chapter of the report of the 'Flavour in the era of LHC' workshop discusses flavor related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at LHC, both from the experimental side and from the theoretical side. We review top quark physics and discuss flavor aspects of several extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs model or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects as well as measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present public available computational tools related to this topic.

  16. Test of the flavour independence of αs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using about 950000 hadronic events collected during 1991 and 1992 with the ALEPH detector, the ratios r b = {α sb}/{α sudsc} and r uds = {α suds}/{α scb} have been measured in order to test the flavour independence of the strong coupling constant αs. The analysis is based on event-shape variables using the full hadronic sample, two b-quark samples enriched by lepton tagging and lifetime tagging, and a light-quark sample enriched by lifetime antitagging. The combined results are rb = 1.002±0.023 and ruds = 0.971 ± 0.023.

  17. Space Station Freedom Evolution Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    Information on the Space Station Freedom Evolution Symposium is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include industry development needs and the Office of Commercial Programs strategy, the three-phase program to develop commercial space, Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), key provisions of the Joint Endeavor agreement, current commercial flight experiment requirements, the CCDS expendable launch vehicle program, the Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) program, commercial launch dates, payload sponsors, the commercial roles of the Space Station Freedom, and a listing of the Office of Commercial Programs Space Station Freedom payloads.

  18. Spring, 1980, DECUS symposium review

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.J.; Duffy, J.M.; McDonald, W.M.; Oppenheimer, J.L.; Brandt, J.J.; Grant, C.W.; O'Brien, D.W.; VanLehn, A.L.

    1980-10-24

    The Digital Equipment Computer Users Society (DECUS) holds biannual symposia where its membership and the host company can exchange ideas, problems, and solutions. This report by the newly formed DECUS Local User Group at LLL collects information gathered at the Spring '80 symposium in Chicago on April 22-25. Information is presented for the following special interest groups (SIGs): RSX/IAS SIG, VAX/VSM SIG, PASCAL (languages) SIG, networks SIG, TECO SIG, LSI-11 SIG, RT-11 SIG, site manager SIG, and database SIG. (RWR)

  19. Can rats learn to associate a flavour with the delayed delivery of food?

    PubMed

    Simbayi, L C; Boakes, R A; Burton, M J

    1986-03-01

    Associations between a specific flavour and access to food were studied using a discrimination procedure devised by Holman (1975). This involved giving rats one flavour (e.g. cinnamon) of saccharin solution on some days, and following this by delivery of food, and a second flavour (e.g. wintergreen) on other days which was never followed by food. Experiment 1 used glucose delivered after a 30-min delay and a slight increase in preference for the paired flavour was detected. Using a 20-min delay Experiment 2 varied the kind of food used; some evidence for discrimination learning was again found in the glucose group, but there was no evidence that rats could associate a flavour with starch solution or solid chow over this delay. To check that the general procedure was a sensitive one, in Experiment 3 one flavour was added to glucose i.e. without delay, and this produced large shifts in a subsequent preference test. Overall the results threw doubt on claims that rats as readily form flavour-calorie associations over delays as they do flavour-toxicosis associations. PMID:3963797

  20. Exploring flavour-producing core microbiota in multispecies solid-state fermentation of traditional Chinese vinegar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zong-Min; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Multispecies solid-state fermentation (MSSF), a natural fermentation process driven by reproducible microbiota, is an important technique to produce traditional fermented foods. Flavours, skeleton of fermented foods, was mostly produced by microbiota in food ecosystem. However, the association between microbiota and flavours and flavour-producing core microbiota are still poorly understood. Here, acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar was taken as a typical case of MSSF. The structural and functional dynamics of microbiota during AAF process was determined by metagenomics and favour analyses. The dominant bacteria and fungi were identified as Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Aspergillus, and Alternaria, respectively. Total 88 flavours including 2 sugars, 9 organic acids, 18 amino acids, and 59 volatile flavours were detected during AAF process. O2PLS-based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavours dynamics showed bacteria made more contribution to flavour formation than fungi. Seven genera including Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Enhydrobacter, Lactococcus, Gluconacetobacer, Bacillus and Staphylococcus were determined as functional core microbiota for production of flavours in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provides a perspective for bridging the gap between the phenotype and genotype of ecological system, and advances our understanding of MSSF mechanisms in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar. PMID:27241188

  1. Exploring flavour-producing core microbiota in multispecies solid-state fermentation of traditional Chinese vinegar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zong-Min; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Multispecies solid-state fermentation (MSSF), a natural fermentation process driven by reproducible microbiota, is an important technique to produce traditional fermented foods. Flavours, skeleton of fermented foods, was mostly produced by microbiota in food ecosystem. However, the association between microbiota and flavours and flavour-producing core microbiota are still poorly understood. Here, acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar was taken as a typical case of MSSF. The structural and functional dynamics of microbiota during AAF process was determined by metagenomics and favour analyses. The dominant bacteria and fungi were identified as Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Aspergillus, and Alternaria, respectively. Total 88 flavours including 2 sugars, 9 organic acids, 18 amino acids, and 59 volatile flavours were detected during AAF process. O2PLS-based correlation analysis between microbiota succession and flavours dynamics showed bacteria made more contribution to flavour formation than fungi. Seven genera including Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, Enhydrobacter, Lactococcus, Gluconacetobacer, Bacillus and Staphylococcus were determined as functional core microbiota for production of flavours in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, based on their dominance and functionality in microbial community. This study provides a perspective for bridging the gap between the phenotype and genotype of ecological system, and advances our understanding of MSSF mechanisms in Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar. PMID:27241188

  2. Symposium for Reimar Luest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longdon, Norman

    1991-02-01

    The work of Reimar Luest is considered. The future of space research and global cooperation in science is discussed. After a welcome address by Francesco Carassa, papers with the following titles were presented: Reimar Luest: The Astronomer (Rudolf Kippenhahn); Reimar Luest: The Space Scientist (Jacques Blamont); The Political Point of View (Hans Hilger Hauschild); Reminiscences of a Fellow Scientist (Lodewijk Woltjer); The View from Industry (Hans L. Merkmle); Reimar Luest: De l'ESRO a l'ESA (Hubert Curien); The Future of Space Exploration of the Solar System (Roald Sagdeev); The Future of Astrophysics from Space (Martin J. Rees); The Outer Planets and the Heliosphere (James A. Van Allen); The International Cooperation for the Future of Space Science (Monoru Oda).

  3. IUTAM Symposium on Hydrodynamic Diffusion of Suspended Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was on multiparticle hydrodynamic interactions which lead to fluctuating motion of the particles and resulting particle migration and dispersion or diffusion. Implications of these phenomena were described for sedimentation, fluidization, suspension flows, granular flows, and fiber suspensions. Computer simulation techniques as well as experimental techniques were described. Each session had an invited leadoff talk which overviewed the session topic as well as described the speaker's own related research. Ample time for discussion was included after each talk as well as at the end of each session. The symposium started with a keynote talk on the first evening on What is so puzzling about hydrodynamic diffusion?, which set the tone for the rest of the meeting by emphasizing both recent advances and unanswered issues.

  4. 8(th) Symposium on Hemostasis: Translational and Basic Science Discoveries.

    PubMed

    Margaritis, Paris; Key, Nigel S

    2016-05-01

    It has been 14 years since the first symposium on hemostasis at UNC Chapel Hill that focused primarily on the tissue factor (TF) and Factor VIIa (FVIIa) biology, biochemistry and translational work for the treatment of bleeding. Concepts, mechanistic data and therapeutic agents have since emerged that permeate not only aspects of the TF and FVIIa functions, but also broader processes in hemostasis and thrombosis. These processes involve circulating proteins, receptors, cells and cellular components that interact within the coagulation system as well as with additional systems that are dysregulated in disorders seemingly unrelated to bleeding/thrombosis. The reviews in this symposium provide the research background to understand such interactions and integrations. PMID:27207413

  5. Symposium on hydrodynamic diffusion of suspended particles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The symposium brought together researchers from academic, government, and private laboratories interested in the interactions of particles in fluids and in granular media. There were 68 participants, including 24 students, currently residing In 12 countries. The participants represented a wide variety of fields, including applied mathematics, chemical engineering, computer science, fluid dynamics, materials science, mechanical engineering, physics, and theoretical and applied mechanics. There were 33 talks and 16 posters presented. The focus of the symposium was on multiparticle hydrodynamic interactions which lead to fluctuating motion of the particles and resulting particle migration and dispersion or diffusion. Implications of these phenomena were described for sedimentation, fluidization, suspension flows, granular flows, and fiber suspensions. Computer simulation techniques as well as experimental techniques were described.

  6. Symposium focuses on Arctic science and policy needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-07-01

    The most important step the United States needs to take for the future of the Arctic is ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOS), U.S. Senator Mark Begich (D-AK) told attendees at the 4th Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Naval and Maritime Operations, held 20-22 June in Washington, D. C. With the Arctic region undergoing rapid transformation due to climate change, scientists at the symposium provided details about diminishing ice and other concerns, while U.S. Naval and Coast Guard officers discussed research and operational needs and policy makers called for more resources to deal with Arctic issues and for LOS ratification.

  7. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  8. DOE Laboratory Catalysis Research Symposium - Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, T.

    1999-02-01

    The conference consisted of two sessions with the following subtopics: (1) Heterogeneous Session: Novel Catalytic Materials; Photocatalysis; Novel Processing Conditions; Metals and Sulfides; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Metal Oxides and Partial Oxidation; Electrocatalysis; and Automotive Catalysis. (2) Homogeneous Catalysis: H-Transfer and Alkane Functionalization; Biocatalysis; Oxidation and Photocatalysis; and Novel Medical, Methods, and Catalyzed Reactions.

  9. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark, Wascher); and "Wage Mobility of MW Workers" (Smith,…

  10. PREFACE: XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof; Fossion, Ruben; Lizcano, David

    2010-04-01

    The attached PDF gives a full listing of contributors and organisation members. In the present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the "XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics", that was held from January 5-8, 2010 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings contain the plenary talks that were presented during the conference. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters, were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. After the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium was organized every year without interruption which makes the present one the 33rd in a row. This year's meeting was dedicated to the memory of Marcos Moshinsky, who passed away on April 1, 2009. Dr. Moshinsky was the most distinguished pioneer and promoter of nuclear physics in Mexico and Latin America and holds the record of 31 (out of 32) participations at the Symposium. In the inaugural session, Alejandro Frank (ICN-UNAM), Peter Hess (ICN-UNAM) and Jorge Flores (IF-UNAM) spoke in his honor and recalled the virtues that characterized him as a teacher, scientist, founder of schools and academic institutions, colleague and friend. His generosity, excellence and honesty were emphasized as the personal qualities that characterized both his personal and academic life. moshinksky_photo "Marcos Moshinsky (1921-2009)" The scientific program consisted of 26 invited talks and 20 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear

  11. 11th European VLBI Network Symposium & Users Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) at the University of Bordeaux (France), on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, hosted the 11th European VLBI Network (EVN) Symposium and EVN Users Meeting on October 9-12, 2012. The Symposium was held at the "Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Bordeaux", located in the "Palais de la Bourse", in the center of Bordeaux. The conference highlighted the latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI, space VLBI and e-VLBI. All fields of astrophysics were concerned - stellar, galactic and extragalactic - as well as astrometry and planetary science. Presentations addressing synergy between (e-)VLBI and other new or planned radio facilities (ALMA, LOFAR, e-MERLIN,...) or instruments at other wavelengths (Fermi, CTA, Gaia,...) were also an integral part of the program. The scientific program was organized in 11 sessions including 71 oral presentations, with an additional 43 posters available for viewing during the entire length of the conference. An EVN Users Meeting was also held during one of the evening to foster interaction between the EVN users and the EVN organization. The symposium was attended by a total of 122 delegates originating from 47 institutes world-wide, sharing new VLBI science and innovations while also building links with other communities. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 283393 (RadioNet3).

  12. Proceedings of the fifteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This Proceedings Volume includes the technical papers that were presented during the Fifteenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences on May 14-15, 1997, at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. The Symposium was organized into eight technical sessions, which included 32 individual presentations followed by discussion and interaction with the audience. The topics of the eight sessions are: multiphase flows 1; multiphase flows 2; mostly optics; fluid mechanics; nonlinear fields; welding and cracks; materials; and controls. The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. It has the prime responsibility for establishing the basic scientific foundation upon which the Nation`s future energy options will have to be identified, developed, and built. It is committed to the generation of new knowledge necessary for the solution of present and future problems of energy exploration, production, conversion, and utilization, consistent with respect for the environment. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the energy database for contributions to this Symposium.

  13. Flavour-changing Higgs couplings in a class of two Higgs doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botella, F. J.; Branco, G. C.; Nebot, M.; Rebelo, M. N.

    2016-03-01

    We analyse various flavour-changing processes like trightarrow hu,hc, hrightarrow τ e,τ μ as well as hadronic decays hrightarrow bs,bd, in the framework of a class of two Higgs doublet models where there are flavour-changing neutral scalar currents at tree level. These models have the remarkable feature of having these flavour-violating couplings entirely determined by the CKM and PMNS matrices as well as tan β . The flavour structure of these scalar currents results from a symmetry of the Lagrangian and therefore it is natural and stable under the renormalisation group. We show that in some of the models the rates of the above flavour-changing processes can reach the discovery level at the LHC at 13 TeV even taking into account the stringent bounds on low energy processes, in particular μ rightarrow eγ.

  14. Relationship between flavour deterioration and the volatile compound profile of semi-ripened sausage.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, José Manuel; Bedia, Mario; Bañón, Sancho

    2013-03-01

    This study provides data on the relationship between flavour deterioration and the volatile compound profile of semi-ripened pork salami kept under retail conditions for up to 150 days. The flavour of salami deteriorated for 120 days, resulting in rancidity and a loss of acceptability. TBARS increased from 0.16 to 0.57 MDA/kg. The flavour changes during the shelf life of salami were monitored from changes in the volatile profile. The retailing time influenced (p<0.05) the level of 27 of the 30 headspace volatiles determined by SPME-GC/MS. Flavour deterioration was associated with the loss and/or degradation of volatiles resulting from spices and microbial activities, and the formation of volatiles from lipid oxidation. The levels of 2-heptenal and methyl esters of heptanoic, pentanoic and hexanoic acids were the best discriminators of storage time, and therefore seem to be promising as marker compounds of flavour deterioration and acceptability. PMID:23273472

  15. 11th Annual LVMH Recherche Symposium: skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Bonté, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The 11(th) Annual LVMH Recherche Scientific Symposium was held in London on October 27(th), into the warmth of the distinguished British Library, with nearly 150 industry and research attendees. The meeting organized by LVMH Recherche was centered on the theme of skin rejuvenation. The current state of play for rejuvenation research was summarized, and then advances in the science of skin aging and rejuvenation therapies were discussed in detail. Personalized genomics and current and prospective translational therapies were presented, followed by a clever linking of multiple global theories towards a cohesive plan for future goals in rejuvenation research. PMID:22615002

  16. 8th Annual Glycoscience Symposium: Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Azadi, Paratoo

    2015-09-24

    The Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC) of the University of Georgia holds a symposium yearly that highlights a broad range of carbohydrate research topics. The 8th Annual Georgia Glycoscience Symposium entitled “Integrating Models of Plant Cell Wall Structure, Biosynthesis and Assembly” was held on April 7, 2014 at the CCRC. The focus of symposium was on the role of glycans in plant cell wall structure and synthesis. The goal was to have world leaders in conjunction with graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and research scientists to propose the newest plant cell wall models. The symposium program closely followed the DOE’s mission and was specifically designed to highlight chemical and biochemical structures and processes important for the formation and modification of renewable plant cell walls which serve as the basis for biomaterial and biofuels. The symposium was attended by both senior investigators in the field as well as students including a total attendance of 103, which included 80 faculty/research scientists, 11 graduate students and 12 Postdoctoral students.

  17. MS&T'13 Symposium Preview: Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2013-08-01

    The Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites symposium at Materials Science & Technology 2013 (MS&T'13) conference is planned to provide a platform to researchers working on various aspects of composite materials and capture the state of the art in this area. The dialogue among leading researchers is expected to provide insight into the future of this field and identify the future directions in terms of research, development, and applications of composite materials. In the 2 day program, the symposium includes 34 presentations, including 10 invited presentations. The contributions have come from 16 different countries including USA, Mexico, Switzerland, India, Egypt, and Singapore.

  18. Proceedings of the seventeenth symposium on energy engineering sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-13

    This Proceedings Volume includes the technical papers that were presented during the Seventeenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences on May 13-14, 1999, at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. The Symposium was structured into seven technical sessions, which included 25 individual presentations followed by discussion and interaction with the audience. A list of participants is appended to this volume. The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term, mission-oriented research in the Department. The Office has prime responsibility for establishing the basic scientific foundation upon which the Nation's future energy options will be identified, developed, and built. BES is committed to the generation of new knowledge necessary to solve present and future problems regarding energy exploration, production, conversion, and utilization, while maintaining respect for the environment. Consistent with DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, prolonging the useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing. The program emphasis is on reducing costs through improved industrial production and performance and expanding the nation's store of fundamental knowledge for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in energy technologies. To achieve these goals, the Engineering Research Program supports approximately 130 research projects covering a broad spectrum of topics that cut across traditional engineering disciplines. The program focuses on

  19. PREFACE: International Symposium on Molecular Conductors: Novel Functions of Molecular Conductors under Extreme Conditions (ISMC 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Toshihiro; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2008-02-01

    The International Symposium on Molecular Conductors 2008 (ISMC2008) was held as the second international symposium of the project entitled `Novel Functions of Molecular Conductors under Extreme Conditions', which was supported by the Grant-in-aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan. The project lasted from September 2003 to March 2008, and was completed by this symposium held at Okazaki Conference Center, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Japan (23-25 July 2008), which about 100 scientists attended. During the symposium, five project teams gave summary talks and exciting talks were given on the topics developed recently not only by the members of the project but also by other scientists including invited speakers from abroad, who are doing active research on molecular conductors. It is expected that papers presented in the symposium will give valuable hints for the next step in the research of this field. Therefore the organizers of this symposium decided to publish this proceedings in order to demonstrate these activities, not only for the local community of the project, but also for the broad society of international scientists who are interested in molecular conductors. The editors, who are also the organizers of this symposium, believe that this proceedings provides a significant and relevant contribution to the field of molecular conductors since it is the first time we have published such a proceedings as an electronic journal. We note that all papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed by expert referees. Editors made every effort to satisfy the criterion of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. Toshihiro Takahashi and Yoshikazu Suzumura Editors: Toshihiro Takahashi (Gakushuin University) (Chairman) Kazushi Kanoda (University of Tokyo) Seiichi Kagoshima (University of Tokyo) Takehiko Mori (Tokyo

  20. Extended shelf life flavoured dairy drink using dissolved carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Menon Rekha; Rao, K Jayaraj; Nath, B Surendra; Ram, Chand

    2014-01-01

    Cardamom flavoured dairy beverage prepared using standardized method was carbonated in glass bottles. Carbonation at 50 psi pressure for 30 s was recommended. The pasteurized flavoured drink, carbonated or otherwise was evaluated for sensory, chemical and microbial quality during its refrigerated storage. The uncarbonated control samples were found to be sensorily acceptable up to 14 days, while the carbonated beverage remained acceptable up to 30 days. Carbonation of drink significantly affected the pH and acidity of product without reducing its acceptability. Carbonation resulted in inhibition of microbes, the effect was pronounced on psychrotrophic count. There was a linear but marginal increase in the pH of the carbonated samples till the 17(th) day of storage; the values diminished thereafter. The carbonated samples also had significantly reduced contents of FFA and soluble nitrogen compared to that of uncarbonated control samples as storage progressed beyond 10 days and this was attributed to inhibited microbial growth. PMID:24426058