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Sample records for flavus aspergillus niger

  1. Antibiotic Extraction as a Recent Biocontrol Method for Aspergillus Niger andAspergillus Flavus Fungi in Ancient Egyptian mural paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemdan, R.; et al.

    Biodeterioration of mural paintings by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus Fungi has been proved in different mural paintings in Egypt nowadays. Several researches have studied the effect of fungi on mural paintings, the mechanism of interaction and methods of control. But none of these researches gives us the solution without causing a side effect. In this paper, for the first time, a recent treatment by antibiotic "6 penthyl α pyrone phenol" was applied as a successful technique for elimination of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus. On the other hand, it is favorable for cleaning Surfaces of Murals executed by tembera technique from the fungi metabolism which caused a black pigments on surfaces.

  2. Identification of Aspergillus (A flavus and A niger) Allergens and Heterogeneity of Allergic Patients' IgE Response.

    PubMed

    Vermani, Maansi; Kandi-Vijayan, Vannan; Kumar-Agarwal, Mahendra

    2015-08-01

    Aspergillus species (A flavus and A niger) are important sources of inhalant allergens. Current  diagnostic  modalities  employ  crude  Aspergillus  extracts  which  only  indicate  the source to which the patient has been sensitized, without identifying the number and type of allergens in crude extracts. We report a study on the identification of major and minor allergens of the two common airborne Aspergillus species and heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to them.Skin prick tests were performed on 300 patients of bronchial asthma and/or allergicrhinitis and 20 healthy volunteers. Allergen specific IgE in patients' sera was estimated by enzyme allergosorbent test (EAST). Immunoblots were performed to identify major/minor allergens of Aspergillus extracts and to study heterogeneity of patients'IgE response to them. Positive cutaneous responses were observed in 17% and 14.7% of patients with A flavusand A niger extracts, respectively. Corresponding EAST positivity was 69.2% and 68.7%. In immunoblots, 5 allergenic proteins were identified in A niger extract, major allergens being 49, 55.4 and 81.5 kDa. Twelve proteins bound patients' IgE in A flavus extract, three being major allergens (13.3, 34 and 37 kDa). The position and slopes of EAST binding and inhibition curves obtained with individual sera varied from patient to patient. The number and molecular weight of IgE-binding proteins in both the Aspergillus extracts varied among patients.These results gave evidence of heterogeneity of patients' IgE response to major/minor Aspergillus allergens. This approach will be helpful to identify disease eliciting molecules in the individual patients (component resolved diagnosis) and may improve allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:26547703

  3. Bioprocess and biotecnology: effect of xylanase from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus on pulp biobleaching and enzyme production using agroindustrial residues as substract.

    PubMed

    de Alencar Guimaraes, Nelciele Cavalieri; Sorgatto, Michele; Peixoto-Nogueira, Simone de Carvalho; Betini, Jorge Henrique Almeida; Zanoelo, Fabiana Fonseca; Marques, Maria Rita; de Moraes Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes Teixeira; Giannesi, Giovana C

    2013-01-01

    This study compares two xylanases produced by filamentous fungi such as A. niger and A. flavus using agroindustrial residues as substract and evaluated the effect of these enzymes on cellulose pulp biobleaching process. Wheat bran was the best carbon source for xylanase production by A. niger and A. flavus. The production of xylanase was 18 and 21% higher on wheat bran when we compare the xylanase production with xylan. At 50C, the xylanase of A. niger retained over 85% activity with 2h of incubation, and A. flavus had a half-life of more than 75minutes. At 55C, the xylanase produced by A. niger showed more stable than from A. flavus showing a half-life of more than 45minutes. The xylanase activity of A. niger and A. flavus were somehow protected in the presence of glycerol 5% when compared to the control (without additives). On the biobleaching assay it was observed that the xylanase from A. flavus was more effective in comparison to A. niger. The kappa efficiency corresponded to 36.32 and 25.93, respectively. That is important to emphasize that the cellulase activity was either analyzed and significant levels were not detected, which explain why the viscosity was not significantly modified. PMID:24010038

  4. [Effect of alcoholic extracts of wild plants on the inhibition of growth of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Fusarium moniliforme and Fusarium poae moulds].

    PubMed

    Tequida-Meneses, Martn; Cortez-Rocha, Mario; Rosas-Burgos, Ema Carina; Lpez-Sandoval, Susana; Corrales-Maldonado, Consuelo

    2002-06-01

    Fungicidal activity of wild plants Larrea tridentata, Karwinskia humboldtiana, Ricinus communis, Eucalyptus globulus, Ambrosia ambrosioides, Nicotiana glauca, Ambrosia confertiflora, Datura discolor, Baccharis glutinosa, Proboscidea parviflora, Solanum rostratum, Jatropha cinerea, Salpianthus macrodonthus y Sarcostemma cynanchoides was evaluated against the moulds species Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Fusarium poae y Fusarium moniliforme moulds species. Alcoholic extracts 6% (w/v) were prepared using six grams of dried plant powders (leaves and stems) and alcohol (70% ethanol or 70% methanol). A spore suspension (1x10(6); ufc/ml) of each mould was prepared by adding saline solution (0.85%) and 0.1% tween 80. The extracts were mixed with Czapeck yeast agar (CYA) at 45-50 degrees C in 1:10 relation on Petri dishes. Triplicate Petri dishes of each treatment and for each mould were centrally inoculated and three Petri dishes were used without treatment as controls. The inoculated dishes and controls were incubated at 25 +/- 2 degrees C for eight days. The incubated dishes were examined each 48 h and after the colony diameter (radial growth) was measured. Two mould species were controlled by L. tridentata, B. glutinosa and P. parviflora. Extracts of L. tridentata in methanol or ethanol at 41.5-100% inhibited all six species of moulds. PMID:12828509

  5. Hybridization between Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date the sexual stages or teleomorphs have been described for three aflatoxigenic species in Aspergillus section Flavi: Petromyces flavus, P. parasiticus and P. nomius. In this study we examined the possibility of interspecific matings between A. flavus and A. parasiticus. These species can b...

  6. 76 FR 16297 - Aspergillus flavus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Findings In the Federal Register of March 3, 2010 (75 FR 9596) (FRL-8811-2), EPA issued a notice pursuant..., 2003 (68 FR 41541) (FRL-7311-6). Those health effects data were the basis for establishing the... exemptions for experimental use of Aspergillus flavus AF36 on pistachio (72 FR 28871, May 23, 2007)...

  7. Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is the major producer of carcinogenic aflatoxins in crops worldwide and is also an important opportunistic human pathogen in aspergillosis. The sexual state of this heterothallic fungus is described from crosses between strains of the opposite mating type. Sexual reproduction oc...

  8. Cryptic Sexuality in Aspergillus parasiticus and A. flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascomycetous fungi of the genus Aspergillus comprise a wide variety of species of biotechnological importance (e.g. A. sojae, A. oryzae, A. niger) as well as pathogens and toxin producers (e.g. A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. fumigatus, A. nidulans). With the exception of A. nidulans, which is a homot...

  9. Genomics of Aspergillus flavus mycotoxin production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aspergilli show immense ecological and metabolic diversity. To date, the sequences of fifteen different Aspergillus genomes have been determined providing scientists with an exciting resource to improve the understanding of Aspergillus molecular genomics. Aspergillus flavus, one of the most wide...

  10. Recombination and cryptic heterokaryosis in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogen of many agronomically important crops worldwide and can also cause human and animal diseases. A. flavus is the major producer of aflatoxins (AFs), which are carcinogenic secondary metabolites. In the United States, mycotoxins have been estimated to cause agricultur...

  11. Cyclopiazonic acid biosynthesis by Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid mycotoxin produced by some strains of Aspergillus flavus. Characterization of the CPA biosynthesis gene cluster confirmed that formation of CPA is via a three-enzyme pathway. This review examines the structure and organization of the CPA genes, elu...

  12. Genomic analysis of aspergillus flavus pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides colonize developing maize seeds and contaminate them with mycotoxins. Maize genotypes differ in resistance to these fungi, but incorporation of adequate resistance into desirable hybrids has been challenging.Little is known about pathogenesis of seeds...

  13. Evaluation of aflatoxin degradation by Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic and hepatocarcinogenic compounds produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus during infection of corn (maize), peanuts, cotton seed, and tree nuts (Figure 1). To minimize exposure to aflatoxins the U.S. Food and Drug Administration enforces a 20 ppb limit of aflatox...

  14. Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by some of the same strains of A. flavus that produce aflatoxins and by some Aspergillus oryzae strains. Despite its discovery 40 years ago, few reviews of its toxicity and biosynthesis have been reported. This review examines w...

  15. Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C.; Fujii, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid neurotoxin produced by some of the same strains of A. flavus that produce aflatoxins and by some Aspergillus oryzae strains. Despite its discovery 40 years ago, few reviews of its toxicity and biosynthesis have been reported. This review examines what is currently known about the toxicity of CPA to animals and humans, both by itself or in combination with other mycotoxins. The review also discusses CPA biosynthesis and the genetic diversity of CPA production in A. flavus/oryzae populations. PMID:22069533

  16. Evolutionary relationships among Aspergillus flavus vegetative compatibility groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal plant pathogen of many diverse crops including cotton, peanuts, maize, almond, and pistachio. During infection by A. flavus, crops are frequently contaminated with highly carcinogenic aflatoxins. A. flavus populations are composed of numerous vegetative compatibility g...

  17. Nuclear heterogeneity in conidial populations of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a major producer of aflatoxin and an opportunistic pathogen for a wide range of hosts. Understanding genotypic and phenotypic variations within strains of A. flavus is important for controlling disease and reducing aflatoxin contamination. A. flavus is multinucleate and predomi...

  18. Ecology, development and gene regulation in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the most widely known species of Aspergillus. It was described as a species in 1809 and first reported as a plant pathogen in 1920. More recently, A. flavus has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen and is now recognized as the second leading cause of aspergill...

  19. A first glance into the genome sequence of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, are toxic and carcinogenic metabolites. They contaminate agricultural crops before harvest and post harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed, Aspergillus flavus genomics p...

  20. Biotransformation of Stypotriol triacetate by Aspergillus niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areche, Carlos; Vaca, Inmaculada; Labbe, Pamela; Soto-Delgado, Jorge; Astudillo, Luis; Silva, Mario; Rovirosa, Juana; San-Martin, Aurelio

    2011-07-01

    Biological transformation of the meroditerpenoid, stypotriol triacetate ( 1) by the fungi Aspergillus niger, Cunninghamella elegans, Gibberella fujikuroi and Mucor plumbeus was studied. The incubation of 1 with A. niger yielded the new compound 6',14-diacetoxy-stypol-4,5-dione ( 2) whose structure was established by 1H, 13C and 2D NMR and supported by DFT/GIAO.

  1. Population dynamics of Aspergillus flavus following biocontrol treatment of corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many agronomically important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, over a period of two years. The field was planted in 2010 and plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Af...

  2. Potential of Aspergillus flavus Genomics for Applications in Biotechnology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a common saprophyte and opportunistic pathogen that survives in the natural environment by extracting nutrition from plant debris, insect carcasses and a variety of other carbon sources. A. flavus produces numerous secondary metabolites and hydrolytic enzymes. The primary obj...

  3. Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus sclerotia naturally produced in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is the major producer of carcinogenic aflatoxins worldwide in crops. Populations of A. flavus are characterized by high genetic variation and the source of this variation is likely sexual reproduction. The fungus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses produce ascospore-bearing ...

  4. Population shifts and mating-type heterokaryosis in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many agronomically important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, NC. This field was planted in 2010 and plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Afla-Guard) biocontrol strains, both of...

  5. Mating-type heterokaryosis and population shifts in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many agronomically important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, NC. This field was planted in 2010 and plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Afla-Guard) biocontrol strains, both of...

  6. Heritability study of eGFP-transformed Aspergillus flavus strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-harvest prevention of aflatoxin contamination of corn, cottonseed, and peanut through field inoculation with non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus appears to be the only method for biocontrol currently being used. Until recently, evidence for out-crossing in A. flavus was observed in agar slants...

  7. Population ecology of Aspergillus flavus associated with Mississippi Delta Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the source of Aspergillus flavus is required to effectively manage within-field aflatoxin contamination of maize (Zea mays L.). Studies assessed the density of A. flavus propagules and other soil microflora (Fusarium spp., total fungi) associated with Mississippi Delta soils, and corr...

  8. The maize rachis affects Aspergillus flavus movement during ear development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to follow infection in ears of maize hybrids resistant and susceptible to the fungus. Developing ears were needle-inoculated with GFP-transformed A. flavus 20 days after silk emergence, and GFP fluorescence in the pith was evalu...

  9. Population structure of Aspergillus flavus before and after biocontrol treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, over a period of two years. Plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Afla-Guard) biocontrol strains, both of which are ...

  10. What Does Genetic Diversity of Aspergillus flavus Tell Us About Aspergillus oryzae?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus oryzae belong to Aspergillus section Flavi. They are closely related and are of significant economic importance. The former species has the ability to produce harmful aflatoxins while the latter is widely used in food fermentation and industrial enzyme production. ...

  11. Screening a strain of Aspergillus niger and optimization of fermentation conditions for degradation of aflatoxin B?.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xue, Beibei; Li, Mengmeng; Mu, Yang; Chen, Zhihui; Li, Jianping; Shan, Anshan

    2014-11-01

    Aflatoxin B?, a type of highly toxic mycotoxin produced by some species belonging to the Aspergillus genus, such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, is widely distributed in feed matrices. Here, coumarin was used as the sole carbon source to screen microorganism strains that were isolated from types of feed ingredients. Only one isolate (ND-1) was able to degrade aflatoxin B? after screening. ND-1 isolate, identified as a strain of Aspergillus niger using phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 18S rDNA, could remove 26.3% of aflatoxin B? after 48 h of fermentation in nutrient broth (NB). Optimization of fermentation conditions for aflatoxin B? degradation by selected Aspergillus niger was also performed. These results showed that 58.2% of aflatoxin B? was degraded after 24 h of culture under the optimal fermentation conditions. The aflatoxin B? degradation activity of Aspergillus niger supernatant was significantly stronger than cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, effects of temperature, heat treatment, pH, and metal ions on aflatoxin B? degradation by the supernatant were examined. Results indicated that aflatoxin B? degradation of Aspergillus niger is enzymatic and this process occurs in the extracellular environment. PMID:25401962

  12. Enhanced diversity and aflatoxigenicity in interspecific hybrids of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus are two of the most important aflatoxin-producing species that contaminate agricultural commodities worldwide. Both species are heterothallic and undergo sexual reproduction in laboratory crosses. Here, we examine the possibility of interspecific matings betwe...

  13. Comparison of different inoculating methods to evaluate the pathogenicity and virulence of Aspergillus niger on two maize hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year field study was conducted to determine the effects of inoculation techniques on the aggressiveness of Aspergillus niger kernel infection in A. flavus resistant and susceptible maize hybrids. Ears were inoculated with the silk-channel, side-needle, and spray techniques 7 days after midsilk...

  14. METHODS TO SAMPLE AIR BORNE PROPAGULES OF ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several techniques (cyclone samplers, filter samplers and rotorods) were evaluated for detection of airborne Aspergillus flavus Link propagules in a cultivated region of southwest Arizona. Cyclone samplers operated continuously for 168 h (7 d) collected a dry sample that was ideal for quantificatio...

  15. RNA interference-mediated control of Aspergillus flavus in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus is a frequent contaminant of agricultural commodities such as corn, peanut, tree nuts and cottonseed. Ingestion of foods, especially corn, contaminated with aflatoxins has been implicated in acute toxicoses while chronic, low-level exposure can lead to...

  16. Mating-type heterokaryosis in Aspergillus flavus in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known pathogen of many important agricultural commodities and is a major producer of aflatoxins (AFs), which are carcinogenic polyketides that pose a serious health risk to humans and animals. Recently, heterokaryosis and the presence of cryptic alleles were shown to ex...

  17. Characterization of toxigenic and atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates from pistachio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty eight Aspergillus flavus isolates collected from a pistachio orchard in California were analyzed for production of aflatoxin (AF), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) and mating types. All toxigenic isolates produced both AFB1 and CPA. Twenty-one percent of the i...

  18. Recombination and cryptic heterokaryosis in experimental populations of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus infects both plants and animals, and is of toxicological importance due to its production of aflatoxins (AFs) and other mycotoxins. Mycotoxins can cause agricultural losses totaling upwards of $1.4 billion annually. Recent efforts to reduce AF concentrations have focused on the us...

  19. Evidence of aneuploidy modulating aflatoxigenicity in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known pathogen of many important agricultural commodities and is a major producer of aflatoxins, which are carcinogenic polyketides that pose a serious health risk to humans and animals. Aflatoxin contamination in peanut exports worldwide accounts for as much as $450 mi...

  20. Genomic profile of maize response to Aspergillus flavus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this experiment was to identify differentially expressed genes for Aspergillus flavus resistance in the Va35 (susceptible) and Mp313E (resistant) maize (Zea mays L.) lines using cDNA microarray analysis. Out of the 5065 ESTs analyzed, 2.4% of the total ESTs analyzed were significant...

  1. Regulation of Aspergillus flavus Aflatoxin Biosynthesis and Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus flavus produces a family of potent mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds collectively known as aflatoxins (AF). These secondary metabolites contaminate a number of oilseed crops during growth of the fungus and this can result in severe negative economic and health i...

  2. Integrated Database for Functional Analysis in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a plant and animal pathogen that also produces the carcinogen, aflatoxin. Because of its economic importance and well characterized pathway of aflatoxin biosynthesis, several labs are studying the development, metabolism, ecology and pathogenicity of this fungus. To facilitate...

  3. Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus are potent producers of carcinogenic and hepatotoxic aflatoxins, polyketide-derived secondary metabolites that contaminate a wide variety of agricultural crops. Strains with opposite mating-type genes MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 within each species were crossed in an att...

  4. Aflatoxin production and oxidative stress in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The colonization of crops by Aspergillus flavus results in the production of aflatoxins. Aflatoxin production is also exacerbated by abiotic stresses in the field. Here, we investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which accumulate in plant tissues in response to drought and heat stres...

  5. Nonaflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus TX9-8 Competitively Prevents Aflatoxin Production by A. flavus Isolates of Large and Small Sclerotial Morphotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxigenic Aspergillus flavus is the main etiological agent for aflatoxin contamination of crops. Using nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates to competitively exclude toxigenic A. flavus isolates in agricultural fields has become an adopted approach to reduce aflatoxin contamination. We determined th...

  6. Environmental and Developmental Factors Influencing Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic mycotoxins formed by a number of fungi in the genus Aspergillus. The major fungi responsible for aflatoxin formation in crop seeds in the field and in storage are Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. This review emphasizes developmental, environmental, biological and ...

  7. Genes Differentially Expressed by Aspergillus flavus Strains After Loss of Aflatoxin Production by Serial Transfers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic fungal secondary metabolites produced by Aspergillus flavus and other closely related species. To better understand the molecular events that are associated with aflatoxin production, three separate nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus strains were produced through serial transfer...

  8. Potential involvement of Aspergillus flavus laccases in peanut invasion at low water potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus (Link) accumulates aflatoxins in peanuts, mainly affecting immature kernels during drought. Peanut invasion by A. flavus induces synthesis of phytoalexins, mostly stilbenoids, as a plant defense mechanism. Fungal laccases are often related to pathogenicity, and among other subst...

  9. Lipids in Aspergillus flavus-maize interaction

    PubMed Central

    Scarpari, Marzia; Punelli, Marta; Scala, Valeria; Zaccaria, Marco; Nobili, Chiara; Ludovici, Matteo; Camera, Emanuela; Fabbri, Anna A.; Reverberi, Massimo; Fanelli, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    In some filamentous fungi, the pathways related to the oxidative stress and oxylipins production are involved both in the process of host-recognition and in the pathogenic phase. In fact, recent studies have shown that the production of oxylipins in filamentous fungi, yeasts and chromists is also related to the development of the organism itself and to mechanisms of communication with the host at the cellular level. The oxylipins, also produced by the host during defense reactions, are able to induce sporulation and to regulate the biosynthesis of mycotoxins in several pathogenic fungi. In A. flavus, the oxylipins play a crucial role as signals for regulating the biosynthesis of aflatoxins, the conidiogenesis and the formation of sclerotia. To investigate the involvement of an oxylipins based cross-talk into Z. mays and A. flavus interaction, we analyzed the oxylipins profile of the wild type strain and of three mutants of A. flavus that are deleted at the Aflox1 gene level also during maize kernel invasion. A lipidomic approach has been addressed through the use of LC-ToF-MS, followed by a statistical analysis of the principal components (PCA). The results showed the existence of a difference between the oxylipins profile generated by the WT and the mutants onto challenged maize. In relation to this, aflatoxin synthesis which is largely hampered in vitro, is intriguingly restored. These results highlight the important role of maize oxylipin in driving secondary metabolism in A. flavus. PMID:24578700

  10. Comparative Genomics of Aspergillus flavus and A. oryzae: An Early View

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus produces aflatoxins and is the second leading cause of aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals. Aspergillus oryzae, on the other hand, has been used for centuries in Japan for the fermentation of food. The recently available whole genome sequences of Aspergillus flavus an...

  11. Biotransformation of artemisinin by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yulian; Liu, Hua; Wu, Yunshan; Wei, Pingying; Chen, Zhencheng; Williamson, John S

    2015-04-01

    Biotransformation of artemisinin (1) by Aspergillus niger was investigated. During 12 days at 28 °C and pH 6.0, A. niger transformed artemisinin into four products. They were identified as 3β-hydroxy-4,12-epoxy-1-deoxyartemisinin (2), artemisinin G (3), 3,13-epoxyartemisinin (4), and 4α-hydroxy-1-deoxyartemisinin (5). Products 2 and 4 are new compounds and are being reported here for the first time. The product 4 contains a 3,13-epoxy structure. This is the first report of epoxidation of artemisinin using microbial strains. The product 4 still has an intact peroxide bridge and therefore can be used as a scaffold for further structural modification using chemical and biological methods in the search for new antimalarial drugs. PMID:25712678

  12. Biotransformation of swertiamarin by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun; Zhou, Bin

    2015-11-01

    The biotransforamtion of swertiamarin has been carried out using Aspergillus niger. The results showed that 60% swertiamarin were metabolized into two metabolites during the 5 days of biotransformation. The metabolites were identified as erythrocentaurin and 5-ethylidene-8-hydroxy-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1Hpyrano[3,4-c]-pyridine-1-one, a novel alkaloid, with NMR and MS. The hydrolysis of glucosidic bond catalyzed by β-D-glucosidase was found to be the rate-limiting reaction in pathway of biotransformation of swertiamarin. PMID:26639489

  13. Retting of Flax by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    De Frana, F P; Rosemberg, J A; De Jesus, A M

    1969-01-01

    In this study, retting was carried out by Aspergillus niger. The pH, galacturonic acid (GA), and total reducing sugar were determined; the end point was identified by the classic empirical processes and by the maximal GA content of the retting water. The process gave clear and resistent fibers, and the retting time was similar to that of current industrial processes with bacterial enzymes. Control of total acidity was not required, since the pH remained close to neutrality throughout the entire process. PMID:16349835

  14. Retting of Flax by Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    De Frana, F. P.; Rosemberg, J. A.; De Jesus, A. M.

    1969-01-01

    In this study, retting was carried out by Aspergillus niger. The pH, galacturonic acid (GA), and total reducing sugar were determined; the end point was identified by the classic empirical processes and by the maximal GA content of the retting water. The process gave clear and resistent fibers, and the retting time was similar to that of current industrial processes with bacterial enzymes. Control of total acidity was not required, since the pH remained close to neutrality throughout the entire process. PMID:16349835

  15. Nutrient environments influence competition among Aspergillus flavus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Hillary L; Cotty, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    The population dynamics of Aspergillus flavus, shaped in part by intraspecific competition, influence the likelihood and severity of crop aflatoxin contamination. Competition for nutrients may be one factor modulating intraspecific interactions, but the influences of specific types and concentrations of nutrients on competition between genotypes of A. flavus have not been investigated. Competition between paired A. flavus isolates on agar media was affected by varying concentrations of carbon (sucrose or asparagine) and nitrogen (nitrate or asparagine). Cocultivated isolate percentages from conidia and agar-embedded mycelia were quantified by measurements of isolate-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms with quantitative pyrosequencing. Compositions and concentrations of nutrients influenced conidiation resulting from cocultivation, but the percentages of total conidia from each competing isolate were not predicted by sporulation of isolates grown individually. Success during sporulation did not reflect the outcomes of competition during mycelial growth, and the extents to which isolate percentages from conidia and mycelia differed varied among both isolate pairs and media. Whether varying concentrations of sucrose, nitrate, or asparagine increased, decreased, or had no influence on competitive ability was isolate dependent. Different responses of A. flavus isolates to nutrient variability suggest genotypes are adapted to different nutrient environments that have the potential to influence A. flavus population structure and the epidemiology of aflatoxin contamination. PMID:23263958

  16. Genotypic and Phenotypic Versatility of Aspergillus flavus during Maize Exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Reverberi, Massimo; Punelli, Marta; Scala, Valeria; Scarpari, Marzia; Uva, Paolo; Mentzen, Wieslawa I.; Dolezal, Andrea L.; Woloshuk, Charles; Pinzari, Flavia; Fabbri, Anna A.; Fanelli, Corrado; Payne, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a cosmopolitan fungus able to respond to external stimuli and to shift both its trophic behaviour and the production of secondary metabolites, including that of the carcinogen aflatoxin (AF). To better understand the adaptability of this fungus, we examined genetic and phenotypic responses within the fungus when grown under four conditions that mimic different ecological niches ranging from saprophytic growth to parasitism. Global transcription changes were observed in both primary and secondary metabolism in response to these conditions, particularly in secondary metabolism where transcription of nearly half of the predicted secondary metabolite clusters changed in response to the trophic states of the fungus. The greatest transcriptional change was found between saprophytic and parasitic growth, which resulted in expression changes in over 800 genes in A. flavus. The fungus also responded to growth conditions, putatively by adaptive changes in conidia, resulting in differences in their ability to utilize carbon sources. We also examined tolerance of A. flavus to oxidative stress and found that growth and secondary metabolism were altered in a superoxide dismutase (sod) mutant and an alkyl-hydroperoxide reductase (ahp) mutant of A. flavus. Data presented in this study show a multifaceted response of A. flavus to its environment and suggest that oxidative stress and secondary metabolism are important in the ecology of this fungus, notably in its interaction with host plant and in relation to changes in its lifestyle (i.e. saprobic to pathogenic). PMID:23894339

  17. Nuclear heterogeneity in conidial populations of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Runa, Farhana; Carbone, Ignazio; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Payne, Gary A

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a major producer of aflatoxin and an opportunistic pathogen for a wide range of hosts. Understanding genotypic and phenotypic variation within strains of A. flavus is important for controlling disease and reducing aflatoxin contamination. A. flavus is multinucleate and predominantly haploid (n) and homokaryotic. Although cryptic heterokaryosis may occur in nature, it is unclear how nuclei in A. flavus influence genetic heterogeneity and if nuclear condition plays a role in fungal ecology. A. flavus mainly reproduces asexually by producing conidia. In order to observe whether conidia are homokaryotic or heterokaryotic, we labeled nuclei of A. flavus using two different nuclear localized fluorescent reporters. The reporter constructs (pYH2A and pCH2B), encode histones HH2A and HH2B fused at the C terminus with either yellow (EYFP) or cyan (ECFP) fluorescent proteins, respectively. The constructs were transformed into the double auxotrophic strain AFC-1 (-pyrG, -argD) to generate a strain containing each reporter construct. By taking advantage of the nutritional requirement for each strain, we were able to generate fusants between FR36 (-argD) expressing yellow fluorescence, and FR46 (-pyr4) expressing cyan fluorescence. Conidia from fusants between FR36 and FR46 showed three types of fluorescence: only EYFP, only ECFP or both EYFP+ECFP. Conidia containing nuclei expressing EYFP+ECFP were separated by Fluorescence-Activated Cell sorting (FACS) and were found to contain both yellow and cyan fluorescent markers in the same nucleus. Further characterization of conidia having only one nucleus but expressing both EYFP+ECFP fluorescence were found to be diploid (2n). Our findings suggest that A. flavus maintains nuclear heterogeneity in conidial populations. PMID:26362651

  18. Genomics of peanut-Aspergillus flavus interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination caused by Aspergillus fungi is a great concern in peanut production worldwide. Pre-harvest Aspergillii infection and aflatoxin contamination are usually severe in peanuts that are grown under drought stressed conditions. Genomic research can provide new tools and resources to...

  19. Selection of Aspergillus flavus isolates for biological control of aflatoxins in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Aspergillus flavus is responsible for producing carcinogenic mycotoxins, the aflatoxins, on corn (maize) and other crops. An additional harmful toxin, cyclopiazonic acid, is produced by some isolates of A. flavus. Several A. flavus strains that do not produce one or both of these mycoto...

  20. Aspergillus flavus Genomics: Gateway to Human and Animal Health, Food Safety, and Crop Resistance to Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is an imperfect filamentous fungus that has existed in nature for thousands of years. A. flavus is an opportunistic pathogen causing invasive and non-invasive aspergillosis in humans, animals, and insects. It is also an allergen causing allergic reaction in humans. A. flavus in...

  1. Genetic variability of Aspergillus flavus isolates from a Mississippi corn field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Aspergillus flavus represents a major threat to food safety and food security on a worldwide scale. Corn, peanuts, cotton, rice and edible nuts, can be colonized by A. flavus strains that produce carcinogenic aflatoxins. A biological strategy for control of toxigenic A. flavus starins inv...

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of Aspergillus flavus in the southern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of animals and wild and domesticated plants with a global distribution. During infection by A. flavus, crops are frequently contaminated with highly carcinogenic aflatoxins. A. flavus populations are composed of numerous vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs),...

  3. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Cavaglieri, L.; Vital, H.; Cristofolini, A.; Merkis, C.; Astoreca, A.; Orlando, J.; Carú, M.; Dalcero, A.; Rosa, C. A. R.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B 1 and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  4. Substrate-induced Lipase Gene Expression and Aflatoxin Production in Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfatoxins are toxic metabolites with demonstrated carcinogenic activity in vertebrate systems produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus when these fungi infect corn, cotton, peanuts and tree nuts. Lipid metabolism has been demonstrated to be utilized by fungi to as nutrition for growth and...

  5. The population genomics of mycotoxin diversity in Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycotoxins, and especially the aflatoxins, are an enormous problem in agriculture, with aflatoxin B1 being the most carcinogenic known natural compound. The worldwide costs associated with aflatoxin monitoring and crop losses are in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Aspergillus flavus and A. par...

  6. Screening a Strain of Aspergillus niger and Optimization of Fermentation Conditions for Degradation of Aflatoxin B1 †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xue, Beibei; Li, Mengmeng; Mu, Yang; Chen, Zhihui; Li, Jianping; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1, a type of highly toxic mycotoxin produced by some species belonging to the Aspergillus genus, such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, is widely distributed in feed matrices. Here, coumarin was used as the sole carbon source to screen microorganism strains that were isolated from types of feed ingredients. Only one isolate (ND-1) was able to degrade aflatoxin B1 after screening. ND-1 isolate, identified as a strain of Aspergillus niger using phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 18S rDNA, could remove 26.3% of aflatoxin B1 after 48 h of fermentation in nutrient broth (NB). Optimization of fermentation conditions for aflatoxin B1 degradation by selected Aspergillus niger was also performed. These results showed that 58.2% of aflatoxin B1 was degraded after 24 h of culture under the optimal fermentation conditions. The aflatoxin B1 degradation activity of Aspergillus niger supernatant was significantly stronger than cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, effects of temperature, heat treatment, pH, and metal ions on aflatoxin B1 degradation by the supernatant were examined. Results indicated that aflatoxin B1 degradation of Aspergillus niger is enzymatic and this process occurs in the extracellular environment. PMID:25401962

  7. Aspergillus flavus impairs antioxidative enzymes of Sternochetus mangiferae during mycosis.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, Kamala P D; Ayyasamy, Arthikirubha; Kempraj, Vivek; Aurade, Ravindra M; Govindan, Selvakumar; Verghese, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Insects depend upon cuticular, humoral and cellular defenses to resist mycosis. However, entomopathogenic fungi through co-evolution have developed mechanisms to counter such defenses. Although a plethora of mechanisms of mycosis by entomopathogenic fungi are well-established, studies on the impairment of insects' antioxidative enzymes during mycosis remain elusive. Here, we used the interaction of Sternochetus mangiferae and its associated entomopathogenic fungus, Aspergillus flavus, as a model to validate our hypothesis. Uninfected insects were exposed to fungal spores for infection to occur. We observed symptoms of mycosis within 48 h of incubation period. Biochemical studies on antioxidative enzymes namely catalase, peroxidase and phenoloxidase, in infected and uninfected insects revealed decreased activity of these enzymes. It appears that A. flavus disables the host's antioxidative enzyme system that plays a crucial role in elimination of oxidative toxins produced during mycosis. PMID:25446036

  8. Structure analysis of an Aspergillus flavus kernels population in North Italy. First analysis of an Aspergillus flavus kernels population based on vegetative compatibility groups in Northern Italy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to gain insight into the causal agents of aflatoxin contamination of maize in Italy, populations of Aspergillus flavus on maize produced in the most affected area were characterized. Forty-six percent of A. flavus, isolated from maize kernels collected in 5 districts of northern Italy betwe...

  9. Isolation and characterization of polygalacturonase genes (pecA and pecB) from Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, M P; Shieh, M T; Cleveland, T E; Cary, J W; Dean, R A

    1995-01-01

    Two genes, pecA and pecB, encoding endopolyglacturonases were cloned from a highly aggressive strain of Aspergillus flavus. The pecA gene consisted of 1,228 bp encoding a protein of 363 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 37.6 kDa, interrupted by two introns of 58 and 81 bp in length. Accumulation of pecA mRNA in both pectin- or glucose-grown mycelia in the highly aggressive strain matched the activity profile of a pectinase previously identified as P2c. Transformants of a weakly aggressive strain containing a functional copy of the pecA gene produced P2c in vitro, confirming that pecA encodes P2c. The coding region of pecB was determined to be 1,217 bp in length interrupted by two introns of 65 and 54 bp in length. The predicted protein of 366 amino acids had an estimated molecular mass of 38 kDa. Transcripts of this gene accumulated in mycelia grown in medium containing pectin alone, never in mycelia grown in glucose-containing medium, for both highly and weakly aggressive strains. Thus, pecB encodes the activity previously identified as P1 or P3. pecA and pecB share a high degree of sequence identity with polygalacturonase genes from Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus oryzae, further establishing the close relationships between members of the A. flavus group. Conservation of intron positions in these genes also indicates that they share a common ancestor with genes encoding endopolyglacturonases of Aspergillus niger. PMID:7574642

  10. How Peroxisomes Affect Aflatoxin Biosynthesis in Aspergillus Flavus

    PubMed Central

    Reverberi, Massimo; Punelli, Marta; Smith, Carrie A.; Zjalic, Slaven; Scarpari, Marzia; Scala, Valeria; Cardinali, Giorgia; Aspite, Nicaela; Pinzari, Flavia; Payne, Gary A.; Fabbri, Anna A.; Fanelli, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, peroxisomes are crucial for the primary metabolism and play a pivotal role in the formation of some secondary metabolites. Further, peroxisomes are important site for fatty acids ?-oxidation, the formation of reactive oxygen species and for their scavenging through a complex of antioxidant activities. Oxidative stress is involved in different metabolic events in all organisms and it occurs during oxidative processes within the cell, including peroxisomal ?-oxidation of fatty acids. In Aspergillus flavus, an unbalance towards an hyper-oxidant status into the cell is a prerequisite for the onset of aflatoxin biosynthesis. In our preliminary results, the use of bezafibrate, inducer of both peroxisomal ?-oxidation and peroxisome proliferation in mammals, significantly enhanced the expression of pex11 and foxA and stimulated aflatoxin synthesis in A. flavus. This suggests the existence of a correlation among peroxisome proliferation, fatty acids ?-oxidation and aflatoxin biosynthesis. To investigate this correlation, A. flavus was transformed with a vector containing P33, a gene from Cymbidium ringspot virus able to induce peroxisome proliferation, under the control of the promoter of the Cu,Zn-sod gene of A. flavus. This transcriptional control closely relates the onset of the antioxidant response to ROS increase, with the proliferation of peroxisomes in A. flavus. The AfP33 transformant strain show an up-regulation of lipid metabolism and an higher content of both intracellular ROS and some oxylipins. The combined presence of a higher amount of substrates (fatty acids-derived), an hyper-oxidant cell environment and of hormone-like signals (oxylipins) enhances the synthesis of aflatoxins in the AfP33 strain. The results obtained demonstrated a close link between peroxisome metabolism and aflatoxin synthesis. PMID:23094106

  11. Aqueous extracts of Tulbaghia violacea inhibit germination of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus conidia.

    PubMed

    Somai, Benesh Munilal; Belewa, Vuyokazi

    2011-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus are important plant pathogens and causal agents of pre- and postharvest rots of corn, peanuts, and tree nuts. These fungal pathogens cause significant crop losses and produce aflatoxins, which contaminate many food products and contribute to liver cancer worldwide. Aqueous preparations of Tulbaghia violacea (wild garlic) were antifungal and at 10 mg/ml resulted in sustained growth inhibition of greater than 50% for both A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Light microscopy revealed that the plant extract inhibited conidial germination in a dose-dependent manner. When exposed to T. violacea extract concentrations of 10 mg/ml and above, A. parasiticus conidia began germinating earlier and germination was completed before that of A. flavus, indicating that A. parasiticus conidia were more resistant to the antifungal effects of T. violacea than were A. flavus conidia. At a subinhibitory extract dose of 15 mg/ml, hyphae of both fungal species exhibited increased granulation and vesicle formation, possibly due to increased reactivity between hyphal cellular components and T. violacea extract. These hyphal changes were not seen when hyphae were formed in the absence of the extract. Transmission electron microscopy revealed thickening of conidial cell walls in both fungal species when grown in the presence of the plant extract. Cell walls of A. flavus also became considerably thicker than those of A. parasiticus, indicating differential response to the extract. Aqueous preparations of T. violacea can be used as antifungal treatments for the control of A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Because the extract exhibited a more pronounced effect on A. flavus than on A. parasiticus, higher doses may be needed for control of A. parasiticus infections. PMID:21669082

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Aspergillus niger Strain An76.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weili; Cheng, Zhi; Zhang, Huaiqiang; Liu, Lin; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger has become one of the most important fungi in industrial biotechnology, and it can efficiently secrete both polysaccharide-degrading enzymes and organic acids. We report here the 6,074,961,332-bp draft sequence of A. niger strain An76, and the findings provide important information related to its lignocellulose-degrading ability. PMID:26893421

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Aspergillus niger Strain An76

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Weili; Cheng, Zhi; Zhang, Huaiqiang; Liu, Lin; Gao, Peiji

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger has become one of the most important fungi in industrial biotechnology, and it can efficiently secrete both polysaccharide-degrading enzymes and organic acids. We report here the 6,074,961,332-bp draft sequence of A. niger strain An76, and the findings provide important information related to its lignocellulose-degrading ability. PMID:26893421

  14. Copper induction and differential expression of laccase in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Ola M; Momtaz, Osama A

    2015-03-01

    Aspergillus flavus was isolated from soil and exhibited laccase activity under both constitutive and copper induced conditions. Spiking the medium with 1 mM copper sulfate resulted in an increase in the activity which reached 51.84 U/mL, a distinctive protein band was detected at 60 kDa. The extracellular enzyme was purified 81 fold using gel filtration chromatography and resulted in two different laccase fractions L1 and L2, the latter had a higher enzymatic activity which reached 79.57 U/mL and specific activity of 64.17 U/μg protein. The analysis of the spectrum of the L2 fraction showed a shoulder at 330 nm which is characteristic for T2/T3 copper centers; both copper and zinc were detected suggesting that this is an unconventional white laccase. Primers of laccase gene were designed and synthesized to recover specific gene from A. flavus . Sequence analysis indicated putative laccase (Genbank ID: JF683612) at the amino acid level suggesting a close identity to laccases from other genera containing the copper binding site. Decolorization of textile waste water under different conditions showed possible application in bioremediation within a short period of time. The effect of copper on A. flavus was concentration dependent. PMID:26221119

  15. Copper induction and differential expression of laccase in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Ola M.; Momtaz, Osama A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus was isolated from soil and exhibited laccase activity under both constitutive and copper induced conditions. Spiking the medium with 1 mM copper sulfate resulted in an increase in the activity which reached 51.84 U/mL, a distinctive protein band was detected at 60 kDa. The extracellular enzyme was purified 81 fold using gel filtration chromatography and resulted in two different laccase fractions L1 and L2, the latter had a higher enzymatic activity which reached 79.57 U/mL and specific activity of 64.17 U/μg protein. The analysis of the spectrum of the L2 fraction showed a shoulder at 330 nm which is characteristic for T2/T3 copper centers; both copper and zinc were detected suggesting that this is an unconventional white laccase. Primers of laccase gene were designed and synthesized to recover specific gene from A. flavus . Sequence analysis indicated putative laccase (Genbank ID: JF683612) at the amino acid level suggesting a close identity to laccases from other genera containing the copper binding site. Decolorization of textile waste water under different conditions showed possible application in bioremediation within a short period of time. The effect of copper on A. flavus was concentration dependent. PMID:26221119

  16. AMINO ACID SUPPLEMENTATION REVEALS DIFFERENTIAL REGULATION OF AFLATOXIN BIOSYNTHESIS IN ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS NRRL 3357 AND ASPERGILLUS PARASITICUS SRRC 143

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate aflatoxin production, the biosynthesis of the toxin in A. flavus and A. parasiticus grown in yeast extract su...

  17. Evaluation of intraspecific competition (Aspergillus flavus Link) and aflatoxin formation in suspended disc culture and preharvest maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abilities of non-aflatoxin producing strains of Aspergillus flavus NRRL 32354; 18543; 21882; 21368 as well as domesticated koji strains Aspergillus oryzae (syn. A. flavus var. oryzae) NRRL 451; 1911; 5592; 6271; 30038 to interfere with aflatoxin formation by A. flavus NRRL 3357; 32355 were exami...

  18. Aspergillus Niger Genomics: Past, Present and into the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger is a filamentous ascomycete fungus that is ubiquitous in the environment and has been implicated in opportunistic infections of humans. In addition to its role as an opportunistic human pathogen, A. niger is economically important as a fermentation organism used for the production of citric acid. Industrial citric acid production by A. niger represents one of the most efficient, highest yield bioprocesses in use currently by industry. The genome size of A. niger is estimated to be between 35.5 and 38.5 megabases (Mb) divided among eight chromosomes/linkage groups that vary in size from 3.5 - 6.6 Mb. Currently, there are three independent A. niger genome projects, an indication of the economic importance of this organism. The rich amount of data resulting from these multiple A. niger genome sequences will be used for basic and applied research programs applicable to fermentation process development, morphology and pathogenicity.

  19. Dual genome microarray: Fusarium verticillioides and Aspergillus flavus gene expression in co-culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus, and fumonisins produced by Fusarium verticillioides, are prominent among the mycotoxins associated with economic losses to the maize grain industry worldwide. F. verticillioides is also recognized as a systemic endophyte of maize that prevents opportunisti...

  20. Recombination, balancing selection and geographic subdivision among worldwide populations of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a global agent of aflatoxin contamination of economically important crops such as corn, peanuts, and cottonseed. Extensive studies have elucidated the biochemical and regulatory mechanisms of aflatoxin production, but basic knowledge of the evolutionary processes that maintain ...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1206 - Aspergillus flavus AF36; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tolerance. (a) An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of the microbial..., refined oil; cotton, undelinted seed. (b) Aspergillus flavus AF36 is temporarily exempt from...

  2. Evaluation of Atoxigenic Strains of Aspergillus flavus as Potential Biocontrol Agents for Aflatoxin in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination resulting from maize infection by Aspergillus flavus is both an economic concern and public health concern. Therefore, strategies for controlling maize contamination are being investigated. Abilities of 11 naturally occurring atoxigenic strains in Nigeria to reduce aflatox...

  3. Characterization of an Aspergillus flavus alkaline protease and its role in the infection of maize kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 33 kDa protein present in Aspergillus flavus infected maize embryo tissue was identified as a fungal alkaline protease (ALP). This protein became one of the major extracellular proteins of A. flavus in potato dextrose broth medium cultural filtrate after 3 days, but was expressed at low levels or ...

  4. Molecular markers associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus in maize: QTL and discriminant analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination of maize (Zea mays L.) grain caused by Aspergillus flavus is a serious health hazard to animals and humans. Resistance to infection by A. flavus is poorly understood. The objectives of this investigation were to identify potential candidate markers associated with resistance ...

  5. A two-dimenstional proteome reference map of the aflatoxigenic fungus Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The description of A. flavus proteome provides insight into its basic biology and a basis for its future proteomic investigations. Aspergillus flavus is a widely distributed fungal pathogen that infects important agricultural commodities (maize, tree nuts, etc.) and contaminates them with aflatoxin...

  6. The release of the Aspergillus flavus whole genome sequence for public access

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. These toxic and carcinogenic compounds contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed, Aspergilllus flavus wh...

  7. The potential role of oxidative stress in Aspergillus flavus survivability and aflatoxin biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination of food and feed occurs due to growth of Aspergillus flavus. This poses a serious health risk because of aflatoxin’s toxic and carcinogenic properties which negatively impact human and livestock health. Colonization and subsequent aflatoxin production by A. flavus is typicall...

  8. Volatile profiles of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Aspergillus flavus using SPME for solid phase extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxigenic and atoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus were grown on potato dextrose agar (PDA) and wetted sterile, cracked corn for 21 and 14 days, respectively. Volatile compounds produced by A. flavus, as well as those present in the PDA controls and sterile cracked corn, were collected using sol...

  9. The launch of the Aspergillus flavus genome browser and limited release of whole genome sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. These toxic and carcinogenic compounds contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed, Aspergilllus flavus wh...

  10. Effect of sexual recombination on population diversity in aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is the major producer of carcinogenic aflatoxins (AFs) in crops worldwide. Recent efforts to reduce AF concentrations in crops have focused on the use of two non-aflatoxigenic A. flavus strains, AF36 and NRRL 21882 (Afla-Guard), as biological control agents. These products are a...

  11. Aspergillus Flavus/Aflatoxin Occurrence and Expression of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Genes in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins (AF) are carcinogenic metabolites produced by several species of Aspergillus, including A. flavus. Although A. flavus is readily isolated from environmental samples, soil and plant material are considered the natural habitat of this fungus. Studies were conducted on a Dundee silt loam to ...

  12. Aspergillus flavus Blast2GO gene ontology database: elevated growth temperature alters amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of a representative gene ontology (GO) database is a prerequisite for a successful functional genomics study. Using online Blast2GO resources we constructed a GO database of Aspergillus flavus. Of the predicted total 13,485 A. flavus genes 8,987 were annotated with GO terms. The mea...

  13. Aspergillus flavus Genomic Data Mining Provides Clues for Its Use in Producing Biobased Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is notorious for its ability to produce aflatoxins. It is also an opportunistic pathogen that infects plants, animals and human beings. The ability to survive in the natural environment, living on plant tissues (leaves or stalks), live or dead insects make A. flavus a ubiquitous...

  14. A maize trypsin inhibitor (ZmTIp) with limited activity against Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of maize both pre- and post-harvest by Aspergillus flavus is a severe agricultural problem in the Southern United States. Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by A. flavus and are carcinogenic to humans and animals upon ingestion. Extensive research has been conducted to identif...

  15. Recombination and lineage-specific gene loss in the aflatoxin gene cluster of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus are potent carcinogens that contaminate agricultural crops. Recent efforts to reduce aflatoxin concentrations in crops have focused on biological control using nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus strains AF36 (= NRRL 18543) and NRRL 21882 (the active component of af...

  16. A GOOD ENDOPHYTE OF MAIZE: ACREMONIUM ZEAE ANTIBIOTICS INHIBITORY TO ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS AND FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maize endophyte Acremonium zeae Gams and Sumner is antagonistic to kernel rotting and mycotoxin producing fungi Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides in cultural tests for antagonism and interferes with A. flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination of preharvest maize kernels. Chemi...

  17. Sexual recombination and the possibility of cryptic heterokaryosis in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus infects both plants and animals and is of toxicological importance due to its production of aflatoxins (AFs). Recent efforts to reduce AF concentrations have focused on the use of the biocontrols AF36 and Afla-Guard, both of which contain nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus strains as an ...

  18. Formation of Aspergillus flavus sclerotia on corn grown under different drought stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a major producer of carcinogenic aflatoxins worldwide in corn, peanuts, tree nuts, cottonseed, spices and other crops. Many countries have strict limits on the amount of aflatoxins permitted in human commodities and animal feed. Sclerotia produced by A. flavus serve several f...

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF MAIZE KERNEL ENDOSPERM PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH RESISTANCE TO AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION BY ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogens produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus during infection of susceptible crops, such as maize (Zea mays L.). Previously, embryo proteins from maize genotypes resistant or susceptible to A. flavus infection were compared using proteomics and resistance-associated proteins wer...

  20. NON-TOXIGENIC ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS ISOLATES FOR REDUCING AFLATOXIN IN MISSISSIPPI DELTA CORN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for two non-toxigenic isolates of Aspergillus flavus CT3 and K49 isolated from the Mississippi Delta to reduce aflatoxin contamination of corn was assessed in a field study. These two isolates exhibited comparable growth and aggressiveness as the toxigenic A. flavus isolate F3W4. The...

  1. EVALUATION OF INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION (ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS LINK) AND AFLATOXIN FORMATION IN SUSPENDED DISC CULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of two non-aflatoxin producing strains of Aspergillus flavus (NRRL 32354; NRRL 29269) to interfere with aflatoxin production by A. flavus NRRL 32355 was examined using a replacement series with the suspended disc culture method (R.A. Norton, 1995). Individual glass fiber discs, affixed ...

  2. Integrated database for identifying candate genes for Aspergillus flavus resistance in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus Link:Fr, an opportunistic fungus that produces aflatoxin, is pathogenic to maize and other oilseed crops. Aflatoxin is a potent carcinogen, and its presence markedly reduces the value of grain. Understanding and enhancing host resistance to A. flavus infection and/or subsequent af...

  3. Genetic Isolation among Sympatric Vegetative Compatibility Groups of the aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus, fungal pathogen of animals and both wild and economically important plants, is most recognized for producing aflatoxin, a cancer-causing secondary metabolite, that contaminates food and animal feed globally. A. flavus is asexual and has a vegetative incompatibility system that li...

  4. Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus sclerotia: acquisition of novel alleles from soil populations and uniparental mitochondrial inheritance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. ...

  5. Specificity of Immunofluorescent Staining for Study of Aspergillus flavus in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, E. L.; Bankole, R. O.

    1965-01-01

    Fluorescein-labeled antiserum prepared with Aspergillus flavus strain CS was tested for specificity by staining fungi grown in soil in the vicinity of buried slides. All 14 strains of A. flavus fluoresced as intensely or nearly as intensely as the antigen control. Among 21 isolates of species of Aspergillus other than A. flavus, 17 reacted with moderate to low fluorescence at intensities readily distinguishable from that of A. flavus. The fluorescence of the remaining four cultures, and particularly A. sydowi, was indistinguishable from that of A. flavus. Fungi other than aspergilli were generally nonreactive. Interfering cross-reactions were encountered for one strain of Spicaria and one strain of Stemphylium; three isolates could not be evaluated because of interfering autofluorescence. An additional 22 isolates were either wholly negative or had a low order of fluorescence. Agglutination tests between each of the fungi and A. flavus CS serum revealed close agreement between agglutination titer and fluorescent-staining reaction. Unknown fungi freshly isolated from soil were checked for reaction to the A. flavus labeled antiserum; only one isolate gave a pronounced staining reaction, and that one proved to be a strain of A. flavus. In a simplified ecological model, the fluorescent-antibody technique was used to follow the development of A. flavus in mixed culture in soil with five other soil fungi. Images Fig. 1 PMID:5325934

  6. NsdC and NsdD affect Aspergillus flavus morphogenesis and aflatoxin production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcription factors NsdC and NsdD have been shown to be necessary for sexual development in Aspergillus nidulans. Herein we examine the role of these proteins in development and aflatoxin production of the agriculturally important, aflatoxin-producing fungus, Aspergillus flavus. We found tha...

  7. Non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates reduce aflatoxins, cyclopiazonic acid and fumonisin in corn (maize)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus strains vary widely in their production of aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). A total of 500 Aspergillus strains isolated from a variety of sources showed 16.4% were negative for both aflatoxin and CPA, 41.3% were positive for both mycotoxins, 13.0% were positive only fo...

  8. RNA interference reduces aflatoxin accumulation by Aspergillus flavus in peanut seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are among the most powerful carcinogens in nature. They are produced by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus Link and other Aspergillus species. Aflatoxins accumulate in many crops, including rice, wheat, oats, pecans, pistachios, soybean, cassava, almonds, peanuts, beans, corn and cot...

  9. Population genetics as a tool for understanding toxigenesis in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species in Aspergillus section Flavi commonly infect agricultural staples such as corn, peanuts, cottonseed, and tree nuts and produce an array of mycotoxins, the most potent of which is aflatoxin. Aspergillus flavus is the dominant aflatoxin-producing species in the majority of crops. Populations...

  10. Sexual reproduction influences aflatoxin chemotype diversity in worldwide populations of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic polyketides produced by several Aspergillus species that contaminate food crops worldwide. Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus are the most common agents of aflatoxin contamination of oil-rich crops. The genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis are clustered and convert acetat...

  11. Production of the Enzyme Naringinase by Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Bram, B.; Solomons, G. L.

    1965-01-01

    The formation of naringinase, a glycolytic enzyme produced by Aspergillus niger, is repressed by glucose. Production of the enzyme is decreased below pH 4.0 and is stimulated by the presence of substrate. Fermentation conditions are described which cause the formation of the enzyme in approximately a fivefold greater concentration than that previously described. PMID:5866035

  12. Glucoamylase production by a newly isolated strain of Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkar, V.P.; Lewis, N.F.

    1982-01-01

    Glucoamylase production by Aspergillus niger 57 was studied in complex and synthetic media under stationary vs. submerged conditions. Stationary cultivation resulted in significantly greater yields than did submerged culture. Crude enzyme activity was optimum at 60 degrees and pH 4.0.

  13. Utilization of brewery spent grain liquor by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Hang, Y D; Splittstoesser, D F; Woodams, E E

    1975-11-01

    Aspergillus niger was found capable of rapidly converting about 97% of the sugar from brewery spent grain liquor to fungal mass. The yield of dry mycelium, based on the sugar consumed, was approximately 57%. This fungus produced 1.10% titratable acid calculated as citric acid and reduced the biochemical oxygen demand by 96%. PMID:1200633

  14. Utilization of Brewery Spent Grain Liquor by Aspergillus niger1

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Y. D.; Splittstoesser, D. F.; Woodams, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    Aspergillus niger was found capable of rapidly converting about 97% of the sugar from brewery spent grain liquor to fungal mass. The yield of dry mycelium, based on the sugar consumed, was approximately 57%. This fungus produced 1.10% titratable acid calculated as citric acid and reduced the biochemical oxygen demand by 96%. PMID:1200633

  15. Development and Evaluation of an Affymetrix array for Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-species Affymetrix GeneChip array was developed to study development, metabolism and pathogenicity of A. flavus. This chip based on the whole genome sequence of A. flavus, contains 13,000 A. flavus genes, 8,000 maize genes and 25 human and mouse innate immune response genes, as well as the ...

  16. Flavone Biotransformation by Aspergillus niger and the Characterization of Two Newly Formed Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Assawah, Suzan W.; El-Sharkawy, Saleh H.; Abdel-Salam, Amal

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from Allium sativum was used at large scale fermentation (150 mg flavone/200 ml medium) to obtain suitable amounts of the products, efficient for identification. Then spectral analysis (UV, IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR) and mass spectrometry were performed for the two products, which contributed to the identification process. The metabolite (1) was identified as 2'-hydroxydihydrochalcone, and the metabolite (2) was identified as 2'-hydroxyphenylmethylketone, which were more active than flavone itself. Antioxidant activities of the two isolated metabolites were tested compared with ascorbic acid. Antioxidant activity of metabolite (1) was recorded 64.58% which represented 79% of the antioxidant activity of ascorbic acid, and metabolite (2) was recorded 54.16% (67% of ascorbic acid activity). However, the antioxidant activity of flavone was recorded 37.50% which represented 46% of ascorbic acid activity. The transformed products of flavone have antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans, with MIC was recorded 250 µg/ml for metabolite (2) against all three organism and 500, 300, and 300 µg/ml for metabolite (1) against tested microorganisms (P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Klebsiella pneumonia, Fusarium moniliforme, A. flavus, Saccharomyces cerviceae, Kluveromyces lactis and C. albicans) at this order. PMID:23990746

  17. Decontamination of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus spores on hazelnuts via atmospheric pressure fluidized bed plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Dasan, Beyhan Gunaydin; Mutlu, Mehmet; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an atmospheric pressure fluidized bed plasma (APFBP) system was designed and its decontamination effect on aflatoxigenic fungi (Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus) on the surface of hazelnuts was investigated. Hazelnuts were artificially contaminated with A. flavus and A. parasiticus and then were treated with dry air plasma for up to 5min in the APFBP system at various plasma parameters. Significant reductions of 4.50 log (cfu/g) in A. flavus and 4.19 log (cfu/g) in A. parasiticus were achieved after 5min treatments at 100% V - 25kHz (655W) by using dry air as the plasma forming gas. The decontamination effect of APFBP on A. flavus and A. parasiticus spores inoculated on hazelnuts was increased with the applied reference voltage and the frequency. No change or slight reductions were observed in A. flavus and A. parasiticus load during the storage of plasma treated hazelnuts whereas on the control samples fungi continued to grow under storage conditions (30days at 25C). Temperature change on hazelnut surfaces in the range between 35 and 90C was monitored with a thermal camera, and it was demonstrated that the temperature increase taking place during plasma treatment did not have a lethal effect on A. flavus and A. parasiticus spores. The damage caused by APFBP treatment on Aspergillus spp. spores was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. PMID:26398284

  18. Identification of the Predominant Volatile Compounds Produced by Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Kamin?ki, E.; Libbey, L. M.; Stawicki, S.; Wasowicz, E.

    1972-01-01

    A culture of Aspergillus flavus grown on moistened wheat meal was homogenized with a blendor, and the resulting slurry was vacuum-distilled at 5 mm of Hg and 35 C. The aqueous distillate was collected in traps cooled to -10 to -80 C. The culture volatiles were extracted from the distillate with CH2Cl2, and, after removal of the bulk of the solvent, the concentrated volatiles were examined by packed-column gas chromatography. Nineteen peaks were observed, and coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to identify the larger components. The compounds identified were: 3-methyl-butanol, 3-octanone, 3-octanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octanol, and cis-2-octen-1-ol. The two octenols were the predominant compounds, and sufficient sample was trapped from the gas chromatograph for infrared analyses; this confirmed the mass spectral identifications and permitted the assignment of the cis designation to 2-octen-1-ol. Both oct-1-en-3-ol and cis-2-octen-1-ol are thought to be responsible for the characteristic musty-fungal odor of certain fungi; the latter compound may be a useful chemical index of fungal growth. PMID:4629700

  19. Interactions in solution and crystallization of Aspergillus flavus urate oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, F.; Vivars, D.; Robert, Ch.; Colloc'h, N.

    2001-11-01

    Interparticle interactions of urate oxidase from Aspergillus flavus have been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering to determine crystallization conditions. This enzyme is a homotetramer with a total molecular weight of 128 kDa. It is a slightly basic protein (pI between 7.5 and 8). The interaction potentials have been studied as a function of the main thermodynamic and chemical parameters: temperature, protein concentration, pH, salt nature and concentration, addition of polyols. In 10 mM sodium carbonate at pH 10.5, the interactions are slightly repulsive and become less repulsive with a pH closer to pI. With the addition of carbonate, the protein loses its tetrameric structure for a dimeric one; with formate, the tetrameric structure remains stable. We also studied the effect of polyethylene glycols as it had been done with high molecular weight proteins. With the addition of PEG 8 K, the interactions became less repulsive and even turned attractive with the addition of both PEG 8 K and salt. Protein crystals of urate oxidase were observed in slightly repulsive conditions (second virial coefficient A2 about +10 -5 mol ml g -2 instead of -2 to -810 -4 mol ml g -2 for low molecular weight proteins).

  20. PRODUCTION OF CYCLOPIAZONIC ACID, AFLATREM AND AFLATOXIN BY ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS IS REGULATED BY VEA, A GENE NECESSARY FOR SCLEROTIAL FORMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant pathogenic fungus, Aspergillus flavus, produces several types of mycotoxins. The most well known are the carcinogenic compounds called aflatoxins. In addition, A. flavus produces cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem mycotoxins, contributing to the toxicity of A. flavus infected crops. Cyclop...

  1. Toward elucidation of genetic and functional genetic mechanisms in corn host resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic mycotoxins produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Aflatoxin contamination in pre-harvest corn profusely happens when heat and drought field conditions favor A. flavus colonization. Commercial corn hybrids are generally susceptible to A. flavus infection. An ideal cont...

  2. RNA sequencing of an nsdC mutant reveals global regulation of secondary metabolic gene clusters in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The zinc finger transcription factor nsdC is required for both sexual development and aflatoxin production in the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus. While previous work with an nsdC knockout mutant was conducted in Aspergillus nidulans and A. flavus strain 3357, here we demonstrate perturbations...

  3. Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.

    SciTech Connect

    Gladden, John Michael

    2013-09-01

    Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  4. Purification and immobilization of Aspergillus niger. beta. -xylosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Oguntimein, G.B.; Reilly, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    ..beta..-Xylosidase from a commercial Aspergillus niger preparation was purified by differential ammonium sulfate precipitation and either gel permeation or cation exchange chromatography, giving 16-fold purification in 32% yield for the first technique or 27-fold purification in 19% yield for the second. Enzyme prepared by this method was immobilized to 10 different carriers, but only when it was bound to alumina with TiCl/sub 4/ and to alkylamine porous silica with glutaraldehyde were substantial efficiencies and stabilities achieved.

  5. Analytical and computational approaches to define the Aspergillus niger secretome

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Adrian; Butler, Gregory D.; Powlowski, Justin; Panisko, Ellen A.; Baker, Scott E.

    2009-03-01

    We used computational and mass spectrometric approaches to characterize the Aspergillus niger secretome. The 11,200 gene models predicted in the genome of A. niger strain ATCC 1015 were the data source for the analysis. Depending on the computational methods used, 691 to 881 proteins were predicted to be secreted proteins. We cultured A. niger in six different media and analyzed the extracellular proteins produced using mass spectrometry. A total of 222 proteins were identified, with 39 proteins expressed under all six conditions and 74 proteins expressed under only one condition. The secreted proteins identified by mass spectrometry were used to guide the correction of about 20 gene models. Additional analysis focused on extracellular enzymes of interest for biomass processing. Of the 63 glycoside hydrolases predicted to be capable of hydrolyzing cellulose, hemicellulose or pectin, 94% of the exo-acting enzymes and only 18% of the endo-acting enzymes were experimentally detected.

  6. Hyperspectral imagery for observing spectral signature change in Aspergillus flavus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCrispino, Kevin; Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Brabham, Kori; Lewis, David; Beach, Jim; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2005-11-01

    Aflatoxin contaminated corn is dangerous for domestic animals when used as feed and cause liver cancer when consumed by human beings. Therefore, the ability to detect A. flavus and its toxic metabolite, aflatoxin, is important. The objective of this study is to measure A. flavus growth using hyperspectral technology and develop spectral signatures for A. flavus. Based on the research group's previous experiments using hyperspectral imaging techniques, it has been confirmed that the spectral signature of A. flavus is unique and readily identifiable against any background or surrounding surface and among other fungal strains. This study focused on observing changes in the A. flavus spectral signature over an eight-day growth period. The study used a visible-near-infrared hyperspectral image system for data acquisition. This image system uses focal plane pushbroom scanning for high spatial and high spectral resolution imaging. Procedures previously developed by the research group were used for image calibration and image processing. The results showed that while A. flavus gradually progressed along the experiment timeline, the day-to-day surface reflectance of A. flavus displayed significant difference in discreet regions of the wavelength spectrum. External disturbance due to environmental changes also altered the growth and subsequently changed the reflectance patterns of A. flavus.

  7. HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY FOR OBSERVING SPECTRAL SIGNATURE CHANGE IN ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contaminated corn is dangerous for domestic animals when used as feed and cause liver cancer when consumed by human beings. Therefore, the ability to detect A. flavus and its toxic metabolite, aflatoxin, is important. The objective of this study is to measure A. flavus growth using hyper...

  8. The effect of 2-phenylethanol treatment on Aspergillus flavus transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pichia anomalais, which produces the antimicrobial volatile 2-phenylethanol (2-PE), is effective in reducing A. flavus growth and aflatoxin production. We treated A. flavus NRRL3357 with 2-PE and analyzed changes in the transcriptomic profiles at different stages of fungal growth. RNA-Seq reads from...

  9. Six novel constitutive promoters for metabolic engineering of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Blumhoff, Marzena; Steiger, Matthias G; Marx, Hans; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Genetic tools for the fine-tuning of gene expression levels are a prerequisite for rational strain optimization through metabolic engineering. While Aspergillus niger is an industrially important fungus, widely used for production of organic acids and heterologous proteins, the available genetic tool box for this organism is still rather limited. Here, we characterize six novel constitutive promoters of A. niger providing different expression levels. The selection of the promoters was based on published transcription data of A. niger. The promoter strength was determined with the ?-glucuronidase (gusA) reporter gene of Escherichia coli. The six promoters covered a GUS activity range of two to three orders of magnitude depending on the strain background. In order to demonstrate the power of the newly characterized promoters for metabolic engineering, they were used for heterologous expression of the cis-aconitate decarboxylase (cad1) gene of Aspergillus terreus, allowing the production of the building block chemical itaconic acid with A. niger. The CAD activity, dependent on the choice of promoter, showed a positive correlation with the specific productivity of itaconic acid. Product titers from the detection limit to up to 570mg/L proved that the set of constitutive promoters is a powerful tool for the fine-tuning of metabolic pathways for the improvement of industrial production processes. PMID:22707054

  10. Functional Genomic Analysis of Aspergillus flavus Interacting with Resistant and Susceptible Peanut.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houmiao; Lei, Yong; Yan, Liying; Wan, Liyun; Ren, Xiaoping; Chen, Silong; Dai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Huifang; Liao, Boshou

    2016-01-01

    In the Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus)-peanut pathosystem, development and metabolism of the fungus directly influence aflatoxin contamination. To comprehensively understand the molecular mechanism of A. flavus interaction with peanut, RNA-seq was used for global transcriptome profiling of A. flavus during interaction with resistant and susceptible peanut genotypes. In total, 67.46 Gb of high-quality bases were generated for A. flavus-resistant (af_R) and -susceptible peanut (af_S) at one (T1), three (T2) and seven (T3) days post-inoculation. The uniquely mapped reads to A. flavus reference genome in the libraries of af_R and af_S at T2 and T3 were subjected to further analysis, with more than 72% of all obtained genes expressed in the eight libraries. Comparison of expression levels both af_R vs. af_S and T2 vs. T3 uncovered 1926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). DEGs associated with mycelial growth, conidial development and aflatoxin biosynthesis were up-regulated in af_S compared with af_R, implying that A. flavus mycelia more easily penetrate and produce much more aflatoxin in susceptible than in resistant peanut. Our results serve as a foundation for understanding the molecular mechanisms of aflatoxin production differences between A. flavus-R and -S peanut, and offer new clues to manage aflatoxin contamination in crops. PMID:26891328

  11. Functional Genomic Analysis of Aspergillus flavus Interacting with Resistant and Susceptible Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Houmiao; Lei, Yong; Yan, Liying; Wan, Liyun; Ren, Xiaoping; Chen, Silong; Dai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Huifang; Liao, Boshou

    2016-01-01

    In the Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus)–peanut pathosystem, development and metabolism of the fungus directly influence aflatoxin contamination. To comprehensively understand the molecular mechanism of A. flavus interaction with peanut, RNA-seq was used for global transcriptome profiling of A. flavus during interaction with resistant and susceptible peanut genotypes. In total, 67.46 Gb of high-quality bases were generated for A. flavus-resistant (af_R) and -susceptible peanut (af_S) at one (T1), three (T2) and seven (T3) days post-inoculation. The uniquely mapped reads to A. flavus reference genome in the libraries of af_R and af_S at T2 and T3 were subjected to further analysis, with more than 72% of all obtained genes expressed in the eight libraries. Comparison of expression levels both af_R vs. af_S and T2 vs. T3 uncovered 1926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). DEGs associated with mycelial growth, conidial development and aflatoxin biosynthesis were up-regulated in af_S compared with af_R, implying that A. flavus mycelia more easily penetrate and produce much more aflatoxin in susceptible than in resistant peanut. Our results serve as a foundation for understanding the molecular mechanisms of aflatoxin production differences between A. flavus-R and -S peanut, and offer new clues to manage aflatoxin contamination in crops. PMID:26891328

  12. Transcriptome analysis of Aspergillus niger grown on sugarcane bagasse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Considering that the costs of cellulases and hemicellulases contribute substantially to the price of bioethanol, new studies aimed at understanding and improving cellulase efficiency and productivity are of paramount importance. Aspergillus niger has been shown to produce a wide spectrum of polysaccharide hydrolytic enzymes. To understand how to improve enzymatic cocktails that can hydrolyze pretreated sugarcane bagasse, we used a genomics approach to investigate which genes and pathways are transcriptionally modulated during growth of A. niger on steam-exploded sugarcane bagasse (SEB). Results Herein we report the main cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes with increased expression during growth on SEB. We also sought to determine whether the mRNA accumulation of several SEB-induced genes encoding putative transporters is induced by xylose and dependent on glucose. We identified 18 (58% of A. niger predicted cellulases) and 21 (58% of A. niger predicted hemicellulases) cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes, respectively, that were highly expressed during growth on SEB. Conclusions Degradation of sugarcane bagasse requires production of many different enzymes which are regulated by the type and complexity of the available substrate. Our presently reported work opens new possibilities for understanding sugarcane biomass saccharification by A. niger hydrolases and for the construction of more efficient enzymatic cocktails for second-generation bioethanol. PMID:22008461

  13. Bisulfite Sequencing Reveals That Aspergillus flavus Holds a Hollow in DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Huang, Shu-Jia; Luo, Yan-Feng; Sun, Ji-Hua; Zhou, Jian-Xiang; Yan, Shu-Jing; He, Jian-Guo; Wang, Jun; He, Zhu-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus first gained scientific attention for its production of aflatoxin. The underlying regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis has been serving as a theoretical model for biosynthesis of other microbial secondary metabolites. Nevertheless, for several decades, the DNA methylation status, one of the important epigenomic modifications involved in gene regulation, in A. flavus remains to be controversial. Here, we applied bisulfite sequencing in conjunction with a biological replicate strategy to investigate the DNA methylation profiling of A. flavus genome. Both the bisulfite sequencing data and the methylome comparisons with other fungi confirm that the DNA methylation level of this fungus is negligible. Further investigation into the DNA methyltransferase of Aspergillus uncovers its close relationship with RID-like enzymes as well as its divergence with the methyltransferase of species with validated DNA methylation. The lack of repeat contents of the A. flavus' genome and the high RIP-index of the small amount of remanent repeat potentially support our speculation that DNA methylation may be absent in A. flavus or that it may possess de novo DNA methylation which occurs very transiently during the obscure sexual stage of this fungal species. This work contributes to our understanding on the DNA methylation status of A. flavus, as well as reinforces our views on the DNA methylation in fungal species. In addition, our strategy of applying bisulfite sequencing to DNA methylation detection in species with low DNA methylation may serve as a reference for later scientific investigations in other hypomethylated species. PMID:22276181

  14. Expression of the Aspergillus terreus itaconic acid biosynthesis cluster in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspergillus terreus is a natural producer of itaconic acid and is currently used to produce itaconic acid on an industrial scale. The metabolic process for itaconic acid biosynthesis is very similar to the production of citric acid in Aspergillus niger. However, a key enzyme in A. niger, cis-aconitate decarboxylase, is missing. The introduction of the A. terreus cadA gene in A. niger exploits the high level of citric acid production (over 200 g per liter) and theoretically can lead to production levels of over 135 g per liter of itaconic acid in A. niger. Given the potential for higher production levels in A. niger, production of itaconic acid in this host was investigated. Results Expression of Aspergillus terreus cis-aconitate decarboxylase in Aspergillus niger resulted in the production of a low concentration (0.05 g/L) of itaconic acid. Overexpression of codon-optimized genes for cis-aconitate decarboxylase, a mitochondrial transporter and a plasma membrane transporter in an oxaloacetate hydrolase and glucose oxidase deficient A. niger strain led to highly increased yields and itaconic acid production titers. At these higher production titers, the effect of the mitochondrial and plasma membrane transporters was much more pronounced, with levels being 5–8 times higher than previously described. Conclusions Itaconic acid can be produced in A. niger by the introduction of the A. terreus cis-aconitate decarboxylase encoding cadA gene. This results in a low itaconic acid production level, which can be increased by codon-optimization of the cadA gene for A. niger. A second crucial requirement for efficient production of itaconic acid is the expression of the A. terreus mttA gene, encoding a putative mitochondrial transporter. Expression of this transporter results in a twenty-fold increase in the secretion of itaconic acid. Expression of the A. terreus itaconic acid cluster consisting of the cadA gene, the mttA gene and the mfsA gene results in A. niger strains that produce over twenty five-fold higher levels of itaconic acid and show a twenty-fold increase in yield compared to a strain expressing only CadA. PMID:24438100

  15. Effect of Competition and adverse culture conditions on aflatoxin production by aspergillus flavus through successive generations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of Aspergillus flavus often degenerate with serial transfers on culture media, resulting in morphological changes and loss of aflatoxin production. However, degeneration does not readily occur in nature as indicated by the wild-type morphological characters of newly isolated strains and the...

  16. Isolation of maize soil and rhizosphere bacteria with antagonistic activity against Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial isolates from Mississippi maize field soil and maize rhizosphere samples were evaluated for their potential as biological control agents against Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides. Isolated strains were screened for antagonistic activities in liquid co-culture against A. flav...

  17. Aspergillus flavus whole genome and EST sequence releases and construction of homologous gene search blast server

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites. These compounds, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed...

  18. Identifying cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genes induced in response to Aspergillus flavus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination in cottonseed, caused primarily by Aspergillus flavus, is a global concern in terms of food safety and economy. Current strategies to reduce the risk of aflatoxin contamination rely mostly upon biological control with non-aflatoxigenic strains and chemical control measures. ...

  19. Batch Submission and Release of 19,618 Aspergillus flavus Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites. These compounds, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed...

  20. TRYPTOPHANS EFFECTS ON AFLATOXIN BIOSYNTHESIS AND ITS REGULATION IN ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. These compounds are toxic and carcinogenic. Many nutritional and environmental factors are known to affect aflatoxin formation. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms that control or ...

  1. INFLUENCE OF TRYPTOPHAN ON AFLATOXIN BIOSYNTHESIS AND REGULATION IN ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are extremely toxic and carcinogenic compounds produced primarily by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Molecular studies on the genetics of aflatoxin biosynthesis established a well organized aflatoxin pathway gene cluster consisting of 25 genes within 70 kb DNA region. M...

  2. RNA-seq analysis of an nsdC mutant in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The C2H2-type transcription factor NsdC (Never in Sexual Development C) has been shown to play a role in asexual development and secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus flavus, an agriculturally relevant, aflatoxin-producing species. The nsdC knoackout mutant demonstrates perturbed morphologi...

  3. New Monomeric Stilbenoids from Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) Seeds Challenged by an Aspergillus flavus Strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two new stilbene derivatives have been isolated from peanut seeds challenged by an Aspergillus flavus strain, along with chiricanine B that has not been reported from peanuts, as well as a stilbenoid that has been known as a synthetic product. The structures of these new putative phytoalexins were d...

  4. Resistance to Aspergillus flavus in maize and peanut: Molecular biology, breeding, environmental stress and future perspectives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The colonization of maize (Zea mays L.) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus results in the contamination with carcinogenic mycotoxins known as aflatoxins leading to economic losses as well as a potential health threat to human. The interactio...

  5. Identification of resistance genes to Aspergillus flavus infection in peanut through genetic and genomic strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut before harvest in the field and after harvest during storage. These fungal moulds produce aflatoxins, the most toxic compounds and the most potent carcinogens. Contamination of aflatoxins to agricultural commodities such as peanut poses serious h...

  6. Influence of Gene Expression on Variable Aflatoxin Production by Different Strains of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a globally distributed fungus. It causes disease in human and crop plants due to the production of numerous conidia dispersed by air movement and possibly by insects. The fungus is an economically important food contaminant because it produces the most potent natural carcinogen...

  7. The inhibitory effect of Bacillus megaterium on aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway gene expression in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the major fungal mold that colonize peanut in the field and during storage. The impacts to human and animal health and to economy in agriculture and commerce are significant since this mould produces the most potent natural toxins, aflatoxins, which are carcinogenic, mut...

  8. Efficacy of water dispersible formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus for aflatoxin management in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiments were conducted in 2011 and 2012 to evaluate the efficacy of water dispersible granule (WDG) formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus in controlling aflatoxin contamination of corn. In 2011, when aflatoxin was present at very high levels, no WDG treatment provided s...

  9. Isolation and structural elucidation of acidic terpenoid phytoalexins in maize and their interactions with Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants use a variety of physical and chemical defenses in response to herbivory and pathogen attack. Infection of maize by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus results in the accumulation of aflatoxins, which are among the most detrimental biogenic substances known to man. The majority of maize de...

  10. Role of Ostrinia Nubilalis in Vectoring Aspergillus Flavus in a Corn Field in northern Italy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis, is a major pest of corn in Europe and in several agricultural areas of the USA. In addition to direct yield losses, the ECB is expected to act as a vector for carrying spores of the aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus flavus. Therefore the object...

  11. Insights into sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus from variation in experimental crosses and natural populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus contaminates many important crops worldwide and is the major producer of aflatoxins, which are cancer-causing secondary metabolites. Biological control is the most effective means of reducing inoculum levels of detrimental aflatoxin-producing fungal pathogens in agricultural syst...

  12. Aspergillus flavus Aflatoxin Occurrence and Expression of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Genes in Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The carcinogen, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) produced by Aspergillus flavus, is a major food safety concern in crops. However, information on AFB1 occurrence in soil and crop residue is scarce. A series of experiments investigated the occurrence of AFB1 in soil and corn residues, and ascertained the ecology ...

  13. Aflatoxigenesis induced in Aspergillus flavus by oxidative stress and reduction by phenolic antioxidants from tree nuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almonds, pistachios, and walnuts grown in California have an aggregate value of over $3.3 billion, with a large proportion of the crop being exported. However, these tree nuts can be subject to contamination by aflatoxins, metabolites produced primarily by Aspergillus flavus and parasiticus, and im...

  14. Is rachis lignification a deterrent to Aspergillus flavus movement through the developing maize ear?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous research, the proteomes of the immature rachis of Aspergillus flavus resistant and susceptible maize inbreds were compared using differential-in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE). One of the proteins that was 66-fold more abundant in the resistant inbred MP313E than in the susceptible inbred S...

  15. Development of non-toxigenic strains of Aspergillus Flavus for control of Aflatoxin in maize.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin (AF), produced by Aspergillus flavus, can be a major problem in Mississippi Delta maize (Zea mays L.) causing economic losses if levels of contamination are high. Although research has been directed at reducing maize AF contamination, no consistent control methods are available. This manus...

  16. Managing and Monitoring of Aspergillus flavus in Corn Using Bioplastic-based Formulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of bioplastic-based formulations for delivering a non-aflatoxigenic strain of Aspergillus flavus and for monitoring Aspergilli with the final objective of controlling aflatoxin contamination in corn. Field application of inoculated bioplastic granules show...

  17. Crop rotation and soil temperature influence the community structure of Aspergillus flavus in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus, the most important cause of aflatoxin contamination has two major morphotypes commonly named S and L strains. Strain S isolates, on average, produce more aflatoxins than the strain L isolates. The S strain has been implicated as the primary causal agent of several contamination e...

  18. Ear Rot, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Fungal Biomass in Maize after Inoculation with Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin, a toxin produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus Link:Fries, occurs naturally in maize (Zea mays L.). Aflatoxin is a potent human carcinogen and is toxic to livestock, pets, and wildlife. When contaminated with aflatoxin, the value of maize grain is markedly reduced. Eight germplasm l...

  19. Anti-fungal activity of maize silk proteins and role of chitinases in Aspergillus flavus resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins were extracted from silks of two Aspergillus flavus resistant maize (Zea mays L.) inbreds, two susceptible inbreds, and one intermediately-resistant inbred grown in the field. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to identify and compare expression patterns of the proteins in the m...

  20. FACTORS AFFECTING THE MAINTENANCE OF ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS TOXIGENICITY IN AGRICULTURAL FIELDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species belonging to Aspergillus section Flavi often produce aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid, mycotoxins that contaminate preharvest peanuts, corn and cottonseed. Soil populations of A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. nomius, A. tamarii and A. caelatus were examined over a large geographic area within...

  1. Potential roles of environmental oxidative stress in aflatoxin production revealed in the Aspergillus flavus transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination caused by Aspergillus flavus infection in crops is known to be exacerbated primarily by abiotic stresses such as drought stress, and biotic stresses such as arthropod infestation. These stresses result in the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the...

  2. Environmental influences on maize-Aspergillus flavus interactions and aflatoxin production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the early 1960’s, the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus (Link ex Fr.) has been the focus of intensive research due to the production of carcinogenic and highly toxic secondary metabolites collectively known as aflatoxins following pre-harvest colonization of crops. Given this recurrent proble...

  3. Comparison of Inoculation Methods for Evaluating Maize for Resistance to Aspergillus flavus Infection and Aflatoxin Accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin, the most potent carcinogen found in nature, is produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Aflatoxin occurs naturally in maize, Zea mays L. Growing maize hybrids with genetic resistance to aflatoxin contamination is generally considered a highly desirable way to reduce losses to aflatoxin....

  4. Understanding the Genetics of Regulation of Aflatoxin Production and Aspergillus flavus Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are polyketide-derived, toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites produced primarily by two fungal species, Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, on crops such as corn, peanuts, cottonseed and treenuts. Regulatory guidelines issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) preve...

  5. Potential roles of WRKY transcription factors in resistance to Aspergillus flavus colonization of immature maize kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to Aspergillus flavus by maize (Zea mays L.) is mediated by several defense proteins; however the mechanism regulating the expression of these defenses is poorly understood. This study examined the potential roles of six maize WRKY transcription factors, ZmWRKY19, ZmWRKY21, ZmWRKY53, ZmW...

  6. CONSTRUCTION OF EXPRESSION CASSETTES TO CONFER RESISTANCE TO ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS IN COTTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been working to develop cotton that is resistant to the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus using a genetic engineering approach. Success of this project depends upon the identification of appropriate regulatory elements, as well as structural genes that can be linked to confer a new pathoge...

  7. Genes differentially expressed by Aspergillus flavus strains after loss of aflatoxin production by serial transfers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic fungal secondary metabolites produced by Aspergillus flavus and other closely related species. Levels of aflatoxins in agricultural commodities are stringently regulated by many countries and thus aflatoxins are a major concern to both producers and consumers. A cluster...

  8. Application of biotechnology towards the enhancement of maize resistance to aflatoxin contamination by Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of maize with aflatoxins by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus poses serious health hazards to humans and animals worldwide. This important fact and the regulations instituted in many countries to control the occurrence of aflatoxins in foods and feed have stimulated rese...

  9. Testing the efficacy of eGFP-transformed Aspergillus flavus as biocontrol strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current biological control methods to prevent pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of corn, cottonseed, and ground and tree nuts involve field inoculation of non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus. To date, the efficacy of this approach requires annual reapplication of the biocontrol agent. The reason ...

  10. Identification of novel metabolites from Aspergillus flavus by high resolution and multiple stage mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus contains more than 55 gene clusters which are predicted to encode proteins involved in secondary metabolite production. One of these, cluster 27, contains a polyketide synthase (pks27) gene which encodes a protein that is highly homologous to the aflatoxin cluster PKS. Comparative...

  11. Volatile trans-2-hexenal a soybean aldehyde inhibits Aspergillus flavus growth and aflatoxin production in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trans-2-hexenal, a volatile aldehyde, is produced by soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] and other plants via the lipoxygenase pathway. In vitro tests showed it significantly (p< 0.001) reduced Aspergillus flavus germinating conidial viability at 10 µM, with approximately 95% viability reduction observ...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1206 - Aspergillus flavus AF36; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tolerance is established for residues of Aspergillus flavus AF36 in or on corn, field, forage; corn, field, grain; corn, field, stover; corn, field, aspirated grain fractions; corn, sweet, kernel plus cob with husk removed; corn, sweet, forage; corn, sweet, stover; corn, pop, grain; and corn, pop, stover,...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1206 - Aspergillus flavus AF36; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tolerance is established for residues of Aspergillus flavus AF36 in or on corn, field, forage; corn, field, grain; corn, field, stover; corn, field, aspirated grain fractions; corn, sweet, kernel plus cob with husk removed; corn, sweet, forage; corn, sweet, stover; corn, pop, grain; and corn, pop, stover,...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1206 - Aspergillus flavus AF36; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tolerance is established for residues of Aspergillus flavus AF36 in or on corn, field, forage; corn, field, grain; corn, field, stover; corn, field, aspirated grain fractions; corn, sweet, kernel plus cob with husk removed; corn, sweet, forage; corn, sweet, stover; corn, pop, grain; and corn, pop, stover,...

  15. Identification of atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates to reduce aflatoxin contamination of maize in Kenya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute aflatoxin poisonings (aflatoxicosis) in Kenya have led to the deaths of several hundred people between 2004 and 2006. Etiology of contamination in the outbreak districts (Eastern Province) identified an unusual fungal community structure dominated by the highly toxigenic Aspergillus flavus S s...

  16. Hyperspectral image classification and development of fluorescence index for single corn kernels infected with Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites predominantly produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin leve...

  17. Mycotoxin Levels and Aspergillus flavus Colonization of Corn and Soybean Under Different Cropping Sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A four year field experiment was initiated in 2005 to determine the effects of eight corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) rotation schemes on aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination of the crops and colonization of the grain by Aspergillus flavus. Both the corn hybrid and soybean cultiva...

  18. 21 CFR 173.120 - Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.120 Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger. Carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme preparation derived from... Aspergillus niger from the carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme product. (d) The additive is used or intended...

  19. 21 CFR 173.120 - Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.120 Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger. Carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme preparation derived from Aspergillus niger may be safely used... the carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme product. (d) The additive is used or intended for use as...

  20. 21 CFR 173.120 - Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.120 Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger. Carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme preparation derived from... Aspergillus niger from the carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme product. (d) The additive is used or intended...

  1. 21 CFR 173.120 - Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.120 Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger. Carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme preparation derived from... Aspergillus niger from the carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme product. (d) The additive is used or intended...

  2. 21 CFR 173.120 - Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.120 Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger. Carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme preparation derived from... Aspergillus niger from the carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme product. (d) The additive is used or intended...

  3. Contribution of arginase to manganese metabolism of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Keni, Sarita; Punekar, Narayan S

    2016-02-01

    Aspects of manganese metabolism during normal and acidogenic growth of Aspergillus niger were explored. Arginase from this fungus was a Mn[II]-enzyme. The contribution of the arginase protein towards A. niger manganese metabolism was investigated using arginase knockout (D-42) and arginase over-expressing (ΔXCA-29) strains of A. niger NCIM 565. The Mn[II] contents of various mycelial fractions were found in the order: D-42 strain < parent strain < ΔXCA-29 strain. While the soluble fraction forms 60 % of the total mycelial Mn[II] content, arginase accounted for a significant fraction of this soluble Mn[II] pool. Changes in the arginase levels affected the absolute mycelial Mn[II] content but not its distribution in the various mycelial fractions. The A. niger mycelia harvested from acidogenic growth media contain substantially less Mn[II] as compared to those from normal growth media. Nevertheless, acidogenic mycelia harbor considerable Mn[II] levels and a functional arginase. Altered levels of mycelial arginase protein did not significantly influence citric acid production. The relevance of arginase to cellular Mn[II] pool and homeostasis was evaluated and the results suggest that arginase regulation could occur via manganese availability. PMID:26679485

  4. Biotransformations of organic compounds mediated by cultures of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Parshikov, Igor A; Woodling, Kellie A; Sutherland, John B

    2015-09-01

    Many different organic compounds may be converted by microbial biotransformation to high-value products for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. This review summarizes the use of strains of Aspergillus niger, a well-known filamentous fungus used in numerous biotechnological processes, for biochemical transformations of organic compounds. The substrates transformed include monocyclic, bicyclic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; azaarenes, epoxides, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and other aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The types of reactions performed by A. niger, although not unique to this species, are extremely diverse. They include hydroxylation, oxidation of various functional groups, reduction of double bonds, demethylation, sulfation, epoxide hydrolysis, dechlorination, ring cleavage, and conjugation. Some of the products may be useful as new investigational drugs or chemical intermediates. PMID:26162670

  5. FluG affects secretion in colonies of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengfeng; Krijgsheld, Pauline; Hulsman, Marc; de Bekker, Charissa; Mller, Wally H; Reinders, Marcel; de Vries, Ronald P; Wsten, Han A B

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of Aspergillus niger are characterized by zonal heterogeneity in growth, sporulation, gene expression and secretion. For instance, the glucoamylase gene glaA is more highly expressed at the periphery of colonies when compared to the center. As a consequence, its encoded protein GlaA is mainly secreted at the outer part of the colony. Here, multiple copies of amyR were introduced in A. niger. Most transformants over-expressing this regulatory gene of amylolytic genes still displayed heterogeneous glaA expression and GlaA secretion. However, heterogeneity was abolished in transformant UU-A001.13 by expressing glaA and secreting GlaA throughout the mycelium. Sequencing the genome of UU-A001.13 revealed that transformation had been accompanied by deletion of part of the fluG gene and disrupting its 3' end by integration of a transformation vector. Inactivation of fluG in the wild-type background of A. niger also resulted in breakdown of starch under the whole colony. Asexual development of the ?fluG strain was not affected, unlike what was previously shown in Aspergillus nidulans. Genes encoding proteins with a signal sequence for secretion, including part of the amylolytic genes, were more often downregulated in the central zone of maltose-grown ?fluG colonies and upregulated in the intermediate part and periphery when compared to the wild-type. Together, these data indicate that FluG of A. niger is a repressor of secretion. PMID:25370014

  6. Steady-state shear characteristics of Aspergillus niger broths

    SciTech Connect

    Svihla, C.K.; Dronawat, S.N.; Hanley, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    It can be difficult to obtain reliable rheological data for filamentous fermentation broths using conventional instruments. One common approach is to measure the torque drawn by an impeller rotating in the suspension. Many previous workers have assumed that the applicable shear rate in such a device is related to the impeller speed by a fluid-independent constant determined by calibration with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The rheology of Aspergillus niger broths have been characterized using the impeller viscometer approach. The changes in the broth rheology were measured, and used to interpret the growth of biomass and the evolution of the microorganism morphology.

  7. Properties of soluble and immobilized Aspergillus niger. beta. -xylosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Oguntimein, G.B.; Reilly, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    Aspergillus niger ..beta..-xylosidase was characterized when in soluble form and when immobilized to alkylamine porous silica with glutaraldehyde and to alumina with titanium tetrachloride. Energies of activation averaged 13.4 kcal/mol for the soluble enzyme, 9.0 kcal/mol when immobilized to alumina, and 8.0 kcal/mol when bound to silica. The highest activity of all forms of ..beta..-xylosidase was found near pH 3. The soluble enzyme was highly stable at pH 4, where lowest rates of decay occurred, and temperatures of 65/sup 0/C and below.

  8. Aspergillus flavus diversity on crops and in the environment can be exploited to reduce aflatoxin exposure and improve health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humans and animals are exposed to aflatoxins, toxic carcinogenic fungal metabolites, through consumption of contaminated food and feed. Aspergillus flavus, the primary causal agent of crop aflatoxin contamination, is composed of phenotypically and genotypically diverse vegetative compatibility group...

  9. Toxigenic Aspergillus flavus and other fungi of public health concern in food and organic matter in southwest Nigeria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six Aspergillus flavus isolates out of 17 fungal isolates were sampled from diverse food and organic matter in southwest Nigeria. All the A. flavus samples produced aflatoxin and cyclopiazonic acid. These six isolates constitute a ready mycobank of toxigenic species for analytical research involving...

  10. PR10 expression in maize and its effect on host resistance against Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a major crop susceptible to Aspergillus flavus infection and subsequent contamination with aflatoxins, the potent carcinogenic secondary metabolites of the fungus. Protein profiles of maize genotypes resistant and susceptible to A. flavus infection and/or aflatoxin contaminati...

  11. Field Assessment of Non-toxigenic Aspergillus flavus Strain K49 in Competitive Displacement of Toxigenic Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-toxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus offer the potential to control aflatoxin contamination by competitive displacement of indigenous populations of A. flavus colonizing corn grain. Two sets of experiments were conducted to assess the competitiveness of strain K49 when challenged against two...

  12. Transcriptomic profiles of Aspergillus flavus CA42, a strain that produces small sclerotia, by decanal treatment and after recovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a ubiquitous saprophyte and is capable of producing many secondary metabolites including the carcinogenic aflatoxins. The A. flavus population that produces small sclerotia (S strain) has been implicated as the culprit for persistent aflatoxin contamination of crops in fields. ...

  13. The master transcription factor MtfA governs aflatoxin production, morphological development, and pathogenicity in the fungus Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus produces a variety of toxic secondary metabolites, among them the aflatoxins (AFs) are the most well-known. These compounds are highly mutagenic and carcinogenic, particularly AFB1. A. flavus is capable of colonizing economically important crops contaminating them with AFs. Molecu...

  14. THE YELLOW PIGMENTS USED IN THE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIGENIC STRAINS OF ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS ARE AFLATOXIN BIOSYTNTHETIC INTERMEDIATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins (AF), among the most potent carcinogens known, are produced by some, but not all, strains of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. The higher percent toxigenic strains in the soil reservoir of A. flavus than in naturally-infected crop plants lends support to strategies for reducing AF co...

  15. The role of Aspergillus flavus veA in the production of extracellular proteins during growth on starch substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aflatoxin-producer and opportunistic plant pathogenic, filamentous fungus Aspergillus flavus is responsible for the contamination of corn and other important agricultural commodities. In order to obtain nutrients from the host A. flavus produces a variety of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Int...

  16. Aspergillus flavus Genomics for Development of Strategies to Interrupt Aflatoxin Formation and Discovery of Fungal Enzymes for Biofuel Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus produces toxic and the most carcinogenic mycotoxins, the aflatoxins. The primary objectives of our A. flavus genomics program are to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination in food and feed and control fungal infection in preharvest crops such as corn, cotton, peanut and tre...

  17. Reduction of aflatoxins, cyclopiazonic acid and fumonisins in corn by biocontrol strains of non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of field studies in corn (maize) evaluated the ability of non-aflatoxigenic biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus to reduce, through competitive exclusion, production in kernels of aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) by A. flavus and fumonisins by Fusarium verticillioides. The abili...

  18. Evaluation of resistance to aflatoxin contamination in kernels of maize genotypes using a GFP-expressing Aspergillus flavus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of resistance or susceptibility of corn inbreds to infection by Aspergillus flavus was evaluated by a kernel screening assay. A GFP-expressing strain of A. flavus was used to accomplish this study to measure fungal spread and aflatoxin levels in real time. Among the four inbreds tested, ...

  19. Modeling the Colonization of Maize by Toxigenic and Non-toxigenic Aspergillus flavus Strains: Implications for Biological Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study assessed field colonization of maize by Aspergillus flavus strains as biological control agents to reduce aflatoxin contamination. Maize (corn, Zea mays L.) ears were inoculated with A. flavus using a pin-bar technique in 2004 and 2005. Non-aflatoxigenic strains K49 & CT3 and toxigenic F...

  20. ASSESSING THE COLONIZATION POTENTIAL OF ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS STRAINS ON CORN UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS USING A PIN BAR INOCULATION TECHNIQUE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to assess the colonization potential of Aspergillus flavus strains as biological control agents to reduce aflatoxin contamination. Corn ears were inoculated at growth stage R4 with various A. flavus strains using a pin-bar inoculation technique in 2004 and 2005. Non-aflatox...

  1. Effect of sexual recombination on population diversity in aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus and evidence for cryptic heterokaryosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is the major producer of carcinogenic aflatoxins (AFs) in crops worldwide. Natural populations of A. flavus show tremendous variation in AF production, some of which can be attributed to environmental conditions, differential regulation of the AF biosynthetic pathway, and deletio...

  2. Extracellular Xylanolytic and Pectinolytic Hydrolase Production by Aspergillus flavus Isolates Contributes to Crop Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Jay E.

    2015-01-01

    Several atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates, including some being used as biocontrol agents, and one toxigenic isolate were surveyed for the ability to produce extracellular xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases. All of the tested isolates displayed good production of endoxylanases when grown on a medium utilizing larch xylan as a sole carbon substrate. Four of the tested isolates produced reasonably high levels of esterase activity, while the atoxigenic biocontrol agent NRRL 21882 isolate esterase level was significantly lower than the others. Atoxigenic A. flavus isolates 19, 22, K49, AF36 (the latter two are biocontrol agents) and toxigenic AF13 produced copious levels of pectinolytic activity when grown on a pectin medium. The pectinolytic activity levels of the atoxigenic A. flavus 17 and NRRL 21882 isolates were significantly lower than the other tested isolates. In addition, A. flavus isolates that displayed high levels of pectinolytic activity in the plate assay produced high levels of endopolygalacturonase (pectinase) P2c, as ascertained by isoelectric focusing electrophoresis. Isolate NRRL 21882 displayed low levels of both pectinase P2c and pectin methyl esterase. A. flavus appears capable of producing these hydrolytic enzymes irrespective of aflatoxin production. This ability of atoxigenic isolates to produce xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases mimics that of toxigenic isolates and, therefore, contributes to the ability of atoxigenic isolates to occupy the same niche as A. flavus toxigenic isolates. PMID:26295409

  3. Analysis of genetic and aflatoxin diversity among Aspergillus flavus isolates collected from sorghum seeds.

    PubMed

    Divakara, S T; Aiyaz, M; Moore, G G; Venkataramana, M; Hariprasad, P; Nayaka, S Chandra; Niranjana, S R

    2015-11-01

    Thirty-four Aspergillus flavus isolates were recovered from sorghum seeds sampled across five states in India. Our study included (1) species confirmation through PCR assay, (2) quantification of total aflatoxin concentrations by the indirect competitive-ELISA (ic-ELISA) method, and (3) analysis of molecular diversity among the A. flavus isolates using ?-tubulin, ITS, and ISSR markers. Among the isolates studied, 28 were found to be positive for the production of aflatoxins. ITS and ?-tubulin phylogenetic analysis segregated the A. flavus sample population into two major groups or clades with little to no subdivision based on geography. In contrast, ISSR analysis also separated the A. flavus isolates into two main clusters, showing a distance of 0.0-0.5, with one cluster exhibiting a high level of diversity though no geographic or chemotype subdivision could be observed. The majority of sampled A. flavus isolates were highly toxigenic, and also highly diversified in terms of toxin-producing potential in-vitro. Genetic diversity among the sorghum isolates of A. flavus further warrants the development of appropriate farming management practices as well as improved aflatoxin detection measures in India. PMID:26102515

  4. Extracellular Xylanolytic and Pectinolytic Hydrolase Production by Aspergillus flavus Isolates Contributes to Crop Invasion.

    PubMed

    Mellon, Jay E

    2015-08-01

    Several atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates, including some being used as biocontrol agents, and one toxigenic isolate were surveyed for the ability to produce extracellular xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases. All of the tested isolates displayed good production of endoxylanases when grown on a medium utilizing larch xylan as a sole carbon substrate. Four of the tested isolates produced reasonably high levels of esterase activity, while the atoxigenic biocontrol agent NRRL 21882 isolate esterase level was significantly lower than the others. Atoxigenic A. flavus isolates 19, 22, K49, AF36 (the latter two are biocontrol agents) and toxigenic AF13 produced copious levels of pectinolytic activity when grown on a pectin medium. The pectinolytic activity levels of the atoxigenic A. flavus 17 and NRRL 21882 isolates were significantly lower than the other tested isolates. In addition, A. flavus isolates that displayed high levels of pectinolytic activity in the plate assay produced high levels of endopolygalacturonase (pectinase) P2c, as ascertained by isoelectric focusing electrophoresis. Isolate NRRL 21882 displayed low levels of both pectinase P2c and pectin methyl esterase. A. flavus appears capable of producing these hydrolytic enzymes irrespective of aflatoxin production. This ability of atoxigenic isolates to produce xylanolytic and pectinolytic hydrolases mimics that of toxigenic isolates and, therefore, contributes to the ability of atoxigenic isolates to occupy the same niche as A. flavus toxigenic isolates. PMID:26295409

  5. Detection of Aspergillus flavus in stored peanuts using real-time PCR and the expression of aflatoxin genes in toxigenic and atoxigenic A. flavus isolates.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed A

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the main species from section Flavi responsible for aflatoxin accumulation in stored peanuts. Rapid methods to detect A. flavus could help to prevent aflatoxins from entering the food chain. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (RTi-PCR) assay was standardized for rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of A. flavus in stored peanuts. A. flavus was detected in 53.6% and 50% of peanut samples by RTi-PCR and A. flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus agar culture, respectively, with 95% agreement between them. Twenty-two A. flavus isolates were screened using high-performance liquid chromatography for their capacity to produce aflatoxin AFB1 (B1). B1 was produced by >72% of the isolates. Sixteen isolates produced B1 at concentrations ranging from 1.64 to 109.18??g/mL. Four aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway genes (aflD, aflM, aflP, and aflQ) were evaluated using PCR and reverse-transcription PCR in 22 A. flavus isolates from peanut kernels with the aim of rapidly and accurately differentiating toxigenic and atoxigenic isolates. The PCR amplification of genes did not correlate with aflatoxin production capability. The expression of aflD and aflQ was a good marker for differentiating toxigenic from atoxigenic isolates. PMID:25621617

  6. An investigation on tolerance and accumulation of a facultative marine fungus Aspergillus flavus to pentavalent arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vala, Anjana K.; Davariya, Vipul; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2010-03-01

    Tolerance of a facultative marine fungus Aspergillus flavus towards As (V) was tested. Luxuriant growth of the test isolate was observed in culture media with As (V) concentrations of 25 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, indicating its tolerance to the metal. Accumulation rate of arsenic was always higher when exposed to As (V) at 50 mg L-1 than at 25 mg L-1. The study reveals Aspergillus flavus as a promising candidate for environmental bioremediation. Arsenic contents (mg g-1) in the fungus when exposed to 50 mg L-1 As (V) were measured as 11.1773, 4.0983, and 8.0000 mg g-1 on day 3, 6 and 9, respectively. The highest content was observed initially, i.e. on day 3, followed by a decline and a rise again. These results provide baseline information for further explorations regarding the exploitation of the fungus for arsenic removal.

  7. [Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus in soya and other legumes].

    PubMed

    Topsy, K

    1977-01-01

    There is no doubt that our programme of applied nutrition must include soya on account of the high nutritive value of the legume. This underlines research undertaken here regarding the risks of contamination by A. flavus and the subsequent formation of aflatoxins on and in soya beans. We have studied on parallel lines soya beans and other legumes important in the local dietary habits. These legumes are either obtained locally or imported. On every specimen of legume we have tried to confirm, or otherwise, the presence of A. flavus and the aflatoxins. This was followed by experimenting on the conditions for growth and formation of aflatoxins on every one of the legumes. During subsequent experiments we have studied mixtures of legumes containing soya. Research on these lines has shown the inhibitory effects of legumes such as lentils, dried garden peas, Bengal gram, green peas, red peas, and broad beans on the growth of A. flavus and the formation of aflatoxins. Groundnut, on the other hand, seems to encourage such growth and such formation. The results of the experiments carried out, as above, lead us to conclude that soya must form part of our national food monitoring programme. PMID:418721

  8. A new diketopiperazine alkaloid isolated from an algicolous Aspergillus flavus strain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aiqun; Fang, Yuchun; Zhu, Tianjiao; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Weiming

    2008-04-01

    A new diketopiperazine alkaloid containing the uncommon amino acid L-7, 9-dihydroxy-8-methoxyphenylalanine (1), has been isolated from the algicolous Aspergillus flavus strain. The structure of 1 including the absolute stereochemistry was determined by spectroscopic data and chemical means. Compound 1 showed weak cytotoxicity against HL-60 cell lines with an IC50 value of 36.5 microg/ml. PMID:18468397

  9. Investigations on the antifungal effect of nerol against Aspergillus flavus causing food spoilage.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Zeng, Xiaobin; Zeng, Hong; Feng, Zhaozhong; Miao, Xiangmin; Peng, Xue

    2013-01-01

    The antifungal efficacy of nerol (NEL) has been proved against Aspergillus flavus by using in vitro and in vivo tests. The mycelial growth of A. flavus was completely inhibited at concentrations of 0.8 ? L/mL and 0.1 ? L/mL NEL in the air at contact and vapor conditions, respectively. The NEL also had an evident inhibitory effect on spore germination in A. flavus along with NEL concentration as well as time-dependent kinetic inhibition. The NEL presented noticeable inhibition on dry mycelium weight and synthesis of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) by A. flavus, totally restraining AFB1 production at 0.6 ? L/mL. In real food system, the efficacy of the NEL on resistance to decay development in cherry tomatoes was investigated in vivo by exposing inoculated and control fruit groups to NEL vapor at different concentration. NEL vapors at 0.1 ? L/mL air concentration significantly reduced artificially contaminated A. flavus and a broad spectrum of fungal microbiota. Results obtained from presented study showed that the NEL had a great antifungal activity and could be considered as a benefit and safe tool to control food spoilage. PMID:24453813

  10. Investigations on the Antifungal Effect of Nerol against Aspergillus flavus Causing Food Spoilage

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jun; Zeng, Xiaobin; Zeng, Hong; Feng, Zhaozhong; Miao, Xiangmin; Peng, Xue

    2013-01-01

    The antifungal efficacy of nerol (NEL) has been proved against Aspergillus flavus by using in vitro and in vivo tests. The mycelial growth of A. flavus was completely inhibited at concentrations of 0.8 μL/mL and 0.1 μL/mL NEL in the air at contact and vapor conditions, respectively. The NEL also had an evident inhibitory effect on spore germination in A. flavus along with NEL concentration as well as time-dependent kinetic inhibition. The NEL presented noticeable inhibition on dry mycelium weight and synthesis of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) by A. flavus, totally restraining AFB1 production at 0.6 μL/mL. In real food system, the efficacy of the NEL on resistance to decay development in cherry tomatoes was investigated in vivo by exposing inoculated and control fruit groups to NEL vapor at different concentration. NEL vapors at 0.1 μL/mL air concentration significantly reduced artificially contaminated A. flavus and a broad spectrum of fungal microbiota. Results obtained from presented study showed that the NEL had a great antifungal activity and could be considered as a benefit and safe tool to control food spoilage. PMID:24453813

  11. Genetic Variability of Aspergillus flavus Isolates from a Mississippi Corn Field

    PubMed Central

    Solorzano, Cesar D.; Abbas, Hamed K.; Zablotowicz, Robert M.; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Jones, Walker A.

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain, K49, is currently being tested as a biological control agent in corn fields in the Mississippi Delta. However, little is known about the overall genetic diversity of A. flavus from year to year in corn fields and specifically in Mississippi. Our objective was to assess the genetic variability of A. flavus isolates from different seasons, inoculum sources, and years, from a no-till corn field. Of the 175 A. flavus isolates examined, 74 and 97 had the typical norB-cypA type I (1.5?kb) and type II (1.0?kb) deletion patterns, respectively. Variability in the sequence of the omtA gene of the majority of the field isolates (n = 118) was compared to strain K49. High levels of haplotypic diversity (24 omtA haplotypes; Hd = 0.61 0.04) were found. Among the 24 haplotypes, two were predominant, H1 (n = 71), which consists of mostly toxigenic isolates, and H49 (n = 18), which consists of mostly atoxigenic isolates including K49. Toxigenic isolates were prevalent (60%) in this natural population. Nonetheless, about 15% of the population likely shared the same ancestral origin with K49. This study provides valuable information on the diversity of A. flavus. This knowledge can be further used to develop additional biological control strains. PMID:25478591

  12. ADOPTING SELECTED HYDROGEN BONDING AND IONIC INTERACTIONS FROM ASPERGILLUS FUMIGATUS PHYTASE STRUCTURE IMPROVES THE THERMOSTABILITY OF ASPERGILLUS NIGER PHYA PHYTASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it has been widely used as a feed supplement to reduce manure phosphorus pollution of swine and poultry, Aspergillus niger PhyA phytase is unable to withstand heat inactivation during feed pelleting. Crystal structure comparisons with its close homolog, the thermostable Aspergillus fumigatu...

  13. Constitutive expression of fluorescent protein by Aspergillus var. niger and Aspergillus carbonarius to monitor fungal colonization in maize plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus niger and A. carbonarius are two species in the Aspergillus section Nigri (black-spored aspergilli) frequently associated with peanut (Arachis hypogea), maize (Zea mays), and other plants as pathogens. These infections are symptomless and as such are major concerns since some black aspe...

  14. Recombination and lineage-specific gene loss in the aflatoxin gene cluster of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Geromy G; Singh, Rakhi; Horn, Bruce W; Carbone, Ignazio

    2009-12-01

    Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus are potent carcinogens that contaminate agricultural crops. Recent efforts to reduce aflatoxin concentrations in crops have focused on biological control using nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus strains AF36 (=NRRL 18543) and NRRL 21882 (the active component of afla-guard. However, the evolutionary potential of these strains to remain nonaflatoxigenic in nature is unknown. To elucidate the underlying population processes that influence aflatoxigenicity, we examined patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) spanning 21 regions in the aflatoxin gene cluster of A. flavus. We show that recombination events are unevenly distributed across the cluster in A. flavus. Six distinct LD blocks separate late pathway genes aflE, aflM, aflN, aflG, aflL, aflI and aflO, and there is no discernable evidence of recombination among early pathway genes aflA, aflB, aflC, aflD, aflR and aflS. The discordance in phylogenies inferred for the aflW/aflX intergenic region and two noncluster regions, tryptophan synthase and acetamidase, is indicative of trans-species evolution in the cluster. Additionally, polymorphisms in aflW/aflX divide A. flavus strains into two distinct clades, each harbouring only one of the two approved biocontrol strains. The clade with AF36 includes both aflatoxigenic and nonaflatoxigenic strains, whereas the clade with NRRL 21882 comprises only nonaflatoxigenic strains and includes all strains of A. flavus missing the entire gene cluster or with partial gene clusters. Our detection of LD blocks in partial clusters indicates that recombination may have played an important role in cluster disassembly, and multilocus coalescent analyses of cluster and noncluster regions indicate lineage-specific gene loss in A. flavus. These results have important implications in assessing the stability of biocontrol strains in nature. PMID:19895419

  15. Loss of msnA a putative stress regulatory gene in Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus increased production of conidia aflatoxins and kojic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of the harmful carcinogenic aflatoxins by Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus has been postulated to be a mechanism to relieve oxidative stress. The msnA gene, the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MSN2 associated with multi-stress response, of the two species was disrupted....

  16. Aspergillus flavus biomass in maize estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is strongly correlated with aflatoxin concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus causes Aspergillus ear rot of maize and produces aflatoxins. There are published assertions that resistance to aflatoxin accumulation and pathogen colonization are distinct traits in maize. However, the levels of colonization are difficult to characterize for a pathogen such as ...

  17. Clustered Genes Involved in Cyclopiazonic Acid Production are Next to the Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an indole-tetramic acid toxin, is produced by many species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. In addition to CPA Aspergillus flavus produces polyketide-derived carcinogenic aflatoxins (AFs). AF biosynthesis genes form a gene cluster in a subtelomeric region. Isolates of A. fla...

  18. Streptomyces-Aspergillus flavus interactions: impact on aflatoxin B accumulation.

    PubMed

    Verheecke, C; Liboz, T; Anson, P; Zhu, Y; Mathieu, F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of Streptomyces sp. as biocontrol agents against aflatoxins in maize. As such, we assumed that Streptomyces sp. could provide a complementary approach to current biocontrol systems such as Afla-guard() and we focused on biocontrol that was able to have an antagonistic contact with A. flavus. A previous study showed that 27 (out of 38) Streptomyces sp. had mutual antagonism in contact with A. flavus. Among these, 16 Streptomyces sp. were able to reduce aflatoxin content to below 17% of the residual concentration. We selected six strains to understand the mechanisms involved in the prevention of aflatoxin accumulation. Thus, in interaction with A. flavus, we monitored by RT-qPCR the gene expression of aflD, aflM, aflP, aflR and aflS. All the Streptomyces sp. were able to reduce aflatoxin concentration (24.0-0.2% residual aflatoxin B1). They all impacted on gene expression, but only S35 and S38 were able to repress expression significantly. Indeed, S35 significantly repressed aflM expression and S38 significantly repressed aflR, aflM and aflP. S6 reduced aflatoxin concentrations (2.3% residual aflatoxin B1) and repressed aflS, aflM and enhanced aflR expression. In addition, the S6 strain (previously identified as the most reducing pure aflatoxin B1) was further tested to determine a potential adsorption mechanism. We did not observe any adsorption phenomenon. In conclusion, this study showed that Streptomyces sp. prevent the production of (aflatoxin gene expression) and decontamination of (aflatoxin B1 reduction) aflatoxins in vitro. PMID:25632796

  19. Cryptic Sexuality Influences Aflatoxigenicity in Aspergillus parasiticus and A. flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascomycetous fungi of the genus Aspergillus comprise a wide variety of species of biotechnological importance as well as pathogens and toxin producers. Recent studies report A. fumigatus to be heterothallic and possibly undergoing sexual reproduction. We therefore investigated whether compatible mat...

  20. Tandem shock waves to enhance genetic transformation of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Loske, Achim M; Fernndez, Francisco; Magaa-Ortz, Denis; Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Ortz-Vzquez, Elizabeth; Gmez-Lim, Miguel A

    2014-08-01

    Filamentous fungi are used in several industries and in academia to produce antibiotics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceutical compounds. The development of valuable strains usually requires the insertion of recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid; however, the protocols to transfer DNA to fungal cells are highly inefficient. Recently, underwater shock waves were successfully used to genetically transform filamentous fungi. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that the efficiency of transformation can be improved significantly by enhancing acoustic cavitation using tandem (dual-pulse) shock waves. Results revealed that tandem pressure pulses, generated at a delay of 300 ?s, increased the transformation efficiency of Aspergillus niger up to 84% in comparison with conventional (single-pulse) shock waves. This methodology may also be useful to obtain new strains required in basic research and biotechnology. PMID:24680880

  1. New pathway for the biodegradation of indole in Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, A.; Vaidyanathan, C.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Indole and its derivatives form a class of toxic recalcitrant environmental pollutants. The growth of Aspergillus niger was inhibited by very low concentrations (0.005 to 0.02%) of indole, even when 125- to 500-fold excess glucose was present in the medium. When 0.02% indole was added, the fungus showed a lag phase for about 30 h and the uptake of glucose was inhibited. Indole was metabolized by a new pathway via indoxyl (3-hydroxyindole), N-formylanthranilic acid, anthranilic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol, which was further degraded by an ortho cleavage. The enzymes N-formylanthranilate deformylase, anthranilate hydroxylase, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate decarboxylase, and catechol dioxygenase were induced by indole as early as after 5 h of growth, and their activities were demonstrated in a cell-free system.

  2. In-silico analysis of Aspergillus niger beta-glucosidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo S., L.; Shazilah, K.; Suhaila, S.; Abu Bakar F., D.; Murad A. M., A.

    2014-09-01

    Genomic data mining was carried out and revealed a total of seventeen β-glucosidases in filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger. Two of them belonged to glycoside hydrolase family 1 (GH1) while the rest belonged to genes in family 3 (GH3). These proteins were then named according to the nomenclature as proposed by the International Union of Biochemistry (IUB), starting from the lowest pI and glycoside hydrolase family. Their properties were predicted using various bionformatic tools showing the presence of domains for signal peptide and active sites. Interestingly, one particular domain, PA14 (protective antigen) was present in four of the enzymes, predicted to be involved in carbohydrate binding. A phylogenetic tree grouped the two glycoside hydrolase families with GH1 and GH3 related organisms. This study showed that the various domains present in these β-glucosidases are postulated to be crucial for the survival of this fungus, as supported by other analysis.

  3. Tailing of thermal inactivation curve of Aspergillus niger spores.

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, H; Itoh, T

    1996-01-01

    The nonlinear thermal inactivation of Aspergillus niger spores in phosphate-citrate buffer was studied. The thermal inactivation pattern of the spore consisted of a shoulder, an accelerated decline, and a tail at various constant temperatures around 60 degrees C. The pattern fitted a thermotolerant subpopulation model. In the model, we postulated that some spores in the initial population had become thermotolerant at a certain ratio during heating. The model parameters including the rate coefficients, the time lag, and the existence ratio of thermotolerant cells were analyzed at various temperatures. The tailing was not observed at an initial concentration below 10(3) cells per ml. Cells cultured from thermotolerant cells showed an inactivation pattern similar to that of the original cells. Also, cells at the second heating showed the same thermotolerance as or were slightly more thermosensitive than the original cells. Intermittent heating was found to be effective to inactivate cells at a high concentration. PMID:8837430

  4. Nanosulfur: A Potent Fungicide Against Food Pathogen, Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Samrat Roy; Goswami, Arunava; Nair, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Gopal, Madhuban; Devakumar, C.; Gogoi, Robin; Srivastava, Chitra; Subhramanyam, B. S.

    2010-10-04

    Elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}), man's oldest eco-friendly fungicide for curing fungal infections in plants and animals, is registered in India as a non-systemic and contact fungicide. However due to its high volume requirement, Indian agrochemical industry and farmers could not effectively use this product till date. We hypothesize that intelligent nanoscience applications might increase the visibility of nanosulfur in Indian agriculture as a potent and eco-safe fungicide. Sulfur nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized bottom-up via a liquid synthesis method with average particle size in the range of 50-80 nm and the shapes of the NPs were spherical. A comparative study of elemental and nano-sulfur produced has been tested against facultative fungal food pathogen, Aspergillus niger. Results showed that nanosulfur is more efficacious than its elemental form.

  5. Nanosulfur: A Potent Fungicide Against Food Pathogen, Aspergillus niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Samrat Roy; Nair, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Gogoi, Robin; Srivastava, Chitra; Gopal, Madhuban; Subhramanyam, B. S.; devakumar, C.; Goswami, Arunava

    2010-10-01

    Elemental sulfur (S0), man's oldest eco-friendly fungicide for curing fungal infections in plants and animals, is registered in India as a non-systemic and contact fungicide. However due to its high volume requirement, Indian agrochemical industry and farmers could not effectively use this product till date. We hypothesize that intelligent nanoscience applications might increase the visibility of nanosulfur in Indian agriculture as a potent and eco-safe fungicide. Sulfur nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized bottom-up via a liquid synthesis method with average particle size in the range of 50-80 nm and the shapes of the NPs were spherical. A comparative study of elemental and nano-sulfur produced has been tested against facultative fungal food pathogen, Aspergillus niger. Results showed that nanosulfur is more efficacious than its elemental form.

  6. Catalytical Properties of Free and Immobilized Aspergillus niger Tannase

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Maltos, Abril; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis V.; Renovato, Jacqueline; Contreras, Juan C.; Rodríguez, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N.

    2011-01-01

    A fungal tannase was produced, recovered, and immobilized by entrapment in calcium alginate beads. Catalytical properties of the immobilized enzyme were compared with those of the free one. Tannase was produced intracellularly by the xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 in a submerged fermentation system. Enzyme was recovered by cell disruption and the crude extract was partially purified. The catalytical properties of free and immobilized tannase were evaluated using tannic acid and methyl gallate as substrates. KM and Vmax values for free enzyme were very similar for both substrates. But, after immobilization, KM and Vmax values increased drastically using tannic acid as substrate. These results indicated that immobilized tannase is a better biocatalyst than free enzyme for applications on liquid systems with high tannin content, such as bioremediation of tannery or olive-mill wastewater. PMID:21918717

  7. Aspergillus Flavus Endocarditis of the Native Mitral Valve in a Bone Marrow Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Tolga; Ergenoglu, Mehmet Umit; Ekinci, Abdurrahman; Tanrikulu, Nursen; Sahin, Mazlum; Demirsoy, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 36 Final Diagnosis: Aspergillus flavus endocarditis Symptoms: Malaise • fatigue and dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Mitral vale replacemnet Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Infective endocarditis due to Aspergillus species is an uncommon infection with a high mortality rate. It mostly occurs after the implantation of prosthetic heart valves. Parenteral nutrition, immunosuppression, broad-spectrum antibiotic regimens, and illegal intravenous drug use are the risk factors for developing infection. Case Report: We report a case of Aspergillus flavus native mitral valve endocarditis in a patient who had allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the past due to myelodysplastic syndrome. Conclusions: Although it is rare and there is limited experience available with the diagnosis and treatment, early recognition and therapeutic intervention with systemic antifungal therapy and aggressive surgical intervention are critical to prevent further complications that may eventually lead to death. In addition, better novel diagnostic tools are needed to facilitate more accurate identification of patients with invasive Aspergillus and to permit earlier initiation of antifungal treatment. PMID:25603977

  8. Mapping the polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The degradation of plant materials by enzymes is an industry of increasing importance. For sustainable production of second generation biofuels and other products of industrial biotechnology, efficient degradation of non-edible plant polysaccharides such as hemicellulose is required. For each type of hemicellulose, a complex mixture of enzymes is required for complete conversion to fermentable monosaccharides. In plant-biomass degrading fungi, these enzymes are regulated and released by complex regulatory structures. In this study, we present a methodology for evaluating the potential of a given fungus for polysaccharide degradation. Results Through the compilation of information from 203 articles, we have systematized knowledge on the structure and degradation of 16 major types of plant polysaccharides to form a graphical overview. As a case example, we have combined this with a list of 188 genes coding for carbohydrate-active enzymes from Aspergillus niger, thus forming an analysis framework, which can be queried. Combination of this information network with gene expression analysis on mono- and polysaccharide substrates has allowed elucidation of concerted gene expression from this organism. One such example is the identification of a full set of extracellular polysaccharide-acting genes for the degradation of oat spelt xylan. Conclusions The mapping of plant polysaccharide structures along with the corresponding enzymatic activities is a powerful framework for expression analysis of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applying this network-based approach, we provide the first genome-scale characterization of all genes coding for carbohydrate-active enzymes identified in A. niger. PMID:22799883

  9. Aspergillus niger as a new allergic agent associated with bindis and its efficacy against homeopathic drugs.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, J N; Kumar, Ajay; Bhatnagar, V P

    2006-10-01

    Aspergillus was found as a dominant fungi to associate with brands of bindis. Among three potencies of four homeopathic drugs, Lycopodium 1M, Sulphur 1M, and Sepia 30 showed maximum inhibition zone of Aspergillus niger in inhibition zone technique. In poison food technique, Sepia 30M, Tellurium 30M, Sulphur 1M and Lycopodium 200 showed maximum percentage inhibition against A. niger PMID:17405335

  10. Induced Autolysis of Aspergillus oryzae (A. niger group)

    PubMed Central

    Emiliani, Ezio; de Davie, I. Ucha

    1962-01-01

    The examination of substances formed during induced autolysis by Aspergillus niger was continued in this work, which dealt in particular with carbohydrates. The autolysate contained a large amount of d-glucose (14 to 20% dry wt) and traces of glycolic aldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, ribose, xylose, and fructose. It also contained glycopeptides (about 10% dry wt), which were split from the cell wall during autolysis and which differed from one another in their level of polymerization and their composition. They were constituted by glucose and mannose, glucose and galactose, or mannose, glucose, and galactose (mannose being the most abundant in this case), and amino acids (chiefly alanine, serine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid). During autolysis, only a part of the cell wall was dissolved, since it retained its shape. Upon further chemical hydrolysis, it produced mostly glucose and glucosamine, and smaller amounts of mannose, galactose, and amino acids. Presumably, glucomannoproteins and glucogalactoproteins were present in the intact cell as a macromolecular complex, constituting, together with chitin, the major part of the cell wall of Aspergillus. PMID:16349623

  11. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility profile of Aspergillus flavus isolates recovered from clinical specimens in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Within the genus Aspergillus, A. flavus is the second most important species of clinical significance. It is predominantly associated with infections involving sinuses, eye and skin, mostly in geographic regions with hot and arid climate, including the Middle East. Recent reports on emergence of resistance to triazoles among Aspergillus spp. is a cause of concern for treatment of patients with invasive aspergillosis. In this study we present data on genetic characterization and antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical and environmental isolates of A. flavus. Methods Ninety-nine Aspergillus section Flavi isolates, originating from clinical (n=92) and environmental (n=7) sources, initially identified by morphological characteristics, were analyzed by partial sequencing of ?-tubulin and calmodulin gene fragments and their susceptibilities to six antifungal agents was determined by Etest on RPMI1640 and Muller-Hinton agar media. Etest minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B and voriconazole were also compared with zone of inhibition diameters obtained by disc diffusion test on RPMI agar medium. Results The identity of all clinical and environmental isolates was confirmed as A. flavus species by combined analysis of ?-tubulin and calmodulin genes. The mean MIC90 (?g/ml) values on RPMI medium for amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, anidulafungin, micafungin and caspofungin were 3, 0.25, 0.25, 0.002, 0.002 and 0.032, respectively. No environmental isolate exhibited MIC value of >2 ?g/ml for amphotericin B. For clinical isolates, the zone of inhibition diameters for amphotericin B and voriconazole ranged from 716 mm and 2434 mm, respectively. Linear regression analysis between Etest MIC values and disk diffusion diameters revealed a significant inverse correlation with amphotericin B (p <0.001) and voriconazole (p<0.003). Conclusions The ?-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences confirmed that all 92 clinical isolates identified phenotypically belonged to A. flavus taxon, thus suggesting that the other species within Aspergillus section Flavi are of little clinical significance. Triazoles and echinocandins showed very good in vitro activity against the A. flavus, however, 10% clinical isolates showed MICs of >2 ?g/ml for amphotericin B. PMID:23496810

  12. Molecular characterisation of Aspergillus flavus isolates from peanut fields in India using AFLP

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Diwakar; Radhakrishnan, T.; Kumar, Vinod; Bagwan, N.B.; Basu, M.S.; Dobaria, J.R.; Mishra, Gyan P.; Chanda, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanut, due to infection by Aspergillus flavus, is a major problem of rain-fed agriculture in India. In the present study, molecular characterisation of 187 Aspergillus flavus isolates, which were sampled from the peanut fields of Gujarat state in India, was performed using AFLP markers. On a pooled cluster analysis, the markers could successfully discriminate among the ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘G’ group A. flavus isolates. PCoA analysis also showed equivalent results to the cluster analysis. Most of the isolates from one district could be clustered together, which indicated genetic similarity among the isolates. Further, a lot of genetic variability was observed within a district and within a group. The results of AMOVA test revealed that the variance within a population (84%) was more than that between two populations (16%). The isolates, when tested by indirect competitive ELISA, showed about 68.5% of them to be atoxigenic. Composite analysis between the aflatoxin production and AFLP data was found to be ineffective in separating the isolate types by aflatoxigenicity. Certain unique fragments, with respect to individual isolates, were also identified that may be used for development of SCAR marker to aid in rapid and precise identification of isolates. PMID:26413047

  13. Molecular characterisation of Aspergillus flavus isolates from peanut fields in India using AFLP.

    PubMed

    Singh, Diwakar; Radhakrishnan, T; Kumar, Vinod; Bagwan, N B; Basu, M S; Dobaria, J R; Mishra, Gyan P; Chanda, S V

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanut, due to infection by Aspergillus flavus, is a major problem of rain-fed agriculture in India. In the present study, molecular characterisation of 187 Aspergillus flavus isolates, which were sampled from the peanut fields of Gujarat state in India, was performed using AFLP markers. On a pooled cluster analysis, the markers could successfully discriminate among the 'A', 'B' and 'G' group A. flavus isolates. PCoA analysis also showed equivalent results to the cluster analysis. Most of the isolates from one district could be clustered together, which indicated genetic similarity among the isolates. Further, a lot of genetic variability was observed within a district and within a group. The results of AMOVA test revealed that the variance within a population (84%) was more than that between two populations (16%). The isolates, when tested by indirect competitive ELISA, showed about 68.5% of them to be atoxigenic. Composite analysis between the aflatoxin production and AFLP data was found to be ineffective in separating the isolate types by aflatoxigenicity. Certain unique fragments, with respect to individual isolates, were also identified that may be used for development of SCAR marker to aid in rapid and precise identification of isolates. PMID:26413047

  14. Seventeen years of subcutaneous infection by Aspergillus flavus; eumycetoma confirmed by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sarah A; Abbas, Manal A; Jouvion, Gregory; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; de Hoog, G Sybren; Kolecka, Anna; Mahgoub, El Sheikh

    2015-12-01

    Chronic subcutaneous infections caused by Aspergillus species are considered to be extremely rare. Because these fungi are among the most common laboratory contaminants, their role as eumycetoma causative agents is difficult to ascertain. Here, we report the first case of A. flavus eumycetoma confirmed by isolation, molecular identification and immunohistochemical analysis. Patient was a 55-year-old male from Sudan suffering from eumycetoma on his left foot for a period of 17 years. He developed swelling, sinuses and white grain discharge was observed. He has been operated nine times and was treated with several regimens of ketoconazole and itraconazole without improvement. Initial diagnosis based on histology and radiology was Scedosporium eumycetoma. However, examination of the biopsy revealed A. flavus, which was identified by molecular analysis and MALDI-TOF MS. Immunohistochemistry using antibody directed against Aspergillus species was positive. Because of the earlier treatment failures with ketoconazole and itraconazole, therapy with voriconazole was initiated. However, in vitro susceptibility testing yielded a lower Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) value for itraconazole (0.25 ?g ml(-1) ) than for voriconazole (1 ?g ml(-1) ). Based on the presented results, A. flavus can be considered as one of the agents of white-grain eumycetoma. PMID:26497138

  15. RNA-Seq-based transcriptome analysis of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus in response to water activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Guo, Zhenni; Zhong, Hong; Wang, Sen; Yang, Weiqiang; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Shihua

    2014-11-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the most important producers of carcinogenic aflatoxins in crops, and the effect of water activity (a(w)) on growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus has been previously studied. Here we found the strains under 0.93 a(w) exhibited decreased conidiation and aflatoxin biosynthesis compared to that under 0.99 a(w). When RNA-Seq was used to delineate gene expression profile under different water activities, 23,320 non-redundant unigenes, with an average length of 1297 bp, were yielded. By database comparisons, 19,838 unigenes were matched well (e-value < 10⁻⁵) with known gene sequences, and another 6767 novel unigenes were obtained by comparison to the current genome annotation of A. flavus. Based on the RPKM equation, 5362 differentially expressed unigenes (with |log₂Ratio| ≥ 1) were identified between 0.99 a(w) and 0.93 a(w) treatments, including 3156 up-regulated and 2206 down-regulated unigenes, suggesting that A. flavus underwent an extensive transcriptome response during water activity variation. Furthermore, we found that the expression of 16 aflatoxin producing-related genes decreased obviously when water activity decreased, and the expression of 11 development-related genes increased after 0.99 a(w) treatment. Our data corroborate a model where water activity affects aflatoxin biosynthesis through increasing the expression of aflatoxin producing-related genes and regulating development-related genes. PMID:25421810

  16. The DmtA methyltransferase contributes to Aspergillus flavus conidiation, sclerotial production, aflatoxin biosynthesis and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kunlong; Liang, Linlin; Ran, Fanlei; Liu, Yinghang; Li, Zhenguo; Lan, Huahui; Gao, Peili; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Zhang, Feng; Nie, Xinyi; Kalayu Yirga, Shimuye; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for epigenetic regulation of gene transcription and development in many animals, plants and fungi. We investigated whether DNA methylation plays a role in the development and secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, identified the DmtA methyltransferase from A. flavus, and produced a dmtA knock-out mutant by replacing the dmtA coding sequence with the pyrG selectable marker. The A. flavus dmtA null mutant lines produced white fluffy mycelium in liquid medium, and displayed a slightly flavescent conidial pigmentation compared with the normal yellow of the wild-type strain when grown on agar. The ΔdmtA lines exhibited decreased conidiation and aflatoxin (AF) biosynthesis, compared with the wild-type line, suggesting that the DmtA knock-out affected the transcriptional level of genes in the AF cluster. In particular, sclerotia development and host colonization were altered in the dmtA null mutants. Green fluorescent protein tagging at the C-terminus of DmtA showed that DmtA localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. DNA methylation content measurements in the dmtA mutants revealed no widespread DNA methylation in the mutants or wild-type lines. Thus, our findings suggest that DmtA, apart from being a C-5 cytosine methyltransferase in A. flavus, contributes to asexual development, aflatoxin biosynthesis, sclerotial production and virulence. PMID:26979781

  17. RNA-Seq-Based Transcriptome Analysis of Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus in Response to Water Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Guo, Zhenni; Zhong, Hong; Wang, Sen; Yang, Weiqiang; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Shihua

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the most important producers of carcinogenic aflatoxins in crops, and the effect of water activity (aw) on growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus has been previously studied. Here we found the strains under 0.93 aw exhibited decreased conidiation and aflatoxin biosynthesis compared to that under 0.99 aw. When RNA-Seq was used to delineate gene expression profile under different water activities, 23,320 non-redundant unigenes, with an average length of 1297 bp, were yielded. By database comparisons, 19,838 unigenes were matched well (e-value < 10−5) with known gene sequences, and another 6767 novel unigenes were obtained by comparison to the current genome annotation of A. flavus. Based on the RPKM equation, 5362 differentially expressed unigenes (with |log2Ratio| ≥ 1) were identified between 0.99 aw and 0.93 aw treatments, including 3156 up-regulated and 2206 down-regulated unigenes, suggesting that A. flavus underwent an extensive transcriptome response during water activity variation. Furthermore, we found that the expression of 16 aflatoxin producing-related genes decreased obviously when water activity decreased, and the expression of 11 development-related genes increased after 0.99 aw treatment. Our data corroborate a model where water activity affects aflatoxin biosynthesis through increasing the expression of aflatoxin producing-related genes and regulating development-related genes. PMID:25421810

  18. Role of Oxidative Stress in Sclerotial Differentiation and Aflatoxin B1 Biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Vernardis, Spyros I.; Klapa, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    We show here that oxidative stress is involved in both sclerotial differentiation (SD) and aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus. Specifically, we observed that (i) oxidative stress regulates SD, as implied by its inhibition by antioxidant modulators of reactive oxygen species and thiol redox state, and that (ii) aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis and SD are comodulated by oxidative stress. However, aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis is inhibited by lower stress levels compared to SD, as shown by comparison to undifferentiated A. flavus. These same oxidative stress levels also characterize a mutant A. flavus strain, lacking the global regulatory gene veA. This mutant is unable to produce sclerotia and aflatoxin B1. (iii) Further, we show that hydrogen peroxide is the main modulator of A. flavus SD, as shown by its inhibition by both an irreversible inhibitor of catalase activity and a mimetic of superoxide dismutase activity. On the other hand, aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis is controlled by a wider array of oxidative stress factors, such as lipid hydroperoxide, superoxide, and hydroxyl and thiyl radicals. PMID:25002424

  19. Data set for the mass spectrometry based exoproteome analysis of Aspergillus flavus isolates

    PubMed Central

    Muthu Selvam, Ramu; Nithya, Rathnavel; Narmatha Devi, Palraj; Bhuvana Shree, R.S.; Valar Nila, Murugesan; Demonte, Naveen Luke; Thangavel, Chitra; Jeya Maheshwari, Jayapal; Lalitha, Prajna; Venkatesh Prajna, Namperumalsamy; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the predominant causative organisms of mycotic keratitis in tropical parts of the world. Extracellular proteins are the earliest proteins that come in contact with the host and have a role in the infection process. Exoproteins of A. flavus isolated from infected cornea, sputum and a saprophyte were pooled and identified using high resolution mass spectrometry in order to get the total exoproteome from cultures isolated from different sources. A total of 637 proteins was identified from the pooled A. flavus exoproteome. Analysis based on GO annotations of the 637 identified proteins revealed that hydrolases form the predominant class of proteins in the exoproteome. Interestingly, a greater proportion of the exoproteins seem to be secreted through the non-classical pathways. This data represent the first in-depth analysis of the representative A. flavus exoproteome of a large set of isolates from distinct sources. This data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001296. PMID:26217704

  20. Inactivation of Aspergillus flavus in drinking water after treatment with UV irradiation followed by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad; Zheng, Tianling; Yu, Xin

    2013-10-01

    The disinfection process for inactivating microorganisms at drinking water treatment plants is aimed for safety of drinking water for humans from a microorganism, such as bacteria, viruses, algae, fungi by using chlorination, ozonation, UV irradiation, etc. In the present study, a combination of two disinfectants, UV irradiation followed by chlorination, was evaluated for inactivating Aspergillus flavus under low contact time and low dosage of UV irradiation. The results indicated an inverse correlation between the inactivation of A. flavus by using UV irradiation only or chlorination alone. By using UV radiation, the 2 log10 control of A. flavus was achieved after 30 s of irradiation, while chlorination was observed to be more effective than UV, where the 2 log was achieved at chlorine concentration of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mg/l, in contact time of 60, 5, 1 and 1 min, respectively. However, combined use (UV irradiation followed by chlorination) was more effective than using either UV or chlorination alone; 5 s UV irradiation followed by chlorination produced 4 log10 reduction of A. flavus at chlorine concentrations of 2 and 3 mg/l under a contact time of 15 min. The results indicated that efficiency of UV irradiation improves when followed by chlorination at low concentrations. PMID:23831798

  1. C15H24 Volatile Compounds Unique to Aflatoxigenic Strains of Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Zeringue, H. J.; Bhatnagar, D.; Cleveland, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Headspace volatiles from eight strains of Aspergillus flavus (four aflatoxigenic strains and four nonaflatoxigenic strains), grown for 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 10 days in submerged cultures, were collected in Tenax GC traps. The traps were desorbed onto a 50-m gas-liquid chromatography capillary column by heat and gas purge from an external direct injector device. The column was interfaced with a mass spectrometer data acquisition system. Peaks were identified by comparing retention times and mass spectra with those obtained from authentic compounds and by using a computer-assisted mass spectral data base. Aflatoxigenic strains of A. flavus produced several C15H24 compounds (e.g., alpha-gurjunene, trans-caryophyllene, and cadinene) which peaked in 3-day cultures and were not present in earlier (1- and 2-day) or later (8- and 10-day) cultures. None of these volatiles were detected in nonaflatoxigenic strains of A. flavus. There was an apparent correlation between the release of C15H24 volatile compounds and the initiation of aflatoxin biosynthesis, and a correlation between decline of aflatoxin synthesis and the disappearance of the C15H24 compounds unique to aflatoxigenic A. flavus also existed. PMID:16348999

  2. Role of oxidative stress in Sclerotial differentiation and aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Vernardis, Spyros I; Klapa, Maria I; Georgiou, Christos D

    2014-09-01

    We show here that oxidative stress is involved in both sclerotial differentiation (SD) and aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus. Specifically, we observed that (i) oxidative stress regulates SD, as implied by its inhibition by antioxidant modulators of reactive oxygen species and thiol redox state, and that (ii) aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis and SD are comodulated by oxidative stress. However, aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis is inhibited by lower stress levels compared to SD, as shown by comparison to undifferentiated A. flavus. These same oxidative stress levels also characterize a mutant A. flavus strain, lacking the global regulatory gene veA. This mutant is unable to produce sclerotia and aflatoxin B1. (iii) Further, we show that hydrogen peroxide is the main modulator of A. flavus SD, as shown by its inhibition by both an irreversible inhibitor of catalase activity and a mimetic of superoxide dismutase activity. On the other hand, aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis is controlled by a wider array of oxidative stress factors, such as lipid hydroperoxide, superoxide, and hydroxyl and thiyl radicals. PMID:25002424

  3. The DmtA methyltransferase contributes to Aspergillus flavus conidiation, sclerotial production, aflatoxin biosynthesis and virulence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kunlong; Liang, Linlin; Ran, Fanlei; Liu, Yinghang; Li, Zhenguo; Lan, Huahui; Gao, Peili; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Zhang, Feng; Nie, Xinyi; Kalayu Yirga, Shimuye; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for epigenetic regulation of gene transcription and development in many animals, plants and fungi. We investigated whether DNA methylation plays a role in the development and secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, identified the DmtA methyltransferase from A. flavus, and produced a dmtA knock-out mutant by replacing the dmtA coding sequence with the pyrG selectable marker. The A. flavus dmtA null mutant lines produced white fluffy mycelium in liquid medium, and displayed a slightly flavescent conidial pigmentation compared with the normal yellow of the wild-type strain when grown on agar. The ΔdmtA lines exhibited decreased conidiation and aflatoxin (AF) biosynthesis, compared with the wild-type line, suggesting that the DmtA knock-out affected the transcriptional level of genes in the AF cluster. In particular, sclerotia development and host colonization were altered in the dmtA null mutants. Green fluorescent protein tagging at the C-terminus of DmtA showed that DmtA localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. DNA methylation content measurements in the dmtA mutants revealed no widespread DNA methylation in the mutants or wild-type lines. Thus, our findings suggest that DmtA, apart from being a C-5 cytosine methyltransferase in A. flavus, contributes to asexual development, aflatoxin biosynthesis, sclerotial production and virulence. PMID:26979781

  4. Effect of specific amino acids on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus in defined media.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, G A; Hagler, W M

    1983-01-01

    Four amino acids were used as sole nitrogen sources or as supplements to ammonium sulfate, and casein and ammonium sulfate were used as sole nitrogen sources to examine their effects on aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL 2999 and Aspergillus flavus 3357 grown on synthetic liquid media. In general, when proline, asparagine, casein, and ammonium sulfate were used as sole nitrogen sources, they supported more growth and toxin production than tryptophan or methionine. However, proline stimulated more toxin production per gram of mycelium in stationary cultures than the other nitrogen sources, including the amino acid asparagine, which is generally recognized as supporting good aflatoxin production. The exact responses to individual nitrogen sources were influenced by the species of fungus and whether cultures were stationary or shaken. In shake cultures, but not in stationary cultures, increased growth was generally associated with increased toxin production. PMID:6416168

  5. Aspergillus flavus infection induces transcriptional and physical changes in developing maize kernels

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Andrea L.; Shu, Xiaomei; OBrian, Gregory R.; Nielsen, Dahlia M.; Woloshuk, Charles P.; Boston, Rebecca S.; Payne, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Maize kernels are susceptible to infection by the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus flavus. Infection results in reduction of grain quality and contamination of kernels with the highly carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxin. To understanding host response to infection by the fungus, transcription of approximately 9000 maize genes were monitored during the host-pathogen interaction with a custom designed Affymetrix GeneChip® DNA array. More than 4000 maize genes were found differentially expressed at a FDR of 0.05. This included the up regulation of defense related genes and signaling pathways. Transcriptional changes also were observed in primary metabolism genes. Starch biosynthetic genes were down regulated during infection, while genes encoding maize hydrolytic enzymes, presumably involved in the degradation of host reserves, were up regulated. These data indicate that infection of the maize kernel by A. flavus induced metabolic changes in the kernel, including the production of a defense response, as well as a disruption in kernel development. PMID:25132833

  6. Antimicrobial effects of ionizing radiation on artificially and naturally contaminated cacao beans. [Aspergillus flavus; Penicillium citrinum

    SciTech Connect

    Restaino, L.; Myron, J.J.J.; Lenovich, L.M.; Bills, S.; Tscherneff, K.

    1984-04-01

    With an initial microbial level of ca. 10/sup 7/ microorganisms per g of Ivory Coast cacao beans, 5 kGy of gamma radiation from a Co/sup 60/ source under an atmosphere of air reduced the microflora per g by 2.49 and 3.03 logs at temperatures of 35 and 50/sup 0/C, respectively. Bahia cacao beans were artificially contaminated with dried spores of Aspergillus flavus and Penicillium citrinum, giving initial fungal levels of 1.9 x 10/sup 4/ and 1.4 x 10/sup 3/ spores per g of whole Bahia cacao beans, respectively. The average D/sub 10/ values for A. flavus and P. citrinum spores on Bahia cacao beans were 0.66 and 0.88 kGy, respectively. 12 references.

  7. Controlling Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus growth and aflatoxin production in poultry feed using carvacrol and trans-cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hsin-Bai; Chen, Chi-Hung; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Darre, Michael J; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are toxic metabolites primarily produced by molds, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Contamination of poultry feed with AF is a major concern to the poultry industry due to severe economic losses stemming from poor performance, reduced egg production, and diminished egg hatchability. This study investigated the inhibitory effect of 2 generally regarded as safe (GRAS), natural plant compounds, namely carvacrol (CR) and trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), on A. flavus and A. parasiticus growth and AF production in potato dextrose broth (PDB) and in poultry feed. In broth culture, PDB supplemented with CR (0%, 0.02%, 0.04% and 0.08%) or TC (0%, 0.005%, 0.01% and 0.02%) was inoculated with A. flavus or A. parasiticus (6 log CFU/mL), and mold counts and AF production were determined on days 0, 1, 3, and 5. Similarly, 200 g portions of poultry feed supplemented with CR or TC (0%, 0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.0%) were inoculated with each mold, and their counts and AF concentrations in the feed were determined at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of storage. Moreover, the effect of CR and TC on the expression of AF synthesis genes in A. flavus and A. parasiticus (aflC, nor1, norA, and ver1) was determined using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). All experiments had duplicate samples and were replicated 3 times. Results indicated that CR and TC reduced A. flavus and A. parasiticus growth and AF production in broth culture and chicken feed (P<0.05). All tested concentrations of CR and TC decreased AF production in broth culture and chicken feed by at least 60% when compared to controls (P<0.05). In addition, CR and TC down-regulated the expression of major genes associated with AF synthesis in the molds (P<0.05). Results suggest the potential use of CR and TC as feed additives to control AF contamination in poultry feed. PMID:26217023

  8. Loss of msnA, a Putative Stress Regulatory Gene, in Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus Increased Production of Conidia, Aflatoxins and Kojic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Scharfenstein, Leslie L.; Luo, Meng; Mahoney, Noreen; Molyneux, Russell J.; Yu, Jiujiang; Brown, Robert L.; Campbell, Bruce C.

    2011-01-01

    Production of the harmful carcinogenic aflatoxins by Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus has been postulated to be a mechanism to relieve oxidative stress. The msnA gene of A. parasiticus and A. flavus is the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MSN2 that is associated with multi-stress response. Compared to wild type strains, the msnA deletion (?msnA) strains of A. parasiticus and A. flavus exhibited retarded colony growth with increased conidiation. The ?msnA strains also produced slightly higher amounts of aflatoxins and elevated amounts of kojic acid on mixed cereal medium. Microarray assays showed that expression of genes encoding oxidative stress defense enzymes, i.e., superoxide dismutase, catalase, and cytochrome c peroxidase in A. parasiticus ?msnA, and the catalase A gene in A. flavus ?msnA, was up-regulated. Both A. parasiticus and A. flavus ?msnA strains produced higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ROS production of A. flavus msnA addback strains was decreased to levels comparable to that of the wild type A. flavus. The msnA gene appears to be required for the maintenance of the normal oxidative state. The impairment of msnA resulted in the aforementioned changes, which might be used to combat the increased oxidative stress in the cells. PMID:22069691

  9. Identification of novel metabolites from Aspergillus flavus by high resolution and multiple stage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malysheva, Svetlana V; Arroyo-Manzanares, Natalia; Cary, Jeffrey W; Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Di Mavungu, José Diana; De Saeger, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus flavus is one of the most important species in the Aspergillus genus and is distributed worldwide as a prevalent aflatoxin-producing food and feed contaminant. A. flavus contains more than 55 gene clusters that are predicted to encode proteins involved in secondary metabolite production. One of these, cluster 27, contains a polyketide synthase (pks27) gene that encodes a protein that is highly homologous to the aflatoxin cluster PKS. Comparative metabolomics, using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) was used to detect metabolites differentially expressed in the A. flavus wild-type and ∆pks27 mutant strains. Metabolite profiling was aided by a statistical differential analysis of MS data using SIEVE software. This differential analysis combined with accurate mass data from the Orbitrap and ion trap multiple stage MS allowed four metabolites to be identified that were produced only by the wild-type culture. These included asparasone A (358 Da), an anthraquinone pigment, and related anthraquinones with masses of 316, 340 and 374 Da. These latter three compounds had similar fragmentation patterns to that of asparasone A. The 316 Da anthraquinone is particularly interesting because it is most likely formed by incorporation of seven malonyl-CoA units rather than the eight units required for the formation of asparasone A. The 340 and 374 Da metabolites are the dehydration and an oxy-derivative of asparasone A, respectively. Asparasone A was also identified in extracts from several other Aspergillus species. PMID:24405210

  10. Potential of essential oils for protection of grains contaminated by aflatoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Renata H.; Gonalez, Edlayne; Marques, Marcia O. M.; Felicio, Roberto C.; Felicio, Joana D.

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a highly toxic and carcinogenic metabolite produced by Aspergillus species on food and agricultural commodities. Inhibitory effects of essential oils of Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) on the mycelial growth and aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus have been studied previously in culture medium. The aim of this study was to evaluate aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus in real food systems (corn and soybean) treated with Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) essential oils. Samples with 60 g of the grains were treated with different volumes of essential oils, 200, 100, 50, and 10 ?L for oregano and 50, 30, 15, and 10 ?L for mentrasto. Fungal growth was evaluated by disk diffusion method. Aflatoxin B1 production was evaluated inoculating suspensions of A. flavus containing 1.3 105 spores/mL in 60 g of grains (corn and soybeans) after adjusting the water activity at 0.94. Aflatoxin was quantified by photodensitometry. Fungal growth and aflatoxin production were inhibited by essential oils, but the mentrasto oil was more effective in soybeans than that of oregano. On the other hand, in corn samples, the oregano essential oil was more effective than that of mentrasto. Chemical compositions of the essential oils were also investigated. The GC/MS oils analysis showed that the main component of mentrasto essential oil is precocene I and of the main component of oregano essential oil is 4-terpineol. The results indicate that both essential oils can become an alternative for the control of aflatoxins in corn and soybeans. PMID:24926289

  11. Non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus to prevent aflatoxin contamination in crops: advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a diverse assemblage of strains that include aflatoxin-producing and non-toxigenic strains with cosmopolitan distribution. The most promising strategy currently being used to reduce preharvest contamination of crops with aflatoxin is to introduce non-aflatoxin (biocontrol) A. flavus into the crop environment. Whether or not introduction of biocontrol strains into agricultural fields is enough to reduce aflatoxin contamination to levels required for acceptance of the contaminated food as fit for consumption is still unknown. There is no question that biocontrol strains are able to reduce the size of the populations of aflatoxin-producing strains but the available data suggests that at most only a four- to five-fold reduction in aflatoxin contamination is achieved. There are many challenges facing this strategy that are both short term and long term. First, the population biology of A. flavus is not well understood due in part to A. flavus’s diversity, its ability to form heterokaryotic reproductive forms, and its unknown ability to survive for prolonged periods after application. Second, biocontrol strains must be selected that are suitable for the environment, the type of crop, and the soil into which they will be introduced. Third, there is a need to guard against inadvertent introduction of A. flavus strains that could impose an additional burden on food safety and food quality, and fourth, with global warming and resultant changes in the soil nutrients and concomitant microbiome populations, the biocontrol strategy must be sufficiently flexible to adapt to such changes. Understanding genetic variation within strains of A. flavus is important for developing a robust biocontrol strategy and it is unlikely that a “one size fits all” strategy will work for preharvest aflatoxin reduction. PMID:24575088

  12. Gene expression profile and response to maize kernels by Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Reese, Brittiney N; Payne, Gary A; Nielsen, Dahlia M; Woloshuk, Charles P

    2011-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus causes an ear rot of maize, often resulting in the production of aflatoxin, a potent liver toxin and carcinogen that impacts the health of humans and animals. Many aspects of kernel infection and aflatoxin biosynthesis have been studied but the precise effects of the kernel environment on A. flavus are poorly understood. The goal of this research was to study the fungal response to the kernel environment during colonization. Gene transcription in A. flavus was analyzed by microarrays after growth on kernels of the four developmental stages: blister (R2), milk (R3), dough (R4), and dent (R5). Five days after inoculation, total RNA was isolated from kernels and hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip arrays containing probes representing 12,834 A. flavus genes. Statistical comparisons of the expression profile data revealed significant differences that included unique sets of upregulated genes in each kernel stage and six patterns of expression over the four stages. Among the genes expressed in colonized dent kernels were a phytase gene and six putative genes involved in zinc acquisition. Disruption of the phytase gene phy1 resulted in reduced growth on medium containing phytate as the sole source of phosphate. Furthermore, growth of the mutant (?phy1) was 20% of the wild-type strain when wound inoculated into maize ears. In contrast, no difference was detected in the amount of aflatoxin produced relative to fungal growth, indicating that phy1 does not affect aflatoxin production. The study revealed the genome-wide effects of immature maize kernels on A. flavus and suggest that phytase has a role in pathogenesis. PMID:21341988

  13. Fatty Acid Toxicity and Methyl Ketone Production in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Harold L.; Darnall, Dennis W.

    1970-01-01

    Vegetative hyphae of Aspergillus niger rapidly converted caproic acid into 2-pentanone. More caproic acid was required for maximal ketone production at alkaline as compared to acidic pH values. Further increases in caproate concentrations at each pH value tested (4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, and 8.5) resulted in inhibition of ketone production and O2 uptake. At alkaline pH values (8.5 and 7.5), oxygen uptake above the endogenous level and the production of 2-pentanone were parallel. This relationship did not hold at acidic pH values. At these pH values, ketone production continued (pH 6.5) or attained a maximum (pH 5.5 and 4.5) at caproate concentrations at which oxygen uptake was inhibited below endogenous levels. These data indicate that endogenous oxygen uptake was not inhibited by caproate at alkaline pH values at concentrations which did inhibit caproate oxidation and 2-pentanone production. Conversely, at acidic pH values, endogenous oxygen uptake was vigorously inhibited by caproate at concentrations at which exogenous fatty acid oxidation and 2-pentanone production were less affected. Simon-Beevers plots of these data showed that the undissociated acid was the permeant form of caproic acid. The fatty anion appeared to be the active or inhibitory form of caproate within the cell. Vegetative hyphae of A. niger were poorly buffered. Once the hyphae were washed and resuspended in phosphate buffer, they were well buffered towards inhibitory concentrations of caproic acid. These findings suggest that the primary mechanism(s) by which caproate inhibits oxygen uptake and ketone formation does not involve a change in the intracellular pH. PMID:5411757

  14. New Monomeric Stilbenoids from Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) Seeds Challenged by an Aspergillus flavus Strain.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Victor S; Krausert, Nicole M; Gloer, James B

    2016-01-27

    Two new stilbene derivatives have been isolated from peanut seeds challenged by an Aspergillus flavus strain, along with chiricanine B, which has not been previously reported from peanuts, as well as a stilbenoid reported previously only as a synthetic product. The structures of these new putative phytoalexins were determined by analysis of (1)H and (13)C NMR, HRESIMS, MS(n), and UV data. The new stilbenoids were named arahypin-13 (21), arahypin-14 (22), and arahypin-15 (23). Together with other known bioactive peanut stilbenoids that were also produced in the challenged seeds, these new compounds may play a defensive role against invasive fungi. PMID:26672388

  15. A new furan derivative from an endophytic Aspergillus flavus of Cephalotaxus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yang-Min; Ma, Cong-Cong; Li, Ting; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A new furan derivative named 5-acetoxymethylfuran-3-carboxylic acid (2), together with a known furan compound, 5-hydroxymethylfuran-3-carboxylic acid (1), were isolated from the fermentation of Aspergillus flavus, endophytic fungi in Cephalotaxus fortunei. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated by NMR, IR, UV and MS data, as well as compared with literature data. The compounds 1 and 2 exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus with MIC values of 31.3 and 15.6 ?g/mL, respectively. The compound 2 showed moderate antioxidant activity. PMID:25942282

  16. Characterization of Natural Antisense Transcript, Sclerotia Development and Secondary Metabolism by Strand-Specific RNA Sequencing of Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chao; Guo, Yong; Lin, Ying; Pan, Li; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus has received much attention owing to its severe impact on agriculture and fermented products induced by aflatoxin. Sclerotia morphogenesis is an important process related to A. flavus reproduction and aflatoxin biosynthesis. In order to obtain an extensive transcriptome profile of A. flavus and provide a comprehensive understanding of these physiological processes, the isolated mRNA of A. flavus CA43 cultures was subjected to high-throughput strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq). Our ssRNA-seq data profiled widespread transcription across the A. flavus genome, quantified vast transcripts (73% of total genes) and annotated precise transcript structures, including untranslated regions, upstream open reading frames (ORFs), alternative splicing variants and novel transcripts. We propose natural antisense transcripts in A. flavus might regulate gene expression mainly on the post-transcriptional level. This regulation might be relevant to tune biological processes such as aflatoxin biosynthesis and sclerotia development. Gene Ontology annotation of differentially expressed genes between the mycelia and sclerotia cultures indicated sclerotia development was related closely to A. flavus reproduction. Additionally, we have established the transcriptional profile of aflatoxin biosynthesis and its regulation model. We identified potential genes linking sclerotia development and aflatoxin biosynthesis. These genes could be used as targets for controlled regulation of aflatoxigenic strains of A. flavus. PMID:24849659

  17. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of Secreted ?-Xylosidase from Aspergillus niger*

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Craig, John S.; Borrusch, Melissa S.; Banerjee, Goutami; Harvey, Christopher M.; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    ?-Linked xylose is a major component of xyloglucans in the cell walls of higher plants. An ?-xylosidase (AxlA) was purified from a commercial enzyme preparation from Aspergillus niger, and the encoding gene was identified. The protein is a member of glycosyl hydrolase family 31. It was active on p-nitrophenyl-?-d-xyloside, isoprimeverose, xyloglucan heptasaccharide (XXXG), and tamarind xyloglucan. When expressed in Pichia pastoris, AxlA had activity comparable to the native enzyme on pNP?X and IP despite apparent hyperglycosylation. The pH optimum of AxlA was between 3.0 and 4.0. AxlA together with ?-glucosidase depolymerized xyloglucan heptasaccharide. A combination of AxlA, ?-glucosidase, xyloglucanase, and ?-galactosidase in the optimal proportions of 51:5:19:25 or 59:5:11:25 could completely depolymerize tamarind XG to free Glc or Xyl, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first characterization of a secreted microbial ?-xylosidase. Secreted ?-xylosidases appear to be rare in nature, being absent from other tested commercial enzyme mixtures and from the genomes of most filamentous fungi. PMID:22033931

  18. Chemical modification of Aspergillus niger ?-glucosidase and its catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Samia A; El-Shayeb, Nefisa M A; Hashem, Abdel-Gawad M; Saleh, Shireen A A; Abdel-Fattah, Ahmed F

    2015-03-01

    Aspergillus niger ?-glucosidase was modified by covalent coupling to periodate activated polysaccharides (glycosylation). The conjugated enzyme to activated starch showed the highest specific activity (128.5 U/mg protein). Compared to the native enzyme, the conjugated form exhibited: a higher optimal reaction temperature, a lower Ea (activation energy), a higher K m (Michaelis constant) and Vmax (maximal reaction rate), and improved thermal stability. The calculated t 1/2 (half-life) values of heat in-activation at 60 C and 70 C were 245.7 and 54.5 min respectively, whereas at these temperatures the native enzyme was less stable (t 1/2 of 200.0 and 49.5 min respectively). The conjugated enzyme retained 32.3 and 29.7%, respectively from its initial activity in presence of 5 mM Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS) and p -Chloro Mercuri Benzoate ( p -CMB), while the native enzyme showed a remarkable loss of activity (retained activity 1.61 and 13.7%, respectively). The present work has established the potential of glycosylation to enhance the catalytic properties of ?-glucosidase enzyme, making this enzyme potentially feasible for biotechnological applications. PMID:26221085

  19. Cloning and characterization of three Aspergillus niger promoters.

    PubMed

    Luo, X

    1995-09-22

    An Aspergillus niger (An) genomic library was constructed using the promoter-trap vector, pLX2A, which contains a hygromycin B (Hy) phosphotransferase-encoding gene (hph) for selection of DNA fragments with promoter activity. This library was transformed in Escherichia coli and 80,000 colonies were obtained, 94% of which contained inserts. Transformations of plasmid DNA from the library into An resulted in 53 Hy-resistant (HyR) colonies. Southern blot analysis of 21 transformants confirmed the integration of hph into the An genome. Using the sib selection procedure, three functional promoters, PX6, PX18 and PX21, were identified from this library. Both DNA strands of all three fragments were sequenced and their sequences showed no significant homology to those in the database. Comparison of the sequences of all known promoters from An suggested that C+T-rich stretches are probably important for promoter structures. The promoter activity was analysed further using beta-galactosidase (beta Gal) as a quantitative marker. The results suggest that while PX21 is a much stronger promoter than the known alpha-amylase promoter of A. oryzae, PX6 promotes only weak expression of beta Gal. PMID:7557461

  20. Chemical modification of Aspergillus niger ?-glucosidase and its catalytic properties

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Samia A.; El-Shayeb, Nefisa M.A.; Hashem, Abdel-Gawad M.; Saleh, Shireen A.A.; Abdel-Fattah, Ahmed F.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus niger ?-glucosidase was modified by covalent coupling to periodate activated polysaccharides (glycosylation). The conjugated enzyme to activated starch showed the highest specific activity (128.5 U/mg protein). Compared to the native enzyme, the conjugated form exhibited: a higher optimal reaction temperature, a lower Ea (activation energy), a higher K m (Michaelis constant) and Vmax (maximal reaction rate), and improved thermal stability. The calculated t 1/2 (half-life) values of heat in-activation at 60 C and 70 C were 245.7 and 54.5 min respectively, whereas at these temperatures the native enzyme was less stable (t 1/2 of 200.0 and 49.5 min respectively). The conjugated enzyme retained 32.3 and 29.7%, respectively from its initial activity in presence of 5 mM Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS) and p -Chloro Mercuri Benzoate ( p -CMB), while the native enzyme showed a remarkable loss of activity (retained activity 1.61 and 13.7%, respectively). The present work has established the potential of glycosylation to enhance the catalytic properties of ?-glucosidase enzyme, making this enzyme potentially feasible for biotechnological applications. PMID:26221085

  1. Some factors affecting tannase production by Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem

    PubMed Central

    Aboubakr, Hamada A.; El-Sahn, Malak A.; El-Banna, Amr A.

    2013-01-01

    One variable at a time procedure was used to evaluate the effect of qualitative variables on the production of tannase from Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem. These variables including: fermentation technique, agitation condition, tannins source, adding carbohydrates incorporation with tannic acid, nitrogen source type and divalent cations. Submerged fermentation under intermittent shaking gave the highest total tannase activity. Maximum extracellular tannase activity (305 units/50 mL) was attained in medium containing tannic acid as tannins source and sodium nitrate as nitrogen source at 30 °C for 96 h. All added carbohydrates showed significant adverse effects on the production of tannase. All tested divalent cations significantly decreased tannase production. Moreover, split plot design was carried out to study the effect of fermentation temperature and fermentation time on tannase production. The results indicated maximum tannase production (312.7 units/50 mL) at 35 °C for 96 h. In other words, increasing fermentation temperature from 30 °C to 35 °C resulted in increasing tannase production. PMID:24294255

  2. Genome shuffling of Aspergillus niger for improving transglycosylation activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Chen, Guiguang; Gu, Lingli; Zeng, Wei; Liang, Zhiqun

    2014-01-01

    Isomaltooligosaccharides (IMO), the glucosylsaccharides used as food additives, are made from saccharified starch by enzymes or microbial cells with transglycosylation activity. This study aimed to generate shuffled futants of Aspergillus niger with enhanced transglycosylation activity for industrial IMO production. The starting mutant population was generated by (60)Co-? radiation; mutants with higher transglycosylation activity were selected and subjected to recursive protoplast fusion. The resulting fusants were screened by a novel high-throughput method based on detecting non-fermentable reducing sugar. After three rounds of genome shuffling, the best performing strain GS3-3 was obtained, its transglycosylation activity (14.91 U/mL) was increased by 194.1 % compared to that of original strain C-6181. In fermentor test, transglycosylation activity of GS3-3 was obtained at 16.61 U/mL. The mycelia of GS3-3 were reused ten times to produce IMO syrup from liquefied cassava starch containing about 280 g/L total sugar within 4 days. The conversion of liquefied cassava starch to IMO was at 71.3-72.1 %, which was higher than the best conversion (68 %) ever reported. GS3-3 shows a great potential for industrial IMO production. PMID:24043449

  3. Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1224 as biological controls for Aspergillus flavus strains.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Dante J; Silva, Julio O; Oliver, Guillermo; Gonzlez, Silvia N

    2006-10-01

    The effect of two species of lactobacilli, Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1224, on growth of different Aspergillus flavus strains was determined. A. flavus strains (Ap, TR2, or CF80) were grown in LAPTg broth at 37 degrees C for 7 days as a single culture and in association with L. casei CRL 431 or L. rhamnosus CRL 1224 at initial inoculum ratios of 1:1, 1:10, and 1:100. In most cases, the mixed cultures had a lower fungal growth and a lower pH than the control cultures. Mycelial dry weight was reduced to 73 and 85% using L. casei CRL 431 and L. rhamnosus CRL 1224, respectively. The pH decrease in mixed cultures when the fungal mycelial dry weight is reduced may play an important role in inhibition. The number of viable bacteria was variably affected by fungal growth. These results indicate that L. casei CRL 431 and L. rhamnosus CRL 1224 may be useful as potential biocontrol agent against A. flavus. PMID:17066943

  4. Environmental influences on maize-Aspergillus flavus interactions and aflatoxin production

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Jake C.; Scully, Brian T.; Ni, Xinzhi; Kemerait, Robert C.; Lee, Robert D.; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Guo, Baozhu

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus (Link ex Fr.) has been the focus of intensive research due to the production of carcinogenic and highly toxic secondary metabolites collectively known as aflatoxins following pre-harvest colonization of crops. Given this recurrent problem and the occurrence of a severe aflatoxin outbreak in maize (Zea mays L.), particularly in the Southeast U.S. in the 1977 growing season, a significant research effort has been put forth to determine the nature of the interaction occurring between aflatoxin production, A. flavus, environment and its various hosts before harvest. Many studies have investigated this interaction at the genetic, transcript, and protein levels, and in terms of fungal biology at either pre- or post-harvest time points. Later experiments have indicated that the interaction and overall resistance phenotype of the host is a quantitative trait with a relatively low heritability. In addition, a high degree of environmental interaction has been noted, particularly with sources of abiotic stress for either the host or the fungus such as drought or heat stresses. Here, we review the history of research into this complex interaction and propose future directions for elucidating the relationship between resistance and susceptibility to A. flavus colonization, abiotic stress, and its relationship to oxidative stress in which aflatoxin production may function as a form of antioxidant protection to the producing fungus. PMID:24550905

  5. Seed mycoflora of Ephedra aphylla and amino acid profile of seed-borne Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Al-Qarawi, Abdulaziz A; Hashem, Abeer; Abd-Allah, Elsayed F

    2012-09-01

    Twenty-seven seed samples of Ephedra aphylla were collected from different rangelands in Riyadh region, Saudi Arabia during seed production season of 2010. They were assessed to determine the incidence of seedborne fungal flora using both agar plate and blotter paper methods. The investigation of the seeds yielded thirty four fungal species belonging to twelve genera, which are new record to seed-brone mycoflora of E. aphylla in Saudi Arabia. The agar plate method was found superior over blotter methods. The genus Aspergillus was the most prevalent one followed by Fusarium, Penicillium, Alternaria, and Chaetomium. Only eighteen isolates of A. flavus (? 28.6% of total isolates) were able to produce aflatoxins. Mycelial amino acids profile of selected aflatoxigenic isolates of A. flavus was investigated and five amino acids, namely cystein, lysine, praline, tryptophan and valine were common in mycelia and all of them were aflatoxins producers. Based on the dissimilarity coefficient between the isolates and their amino acids patterns, high diversity among the population of A. flavus has been recorded. PMID:22982635

  6. Self-sufficient redox biotransformation of lignin-related benzoic acids with Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Palazzolo, Martn A; Mascotti, Mara L; Lewkowicz, Elizabeth S; Kurina-Sanz, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    Aromatic carboxylic acids are readily obtained from lignin in biomass processing facilities. However, efficient technologies for lignin valorization are missing. In this work, a microbial screening was conducted to find versatile biocatalysts capable of transforming several benzoic acids structurally related to lignin, employing vanillic acid as model substrate. The wild-type Aspergillus flavus growing cells exhibited exquisite selectivity towards the oxidative decarboxylation product, 2-methoxybenzene-1,4-diol. Interestingly, when assaying a set of structurally related substrates, the biocatalyst displayed the oxidative removal of the carboxyl moiety or its reduction to the primary alcohol whether electron withdrawing or donating groups were present in the aromatic ring, respectively. Additionally, A. flavus proved to be highly tolerant to vanillic acid increasing concentrations (up to 8 g/L), demonstrating its potential application in chemical synthesis. A. flavus growing cells were found to be efficient biotechnological tools to perform self-sufficient, structure-dependent redox reactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a biocatalyst exhibiting opposite redox transformations of the carboxylic acid moiety in benzoic acid derivatives, namely oxidative decarboxylation and carboxyl reduction, in a structure-dependent fashion. PMID:26445878

  7. Microsatellite Typing of Aspergillus flavus Strains in a Tunisian Onco-hematology Unit.

    PubMed

    Gheith, Soukeina; Saghrouni, Fatma; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Bannour, Wadiaa; Khelif, Abderrahim; Piarroux, Renaud; Ben Said, Moncef; Njah, Mansour; Ranque, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the most common species associated with invasive aspergillosis in Tunisia. The molecular epidemiology of the species is poorly documented. We used five highly discriminative microsatellite markers for the genotyping of clinical and hospital environmental A. flavus strains to assess whether IA could be hospital-acquired in the onco-hematology unit of the Farhat Hached teaching hospital of Sousse, Tunisia. The genotyping of 18 clinical isolates, collected from sputa of 17 acute leukemia patients, and 81 isolates, collected in these patients' hospital environment and food, identified 57 isolates that were grouped in 10 clones, each of them including 2-17 isolates. The remaining 42 isolates showed a unique genotype. Two main transmission scenarios were observed: (1) the same clone was isolated from different patients; (2) the same clone was isolated from a patient, its hospital environment and/or food. These findings strongly suggest the occurrence of hospital-acquired A. flavus infection/colonization in the investigated onco-hematology unit. PMID:26582086

  8. Antifungal properties and inhibitory effects upon aflatoxin production of Thymus vulgaris L. by Aspergillus flavus Link.

    PubMed

    Kohiyama, Cssia Yumie; Yamamoto Ribeiro, Milene Mayumi; Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Bando, Erika; Bomfim, Natlia da Silva; Nerilo, Samuel Botio; Rocha, Gustavo Henrique Oliveira; Grespan, Renata; Mikcha, Jane Martha Graton; Machinski, Miguel

    2015-04-15

    The antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic properties of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) were evaluated upon Aspergillus flavus "in vitro". Suspension containing 10(6) of A. flavus were cultivated with TEO in concentrations ranging from 50 to 500 ?g/mL. TEO reached minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) at 250 ?g/mL. Inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was detected at a concentration of 100 ?g/mL of TEO. Morphological evaluation performed by both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that antifungal activity of TEO could be detected starting at a concentration of 50 ?g/mL and the fungicide effect at a concentration of 250 ?g/mL. TEO completely inhibited production of both B1 and B2 aflatoxins (AFB1 and AFB2) at a concentration of 150 ?g/mL. This way, fungal biomass development and aflatoxin production were dependent on TEO concentration. Therefore, TEO was capable of controlling the growth of A. flavus and its production of aflatoxins. PMID:25466118

  9. Morphological and molecular identification of filamentous Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus isolated from compound feeds in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Iheanacho, Henry E; Njobeh, Patrick B; Dutton, Francis M; Steenkamp, Paul A; Steenkamp, Lucia; Mthombeni, Julian Q; Daru, Barnabas H; Makun, Anthony H

    2014-12-01

    Isolation of filamentous species of two Aspergillum genera from compound feeds produced in South Africa, and subsequent extraction of their individual DNA in this study, presents a simple but rapid molecular procedure for high through-put analysis of the individual morphological forms. DNA was successfully isolated from the Aspergillus spp. from agar cultures by use of a commercial kit. Agarose gel electrophoresis fractionation of the fungi DNA, showed distinct bands. The DNA extracted by this procedure appears to be relatively pure with a ratio absorbance at 260 and 280nm. However, the overall morphological and molecular data indicated that 67.5 and 51.1% of feed samples were found to be contaminated with Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, respectively, with poultry feed having the highest contamination mean level of 5.7נ105CFU/g when compared to cattle (mean: 4.0נ106CFU/g), pig (mean: 2.7נ104CFU/g) and horse (1.0נ102CFU) feed. This technique presents a readily achievable, easy to use method in the extraction of filamentous fungal DNA and it's identification. Hence serves as an important tool towards molecular study of these organisms for routine analysis check in monitoring and improving compound feed quality against fungal contamination. PMID:25084661

  10. Aspergillus flavus induces granulomatous cerebral aspergillosis in mice with display of distinct cytokine profile.

    PubMed

    Anand, R; Shankar, J; Tiwary, B N; Singh, A P

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the leading Aspergillus spp. resulting in invasive aspergillosis of central nervous system (CNS) in human beings. Immunological status in aspergillosis of central nervous system remains elusive in case of both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Since cytokines are the major mediators of host response, evaluation of disease pathology along with cytokine profile in brain may provide snapshots of neuro-immunological response. An intravenous model of A. flavus infection was utilized to determine the pathogenicity of infection and cytokine profile in the brain of male BALB/c mice. Enumeration of colony forming units and histopathological analyses were performed on the brain tissue at distinct time periods. The kinetics of cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-12/IL-23p40, IL-6, IL-23, IL-17A and IL-4) was evaluated at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h post infection (hPI) in brain homogenates using murine cytokine specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Histological analysis exhibited the hyphae with leukocyte infiltrations leading to formation of granulomata along with ischemia and pyknosis of neurons in the brain of infected mice. Diseased mice displayed increased secretion of IFN-γ, IL-12p40 and IL-6 with a concomitant reduction in the secretion of Th2 cytokine IL-4, and Th17 promoting cytokine, IL-23 during the late phase of infection. A.flavus induced inflammatory granulomatous cerebral aspergillosis in mice, characterized by a marked increase in the Th1 cytokines and neurons undergoing necrosis. A marked increase in necrosis of neurons with concurrent inflammatory responses might have led to the host mortality during late phase of infection. PMID:25647272

  11. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis of clinical isolates of Aspergillus flavus from Iran reveals the first cases of Aspergillus minisclerotigenes associated with human infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspergillus flavus is intensively studied for its role in infecting crop plants and contaminating produce with aflatoxin, but its role as a human pathogen is less well understood. In parts of the Middle East and India, A. flavus surpasses A. fumigatus as a cause of invasive aspergillosis and is a significant cause of cutaneous, sinus, nasal and nail infections. Methods A collection of 45 clinical and 10 environmental A. flavus isolates from Iran were analysed using Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat (VNTR) markers with MICROSAT and goeBURST to determine their genetic diversity and their relatedness to clinical and environmental A. flavus isolates from Australia. Phylogeny was assessed using partial β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequencing, and mating type was determined by PCR. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed on selected isolates using a reference microbroth dilution method. Results There was considerable diversity in the A. flavus collection, with no segregation on goeBURST networks according to source or geographic location. Three Iranian isolates, two from sinus infections and one from a paranasal infection grouped with Aspergillus minisclerotigenes, and all produced B and G aflatoxin. Phylogenic analysis using partial β-tubulin and calmodulin sequencing confirmed two of these as A. minisclerotigenes, while the third could not be differentiated from A. flavus and related species within Aspergillus section flavi. Based on epidemiological cut-off values, the A. minisclerotigens and A. flavus isolates tested were susceptible to commonly used antifungal drugs. Conclusions This is the first report of human infection due to A. minisclerotigenes, and it raises the possiblity that other species within Aspergillus section flavi may also cause clinical disease. Clinical isolates of A. flavus from Iran are not distinct from Australian isolates, indicating local environmental, climatic or host features, rather than fungal features, govern the high incidence of A. flavus infection in this region. The results of this study have important implications for biological control strategies that aim to reduce aflatoxin by the introduction of non-toxigenic strains, as potentially any strain of A. flavus, and closely related species like A. minisclerotigenes, might be capable of human infection. PMID:24986045

  12. Effects of Gamma and Electron Beam Radiation on Brazil Nuts Artificially Inoculated with Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ednei; Reis, Tatiana Alves; Baquião, Arianne Costa; Corrêa, Benedito

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation (GR) and electron beam (EB) on Brazil nut samples contaminated with Aspergillus flavus. Fifty samples were spread with an A. flavus suspension and incubated at 30°C and a relative humidity of 93%. After 15 days of incubation, mycobiota and aflatoxin analysis were performed. The samples were divided into three groups (control, group 1, and group 2) that received radiation doses of 0 kGy (control) and 5 and 10 kGy each of GR and EB (groups 1 and 2). Noninoculated samples were irradiated with the same doses for sensory evaluation. The results showed that after 15 days of incubation, the average water activity of the samples was 0.80. The irradiation with GR and EB at doses of 5 and 10 kGy was able to eliminate A. flavus in Brazil nut samples. Aflatoxin analysis showed that EB doses of 5 and 10 kGy reduced aflatoxin B1 levels by 53.32 and 65.66%, respectively, whereas the same doses of GR reduced the levels of this toxin by 70.61 and 84.15% compared with the level in the control groups. Sensory evaluation demonstrated that the texture and odor of irradiated Brazil nut samples were acceptable. The taste evaluation indicated that 5 kGy of GR was judged acceptable. The results highlight that both irradiation processes (5- and 10-kGy doses) showed efficiency in A. flavus and aflatoxin elimination. GR and EB treatments resulted in some alterations in the sensory attributes of samples with the doses used in this study; however, Brazil nut samples irradiated with 5-kGy GR doses were considered acceptable. PMID:26197295

  13. Buckwheat achenes antioxidant profile modulates Aspergillus flavus growth and aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Chitarrini, G; Nobili, C; Pinzari, F; Antonini, A; De Rossi, P; Del Fiore, A; Procacci, S; Tolaini, V; Scala, V; Scarpari, M; Reverberi, M

    2014-10-17

    Buckwheat (Fagopyrum spp.) is a "pseudo-cereal" of great interest in the production of healthy foods since its flour, derived from achenes, is enriched with bioactive compounds and, due to the absence of gluten, may be used in composition of celiac diets. Amongst buckwheat species, F. tataricum achenes possess a larger amount of the antioxidant flavenol rutin than the common buckwheat F. esculentum. Ongoing climate change may favor plant susceptibility to the attack by pathogenic, often mycotoxigenic, fungi with consequent increase of mycotoxins in previously unexploited feeds and foodstuffs. In particular, Aspergillus flavus, under suitable environmental conditions such as those currently occurring in Italy, may produce aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), the most carcinogenic compound of fungal origin which is classified by IARC as Category 1. In this study, the viable achenes of two buckwheat species, F. tataricum (var. Golden) and F. esculentum (var. Aelita) were inoculated with an AFB1-producing A. flavus NRRL 3357 to analyze their relative performances against fungal invasion and toxin contamination. Notably, we sought the existence of a correlation between the amount of tocols/flavonols in the achenes of buckwheat, infected and non-infected with A. flavus, and to analyze the ability of the pathogen to grow and produce toxin during achene infection. Results suggest that achenes of F. tataricum, the best producer of antioxidant compounds in this study, are less susceptible to A. flavus infection and consequently, but not proportionally, to mycotoxin contamination compared with F. esculentum. Moreover, rutin-derived quercetin appears to be more efficient in inhibiting aflatoxin biosynthesis than the parent compound. PMID:25108759

  14. Characterization of a maize association mapping panel for new sources of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin accumulation resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) susceptibility to ear rot and aflatoxin accumulation by Aspergillus flavus (Link:Fr) causes significant economic and human health damage worldwide. Although host plant resistance is an ideal solution to the problem, no commercial varieties display sufficient levels of resistance ...

  15. Gene expression profiling and identification of resistance genes to aspergillus flavus infection in peanut through EST and microarray strategies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut seeds and produce aflatoxins, which are associated with various diseases in domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The most cost-effective strategy to minimize aflatoxin contamination involves the development of peanut cultivars that are...

  16. Tight control of mycotoxin biosynthesis gene expression in Aspergillus flavus by temperature as revealed by RNA-seq

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the effect of temperature on mycotoxin biosynthesis, RNA-Seq technology was used to profile the Aspergillus flavus transcriptome under different temperature conditions. This approach allowed us to quantify transcript abundance for over 80% of fungal genes including 1,153 genes ...

  17. Fluorescent viability stains to probe the metabolic status of aflatoxigenic fungus in dual culture of Aspergillus flavus and Pichia anomala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolic activity of aflatoxigenic fungus, Aspergillus flavus co-cultured with a biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala was examined using several vital stains. Both the FUN-1 stain and the combined use of DiBAC4(5) with CDFA-AM stains demonstrated that P. anomala inactivated the ATP generating syst...

  18. Evaluation of the expression genes associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus colonization and aflatoxin production in different maize lines.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic toxic compounds produced by Aspergillus flavus during infection of crops including maize (Zea mays L.). Contamination of maize with aflatoxin is exacerbated by late season drought stress. Previous studies have implicated numerous resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) that...

  19. Evaluation of the expression of genes associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus colonization and aflatoxin production in different maize lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic toxic compounds produced by Aspergillus flavus during infection of crops including maize (Zea mays L.). Contamination of maize with aflatoxin is exacerbated by late season drought stress. Previous studies have implicated numerous resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) that...

  20. Proteomic analysis of the maize rachis: Potential roles of constitutive and induced proteins in resistance to Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of the maize (Zea mays L.) with aflatoxigenic fungus Aspergillus flavus and consequent contamination with carcinogenic aflatoxin is a persistent and serious agricultural problem causing disease and significant crop losses worldwide. The rachis (cob) is an important structure of maize ear ...

  1. Use of a Granular Bioplastic Formulation for Carrying Conidia of a Non-aflatoxigenic Strain of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research demonstrated that aflatoxin contamination in corn grown in Mississippi is reduced by field application of wheat grains pre-inoculated with the non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain NRRL 30797. To facilitate field applications of the biocontrol isolate, a series of laboratory ...

  2. Development of a GFP-Expressing Aspergillus flavus Strain to Study Fungal Invasion, Colonization, and Resistance in Cottonseed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton bolls were inoculated with a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Aspergillus flavus (strain 70) to monitor fungal growth, mode of entry, colonization of cottonseeds and production of aflatoxins. The GFP strain and the wild type did not differ significantly in pathogen aggressiveness a...

  3. Evaluation of recycled bioplastic pellets and a sprayable formulation for application of an Aspergillus flavus biocontrol strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biocontrol of Aspergillus flavus using inoculated bioplastic granules has been proven to be effective under laboratory and field conditions. In the present study, the use of low-density pellets from recycled bioplastic as a biocontrol strain carrier was evaluated. Applying recycled bioplastic pell...

  4. Identification of maize genes associated with host plant resistance and susceptibility to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination of maize pose negative impacts in agriculture and health. Commercial maize hybrids are generally susceptible to this fungus. Significant levels of host plant resistance have been observed in certain maize inbred lines. This study was conducted...

  5. Direct genetic evidence to support the presence of sexual recombination within the life cycle of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus contaminates many important crops worldwide and is the major producer of aflatoxins, which are cancer-causing secondary metabolites. In the United States, mycotoxins have been estimated to cause agricultural losses totaling upwards of $1.4 billion annually, with aflatoxin contamin...

  6. USE OF GFP-TAGGED ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS TO MONITOR FUNGAL GROWTH IN DEVELOPING EARS OF RESISTANT AND SUSCEPTIBLE CORN HYBRIDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a GFP-transformed Aspergillus flavus strain to needle inoculate mid-maturation ears and follow the path of fungal invasion in resistant and susceptible hybrids of Zea mays. In all ear cross-sections examined, the level of fluorescence was higher in susceptible compared to resistant lines. ...

  7. Community structure of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in major almond producing areas of California, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several nut crops including almonds, pistachios, and walnuts can become contaminated with mycotoxins. Of greatest economic significance are aflatoxins, which are mainly produced by members of Aspergillus section Flavi. The distribution of the two sclerotial-size morphotypes of A. flavus (i.e. S and ...

  8. Ecology of Aspergillus flavus, Regulation of Aflatoxin Production and Management Strategies to Reduce Aflatoxin Contamination of Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contamination of corn (maize) by fungi and the accumulation of mycotoxins are a serious agricultural problem for human and animal health. One particular devastating group of mycotoxins, called aflatoxins, has been intensely studied since the 1960s. Studies of Aspergillus flavus, the agricultura...

  9. Inhibition of Aspergillus flavus in soil by antagonistic Pseudomonas strains reduces the potential for airborne spore dispersal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain JP1015 and Pseudomonas fluorescens strain JP2175 were previously isolated from Mississippi cornfield soil samples and selected for their growth inhibition of Aspergillus flavus in laboratory culture. In this study, the antifungal activity of these bacterial strains a...

  10. Menadione-Induced Oxidative Stress Re-Shapes the Oxylipin Profile of Aspergillus flavus and Its Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Zaccaria, Marco; Ludovici, Matteo; Sanzani, Simona Marianna; Ippolito, Antonio; Aiese Cigliano, Riccardo; Sanseverino, Walter; Scarpari, Marzia; Scala, Valeria; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is an efficient producer of mycotoxins, particularly aflatoxin B1, probably the most hepatocarcinogenic naturally-occurring compound. Although the inducing agents of toxin synthesis are not unanimously identified, there is evidence that oxidative stress is one of the main actors in play. In our study, we use menadione, a quinone extensively implemented in studies on ROS response in animal cells, for causing stress to A. flavus. For uncovering the molecular determinants that drive A. flavus in challenging oxidative stress conditions, we have evaluated a wide spectrum of several different parameters, ranging from metabolic (ROS and oxylipin profile) to transcriptional analysis (RNA-seq). There emerges a scenario in which A. flavus activates several metabolic processes under oxidative stress conditions for limiting the ROS-associated detrimental effects, as well as for triggering adaptive and escape strategies. PMID:26512693

  11. Menadione-Induced Oxidative Stress Re-Shapes the Oxylipin Profile of Aspergillus flavus and Its Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, Marco; Ludovici, Matteo; Sanzani, Simona Marianna; Ippolito, Antonio; Cigliano, Riccardo Aiese; Sanseverino, Walter; Scarpari, Marzia; Scala, Valeria; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus flavus is an efficient producer of mycotoxins, particularly aflatoxin B?, probably the most hepatocarcinogenic naturally-occurring compound. Although the inducing agents of toxin synthesis are not unanimously identified, there is evidence that oxidative stress is one of the main actors in play. In our study, we use menadione, a quinone extensively implemented in studies on ROS response in animal cells, for causing stress to A. flavus. For uncovering the molecular determinants that drive A. flavus in challenging oxidative stress conditions, we have evaluated a wide spectrum of several different parameters, ranging from metabolic (ROS and oxylipin profile) to transcriptional analysis (RNA-seq). There emerges a scenario in which A. flavus activates several metabolic processes under oxidative stress conditions for limiting the ROS-associated detrimental effects, as well as for triggering adaptive and escape strategies. PMID:26512693

  12. Larval Preference and Performance of Amyelois transitella (Navel Orangeworm, Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in Relation to the Fungus Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Ampt, Eline A; Bush, Daniel S; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2016-02-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker), is a polyphagous pest of California nut crops and is responsible for extensive losses in the United States. It directly damages crops by feeding and contaminating nuts with frass and webbing and vectors saprophytic fungi that infect crops. The navel orangeworm is commonly associated with Aspergillus species, including the toxigenic Aspergillus flavus, which causes crop loss by producing carcinogens, including aflatoxin B1. This lepidopteran-fungus association is the most economically serious pest complex in Central Valley orchards, and evidence indicates that this relationship is mutualistic. We assessed preference and performance of navel orangeworm larvae associated with A. flavus in behavioral bioassays in which neonates were allowed to orient within arenas to media with or without fungal tissue, and performance bioassays in which larvae were reared with and without A. flavus on potato dextrose agar (PDA) and a semidefined almond PDA diet to evaluate effects on development and pupal weight. Navel orangeworm larvae were attracted to A. flavus and developed faster in its presence, indicating a nutritional benefit to the caterpillars. Larvae reached pupation ∼33% faster on diet containing A. flavus, and pupal weights were ∼18% higher for males and ∼13% higher for females on this diet. Our findings indicate that A. flavus plays an important role in larval orientation and development on infected hosts. The preference-performance relationship between navel orangeworms and Aspergillus flavus is consistent with a facultative mutualism that has broad implications for pest management efforts and basic understanding of Lepidoptera-plant interactions. PMID:26491042

  13. The infrared spectral transmittance of Aspergillus niger spore aggregated particle swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinying; Hu, Yihua; Gu, Youlin; Li, Le

    2015-10-01

    Microorganism aggregated particle swarm, which is quite an important composition of complex media environment, can be developed as a new kind of infrared functional materials. Current researches mainly focus on the optical properties of single microorganism particle. As for the swarm, especially the microorganism aggregated particle swarm, a more accurate simulation model should be proposed to calculate its extinction effect. At the same time, certain parameters deserve to be discussed, which helps to better develop the microorganism aggregated particle swarm as a new kind of infrared functional materials. In this paper, take Aspergillus Niger spore as an example. On the one hand, a new calculation model is established. Firstly, the cluster-cluster aggregation (CCA) model is used to simulate the structure of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle. Secondly, the single scattering extinction parameters for Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle are calculated by using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method. Thirdly, the transmittance of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle swarm is simulated by using Monte Carlo method. On the other hand, based on the model proposed above, what influences can wavelength causes has been studied, including the spectral distribution of scattering intensity of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle and the infrared spectral transmittance of the aggregated particle swarm within the range of 8~14μm incident infrared wavelengths. Numerical results indicate that the scattering intensity of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle reduces with the increase of incident wavelengths at each scattering angle. Scattering energy mainly concentrates on the scattering angle between 0~40°, forward scattering has an obvious effect. In addition, the infrared transmittance of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle swarm goes up with the increase of incident wavelengths. However, some turning points of the trend are associated with the absorption capacity of the swarm. When parameters of the swarm are set as follows: each Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle contains 40 original particles, the radius of original particle is 1.5μm, the density of aggregated particles is around 200/cm3, the measurement area is 4 meters thick, under conditions mentioned above, the infrared transmittance can be less than 10% between the incident wavelengths of 9.5~13μm. In the end, all the results provide the basis for better developing the microorganism aggregated particle swarm as a new kind of infrared functional materials and precisely choosing the effective defiladed infrared band.

  14. Gene Expression Profiling and Identification of Resistance Genes to Aspergillus flavus Infection in Peanut through EST and Microarray Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baozhu; Fedorova, Natalie D.; Chen, Xiaoping; Wan, Chun-Hua; Wang, Wei; Nierman, William C.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yu, Jiujiang

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut seeds and produce aflatoxins, which are associated with various diseases in domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The most cost-effective strategy to minimize aflatoxin contamination involves the development of peanut cultivars that are resistant to fungal infection and/or aflatoxin production. To identify peanut Aspergillus-interactive and peanut Aspergillus-resistance genes, we carried out a large scale peanut Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) project which we used to construct a peanut glass slide oligonucleotide microarray. The fabricated microarray represents over 40% of the protein coding genes in the peanut genome. For expression profiling, resistant and susceptible peanut cultivars were infected with a mixture of Aspergillus flavus and parasiticus spores. The subsequent microarray analysis identified 62 genes in resistant cultivars that were up-expressed in response to Aspergillus infection. In addition, we identified 22 putative Aspergillus-resistance genes that were constitutively up-expressed in the resistant cultivar in comparison to the susceptible cultivar. Some of these genes were homologous to peanut, corn, and soybean genes that were previously shown to confer resistance to fungal infection. This study is a first step towards a comprehensive genome-scale platform for developing Aspergillus-resistant peanut cultivars through targeted marker-assisted breeding and genetic engineering. PMID:22069737

  15. Role of pigmentation in protecting Aspergillus niger conidiospores against pulsed light radiation.

    PubMed

    Esbelin, Julia; Mallea, Sabine; Ram, Arthur F; Carlin, Frdric

    2013-01-01

    The photoprotective potential of fungus pigments was investigated by irradiating conidiospores of three Aspergillus niger strains possessing the same genetic background, but differing in their degree of pigmentation with pulsed light (PL) and monochromatic (254 nm) UV-C radiation. Spores of A. niger MA93.1 and JHP1.1 presenting, respectively, a fawn and a white pigmentation were more sensitive to PL and continuous UV-C radiation than the wild-type A. niger strain N402 possessing a dark pigment. Both spores of the dark A. niger N402 and the fawn-color mutant were equally resistant to moist heat at 56C while spores of the white-color mutant were highly sensitive. These results indicate that melanin protects pigmented spores of A. niger from PL. PMID:23278805

  16. Novel Route for Agmatine Catabolism in Aspergillus niger Involves 4-Guanidinobutyrase

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Saragadam, Tejaswani

    2015-01-01

    Agmatine, a significant polyamine in bacteria and plants, mostly arises from the decarboxylation of arginine. The functional importance of agmatine in fungi is poorly understood. The metabolism of agmatine and related guanidinium group-containing compounds in Aspergillus niger was explored through growth, metabolite, and enzyme studies. The fungus was able to metabolize and grow on l-arginine, agmatine, or 4-guanidinobutyrate as the sole nitrogen source. Whereas arginase defined the only route for arginine catabolism, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches suggested the absence of arginine decarboxylase in A. niger. Efficient utilization by the parent strain and also by its arginase knockout implied an arginase-independent catabolic route for agmatine. Urea and 4-guanidinobutyrate were detected in the spent medium during growth on agmatine. The agmatine-grown A. niger mycelia contained significant levels of amine oxidase, 4-guanidinobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-guanidinobutyrase (GBase), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, but no agmatinase activity was detected. Taken together, the results support a novel route for agmatine utilization in A. niger. The catabolism of agmatine by way of 4-guanidinobutyrate to 4-aminobutyrate into the Krebs cycle is the first report of such a pathway in any organism. A. niger GBase peptide fragments were identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding open reading frame from the A. niger NCIM 565 genome was located and cloned. Subsequent expression of GBase in both Escherichia coli and A. niger along with its disruption in A. niger functionally defined the GBase locus (gbu) in the A. niger genome. PMID:26048930

  17. Novel Route for Agmatine Catabolism in Aspergillus niger Involves 4-Guanidinobutyrase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Saragadam, Tejaswani; Punekar, Narayan S

    2015-08-15

    Agmatine, a significant polyamine in bacteria and plants, mostly arises from the decarboxylation of arginine. The functional importance of agmatine in fungi is poorly understood. The metabolism of agmatine and related guanidinium group-containing compounds in Aspergillus niger was explored through growth, metabolite, and enzyme studies. The fungus was able to metabolize and grow on l-arginine, agmatine, or 4-guanidinobutyrate as the sole nitrogen source. Whereas arginase defined the only route for arginine catabolism, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches suggested the absence of arginine decarboxylase in A. niger. Efficient utilization by the parent strain and also by its arginase knockout implied an arginase-independent catabolic route for agmatine. Urea and 4-guanidinobutyrate were detected in the spent medium during growth on agmatine. The agmatine-grown A. niger mycelia contained significant levels of amine oxidase, 4-guanidinobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-guanidinobutyrase (GBase), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, but no agmatinase activity was detected. Taken together, the results support a novel route for agmatine utilization in A. niger. The catabolism of agmatine by way of 4-guanidinobutyrate to 4-aminobutyrate into the Krebs cycle is the first report of such a pathway in any organism. A. niger GBase peptide fragments were identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding open reading frame from the A. niger NCIM 565 genome was located and cloned. Subsequent expression of GBase in both Escherichia coli and A. niger along with its disruption in A. niger functionally defined the GBase locus (gbu) in the A. niger genome. PMID:26048930

  18. The Inhibitory Effects of Curcuma longa L. Essential Oil and Curcumin on Aspergillus flavus Link Growth and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Ferreira, Francine Maery Dias; Arrotia, Carla Cristina; da Costa, Christiane Luciana; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Machinski Junior, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The essential oil from Curcuma longa L. was analysed by GC/MS. The major components of the oil were ar-turmerone (33.2%), ?-turmerone (23.5%) and ?-turmerone (22.7%). The antifungal activities of the oil were studied with regard to Aspergillus flavus growth inhibition and altered morphology, as preliminary studies indicated that the essential oil from C. longa inhibited Aspergillus flavus Link aflatoxin production. The concentration of essential oil in the culture media ranged from 0.01% to 5.0%?v/v, and the concentration of curcumin was 0.010.5%?v/v. The effects on sporulation, spore viability, and fungal morphology were determined. The essential oil exhibited stronger antifungal activity than curcumin on A. flavus. The essential oil reduced the fungal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. A. flavus growth rate was reduced by C. longa essential oil at 0.10%, and this inhibition effect was more efficient in concentrations above 0.50%. Germination and sporulation were 100% inhibited in 0.5% oil. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of A. flavus exposed to oil showed damage to hyphae membranes and conidiophores. Because the fungus is a plant pathogen and aflatoxin producer, C. longa essential oil may be used in the management of host plants. PMID:24367241

  19. The inhibitory effects of Curcuma longa L. essential oil and curcumin on Aspergillus flavus link growth and morphology.

    PubMed

    Dias Ferreira, Flvio; Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Dias Ferreira, Francine Maery; Arrotia, Carla Cristina; da Costa, Christiane Luciana; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Machinski, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The essential oil from Curcuma longa L. was analysed by GC/MS. The major components of the oil were ar-turmerone (33.2%), ? -turmerone (23.5%) and ? -turmerone (22.7%). The antifungal activities of the oil were studied with regard to Aspergillus flavus growth inhibition and altered morphology, as preliminary studies indicated that the essential oil from C. longa inhibited Aspergillus flavus Link aflatoxin production. The concentration of essential oil in the culture media ranged from 0.01% to 5.0%?v/v, and the concentration of curcumin was 0.01-0.5%?v/v. The effects on sporulation, spore viability, and fungal morphology were determined. The essential oil exhibited stronger antifungal activity than curcumin on A. flavus. The essential oil reduced the fungal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. A. flavus growth rate was reduced by C. longa essential oil at 0.10%, and this inhibition effect was more efficient in concentrations above 0.50%. Germination and sporulation were 100% inhibited in 0.5% oil. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of A. flavus exposed to oil showed damage to hyphae membranes and conidiophores. Because the fungus is a plant pathogen and aflatoxin producer, C. longa essential oil may be used in the management of host plants. PMID:24367241

  20. In vitro comparative analysis of monocrotophos degrading potential of Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena; Yadav, Deepak

    2014-06-01

    Fungal degradation is emerging as a new powerful tool for the removal of potent neurotoxin pesticide, monocrotophos. Therefore, the present study is aimed at comparative characterization of monocrotophos degrading ability of three different fungal strains. Fungal strains were isolated from local agricultural soil by enrichment culture method, screened by gradient culture and identified as Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp. Growth kinetics revealed a direct positive influence of monocrotophos on the viability of fungal isolates. Fungal degradation was studied in phosphorus free liquid culture medium supplemented with 150 mg L(-1) concentration of monocrotophos for a period of 15 days under optimized culture conditions. Degradation of MCP followed first order kinetics with kdeg of 0.007, 0.002 and 0.005 day(-1) and half life (t1/2) of 4.21, 12.64 and 6.32 days for A. flavus, F. pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp. respectively. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report signifying the potential of monocrotophos degradation by Fusarium and Macrophomina sp. The results were further confirmed by HPTLC and FTIR which indicates disappearance of monocrotophos by hydrolytic cleavage of vinyl phosphate bond. Degradation of monocrotophos by fungal isolates was accompanied by the release of extracellular alkaline phosphatases, inorganic phosphates and ammonia. The overall comparative analysis followed the order of A. flavus > Macrophomina sp. > F. pallidoroseum. Therefore, it could be concluded from the study that these three different fungal strains could be effectively used as a potential candidate for the removal of monocrotophos from contaminated sites. PMID:24179090

  1. Aflatoxin Biosynthesis and Sclerotial Development in Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are a family of fungal secondary metabolites. They are produced by species in the genus Aspergillus. Within the last decade, significant advances have been made in understanding the biochemistry, genetics, and gene regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis. Many scientists have used aflatox...

  2. Relating significance and relations of differentially expressed genes in response to Aspergillus flavus infection in maize.

    PubMed

    Asters, Matthew C; Williams, W Paul; Perkins, Andy D; Mylroie, J Erik; Windham, Gary L; Shan, Xueyan

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus infecting maize and producing aflatoxins that are health hazards to humans and animals. Characterizing host defense mechanism and prioritizing candidate resistance genes are important to the development of resistant maize germplasm. We investigated methods amenable for the analysis of the significance and relations among maize candidate genes based on the empirical gene expression data obtained by RT-qPCR technique from maize inbred lines. We optimized a pipeline of analysis tools chosen from various programs to provide rigorous statistical analysis and state of the art data visualization. A network-based method was also explored to construct the empirical gene expression relational structures. Maize genes at the centers in the network were considered as important candidate genes for maize DNA marker studies. The methods in this research can be used to analyze large RT-qPCR datasets and establish complex empirical gene relational structures across multiple experimental conditions. PMID:24770700

  3. Biosynthesis of fat in surface culture of a local strain of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Selim, M S; Attah, N K

    1979-01-01

    An Aspergillus flavus strain isolated from Egyptian soil produced fat in appreciable amounts. General evidence for the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in this organism has been ascertained by the detection of citric, malic and fumaric acids in the metabolized culture solution. Maximum fat yield was attained after seven days of incubation. The lower intial pH value of the media favoured the fat obtained from the felts and raised its acid value. When the felts were sterilized in their acidic metabolism solutions increased the acid values of the fats over those of fats extracted from felts sterilized in distilled water. The felts autoclaved for the longest time produced the highest yields of fat with the highest free acidity. The employment of calcium carbonate in the nutrient solutions raised appreciably the acid values of the fats and suppressed the other metabolic activities. PMID:40364

  4. Extracellular biosynthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles using Aspergillus flavus NJP08: A mechanism perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Navin; Bhargava, Arpit; Majumdar, Sonali; Tarafdar, J. C.; Panwar, Jitendra

    2011-02-01

    The present study demonstrates an eco-friendly and low cost protocol for synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the cell-free filtrate of Aspergillus flavus NJP08 when supplied with aqueous silver (Ag+) ions. Identification of the fungal isolate was based on nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) identities. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) revealed the formation of spherical metallic silver nanoparticles. The average particle size calculated using Dynamic Light Scattering measurements (DLS) was found to be 17 +/- 5.9 nm. UV-Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of extracellular proteins. SDS-PAGE profiles of the extracellular proteins showed the presence of two intense bands of 32 and 35 kDa, responsible for the synthesis and stability of silver nanoparticles, respectively. A probable mechanism behind the biosynthesis is discussed, which leads to the possibility of using the present protocol in future ``nano-factories''.

  5. Optimization of L-malic acid production by Aspergillus flavus in a stirred fermentor.

    PubMed

    Battat, E; Peleg, Y; Bercovitz, A; Rokem, J S; Goldberg, I

    1991-05-01

    Effects of various nutritional and environmental factors on the accumulation of organic acids (mainly L-malic acid) by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus flavus were studied in a 16-L stirred fermentor. Improvement of the molar yield (moles acid produced per moles glucose consumed) of L-malic acid was obtained mainly by increasing the agitation rate (to 350 rpm) and the Fe(z+) ion concentration (to 12 mg/L) and by lowering the nitrogen (to 271 mg/L) and phosphate concentrations (to 1.5 mM) in the medium. These changes resulted in molar yields for L-malic acid and total C(4) acids (L-malic, succinic, and fumaric acids) of 128 and 155%, respectively. The high molar yields obtained (above 100%) are additional evidence for the operation of part of the reductive branch of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in L-malic acid accumulation by A. flavus. The fermentation conditions developed using the above mentioned factors and 9% CaCO(3) in the medium resulted in a high concentration (113 g/L L-malic acid from 120 g/L glucose utilized) and a high overall productivity (0.59 g/L h) of L-malic acid. These changes in acid accumulation coincide with increases in the activities of NAD(+)-malate dehydrogenase, fumarase, and citrate synthase. PMID:18597343

  6. Inactivation of Aspergillus flavus spores in a sealed package by cold plasma streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohbatzadeh, F.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Shokri, H.; Nikpour, M.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the inactivation efficacy of cold streamers in a sealed package on pathogenic fungi Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus) spores that artificially contaminated pistachio surface. To produce penetrating cold streamers, electric power supply was adapted to deposit adequate power into the package. The plasma streamers were generated by an alternating high voltage with carrier frequency of 12.5 kHz which was suppressed by a modulated pulsed signal at frequency of 110 Hz. The plasma exposition time was varied from 8 to 18 min to show the effect of the plasma treatment on fungal clearance while the electrode and sample remained at room temperature. This proved a positive effect of the cold streamers treatment on fungal clearance. Benefits of deactivation of fungal spores by streamers inside the package include no heating, short treatment time and adaptability to existing processes. Given its ability to ensure the safety and longevity of food products, this technology has great potential for utilization in food packaging and processing industry. In this study, moisture and pH changes of pistachio samples after plasma streamers treatment were also investigated.

  7. Implications of European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, infestation in an Aspergillus flavus-biocontrolled corn agroecosystem.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Mencarelli M; Accinelli C; Vicari A

    2013-09-01

    BACKGROUND: A novel biocontrol strategy consisting of field application of bioplastic-based granules inoculated with a non-toxigenic Aspergillus flavus L. strain has recently been shown to be effective for reducing aflatoxin contamination in corn. This study focused on other factors that may affect the feasibility of this biocontrol technique, and more specifically the role of the European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis H., in the dispersal and infestation of A. flavus in corn and its impact on crop yield.RESULTS: In spite of the high percentage of corn ears showing larval feeding damage, ECB-bored kernels accounted for only 3 and 4% in 2009 and 2010 respectively. Most of the damaged kernels were localised in the ear tip or immediately below. More precisely, the average incidence of ECB-bored kernels in the upper end of the ear was 32%. However, less than 5% of kernels from the central body of the ear, which includes the majority of kernels, were injured by ECB.CONCLUSIONS: Although ECB larvae showed a high tolerance to aflatoxin B1 and thus had the potential to serve as vectors of the mould, fungal infection of kernels was poorly associated with insect damage. ECB infestation resulted in grain yield losses not exceeding 2.5%.

  8. Global Survey of Canonical Aspergillus flavus G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Affeldt, Katharyn J.; Carrig, Joseph; Amare, Meareg

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are transmembrane receptors that relay signals from the external environment inside the cell, allowing an organism to adapt to its surroundings. They are known to detect a vast array of ligands, including sugars, amino acids, pheromone peptides, nitrogen sources, oxylipins, and light. Despite their prevalence in fungal genomes, very little is known about the functions of filamentous fungal GPCRs. Here we present the first full-genome assessment of fungal GPCRs through characterization of null mutants of all 15 GPCRs encoded by the aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus flavus. All strains were assessed for growth, development, ability to produce aflatoxin, and response to carbon sources, nitrogen sources, stress agents, and lipids. Most GPCR mutants were aberrant in one or more response processes, possibly indicative of cross talk in downstream signaling pathways. Interestingly, the biological defects of the mutants did not correspond with assignment to established GPCR classes; this is likely due to the paucity of data for characterized fungal GPCRs. Many of the GPCR transcripts were differentially regulated under various conditions as well. The data presented here provide an extensive overview of the full set of GPCRs encoded by A. flavus and provide a framework for analysis in other fungal species. PMID:25316696

  9. Increased susceptibility and reduced phytoalexin accumulation in drought-stressed peanut kernels challenged with Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed Central

    Wotton, H R; Strange, R N

    1987-01-01

    Three genotypes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), with ICG numbers 221, 1104, and 1326, were grown in three replicate plots and drought stressed during the last 58 days before harvest by withholding irrigation water. Within each plot there were eight levels of stress ranging from 1.1 to 25.9 cm of water. Kernels harvested from the plots were hydrated to 20% moisture and challenged with Aspergillus flavus. Fungal colonization, aflatoxin content, and phytoalexin accumulation were measured. Fungal colonization of non-drought-stressed kernels virtually ceased by 3 days after inoculation, when the phytoalexin concentration exceeded 50 micrograms/g (fresh weight) of kernels, but the aflatoxin concentration continued to rise exponentially for an additional day. When fungal colonization, aflatoxin production, and phytoalexin accumulation were measured 3 days after drought-stressed material was challenged, the following relationships were apparent. Fungal colonization was inversely related to water supply (r varied from -0.848 to -0.904, according to genotype), as was aflatoxin production (r varied from -0.876 to -0.912, according to genotype); the phytoalexin concentration was correlated with water supply when this exceeded 11 cm (r varied from 0.696 to 0.917, according to genotype). The results are discussed in terms of the critical role played by drought stress in predisposing peanuts to infection by A. flavus and the role of the impaired phytoalexin response in mediating this increased susceptibility. PMID:3105455

  10. The effect of temperature on Natural Antisense Transcript (NAT) expression in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carrie A; Robertson, Dominique; Yates, Bethan; Nielsen, Dahlia M; Brown, Doug; Dean, Ralph A; Payne, Gary A

    2008-11-01

    Naturally occurring Antisense Transcripts (NATs) compose an emerging group of regulatory RNAs. These regulatory elements appear in all organisms examined, but little is known about global expression of NATs in fungi. Analysis of currently available EST sequences suggests that 352 cis NATs are present in Aspergillus flavus. An Affymetrix GeneChip microarray containing probes for these cis NATs, as well as all predicted genes in A. flavus, allowed a whole genome expression analysis of these elements in response to two ecologically important temperatures for the fungus. RNA expression analysis showed that 32 NATs and 2,709 genes were differentially expressed between 37 degrees C, the optimum temperature for growth, and 28 degrees C, the conducive temperature for the biosynthesis of aflatoxin (AF) and many other secondary metabolites. These NATs correspond to sense genes with diverse functions including transcription initiation, carbohydrate processing and binding, temperature sensitive morphogenesis, and secondary metabolism. This is the first report of a whole genome transcriptional analysis of NAT expression in a fungus. PMID:18813928

  11. ROLE OF COMPETITION AND ADVERSE CULTURE CONDITIONS IN PREVENTING THE LOSS OF A AFLATOXIN PRODUCTION BY ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS DURING SERIAL TRANSFERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is genetically unstable when repeatedly transferred in culture. Serial transfers often result in loss of aflatoxin production and in associated morphological changes such as reduced sporulation, proliferation of aerial hyphae and an inability to produce sclerotia. However, degene...

  12. A Novel Y319H Substitution in CYP51C Associated with Azole Resistance in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Paul, R A; Rudramurthy, S M; Meis, J F; Mouton, J W; Chakrabarti, A

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to explore any mutation in the CYP51 gene conferring azole resistance in Aspergillus flavus. Two voriconazole-resistant and 45 voriconazole-susceptible isolates were included in the study. Sequence analysis demonstrated a T1025C nucleotide change in CYP51C, resulting in the Y319H amino acid substitution in one resistant isolate. However, the earlier described T788G mutation in CYP51C conferring voriconazole resistance in A. flavus isolates was present in all isolates, irrespective of their susceptibility status. PMID:26248359

  13. Functional characterization of a veA-dependent polyketide synthase gene in Aspergillus flavus necessary for the synthesis of asparasone, a sclerotium-specific pigment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The filamentous fungus, Aspergillus flavus, produces the toxic and carcinogenic, polyketide synthase (PKS)-derived family of secondary metabolites termed aflatoxins. While analysis of the A. flavus genome has identified many other PKSs capable of producing secondary metabolites, to date, only a few ...

  14. Volatile profiles and aflatoxin production by toxigenic and non-toxigenic isolates of Aspergillus flavus grown on sterile and non-sterile cracked corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic fungus which can grow on corn and produce aflatoxins which render it unsafe for food and feed consumption. In this study, aflatoxin and non-aflatoxin producing isolates of A. flavus were grown separately on wet (20% water added), sterile or non-sterile cracked co...

  15. Aspergillus flavus genetic diversity of corn fields treated with non-toxigenic strain afla-guard in the southern U.S

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus genetic diversity of corn fields treated with the non-toxigenic strain Afla-Guard (NRRL 21882) was determined for 384 A. flavus isolates from 14 locations within 6 states in the southern U.S. ELISA test has determined low levels of toxigenic strains (only 91 positive). Nearly hal...

  16. Analysis of an nsdC mutant in Aspergillus flavus reveals an extensive role in the regulation of several secondary metabolic gene clusters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic fungus that can invade and contaminate agronomically important crops. The fungus produces a number of toxic secondary metabolites, such as aflatoxin, which are synthesized from genes located in close proximity with each other on the chromosome. A. flavus has appro...

  17. rtfA, a putative RNA-Pol II transcription elongation factor, is necessary for normal morphological and chemical development in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus flavus is an agriculturally important opportunistic plant pathogen that produces potent carcinogenic compounds called aflatoxins. We identified the A. flavus rtfA gene, the ortholog of rtf1 in S. cerevisiae and rtfA in A. nidulans. Interestingly, rtfA has multiple ...

  18. Use of UHPLC high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry to investigate genes involved in the production of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Aspergillus flavus is known for its ability to produce the toxic and carcinogenic aflatoxins in food and feed. While aflatoxins are of most concern, A. flavus is predicted to be capable of producing many more metabolites based on a study of its complete genome sequence. Some of these meta...

  19. The biochemistry of citric acid accumulation by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Karaffa, L; Sndor, E; Fekete, E; Szentirmai, A

    2001-01-01

    Fungi, in particular Aspergilli, are well known for their potential to overproduce a variety of organic acids. These microorganisms have an intrinsic ability to accumulate these substances and it is generally believed that this provides the fungi with an ecological advantage, since they grow rather well at pH 3 to 5, while some species even tolerate pH values as low as 1.5. Organic acid production can be stimulated and in a number of cases conditions have been found that result in almost quantitative conversion of carbon substrate into acid. This is exploited in large-scale production of a number of organic acids like citric-, gluconic- and itaconic acid. Both in production volume as well as in knowledge available, citrate is by far the major organic acid. Citric acid (2-hydroxy-propane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid) is a true bulk product with an estimated global production of over 900 thousand tons in the year 2000. Till the beginning of the 20th century, it was exclusively extracted from lemons. Since the global market was dominated by an Italian cartel, other means of production were sought. Chemical synthesis was possible, but not suitable due to expensive raw materials and a complicated process with low yield. The discovery of citrate accumulation by Aspergillus niger led to a rapid development of a fermentation process, which only a decade later accounted for a large part of the global production. The application of citric acid is based on three of its properties: (1) acidity and buffer capacity, (2) taste and flavour, and (3) chelation of metal ions. Because of its three acid groups with pKa values of 3.1, 4.7 and 6.4, citrate is able to produce a very low pH in solution, but is also useful as a buffer over a broad range of pH values (2 to 7). Citric acid has a pleasant acid taste which leaves little aftertaste. It sometimes enhances flavour, but is also able to mask sweetness, such as the aspartame taste in diet beverages. Chelation of metal ions is a very important property that has led to applications such as antioxidant and preservative. Moreover, it is a "natural" substance and fully biodegradable. PMID:11791342

  20. Conversion of fusaric acid to fusarinol by Aspergillus niger: A detoxification reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium oxysporum causes wilt diseases of plants and produces a potent phytotoxin fusaric acid (FA) which is also toxic to many microorganisms. An Aspergillus strain with high tolerance to FA was isolated from soil. HPLC analysis of culture filtrates from A. niger grown with the addition...

  1. Unfolding and Refolding of Aspergillus Niger PhyB Phytase: Role of Disulfide Bridges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Role of disulfide bridges in folding of Aspergillus niger phytase pH 2.5-optimum (PhyB) was investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Guanidinium chloride (GuCl) at 1.0 M unfolded phytase; however, its removal by dialysis refolded the protein. Thiol reagent, tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphin...

  2. SORPTION OF HEAVY METALS BY THE SOIL FUNGI ASPERGILLUS NIGER AND MUCOR ROUXII

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of the nitrate salts of cadmium(II), copper (II), lanthanum(III) and silver (I) by two fungi, Aspergillus niger and Mucor rouxii, was evaluated using Fruendlich adsorption isotherms and energy dispersive X-ray electron microscopy. The linearized Freundlich isotherm descr...

  3. NIGERLYSINTM, HEMOLYSIN PRODUCED BY ASPERGILLUS NIGER, CAUSES LETHALITY OF PRIMARY RAT CORTICAL NEURONAL CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aspergillus niger produced a proteinaceous hemolysin, nigerlysinTM when incubated on sheep's blood agar at both 23° C and 37°C. Nigerlysin was purified from tryptic soy broth culture filtrate. Purified nigerlysin has a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa, with an...

  4. NIGERLYSINTM, HEMOLYSIN PRODUCED BY ASPERGILLUS NIGER, CAUSES LETHALITY OF PRIMARY RAT CORTICAL NEURONAL CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aspergillus niger produced a proteinaceous hemolysin, nigerlysinTM when incubated on sheep's blood agar at both 23 C and 37C. Nigerlysin was purified from tryptic soy broth culture filtrate. Purified nigerlysin has a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa, with an...

  5. Characterization of the fumonisin B2 biosynthetic gene cluster in Aspergillus niger and A. awamori.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus niger and A. awamori strains isolated from grapes cultivated in Mediterranean basin were examined for fumonisin B2 (FB2) production and presence/absence of sequences within the fumonisin biosynthetic gene (fum) cluster. Presence of 13 regions in the fum cluster was evaluated by PCR assay...

  6. Enzymatic Comparisons of Aspergillus niger PhyA and Escherichia coli AppA2 Phytases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was to compare three phytase activity assays and kinetics of Aspergillus niger PhyA and Escherichia coli AppA2 phytases expressed in Pichia pastoris at the observed stomach pH of 3.5. In Experiment 1, equivalent phytase activities in the crude preparations of PhyA and AppA2 were tested ...

  7. Effect of sexual recombination on population diversity in aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus and evidence for cryptic heterokaryosis.

    PubMed

    Olarte, Rodrigo A; Horn, Bruce W; Dorner, Joe W; Monacell, James T; Singh, Rakhi; Stone, Eric A; Carbone, Ignazio

    2012-03-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the major producer of carcinogenic aflatoxins (AFs) in crops worldwide. Natural populations of A.flavus show tremendous variation in AF production, some of which can be attributed to environmental conditions, differential regulation of the AF biosynthetic pathway and deletions or loss-of-function mutations in the AF gene cluster. Understanding the evolutionary processes that generate genetic diversity in A.flavus may also explain quantitative differences in aflatoxigenicity. Several population studies using multilocus genealogical approaches provide indirect evidence of recombination in the genome and specifically in the AF gene cluster. More recently, A.flavus has been shown to be functionally heterothallic and capable of sexual reproduction in laboratory crosses. In the present study, we characterize the progeny from nine A.flavus crosses using toxin phenotype assays, DNA sequence-based markers and array comparative genome hybridization. We show high AF heritability linked to genetic variation in the AF gene cluster, as well as recombination through the independent assortment of chromosomes and through crossing over within the AF cluster that coincides with inferred recombination blocks and hotspots in natural populations. Moreover, the vertical transmission of cryptic alleles indicates that while an A.flavus deletion strain is predominantly homokaryotic, it may harbour AF cluster genes at a low copy number. Results from experimental matings indicate that sexual recombination is driving genetic and functional hyperdiversity in A.flavus. The results of this study have significant implications for managing AF contamination of crops and for improving biocontrol strategies using nonaflatoxigenic strains of A.flavus. PMID:22212063

  8. Environmental factors modify carbon nutritional patterns and niche overlap between Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides strains from maize.

    PubMed

    Giorni, Paola; Magan, Naresh; Battilani, Paola

    2009-04-15

    This study examined the utilization patterns of key carbon sources (CS, 24: including key sugars, amino acids and fatty acids) in maize by strains of Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides under different water activity (a(w), 0.87-0.98 a(w)) and temperature (20-35 degrees C) values and compared the niche overlap indices (NOI) that estimate the in vitro CS utilization profiles [Wilson, M., Lindow, S.E., 1994. Coexistence among epiphytic bacterial populations mediated through nutritional resource partitioning. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 60, 4468-4477.]. The ability to grow in these key CS in minimal media was studied for 120 h in 12 h steps. The NOI was calculated for inter-species (F. verticillioides-A. flavus) and for intra-species (A. flavus-A. flavus) using CS utilization patterns over the range of interacting environmental conditions. 30 degrees C, over the whole a(w) range examined, was found to be optimal for utilization of the maximum number of CS by A. flavus. In contrast, for F. verticillioides this was more so at 20 degrees C; 25 degrees C allowed a suboptimal usage of CS for both species. NOIs confirmed the nutritional dominance of A. flavus at 30 degrees C, especially at lower a(w) levels and that of F. verticillioides at 20 degrees C, mainly at 0.95 a(w). In other conditions of a(w), based on CS utilization patterns, the data indicated that A. flavus and F. verticillioides occupied different ecological niches. The variability in nutritional sources utilization between A. flavus strains was not related to their ability to produce aflatoxins (AFs). This type of data helps to explain the nutritional dominance of fungal species and strains under different environmental conditions. This could be useful in trying to find appropriate natural biocontrol microorganisms to compete with these mycotoxigenic species. PMID:19239978

  9. [Construction and application of black-box model for glucoamylase production by Aspergillus niger].

    PubMed

    Li, Lianwei; Lu, Hongzhong; Xia, Jianye; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2015-07-01

    Carbon-limited continuous culture was used to study the relationship between the growth of Aspergillus niger and the production of glucoamylase. The result showed that when the specific growth rate was lower than 0.068 h(-1), the production of glucoamylase was growth-associated, when the specific growth rate was higher than 0.068 h(-1), the production of glucoamylase was not growth-associated. Based on the result of continuous culture, the Monod dynamics model of glucose consumption of A. niger was constructed, Combining Herbert-Pirt equation of glucose and oxygen consumption with Luedeking-Piret equation of enzyme production, the black-box model of Aspergillus niger for enzyme production was established. The exponential fed-batch culture was designed to control the specific growth rate at 0.05 h(-1) by using this model and the highest yield for glucoamylase production by A. niger reached 0.127 g glucoamylase/g glucose. The black-box model constructed in this study successfully described the glucoamylase production by A. niger and the result of the model fitted the measured value well. The black-box model could guide the design and optimization of glucoamylase production by A. niger. PMID:26647584

  10. Comparison of Expression of Secondary Metabolite Biosynthesis Cluster Genes in Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, and A. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C.; Mack, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Fifty six secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters are predicted to be in the Aspergillus flavus genome. In spite of this, the biosyntheses of only seven metabolites, including the aflatoxins, kojic acid, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem, have been assigned to a particular gene cluster. We used RNA-seq to compare expression of secondary metabolite genes in gene clusters for the closely related fungi A. parasiticus, A. oryzae, and A. flavus S and L sclerotial morphotypes. The data help to refine the identification of probable functional gene clusters within these species. Our results suggest that A. flavus, a prevalent contaminant of maize, cottonseed, peanuts and tree nuts, is capable of producing metabolites which, besides aflatoxin, could be an underappreciated contributor to its toxicity. PMID:24960201

  11. Comparison of expression of secondary metabolite biosynthesis cluster genes in Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, and A. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Mack, Brian M

    2014-06-01

    Fifty six secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters are predicted to be in the Aspergillus flavus genome. In spite of this, the biosyntheses of only seven metabolites, including the aflatoxins, kojic acid, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem, have been assigned to a particular gene cluster. We used RNA-seq to compare expression of secondary metabolite genes in gene clusters for the closely related fungi A. parasiticus, A. oryzae, and A. flavus S and L sclerotial morphotypes. The data help to refine the identification of probable functional gene clusters within these species. Our results suggest that A. flavus, a prevalent contaminant of maize, cottonseed, peanuts and tree nuts, is capable of producing metabolites which, besides aflatoxin, could be an underappreciated contributor to its toxicity. PMID:24960201

  12. A volatile relationship: profiling an inter-kingdom dialogue between two plant pathogens, Ralstonia Solanacearum and Aspergillus Flavus.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Joseph E; Jewell, Kelsea; Roze, Ludmila V; Scherf, Jacob; Ndagano, Dora; Beaudry, Randolph; Linz, John E; Allen, Caitilyn; Keller, Nancy P

    2014-05-01

    Microbes in the rhizosphere have a suite of extracellular compounds, both primary and secondary, that communicate with other organisms in their immediate environment. Here, we describe a two-way volatile interaction between two widespread and economically important soil-borne pathogens of peanut, Aspergillus flavus and Ralstonia solanacearum, a fungus and bacterium, respectively. In response to A. flavus volatiles, R. solanacearum reduced production of the major virulence factor extracellular polysaccharide (EPS). In parallel, A. flavus responded to R. solanacearum volatiles by reducing conidia production, both on plates and on peanut seeds and by increasing aflatoxin production on peanut. Volatile profiling of these organisms using solid-phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (SPME-GCMS) provided a first glimpse at the compounds that may drive these interactions. PMID:24801606

  13. Phytase production by Aspergillus niger CFR 335 and Aspergillus ficuum SGA 01 through submerged and solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Gunashree B; Venkateswaran, Govindarajulu

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation is one of the industrially important processes for the development of microbial metabolites that has immense applications in various fields. This has prompted to employ fermentation as a major technique in the production of phytase from microbial source. In this study, a comparison was made between submerged (SmF) and solid-state fermentations (SSF) for the production of phytase from Aspergillus niger CFR 335 and Aspergillus ficuum SGA 01. It was found that both the fungi were capable of producing maximum phytase on 5th day of incubation in both submerged and solid-state fermentation media. Aspergillus niger CFR 335 and A. ficuum produced a maximum of 60.6 U/gds and 38 U/gds of the enzyme, respectively, in wheat bran solid substrate medium. Enhancement in the enzyme level (76 and 50.7 U/gds) was found when grown in a combined solid substrate medium comprising wheat bran, rice bran, and groundnut cake in the ratio of 2 : 1 : 1. A maximum of 9.6 and 8.2 U/mL of enzyme activity was observed in SmF by A. niger CFR 335 and A.ficuum, respectively, when grown in potato dextrose broth. PMID:24688383

  14. Phytase Production by Aspergillus niger CFR 335 and Aspergillus ficuum SGA 01 through Submerged and Solid-State Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Gunashree B.; Venkateswaran, Govindarajulu

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation is one of the industrially important processes for the development of microbial metabolites that has immense applications in various fields. This has prompted to employ fermentation as a major technique in the production of phytase from microbial source. In this study, a comparison was made between submerged (SmF) and solid-state fermentations (SSF) for the production of phytase from Aspergillus niger CFR 335 and Aspergillus ficuum SGA 01. It was found that both the fungi were capable of producing maximum phytase on 5th day of incubation in both submerged and solid-state fermentation media. Aspergillus niger CFR 335 and A. ficuum produced a maximum of 60.6?U/gds and 38?U/gds of the enzyme, respectively, in wheat bran solid substrate medium. Enhancement in the enzyme level (76 and 50.7?U/gds) was found when grown in a combined solid substrate medium comprising wheat bran, rice bran, and groundnut cake in the ratio of 2?:?1?:?1. A maximum of 9.6 and 8.2?U/mL of enzyme activity was observed in SmF by A. niger CFR 335 and A.ficuum, respectively, when grown in potato dextrose broth. PMID:24688383

  15. Overexpression of Aspergillus tubingensis faeA in protease-deficient Aspergillus niger enables ferulic acid production from plant material.

    PubMed

    Zwane, Eunice N; Rose, Shaunita H; van Zyl, Willem H; Rumbold, Karl; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda

    2014-06-01

    The production of ferulic acid esterase involved in the release of ferulic acid side groups from xylan was investigated in strains of Aspergillus tubingensis, Aspergillus carneus, Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae. The highest activity on triticale bran as sole carbon source was observed with the A. tubingensis T8.4 strain, which produced a type A ferulic acid esterase active against methyl p-coumarate, methyl ferulate and methyl sinapate. The activity of the A. tubingensis ferulic acid esterase (AtFAEA) was inhibited twofold by glucose and induced twofold in the presence of maize bran. An initial accumulation of endoglucanase was followed by the production of endoxylanase, suggesting a combined action with ferulic acid esterase on maize bran. A genomic copy of the A. tubingensis faeA gene was cloned and expressed in A. niger D15#26 under the control of the A. niger gpd promoter. The recombinant strain has reduced protease activity and does not acidify the media, therefore promoting high-level expression of recombinant enzymes. It produced 13.5 U/ml FAEA after 5 days on autoclaved maize bran as sole carbon source, which was threefold higher than for the A. tubingensis donor strain. The recombinant AtFAEA was able to extract 50 % of the available ferulic acid from non-pretreated maize bran, making this enzyme suitable for the biological production of ferulic acid from lignocellulosic plant material. PMID:24664515

  16. Characterization of species of the Aspergillus section Nigri from corn field isolates co-infected with Aspergillus flavus/parasiticus species and the potential for ochratoxin A production.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the Aspergillus section Nigri, known as black-spored aspergilli, can contaminate several substrates including maize. Although some species within the group can produce plant disease symptoms such as black mold in onions and maize ear rot, the main concern with A. niger aggregate contamina...

  17. The effects of agitation and aeration on the production of gluconic acid by Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Dronawat, S.N.; Svihla, C.K.; Hanley, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    The effects of agitation and aeration in the production of gluconic acid by Aspergillus niger from a glucose medium were investigated. Experiments were conducted at aeration rates of 5.0 and 10.0 L/min. Four different agitation speeds were investigated for each aeration rate. Gluconic acid concentration and biomass concentration were analyzed, and the rate of consumption of substrate by A. niger was noted. The main purpose of this work was to find the optimal conditions of agitation and aeration for the growth of A. niger and production of gluconic acid in submerged culture in a batch fermentor at a bench-top scale. The oxygen-transfer rates at different agitation and aeration rates were calculated. The gluconic acid concentration and rate of growth of A. niger increased with increase in the agitation and aeration rates.

  18. Effects of Clitoria ternatea leaf extract on growth and morphogenesis of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kamilla, L; Mansor, S M; Ramanathan, S; Sasidharan, S

    2009-08-01

    Clitoria ternatea is known for its antimicrobial activity but the antifungal effects of leaf extract on growth and morphogenesis of Aspergillus niger have not been observed. The extract showed a favorable antifungal activity against A. niger with a minimum inhibition concentration 0.8 mg/mL and minimum fungicidal concentration 1.6 mg/mL, respectively. The leaf extract exhibited considerable antifungal activity against filamentous fungi in a dose-dependent manner with 0.4 mg/mL IC50 value on hyphal growth of A. niger. The main changes observed under scanning electron microscopy after C. ternatea extract treatment were loss of cytoplasm in fungal hyphae and the hyphal wall and its diameter became markedly thinner, distorted, and resulted in cell wall disruption. In addition, conidiophore alterations were also observed when A. niger was treated with C. ternatea leaf extract. PMID:19575837

  19. Toxigenic potentiality of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus strains isolated from black pepper assessed by an LC-MS/MS based multi-mycotoxin method.

    PubMed

    Yogendrarajah, Pratheeba; Devlieghere, Frank; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; De Meulenaer, Bruno; De Saeger, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    A liquid chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated to determine mycotoxins, produced by fungal isolates grown on malt extract agar (MEA). All twenty metabolites produced by different fungal species were extracted using acetonitrile/1% formic acid. The developed method was applied to assess the toxigenic potentiality of Aspergillus flavus (n=11) and Aspergillus parasiticus (n=6) strains isolated from black peppers (Piper nigrum L.) following their growth at 22, 30 and 37C. Highest mean radial colony growth rates were observed at 30C for A.flavus (5.210.68mm/day) and A.parasiticus (4.970.33mm/day). All of the A.flavus isolates produced aflatoxin B1 and O-methyl sterigmatocystin (OMST) while 91% produced aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) and 82% of them produced sterigmatocystin (STERIG) at 30C. Except one, all the A.parasiticus isolates produced all the four aflatoxins, STERIG and OMST at 30C. Remarkably high AFB1 was produced by some A.flavus isolates at 22C (max 16-40mg/kg). Production of mycotoxins followed a different trend than that of growth rate of both species. Notable correlations were found between different secondary metabolites of both species; R(2) 0.87 between AFB1 and AFB2 production. Occurrence of OMST could be used as a predictor for AFB1 production. PMID:26338134

  20. Toward elucidation of genetic and functional genetic mechanisms in corn host resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xueyan; Williams, W. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic mycotoxins produced by some species in the Aspergillus genus, such as A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Contamination of aflatoxins in corn profusely happens at pre-harvest stage when heat and drought field conditions favor A. flavus colonization. Commercial corn hybrids are generally susceptible to A. flavus infection. An ideal strategy for preventing aflatoxin contamination is through the enhancement of corn host resistance to Aspergillus infection and aflatoxin production. Constant efforts have been made by corn breeders to develop resistant corn genotypes. Significantly low levels of aflatoxin accumulation have been determined in certain resistant corn inbred lines. A number of reports of quantitative trait loci have provided compelling evidence supporting the quantitative trait genetic basis of corn host resistance to aflatoxin accumulation. Important findings have also been obtained from the investigation on candidate resistance genes through transcriptomics approach. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms will provide in-depth understanding of the host–pathogen interactions and hence facilitate the breeding of corn with resistance to A. flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation. PMID:25101068

  1. Influence of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and related metabolites on the biosynthesis of aflatoxin by resting cells of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Shantha, T; Murthy, V S

    1981-11-01

    Resting cells of Aspergillus flavus synthesized aflatoxin from acetate as the sole carbon source after 36 h of incubation. Addition of pyruvate (5.5 mg/m) as cosubstrate to [1-14C]acetate and unlabeled acetate considerably reduced toxin production but increased the radioactivity on the tricarboxylic acid intermediates. This suggests that high tricarboxylic acid activity drastically affected toxin synthesis. PMID:6797348

  2. Clinical and immunological reactions to Aspergillus niger among workers at a biotechnology plant.

    PubMed Central

    Topping, M D; Scarisbrick, D A; Luczynska, C M; Clarke, E C; Seaton, A

    1985-01-01

    The workforce at a biotechnology plant producing citric acid by fermentation of molasses with a strain of Aspergillus niger was studied. A combination of a respiratory questionnaire and clinical assessment identified 18 subjects (4.9% of the workforce) with work related bronchospasm. In nine of these evidence of sensitisation to A niger was obtained by skin prick tests and radioallergosorbent test (RAST) using as an antigen an extract of the A niger culture fluid from the process. Of the 325 subjects without work related bronchospasm, only nine (2.7%) had a positive prick test. There were no subjects with symptoms of extrinsic allergic alveolitis. Investigation into the source of the antigen showed that whereas, in some areas of the plant, A niger spores were present, in others there were no detectable spores. In these areas, however, extracts of filters from air samplers were shown by RAST inhibition to contain A niger antigens, indicating that the culture fluid was generating airborne antigen. RAST inhibition studies showed that the A niger culture fluid used in the process contained antigens that were not present in a commercially available A niger extract, thus emphasising the importance in this type of investigation of using antigens prepared from material to which the workers are exposed. PMID:3986142

  3. Biological Activities and Identification of Bioactive Metabolite from Endophytic Aspergillus flavus L7 Isolated from Aegle marmelos.

    PubMed

    Patil, M P; Patil, R H; Maheshwari, V L

    2015-07-01

    Aegle marmelos, a well-known Indian plant with medicinal and religious importance, has been extensively used in Indian traditional medicine. The present study aimed to isolate, identify, and evaluate the biological activities of endophytic fungi from A. marmelos. One of the isolates, labeled as L7, was identified as Aspergillus flavus using morphology and ITS gene sequence. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents in the culture filtrate were found to be 65.77 mg GAE/ml and 158.33 mg quercetin/ml of crude extract, respectively. The extract showed excellent antimicrobial activity against common human bacterial and fungal pathogens. The test extract at 700 µg/ml, which notably reduced the concentration of DPPH-free radical as percent DPPH scavenging activity, was found to be the highest (64.53 %). The extract, at the concentration of 2 mg/ml, produced 70 % inhibition of hemolysis of RBCs compared to 78 % produced by standard drug (Ibuprofen). Chemical profiling of the fermented extract using TLC followed by UV and FTIR revealed the presence of flavonoids. The HPLC analysis confirmed the presence of bioflavonoid rutin in the extract. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on production of bioactive flavonoid by endophytic Aspergillus flavus obtained from A. marmelos and its pharmaceutical potential. In conclusion, the endophytic Aspergillus flavus obtained from the A. marmelos could be explored as an economic and potential natural resource with diverse pharmaceutical and biological activities. PMID:25860867

  4. The Master Transcription Factor mtfA Governs Aflatoxin Production, Morphological Development and Pathogenicity in the Fungus Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhenhong; Lohmar, Jessica M; Satterlee, Timothy; Cary, Jeffrey W; Calvo, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus produces a variety of toxic secondary metabolites; among them, the aflatoxins (AFs) are the most well known. These compounds are highly mutagenic and carcinogenic, particularly AFB?. A. flavus is capable of colonizing a number of economically-important crops, such as corn, cotton, peanut and tree nuts, and contaminating them with AFs. Molecular genetic studies in A. flavus could identify novel gene targets for use in strategies to reduce AF contamination and its adverse impact on food and feed supplies worldwide. In the current study, we investigated the role of the master transcription factor gene mtfA in A. flavus. Our results revealed that forced overexpression of mtfA results in a drastic decrease or elimination of several secondary metabolites, among them AFB?. The reduction in AFB? was accompanied by a decrease in aflR expression. Furthermore, mtfA also regulates development; conidiation was influenced differently by this gene depending on the type of colonized substrate. In addition to its effect on conidiation, mtfA is necessary for the normal maturation of sclerotia. Importantly, mtfA positively affects the pathogenicity of A. flavus when colonizing peanut seeds. AF production in colonized seeds was decreased in the deletion mtfA strain and particularly in the overexpression strain, where only trace amounts were detected. Interestingly, a more rapid colonization of the seed tissue occurred when mtfA was overexpressed, coinciding with an increase in lipase activity and faster maceration of the oily part of the seed. PMID:26805883

  5. Stimulation by Hyphopichia burtonii and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens of aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus in irradiated maize and rice grains

    SciTech Connect

    Cuero, R.G.; Smith, J.E.; Lacey, J.

    1987-05-01

    Aspergillus flavus was grown on maize and rice extract agars and on irradiated viable cracked maize and rice grains, either in pure culture or in dual culture with wild strains of either Hyphopichia burtonii or Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Aflatoxin production by A. flavus and its growth and interactions with the other microorganisms were studied at three water activities (a/sub w/) (0.98, 0.95, and 0.90) and two temperatures (25 and 16/sup 0/C). Both H. burtonii and B. amyloliquefaciens markedly stimulated growth and aflotoxin production by A. flavus on cracked maize, especially at 25/sup 0/C and 0.95 and 0.98 a/sub w/. No aflatoxin was detected in pure cultures of A. flavus on cracked rice after 12 days of incubation at 25/sup 0/C, but some was produced by mixed cultures at 16/sup 0/C and 0.98 a/sub w/. The morphological interactions among A. flavus, H. burtonii, and B. amyloliquefaciens were also examined on maize and rice extract agars under similar controlled conditions.

  6. RNA sequencing of an nsdC mutant reveals global regulation of secondary metabolic gene clusters in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Matthew K; Mack, Brian M; Wei, Qijian; Bland, John M; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cary, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus, Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus) is an opportunistic pathogen capable of invading a number of crops and contaminating them with toxic secondary metabolites such as aflatoxins. Characterizing the molecular mechanisms governing growth and development of this organism is vital for developing safe and effective strategies for reducing crop contamination. The transcription factor nsdC has been identified as being required for normal asexual development and aflatoxin production in A. flavus. Building on a previous study using a large (L)-sclerotial morphotype A. flavus nsdC mutant we observed alterations in conidiophore development and loss of sclerotial and aflatoxin production using a nsdC mutant of a small (S)-sclerotial morphotype, that normally produces aflatoxin and sclerotia in quantities much higher than the l-morphotype. RNA sequencing analysis of the nsdC knockout mutant and isogenic control strain identified a number of differentially expressed genes related to development and production of secondary metabolites, including aflatoxin, penicillin and aflatrem. Further, RNA-seq data indicating down regulation of aflatrem biosynthetic gene expression in the nsdC mutant correlated with HPLC analyses showing a decrease in aflatrem levels. The current study expands the role of nsdC as a globally acting transcription factor that is a critical regulator of both asexual reproduction and secondary metabolism in A. flavus. PMID:26686623

  7. The bZIP Protein MeaB Mediates Virulence Attributes in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Bing; Franke, Stephen; Choithani, Anjali; Keller, Nancy P.

    2013-01-01

    LaeA is a fungal specific virulence factor of both plant and human pathogenic fungi. Transcriptional profiles of laeA mutants have been successfully exploited to identify regulatory mechanisms of secondary metabolism in fungi; here we use laeA mutants as tools to elucidate virulence attributes in Aspergillus flavus. Microarray expression profiles of ΔlaeA and over-expression laeA (OE::laeA) were compared to wild type A. flavus. Strikingly, several nitrogen metabolism genes are oppositely mis-regulated in the ΔlaeA and OE::laeA mutants. One of the nitrogen regulatory genes, the bZIP encoding meaB, is up-regulated in ΔlaeA. Significantly, over-expression of meaB (OE::meaB) phenocopies the decreased virulence attributes of a ΔlaeA phenotype including decreased colonization of host seed, reduced lipase activity and loss of aflatoxin B1 production in seed. However, a double knock-down of laeA and meaB (KD::laeA,meaB) demonstrated that KD::laeA,meaB closely resembled ΔlaeA rather than wild type or ΔmeaB in growth, aflatoxin biosynthesis and sclerotia production thus suggesting that meaB does not contribute to the ΔlaeA phenotype. MeaB and LaeA appear to be part of regulatory networks that allow them to have both shared and distinct roles in fungal biology. PMID:24040154

  8. The bZIP protein MeaB mediates virulence attributes in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Amaike, Saori; Affeldt, Katharyn J; Yin, Wen-Bing; Franke, Stephen; Choithani, Anjali; Keller, Nancy P

    2013-01-01

    LaeA is a fungal specific virulence factor of both plant and human pathogenic fungi. Transcriptional profiles of laeA mutants have been successfully exploited to identify regulatory mechanisms of secondary metabolism in fungi; here we use laeA mutants as tools to elucidate virulence attributes in Aspergillus flavus. Microarray expression profiles of ΔlaeA and over-expression laeA (OE::laeA) were compared to wild type A. flavus. Strikingly, several nitrogen metabolism genes are oppositely mis-regulated in the ΔlaeA and OE::laeA mutants. One of the nitrogen regulatory genes, the bZIP encoding meaB, is up-regulated in ΔlaeA. Significantly, over-expression of meaB (OE::meaB) phenocopies the decreased virulence attributes of a ΔlaeA phenotype including decreased colonization of host seed, reduced lipase activity and loss of aflatoxin B1 production in seed. However, a double knock-down of laeA and meaB (KD::laeA,meaB) demonstrated that KD::laeA,meaB closely resembled ΔlaeA rather than wild type or ΔmeaB in growth, aflatoxin biosynthesis and sclerotia production thus suggesting that meaB does not contribute to the ΔlaeA phenotype. MeaB and LaeA appear to be part of regulatory networks that allow them to have both shared and distinct roles in fungal biology. PMID:24040154

  9. Characterization of Expressed Sequence Tag-Derived Simple Sequence Repeat Markers for Aspergillus flavus: Emphasis on Variability of Isolates from the Southern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers were developed from Aspergillus flavus expressed sequence tag (EST) database to conduct an analysis of genetic relationships of Aspergillus isolates from numerous host species and geographical regions, but primarily from the United States. Twenty-nine primers wer...

  10. Use of Pyrosequencing to Quantify Incidence of a Specific Aspergillus flavus Strain Within Complex Fungal Communities Associated with Commercial Cotton Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic carcinogens produced by several species of Aspergillus, and its presence in foods causes chronic health effects including immune-system suppression, growth retardation, cancer, and death in both humans and domestic animals. Atoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus have b...

  11. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis due to Aspergillus niger in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, S; Xess, I; Swetha, J V; Tanveer, N; Asati, D; Ramam, M; Singh, M K

    2009-01-01

    Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is a rare entity, usually caused by A. fumigatus and A. flavus . Here, we present such a case, manifested by ulceration due to A. niger, which remained undiagnosed for a prolonged period. The immunological status was intact, although the patient had associated severe fungal infection. Recurrence of the lesion occurred despite repeated anti-fungal therapies. Anti fungal testing was done based on the broth dilution (M-38A, NCCLS, USA) method. The culture isolate was found to be sensitive to fluconazole and amphotericin B. Continuation of antifungal therapy improved the symptoms, reducing the size of the lesion. PMID:19736412

  12. Cytokine milieu in renal cavities of immunocompetent mice in response to intravenous challenge of Aspergillus flavus leading to aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Rajesh; Shankar, Jata; Singh, Agam P; Tiwary, Bhupendra N

    2013-01-01

    Investigations in mice have demonstrated that Aspergillus flavus is more virulent than all other Aspergillus species except A. tamari. However, there is a complete lack of information on the immune responses elicited by A. flavus in systemic model. This communication reports the progression of infection and cytokine profile in BALB/c mice in response to intravenous challenge of A. flavus. The pathogenesis of infection was evaluated morphologically and by the analysis of Colony Forming Units (CFUs) in kidney homogenates. The kinetics of regulated cytokines was determined in kidneys by cytokine-specific murine ELISA. During the initial phase of infection the rate of clearance of A. flavus was high, most likely through recruited neutrophils and the resident renal macrophages with concurrent significant release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12/IL-23p40, IL-6) indicating antifungal innate immune response to be active at the site. However, at 24h PI there was a significant rise of IL-17 and IL-23 suggesting the activation of IL-17/IL-23 axis of inflammation resulting in rise of CFU. The lack of significant induction in the anti-inflammatory cytokines like IL-4 and IL-10 confirmed the absence of Th2 type of response. In the late phase, after 3days post-infection, there was a rise in the number of pathogen in the kidneys as determined by histopathology and CFU counts. The A. flavus hyphae were evident in the renal pelvis and ureter and we propose the production of blastoconidia by metamorphosed hyphae. PMID:23063795

  13. Misidentification of Aspergillus nomius and Aspergillus tamarii as Aspergillus flavus: Characterization by Internal Transcribed Spacer, β-Tubulin, and Calmodulin Gene Sequencing, Metabolic Fingerprinting, and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Emily W. T.; Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Lau, Eunice C. L.; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Fung, Kitty S. C.; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus nomius and Aspergillus tamarii are Aspergillus species that phenotypically resemble Aspergillus flavus. In the last decade, a number of case reports have identified A. nomius and A. tamarii as causes of human infections. In this study, using an internal transcribed spacer, β-tubulin, and calmodulin gene sequencing, only 8 of 11 clinical isolates reported as A. flavus in our clinical microbiology laboratory by phenotypic methods were identified as A. flavus. The other three isolates were A. nomius (n = 2) or A. tamarii (n = 1). The results corresponded with those of metabolic fingerprinting, in which the A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. tamarii strains were separated into three clusters based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC MS) analysis. The first two patients with A. nomius infections had invasive aspergillosis and chronic cavitary and fibrosing pulmonary and pleural aspergillosis, respectively, whereas the third patient had A. tamarii colonization of the airway. Identification of the 11 clinical isolates and three reference strains by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) showed that only six of the nine strains of A. flavus were identified correctly. None of the strains of A. nomius and A. tamarii was correctly identified. β-Tubulin or the calmodulin gene should be the gene target of choice for identifying A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. tamarii. To improve the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS, the number of strains for each species in MALDI-TOF MS databases should be expanded to cover intraspecies variability. PMID:24452174

  14. Reduction of Aflatoxin in Pistachio Through Biological Control of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A retrotransposon, AFLAV (A. flavus retrotransposon), has been recently characterized in A. flavus. Complete DNA sequence of 7784 bp containing the AFLAV has been submitted to GenBank (accession number AY485785). Multicopies of this transposon are dispersed in the chromosomes of A. flavus. PCR pr...

  15. Molecular Technique to Fingerprint Aspergillus flavus Causing Aflatoxin Contamination in Food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A retrotransposon, AFLAV (A. flavus retrotransposon), has been recently characterized in A. flavus. Complete DNA sequence of 7784 bp containing the AFLAV has been submitted to GenBank (accession number AY485785). Multicopies of this transposon are dispersed in the chromosomes of A. flavus. PCR pri...

  16. Expression of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Aspergillus niger for L-Lactic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Khyati K.; Punekar, Narayan S.

    2015-01-01

    Different engineered organisms have been used to produce L-lactate. Poor yields of lactate at low pH and expensive downstream processing remain as bottlenecks. Aspergillus niger is a prolific citrate producer and a remarkably acid tolerant fungus. Neither a functional lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from nor lactate production by A. niger is reported. Its genome was also investigated for the presence of a functional ldh. The endogenous A. niger citrate synthase promoter relevant to A. niger acidogenic metabolism was employed to drive constitutive expression of mouse lactate dehydrogenase (mldhA). An appraisal of different branches of the A. niger pyruvate node guided the choice of mldhA for heterologous expression. A high copy number transformant C12 strain, displaying highest LDH specific activity, was analyzed under different growth conditions. The C12 strain produced 7.7 g/l of extracellular L-lactate from 60 g/l of glucose, in non-neutralizing minimal media. Significantly, lactate and citrate accumulated under two different growth conditions. Already an established acidogenic platform, A. niger now promises to be a valuable host for lactate production. PMID:26683313

  17. Comparing phosphorus mobilization strategies using Aspergillus niger for the mineral dissolution of three phosphate rocks.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K D; van Straaten, P; de Orduña, R Mira; Glasauer, S; Trevors, J; Fallow, D; Smith, P S

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiencies are limiting crop production in agricultural soils worldwide. Locally available sources of raw phosphate rock (PR) are being recognized for their potential role in soil fertility improvement. Phosphorus bioavailability is essential for the efficiency of PRs and can be increased by acid treatments. The utilization of organic acid producing micro-organisms, notably Aspergillus niger, presents a sustainable alternative to the use of strong inorganic acids, but acid production of A. niger strongly depends on the mineral content of the growth media. This study compared the phosphorus mobilization efficiency of two biological treatments, namely addition of acidic cell-free supernatants from A. niger cultivations to PRs and the direct cultivation of A. niger with PRs. The results show that addition of PR to cultivations leads to significant differences in the profile of organic acids produced by A. niger. Additions of PR, especially igneous rocks containing high amounts of iron and manganese, lead to reduced citric acid concentrations. In spite of these differences, phosphorus mobilization was similar between treatments, suggesting that the simpler direct cultivation method was not inferior. In addition to citric acid, it is suggested that oxalic acid contributes to PR solubilization in direct cultivations with A. niger, which would benefit farmers in developing countries where conventional fertilizers are not adequately accessible. PMID:19709342

  18. The promoter of the glucoamylase-encoding gene of Aspergillus niger functions in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Smith, T L; Gaskell, J; Berka, R M; Yang, M; Henner, D J; Cullen, D

    1990-04-16

    Promoter sequences from the Aspergillus niger glucoamylase-encoding gene (glaA) were linked to the bacterial hygromycin (Hy) phosphotransferase-encoding gene (hph) and this chimeric marker was used to select Hy-resistant (HyR) Ustilago maydis transformants. This is an example of an Ascomycete promoter functioning in a Basidiomycete. HyR transformants varied with respect to copy number of integrated vector, mitotic stability, and tolerance to Hy. Only 216 bp of glaA promoter sequence is required for expression in U. maydis but this promoter is not induced by starch as it is in Aspergillus spp. The transcriptional start points are the same in U. maydis and A. niger. PMID:2112106

  19. Inhibition of Aflatoxin Synthesis in Aspergillus flavus by Three Structurally Modified Lentinans

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinyou; Mo, Haizhen; Chen, Ying; Ding, Ding; Hu, Liangbin

    2014-01-01

    The chemical properties of ?-glucans leading to their inhibition on aflatoxin (AF) production by Aspergillus flavus remain unclear. In this study, structurally modified lentinan derivatives were prepared by carboxymethylation, sulfation, and phosphorylation to explore their inhibition activity to AF synthesis. The results demonstrated that inhibitory activity of lentinan decreased at higher or lower concentrations than 200 ?g/mL. Compared with lentinan, the sulphated derivatives only performed a reduced optimal inhibition rate at a higher concentration. The phosphorylated derivatives achieved complete inhibition of AF production at 50 ?g/mL, but the inhibitory activity was attenuated with an increase of concentration. The minimum concentration of carboxymethylated derivatives to completely inhibit AF synthesis was the same as that of the original lentinan, whereas their inhibition activity was not reduced at the increasing concentration. RT-PCR analyses were conducted to understand the effects of lentinan and its carboxymethylated derivatives on the transcription of certain genes associated with AF biosynthesis. The results showed that lentinan delayed the transcription of aflQ, whereas its carboxymethylated derivatives promoted the transcriptions of all the tested genes. Our results revealed that some chemical group features apart from the ?-bond could play the vital role in the prevention of AF formation by polysaccharide, and highlighted the structural modifications which could promote its practicability in the control of aflatoxin contamination. PMID:24599078

  20. Characterization of the Maize Chitinase Genes and Their Effect on Aspergillus flavus and Aflatoxin Accumulation Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Leigh K.; Mylroie, J. Erik; Oliveira, Dafne A.; Smith, J. Spencer; Ozkan, Seval; Windham, Gary L.; Williams, W. Paul; Warburton, Marilyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a crop of global importance, but prone to contamination by aflatoxins produced by fungi in the genus Aspergillus. The development of resistant germplasm and the identification of genes contributing to resistance would aid in the reduction of the problem with a minimal need for intervention by farmers. Chitinolytic enzymes respond to attack by potential pathogens and have been demonstrated to increase insect and fungal resistance in plants. Here, all chitinase genes in the maize genome were characterized via sequence diversity and expression patterns. Recent evolution within this gene family was noted. Markers from within each gene were developed and used to map the phenotypic effect on resistance of each gene in up to four QTL mapping populations and one association panel. Seven chitinase genes were identified that had alleles associated with increased resistance to aflatoxin accumulation and A. flavus infection in field grown maize. The chitinase in bin 1.05 identified a new and highly significant QTL, while chitinase genes in bins 2.04 and 5.03 fell directly beneath the peaks of previously published QTL. The expression patterns of these genes corroborate possible grain resistance mechanisms. Markers from within the gene sequences or very closely linked to them are presented to aid in the use of marker assisted selection to improve this trait. PMID:26090679

  1. [The biosynthesis of kojic acid by Aspergillus flavus Link strains isolated from feed].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, S M

    1999-01-01

    An ability of 98 strains of Aspergillus flavus link to form kojic acid has been studied. Fourteen strains with high activity of synthesis (the content of kojic acid in the nutrient medium was 28-32 mg/ml on the 14th day of cultivation) have been selected. The specific kojiforming activity of kojic acid formation of aspergilli strains was maximal during exponential growth phase. Initial value of pH of growth medium providing maximum intensity of kojic acid biosynthesis (4.5-5.5). Such carbohydrates as glucose, saccharose, maltose and galactose proved to be of the most use. Comparatively high yield of kojic acid (8.5-9.5 g/kg) was obtained by the method of solid-phase fermentation on the grain and grain-forage with high amount of proteins and carbohydrates (maize, oats, rye and barley grain). A method of production of crystalline chemically pure kojic acid was modified. The preparation toxicity was studied on chickens. A number of clinical and pathanatomical symptoms characteristic of kojitoxicosis of agricultural animals and poultry have been registered. PMID:10610185

  2. No effect of soybean lipoxygenase on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus flavus-inoculated seeds.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Mellon JK; Cotty PJ

    2002-12-01

    Soybean lines lacking lipoxygenase (LOX) activity were compared with soybean lines having LOX activity for the ability to support growth and aflatoxin B1 production by the fungal seed pathogen Aspergillus flavus. Whole seeds, broken seeds, and heat-treated (autoclaved) whole seeds were compared. Broken seeds, irrespective of LOX presence, supported excellent fungal growth and the highest aflatoxin levels. Autoclaved whole seeds, with or without LOX, produced good fungal growth and aflatoxin levels approaching those of broken seeds. Whole soybean seeds supported sparse fungal growth and relatively low aflatoxin levels. There was no significant difference in aflatoxin production between whole soybean seeds either with or without LOX, although there did seem to be differences among the cultivars tested. The heat treatment eliminated LOX activity (in LOX+ lines), yet aflatoxin levels did not change substantially from the broken seed treatment. Broken soybean seeds possessed LOX activity (in LOX+ lines) and yet yielded the highest aflatoxin levels. The presence of active LOX did not seem to play the determinant role in the susceptibility of soybean seeds to fungal pathogens. Seed coat integrity and seed viability seem to be more important characteristics in soybean seed resistance to aflatoxin contamination. Soybean seeds lacking LOX seem safe from the threat of increased seed pathogen susceptibility.

  3. No effect of soybean lipoxygenase on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus flavus-inoculated seeds.

    PubMed

    Mellon, J K; Cotty, P J

    2002-12-01

    Soybean lines lacking lipoxygenase (LOX) activity were compared with soybean lines having LOX activity for the ability to support growth and aflatoxin B1 production by the fungal seed pathogen Aspergillus flavus. Whole seeds, broken seeds, and heat-treated (autoclaved) whole seeds were compared. Broken seeds, irrespective of LOX presence, supported excellent fungal growth and the highest aflatoxin levels. Autoclaved whole seeds, with or without LOX, produced good fungal growth and aflatoxin levels approaching those of broken seeds. Whole soybean seeds supported sparse fungal growth and relatively low aflatoxin levels. There was no significant difference in aflatoxin production between whole soybean seeds either with or without LOX, although there did seem to be differences among the cultivars tested. The heat treatment eliminated LOX activity (in LOX+ lines), yet aflatoxin levels did not change substantially from the broken seed treatment. Broken soybean seeds possessed LOX activity (in LOX+ lines) and yet yielded the highest aflatoxin levels. The presence of active LOX did not seem to play the determinant role in the susceptibility of soybean seeds to fungal pathogens. Seed coat integrity and seed viability seem to be more important characteristics in soybean seed resistance to aflatoxin contamination. Soybean seeds lacking LOX seem safe from the threat of increased seed pathogen susceptibility. PMID:12495021

  4. Nutritional changes in powdered red pepper upon in vitro infection of Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Smita; Mishra, H.N.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative losses in various biochemical constituents like capsaicin, carotenes, ascorbic acid, polyphenols, mineral matter, sugars (soluble and insoluble), protein and fat were estimated after the successful growth of Aspergillus flavus for 30 days on powdered red pepper. The fungal biomass was measured by ergosterol content and Aflatoxin B1 by HPLC. Amongst the various nutritional constituents evaluated for nutritional losses and changes the highest nutritional loss was reported in total carotenoids (88.55%) followed by total sugars (85.5%). The protein content of the infected sample increased from 18.01% to 23%. The nutritional profile of chilli powder (Capsicum annum var. sannam L.) shows highest share of total soluble sugars (32.89%) and fiber content (21.05%), followed by protein (18.01%) and fat (13.32%) making it an ideal solid- substrate for mould growth. At the end of incubation the fungal biomass was 192. 25 mg / 100 gram powder, total plate count 17.5 X 10 4 CFU/g and Aflatoxin B1 content was 30.06 μg / kg. PMID:24031333

  5. Indole Diterpenoids and Isocoumarin from the Fungus, Aspergillus flavus, Isolated from the Prawn, Penaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kunlai; Li, Ye; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yi; Liu, Peipei; Zhu, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Two new indole-diterpenoids (1 and 2) and a new isocoumarin (3), along with the known ?-aflatrem (4), paspalinine (5), leporin B (6), ?-cyclopiazonic acid (7), iso-?-cyclopiazonic acid (8), ditryptophenaline (9), aflatoxin B1 (10), 7-O-acetylkojic acid (11) and kojic acid (12), were isolated from the fermentation broth of the marine-derived fungus, Aspergillus flavus OUCMDZ-2205. The structures of Compounds 112 were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, quantum ECD calculations and the chemical method. New Compound 1 exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus with a MIC value of 20.5 ?M. Both new Compounds 1 and 2 could arrest the A549 cell cycle in the S phase at a concentration of 10 ?M. Compound 1 showed PKC-beta inhibition with an IC50 value of 15.6 ?M. In addition, the absolute configurations of the known compounds, 46 and leporin A (6a), were also determined for the first time. PMID:24983640

  6. Effect of climate change on Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin B1 production

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Angel; Rodriguez, Alicia; Magan, Naresh

    2014-01-01

    This review considers the available information on the potential impact of key environmental factors and their interactions on the molecular ecology, growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus in vitro and in maize grain. The recent studies which have been carried out to examine the impact of water activity × temperature on aflatoxin biosynthesis and phenotypic aflatoxin production are examined. These have shown that there is a direct relationship between the relative expression of key regulatory and structural genes under different environmental conditions which correlate directly with aflatoxin B1 production. A model has been developed to integrate the relative expression of 10 biosynthetic genes in the pathway, growth and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production which was validated under elevated temperature and water stress conditions. The effect of interacting conditions of aw × temperature × elevated CO2 (2 × and 3 × existing levels) are detailed for the first time. This suggests that while such interacting environmental conditions have little effect on growth they do have a significant impact on aflatoxin biosynthetic gene expression (structural aflD and regulatory aflR genes) and can significantly stimulate the production of AFB1. While the individual factors alone have an impact, it is the combined effect of these three abiotic factors which have an impact on mycotoxin production. This approach provides data which is necessary to help predict the real impacts of climate change on mycotoxigenic fungi. PMID:25101060

  7. Effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss. essential oil on colony morphology and ultrastructure of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Gandomi, Hassan; Misaghi, Ali; Basti, Afshin Akhondzadeh; Hamedi, Hassan; Shirvani, Zahra Ramezani

    2011-09-01

    The mode of inhibitory action of Zataria multiflora Boiss. essential oil (EO) on the fungus, Aspergillus flavus, was studied by colony morphology examination, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The EO at concentrations used in this study suppressed the size of the colony as well as sporulation. SEM of mycelia treated with given concentrations of EO showed morphological alterations ranging from loss of turgidity and uniformity of mycelia at low concentrations of EO to evident destruction of the hyphae at higher concentration of EO. Semi-thin sections of mycelia exposed to different concentrations of EO were analysed by light microscopy and revealed that the major change at level as low as 50 ppm of EO was limited to vacuolisation of cytoplasm resulting in cell swelling, while at higher concentrations, detachment of the cell membrane from the cell wall, deformation of mycelia and shedding the cytoplasm from the cell were the main alterations. These damages were well documented by TEM, which showed that the main sites of action of EO were the plasma membrane and cell wall. In conclusion, morphological and structural changes observed in this study may be one of the mechanisms involved in growth inhibition of the fungi and reducing aflatoxin production. PMID:21039935

  8. Sub-inhibitory concentration of biogenic selenium nanoparticles lacks post antifungal effect for Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans and stimulates the growth of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Kazempour, Zahra Bahri; Yazdi, Mohammad Hossein; Rafii, Fatemeh; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background The antifungal activity of selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) prepared by Klebsiella pneumoniae has been reported previously for different fungi. In the present study, freshly prepared Se NPs produced by K. pneumoniae were purified and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and its post antifungal effects for two fungi were evaluated. Materials and Methods The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of Se NPs, determined by serial dilution were 250 g/ml for Aspergillus niger and 2,000 g/ml for Candida albicans. The effect of exposure of A. niger and C. albicans to Se NPs on later growth was evaluated by incubating the fungi for 1 hour at 25 C in media containing 0, 1, 2 and 4 x MIC of Se NPs and diluting the cultures 100 times with Se free medium. The kinetics of growth of the fungi in control cultures and in non-toxic Se NPs concentration of, 0.01 MIC, 0.02 MIC or 0.04 MIC were measured. Results The exposure of A. niger and C. albicans to 2 and 4 x MIC of Se NPs stimulated the growth of both fungi in the absence of toxic concentrations of Se. The strongest stimulation was observed for A. niger. Conclusion It is concluded that exposure to high concentration of the Se NPs did not have any post-inhibitory effect on A. niger and C. albicans and that trace amounts of this element promoted growth of both fungi in a dose- dependent-manner. The role of nanoparticles serving as needed trace elements and development of microorganism tolerance to nanoparticles should not be dismissed while considering therapeutic potential. PMID:23466957

  9. Prospecting for the incidence of genes involved in ochratoxin and fumonisin biosynthesis in Brazilian strains of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus welwitschiae.

    PubMed

    Massi, Fernanda Pelisson; Sartori, Daniele; de Souza Ferranti, Larissa; Iamanaka, Beatriz Thie; Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Vieira, Maria Lucia Carneiro; Fungaro, Maria Helena Pelegrinelli

    2016-03-16

    Aspergillus niger "aggregate" is an informal taxonomic rank that represents a group of species from the section Nigri. Among A. niger "aggregate" species Aspergillus niger sensu stricto and its cryptic species Aspergillus welwitschiae (=Aspergillus awamori sensu Perrone) are proven as ochratoxin A and fumonisin B2 producing species. A. niger has been frequently found in tropical and subtropical foods. A. welwitschiae is a new species, which was recently dismembered from the A. niger taxon. These species are morphologically very similar and molecular data are indispensable for their identification. A total of 175 Brazilian isolates previously identified as A. niger collected from dried fruits, Brazil nuts, coffee beans, grapes, cocoa and onions were investigated in this study. Based on partial calmodulin gene sequences about one-half of our isolates were identified as A. welwitschiae. This new species was the predominant species in onions analyzed in Brazil. A. niger and A. welwitschiae differ in their ability to produce ochratoxin A and fumonisin B2. Among A. niger isolates, approximately 32% were OTA producers, but in contrast only 1% of the A. welwitschiae isolates revealed the ability to produce ochratoxin A. Regarding fumonisin B2 production, there was a higher frequency of FB2 producing isolates in A. niger (74%) compared to A. welwitschiae (34%). Because not all A. niger and A. welwitschiae strains produce ochratoxin A and fumonisin B2, in this study a multiplex PCR was developed for detecting the presence of essential genes involved in ochratoxin (polyketide synthase and radHflavin-dependent halogenase) and fumonisin (α-oxoamine synthase) biosynthesis in the genome of A. niger and A. welwitschiae isolates. The frequency of strains harboring the mycotoxin genes was markedly different between A. niger and A. welwitschiae. All OTA producing isolates of A. niger and A. welwitschiae showed in their genome the pks and radH genes, and 95.2% of the nonproducing isolates did not contain these genes. The α-oxoamine synthase gene was detected in 100% and 36% of the A. niger and A. welwitschiae isolates, respectively. The loss of ochratoxin A production in A. niger and A. welwitschiae is highly associated with gene deletions within the ochratoxin biosynthetic gene cluster. The loss of fumonisin production in A. welwitschiae is associated with gene deletions within the fumonisin biosynthetic gene cluster, but this is not the case with A. niger. PMID:26803270

  10. Sexual Reproduction in Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia: Acquisition of Novel Alleles from Soil Populations and Uniparental Mitochondrial Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Bruce W.; Gell, Richard M.; Singh, Rakhi; Sorensen, Ronald B.; Carbone, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of one mating type. Less commonly, sclerotia may be fertilized during co-infection of crops with sexually compatible strains. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were performed to examine sexual reproduction in single-strain and fertilized sclerotia following exposure of sclerotia to natural fungal populations in soil. Female and male roles and mitochondrial inheritance in A. flavus were also examined through reciprocal crosses between sclerotia and conidia. Single-strain sclerotia produced ascospores on soil and progeny showed biparental inheritance that included novel alleles originating from fertilization by native soil strains. Sclerotia fertilized in the laboratory and applied to soil before ascocarp formation also produced ascospores with evidence of recombination in progeny, but only known parental alleles were detected. In reciprocal crosses, sclerotia and conidia from both strains functioned as female and male, respectively, indicating A. flavus is hermaphroditic, although the degree of fertility depended upon the parental sources of sclerotia and conidia. All progeny showed maternal inheritance of mitochondria from the sclerotia. Compared to A. flavus populations in crops, soil populations would provide a higher likelihood of exposure of sclerotia to sexually compatible strains and a more diverse source of genetic material for outcrossing. PMID:26731416

  11. Sexual Reproduction in Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia: Acquisition of Novel Alleles from Soil Populations and Uniparental Mitochondrial Inheritance.

    PubMed

    Horn, Bruce W; Gell, Richard M; Singh, Rakhi; Sorensen, Ronald B; Carbone, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of one mating type. Less commonly, sclerotia may be fertilized during co-infection of crops with sexually compatible strains. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were performed to examine sexual reproduction in single-strain and fertilized sclerotia following exposure of sclerotia to natural fungal populations in soil. Female and male roles and mitochondrial inheritance in A. flavus were also examined through reciprocal crosses between sclerotia and conidia. Single-strain sclerotia produced ascospores on soil and progeny showed biparental inheritance that included novel alleles originating from fertilization by native soil strains. Sclerotia fertilized in the laboratory and applied to soil before ascocarp formation also produced ascospores with evidence of recombination in progeny, but only known parental alleles were detected. In reciprocal crosses, sclerotia and conidia from both strains functioned as female and male, respectively, indicating A. flavus is hermaphroditic, although the degree of fertility depended upon the parental sources of sclerotia and conidia. All progeny showed maternal inheritance of mitochondria from the sclerotia. Compared to A. flavus populations in crops, soil populations would provide a higher likelihood of exposure of sclerotia to sexually compatible strains and a more diverse source of genetic material for outcrossing. PMID:26731416

  12. Impact of the antifungal protein PgAFP from Penicillium chrysogenum on the protein profile in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Josu; Owens, Rebecca A; Doyle, Sean; Asensio, Miguel A; Nez, Flix

    2015-10-01

    Antifungal proteins produced by molds are generally small, highly basic, and cysteine-rich. The best known effects of these proteins include morphological changes, metabolic inactivation, and membrane perturbation on sensitive fungi. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation leads to apoptosis, with G -protein playing a key role in transduction of cell death signals. The antifungal protein PgAFP from Penicillium chrysogenum inhibits growth of some toxigenic molds. Here we analyzed the effect of the antifungal protein PgAFP on the growth of Aspergillus flavus. For this, comparative proteomic analysis was used to identify the whole protein profile and protein change in abundance after PgAFP treatment. PgAFP provoked metabolic changes related to reduced energy metabolism, cell wall integrity alteration, and increased stress response due to higher levels of ROS. The observed changes in protein abundance, favoring a higher glutathione concentration as well as the increased abundance in heat shock proteins, do not seem to be enough to avoid necrosis. The decreased chitin deposition observed in PgAFP-treated A. flavus is attributed to a lower relative quantity of Rho1. The reduced relative abundance of a ? subunit of G -protein seems to be the underlying reason for modulation of apoptosis in PgAFP-treated A. flavus hyphae. We propose Rho1 and G -protein subunit ? CpcB to be the main factors in the mode of action of PgAFP in A. flavus. Additionally, enzymes essential for the biosynthesis of aflatoxin were no longer detectable in A. flavus hyphae at 24 h, following treatment with PgAFP. This presents a promising effect of PgAFP, which may prevent A. flavus from producing mycotoxins. However, the impact of PgAFP on actual aflatoxin production requires further study. PMID:26078108

  13. Production of cellulase and xylanase in a bubble gum column using immobilized Aspergillus niger KKS

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Seong-Woo; Kim, Seung-Woo; Lee, Jin-Suk

    1995-05-01

    Aspergillus niger KKS, isolated from a farmland near Suwon, was immobilized on Celite and polyurethane foams. Enzyme activities produced by the immobilized cell system in a bubble column were higher than that of shake-flask culture. The enzyme productivities were twice as high. {Beta}-Glucosidase, {Beta}-xylosidase, and xylanase activities obtained in a bubble column were significant when the ground rice straw was used as a substrate. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The phosphatidyl choline exchange properties in the cytosol of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Audigier-Petit, C; Letoublon, R; Fayet, Y; Got, R; Frot-Coutaz, J

    1986-01-01

    The presence of a PC-binding activity in the cytosol of Aspergillus niger van Tieghem has been established by measuring the reversible exchange of labeled DPC between an adsorbent (celite) and the cytosol. We have shown that this exchange is dependent upon the temperature and the ionic strength and it varies linearly with the protein concentration. This PC-binding activity is able to discriminate between DPC and some other phospholipids. PMID:3098303

  15. Novel Antifungal Peptides Produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 Effectively Inhibit Growth of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Muhialdin, Belal J; Hassan, Zaiton; Abu Bakar, Fatimah; Algboory, Hussein L; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-05-01

    The ability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 to produce antifungal peptides that inhibit growth of Aspergillus niger was evaluated under optimum growth conditions of 30 C for 48 h. The cell-free supernatant showed inhibitory activity against A. niger. Five novel peptides were isolated with the sequences GPFPL, YVPLF, LLHGVPLP, GPFPLEMTLGPT, and TVYPFPGPL as identified by de novo sequencing using PEAKS 6 software. Peptide LLHGVPLP was the only positively charged (cationic peptides) and peptide GPFPLEMTLGPT negatively charged (anionic), whereas the rest are neutral. The identified peptides had high hydrophobicity ratio and low molecular weights with amino acids sequences ranging from 5 to 12 residues. The mode of action of these peptides is observed under the scanning electron microscope and is due to cell lysis of fungi. This work reveals the potential of peptides from L. mesenteroides DU15 as natural antifungal preservatives in inhibiting the growth of A. niger that is implicated to the spoilage during storage. PMID:25847317

  16. Characterization of novel thermostable polygalacturonases from Penicillium brasilianum and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Jamile; Pili, Jonaina; Cence, Karine; Toniazzo, Geciane; Treichel, Helen; Valduga, Eunice

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was the partial characterization of polygalacturonase (PG) extracts produced by a newly isolated Penicillium brasilianum and Aspergillus niger in submerged fermentation. The partial characterization of the crude enzymatic extracts showed optimum activity at pH 5.5 and 37C for both extracts. The results of temperature stability showed that PG from both microorganisms were more stable at 55C. However, the enzyme obtained by P. brasilianum presents a half-life time (t 1/2=693.10h), about one order of magnitude higher than those observed in for A. niger at 55C. In terms of pH stability, the PG produced by P. brasilianum presented higher stability at pH 4.0 and 5.0, while the PG from A. niger showed higher stability at pH 5.0. PMID:26341112

  17. Evidence for a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, C.P.; Schreferl-Kunar, G.; Woehrer, W.; Roehr, M.

    1988-03-01

    Oxalate accumulation of up to 8 g/liter was induced in Aspergillus niger by shifting the pH from 6 to 8. This required the presence of P/sub i/ and a nitrogen source and was inhibited by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Exogenously added /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was not incorporated into oxalate, but was incorporated into acetate and malate, thus indicating the biosynthesis of oxalate by hydrolytic cleavage of oxaloacetate. Inhibition of mitochondrial citrate metabolism by fluorocitrate did not significantly decrease the oxalate yield. The putative enzyme that was responsible for this oxaloacetate hydrolase (EC 3.7.1.1), which was induced de novo during the pH shift. Subcellular fractionation of oxalic acid-forming mycelia of A. niger showed that this enzyme is located in the cytoplasm of A. niger. The results are consistent with a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate formation which does not involve the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  18. Production of a bioflocculant from Aspergillus niger using palm oil mill effluent as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Aljuboori, Ahmad H Rajab; Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Osman, Noridah Binti; Yusup, Suzana

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the potential of bioflocculant production from Aspergillus niger using palm oil mill effluent (POME) as carbon source. The bioflocculant named PM-5 produced by A. niger showed a good flocculating capability and flocculating rate of 76.8% to kaolin suspension could be achieved at 60 h of culture time. Glutamic acid was the most favorable nitrogen source for A. niger in bioflocculant production at pH 6 and temperature 35 °C. The chemical composition of purified PM-5 was mainly carbohydrate and protein with 66.8% and 31.4%, respectively. Results showed the novel bioflocculant (PM-5) had high potential to treat river water from colloids and 63% of turbidity removal with the present of Ca(2+) ion. PMID:25189510

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on the production of cell wall degrading enzymes by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Gherbawy, Y A

    1998-03-01

    Fungi occurring in Egyptian fruits in the City of Qena were studied. Results from the examination of 25 replicated samples of plums, pears and apples are reported. Examinations were carried out by direct plating after surface disinfection in a 0.5% (w/v) calcium hypochlorite solution on Czapek's-Dox agar. The dominant fungus found in the three types of fruit was Aspergillus niger, which was present in 88% of plum samples, 80% of pear samples and all of the apple samples. The lowest dose of gamma irradiation (1 MCi for 10 min) enhanced the three isolates of A. niger investigated to produce more biomass and polygalactronase, pectinmethylglacturonase, cellulase and protease. The higher doses (1 MCi for 20 and 30 min) were inhibitory to the growth of A. niger. PMID:9600619

  20. Direct fermentation of potato starch to ethanol by cocultures of Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Abouzied, M M; Reddy, C A

    1986-01-01

    Direct fermentation of unhydrolyzed potato starch to ethanol by monocultures of an amylolytic fungus, Aspergillus niger, and cocultures of A. niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Amylolytic activity, rate and amount of starch utilization, and ethanol yields increased several-fold in coculture versus the monoculture due to the synergistic metabolic interactions between the species. Optimal ethanol yields were obtained in the pH range 5 to 6 and amylolytic activity was obtained in the pH range 5 to 8. Ethanol yields were maximal when fermentations were conducted anaerobically. Increasing S. cerevisiae inoculum in the coculture from 4 to 12% gave a dramatic increase in the rate of ethanol production, and ethanol yields of greater than 96% of the theoretical maximum were obtained within 2 days of fermentation. These results indicate that simultaneous fermentation of starch to ethanol can be conducted efficiently by using cocultures of the amylolytic fungus A. niger and a nonamylolytic sugar fermenter, S. cerevisiae. PMID:3539016

  1. Efficacy of two chemical coagulants and three different filtration media on removal of Aspergillus flavus from surface water.

    PubMed

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad; Zheng, Tianling; Yu, Xin

    2014-02-01

    Aquatic fungi are common in various aqueous environments and play potentially crucial roles in nutrient and carbon cycling as well as interacting with other organisms. Species of Aspergillus are the most common fungi that occur in water. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the efficacy of two coagulants, aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride, used at different concentrations to treat drinking water, in removing Aspergillus flavus, as well as testing three different filtration media: sand, activated carbon, and ceramic granules, for their removal of fungi from water. The results revealed that both coagulants were effective in removing fungi and decreasing the turbidity of drinking water, and turbidity decreased with increasing coagulant concentration. Also, at the highest concentration of the coagulants, A. flavus was decreased by 99.6% in the treated water. Among ceramic granules, activated carbon, and sand used as media for water filtration, the sand and activated carbon filters were more effective in removing A. flavus than ceramic granules while simultaneously decreasing the turbidity levels in the test water samples. Post-treatment total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations in the experimental water did not decrease; on the contrary, TN concentrations increased with the increasing dosage of coagulants. The filtration process had no effect in reducing TOC and TN in tested water. PMID:25076518

  2. Targeting enzymes to the right compartment: metabolic engineering for itaconic acid production by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Blumhoff, Marzena L; Steiger, Matthias G; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Itaconic acid is an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid which has a high potential as a biochemical building block. It can be microbially produced from some Aspergillus species, such as Aspergillus itaconicus and Aspergillus terreus. However, the achieved titers are significantly lower as compared to the citric acid production by A. niger. Heterologous expression of cis-aconitate decarboxylase in A. niger leads to the accumulation of small amounts of itaconic acid. Additional expression of aconitase, the second enzyme metabolically linking citric acid and itaconic acid improves productivity. However, proper organelle targeting of the enzymes appears to be an important point to consider. Here we compare the mitochondrial expression with the cytosolic expression of cis-aconitate decarboxylase or aconitase in A. niger. Heterologous expression of both enzymes in the mitochondria doubles the productivity compared to strains which express the enzymes in the cytosol. It is essential to target enzymes to the correct compartment in order to establish a proper flux through a compartmentalized pathway. PMID:23727192

  3. Biocatalytic potential of laccase-like multicopper oxidases from Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laccase-like multicopper oxidases have been reported in several Aspergillus species but they remain uncharacterized. The biocatalytic potential of the Aspergillus niger fungal pigment multicopper oxidases McoA and McoB and ascomycete laccase McoG was investigated. Results The laccase-like multicopper oxidases McoA, McoB and McoG from the commonly used cell factory Aspergillus niger were homologously expressed, purified and analyzed for their biocatalytic potential. All three recombinant enzymes were monomers with apparent molecular masses ranging from 80 to 110 kDa. McoA and McoG resulted to be blue, whereas McoB was yellow. The newly obtained oxidases displayed strongly different activities towards aromatic compounds and synthetic dyes. McoB exhibited high catalytic efficiency with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPPDA) and 2,2-azino-di(3-ethylbenzthiazoline) sulfonic acid (ABTS), and appeared to be a promising biocatalyst. Besides oxidizing a variety of phenolic compounds, McoB catalyzed successfully the decolorization and detoxification of the widely used textile dye malachite green. Conclusions The A. niger McoA, McoB, and McoG enzymes showed clearly different catalytic properties. Yellow McoB showed broad substrate specificity, catalyzing the oxidation of several phenolic compounds commonly present in different industrial effluents. It also harbored high decolorization and detoxification activity with the synthetic dye malachite green, showing to have an interesting potential as a new industrial biocatalyst. PMID:23270588

  4. Production of Specific Monoclonal Antibodies to Aspergillus Species and Their Use in Immunohistochemical Identification of Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Fenelon, L. E.; Hamilton, A. J.; Figueroa, J. I.; Bartholomew, M. A.; Allen, M. H.; McCarthy, P.; Hay, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Two anti-Aspergillus murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), designated 164G and 611F, have been produced; both specifically recognize cytoplasmic antigens of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, and A. niger by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The MAbs can identify Aspergillus spp. both in frozen sections by immunofluorescence and in paraffin-embedded clinical specimens by immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase staining. PMID:10074559

  5. Induction of mutation in Aspergillus niger for conversion of cellulose into glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Helmi, S.; Khalil, A.E.; Tahoun, M.K.; Khairy, A.H.

    1991-12-31

    Plant wastes are very important part of biomass used and investigated for energy, chemical, and fuel production. Cellulose is the major renewable form of carbohydrate in the world, about 10{sup 11} tons of which is synthesized annually. For general use, it must be hydrolyzed first, either chemically or by cellulases derived from a few specialized microorganisms. Enzymes are acceptable environmentally but expensive to produce. Certainly, induction of mutations and selection of high cellulose microbial strains with significant adaptability to degrade cellulose to glucose is promising solutions. Induction of mutations in other fungi and Aspergillus sp. rather than Aspergillus niger was reported. Aspergillus ustus and Trichoderma harzianum were induced by gamma irradiation indicating mutants that excrete higher cellulose yields, particularly exocellobiohydrolase (Avicelase) than their respective wild types. Mutants from the celluiolytic fungus Penicillium pinophilum were induced by chemical and UV-irradiation. Enhancing the production of endo-1,4-{Beta}-D-glucanase (CMCase) and particularly {Beta}-glucosidase was obtained by gamma irradiation of Altemaria alternate. To overcome the lower activity of {beta}-glucosidase in certain fungi species rather than A. niger, mixed cultures of different species were tried. Thus, Aspergillus phonicis with Trichoderma reesei Rut 30, produced a cellulose complex that improved activity twofold over cellulose from Trichoderma alone.

  6. Identification of phenolics for control of Aspergillus flavus using Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a model target-gene bioassay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong H; Campbell, Bruce C; Mahoney, Noreen E; Chan, Kathleen L; Molyneux, Russell J

    2004-12-29

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in a high-throughput bioassay to identify phenolic agents for control of the aflatoxigenic fungus Aspergillus flavus. Veratraldehyde, 1, cinnamic acid, 5, and the respective benzoic acid derivatives vanillin, 2, vanillic acid, 3, and vanillylacetone, 4, and cinnamic acid derivatives o-coumaric acid, 6, m-coumaric acid, 7, and p-coumaric acid, 8, showed significant antifungal activities (from highest to lowest, 2, 5 > 1 > 6, 7 > 4 > 3, 8) in the yeast system, with caffeic acid, 9, having little to no effect. Antifungal activity levels against A. flavus were similar. This similarity in antifungal activity demonstrated the usefulness of the S. cerevisiae bioassay for screening antifungal compounds. Assays using deletion mutants of yeast identified signal transduction and antioxidative stress response genes important to fungal tolerance. Targeting the antioxidative stress response system with certain compounds (e.g., 4) in combination with strobilurin fungicides had a synergistic effect against both fungi. PMID:15612761

  7. Efficacy of water-dispersible formulations of biological control strains of Aspergillus flavus for aflatoxin management in corn.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Mark A; Abbas, Hamed K; Jin, Xixuan; Elliott, Brad

    2016-02-01

    Field experiments were conducted in 2011 and 2012 to evaluate the efficacy of water-dispersible granule (WDG) formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus in controlling aflatoxin contamination of corn. In 2011, when aflatoxin was present at very high levels, there was no WDG treatment that could provide significant protection against aflatoxin contamination. The following year a new WDG formulation was tested that resulted in 100% reduction in aflatoxin in one field experiment and ? 49% reduction in all five WDG treatments with biocontrol strain 21882. Large sampling error, however, limited the resolution of various treatment effects. Corn samples were also subjected to microbial analysis to understand better the mechanisms of successful biocontrol. In the samples examined here, the size of the A. flavus population on the grain was associated with the amount of aflatoxin, but the toxigenic status of that population was a poor predictor of aflatoxin concentration. PMID:26730792

  8. Infected Baerveldt Glaucoma Drainage Device by Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Nurul-Laila; Azhany, Yaakub; Abdul Rahman, Zaidah; Yusof, Roziawati; Liza-Sharmini, Ahmad Tajudin

    2015-01-01

    Fungal endophthalmitis is rare but may complicate glaucoma drainage device surgery. Management is challenging as the symptoms and signs may be subtle at initial presentation and the visual prognosis is usually poor due to its resistant nature to treatment. At present there is lesser experience with intravitreal injection of voriconazole as compared to Amphotericin B. We present a case of successfully treated Aspergillus endophthalmitis following Baerveldt glaucoma drainage device implantation with intravitreal and topical voriconazole. PMID:26064735

  9. Identification of Maize Genes Associated with Host Plant Resistance or Susceptibility to Aspergillus flavus Infection and Aflatoxin Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Rowena Y.; Williams, W. Paul; Mylroie, J. Erik; Boykin, Deborah L.; Harper, Jonathan W.; Windham, Gary L.; Ankala, Arunkanth; Shan, Xueyan

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination of maize pose negative impacts in agriculture and health. Commercial maize hybrids are generally susceptible to this fungus. Significant levels of host plant resistance have been observed in certain maize inbred lines. This study was conducted to identify maize genes associated with host plant resistance or susceptibility to A. flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation. Results Genome wide gene expression levels with or without A. flavus inoculation were compared in two resistant maize inbred lines (Mp313E and Mp04∶86) in contrast to two susceptible maize inbred lines (Va35 and B73) by microarray analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to find genes contributing to the larger variances associated with the resistant or susceptible maize inbred lines. The significance levels of gene expression were determined by using SAS and LIMMA programs. Fifty candidate genes were selected and further investigated by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) in a time-course study on Mp313E and Va35. Sixteen of the candidate genes were found to be highly expressed in Mp313E and fifteen in Va35. Out of the 31 highly expressed genes, eight were mapped to seven previously identified quantitative trait locus (QTL) regions. A gene encoding glycine-rich RNA binding protein 2 was found to be associated with the host hypersensitivity and susceptibility in Va35. A nuclear pore complex protein YUP85-like gene was found to be involved in the host resistance in Mp313E. Conclusion Maize genes associated with host plant resistance or susceptibility were identified by a combination of microarray analysis, qRT-PCR analysis, and QTL mapping methods. Our findings suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in maize host plant defense systems in response to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation. These findings will be important in identification of DNA markers for breeding maize lines resistant to aflatoxin accumulation. PMID:22606305

  10. Genome mining and functional genomics for siderophore production in Aspergillus niger.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Franken AC; Lechner BE; Werner ER; Haas H; Lokman BC; Ram AF; van den Hondel CA; de Weert S; Punt PJ

    2014-11-01

    Iron is an essential metal for many organisms, but the biologically relevant form of iron is scarce because of rapid oxidation resulting in low solubility. Simultaneously, excessive accumulation of iron is toxic. Consequently, iron uptake is a highly controlled process. In most fungal species, siderophores play a central role in iron handling. Siderophores are small iron-specific chelators that can be secreted to scavenge environmental iron or bind intracellular iron with high affinity. A second high-affinity iron uptake mechanism is reductive iron assimilation (RIA). As shown in Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus nidulans, synthesis of siderophores in Aspergilli is predominantly under control of the transcription factors SreA and HapX, which are connected by a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Abolishing this fine-tuned regulation corroborates iron homeostasis, including heme biosynthesis, which could be biotechnologically of interest, e.g. the heterologous production of heme-dependent peroxidases. Aspergillus niger genome inspection identified orthologues of several genes relevant for RIA and siderophore metabolism, as well as sreA and hapX. Interestingly, genes related to synthesis of the common fungal extracellular siderophore triacetylfusarinine C were absent. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) confirmed the absence of triacetylfusarinine C, and demonstrated that the major secreted siderophores of A. niger are coprogen B and ferrichrome, which is also the dominant intracellular siderophore. In A. niger wild type grown under iron-replete conditions, the expression of genes involved in coprogen biosynthesis and RIA was low in the exponential growth phase but significantly induced during ascospore germination. Deletion of sreA in A. niger resulted in elevated iron uptake and increased cellular ferrichrome accumulation. Increased sensitivity toward phleomycin and high iron concentration reflected the toxic effects of excessive iron uptake. Moreover, SreA-deficiency resulted in increased accumulation of heme intermediates, but no significant increase in heme content. Together with the upregulation of several heme biosynthesis genes, these results reveal a complex heme regulatory mechanism.

  11. The Master Transcription Factor mtfA Governs Aflatoxin Production, Morphological Development and Pathogenicity in the Fungus Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhenhong; Lohmar, Jessica M.; Satterlee, Timothy; Cary, Jeffrey W.; Calvo, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus produces a variety of toxic secondary metabolites; among them, the aflatoxins (AFs) are the most well known. These compounds are highly mutagenic and carcinogenic, particularly AFB1. A. flavus is capable of colonizing a number of economically-important crops, such as corn, cotton, peanut and tree nuts, and contaminating them with AFs. Molecular genetic studies in A. flavus could identify novel gene targets for use in strategies to reduce AF contamination and its adverse impact on food and feed supplies worldwide. In the current study, we investigated the role of the master transcription factor gene mtfA in A. flavus. Our results revealed that forced overexpression of mtfA results in a drastic decrease or elimination of several secondary metabolites, among them AFB1. The reduction in AFB1 was accompanied by a decrease in aflR expression. Furthermore, mtfA also regulates development; conidiation was influenced differently by this gene depending on the type of colonized substrate. In addition to its effect on conidiation, mtfA is necessary for the normal maturation of sclerotia. Importantly, mtfA positively affects the pathogenicity of A. flavus when colonizing peanut seeds. AF production in colonized seeds was decreased in the deletion mtfA strain and particularly in the overexpression strain, where only trace amounts were detected. Interestingly, a more rapid colonization of the seed tissue occurred when mtfA was overexpressed, coinciding with an increase in lipase activity and faster maceration of the oily part of the seed. PMID:26805883

  12. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Different Toxigenic and Atoxigenic Isolates of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Jake C; Scully, Brian T; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Gold, Scott E; Glenn, Anthony E; Abbas, Hamed K; Lee, R Dewey; Kemerait, Robert C; Guo, Baozhu

    2015-08-01

    Drought stress in the field has been shown to exacerbate aflatoxin contamination of maize and peanut. Drought and heat stress also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant tissues. Given the potential correlation between ROS and exacerbated aflatoxin production under drought and heat stress, the objectives of this study were to examine the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress on the growth of different toxigenic (+) and atoxigenic (-) isolates of Aspergillus flavus and to test whether aflatoxin production affects the H2O2 concentrations that the isolates could survive. Ten isolates were tested: NRRL3357 (+), A9 (+), AF13 (+), Tox4 (+), A1 (-), K49 (-), K54A (-), AF36 (-), and Aflaguard (-); and one A. parasiticus isolate, NRRL2999 (+). These isolates were cultured under a H2O2 gradient ranging from 0 to 50 mM in two different media, aflatoxin-conducive yeast extract-sucrose (YES) and non-conducive yeast extract-peptone (YEP). Fungal growth was inhibited at a high H2O2 concentration, but specific isolates grew well at different H2O2 concentrations. Generally the toxigenic isolates tolerated higher concentrations than did atoxigenic isolates. Increasing H2O2 concentrations in the media resulted in elevated aflatoxin production in toxigenic isolates. In YEP media, the higher concentration of peptone (15%) partially inactivated the H2O2 in the media. In the 1% peptone media, YEP did not affect the H2O2 concentrations that the isolates could survive in comparison with YES media, without aflatoxin production. It is interesting to note that the commercial biocontrol isolates, AF36 (-), and Aflaguard (-), survived at higher levels of stress than other atoxigenic isolates, suggesting that this testing method could potentially be of use in the selection of biocontrol isolates. Further studies will be needed to investigate the mechanisms behind the variability among isolates with regard to their degree of oxidative stress tolerance and the role of aflatoxin production. PMID:26251922

  13. Growth and hydrolase profiles can be used as characteristics to distinguish Aspergillus niger and other black aspergilli

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, M.; Houbraken, J.A.M.P.; Dalhuijsen, S.; Samson, R.A.; de Vries, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Wild type Aspergillus niger isolates from different biotopes from all over the world were compared to each other and to the type strains of other black Aspergillus species with respect to growth and extracellular enzyme profiles. The origin of the A. niger isolate did not result in differences in growth profile with respect to monomeric or polymeric carbon sources. Differences were observed in the growth rate of the A. niger isolates, but these were observed on all carbon sources and not specific for a particular carbon source. In contrast, carbon source specific differences were observed between the different species. Aspergillus brasiliensis is the only species able to grow on D-galactose, and A. aculeatus had significantly better growth on Locus Bean gum than the other species. Only small differences were found in the extracellular enzyme profile of the A. niger isolates during growth on wheat bran, while large differences were observed in the profiles of the different black aspergilli. In addition, differences were observed in temperature profiles between the black Aspergillus species, but not between the A. niger isolates, demonstrating no isolate-specific adaptations to the environment. These data indicate that the local environment does not result in stable adaptations of A. niger with respect to growth profile or enzyme production, but that the potential is maintained irrespective of the environmental parameters. It also demonstrates that growth, extracellular protein and temperature profiles can be used for species identification within the group of black aspergilli. PMID:21892240

  14. Hydrolysis of rice hull by crosslinked Aspergillus niger cellulase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Khare, S K; Gupta, M N

    2001-07-01

    A. niger cellulase was crosslinked by glutaraldehyde to obtain a heat-stable enzyme preparation for rice hull cellulose hydrolysis. Under optimized crosslinking conditions of 0.12 M glutaraldehyde, pH 7.0, temperature 40 degrees C and at 45 min of crosslinking, a preparation having 15% more activity than free enzyme was obtained which also had considerable improvement in heat stability at 65 degrees C and 70 degrees C. Whereas the free enzyme lost 80% of its activity in 4 h at 65 degrees C, the crosslinked preparation lost only 30% activity. The crosslinked preparation hydrolyzed cellulosic biomass more effectively giving 2.2 mg/ml glucose and 52% corresponding saccharification in 4 h at 65 degrees C as compared to 14% saccharification by free enzyme under similar conditions. PMID:11341689

  15. Comparative Secretome Analysis of Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma reesei, and Penicillium oxalicum During Solid-State Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weili; Zhang, Huaiqiang; Liu, Shijia; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Peiji; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2015-11-01

    Filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus spp., Trichoderma spp., and Penicillium spp. are frequently used to produce high concentrations of lignocellulosic enzymes. This study examined the discrepancies in the compositions and dynamic changes in the extracellular enzyme systems secreted by Aspergillus niger ATCC1015, Trichoderma reesei QM9414, and Penicillium oxalicum 114-2 cultured on corn stover and wheat bran. The results revealed different types and an abundance of monosaccharides and oligosaccharides were released during incubation, which induced the secretion of diverse glycoside hydrolases. Both the enzyme activities and isozyme numbers of the three fungal strains increased with time. A total of 279, 161, and 183 secretory proteins were detected in A. niger, T. reesei, and P. oxalicum secretomes, respectively. In the A. niger secretomes, more enzymes involved in the degradation of (galacto)mannan, xyloglucan, and the backbone of pectin distributed mostly in dicots were detected. In comparison, although P. oxalicum 114-2 hardly secreted any xyloglucanases, the diversities of enzymes involved in the degradation of xylan and ?-(1,3;1,4)-D-glucan commonly found in monocots were higher. The cellulase system of P. oxalicum 114-2 was more balanced. The degradation preference provided a new perspective regarding the recomposition of lignocellulosic enzymes based on substrate types. PMID:26319683

  16. Mutualistic interaction between Salmonella enterica and Aspergillus niger and its effects on Zea mays colonization

    PubMed Central

    Balbontín, Roberto; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium inhabits a variety of environments and is able to infect a broad range of hosts. Throughout its life cycle, some hosts can act as intermediates in the path to the infection of others. Aspergillus niger is a ubiquitous fungus that can often be found in soil or associated to plants and microbial consortia. Recently, S. Typhimurium was shown to establish biofilms on the hyphae of A. niger. In this work, we have found that this interaction is stable for weeks without a noticeable negative effect on either organism. Indeed, bacterial growth is promoted upon the establishment of the interaction. Moreover, bacterial biofilms protect the fungus from external insults such as the effects of the anti-fungal agent cycloheximide. Thus, the Salmonella–Aspergillus interaction can be defined as mutualistic. A tripartite gnotobiotic system involving the bacterium, the fungus and a plant revealed that co-colonization has a greater negative effect on plant growth than colonization by either organism in dividually. Strikingly, co-colonization also causes a reduction in plant invasion by S. Typhimurium. This work demonstrates that S. Typhimurium and A. niger establish a mutualistic interaction that alters bacterial colonization of plants and affects plant physiology. PMID:25351041

  17. Lethal Effects of Aspergillus niger against Mosquitoes Vector of Filaria, Malaria, and Dengue: A Liquid Mycoadulticide

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gavendra; Prakash, Soam

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is a fungus of the genus Aspergillus. It has caused a disease called black mold on certain fruits and vegetables. The culture filtrates released from the A. niger ATCC 66566 were grown in Czapek dox broth (CDB) then filtered with flash chromatograph and were used for the bioassay after a growth of thirty days. The result demonstrated these mortalities with LC50, LC90, and LC99 values of Culex quinquefasciatus 0.76, 3.06, and 4.75, Anopheles stephensi 1.43, 3.2, and 3.86, and Aedes aegypti 1.43, 2.2, and 4.1??l/cm2, after exposure of seven hours. We have calculated significant LT90 values of Cx. quinquefasciatus 4.5, An. stephensi 3.54, and Ae. aegypti 6.0?hrs, respectively. This liquid spray of fungal culture isolate of A. niger can reduce malaria, dengue, and filarial transmission. These results significantly support broadening the current vector control paradigm beyond chemical adulticides. PMID:22629156

  18. EVALUATION OF A BIOPESTICIDE, PICHIA ANOMALA WRL-076 TO CONTROL ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS IN A COMMERCIAL ORCHARD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Existing literatures indicate that wounds in plant tissues provide the entry to A. flavus. By mechanically wounding pistachio nut-fruits, sufficient number of nut-fruits conducive to A. flavus and fungal infection are generated. The wounded nut-fruits are easily recognized for sampling. Two experim...

  19. Formation of Sclerotia and Production of Indoloterpenes by Aspergillus niger and Other Species in Section Nigri

    PubMed Central

    Frisvad, Jens C.; Petersen, Lene M.; Lyhne, E. Kirstine; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Several species in Aspergillus section Nigri have been reported to produce sclerotia on well-known growth media, such as Czapek yeast autolysate (CYA) agar, with sclerotia considered to be an important prerequisite for sexual development. However Aspergillus niger sensu stricto has not been reported to produce sclerotia, and is thought to be a purely asexual organism. Here we report, for the first time, the production of sclerotia by certain strains of Aspergillus niger when grown on CYA agar with raisins, or on other fruits or on rice. Up to 11 apolar indoloterpenes of the aflavinine type were detected by liquid chromatography and diode array and mass spectrometric detection where sclerotia were formed, including 10,23-dihydro-24,25-dehydroaflavinine. Sclerotium induction can thus be a way of inducing the production of new secondary metabolites from previously silent gene clusters. Cultivation of other species of the black aspergilli showed that raisins induced sclerotium formation by A. brasiliensis, A. floridensis A. ibericus, A. luchuensis, A. neoniger, A. trinidadensis and A. saccharolyticus for the first time. PMID:24736731

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Keratinase from a Feather-Degrading Fungus, Aspergillus flavus Strain K-03

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    A keratinolytic enzyme secreted by Aspergillus flavus K-03 cultured in feather meal basal medium (FMBM) containing 2% (w/v) chicken feather was purified and characterized. Keratinolytic enzyme secretion was the maximal at day 16 of the incubation period at pH 8 and 28?. No relationship was detected between enzyme yield and increase of fungal biomass. The fraction obtained at 80% ammonium sulfate saturation showed 2.39-fold purification and was further purified by gel filtration in Sephadex G-100 followed by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, yielding an active protein peak showing 11.53-fold purification. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and zymograms indicated that the purified keratinase is a monomeric enzyme with 31 kDa molecular weight. The extracellular keratinase of A. flavus was active in a board range of pH (7~10) and temperature (30?~70?) profiles with the optimal for keratinase activity at pH 8 and 45?. The keratinase activity was totally inhibited by protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), iodoacetic acid, and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) while no reduction of activity by the addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) was observed. N-terminal amino acid sequences were up to 80% homologous with the fungal subtilisins produced by Fusarium culmorum. Therefore, on the basis of these characteristics, the keratinase of A. flavus K-03 is determined to be subtilisins-like. PMID:24015101

  1. Use of a granular bioplastic formulation for carrying conidia of a non-aflatoxigenic strain of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Accinelli, Cesare; Saccà, M Ludovica; Abbas, Hamed K; Zablotowicz, Robert M; Wilkinson, Jeffery R

    2009-09-01

    Previous research demonstrated that aflatoxin contamination in corn is reduced by field application of wheat grains pre-inoculated with the non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain NRRL 30797. To facilitate field applications of this biocontrol isolate, a series of laboratory studies were conducted on the reliability and efficiency of replacing wheat grains with the novel bioplastic formulation Mater-Bi to serve as a carrier matrix to formulate this fungus. Mater-Bi granules were inoculated with a conidial suspension of NRRL 30797 to achieve a final cell density of approximately log 7 conidia/granule. Incubation of 20-g soil samples receiving a single Mater-Bi granule for 60-days resulted in log 4.2-5.3 propagules of A. flavus/g soil in microbiologically active and sterilized soil, respectively. Increasing the number of granules had no effect on the degree of soil colonization by the biocontrol fungus. In addition to the maintenance of rapid vegetative growth and colonization of soil samples, the bioplastic formulation was highly stable, indicating that Mater-Bi is a suitable substitute for biocontrol applications of A. flavus NRRL 30797. PMID:19349167

  2. A Caleosin-Like Protein with Peroxygenase Activity Mediates Aspergillus flavus Development, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Seed Infection.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Blee, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Caleosins are a small family of calcium-binding proteins endowed with peroxygenase activity in plants. Caleosin-like genes are present in fungi; however, their functions have not been reported yet. In this work, we identify a plant caleosin-like protein in Aspergillus flavus that is highly expressed during the early stages of spore germination. A recombinant purified 32-kDa caleosin-like protein supported peroxygenase activities, including co-oxidation reactions and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides. Deletion of the caleosin gene prevented fungal development. Alternatively, silencing of the gene led to the increased accumulation of endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides and antioxidant activities but to a reduction of fungal growth and conidium formation. Two key genes of the aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway, aflR and aflD, were downregulated in the strains in which A. flavus PXG (AfPXG) was silenced, leading to reduced aflatoxin B1 production in vitro. Application of caleosin/peroxygenase-derived oxylipins restored the wild-type phenotype in the strains in which AfPXG was silenced. PXG-deficient A. flavus strains were severely compromised in their capacity to infect maize seeds and to produce aflatoxin. Our results uncover a new branch of the fungal oxylipin pathway and may lead to the development of novel targets for controlling fungal disease. PMID:26116672

  3. A Caleosin-Like Protein with Peroxygenase Activity Mediates Aspergillus flavus Development, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Seed Infection

    PubMed Central

    Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Blee, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Caleosins are a small family of calcium-binding proteins endowed with peroxygenase activity in plants. Caleosin-like genes are present in fungi; however, their functions have not been reported yet. In this work, we identify a plant caleosin-like protein in Aspergillus flavus that is highly expressed during the early stages of spore germination. A recombinant purified 32-kDa caleosin-like protein supported peroxygenase activities, including co-oxidation reactions and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides. Deletion of the caleosin gene prevented fungal development. Alternatively, silencing of the gene led to the increased accumulation of endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides and antioxidant activities but to a reduction of fungal growth and conidium formation. Two key genes of the aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway, aflR and aflD, were downregulated in the strains in which A. flavus PXG (AfPXG) was silenced, leading to reduced aflatoxin B1 production in vitro. Application of caleosin/peroxygenase-derived oxylipins restored the wild-type phenotype in the strains in which AfPXG was silenced. PXG-deficient A. flavus strains were severely compromised in their capacity to infect maize seeds and to produce aflatoxin. Our results uncover a new branch of the fungal oxylipin pathway and may lead to the development of novel targets for controlling fungal disease. PMID:26116672

  4. Fluorescent viability stains to probe the metabolic status of aflatoxigenic fungus in dual culture of Aspergillus flavus and Pichia anomala.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Brandl, Maria T; Hernlem, Bradley; Eng, Jeffrey G; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L

    2011-02-01

    The metabolic activity of the aflatoxigenic fungus, Aspergillus flavus co-cultured with the biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala was examined using several viability stains. Both the FUN-1 stain and the combined use of DiBAC(4)(5) with CDFA-AM stains were applied in this study. The results suggest that the ATP-generating system in A. flavus was inactivated as the ratio of yeasts to fungi increased in the dual culture. A decrease in hyphal membrane potential and esterase activity was substantiated by the combined stains of DiBAC(4)(5) and CDFA-AM. Reduced metabolic function in conjunction with cell wall damage of A. flavus hindered the growth and biomass production of this fungus. Viability stains such as FUN-1 and DiBAC(4)(5) with CDFA-AM may assist in elucidating the biocontrol mechanism by allowing for the visualization of the antagonistic effect of yeast species on target fungi in situ, as well as for screening potent biocontrol yeast agents against fungal pathogens. PMID:20680685

  5. Purification and Characterization of a Keratinase from a Feather-Degrading Fungus, Aspergillus flavus Strain K-03.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Dong

    2007-12-01

    A keratinolytic enzyme secreted by Aspergillus flavus K-03 cultured in feather meal basal medium (FMBM) containing 2% (w/v) chicken feather was purified and characterized. Keratinolytic enzyme secretion was the maximal at day 16 of the incubation period at pH 8 and 28?. No relationship was detected between enzyme yield and increase of fungal biomass. The fraction obtained at 80% ammonium sulfate saturation showed 2.39-fold purification and was further purified by gel filtration in Sephadex G-100 followed by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, yielding an active protein peak showing 11.53-fold purification. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and zymograms indicated that the purified keratinase is a monomeric enzyme with 31 kDa molecular weight. The extracellular keratinase of A. flavus was active in a board range of pH (7~10) and temperature (30?~70?) profiles with the optimal for keratinase activity at pH 8 and 45?. The keratinase activity was totally inhibited by protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), iodoacetic acid, and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) while no reduction of activity by the addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) was observed. N-terminal amino acid sequences were up to 80% homologous with the fungal subtilisins produced by Fusarium culmorum. Therefore, on the basis of these characteristics, the keratinase of A. flavus K-03 is determined to be subtilisins-like. PMID:24015101

  6. Inhibition of growth of Aspergillus flavus and fungal alpha-amylases by a lectin-like protein from Lablab purpureus.

    PubMed

    Fakhoury, A M; Woloshuk, C P

    2001-08-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of maize causing an important ear rot disease when plants are exposed to drought and heat stress. Associated with the disease is the production of aflatoxins, which are a series of structurally related mycotoxins known to be carcinogenic. Previous research has suggested that the alpha-amylase of A. flavus promotes aflatoxin production in the endosperm of infected maize kernels. We report here the isolation and characterization of a 36-kDa alpha-amylase inhibitor from Lablab purpureus (AILP). AILP inhibited the alpha-amylases from several fungi but had little effect on those from animal and plant sources. The protein inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of A. flavus. The amino acid sequence indicated that AILP is similar to lectin members of a lectin-arcelin-alpha-amylase inhibitor family described in common bean and shown to be a component of plant resistance to insect pests. AILP also agglutinated papain-treated red blood cells from human and rabbit. These data indicate that AILP represents a novel variant in the lectin-arcelin-alpha-amylase inhibitor family of proteins having lectin-like and alpha-amylase inhibitory activity. PMID:11497467

  7. Salmonella Biofilm Formation on Aspergillus niger Involves Cellulose – Chitin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Maria T.; Carter, Michelle Q.; Parker, Craig T.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Huynh, Steven; Zhou, Yaguang

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to and forms biofilms on the hyphae of the common fungus, Aspergillus niger. Several Salmonella enterica serovars displayed a similar interaction, whereas other bacterial species were unable to bind to the fungus. Bacterial attachment to chitin, a major constituent of fungal cell walls, mirrored this specificity. Pre-incubation of S. Typhimurium with N-acetylglucosamine, the monomeric component of chitin, reduced binding to chitin beads by as much as 727-fold and inhibited attachment to A. niger hyphae considerably. A cellulose-deficient mutant of S. Typhimurium failed to attach to chitin beads and to the fungus. Complementation of this mutant with the cellulose operon restored binding to chitin beads to 79% of that of the parental strain and allowed for attachment and biofilm formation on A. niger, indicating that cellulose is involved in bacterial attachment to the fungus via the chitin component of its cell wall. In contrast to cellulose, S. Typhimurium curli fimbriae were not required for attachment and biofilm development on the hyphae but were critical for its stability. Our results suggest that cellulose–chitin interactions are required for the production of mixed Salmonella-A. niger biofilms, and support the hypothesis that encounters with chitinaceous alternate hosts may contribute to the ecological success of human pathogens. PMID:22003399

  8. An Antifungal Role of Hydrogen Sulfide on the Postharvest Pathogens Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Hong; Hu, Liang-Bin; Yan, Hong; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the antifungal role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the postharvest pathogens Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum growing on fruits and under culture conditions on defined media was investigated. Our results show that H2S, released by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) effectively reduced the postharvest decay of fruits induced by A. niger and P. italicum. Furthermore, H2S inhibited spore germination, germ tube elongation, mycelial growth, and produced abnormal mycelial contractions when the fungi were grown on defined media in Petri plates. Further studies showed that H2S could cause an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. niger. In accordance with this observation we show that enzyme activities and the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) genes in A. niger treated with H2S were lower than those in control. Moreover, H2S also significantly inhibited the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rhizopus oryzae, the human pathogen Candida albicans, and several food-borne bacteria. We also found that short time exposure of H2S showed a microbicidal role rather than just inhibiting the growth of microbes. Taken together, this study suggests the potential value of H2S in reducing postharvest loss and food spoilage caused by microbe propagation. PMID:25101960

  9. Analysis of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles synthesized by coastal strains of Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, Kandasamy; Alikunhi, Nabeel M; Pathmanaban, SriMahibala; Nabikhan, Asmathunisha; Kandasamy, Saravanakumar

    2010-12-01

    The present study investigated the extracellular biosynthesis of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles by Escherichia coli AUCAS 112 and Aspergillus niger AUCAS 237 derived from coastal mangrove sediment of southeast India. Both microbial species were able to produce silver nanoparticles, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction spectrum. The nanoparticles synthesized were mostly spherical, ranging in size from 5 to 20 nm for E. coli and from 5 to 35 nm for A. niger, as evident by transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform spectroscopy revealed prominent peaks corresponding to amides I and II, indicating the presence of a protein for stabilizing the nanoparticles. Electrophoretic analysis revealed the presence of a prominent protein band with a molecular mass of 45 kDa for E. coli and 70 kDa for A. niger. The silver nanoparticles inhibited certain clinical pathogens, with antibacterial activity being more distinct than antifungal activity. The antimicrobial activity of E. coli was more pronounced than that of A. niger and was enhanced with the addition of polyvinyl alcohol as a stabilizing agent. This work highlighted the possibility of using microbes of coastal origin for synthesis of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles. PMID:21164575

  10. Repeat induced point mutation in two asexual fungi, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Braumann, Ilka; van den Berg, Marco; Kempken, Frank

    2008-05-01

    Repeat induced point mutation (RIP) is a gene silencing mechanism present in fungal genomes. During RIP, duplicated sequences are efficiently and irreversibly mutated by transitions from C:G to T:A. For the first time, we have identified traces of RIP in transposable elements of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum, two biotechnologically relevant fungi. We found that RIP in P. chrysogenum has affected a large set of sequences, which also contain other mutations. On the other hand, RIP in A. niger is limited to only few sequences, but literally all mutations are RIP-like. Surprisingly, RIP occurred only in transposon sequences that have disrupted open reading frames in A. niger, a phenomenon not yet reported for other fungi. In both fungal species, we identified two sequences with strong sequence similarity to Neurospora crassa RID. RID is a putative DNA methyltransferase and the only known enzyme involved in the RIP process. Our findings suggest that both A. niger and P. chrysogenum either had a sexual past or have a sexual potential. These findings have important implications for future strain development of these fungi. PMID:18347798

  11. Tolerance of arsenate-induced stress in Aspergillus niger, a possible candidate for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Das, Durba; Kumar Mondal, Sushil; Biswas, Raktim; Kumar Das, Tapan; Boujedaini, Naoual; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur R

    2010-02-01

    The arsenate tolerance limit in wild-type Aspergillus niger was determined. Because of its high tolerance, toxic effects of arsenate concentrations ranging from 25 to 100mg/L were investigated in regard to growth, intracellular thiols, proline and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of wild-type A. niger. Cellular arsenate uptake was analyzed. Activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) were assayed. Growth of A. niger increased at 25mg/L arsenate, and it survived up to 100mg/L. MDA, intracellular thiol and proline contents increased up to a certain level. Activities of GR, SOD and CAT declined following a rise at low concentration(s); SDH activity decreased gradually with increased arsenate stress. Results indicated that A. niger had high arsenate uptake potential and could tolerate oxidative stress by manipulating its anti-oxidative defense mechanism, a property that may be exploited for removal of arsenate from contaminated aqua-environment. PMID:19811831

  12. Type III polyketide synthase is involved in the biosynthesis of protocatechuic acid in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yangyong; Xiao, Jing; Pan, Li

    2014-11-01

    Genomic studies have shown that not only plants but also filamentous fungi contain type III polyketide synthases. To study the function of type III polyketide synthase (AnPKSIII) in Aspergillus niger, a deletion strain (delAnPKSIII) and an overexpression strain (oeAnPKSIII) were constructed in A. niger MA169.4, a derivative of the wild-type (WT) A. niger ATCC 9029 that produces large quantities of gluconic acid. Alterations in the metabolites were analyzed by HPLC when the extract of the overexpression strain was compared with extracts of the WT and deletion strains. Protocatechuic acid (PCA; 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3.2mg/l) was isolated and identified as the main product of AnPKSIII when inductively expressed in A. niger MA169.4. The molecular weight of PCA was 154.1 (m/z 153.1 [M-H](-)), was detected by ESI-MS in the negative ionization mode, and (1)H and (13)C NMR data confirmed its structure. PMID:25048233

  13. Kinetics of cellobiose hydrolysis using cellobiase composites from Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Grous, W.; Converse, A.; Grethlein, H.; Lynd, L.

    1985-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose involves the formation of cellobiose as an intermediate. It has been found necessary to add cellobiase from Aspergillus niger (NOVO) to the cellobiase component of Trichoderma reesei mutant Rut C-30 (Natick) cellulase enzymes in order to obtain after 48 h complete conversion of the cellobiose formed in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. This study of the cellobiase activity of these two enzyme sources was undertaken as a first step in the formation of a kinetic model for cellulose hydrolysis that can be used in process design. In order to cover the full range of cellobiose concentrations, it was necessary to develop separate kinetic parameters for high- and low-concentration ranges of cellobiose for the enzymes from each organism. Competitive glucose inhibition was observed with the enzymes from both organisms. Substrate inhibition was observed only with the A. niger enzymes.

  14. Naphtho-gamma-pyrone production by Aspergillus niger isolated from stored cottonseed.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, K C; DeLucca, A J; Ciegler, A

    1984-01-01

    Aspergillus niger was found to be the predominant fungal contaminant of stored cottonseed. Seven strains were isolated and grown on rice. The hexane-insoluble material from methylene chloride extracts of 2-week-old cultures contained components toxic to mice. Based on high-pressure thin-layer and liquid chromatographic analyses, the major components in the mixture were eight different naphtho-gamma-pyrones. Of these, the hydrated dimeric naphthopyrones aurasperones B and C occurred in higher yield than aurasperones A, iso-A, and D and the monomeric naphthopyrones flavasperone and rubrofusarin, all of which were present in the mixture. In addition, fonsecin monomethyl ether was isolated. This metabolite may be a precursor in the biosynthesis of the hydrated aurasperones; it has not been identified previously as a metabolite of A. niger. The relative amounts of the different naphthopyrones were dependent on both the growth substrate and the fungal isolate. Images PMID:6548104

  15. Inhibition of Aspergillus niger Phosphate Solubilization by Fluoride Released from Rock Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Vassilev, Nikolay Bojkov; Bonduki, Victor Hugo Arajo; da Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Jos Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The simultaneous release of various chemical elements with inhibitory potential for phosphate solubilization from rock phosphate (RP) was studied in this work. Al, B, Ba, Ca, F, Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, Si, Sr, V, Zn, and Zr were released concomitantly with P during the solubilization of Arax RP (Brazil), but only F showed inhibitory effects on the process at the concentrations detected in the growth medium. Besides P solubilization, fluoride decreased fungal growth, citric acid production, and medium acidification by Aspergillus niger. At the maximum concentration found during Arax RP solubilization (22.9 mg F? per liter), fluoride decreased P solubilization by 55%. These findings show that fluoride negatively affects RP solubilization by A. niger through its inhibitory action on the fungal metabolism. Given that fluoride is a common component of RPs, the data presented here suggest that most of the microbial RP solubilization systems studied so far were probably operated under suboptimal conditions. PMID:23770895

  16. In-situ detection of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Hanazawa, R; Murayama, S Y; Yamaguchi, H

    2000-03-01

    An in-situ hybridisation (ISH) technique to detect Aspergillus fumigatus in infected tissues was developed in which 568-bp, 333-bp and 154-bp PCR products of the alkaline proteinase gene were employed. Dot-blot hybridisation with the 568-bp probe on a membrane containing genomic DNA from several different fungi including A. flavus, A. niger, Penicillium spp., Mucor racemosus or Pseudallescheria boydii gave negative results. ISH was done on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pulmonary tissues from rats infected with A. fumigatus and renal tissues from mice infected with A. fumigatus, A. flavus or A. niger. The 568-bp probe reacted strongly in ISH with both A. fumigatus and A. flavus, and weakly with A. niger. The 333-bp probe also reacted in ISH with A. fumigatus and A. flavus, although the intensity was weaker. However, in ISH with the 154-bp probe, there was no positive signal with any Aspergillus spp. These results demonstrate that A. fumigatus and A. flavus can be specifically detected in infected tissues by ISH with the 568-bp probe. This technique could be applicable to clinical specimens for molecular diagnosis of aspergillus infections. PMID:10707949

  17. Morphological and toxigenic variability in the Aspergillus flavus isolates from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) production system in Gujarat (India).

    PubMed

    Singh, Diwakar; Thankappan, Radhakrishnan; Kumar, Vinod; Bagwan, Naimoddin B; Basu, Mukti S; Dobaria, Jentilal R; Mishra, Gyan P; Chanda, Sumitra

    2015-03-01

    Morphological and toxigenic variability in 187 Aspergillus flavus isolates, collected from a major Indian peanut production system, from 10 districts of Gujarat was studied. On the basis of colony characteristics, the isolates were grouped as group A (83%), B (11%) and G (6%). Of all the isolates, 21%, 47% and 32% were found to be fast-growing, moderately-fast and slow-growing respectively, and nosclerotia and sclerotia production was recorded in 32.1% and 67% isolates respectively. Large, medium and small number of sclerotia production was observed in 55, 38 and 34 isolates respectively. Toxigenic potential based on ammonia vapour test was not found reliable, while ELISA test identified 68.5%, 18.7% and 12.8% isolates as atoxigenic, moderately-toxigenic and highly-toxigenic, respectively. On clustering, the isolates were grouped into 15 distinct clusters, 'A' group of isolates was grouped distinctly in different clusters, while 'B' and 'G' groups of isolates were clustered together. No association was observed between morphological-diversity and toxigenic potential of the isolates. From the present investigation, most virulent isolates were pooled to form a consortium for sick-plot screening of germplasm, against Aspergillus flavus. In future, atoxigenic isolates may be evaluated for their potential to be used as bio-control agent against toxigenicisolates. PMID:25895268

  18. Aspergillus niger Enhance Bioactive Compounds Biosynthesis As Well As Expression of Functional Genes in Adventitious Roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Juan; Li, Jinxin; Liu, Dahui; Li, Hongfa; Gao, Wenyuan; Li, Jianli; Liu, Shujie

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the culture conditions for the accumulation of Glycyrrhiza uralensis adventitious root metabolites in balloon-type bubble bioreactors (BTBBs) have been optimized. The results of the culture showed that the best culture conditions were a cone angle of 90° bioreactor and 0.4-0.6-0.4-vvm aeration volume. Aspergillus niger can be used as a fungal elicitor to enhance the production of defense compounds in plants. With the addition of a fungal elicitor (derived from Aspergillus niger), the maximum accumulation of total flavonoids (16.12 mg g(-1)) and glycyrrhetinic acid (0.18 mg g(-1)) occurred at a dose of 400 mg L(-1) of Aspergillus niger resulting in a 3.47-fold and 1.8-fold increase over control roots. However, the highest concentration of polysaccharide (106.06 mg g(-1)) was achieved with a mixture of elicitors (Aspergillus niger and salicylic acid) added to the medium, resulting in a 1.09-fold increase over Aspergillus niger treatment alone. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) analysis was performed, showing that seven compounds were present after treatment with the elicitors, including uralsaponin B, licorice saponin B2, liquiritin, and (3R)-vestitol, only identified in the mixed elicitor treatment group. It has also been found that elicitors (Aspergillus niger and salicylic acid) significantly upregulated the expression of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), β-amyrin synthase (β-AS), squalene epoxidase (SE) and a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP72A154) genes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of bioactive compounds, and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) activity. PMID:26490378

  19. Fractionation of Aspergillus niger cellulases by combined ion exchange affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, R.F.; Allen, T.L.; Dykema, P.A.

    1987-02-05

    Eight chemically modified cellulose supports were tested for their ability to adsorb components of the Aspergillus niger cellulase system. At least two of the most effective adsorbents, aminoethyl cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose, were shown to be useful for the fractionation of cellulases. These supports apparently owe their resolving capacity to both ion exchange and biospecific binding effects; however, the relative importance of each effect is unknown. These observations form the basis for a new cellulase fractionation technique, combined ion exchange-affinity chromatography. 22 references.

  20. [Hydroxylation of indolyl-3-acetic acid by the fungus aspergillus niger IBFM-F-12].

    PubMed

    Koshcheenko, K A; Baklashova, T G; Kozlovskiĭ, A G; Arinbasarov, M U; Skriabin, G K

    1977-01-01

    Physiological and biochemical properties of the culture of Aspergillus niger IBPM F 12 carrying out hydroxylation IAA in the 4-, 5-, 6-positions of the indole nucleus were studied. The optimal composition of the medium for the cultivation was established. The transformation was performed by the washed fungal mycelium taken in the middle of the growth log-phase at a substrate concentration of I g/l. The correlation between the hydroxylase activity and pH, temperaure and biomass quantity was shown. The method of isolating 4-, 5- and 6-hydroxyindolyl-3-acetic acids in preparative amounts was developed. PMID:866301

  1. Optimization of process parameters influencing the submerged fermentation of extracellular lipases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Padhiar, Jigita; Das, Arijit; Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2011-11-15

    The present study was aimed at optimization, production and partial purification of lipases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. Various nutritional and physical parameters affecting lipase production such as carbon and nitrogen supplements, pH, temperature, agitation speed and incubation time were studied. Refined sunflower oil (1% v/v) and tryptone at a pH of 6.2 favored maximum lipase production in Pseudomonas at 30 degrees C and 150 rpm, when incubated for 5 days. In C. albicans refined sunflower oil (3% v/v) and peptone resulted in maximum lipase production at pH 5.2, 30 degrees C and 150 rpm, when incubated for 5 days. In A. flavus coconut oil (3% v/v) and peptone yielded maximum lipase at pH 6.2, 37 degrees C, 200 rpm after an incubation period of 5 days. The lipases were partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and dialysis. In P. aeruginosa enzyme activity of the dialyzed fraction was found to be 400 U mL-' and for C. albicans 410 U mL(-1). The dialysed lipase fraction from A. flavus demonstrated an activity of 460 U mL(-1). The apparent molecular weights of the dialyzed lipases were determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The dialyzed lipase fraction obtained from P. aeruginosa revealed molecular weights of 47, 49 and 51 kDa, whereas, lipases from C. albicans and A. flavus demonstrated 3 bands (16.5, 27 and 51 kDa) and one band (47 kDa), respectively. These extracellular lipases may find wide industrial applications. PMID:22514878

  2. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Different Toxigenic and Atoxigenic Isolates of Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Jake C.; Scully, Brian T.; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Gold, Scott E.; Glenn, Anthony E.; Abbas, Hamed K.; Lee, R. Dewey; Kemerait, Robert C.; Guo, Baozhu

    2015-01-01

    Drought stress in the field has been shown to exacerbate aflatoxin contamination of maize and peanut. Drought and heat stress also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant tissues. Given the potential correlation between ROS and exacerbated aflatoxin production under drought and heat stress, the objectives of this study were to examine the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress on the growth of different toxigenic (+) and atoxigenic (−) isolates of Aspergillus flavus and to test whether aflatoxin production affects the H2O2 concentrations that the isolates could survive. Ten isolates were tested: NRRL3357 (+), A9 (+), AF13 (+), Tox4 (+), A1 (−), K49 (−), K54A (−), AF36 (−), and Aflaguard (−); and one A. parasiticus isolate, NRRL2999 (+). These isolates were cultured under a H2O2 gradient ranging from 0 to 50 mM in two different media, aflatoxin-conducive yeast extract-sucrose (YES) and non-conducive yeast extract-peptone (YEP). Fungal growth was inhibited at a high H2O2 concentration, but specific isolates grew well at different H2O2 concentrations. Generally the toxigenic isolates tolerated higher concentrations than did atoxigenic isolates. Increasing H2O2 concentrations in the media resulted in elevated aflatoxin production in toxigenic isolates. In YEP media, the higher concentration of peptone (15%) partially inactivated the H2O2 in the media. In the 1% peptone media, YEP did not affect the H2O2 concentrations that the isolates could survive in comparison with YES media, without aflatoxin production. It is interesting to note that the commercial biocontrol isolates, AF36 (−), and Aflaguard (−), survived at higher levels of stress than other atoxigenic isolates, suggesting that this testing method could potentially be of use in the selection of biocontrol isolates. Further studies will be needed to investigate the mechanisms behind the variability among isolates with regard to their degree of oxidative stress tolerance and the role of aflatoxin production. PMID:26251922

  3. Reduced by-product formation and modified oxygen availability improve itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Li, An; Pfelzer, Nina; Zuijderwijk, Robbert; Brickwedde, Anja; van Zeijl, Cora; Punt, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Aspergillus niger has an extraordinary potential to produce organic acids as proven by its application in industrial citric acid production. Previously, it was shown that expression of the cis-aconitate decarboxylase gene (cadA) from Aspergillus terreus converted A. niger into an itaconic acid producer (Li et al., Fungal Genet Bio 48: 602-611, 2011). After some initial steps in production optimization in the previous research (Li et al., BMC biotechnol 12: 57, 2012), this research aims at modifying host strains and fermentation conditions to further improve itaconic acid production. Expression of two previously identified A. terreus genes encoding putative organic acid transporters (mttA, mfsA) increased itaconic acid production in an A. niger cis-aconitate decarboxylase expressing strain. Surprisingly, the production did not increase further when both transporters were expressed together. Meanwhile, oxalic acid was accumulated as a by-product in the culture of mfsA transformants. In order to further increase itaconic acid production and eliminate by-product formation, the non-acidifying strain D15#26 and the oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase (oahA) deletion strain AB 1.13 ?oahA #76 have been analyzed for itaconic acid production. Whereas cadA expression in AB 1.13 ?oahA #76 resulted in higher itaconic acid production than strain CAD 10.1, this was not the case in strain D15#26. As expected, oxalic acid production was eliminated in both strains. In a further attempt to increase itaconic acid levels, an improved basal citric acid-producing strain, N201, was used for cadA expression. A selected transformant (N201CAD) produced more itaconic acid than strain CAD 10.1, derived from A. niger strain AB1.13. Subsequently, we have focused on the influence of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) on itaconic acid production. Interestingly, reduced D.O. levels (10-25 %) increased itaconic acid production using strain N201 CAD. Similar results were obtained in strain AB 1.13 CAD + HBD2.5 (HBD 2.5) which overexpressed a fungal hemoglobin domain. Our results showed that overexpression of the hemoglobin domain increased itaconic acid production in A. niger at lower D.O. levels. Evidently, the lower levels of D.O. have a positive influence on itaconic acid production in A. niger strains. PMID:23397482

  4. The two genome sequence release and blast server construction for aflatoxin-producing L and S strains Aspergillus parasiticus and A. flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites. These compounds, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed...

  5. Identification and quantification of a toxigenic and non-toxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain in contaminated maize using quantitative real-time PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins, which are produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus, are toxic to humans, livestock, and pets. The value of maize (Zea mays) grain is markedly reduced when contaminated with aflatoxin. Plant resistance and biological control using non-toxin producing strains are considered effective st...

  6. Comparison of major biocontrol strains of non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus for the reduction of aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological control of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus in maize through competitive displacement by non-aflatoxigenic strains was evaluated in a series of field studies. Four sets of experiments were conducted between 2007 to 2009 to assess the competitiveness of non-aflatoxigenic strains when challen...

  7. 75 FR 9596 - Notice of Filing of a Pesticide Petition for Residues of a Aspergillus flavus AF36 on Corn Food...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... AGENCY Notice of Filing of a Pesticide Petition for Residues of a Aspergillus flavus AF36 on Corn Food... regulations for residues of a pesticide chemical in or on various commodities. DATES: Comments must be...), 21 U.S.C. 346a, proposing the modification of regulations in 40 CFR part 180 for residues of...

  8. Non-pheromonal control of navel orangeworm as a promising method toward decreasing contamination of Aspergillus flavus in California tree nuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The navel orangeworm (NOW) is a major insect pest of tree nuts and is a vector of Aspergillus flavus – a fungus responsible for aflatoxin contamination of California tree nuts. Despite the presence of NOW throughout a typical season, the identification of particular VOCs, or their potential role as ...

  9. A public platform for the verification of the phenotypic effect of candidate genes for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation and Aspergillus flavus infection in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A public candidate gene testing pipeline for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation or Aspergillus flavus infection in maize is presented here. The pipeline consists of steps for identifying, testing, and verifying the association of any maize gene sequence with resistance under field conditions. Reso...

  10. Use of a Granular Bio-Plastic Formulation (Mater-Bi) for Carrying Spores of a Non-Aflatoxigenic Strain of Aspergillus Flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research conducted at the USDA-ARS (Stoneville, MS) demonstrated that aflatoxin contamination in maize is dramatically reduced by inoculation with the atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain K49. To facilitate storage for field applications a series of studies were conducted on the reliability and effi...

  11. The major volatile compound 2-phenylethanol from the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala inhibits growth and expression of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a globally distributed fungus and an important food contaminant because it produces the most potent natural carcinogenic compound known as aflatoxin (AF) B1. The major volatile from a yeast strain, Pichia anomala WRL-076 was identified by SPEM-GC/MS analysis to be 2-phenylethan...

  12. An Aspergillus flavus secondary metabolic gene cluster containing a hybrid PKS-NRPS is necessary for synthesis of the 2-pyridones, leporins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus flavus, has been shown to harbor as many as 55 putative secondary metabolic gene clusters including the one responsible for production of the toxic and carcinogenic, polyketide synthase (PKS)-derived family of secondary metabolites termed aflatoxins....

  13. Identification of Genes Associated with Morphology in Aspergillus niger by Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ziyu; Mao, Xingxue; Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-01-01

    The morphology of citric acid production strains of Aspergillus niger is sensitive to a variety of factors, including the concentration of manganese (Mn2+). Upon increasing the Mn2+ concentration in A. niger (ATCC 11414) cultures to 14 ppb or higher, the morphology switches from pelleted to filamentous, accompanied by a rapid decline in citric acid production. The molecular mechanisms through which Mn2+ exerts effects on morphology and citric acid production in A. niger cultures have not been well defined, but our use of suppression subtractive hybridization has identified 22 genes responsive to Mn2+. Fifteen genes were differentially expressed when A. niger was grown in media containing 1,000 ppb of Mn2+ (filamentous form), and seven genes were expressed in 10 ppb of Mn2+ (pelleted form). Of the 15 filament-associated genes, seven are novel and eight share 47 to 100% identity with genes from other organisms. Five of the pellet-associated genes are novel, and the other two genes encode a pepsin-type protease and polyubiquitin. All 10 genes with deduced functions are either involved in amino acid metabolism-protein catabolism or cell regulatory processes. Northern blot analysis showed that the transcripts of all 22 genes were rapidly enhanced or suppressed by Mn2+. Steady-state mRNA levels of six selected filament-associated genes remained high during 5 days of culture in a filamentous state and remained low under pelleted growth conditions. The opposite behavior was observed for four selected pellet-associated genes. The full-length cDNA of the filament-associated clone, Brsa-25, was isolated. Antisense expression of Brsa-25 permitted pelleted growth and increased citrate production at concentrations of Mn2+ that were higher than the parent strain could tolerate. These results suggest the involvement of the newly isolated genes in the regulation of A. niger morphology. PMID:15066846

  14. Identification of Genes Associated with Morphology in Aspergillus Niger by Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu; Mao, Xingxue; Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-04-01

    The morphology of citric acid production strains of Aspergillus niger is sensitive to a variety of factors including the concentration of manganese (Mn2+). Upon increasing the Mn2+ concentration in A. niger (ATCC 11414) cultures to 14 ppb or higher, the morphology switches from pelleted to filamentous, accompanied by a rapid decline in citric acid production. Molecular mechanisms through which Mn2+ exerts effects on morphology and citric acid production in A. niger have not been well defined, but our use of suppression subtractive hybridization has identified 22 genes responsive to Mn2+. Fifteen genes were differentially expressed when A. niger was grown in media containing 1000 ppb Mn2+ (filamentous form) and seven genes in 10 ppb Mn2+ (pelleted form). Of the fifteen filamentous-associated genes, seven are novel and eight share 47-100% identity to genes from other organisms. Five of the pellet-associated genes are novel, and the other two genes encode a pepsin-type protease and polyubiquitin. All ten genes with deduced functions are either involved in amino acid metabolism/protein catabolism or cell regulatory processes. Northern-blot analysis showed that the transcripts of all 22 genes were rapidly enhanced or suppressed by Mn2+. Steady-state mRNA levels of six selected filamentous associated genes remained high during five days of culture in a filamentous state and low under pelleted growth conditions. The opposite behavior was observed for four selected pellet-associated genes. The full-length cDNA of the filamentous-associated clone, Brsa-25 was isolated. Antisense expression of Brsa-25 permitted pelleted growth and increased citrate production at higher concentrations of Mn2+ than could be tolerated by the parent strain. The results suggest the involvement of the newly isolated genes in regulation of A. niger morphology.

  15. Evolutionary Origins of the Fumonisin Secondary Metabolite Gene Cluster in Fusarium verticillioides and Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Khaldi, Nora; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2011-01-01

    The secondary metabolite gene clusters of euascomycete fungi are among the largest known clusters of functionally related genes in eukaryotes. Most of these clusters are species specific or genus specific, and little is known about how they are formed during evolution. We used a comparative genomics approach to study the evolutionary origins of a secondary metabolite cluster that synthesizes a polyketide derivative, namely, the fumonisin (FUM) cluster of Fusarium verticillioides, and that of Aspergillus niger another fumonisin (fumonisin B) producing species. We identified homologs in other euascomycetes of the Fusarium verticillioides FUM genes and their flanking genes. We discuss four models for the origin of the FUM cluster in Fusarium verticillioides and argue that two of these are plausible: (i) assembly by relocation of initially scattered genes in a recent Fusarium verticillioides; or (ii) horizontal transfer of the FUM cluster from a distantly related Sordariomycete species. We also propose that the FUM cluster was horizontally transferred into Aspergillus niger, most probably from a Sordariomycete species. PMID:21716743

  16. Dual transcriptional profiling of a bacterial/fungal confrontation: Collimonas fungivorans versus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Mela, Francesca; Fritsche, Kathrin; de Boer, Wietse; van Veen, Johannes A; de Graaff, Leo H; van den Berg, Marlies; Leveau, Johan H J

    2011-09-01

    Interactions between bacteria and fungi cover a wide range of incentives, mechanisms and outcomes. The genus Collimonas consists of soil bacteria that are known for their antifungal activity and ability to grow at the expense of living fungi. In non-contact confrontation assays with the fungus Aspergillus niger, Collimonas fungivorans showed accumulation of biomass concomitant with inhibition of hyphal spread. Through microarray analysis of bacterial and fungal mRNA from the confrontation arena, we gained new insights into the mechanisms underlying the fungistatic effect and mycophagous phenotype of collimonads. Collimonas responded to the fungus by activating genes for the utilization of fungal-derived compounds and for production of a putative antifungal compound. In A. niger, differentially expressed genes included those involved in lipid and cell wall metabolism and cell defense, which correlated well with the hyphal deformations that were observed microscopically. Transcriptional profiles revealed distress in both partners: downregulation of ribosomal proteins and upregulation of mobile genetic elements in the bacteria and expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress and conidia-related genes in the fungus. Both partners experienced nitrogen shortage in each other's presence. Overall, our results indicate that the Collimonas/Aspergillus interaction is a complex interplay between trophism, antibiosis and competition for nutrients. PMID:21614084

  17. Effect of oxygen transfer rate on the composition of the pectolytic enzyme complex of Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Zetelaki-Horvath, K.; Vas, K.

    1981-01-01

    Optimal agitation and aeration conditions (assuring O/sub 2/ transfer rates (OTR) of 12-179 mmol/L-h) were determined for pectin lyase (PL) synthesis of an Aspergillus niger strain. Components of the pectolytic enzyme complex were also investigated in order to determine whether their O/sub 2/ demand is identical with or different from that of pectin lyase. Should the latter be the case, a possibility would be given to produce enzyme complexes of different agitation and aeration conditions. The mycelium yield of Aspergillus niger was maximum at an OTR of 100 mmol/L-h. The yields of the various pectolytic enzymes reached maximum at different OTRs. PL production was highest (0.555 mumol/min-mL) at an OTR of 60 mmol/L-h. Endopolygalacturonase (PG) production has a maximum at OTR 49 mmol/L-h, with a 2nd peak at 100-135 mmol O2/L-h. Pectin esterase (PE) synthesis showed a maximum at an OTR of 12-14 mmol/L-h, while both apple juice clarifying and macerating activities gave 2 maximum at 14 and 60 mmol/L-h due to the optima of PE and endo-PG. Macerating activity showed a high value at OTR optimal for PL production as well.

  18. Studies on influence of natural biowastes on cellulase production by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kiranmayi, M Usha; Poda, Sudhakar; Vijayalakshmi, M; Krishna, P V

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of natural biowaste substrates such as banana peel powder and coir powder at varying environmental parameters of pH (4-9) and temperature (20-50 degrees C) on the cellulase enzyme production by Aspergillus niger. The cellulase enzyme production was analyzed by measuring the amount of glucose liberated in IU ml(-1) by using the dinitrosalicylic acid assay method. The substrates were pretreated with 1% NaOH (alkaline treatment) and autoclaved. The maximum activity of the enzyme was assayed at varying pH with temperatures being constant and varying temperatures with pH being constant. The highest activity of the enzyme at varying pH was recorded at pH 6 for banana peel powder (0.068 +/- 0.002 IU ml) and coir powder (0.049 +/- 0.002 IU ml(-1)) and the maximum activity of the enzyme at varying temperature was recorded at 35 degrees C for both banana peel powder (0.072 +/- 0.001 IU ml(-1)) and coir powder (0.046 +/- 0.003 IU ml(-1)). At varying temperatures and pH the high level of enzyme production was obtained at 35 degrees C and pH 6 by using both the substrates, respectively. However among the two substrates used for the production of cellulases by Aspergillus niger banana peel powder showed maximum enzymatic activity than coir powder as substrate. PMID:22471203

  19. Molecular cloning and over-expression of a fructosyltransferase from Aspergillus niger QU10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Yang, Jing; Shi, Jiaji; Qian, Shijun; Chao, Yapeng

    2015-04-01

    The main commercial production of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) comes from enzymatic transformation using sucrose as substrate by microbial enzyme fructosyltransferase. A fructosyltransferase genomic DNA was isolated from Aspergillus niger QU10 by PCR. The nucleotide sequence showed a 1 941 bp size, and has been submitted to GenBank (KF699529). The cDNA of the fructosyltransferase, containing an open reading frame of 1 887 bp, was further cloned by RT-PCR. The fructosyltransferase gene from Aspergillus niger was functionally expressed both in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris GS 115. The highest activity value for the construction with the ?-factor signal peptide reached 431 U/mL after 3 days of incubation. The recombinant enzyme is extensively glycosylated, and the active form is probably represented by a homodimer with an apparent molecular mass of 200 kDa as judged from mobility in seminative PAGE gels. The extracellular recombinant enzyme converted sucrose mostly to FOS, mainly 1-kestose and nystose, liberating glucose. FOS reached a maximal value and represented about 58% of total sugars present in the reaction mixture after 4 h reaction. The results suggest that the availability of recombinant Pichia pastoris as a new source of a FOS-producing enzyme might result of biotechnology interest for industrial application. PMID:26380408

  20. Genome mining and functional genomics for siderophore production in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Franken, Angelique C W; Lechner, Beatrix E; Werner, Ernst R; Haas, Hubertus; Lokman, B Christien; Ram, Arthur F J; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; de Weert, Sandra; Punt, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    Iron is an essential metal for many organisms, but the biologically relevant form of iron is scarce because of rapid oxidation resulting in low solubility. Simultaneously, excessive accumulation of iron is toxic. Consequently, iron uptake is a highly controlled process. In most fungal species, siderophores play a central role in iron handling. Siderophores are small iron-specific chelators that can be secreted to scavenge environmental iron or bind intracellular iron with high affinity. A second high-affinity iron uptake mechanism is reductive iron assimilation (RIA). As shown in Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus nidulans, synthesis of siderophores in Aspergilli is predominantly under control of the transcription factors SreA and HapX, which are connected by a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Abolishing this fine-tuned regulation corroborates iron homeostasis, including heme biosynthesis, which could be biotechnologically of interest, e.g. the heterologous production of heme-dependent peroxidases. Aspergillus niger genome inspection identified orthologues of several genes relevant for RIA and siderophore metabolism, as well as sreA and hapX. Interestingly, genes related to synthesis of the common fungal extracellular siderophore triacetylfusarinine C were absent. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) confirmed the absence of triacetylfusarinine C, and demonstrated that the major secreted siderophores of A. niger are coprogen B and ferrichrome, which is also the dominant intracellular siderophore. In A. niger wild type grown under iron-replete conditions, the expression of genes involved in coprogen biosynthesis and RIA was low in the exponential growth phase but significantly induced during ascospore germination. Deletion of sreA in A. niger resulted in elevated iron uptake and increased cellular ferrichrome accumulation. Increased sensitivity toward phleomycin and high iron concentration reflected the toxic effects of excessive iron uptake. Moreover, SreA-deficiency resulted in increased accumulation of heme intermediates, but no significant increase in heme content. Together with the upregulation of several heme biosynthesis genes, these results reveal a complex heme regulatory mechanism. PMID:25062661

  1. Aspergillus hazardous problem in ceramic workers.

    PubMed

    Saad-Hussein, Amal; Morcos, Nadia Y S; Rizk, Sanaa A; Ibrahim, Khadiga S; El-Zaher, Naglaa Abd; Moubarz, Gehan

    2012-11-01

    Ceramic workers are at a high risk of developing respiratory problems as they are exposed to high levels of respirable dust containing silica and high microbial counts, including high Aspergillus counts. The aim of the study was to study the percentage of ceramic workers with positive Aspergillus (A.) through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and specific IgE (sIgE) for the different Aspergillus species. PCR and specific IgE (sIgE) for the different Aspergillus species (A. flavus, A. fumigatus and A. niger) were estimated in 40 ceramic workers and 56 control subjects. Results revealed that 32.5% of the workers' sputum was PCR positive for Aspergillus. About 69.2% of them were A. flavus positive, 15.4% A. niger positive, 7.7% A. fumigatus positive and 7.7% A. flavus and A. fumigatus positive. The percentage change in sIgE for A. fumigatus between the workers and their controls was over 100%, while less than 50% for the other two species. The sIgE levels for the three Aspergillus species were not significantly correlated with the duration of exposure. Fungal exposure could be considered potential hazardous problem in ceramic industry. There were no significant correlations between the duration of exposure and the sIgE for the different Aspergillus species. PMID:22082828

  2. Two Novel, Putatively Cell Wall-Associated and Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored ?-Glucanotransferase Enzymes of Aspergillus niger?

    PubMed Central

    van der Kaaij, R. M.; Yuan, X.-L.; Franken, A.; Ram, A. F. J.; Punt, P. J.; van der Maarel, M. J. E. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2007-01-01

    In the genome sequence of Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88, three genes were identified with high similarity to fungal ?-amylases. The protein sequences derived from these genes were different in two ways from all described fungal ?-amylases: they were predicted to be glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored, and some highly conserved amino acids of enzymes in the ?-amylase family were absent. We expressed two of these enzymes in a suitable A. niger strain and characterized the purified proteins. Both enzymes showed transglycosylation activity on donor substrates with ?-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds and at least five anhydroglucose units. The enzymes, designated AgtA and AgtB, produced new ?-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds and therefore belong to the group of the 4-?-glucanotransferases (EC 2.4.1.25). Their reaction products reached a degree of polymerization of at least 30. Maltose and larger maltooligosaccharides were the most efficient acceptor substrates, although AgtA also used small nigerooligosaccharides containing ?-(1,3)-glycosidic bonds as acceptor substrate. An agtA knockout of A. niger showed an increased susceptibility towards the cell wall-disrupting compound calcofluor white, indicating a cell wall integrity defect in this strain. Homologues of AgtA and AgtB are present in other fungal species with ?-glucans in their cell walls, but not in yeast species lacking cell wall ?-glucan. Possible roles for these enzymes in the synthesis and/or maintenance of the fungal cell wall are discussed. PMID:17496125

  3. Efficacy and possible mechanisms of perillaldehyde in control of Aspergillus niger causing grape decay.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanzhen; Zeng, Hong; Li, Zongyun; Zhang, Peng; Tessema, Akalate; Peng, Xue

    2015-06-01

    A variety of plant products have been recognized for their antifungal activity and recently have attracted food industry attention for their efficacy in controlling postharvest fungal decay of fruits. The antifungal activity of perillaldehyde (PAE) was evaluated against Aspergillus niger, a known cause of grape spoilage, and possible mechanisms were explored. PAE showed notable antifungal activity against A. niger, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of 0.25 and 1 ?l/ml, respectively. The accumulation of mycelial biomass was also inhibited by PAE in a dose-dependent manner, completely inhibiting mycelial growth at 1 ?l/ml. In vivo data confirmed that the vapour treatment of grapes with various concentrations of PAE markedly improved control of A. niger and suppressed natural decay. Concentrations of PAE of 0.075 ?l/ml air showed the greatest inhibition of fungal growth compared to the controls. Further experiments indicated that PAE activated a membrane-active mechanism that inhibits ergosterol synthesis, increases membrane permeability (as evidenced by extracellular pH and conductivity measurements), and disrupts membrane integrity, leading to cell death. Our findings suggest that this membrane-active mechanism makes PAE a promising potential antifungal agent for postharvest control of grape spoilage. PMID:25755082

  4. Organic acid production by Aspergillus niger in recycling culture analyzed by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Schrickx, J M; Raedts, M J; Stouthamer, A H; van Verseveld, H W

    1995-10-10

    Wild-type Aspergillus niger N402 and glucoamylase++ overproducing transformant A. niger N402[pAB6-10]B1 have grown in maltodextrin- and xylose-limited recycling culture at pH 4.5 on mineral medium. The only products formed were organic acids and proteins, among which glucoamylase. The production of organic acids by the fungus has been analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using capillary electrophoresis. The only organic acids produced in these cultures were substantial amounts of citric acid. This is the first demonstration of abundant oxalic acid production and a very low citric acid production by submerged cultures of A. niger. In the maltodextrin-limited culture the oxalic acid production rate increased during the first 80 h of cultivation and decreased after that time. In xylose-limited recycling culture the oxalic acid production rate always increased in time and highest values were found in the last samples taken from the culture after about 140 h of cultivation. Oxalic acid production rates were highest by the wild-type strain grown on xylose as carbon source, i.e., when the lowest glucoamylase production rates were observed. A clear negative correlation was found between the oxalic acid production rate and the respiration quotient (RQ). An increase in the oxygen consumption rate, due to the production of strongly oxidized oxalic acid, caused the RQ to be lowest at those stages of recycling cultivation when highest oxalic acid production rates were observed. PMID:8678298

  5. Metabolic model integration of the bibliome, genome, metabolome and reactome of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    The release of the genome sequences of two strains of Aspergillus niger has allowed systems-level investigations of this important microbial cell factory. To this end, tools for doing data integration of multi-ome data are necessary, and especially interesting in the context of metabolism. On the basis of an A. niger bibliome survey, we present the largest model reconstruction of a metabolic network reported for a fungal species. The reconstructed gapless metabolic network is based on the reportings of 371 articles and comprises 1190 biochemically unique reactions and 871 ORFs. Inclusion of isoenzymes increases the total number of reactions to 2240. A graphical map of the metabolic network is presented. All levels of the reconstruction process were based on manual curation. From the reconstructed metabolic network, a mathematical model was constructed and validated with data on yields, fluxes and transcription. The presented metabolic network and map are useful tools for examining systemwide data in a metabolic context. Results from the validated model show a great potential for expanding the use of A. niger as a high-yield production platform. PMID:18364712

  6. Deletion of a Chitin Synthase Gene in a Citric Acid Producing Strain of Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, Torri E.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-01-29

    Citric acid production by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is carried out in a process that causes the organism to drastically alter its morphology. This altered morphology includes hyphal swelling and highly limited polar growth resulting in clumps of swollen cells that eventually aggregate into pellets of approximately 100 microns in diameter. In this pelleted form, A. niger has increased citric acid production as compared to growth in filamentous form. Chitin is a crucial component of the cell wall of filamentous fungi. Alterations in the deposition or production of chitin may have profound effects on the morphology of the organism. In order to study the role of chitin synthesis in pellet formation we have deleted a chitin synthase gene (csmA) in Aspergillus niger strain ATCC 11414 using a PCR based deletion construct. This class of chitin synthases is only found in filamentous fungi and is not present in yeasts. The csmA genes contain a myosin motor domain at the N-terminus and a chitin synthesis domain at the C-terminus. They are believed to contribute to the specialized polar growth observed in filamentous fungi that is lacking in yeasts. The csmA deletion strain (csmAΔ) was subjected to minimal media with and without osmotic stabilizers as well as tested in citric acid production media. Without osmotic stabilizers, the mutant germlings were abnormally swollen, primarily in the subapical regions, and contained large vacuoles. However, this swelling is ultimately not inhibitory to growth as the germlings are able to recover and undergo polar growth. Colony formation was largely unaffected in the absence of osmotic stabilizers. In citric acid production media csmAΔ was observed to have a 2.5 fold increase in citric acid production. The controlled expression of this class of chitin synthases may be useful for improving production of organic acids in filamentous fungi.

  7. Nanocapsular dispersion of cinnamaldehyde for enhanced inhibitory activity against aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Shen, Qingshan; Zhou, Wei; Mo, Haizhen; Pan, Daodong; Hu, Liangbin

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is marginally soluble in water, making it challenging to evenly disperse it in foods, and resulting in lowered anti-A. flavus efficacy. In the present study, nano-dispersed CA (nano-CA) was prepared to increase its aqueous solubility. Free and nano-dispersed CA were compared in terms of their inhibitory activity against fungal growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus both in Sabouraud Dextrose (SD) culture and in peanut butter. Our results indicated that free CA inhibited the mycelia growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1.0 mM, but promoted the aflatoxin production at some concentrations lower than the MIC. Nano-CA had a lower MIC value of 0.8 mM against A. flavus, and also showed improved activity against aflatoxin production without the promotion at lower dose. The solidity of peanut butter had an adverse impact on the antifungal activity of free CA, whereas nano-dispersed CA showed more than 2-fold improved activity against the growth of A. flavus. Free CA still promoted AFB1 production at the concentration of 0.25 mM, whereas nano-CA showed more efficient inhibition of AFB1 production in the butter. PMID:25853318

  8. Radiosensitization of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum using basil essential oil and ionizing radiation for food decontamination.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of basil oil, was determined for two pathogenic fungi of rice, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. The antifungal activity of the basil oil in combination with ionising radiation was then investigated to determine if basil oil caused radiosensit...

  9. A chemical epigenetics approach for engineering the in situ biosynthesis of a cryptic natural product from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Henrikson, Jon C; Hoover, Ashley R; Joyner, P Matthew; Cichewicz, Robert H

    2009-02-01

    A new fungal metabolite, nygerone A (), featuring a unique 1-phenylpyridin-4(1H)-one core that had previously not been reported from any natural source, has been obtained from Aspergillus niger using a chemical epigenetics methodology. PMID:19156306

  10. Presence of epoxide hydrolase activity in Aspergillus niger: Hydrolysis of 6', 7'-epoxybergamottin to 6', 7'-dihydroxybergamottin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 6', 7'-epoxybergamottin (EB) is one of major furanocoumarins in grapefruit. Previously, we have shown that Aspergillus niger has a capability of metabolizing EB into 6', 7'-dihydroxybergamottin (DHB), which is further metabolized to bergaptol and bergaptol-5-sulfate in vivo. In this study, we at...

  11. Chronological aging in conidia of pathogenic Aspergillus: Comparison between species.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Manuela; Pereira, Clara; Bessa, Cludia; Araujo, Ricardo; Saraiva, Luclia

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus niger are common airborne fungi, and the most frequent causative agents of human fungal infections. However, the resistance and lifetime persistence of these fungi in the atmosphere, and the mechanism of aging of Aspergillus conidia are unknown.With this work, we intended to study the processes underlying conidial aging of these four relevant and pathogenic Aspergillus species. Chronological aging was therefore evaluated in A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and A. niger conidia exposed to environmental and human body temperatures. The results showed that the aging process in Aspergillus conidia involves apoptosis,with metacaspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and reactive oxygen species production, associated with secondary necrosis. Distinct results were observed for the selected pathogenic species. At environmental conditions, A. niger was the species with the highest resistance to aging, indicating a higher adaption to environmental conditions, whereas A. flavus followed by A. terreus were the most sensitive species. At higher temperatures (37 C), A. fumigatus presented the longest lifespan, in accordance with its good adaptation to the human body temperature. Altogether,with this work new insights regarding conidia aging are provided, which may be useful when designing treatments for aspergillosis. PMID:26341609

  12. Improved mannan-degrading enzymes' production by Aspergillus niger through medium optimization.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Siti Norita; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Ariff, Arbakariya B

    2011-02-28

    The effect of different carbon and nitrogen sources on the production of mannan-degrading enzymes, focussing on β-mannanase, by Aspergillus niger was investigated using shake flask culture. The β-mannanase activity obtained during growth of A. niger on guar gum (GG, 1495 nkat mL(-1)) was much higher than those observed on other carbon substrates, locust bean gum (1148 nkat mL(-1)), α-cellulose (10.7 nkat mL(-1)), glucose (8.8 nkat mL(-1)) and carboxymethylcellulose (4.6 nkat mL(-1)). For fermentation using GG as a carbon source, bacteriological peptone gave the highest β-mannanase activity (1744 nkat mL(-1)) followed by peptone from meat (1168 nkat mL(-1)), yeast extract (817 nkat mL(-1)), ammonium sulphate (241 nkat mL(-1)), ammonium nitrate (113 nkat mL(-1)) and ammonium chloride (99 nkat mL(-1)) when used as a nitrogen source. The composition of bacteriological peptone and initial pH of the medium were further optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Medium consisted of 21.3 g L(-1) GG and 57 g L(-1) peptone with initial culture pH of 5.5 was optimum for β-mannanase production (2063 nkat mL(-1)) by A. niger. The β-mannanase production obtained in this study using A. niger was significantly higher than those reported in the literature. PMID:20970530

  13. An artificially constructed Syngonium podophyllum-Aspergillus niger combinate system for removal of uranium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    He, Jia-Dong; Wang, Yong-Dong; Hu, Nan; Ding, Dexin; Sun, Jing; Deng, Qin-Wen; Li, Chang-Wu; Xu, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillus niger was inoculated to the roots of five plants, and the Syngonium podophyllum-A. niger combinate system (SPANCS) was found to be the most effective in removing uranium from hydroponic liquid with initial uranium concentration of 5 mg L(-1). Furthermore, the hydroponic experiments on the removal of uranium from the hydroponic liquids with initial uranium concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg L(-1) by the SPANCS were conducted, the inhibitory effect of A. niger on the growth of S. podophyllum in the SPANCS was studied, the accumulation characteristics of uranium by S. podophyllum in the SPANCS were analyzed, and the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were measured. The results show that the removal of uranium by the SPANCS from the hydroponic liquids with initial uranium concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg L(-1) reached 98.20, 97.90, and 98.50 %, respectively, after 37 days of accumulation of uranium; that the uranium concentrations in the hydroponic liquids decreased to 0.009, 0.021, and 0.045 mg L(-1), respectively, which are lower than the stipulated concentration for discharge of 0.050 mg L(-1) by the People's Republic of China; that A. niger helped to generate more groups in the root of S. podophyllum which can improve the complexing capability of S. podophyllum for uranium; and that the uranium accumulated in the root of S. podophyllum was in the form of phosphate uranyl and carboxylic uranyl. PMID:26208659

  14. Cytosolic streaming in vegetative mycelium and aerial structures of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Bleichrodt, R.; Vinck, A.; Krijgsheld, P.; van Leeuwen, M.R.; Dijksterhuis, J.; Wsten, H.A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus niger forms aerial hyphae and conidiophores after a period of vegetative growth. The hyphae within the mycelium of A. niger are divided by septa. The central pore in these septa allows for cytoplasmic streaming. Here, we studied inter- and intra-compartmental streaming of the reporter protein GFP in A. niger. Expression of the gene encoding nuclear targeted GFP from the gpdA or glaA promoter resulted in strong fluorescence of nuclei within the vegetative hyphae and weak fluorescence in nuclei within the aerial structures. These data and nuclear run on experiments showed that gpdA and glaA are higher expressed in the vegetative mycelium when compared to aerial hyphae, conidiophores and conidia. Notably, gpdA or glaA driven expression of the gene encoding cytosolic GFP resulted in strongly fluorescent vegetative hyphae and aerial structures. Apparently, GFP streams from vegetative hyphae into aerial structures. This was confirmed by monitoring fluorescence of photo-activatable GFP (PA-GFP). In contrast, PA-GFP did not stream from aerial structures to vegetative hyphae. Streaming of PA-GFP within vegetative hyphae or within aerial structures of A. niger occurred at a rate of 1015 ?m s-1. Taken together, these results not only show that GFP streams from the vegetative mycelium to aerial structures but it also indicates that its encoding RNA is not streaming. Absence of RNA streaming would explain why distinct RNA profiles were found in aerial structures and the vegetative mycelium by nuclear run on analysis and micro-array analysis. PMID:23450745

  15. Cytosolic streaming in vegetative mycelium and aerial structures of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Bleichrodt, R; Vinck, A; Krijgsheld, P; van Leeuwen, M R; Dijksterhuis, J; Wsten, H A B

    2013-03-15

    Aspergillus niger forms aerial hyphae and conidiophores after a period of vegetative growth. The hyphae within the mycelium of A. niger are divided by septa. The central pore in these septa allows for cytoplasmic streaming. Here, we studied inter- and intra-compartmental streaming of the reporter protein GFP in A. niger. Expression of the gene encoding nuclear targeted GFP from the gpdA or glaA promoter resulted in strong fluorescence of nuclei within the vegetative hyphae and weak fluorescence in nuclei within the aerial structures. These data and nuclear run on experiments showed that gpdA and glaA are higher expressed in the vegetative mycelium when compared to aerial hyphae, conidiophores and conidia. Notably, gpdA or glaA driven expression of the gene encoding cytosolic GFP resulted in strongly fluorescent vegetative hyphae and aerial structures. Apparently, GFP streams from vegetative hyphae into aerial structures. This was confirmed by monitoring fluorescence of photo-activatable GFP (PA-GFP). In contrast, PA-GFP did not stream from aerial structures to vegetative hyphae. Streaming of PA-GFP within vegetative hyphae or within aerial structures of A. niger occurred at a rate of 10-15 ?m s(-1). Taken together, these results not only show that GFP streams from the vegetative mycelium to aerial structures but it also indicates that its encoding RNA is not streaming. Absence of RNA streaming would explain why distinct RNA profiles were found in aerial structures and the vegetative mycelium by nuclear run on analysis and micro-array analysis. PMID:23450745

  16. Transcriptomic profiles of Aspergillus flavus CA42, a strain that produces small sclerotia, by decanal treatment and after recovery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Scharfenstein, Leslie L; Mack, Brian; Yu, Jiujiang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C

    2014-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a ubiquitous saprophyte and is capable of producing many secondary metabolites including the carcinogenic aflatoxins. The A. flavus population that produces small sclerotia (S strain) has been implicated as the culprit for persistent aflatoxin contamination in field crops. We investigated how the plant volatile decanal, a C10 fatty aldehyde, affected the growth and development of the S strain A. flavus. Decanal treatment yielded fluffy variants lacking sclerotia and conidia and exhibiting a dosage-dependent radial colony growth. We used RNA-Seq analysis to examine transcriptomic changes caused by decanal and after removal of decanal. Mature sclerotia contained only 80% of the total transcripts detected in all samples in comparison to 94% for the decanal treated culture. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that decanal treatment increased expression of genes involved in oxidoreductase activity, cellular carbohydrate metabolism, alcohol metabolism and aflatoxin biosynthesis. The treatment affected cellular components associated with cell wall, and gene expression of glucanases, ?-amylases, pectinesterase and peptidase required for its biosynthesis was increased. After decanal was removed, the culture resumed sclerotial production. Moreover, its GO terms significantly overlapped with those of the untreated culture; five of the enriched molecular functions, oxidoreductase activity, monooxygenase activity, electron carrier activity, heme binding, and iron binding were found in the untreated culture. The GO term of cellular component enriched was mainly integral protein constituents of the membrane. The results suggested that decanal halted development at the vegetative state rendering the fungus unable to produce conidia and sclerotia. The induced fluffy phenotype could be related to lower transcript abundance of flbB, flbD, and flbE but not to veA expression. Increased abundance of the laeA transcript in the treated culture correlated with early transcriptional activation of aflatoxin and kojic acid biosynthesis gene clusters. Expression profiles revealed subtle differences in timing of activation of the respective 55 secondary metabolite gene clusters. PMID:24780887

  17. Aspergillus flavus Conidia-derived Carbon/Sulfur Composite as a Cathode Material for High Performance LithiumSulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Maowen; Jia, Min; Mao, Cuiping; Liu, Sangui; Bao, Shujuan; Jiang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to prepare porous carbon materials with an extremely high surface area of 2459.6?m2g?1 by using Aspergillus flavus conidia as precursors. The porous carbon serves as a superior cathode material to anchor sulfur due to its uniform and tortuous morphology, enabling high capacity and good cycle lifetime in lithium sulfur-batteries. Under a current rate of 0.2?C, the carbon-sulfur composites with 56.7?wt% sulfur loading deliver an initial capacity of 1625?mAh g?1, which is almost equal to the theoretical capacity of sulfur. The good performance may be ascribed to excellent electronic networks constructed by the high-surface-area carbon species. Moreover, the semi-closed architecture of derived carbons can effectively retard the polysulfides dissolution during charge/discharge, resulting in a capacity of 940?mAh g?1 after 120 charge/discharge cycles.

  18. Aspergillus flavus Conidia-derived Carbon/Sulfur Composite as a Cathode Material for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Maowen; Jia, Min; Mao, Cuiping; Liu, Sangui; Bao, Shujuan; Jiang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to prepare porous carbon materials with an extremely high surface area of 2459.6?m(2)g(-1) by using Aspergillus flavus conidia as precursors. The porous carbon serves as a superior cathode material to anchor sulfur due to its uniform and tortuous morphology, enabling high capacity and good cycle lifetime in lithium sulfur-batteries. Under a current rate of 0.2?C, the carbon-sulfur composites with 56.7?wt% sulfur loading deliver an initial capacity of 1625?mAh g(-1), which is almost equal to the theoretical capacity of sulfur. The good performance may be ascribed to excellent electronic networks constructed by the high-surface-area carbon species. Moreover, the semi-closed architecture of derived carbons can effectively retard the polysulfides dissolution during charge/discharge, resulting in a capacity of 940?mAh g(-1) after 120 charge/discharge cycles. PMID:26732547

  19. Tight control of mycotoxin biosynthesis gene expression in Aspergillus flavus by temperature as revealed by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiujiang; Fedorova, Natalie D; Montalbano, Beverly G; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E; Bennett, Joan W; Nierman, William C

    2011-09-01

    To better understand the effect of temperature on mycotoxin biosynthesis, RNA-Seq technology was used to profile the Aspergillus flavus transcriptome under different temperature conditions. This approach allowed us to quantify transcript abundance for over 80% of fungal genes including 1153 genes that were differentially expressed at 30 and 37?C. Eleven of the 55 secondary metabolite clusters were upregulated at the lower temperature, including aflatoxin biosynthesis genes, which were among the most highly upexpressed genes. On average, transcript abundance for the 30 aflatoxin biosynthesis genes was 3300 times greater at 30?C as compared with 37?C. The results are consistent with the view that high temperature negatively affects aflatoxin production by turning down transcription of the two key transcriptional regulators, aflR and aflS. Subtle changes in the expression levels of aflS to aflR appear to control transcription activation of the aflatoxin cluster. PMID:21707733

  20. In silico analysis of β-mannanases and β-mannosidase from Aspergillus flavus and Trichoderma virens UKM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Chai Sin; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu

    2013-11-01

    A gene encoding an endo-β-1,4-mannanase from Trichoderma virens UKM1 (manTV) and Aspergillus flavus UKM1 (manAF) was analysed with bioinformatic tools. In addition, A. flavus NRRL 3357 genome database was screened for a β-mannosidase gene and analysed (mndA-AF). These three genes were analysed to understand their gene properties. manTV and manAF both consists of 1,332-bp and 1,386-bp nucleotides encoding 443 and 461 amino acid residues, respectively. Both the endo-β-1,4-mannanases belong to the glycosyl hydrolase family 5 and contain a carbohydrate-binding module family 1 (CBM1). On the other hand, mndA-AF which is a 2,745-bp gene encodes a protein sequence of 914 amino acid residues. This β-mannosidase belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase family 2. Predicted molecular weight of manTV, manAF and mndA-AF are 47.74 kDa, 49.71 kDa and 103 kDa, respectively. All three predicted protein sequences possessed signal peptide sequence and are highly conserved among other fungal β-mannanases and β-mannosidases.

  1. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits fungal growth and aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis by modulating the oxidative stress response of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Shang, Bo; Wang, Ling; Lu, Zhisong; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CIN) is a promising natural preservative and generally recognized as safe for commodities as well as consumers. In this work, the antifungal effects of CIN on Aspergillus flavus were evaluated both in solid and in liquid culture conditions. Our results indicated that CIN effectively inhibited radial growth, spore production, mycelium formation, and aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis by A. flavus in a dose-dependent manner. At the concentration of 104mgL(-1), CIN exposure was able to completely inhibit fungal growth as well as aflatoxin B1 production. Furthermore, the inhibitory activities of CIN were closely connected with the treatment period and the tested fungal species. Compared with the control strains, CIN dose dependently changed the morphology and ultrastructure of mycelium in different degree. Especially, the reduction of hydrogen peroxide was considered to follow the destruction of mitochondrial. Meanwhile, CIN significantly cut the levels of lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione. The activity of total superoxide dismutase was significantly inhibited after CIN treatment at the end of incubation, whereas the activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase were opposite. These results indicated that the inhibitory effect of CIN could attribute to oxidative stress alleviation possibly induced by modifications of cellular structure as well as redox status. PMID:26585445

  2. Antifungal activity evaluation of Mexican oregano (Lippia berlandieri Schauer) essential oil on the growth of Aspergillus flavus by gaseous contact.

    PubMed

    Gmez-Snchez, Ada; Palou, Enrique; Lpez-Malo, Aurelio

    2011-12-01

    The antifungal activity of Mexican oregano (Lippia berlandieri Schauer) essential oil by gaseous contact on the growth of Aspergillus flavus at selected essential oil concentrations (14.7, 29.4, 58.8, or 117.6 ?l of essential oil per liter of air) and temperatures (25, 30, or 35C) was evaluated in potato dextrose agar formulated at water activity of 0.98 and pH 4.0. Mold growth curves were adequately fitted (0.984 < R(2) < 0.999) by the modified Gompertz model. The effect of the independent variables (concentration of essential oil and temperature) on the estimated model parameters (reciprocal of growth rate [1/?(m)] and lag time [?]) were evaluated through polynomial equations. Both ?(m) and ? were significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the independent variables; ?(m) decreased and ? increased as essential oil concentration increased and temperature decreased, which suggests that Mexican oregano essential oil retards or inhibits mold germination stage. Further, minimum fungistatic and fungicide essential oil concentrations at 30 and 35C were determined. Mexican oregano essential oil applied in gas phase exerts important antifungal activity on the growth of A. flavus, suggesting its potential to inhibit other food spoilage molds. PMID:22186064

  3. The inhibitory effect of Bacillus megaterium on aflatoxin and cyclopiazonic acid biosynthetic pathway gene expression in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing; Chi, Chen; Yu, Jiujiang; Shan, Shihua; Li, Qiyu; Li, Qianting; Guan, Bin; Nierman, William C; Bennett, Joan W

    2014-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the major moulds that colonize peanut in the field and during storage. The impact to human and animal health, and to the economy in agriculture and commerce, is significant since this mold produces the most potent known natural toxins, aflatoxins, which are carcinogenic, mutagenic, immunosuppressive, and teratogenic. A strain of marine Bacillus megaterium isolated from the Yellow Sea of East China was evaluated for its effect in inhibiting aflatoxin formation in A. flavus through down-regulating aflatoxin pathway gene expression as demonstrated by gene chip analysis. Aflatoxin accumulation in potato dextrose broth liquid medium and liquid minimal medium was almost totally (more than 98%) inhibited by co-cultivation with B. megaterium. Growth was also reduced. Using expression studies, we identified the fungal genes down-regulated by co-cultivation with B. megaterium across the entire fungal genome and specifically within the aflatoxin pathway gene cluster (aflF, aflT, aflS, aflJ, aflL, aflX). Modulating the expression of these genes could be used for controlling aflatoxin contamination in crops such as corn, cotton, and peanut. Importantly, the expression of the regulatory gene aflS was significantly down-regulated during co-cultivation. We present a model showing a hypothesis of the regulatory mechanism of aflatoxin production suppression by AflS and AflR through B. megaterium co-cultivation. PMID:24652062

  4. Chemoprevention by essential oil of turmeric leaves (Curcuma longa L.) on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, S; Chempakam, B; Leela, N K; Suseela Bhai, R

    2011-05-01

    Turmeric is well known for a wide range of medicinal properties. Essential oil of turmeric leaves (Curcuma longa L.) were evaluated at varying concentrations of 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5% (v/v) in Yeast Extract Sucrose (YES) broth inoculated with spore suspension of Aspergillus flavus of 10(6)conidia/ml. These were evaluated for their potential in the control of aflatoxigenic fungus A. flavus and aflatoxin production. Turmeric leaf oil exhibited 95.3% and 100% inhibition of toxin production respectively at 1.0% and 1.5%. The extent of inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production was dependent on the concentration of essential oil used. The oil exhibited significant inhibition of fungal growth as well as aflatoxins B(1) and G(1) production. The LD(50) and LD(90) were also determined. GC-MS analysis of the oil showed ?-phellandrene, p-cymene and terpinolene as the major components in turmeric leaf oil. The possibility of using these phytochemical components as bio-preservatives for storage of spices is discussed. PMID:21354246

  5. Effect of Citrus reticulata and Cymbopogon citratus essential oils on Aspergillus flavus growth and aflatoxin production on Asparagus racemosus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Shukla, Ravindra; Kumar, Ashok; Prakash, Bhanu; Singh, Shubhra; Dubey, Nawal Kishore

    2010-09-01

    Essential oils extracted from Citrus reticulata and Cymbopogon citratus were tested in vitro against the toxigenic strain of Aspergillus flavus, isolated from the tuberous roots of Asparagus racemosus, used in preparation of herbal drugs. The essential oils completely inhibited the growth of A. flavus at 750 ppm and also exhibited a broad fungitoxic spectrum against nine additional fungi isolated from the roots. Citrus reticulata and Cymbopogon citratus essential oils completely inhibited aflatoxin B(1) production at 750 and 500 ppm, respectively. During in vivo investigation, the incidence of fungi and aflatoxin B(1) production decreased considerably in essential oil-treated root samples. The findings thus indicate possible exploitation of the essential oils as effective inhibitor of aflatoxin B(1) production and as post-harvest fungitoxicant of traditionally used plant origin for the control of storage fungi. These essential oils may be recommended as plant-based antifungals as well as aflatoxin B(1) suppressors in post-harvest processing of herbal samples. PMID:20401550

  6. Effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss. essential oil on growth and aflatoxin formation by Aspergillus flavus in culture media and cheese.

    PubMed

    Gandomi, Hassan; Misaghi, Ali; Basti, Afshin Akhondzadeh; Bokaei, Saeed; Khosravi, Alireza; Abbasifar, Arash; Javan, Ashkan Jebelli

    2009-10-01

    The effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss. essential oil (EO) against growth, spore production and aflatoxin formation by Aspergillus flavus ATCC 15546 was investigated in synthetic media as well as Iranian ultra-filtered white cheese in brine. EO effectively inhibited radial growth and spore production on potato dextrose agar (PDA) in a dose-dependent manner. At 200 ppm, the radial growth and sporulation reduced by 79.4% and 92.5%, respectively. The growth was completely prevented at EO400 ppm on PDA, and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of the oil was estimated at 1000 ppm. The oil also significantly suppressed mycelial growth and aflatoxin synthesis in broth medium at all concentrations tested (P<0.05). At 150 ppm of EO, the mycelial growth and aflatoxin accumulation reduced by 90% and 99.4%, respectively. The EO at all concentrations tested, had an inhibitory effect against radial fungal growth and aflatoxin production by A. flavus in cheese. However, no concentration of EO examined was able to completely inhibit the growth and aflatoxin production in cheese. The results suggested the potential substitution of the antifungal chemicals by this EO as a natural inhibitor to control the growth of molds in foods such as cheese. PMID:19477213

  7. Removal of aflatoxin B1 and inhibition of Aspergillus flavus growth by the use of Lactobacillus plantarum on olives.

    PubMed

    Kachouri, Faten; Ksontini, Hamida; Hamdi, Moktar

    2014-10-01

    Olives can be contaminated with a wide variety of molds (Aspergillus and/or Penicillium) that can be occurring naturally on fresh and processed olives and could support mycotoxin production. The aim of this work was to investigate aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production by fungi and its bioaccumulation in olives during storage and to study the impact of the application of Lactobacillus plantarum on the inhibition of mold development and production of AFB1. Two different treatments were applied: (i) olives with natural microflora and (ii) olives inoculated with Aspergillus flavus after elimination of natural microflora. AFB1 has been extracted from olives and quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography using a fluorescence detector. Results showed the absence of this metabolite in the olives for the season 2008 to 2009. In 2009 to 2010, AFB1 was detected at the level of 11 μg/kg. The application of L. plantarum during the storage of olives favors the reduction of the level of AFB1 to 5.9 μg/kg correlated with a decrease in the amount of molds (86.3%). The images obtained by environmental scanning electron microscopy showed that L. plantarum was able to adhere to the olive surface and probably produce a biofilm that inhibits the multiplication of yeast and fungi by oxygen competition. Results showed an increase of antioxidant activity and amount of total phenolic compounds of olives, respectively, by 24 and 8.6%. In many olives contaminated with A. flavus, AFB1 was present at an initial level of 5.15 μg/kg and increased to 6.55 μg/kg after 8 days of storage. The biological detoxification of AFB1 in olives by L. plantarum is confirmed by the reduction of the level of AFB1 to 2.12 μg/kg on day 0 and its absence after 4 days of storage. PMID:25285494

  8. Aspergillus flavus grown in peptone as the carbon source exhibits spore density- and peptone concentration-dependent aflatoxin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aflatoxins (AFs) are highly carcinogenic compounds produced by Aspergillus species in seeds with high lipid and protein contents. It has been known for over 30 years that peptone is not conducive for AF productions, although reasons for this remain unknown. Results In this study, we showed that when Aspergillus flavus was grown in peptone-containing media, higher initial spore densities inhibited AF biosynthesis, but promoted mycelial growth; while in glucose-containing media, more AFs were produced when initial spore densities were increased. This phenomenon was also observed in other AF-producing strains including A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Higher peptone concentrations led to inhibited AF production, even in culture with a low spore density. High peptone concentrations did however promote mycelial growth. Spent medium experiments showed that the inhibited AF production in peptone media was regulated in a cell-autonomous manner. mRNA expression analyses showed that both regulatory and AF biosynthesis genes were repressed in mycelia cultured with high initial spore densities. Metabolomic studies revealed that, in addition to inhibited AF biosynthesis, mycelia grown in peptone media with a high initial spore density showed suppressed fatty acid biosynthesis, reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, and increased pentose phosphate pathway products. Additions of TCA cycle intermediates had no effect on AF biosynthesis, suggesting the inhibited AF biosynthesis was not caused by depleted TCA cycle intermediates. Conclusions We here demonstrate that Aspergillus species grown in media with peptone as the sole carbon source are able to sense their own population densities and peptone concentrations to switch between rapid growth and AF production. This switching ability may offer Aspergillus species a competition advantage in natural ecosystems, producing AFs only when self-population is low and food is scarce. PMID:22694821

  9. DNA FINGERPRINTING ANALYSIS OF VEGETATIVE COMPATIBILITY GROUPS IN ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS FROM A PEANUT FEILD IN GEORGIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of a species specific DNA probe pAF28 to correctly match 75 strains of A. flavus isolated from a peanut field in Georgia with one of 44 distinct VCGs was assessed. Multiple strains belonging to the same VCG typically produced identical DNA fingerprints with the exception of VCG 17 and V...

  10. Analysis of genetic and aflatoxin diversity among Aspergillus flavus strains isolated from sorghum seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 34 A. flavus isolates were recovered from sorghum seeds sampled across five states in India. Our study included (1) species confirmation through PCR assay, (2) an aflatoxin cluster genotype assay using developed multiplex PCR, (3) quantification of total aflatoxin concentrations by the iC...

  11. Characterization of AFLAV, a Tfl/Sushi retrotransposon from Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insert of pAF28 contains a 4.5 kb region which encodes a truncated retrotransposon (AfRTL-1). In search for a full-length and intact copy of retrotransposon, we exploited a novel PCR cloning strategy by amplifying a 3.4 kb region from the genomic DNA of A. flavus NRRL 6541. The fragment was cl...

  12. Oxalic acid production by citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger overexpressing the oxaloacetate hydrolase gene oahA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2014-05-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used worldwide in the industrial production of citric acid. However, under specific cultivation conditions, citric acid-producing strains of A. niger accumulate oxalic acid as a by-product. Oxalic acid is used as a chelator, detergent, or tanning agent. Here, we sought to develop oxalic acid hyperproducers using A. niger as a host. To generate oxalic acid hyperproducers by metabolic engineering, transformants overexpressing the oahA gene, encoding oxaloacetate hydrolase (OAH; EC 3.7.1.1), were constructed in citric acid-producing A. niger WU-2223L as a host. The oxalic acid production capacity of this strain was examined by cultivation of EOAH-1 under conditions appropriate for oxalic acid production with 30 g/l glucose as a carbon source. Under all the cultivation conditions tested, the amount of oxalic acid produced by EOAH-1, a representative oahA-overexpressing transformant, exceeded that produced by A. niger WU-2223L. A. niger WU-2223L and EOAH-1 produced 15.6 and 28.9 g/l oxalic acid, respectively, during the 12-day cultivation period. The yield of oxalic acid for EOAH-1 was 64.2 % of the maximum theoretical yield. Our method for oxalic acid production gave the highest yield of any study reported to date. Therefore, we succeeded in generating oxalic acid hyperproducers by overexpressing a single gene, i.e., oahA, in citric acid-producing A. niger as a host. PMID:24615146

  13. Development of an Unmarked Gene Deletion System for the Filamentous Fungi Aspergillus niger and Talaromyces versatilis

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Stphane; Llanos, Agustina; Parrou, Jean-Luc; Kokolski, Matthew; Pullan, Steven T.; Shunburne, Lee

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a method to delete genes in filamentous fungi that allows recycling of the selection marker and is efficient in a nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-proficient strain. We exemplify the approach by deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator XlnR in the fungus Aspergillus niger. To show the efficiency and advantages of the method, we deleted 8 other genes and constructed a double mutant in this species. Moreover, we showed that the same principle also functions in a different genus of filamentous fungus (Talaromyces versatilis, basionym Penicillium funiculosum). This technique will increase the versatility of the toolboxes for genome manipulation of model and industrially relevant fungi. PMID:24682295

  14. Purification and characterization of a highly enantioselective epoxide hydrolase from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Morisseau, C; Archelas, A; Guitton, C; Faucher, D; Furstoss, R; Baratti, J C

    1999-07-01

    The epoxide hydrolase from Aspergillus niger was purified to homogeneity using a four-step procedure and p-nitrostyrene oxide (pNSO) as substrate. The enzyme was purified 246-fold with 4% activity yield. The protein is a tetramer composed of four identical subunits of molecular mass 45 kDa. Maximum activity was observed at 40 degrees C, pH 7.0, and with dimethylformamide as cosolvent to dissolve pNSO. Hydrolysis of pNSO was highly enantioselective, with an E value (i.e. enantiomeric ratio) of 40 and a high regioselectivity (97%) for the less hindered carbon atom of the epoxide. This enzyme may be a good biocatalyst for the preparation of enantiopure epoxides or diols. PMID:10406946

  15. Amylolysis of raw corn by Aspergillus niger for simultaneous ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, I.Y.; Steinberg, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    The novelty of this approach was hydrolysis of the raw starch in ground corn to fermentable sugars that are simultaneously fermented to ethanol by yeast in a nonsterile environment. Thus, the conventional cooking step can be eliminated for energy conservation. A koji of Aspergillus niger grown on whole corn for 3 days was the crude enzyme source. A ratio of 0.2 g dry koji/g total solids was found sufficient. Optimum pH was 4.2. Ethanol concentration was 7.7% (w/w) in the aqueous phase with 92% raw starch conversion. Agitation increased rate. Sacharification was the rate-limiting step. The initial ethanol concentration preventing fermentation was estimated to be 8.3% by weight. (Refs. 96).

  16. Refinement of the crystal structures of biomimetic weddellites produced by microscopic fungus Aspergillus niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakov, A. V.; Frank-Kamenetskaya, O. V.; Gurzhiy, V. V.; Zelenskaya, M. S.; Izatulina, A. R.; Sazanova, K. V.

    2014-05-01

    The single-crystal structures of four biomimetic weddellites CaC2O4 · (2 + x)H2O with different contents of zeolitic water ( x = 0.10-0.24 formula units) produced by the microscopic fungus Aspergillus niger were refined from X-ray diffraction data ( R = 0.029-0.038). The effect of zeolitic water content on the structural stability of weddellite was analyzed. The parameter a was shown to increase with increasing x due to the increase in the distance between water molecules along this direction. The water content and structural parameters of the synthesized weddellites are similar to those of weddellites from biofilms and kidney stones.

  17. Biotransformations of imbricatolic acid by Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus nigricans cultures.

    PubMed

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Aranda, Carlos; Kurina, Marcela; Rodrguez, Jaime A; Theoduloz, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Microbial transformation of imbricatolic acid (1) by Aspergillus niger afforded 1alpha-hydroxyimbricatolic acid (2), while transformation with Rhizopus nigricans yielded 15-hydroxy-8,17-epoxylabdan-19-oic acid (3). When the diterpene 1 was added to a Cunninghamella echinulata culture, the main products were the microbial metabolites mycophenolic acid (4) and its 3-hydroxy derivative 5. All the structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. The cytotoxicity of these compounds towards human lung fibroblasts and AGS cells was assessed. While 4 and 5 showed low cytotoxicity, with IC50 values > 1000 microM against AGS cells and fibroblasts, 1alpha-hydroxyimbricatolic acid (2) presented moderate toxicity towards these targets, with IC50 values of 307 and 631 microM, respectively. The structure of 2 is presented for the first time. PMID:17873843

  18. Effect of Microgravity on Fungistatic Activity of an α-Aminophosphonate Chitosan Derivative against Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang Soo; Kim, Byoung-Suhk

    2015-01-01

    Biocontamination within the international space station is ever increasing mainly due to human activity. Control of microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria are important to maintain the well-being of the astronauts during long-term stay in space since the immune functions of astronauts are compromised under microgravity. For the first time control of the growth of an opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus niger, under microgravity is studied in the presence of α-aminophosphonate chitosan. A low-shear modelled microgravity was used to mimic the conditions similar to space. The results indicated that the α-aminophosphonate chitosan inhibited the fungal growth significantly under microgravity. In addition, the inhibition mechanism of the modified chitosan was studied by UV-Visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. This work highlighted the role of a bio-based chitosan derivative to act as a disinfectant in space stations to remove fungal contaminants. PMID:26468641

  19. Effect of Microgravity on Fungistatic Activity of an ?-Aminophosphonate Chitosan Derivative against Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Devarayan, Kesavan; Sathishkumar, Yesupatham; Lee, Yang Soo; Kim, Byoung-Suhk

    2015-01-01

    Biocontamination within the international space station is ever increasing mainly due to human activity. Control of microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria are important to maintain the well-being of the astronauts during long-term stay in space since the immune functions of astronauts are compromised under microgravity. For the first time control of the growth of an opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus niger, under microgravity is studied in the presence of ?-aminophosphonate chitosan. A low-shear modelled microgravity was used to mimic the conditions similar to space. The results indicated that the ?-aminophosphonate chitosan inhibited the fungal growth significantly under microgravity. In addition, the inhibition mechanism of the modified chitosan was studied by UV-Visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. This work highlighted the role of a bio-based chitosan derivative to act as a disinfectant in space stations to remove fungal contaminants. PMID:26468641

  20. An acidic pectin lyase from Aspergillus niger with favourable efficiency in fruit juice clarification.

    PubMed

    Xu, S X; Qin, X; Liu, B; Zhang, D Q; Zhang, W; Wu, K; Zhang, Y H

    2015-02-01

    The pectin lyase gene pnl-zj5a from Aspergillus niger ZJ5 was identified and expressed in Pichia pastoris. PNL-ZJ5A was purified by ultrafiltration, anion exchange and gel chromatography. The Km and Vmax values determined using citrus pectin were 0.66 mg ml(-1) and 32.6 ?mol min(-1) mg(-1) , respectively. PNL-ZJ5A exhibited optimal activity at 43C and retained activity over 25-50C. PNL-ZJ5A was optimally active at pH 5 and effective in apple juice clarification. Compared with controls, PNL-ZJ5A increased the fruit juice yield significantly. Furthermore, PNL-ZJ5A reduced the viscosity of apple juice by 38.8% and increased its transmittance by 86.3%. PNL-ZJ5A combined with a commercial pectin esterase resulted in higher juice volume. PMID:25382689

  1. Aroma enhancement in wines using co-immobilized Aspergillus niger glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez-Pombo, Paula; Faria, Laura; Carrau, Francisco; Batista-Viera, Francisco; Brena, Beatriz M

    2014-01-15

    A major fraction of monoterpenes and norisoprenoids in young wines is conjugated to sugars representing a significant reservoir of aromatic precursors. To promote their release, ?-glucosidase, ?-arabinosidase, and ?-rhamnosidase from a commercial Aspergillus niger preparation, were immobilized onto acrylic beads. The aim of this work was the development and application of an immobilized biocatalyst, due to the well-known advantages over soluble enzyme preparations: control of the reaction progress and preparation of enzyme-free products. In addition, the obtained derivative showed increased stability in simile wine conditions. After the treatment of Muscat wine with the biocatalyst for 20days, free monoterpenes increased significantly (from 1119 to 2132?g/L, p<0.01) with respect to the control wine. Geraniol was increased 3,4-fold over its flavor thresholds, and accordingly its impact on sensorial properties was very relevant: nine of ten judges considered treated wine more intense in fruit and floral notes. PMID:24054229

  2. Shotgun Proteomics of Aspergillus niger Microsomes upon d-Xylose Induction▿ †

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, José Miguel P. Ferreira; van Passel, Mark W. J.; Schaap, Peter J.; de Graaff, Leo H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein secretion plays an eminent role in cell maintenance and adaptation to the extracellular environment of microorganisms. Although protein secretion is an extremely efficient process in filamentous fungi, the mechanisms underlying protein secretion have remained largely uncharacterized in these organisms. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the d-xylose induction of cellulase and hemicellulase enzyme secretion on the protein composition of secretory organelles in Aspergillus niger. We aimed to systematically identify the components involved in the secretion of these enzymes via mass spectrometry of enriched subcellular microsomal fractions. Under each condition, fractions enriched for secretory organelles were processed for tandem mass spectrometry, resulting in the identification of peptides that originate from 1,081 proteins, 254 of which—many of them hypothetical proteins—were predicted to play direct roles in the secretory pathway. d-Xylose induction led to an increase in specific small GTPases known to be associated with polarized growth, exocytosis, and endocytosis. Moreover, the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) components Cdc48 and all 14 of the 20S proteasomal subunits were recruited to the secretory organelles. In conclusion, induction of extracellular enzymes results in specific changes in the secretory subproteome of A. niger, and the most prominent change found in this study was the recruitment of the 20S proteasomal subunits to the secretory organelles. PMID:20453123

  3. Conversion of cassava starch to biomass, carbohydrates, and acids by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Tan, K H; Ferguson, L B; Carlton, C

    1984-01-01

    The filamentous fungus, Aspergillus niger, efficiently converted cassava polysaccharides to mycelial mass, simple sugars, and acids during the course of its growth. A typical 70-ml culture broth containing 2% cassava polysaccharides yielded 0.38 g dry mycelial mass, 1.14 mmol reducing sugars, and 1.17 meq acids at the end of 42 h. About 70% of the initial total carbohydrate in the medium was degraded during the same period. The sugars and acids in the culture broths were analyzed by HPLC on a single Aminex HPX-87 column at 55 degrees C, using 0.013 N H2SO4 as the eluting solvent. Cassava polysaccharides were degraded to oligosaccharides, maltotriose, maltose, and glucose beyond the 20-h growth periods, with maltotriose emerging as the major simple sugar. The appearance of citric, malic, gluconic, succinic, and fumaric acids accounted mostly for the decreasing pH in the growth media. Formation of carbohydrate species in the culture broths was closely related to the biosynthesis and secretion of several carbohydrases by A. niger. The extracellular carbohydrases were separated and identified by chromatofocusing and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to be amyloglucosidase (EC 3.1.2.3), alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1), and alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20), respectively. PMID:6490584

  4. Enzymatic detergent formulation containing amylase from Aspergillus niger: a comparative study with commercial detergent formulations.

    PubMed

    Mitidieri, Sydnei; Souza Martinelli, Anne Helene; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning

    2006-07-01

    There is a wide range of biotechnological applications for amylases, including the textile, pharmaceutical, food and laundry industries. Hydrolytic enzymes are 100% biodegradable and enzymatic detergents can achieve effective cleaning with lukewarm water. Microorganisms and culture media were tested for amylase production and the best producer was Aspergillus niger L119 (3.9 U ml(-1) +/- 0.2) in submerged culture and its amylase demonstrated excellent activity at 50-55 degrees C and pH 4.0, remaining stable at 53 degrees C for up to 200 h. In order to establish the potential uses of this enzyme in detergents, different formulations were tested using the A. niger amylase extract. Enzyme activity was compared with three commercial formulations. The detergents are used in hospitals to clean surgical and endoscopy equipment. The presence of amylase in the formulation is because of its action within hospital drainage system, whether or not it has any function in cleaning the equipment. PMID:16112858

  5. Switching from a Unicellular to Multicellular Organization in an Aspergillus niger Hypha

    PubMed Central

    Bleichrodt, Robert-Jan; Hulsman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pores in fungal septa enable cytoplasmic streaming between hyphae and their compartments. Consequently, the mycelium can be considered unicellular. However, we show here that Woronin bodies close ~50% of the three most apical septa of growing hyphae of Aspergillus niger. The incidence of closure of the 9th and 10th septa was even ?94%. Intercompartmental streaming of photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PA-GFP) was not observed when the septa were closed, but open septa acted as a barrier, reducing the mobility rate of PA-GFP ~500 times. This mobility rate decreased with increasing septal age and under stress conditions, likely reflecting a regulatory mechanism affecting septal pore diameter. Modeling revealed that such regulation offers effective control of compound concentration between compartments. Modeling also showed that the incidence of septal closure in A.niger had an even stronger impact on cytoplasmic continuity. Cytoplasm of hyphal compartments was shown not to be in physical contact when separated by more than 4 septa. Together, data show that apical compartments of growing hyphae behave unicellularly, while older compartments have a multicellular organization. PMID:25736883

  6. Spatial differentiation of gene expression in Aspergillus niger colony grown for sugar beet pulp utilization.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Isabelle; Zhou, Miaomiao; Vivas Duarte, Alexandra; Downes, Damien J; Todd, Richard B; Kloezen, Wendy; Post, Harm; Heck, Albert J R; Maarten Altelaar, A F; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of plant biomass to fermentable sugars is of critical importance for the use of plant materials for biofuels. Filamentous fungi are ubiquitous organisms and major plant biomass degraders. Single colonies of some fungal species can colonize massive areas as large as five soccer stadia. During growth, the mycelium encounters heterogeneous carbon sources. Here we assessed whether substrate heterogeneity is a major determinant of spatial gene expression in colonies of Aspergillus niger. We analyzed whole-genome gene expression in five concentric zones of 5-day-old colonies utilizing sugar beet pulp as a complex carbon source. Growth, protein production and secretion occurred throughout the colony. Genes involved in carbon catabolism were expressed uniformly from the centre to the periphery whereas genes encoding plant biomass degrading enzymes and nitrate utilization were expressed differentially across the colony. A combined adaptive response of carbon-catabolism and enzyme production to locally available monosaccharides was observed. Finally, our results demonstrate that A. niger employs different enzymatic tools to adapt its metabolism as it colonizes complex environments. PMID:26314379

  7. Bioleaching of heavy metals from a low-grade mining ore using Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Catherine N; Kamali, Mahtab; Gibbs, Bernard F

    2004-07-01

    The main concern of this study is to develop a feasible and economical technique to microbially recover metals from oxide low-grade ores. Owing to the significant quantities of metals that are embodied in low-grade ores and mining residues, these are potential viable sources of metals. In addition, they potentially endanger the environment, as the metals they contain may be released to the environment in hazardous form. Hence, mining industries are seeking an efficient, economic technique to handle these ores. Pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical techniques are either very expensive, energy intensive or have a negative impact on the environment. For these reasons, biohydrometallurgical techniques are coming into perspective. In this study, by employing Aspergillus niger, the feasibility of recovery of metals from a mining residue is shown. A. niger exhibits good potential in generating a variety of organic acids effective for metal solubilization. Organic acid effectiveness was enhanced when sulfuric acid was added to the medium. Different agricultural wastes such as potato peels were tested. In addition, different auxiliary processes were evaluated in order to either elevate the efficiency or reduce costs. Finally, maximum solubilization of 68%, 46% and 34% were achieved for copper, zinc and nickel, respectively. Also iron co-dissolution was minimized as only 7% removal occurred. PMID:15177728

  8. Production of Proteolytic Enzymes by a Keratin-Degrading Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Fernanda Cortez; Silva, Lucas André Dedavid e; Tichota, Deise Michele; Daroit, Daniel Joner; Velho, Renata Voltolini; Pereira, Jamile Queiroz; Corrêa, Ana Paula Folmer; Brandelli, Adriano

    2011-01-01

    A fungal isolate with capability to grow in keratinous substrate as only source of carbon and nitrogen was identified as Aspergillus niger using the sequencing of the ITS region of the rDNA. This strain produced a slightly acid keratinase and an acid protease during cultivation in feather meal. The peak of keratinolytic activity occurred in 48 h and the maximum proteolytic activity in 96 h. These enzymes were partly characterized as serine protease and aspartic protease, respectively. The effects of feather meal concentration and initial pH on enzyme production were evaluated using a central composite design combined with response surface methodology. The optimal conditions were determined as pH 5.0 for protease and 7.8 for keratinase and 20 g/L of feather meal, showing that both models were predictive. Production of keratinases by A. niger is a less-exploited field that might represent a novel and promising biotechnological application for this microorganism. PMID:22007293

  9. Invitro and invivo antifungal activity of Cassia surattensis flower against Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Sumathy, Vello; Zakaria, Zuraini; Jothy, Subramanion L; Gothai, Sivapragasam; Vijayarathna, Soundararajan; Yoga Latha, Lachimanan; Chen, Yeng; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2014-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) in immunocompromised host is a major infectious disease leading to reduce the survival rate of world population. Aspergillus niger is a causative agent causing IA. Cassia surattensis plant is commonly used in rural areas to treat various types of disease. C. surattensis flower extract was evaluated against the systemic aspergillosis model in this study. Qualitative measurement of fungal burden suggested a reduction pattern in the colony forming unit (CFU) of lung, liver, spleen and kidney for the extract treated group. Galactomannan assay assessment showed a decrease of fungal load in the treatment and positive control group with galactomannan index (GMI) value of 1.27 and 0.25 on day 28 but the negative control group showed high level of galactomannan in the serum with GMI value of 3.58. Histopathology examinations of the tissues featured major architecture modifications in the tissues of negative control group. Tissue reparation and recovery from infection were detected in extract treated and positive control group. Time killing fungicidal study of A. niger revealed dependence of the concentration of C. surattensis flower extract. PMID:25457794

  10. GC--MS analysis reveals production of 2--Phenylethanol from Aspergillus niger endophytic in rose.

    PubMed

    Wani, Masood Ahmed; Sanjana, Kaul; Kumar, Dhar Manoj; Lal, Dhar Kanahya

    2010-02-01

    Endophytes include all organisms that during a variable period of their life, colonize the living internal tissues of their hosts without causing detectable symptoms. Several fungal endophytes have been isolated from a variety of plant species which have proved themselves as a rich source of secondary metabolites. The reported natural products from endophytes include antibiotics, immunosuppresants, anticancer compounds, antioxidant agents, etc. For the first time Rosa damacaena (rose) has been explored for its endophytes. The rose oil industry is the major identified deligence for its application in perfumery, flavouring, ointments, and pharmaceuticals including various herbal products. During the present investigation fungal endophytes were isolated from Rosa damacaena. A total of fifty four isolates were isolated out of which sixteen isolates were screened for the production of secondary metabolites. GCMS analysis reveals the production of 2-phenylethanol by one of the isolates JUBT 3M which was identified as Aspergillus niger. This is the first report of production of 2-phenylethanol from endophytic A. niger. 2-phenylethanol is an important constituent of rose oil constituting about 4.06% of rose oil. Presence of 2-phenylethanol indicates that the endophyte of rose may duplicate the biosynthesis of phenyl propanoids by rose plant. Besides this, the other commercial applications of phenylethanol include its use in antiseptics, disinfectants, anti-microbials and preservative in pharmaceuticals. PMID:20082377

  11. Production of Proteolytic Enzymes by a Keratin-Degrading Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fernanda Cortez; Silva, Lucas Andr Dedavid E; Tichota, Deise Michele; Daroit, Daniel Joner; Velho, Renata Voltolini; Pereira, Jamile Queiroz; Corra, Ana Paula Folmer; Brandelli, Adriano

    2011-01-01

    A fungal isolate with capability to grow in keratinous substrate as only source of carbon and nitrogen was identified as Aspergillus niger using the sequencing of the ITS region of the rDNA. This strain produced a slightly acid keratinase and an acid protease during cultivation in feather meal. The peak of keratinolytic activity occurred in 48?h and the maximum proteolytic activity in 96?h. These enzymes were partly characterized as serine protease and aspartic protease, respectively. The effects of feather meal concentration and initial pH on enzyme production were evaluated using a central composite design combined with response surface methodology. The optimal conditions were determined as pH 5.0 for protease and 7.8 for keratinase and 20?g/L of feather meal, showing that both models were predictive. Production of keratinases by A. niger is a less-exploited field that might represent a novel and promising biotechnological application for this microorganism. PMID:22007293

  12. Seeds as natural matrices for immobilization of Aspergillus niger mycelium producing pectinases.

    PubMed

    Fiedurek, J; Szczodrak, J; Rogalski, J

    1995-04-01

    A simple method for the immobilization of Aspergillus niger mycelium producing polygalacturonase (PG) and pectinesterase (PE) is described. Fungal conidia were immobilized on wheat, rye, barley, peas, buckwheat and mustards seeds. Spongy mycelia overgrowing the seed surfaces on mineral medium with pectin produced extracellular PG and PE; the highest production was reached on the wheat carrier. Some of the variables influencing the enzymatic activity have been optimized. After every 24 h, a culture liquid with 6.8-7.8 U of PG ml-1 and 7.0-10.1 U of PE ml-1 was obtained. This procedure also made possible repeated batch enzyme production and, as many as eight subsequent 24-h batches could be fermented by using the same carrier without any loss of PG activity. The addition of sodium orthovanadate (1 mmol) into the medium with pectin caused a significant increase in PG and PE activity produced by free cells of A. niger (by 1.59-fold and 1.67-fold respectively), and only 0.47-fold of PG activity in case of the immobilized mycelium. PMID:7744727

  13. Efficacy of lipase from Aspergillus niger as an additive in detergent formulations: a statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Saisubramanian, N; Edwinoliver, N G; Nandakumar, N; Kamini, N R; Puvanakrishnan, R

    2006-08-01

    The efficacy of lipase from Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594 as an additive in laundry detergent formulations was assessed using response surface methodology (RSM). A five-level four-factorial central composite design was chosen to explain the washing protocol with four critical factors, viz. detergent concentration, lipase concentration, buffer pH and washing temperature. The model suggested that all the factors chosen had a significant impact on oil removal and the optimal conditions for the removal of olive oil from cotton fabric were 1.0% detergent, 75 U of lipase, buffer pH of 9.5 and washing temperature of 25 degrees C. Under optimal conditions, the removal of olive oil from cotton fabric was 33 and 17.1% at 25 and 49 degrees C, respectively, in the presence of lipase over treatment with detergent alone. Hence, lipase from A. niger could be effectively used as an additive in detergent formulation for the removal of triglyceride soil both in cold and warm wash conditions. PMID:16491364

  14. Bacillus subtilis attachment to Aspergillus niger hyphae results in mutually altered metabolism.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Isabelle; van den Esker, Marielle H; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Mattern, Derek J; Blei, Felix; Zhou, Miaomiao; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Brakhage, Axel A; Kuipers, Oscar P; de Vries, Ronald P; Kovács, Ákos T

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between microbes affects the growth, metabolism and differentiation of members of the microbial community. While direct and indirect competition, like antagonism and nutrient consumption have a negative effect on the interacting members of the population, microbes have also evolved in nature not only to fight, but in some cases to adapt to or support each other, while increasing the fitness of the community. The presence of bacteria and fungi in soil results in various interactions including mutualism. Bacilli attach to the plant root and form complex communities in the rhizosphere. Bacillus subtilis, when grown in the presence of Aspergillus niger, interacts similarly with the fungus, by attaching and growing on the hyphae. Based on data obtained in a dual transcriptome experiment, we suggest that both fungi and bacteria alter their metabolism during this interaction. Interestingly, the transcription of genes related to the antifungal and putative antibacterial defence mechanism of B. subtilis and A. niger, respectively, are decreased upon attachment of bacteria to the mycelia. Analysis of the culture supernatant suggests that surfactin production by B. subtilis was reduced when the bacterium was co-cultivated with the fungus. Our experiments provide new insights into the interaction between a bacterium and a fungus. PMID:25040940

  15. Optimization of Fermentation Medium for Extracellular Lipase Production from Aspergillus niger Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Zhi; Guo, Hongtao; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    Lipase produced by Aspergillus niger is widely used in various industries. In this study, extracellular lipase production from an industrial producing strain of A. niger was improved by medium optimization. The secondary carbon source, nitrogen source, and lipid were found to be the three most influential factors for lipase production by single-factor experiments. According to the statistical approach, the optimum values of three most influential parameters were determined: 10.5 g/L corn starch, 35.4 g/L soybean meal, and 10.9 g/L soybean oil. Using this optimum medium, the best lipase activity was obtained at 2,171 U/mL, which was 16.4% higher than using the initial medium. All these results confirmed the validity of the model. Furthermore, results of the Box-Behnken Design and quadratic models analysis indicated that the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio significantly influenced the enzyme production, which also suggested that more attention should be paid to the C/N ratio for the optimization of enzyme production. PMID:26366414

  16. Morphology of Filamentous Fungi: Linking Cellular Biology to Process Engineering Using Aspergillus niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krull, Rainer; Cordes, Christiana; Horn, Harald; Kampen, Ingo; Kwade, Arno; Neu, Thomas R.; Nörtemann, Bernd

    In various biotechnological processes, filamentous fungi, e.g. Aspergillus niger, are widely applied for the production of high value-added products due to their secretion efficiency. There is, however, a tangled relationship between the morphology of these microorganisms, the transport phenomena and the related productivity. The morphological characteristics vary between freely dispersed mycelia and distinct pellets of aggregated biomass. Hence, advantages and disadvantages for mycel or pellet cultivation have to be balanced out carefully. Due to this inadequate understanding of morphogenesis of filamentous microorganisms, fungal morphology, along with reproducibility of inocula of the same quality, is often a bottleneck of productivity in industrial production. To obtain an optimisation of the production process it is of great importance to gain a better understanding of the molecular and cell biology of these microorganisms as well as the approaches in biochemical engineering and particle technique, in particular to characterise the interactions between the growth conditions, cell morphology, spore-hyphae-interactions and product formation. Advances in particle and image analysis techniques as well as micromechanical devices and their applications to fungal cultivations have made available quantitative morphological data on filamentous cells. This chapter provides the ambitious aspects of this line of action, focussing on the control and characterisation of the morphology, the transport gradients and the approaches to understand the metabolism of filamentous fungi. Based on these data, bottlenecks in the morphogenesis of A. niger within the complex production pathways from gene to product should be identified and this may improve the production yield.

  17. Spatial differentiation of gene expression in Aspergillus niger colony grown for sugar beet pulp utilization

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Isabelle; Zhou, Miaomiao; Vivas Duarte, Alexandra; Downes, Damien J.; Todd, Richard B.; Kloezen, Wendy; Post, Harm; Heck, Albert J. R.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; de Vries, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of plant biomass to fermentable sugars is of critical importance for the use of plant materials for biofuels. Filamentous fungi are ubiquitous organisms and major plant biomass degraders. Single colonies of some fungal species can colonize massive areas as large as five soccer stadia. During growth, the mycelium encounters heterogeneous carbon sources. Here we assessed whether substrate heterogeneity is a major determinant of spatial gene expression in colonies of Aspergillus niger. We analyzed whole-genome gene expression in five concentric zones of 5-day-old colonies utilizing sugar beet pulp as a complex carbon source. Growth, protein production and secretion occurred throughout the colony. Genes involved in carbon catabolism were expressed uniformly from the centre to the periphery whereas genes encoding plant biomass degrading enzymes and nitrate utilization were expressed differentially across the colony. A combined adaptive response of carbon-catabolism and enzyme production to locally available monosaccharides was observed. Finally, our results demonstrate that A. niger employs different enzymatic tools to adapt its metabolism as it colonizes complex environments. PMID:26314379

  18. Heterologous expression and enzymatic characterization of fructosyltransferase from Aspergillus niger in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailin; Wang, Yitian; Zhang, Ling; Shen, Wei

    2016-01-25

    In this work, the cDNA encoding fructosyltransferase (FTase) from Aspergillus niger YZ59 (CICIM F0901) was obtained and expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris strain GS115. The yield of recombinant FTase in a 5-L fermentor reached 1020.0 U/mL after 96 h of induction, which was 1160.4 times higher that of native FTase from A. niger YZ59. The specific activity of recombinant FTase was 6.8×10(4) U/mg. The optimum temperature and pH of the recombinant FTase were 55 °C and 5.5, respectively. The recombinant FTase was stable below 40 °C and at pH from 3.0 to 10.0. Using sucrose as the substrate, the Km and Vmax values of recombinant FTase were 159.8 g/L and 0.66 g/(L min), respectively. The turnover number (kcat) and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of recombinant FTase was 1.1×10(4) min(-1) and 68.8 L/(g min), respectively. The recombinant FTase was slightly activated by 5mM Ni(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), Fe(3+), or Mn(2+), but inhibited by all other metal ions (Na(+), Li(+), Ba(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+)). The highest yield of fructooligosaccharides for purified FTase reached approximately 343.3 g/L (w/v). This is the first study reporting the heterologous expression of FTases from A. niger in P. pastoris. This study plays an important role in the fructooligosaccharide synthesis industry by recombinant FTases. PMID:25976629

  19. Mycotoxigenicity of clinical and environmental Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus isolates.

    PubMed

    Kosalec, Ivan; Pepeljnjak, Stjepan

    2005-12-01

    Clinical isolates of fifty strains of A. fumigatus and 30 strains of A. flavus from immmunocompromised patients from the hematological unit were analyzed for mycotoxin production and compared with the same number of environmental isolates (from soil, compost, and air). Only 9 (18%) strains of A. fumigatus produced gliotoxin in a mean concentration 2.22 mg mL-1 (range 0.5-5 mg mL-1). Aflatoxin B1 was detected in 7 (23%) isolates (range from 0.02 to 1.2 mg L-1) and aflatoxin G1 in one (3%) of clinical A. flavus isolates (0.12 mg L-1). In the group of environmental isolates, 11 (37%) were positive for aflatoxin B1 production (range from 0.02 to 1.2 mg L-1) and one for aflatoxin G1 (0.02 mg L-1). Bioautoantibiogram ("bioassay in situ") on TLC plates against Bacillus subtilis NCTC 8236 showed that only gliotoxin-producing strains have bactericidal activity of Rf values corresponding to gliotoxin. The secondary-metabolite profiles of clinical and environmental A. fumigatus and A. flavus isolates were homogeneous, except for gliotoxin production, which was detected only in the group of clinical isolates of A. fumigatus (18%). PMID:16375826

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Performance of Aspergillus flavus on Resistant and Susceptible Maize Genotypes during Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus, a mycotoxicogenic fungal genus, produces carcinogenic aflatoxins in crops like peanuts and maize. Development of fungal resistant maize cultivars is one strategy used to decrease contamination. Successful development and identification of resistant maize genotypes requires evaluation o...