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Sample records for floating light activated

  1. Feasibility of Neural Stimulation With Floating-Light-Activated Microelectrical Stimulators

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Ammar; Sahin, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Neural microstimulation is becoming a powerful tool for the restoration of impaired functions in the central nervous system. Microelectrode arrays with fine wire interconnects have traditionally been used in the development of these neural prosthetic devices. However, these interconnects are usually the most vulnerable part of the neuroprosthetic implant that can eventually cause the device to fail. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of floating-light-activated microelectrical stimulators (FLAMES) for wireless neural stimulation. A computer model was developed to simulate the micro stimulators for typical requirements of neural activation in the human white and gray matters. First, the photon densities due to a circular laser beam were simulated in the neural tissue at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Temperature elevation in the tissue was calculated and the laser power was retrospectively adjusted to 325 and 250 mW/cm2 in the gray and white matters, respectively, to limit ΔT to 0.5 °C. Total device area of the FLAMES increased with all parameters considered but decreased with the output voltage. We conclude that the number of series photodiodes in the device can be used as a free parameter to minimize the device size. The results suggest that floating, optically activated stimulators are feasible at submillimeter sizes for the activation of the brain cortex or the spinal cord. PMID:21552457

  2. Floating light-activated microelectrical stimulators tested in the rat spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Ammar; Sahin, Mesut; Freedman, David S.; Cevik, Elif; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Unlu, M. Selim

    2011-10-01

    Microelectrodes of neural stimulation utilize fine wires for electrical connections to driving electronics. Breakage of these wires and the neural tissue response due to their tethering forces are major problems encountered with long-term implantation of microelectrodes. The lifetime of an implant for neural stimulation can be substantially improved if the wire interconnects are eliminated. Thus, we proposed a floating light-activated microelectrical stimulator (FLAMES) for wireless neural stimulation. In this paradigm, a laser beam at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths will be used as a means of energy transfer to the device. In this study, microstimulators of various sizes were fabricated, with two cascaded GaAs p-i-n photodiodes, and tested in the rat spinal cord. A train of NIR pulses (0.2 ms, 50 Hz) was sent through the tissue to wirelessly activate the devices and generate the stimulus current. The forces elicited by intraspinal stimulation were measured from the ipsilateral forelimb with a force transducer. The largest forces were around 1.08 N, a significant level of force for the rat forelimb motor function. These in vivo tests suggest that the FLAMES can be used for intraspinal microstimulation even for the deepest implant locations in the rat spinal cord. The power required to generate a threshold arm movement was investigated as the laser source was moved away from the microstimulator. The results indicate that the photon density does not decrease substantially for horizontal displacements of the source that are in the same order as the beam radius. This gives confidence that the stimulation threshold may not be very sensitive to small displacement of the spinal cord relative to the spine-mounted optical power source.

  3. Floating light-activated microelectrical stimulators tested in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Ammar; Sahin, Mesut; Freedman, David S; Cevik, Elif; Spuhler, Philipp S; Unlu, M Selim

    2011-10-01

    Microelectrodes of neural stimulation utilize fine wires for electrical connections to driving electronics. Breakage of these wires and the neural tissue response due to their tethering forces are major problems encountered with long-term implantation of microelectrodes. The lifetime of an implant for neural stimulation can be substantially improved if the wire interconnects are eliminated. Thus, we proposed a floating light-activated microelectrical stimulator (FLAMES) for wireless neural stimulation. In this paradigm, a laser beam at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths will be used as a means of energy transfer to the device. In this study, microstimulators of various sizes were fabricated, with two cascaded GaAs p-i-n photodiodes, and tested in the rat spinal cord. A train of NIR pulses (0.2 ms, 50 Hz) was sent through the tissue to wirelessly activate the devices and generate the stimulus current. The forces elicited by intraspinal stimulation were measured from the ipsilateral forelimb with a force transducer. The largest forces were around 1.08 N, a significant level of force for the rat forelimb motor function. These in vivo tests suggest that the FLAMES can be used for intraspinal microstimulation even for the deepest implant locations in the rat spinal cord. The power required to generate a threshold arm movement was investigated as the laser source was moved away from the microstimulator. The results indicate that the photon density does not decrease substantially for horizontal displacements of the source that are in the same order as the beam radius. This gives confidence that the stimulation threshold may not be very sensitive to small displacement of the spinal cord relative to the spine-mounted optical power source. PMID:21914931

  4. Floating Light-Activated Micro Electrical Stimulators Tested in the Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Ammar; Sahin, Mesut; Freedman, David S.; Cevik, Elif; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Unlu, M. Selim

    2011-01-01

    Microelectrodes of neural stimulation utilize fine wires for electrical connections to driving electronics. Breakage of these wires and the neural tissue response due to their tethering forces are major problems encountered with long term implantation of microelectrodes. The lifetime of an implant for neural stimulation can be substantially improved if the wire interconnects are eliminated. Thus, we proposed a floating light-activated micro electrical stimulator (FLAMES) for wireless neural stimulation. In this paradigm, a laser beam at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths will be used as a means of energy transfer to the device. In this study, microstimulators of various sizes were fabricated, with two cascaded GaAs p-i-n photodiodes, and tested in the rat spinal cord. A train of NIR pulses (0.2 ms, 50 Hz) was sent through the tissue to wirelessly activate the devices and generate the stimulus current. The forces elicited by intraspinal stimulation were measured from the ipsilateral forelimb with a force transducer. The largest forces were around 1.08N, a significant level of force for the rat forelimb motor function. These in vivo tests suggest that the FLAMES can be used for intraspinal microstimulation even for the deepest implant locations in the rat spinal cord. The power required to generate a threshold arm movement was investigated as the laser source was moved away from the microstimulator. The results indicate that the photon density does not decrease substantially for horizontal displacements of the source that are in the same order as the beam radius. This gives confidence that the stimulation threshold may not be very sensitive to small displacement of the spinal cord relative to the spine-mounted optical power source. PMID:21914931

  5. In vitro testing of floating light activated micro-electrical stimulators.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Ammar; Jayasinha, Vianney; Spuhler, Philipp S; Unlu, M; Sahin, Mesut

    2009-01-01

    Chronic tissue response to microelectrode implants stands in the way as a major challenge to development of many neural prosthetic applications. The long term tissue response is mostly due to the movement of interconnects and the resulting mechanical stress between the electrode and the surrounding neural tissue. Remotely activated floating micro-stimulators are one possible method of eliminating the interconnects. As a method of energy transfer to the micro-stimulator, we proposed to use a laser beam at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. FLAMES of various sizes were fabricated with integrated silicon PIN photodiodes. Sizes varied from 120 (Width) x 300 (Length) x 100 (Height) microm to 200 x 500 x 100microm. Devices were bench tested using 850nm excitation from a Ti:Sapphire laser. To test this method, the voltage field of the FLAMES was experimentally tested in saline solution pulsed with a NIR laser beam. The voltage generated is around 196mV in peak at the cathodic contact as a response to a single pulse. When a train of laser pulses was applied at 100Hz, the peak voltage at the cathodic contact remained around 141mV suggesting the feasibility of this approach for applications with pulse frequencies up to 100Hz. PMID:19964480

  6. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Floating Hose Strings 149.550 What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string? Hose strings that are floating or supported on trestles must display...

  7. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Floating Hose Strings 149.550 What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string? Hose strings that are floating or supported on trestles must display...

  8. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Floating Hose Strings 149.550 What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string? Hose strings that are floating or supported on trestles must display...

  9. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Simple Floating Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Nakamura, Junichi; Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel image sensor integrated circuit features simple floating-gate structure, with metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as active circuit element in each pixel. Provides flexibility of readout modes, no kTC noise, and relatively simple structure suitable for high-density arrays. Features desirable for "smart sensor" applications.

  10. Photo-active float for field water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Shwetharani, R; Balakrishna, R Geetha

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the antibacterial activity of a photoactive float fabricated with visible light active N-F-TiO2 for the disinfection of field water widely contaminated with Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria like, Salmonella typhimurium (Gram negative), Escherichia coli (Gram negative), Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive), Bacillus species (Gram positive), and Pseudomonas species (Gram negative). The antibacterial activity can be attributed to the unique properties of the photocatalyst, which releases reactive oxygen species in aqueous solution, under the illumination of sunlight. N-F-TiO2 nanoparticles efficiently photocatalyse the destruction of all the bacteria present in the contaminated water, giving clean water. The inactivation of bacteria is confirmed by a standard plate count method, MDA, RNA and DNA analysis. The purity of water was further validated by SPC indicating nil counts of bacteria after two days of storing and testing. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, BET measurement, SEM, EDX, UV-Vis and PL analysis. PMID:26924232

  11. 33 CFR 149.550 - What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for lights on a floating hose string? 149.550 Section 149.550 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on...

  12. Controlled-motion of floating macro-objects induced by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetta, Daniele E.; Simoni, Francesco; Nucara, Luca; Castagna, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    Photons energy can be conventionally converted to mechanical work through a series of energy-expensive steps such as for example delivery and storage. However, these steps can be bypassed obtaining a straightforward conversion of photons energy to mechanical work. As an example, in literature, high power near infrared light is used to move small objects floating on fluid surfaces, exploiting the Marangoni effect. In this work we use a low power non-collimated visible laser-light to induce thermal surface tension gradients, resulting in the movement of objects floating on fluid surfaces. By real time tracking of the object trajectories, we evaluate the average applied driving force caused by the light irradiation. In addition we show how transparent objects can be moved by light when the supporting fluids are properly doped.

  13. Active motion and load control of floating offshore wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, Kaveh

    The research in this thesis is focused on stabilization and load reduction of floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) structures for both the fore-aft (pitch) and side-to-side (roll) directions. Based on the Tuned Mass Damper (TMD) and Active Vane concepts recently proposed, two composite actuation schemes are investigated. The first scheme is to apply the horizontal vane and vertical vane to platform pitch and roll, respectively, resulting in the so-called Double Vane Actuation (DVA) scheme. The second scheme is the combination of the TMD based pitch control and active vertical vane based roll control, resulting in the so-called Hybrid Actuation (HA) scheme. Simulation results of DVA show great reductions of motions and loads in the fore-aft and side-to-side directions. Performance of HA is investigated by extensive simulations based on the IEC61400-3 standard and results show significant and consistent motions and loads reductions in both FA and SS directions.

  14. Active vibration isolation of macro-micro motion stage disturbances using a floating stator platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lufan; Long, Zhili; Cai, Jiandong; Liu, Yang; Fang, Jiwen; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-10-01

    Macro-micro motion stage is mainly applied in microelectronics manufacturing to realize a high-acceleration, high-speed and nano-positioning motion. The high acceleration and nano-positioning accuracy would be influenced by the vibration of the motion stage. In the paper, a concept of floating stage is introduced in the macro-micro motion for isolating vibration disturbances. The design model of the floating stage is established and its theoretical analyses including natural frequency, transient and frequency response analyses are investigated, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the floating stator platform as a vibration isolator for the macro-micro motion stage. Moreover, an optimal design of the floating stator is conducted and then verified by experiments. In order to characterize and quantify the performance of isolation obtained from the traditional fixed stator and the floating stator, the acceleration responses at different accelerations, speeds and displacements are measured in x, y and z directions. The theoretical and experimental analyses in time and frequency domains indicate that the floating stator platform is effective to actively isolate the vibration in the macro-micro motion stage. In macro-micro motion stage, high acceleration motion is provided by VCM. Vibration is induced from VCM, that is, VCM is a source system, the vibration response or force is felt by a receiver system. Generally, VCM is fixed on the base, which means that the base is the receiver system which absorbs or transfers the vibration. However, the vibration cannot completely disappear and the base vibration is inevitable. In the paper, a floated stator platform as isolation system is developed to decrease or isolate vibration between VCM and base. The floated stator platform consists of damper, stopper, floated lock, spring, limiter, sub base, etc. Unlike the traditional stator of VCM fixed on the base, the floated stator can be moved on the linear guide under vibration force or driven force. The springs are used to buffer shock at both end of the floated stator and the dampers are applied to absorb vibration before and after the floated stator. Limiter and stopper prevent the damper from impact damage in the linear direction. The springs and dampers form a spring-damping system, as shown in above figure. When VCM provides a large driven force transiently for high acceleration motion, the impact force or unpredictable vibration would be absorbed or decreased through the floated stator platform. The vibration of base will be weakened or eliminated and this can assure positional accuracy of grating ruler read head on positioning platform and others.

  15. "JCE" Classroom Activity #108. Using Archimedes' Principle to Explain Floating and Sinking Cans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In this activity, students (working alone or in groups) measure the mass of several soda cans (diet and regular soda) along with the mass of water that each can displaces. The students are then asked to compare these two mass values for the sinking cans and for the floating cans. The purpose of this activity is for students to determine that the…

  16. "JCE" Classroom Activity #108. Using Archimedes' Principle to Explain Floating and Sinking Cans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    In this activity, students (working alone or in groups) measure the mass of several soda cans (diet and regular soda) along with the mass of water that each can displaces. The students are then asked to compare these two mass values for the sinking cans and for the floating cans. The purpose of this activity is for students to determine that the

  17. 24 CFR 570.301 - Activity locations and float-funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... submission requirements referred to in this section are those in 24 CFR part 91. (a) For activities for which... planned public facility or improvement, how it expects to determine its location. (b) Float-funded... to be received in a future program year (in accordance with 24 CFR 91.220(g)(1)(ii)(D)). (4)...

  18. 24 CFR 570.301 - Activity locations and float-funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... submission requirements referred to in this section are those in 24 CFR part 91. (a) For activities for which... planned public facility or improvement, how it expects to determine its location. (b) Float-funded... to be received in a future program year (in accordance with 24 CFR 91.220(g)(1)(ii)(D)). (4)...

  19. 24 CFR 570.301 - Activity locations and float-funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... submission requirements referred to in this section are those in 24 CFR part 91. (a) For activities for which... planned public facility or improvement, how it expects to determine its location. (b) Float-funded... to be received in a future program year (in accordance with 24 CFR 91.220(g)(1)(ii)(D)). (4)...

  20. 24 CFR 570.301 - Activity locations and float-funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... submission requirements referred to in this section are those in 24 CFR part 91. (a) For activities for which... planned public facility or improvement, how it expects to determine its location. (b) Float-funded... to be received in a future program year (in accordance with 24 CFR 91.220(g)(1)(ii)(D)). (4)...

  1. 24 CFR 570.301 - Activity locations and float-funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... submission requirements referred to in this section are those in 24 CFR part 91. (a) For activities for which... planned public facility or improvement, how it expects to determine its location. (b) Float-funded... to be received in a future program year (in accordance with 24 CFR 91.220(g)(1)(ii)(D)). (4)...

  2. Floating Boats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a simple laboratory activity in which students collect a series of measurements and then use graphical analysis to determine the nature of the relationship between an object's mass and the volume of water it displaces. In this activity, students explore the relationships between the mass of a floating

  3. Stools - floating

    MedlinePLUS

    Stools that float are most often due to poor absorption of nutrients ( malabsorption ) or too much gas (flatulence). ... Increased gas in the stool allows it to float. Floating stools may also happen if you have ...

  4. Melt processing of (light rare earth) Ba2Cu3Oy materials by the floating zone method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, F.; Marinel, S.; Monot-Laffez, I.

    2002-04-01

    The floating zone method has been optimized to process the (light rare earth) Ba2Cu3Oy (LRE123) compound. The effects of processing rate, thermal gradient and maximal temperature have been investigated. Nd1Ba2Cu3Oy, Sm1Ba2Cu3Oy, Gd1Ba2Cu3Oy and (Nd0.33Eu0.33Gd0.33)1Ba2Cu3Oy have been processed under air and exhibited an optimal critical temperature greater than 93 K with a sharp transition. Critical current densities under self-field of 55000 A cm-2 have been reached and a fishtail effect appears under 2 T with different mixing of light rare earth. Large single domains have been obtained with the (a, b) plane oriented at 90 of the bar axis. Moreover, the composition homogeneity has been tested along the Nd123 bar. Thus, the floating zone method is an interesting process to investigate under air new compositions of LRE123.

  5. Adaptability of free-floating green tide algae in the Yellow Sea to variable temperature and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianjun; Zhang, Jianheng; Huo, Yuanzi; Zhou, Lingjie; Wu, Qing; Chen, Liping; Yu, Kefeng; He, Peimin

    2015-12-30

    In this study, the influence of temperature and light intensity on the growth of seedlings and adults of four species of green tide algae (Ulvaprolifera, Ulvacompressa, Ulva flexuosa and Ulvalinza) from the Yellow Sea was evaluated. The results indicated that the specific growth rate (SGR) of seedlings was much higher than that of adults for the four species. The adaptability of U. prolifera is much wider: Adult daily SGRs were the highest among the four species at 15-20°C with 10-600μmol·m(-2)·s(-1) and 25-30°C with 200-600μmol·m(-2)·s(-1). SGRs were 1.5-3.5 times greater than the other three species at 15-25°C with 200-600μmol·m(-2)·s(-1). These results indicate that U. prolifera has better tolerance to high temperature and light intensity than the other three species, which may in part explain why only U. prolifera undergoes large-scale outbreaks and floats to the Qingdao coast while the other three species decline and disappear at the early stage of blooming. PMID:26573134

  6. To Float or Not to Float: How Interactions between Light and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Species Determine the Buoyancy of Stratiotes aloides.

    PubMed

    Harpenslager, Sarah F; Smolders, Alfons J P; Kieskamp, Arit A M; Roelofs, Jan G M; Lamers, Leon P M

    2015-01-01

    Structural diversity formed by dense, floating Stratiotes aloides stands, generates hotspots of biodiversity of flora and fauna in wetlands. However, only part of the populations become emergent and provide this important facilitation. Since it has been hypothesised that its buoyancy depends on the rates of underwater photosynthesis, we investigated the role of dissolved CO2 availability and PAR on photosynthesis, biomass production and buoyancy in a controlled greenhouse experiment. Photosynthesis and growth were strongly influenced by both PAR and CO2 availability. At low PAR, plants formed less biomass and produced no emergent leaves, even when CO2 was abundant. At low CO2 levels, S. aloides switched to HCO3- use, resulting in a lower photosynthetic O2 production, decreased emergent leaf formation and increased CaCO3 precipitation on its leaves, all of which impaired buoyancy. At high PAR, low CO2 availability resulted in slower colonisation of the water layer, whereas CO2 availability did not influence PAR-limited plants. Our study shows that site conditions, rather than the sole abundance of potentially facilitating species, may strongly determine whether or not they form the structure necessary to act as a facilitator for biodiversity in aquatic environments. PMID:25909504

  7. To Float or Not to Float: How Interactions between Light and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Species Determine the Buoyancy of Stratiotes aloides

    PubMed Central

    Harpenslager, Sarah F.; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Kieskamp, Ariët A. M.; Roelofs, Jan G. M.; Lamers, Leon P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Structural diversity formed by dense, floating Stratiotes aloides stands, generates hotspots of biodiversity of flora and fauna in wetlands. However, only part of the populations become emergent and provide this important facilitation. Since it has been hypothesised that its buoyancy depends on the rates of underwater photosynthesis, we investigated the role of dissolved CO2 availability and PAR on photosynthesis, biomass production and buoyancy in a controlled greenhouse experiment. Photosynthesis and growth were strongly influenced by both PAR and CO2 availability. At low PAR, plants formed less biomass and produced no emergent leaves, even when CO2 was abundant. At low CO2 levels, S. aloides switched to HCO3- use, resulting in a lower photosynthetic O2 production, decreased emergent leaf formation and increased CaCO3 precipitation on its leaves, all of which impaired buoyancy. At high PAR, low CO2 availability resulted in slower colonisation of the water layer, whereas CO2 availability did not influence PAR-limited plants. Our study shows that site conditions, rather than the sole abundance of potentially facilitating species, may strongly determine whether or not they form the structure necessary to act as a facilitator for biodiversity in aquatic environments. PMID:25909504

  8. Does It Sink or Float?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith Richards

    2012-01-01

    This activity is designed to teach prekindergarten to second grade students about the concept of sink or float through an inquiry activity. Students will use familiar objects to predict and test the properties of sink and float. Background information is offered to teachers to assist them with this activity. This lesson begins with an engaging

  9. Intracellular light-activation of riboswitch activity.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Steven; Gardner, Laura; Deiters, Alexander; Williams, Gavin J

    2014-06-16

    By combining a riboswitch with a cell-permeable photocaged small-molecule ligand, an optochemical gene control element was constructed that enabled spatial and temporal control of gene expression in bacterial cells. The simplicity of this strategy, coupled with the ability to create synthetic riboswitches with tailored ligand specificities and output in a variety of microorganisms, plants, and fungi might afford a general strategy to photocontrol gene expression in vivo. The ability to activate riboswitches by using light enables the interrogation and manipulation of a wide range of biological processes with high precision, and will have broad utility in the regulation of artificial genetic circuits. PMID:24861567

  10. On floats and float tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seewald, Friedrich

    1931-01-01

    The principal source of information on float resistance is the model test. In view of the insuperable difficulties opposing any attempt at theoretical treatment of the resistance problem, particularly at attitudes which tend toward satisfactory take-off, such as the transitory stage to planing, the towing test is and will remain the primary method for some time.

  11. Bright light activates a trigeminal nociceptive pathway

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Tashiro, Akimasa; Chang, Zheng; Bereiter, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Bright light can cause ocular discomfort and/or pain; however, the mechanism linking luminance to trigeminal nerve activity is not known. In this study we identify a novel reflex circuit necessary for bright light to excite nociceptive neurons in superficial laminae of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc/C1). Vc/C1 neurons encoded light intensity and displayed a long delay (>10 s) for activation. Microinjection of lidocaine into the eye or trigeminal root ganglion (TRG) inhibited light responses completely, whereas topical application onto the ocular surface had no effect. These findings indicated that light-evoked Vc/C1 activity was mediated by an intraocular mechanism and transmission through the TRG. Disrupting local vasomotor activity by intraocular microinjection of the vasoconstrictive agents, norepinephrine or phenylephrine, blocked light-evoked neural activity, whereas ocular surface or intra-TRG microinjection of norepinephrine had no effect. Pupillary muscle activity did not contribute since light-evoked responses were not altered by atropine. Microinjection of lidocaine into the superior salivatory nucleus diminished light-evoked Vc/C1 activity and lacrimation suggesting that increased parasympathetic outflow was critical for light-evoked responses. The reflex circuit also required input through accessory visual pathways since both Vc/C1 activity and lacrimation were prevented by local blockade of the olivary pretectal nucleus. These findings support the hypothesis that bright light activates trigeminal nerve activity through an intraocular mechanism driven by a luminance-responsive circuit and increased parasympathetic outflow to the eye. PMID:20206444

  12. Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids

    PubMed Central

    Hölker, Franz; Heller, Stefan; Berghahn, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month’s exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m × 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx) artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift. PMID:24688857

  13. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  14. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  15. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  16. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  17. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  18. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  19. Floating Point Control Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  20. Light-Activated Content Release from Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Successful integration of diagnostic and therapeutic actions at the level of individual cells requires new materials that combine biological compatibility with functional versatility. This review focuses on the development of liposome-based functional materials, where payload release is activated by light. Methods of sensitizing liposomes to light have progressed from the use of organic molecular moieties to the use of metallic plasmon resonant structures. This development has facilitated application of near infrared light for activation, which is preferred for its deep penetration and low phototoxicity in biological tissues. Presented mechanisms of light-activated liposomal content release enable precise in vitro manipulation of minute amounts of reagents, but their use in clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications will require demonstration of safety and efficacy. PMID:23139729

  1. Light Activation of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Larry S.; Dailey, Frank; Criddle, Richard S.

    1978-01-01

    The development of methods of preparation of long wavelength ultraviolet light capable of activating ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase is reported. This preparation was obtained from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves which had reached about one-half maximum leaf weight. It was prepared at low ionic strength by use of mixed anion and cation exchange resins and buffers containing dimethylsulfoxide. The preparation is greatly enriched in fraction I protein to the point of apparent homogeneity. When assayed in the presence of saturating ribulose bisphosphate and sodium bicarbonate, the rate of carbon fixation is a linear function of long wavelength ultraviolet irradiation in the range of 20,000 to 30,000 ergs per square centimeter per second. Glutathione (5 mm) inhibits light activation without affecting activity in the dark. Copper sulfate inhibits both light and dark activity, but is slightly less effective in the presence of ultraviolet light. Sucrose inhibition of carboxylation is only readily apparent in the absence of ultraviolet light. Ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by solubilization in buffers containing dimethylsulfoxide plus heat treatment promotes ultraviolet light activation. PMID:16660592

  2. Study on a Mechanical Semi-Active Heave Compensation System of Drill String for Use on Floating Drilling Platform

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingyou; Tang, Yang; Huang, Chongjun; Xie, Chong

    2015-01-01

    There are some disadvantages for existing heave compensation systems of drill string used for the Floating Drilling Platform (FDP), including high energy consumption, large and complex structure, and expensive manufacturing and maintenance costs. In view of the above, we present a streamlined mechanical semi-active heave compensation system (MSAHC) in this study. This system consists of active compensation part with the pinion and rack and passive compensation part. In order to evaluate system performance of the MSAHC, we establish its simulation model with AMEsim software. In the process of simulation, displacement of rotary hook and energy consumption is regarded as performance parameters of the system. And the change rule of two performance parameters are analyzed by changing these design parameters including gear radius of the pinion and rack, scale coefficient of PID, rotary hook load, heave height and heave period of the FDP, and accumulator volume. Then, based on the simulation results of the MSAHC system performance, we have selected out a best set of design parameters from them. Moreover, the feasibility of the design scheme of the MSAHC is effectively verified by comparison with the existing three heave compensation system. The result shows that the energy consumption of the MSAHC is lower than the active heave compensation system (AHC) and the semi-active heave compensation system (SAHC) when achieving a same compensation effect as well as the accumulator volume of MSAHC is half of the passive heave compensation system (PHC). Therefore, the new designed MSAHC not only ensure compensation effect but also lower energy consumption, and its structure is simplified by adopting the simple mechanical structure to decrease manufacturing cost, maintenance cost and floor space. PMID:26186620

  3. Study on a Mechanical Semi-Active Heave Compensation System of Drill String for Use on Floating Drilling Platform.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyou; Tang, Yang; Huang, Chongjun; Xie, Chong

    2015-01-01

    There are some disadvantages for existing heave compensation systems of drill string used for the Floating Drilling Platform (FDP), including high energy consumption, large and complex structure, and expensive manufacturing and maintenance costs. In view of the above, we present a streamlined mechanical semi-active heave compensation system (MSAHC) in this study. This system consists of active compensation part with the pinion and rack and passive compensation part. In order to evaluate system performance of the MSAHC, we establish its simulation model with AMEsim software. In the process of simulation, displacement of rotary hook and energy consumption is regarded as performance parameters of the system. And the change rule of two performance parameters are analyzed by changing these design parameters including gear radius of the pinion and rack, scale coefficient of PID, rotary hook load, heave height and heave period of the FDP, and accumulator volume. Then, based on the simulation results of the MSAHC system performance, we have selected out a best set of design parameters from them. Moreover, the feasibility of the design scheme of the MSAHC is effectively verified by comparison with the existing three heave compensation system. The result shows that the energy consumption of the MSAHC is lower than the active heave compensation system (AHC) and the semi-active heave compensation system (SAHC) when achieving a same compensation effect as well as the accumulator volume of MSAHC is half of the passive heave compensation system (PHC). Therefore, the new designed MSAHC not only ensure compensation effect but also lower energy consumption, and its structure is simplified by adopting the simple mechanical structure to decrease manufacturing cost, maintenance cost and floor space. PMID:26186620

  4. Light-activated Reassembly of Split GFP

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Kevin P.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Truncated Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with the 11th β-strand removed is potentially interesting for bioconjugation, imaging, and the preparation of semi-synthetic proteins with novel spectroscopic or functional properties. Surprisingly, the truncated GFP generated by removing the 11th strand, once refolded, does not reassemble with a synthetic peptide corresponding to strand 11, but does reassemble following light activation. The mechanism of this process has been studied in detail by absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. The chromophore in this refolded truncated GFP is found to be in the trans configuration. Upon exposure to light a photostationary state is formed between the trans and cis conformations of the chromophore, and only truncated GFP with the cis configuration of the chromophore binds the peptide. A kinetic model describing the light activated reassembly of this split GFP is discussed. This unique light-driven reassembly is potentially useful for controlling protein-protein interactions. PMID:21351768

  5. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  6. CMOS common-mode rejection filter with floating active transformer operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Daisuke; Ikebe, Masayuki; Motohisa, Junichi; Sano, Eiichi; Kondou, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We propose an inductorless common-mode rejection filter with a gyrator-C network for common-mode-noise reduction. By adopting a gyrator-C network and ladder structure, high-order and small filter circuits with active transformer operation were fabricated. The filter was designed and fabricated in a Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.18 m CMOS process. This filter exhibited a CMRR of 80 dB, output noise voltage of 103 nV/Hz1/2, third-order input intercept point of 8.8 dBm at 1 MHz operation, and cutoff frequency of under 6 MHz. The total power consumption was 14.8 mW with a 2.5 V supply, and the chip area was 0.7 0.4 mm2.

  7. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  8. Flinking: Neither Floating nor Sinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger B.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an activity that challenges students to make an object that, when released under water, does not float up or sink down. The main concept this activity investigates is the density of ordinary objects in comparison to the density of water. (PR)

  9. The Design of Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1938-01-01

    Following a summary of the multiplicity of domestic and foreign floats and a brief enumeration of the requirements of floats, the essential form parameters and their effect on the qualities of floats are detailed. On this basis a standard float design is developed which in model families with varying length/beam ratio and angle of dead rise is analyzed by an experimental method which permits its best utilization on any airplane.

  10. Floating sample-collection platform with stage-activated automatic water sampler for streams with large variation in stage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarte, Stephen R.; Schmidt, A.R.; Sullivan, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    A floating sample-collection platform is described for stream sites where the vertical or horizontal distance between the stream-sampling point and a safe location for the sampler exceed the suction head of the sampler. The platform allows continuous water sampling over the entire storm-runoff hydrogrpah. The platform was developed for a site in southern Illinois.

  11. Floating Boats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a simple laboratory activity in which students collect a series of measurements and then use graphical analysis to determine the nature of the relationship between an object's mass and the volume of water it displaces. In this activity, students explore the relationships between the mass of a floating…

  12. Whatever Floats Your Boat: A Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornoelje, Joanne; Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a simple design challenge, based on the PBS program "Design Squad's" "Watercraft" activity that will prove engaging to most technology and engineering students. In this floating boat challenge, students are to build a boat that can float and support 25 pennies for at least 10 seconds--without leaking, sinking, or tipping

  13. Light-activated self-propelled colloids

    PubMed Central

    Palacci, J.; Sacanna, S.; Kim, S.-H.; Yi, G.-R.; Pine, D. J.; Chaikin, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Light-activated self-propelled colloids are synthesized and their active motion is studied using optical microscopy. We propose a versatile route using different photoactive materials, and demonstrate a multiwavelength activation and propulsion. Thanks to the photoelectrochemical properties of two semiconductor materials (α-Fe2O3 and TiO2), a light with an energy higher than the bandgap triggers the reaction of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and produces a chemical cloud around the particle. It induces a phoretic attraction with neighbouring colloids as well as an osmotic self-propulsion of the particle on the substrate. We use these mechanisms to form colloidal cargos as well as self-propelled particles where the light-activated component is embedded into a dielectric sphere. The particles are self-propelled along a direction otherwise randomized by thermal fluctuations, and exhibit a persistent random walk. For sufficient surface density, the particles spontaneously form ‘living crystals’ which are mobile, break apart and reform. Steering the particle with an external magnetic field, we show that the formation of the dense phase results from the collisions heads-on of the particles. This effect is intrinsically non-equilibrium and a novel principle of organization for systems without detailed balance. Engineering families of particles self-propelled by different wavelength demonstrate a good understanding of both the physics and the chemistry behind the system and points to a general route for designing new families of self-propelled particles. PMID:25332383

  14. Light-activated self-propelled colloids.

    PubMed

    Palacci, J; Sacanna, S; Kim, S-H; Yi, G-R; Pine, D J; Chaikin, P M

    2014-11-28

    Light-activated self-propelled colloids are synthesized and their active motion is studied using optical microscopy. We propose a versatile route using different photoactive materials, and demonstrate a multiwavelength activation and propulsion. Thanks to the photoelectrochemical properties of two semiconductor materials (?-Fe2O3 and TiO2), a light with an energy higher than the bandgap triggers the reaction of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and produces a chemical cloud around the particle. It induces a phoretic attraction with neighbouring colloids as well as an osmotic self-propulsion of the particle on the substrate. We use these mechanisms to form colloidal cargos as well as self-propelled particles where the light-activated component is embedded into a dielectric sphere. The particles are self-propelled along a direction otherwise randomized by thermal fluctuations, and exhibit a persistent random walk. For sufficient surface density, the particles spontaneously form 'living crystals' which are mobile, break apart and reform. Steering the particle with an external magnetic field, we show that the formation of the dense phase results from the collisions heads-on of the particles. This effect is intrinsically non-equilibrium and a novel principle of organization for systems without detailed balance. Engineering families of particles self-propelled by different wavelength demonstrate a good understanding of both the physics and the chemistry behind the system and points to a general route for designing new families of self-propelled particles. PMID:25332383

  15. Anomalous Light Phenomena vs. Bioelectric Brain Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    We present a research proposal concerning the instrumented investigation of anomalous light phenomena that are apparently correlated with particular mind states, such as prayer, meditation or psi. Previous research by these authors demonstrate that such light phenomena can be monitored and measured quite efficiently in areas of the world where they are reported in a recurrent way. Instruments such as optical equipment for photography and spectroscopy, VLF spectrometers, magnetometers, radar and IR viewers were deployed and used massively in several areas of the world. Results allowed us to develop physical models concerning the structural and time-variable behaviour of light phenomena, and their kinematics. Recent insights and witnesses have suggested to us that a sort of "synchronous connection" seems to exist between plasma-like phenomena and particular mind states of experiencers who seem to trigger a light manifestation which is very similar to the one previously investigated. The main goal of these authors is now aimed at the search for a concrete "entanglement-like effect" between the experiencer's mind and the light phenomena, in such a way that both aspects are intended to be monitored and measured simultaneously using appropriate instrumentation. The goal of this research project is twofold: a) to verify quantitatively the existence of one very particular kind of mind-matter interaction and to study in real time its physical and biophysical manifestations; b) to repeat the same kind of experiment using the same test-subject in different locations and under various conditions of geomagnetic activity.

  16. Exploring Floating Concrete and Beam Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Billie G.; Snell, Luke M.

    2002-01-01

    Presents two construction activities that address both state and federal science standards and encourage students to consider career options in mathematics and science. Includes floating concrete and paper bridge activities. (YDS)

  17. Stopping light in an active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Nan; Chen, Jiangwei; Tang, Dongming

    2015-09-01

    On the basis of work done by Lorentz force and Maxwell's equations, energy conversion relationships of electromagnetic fields in the dispersive and absorptive media are analyzed. Then new definitions of stored and lossy energy densities are proposed, respectively. Furthermore, it is predicted that light may stop steadily in an active medium when both real part of impedance and imaginary part of wave vector equal zero, which corresponds to a case that time-dependent Poynting vector shift forward and then turn backward periodically.

  18. Neuropharmacology of light-induced locomotor activation.

    PubMed

    Amato, Davide; Pum, Martin E; Groos, Dominik; Lauber, Andrea C; Huston, Joseph P; Carey, Robert J; de Souza Silva, Maria A; Müller, Christian P

    2015-08-01

    Presentation of non-aversive light stimuli for several seconds was found to reliably induce locomotor activation and exploratory-like activity. Light-induced locomotor activity (LIA) can be considered a convenient simple model to study sensory-motor activation. LIA was previously shown to coincide with serotonergic and dopaminergic activation in specific cortical areas in freely moving and anesthetized animals. In the present study we explore the neuropharmacology of LIA using a receptor antagonist/agonist approach in rats. The non-selective 5-HT2-receptor antagonist ritanserin (1.5-6 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced LIA. Selective antagonism of either the 5-HT2A-receptor by MDL 11,939 (0.1-0.4 mg/kg, i.p.), or the 5-HT2C-receptor by SDZ SER 082 (0.125-0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination, had no significant influence on LIA. Also the selective 5-HT1A-receptor antagonist, WAY 100635 (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect LIA. Neither did the preferential dopamine D2-receptor antagonist, haloperidol (0.025-0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) nor the D2/D3-receptor agonist, quinpirole (0.025-0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) affect the expression of LIA. However, blocking the glutamatergic NMDA-receptor with phencyclidine (PCP, 1.5-6 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced LIA. This effect was also observed with ketamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). These findings suggest that serotonin and dopamine receptors abundantly expressed in the cortex do not mediate light-stimulus triggered locomotor activity. PCP and ketamine effects, however, suggest an important role of NMDA receptors in LIA. PMID:25842246

  19. Biotransformation of arsenite and bacterial aox activity in drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses: Arsenic contamination in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    The potential arsenite bioteansformation activity of arsenic was investigated by examining bacterial arsenic arsenite-oxidizing gene such as aoxS, aoxR, aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD in high arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from the surface water of floating houses. There is a biogeochemical cycle of activity involving arsenite oxidase aox system and the ars (arsenic resistance system) gene operon and aoxR leader gene activity in Alcaligenes faecalis SRR-11 and aoxS leader gene activity in Achromobacter xylosoxidans TSL-66. Batch experiments showed that SRR-11 and TSL-66 completely oxidized 1mM of As (III) to As (V) within 35-40h. The leaders of aoxS and aoxR are important for gene activity, and their effects in arsenic bioremediation and mobility in natural water has a significant ecological role because it allows arsenite oxidase in bacteria to control the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses. PMID:26219073

  20. Light and dark-activated biocidal activity of conjugated polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eunkyung; Corbitt, Thomas S; Parthasarathy, Anand; Schanze, Kirk S; Whitten, David G

    2011-08-01

    This Spotlight on Applications provides an overview of a research program that has focused on the development and mechanistic study of cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) that function as light- and dark-active biocidal agents. Investigation has centered on poly-(phenylene ethynylene) (PPE) type conjugated polymers that are functionalized with cationic quaternary ammonium solubilizing groups. These polymers are found to interact strongly with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and upon illumination with near-UV and visible light act to rapidly kill the bacteria. Mechanistic studies suggest that the cationic PPE-type polymers efficiently sensitize singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), and this cytotoxic agent is responsible for initiating the sequence of events that lead to light-activated bacterial killing. Specific CPEs also exhibit dark-active antimicrobial activity, and this is believed to arise due to interactions between the cationic/lipophilic polymers and the negatively charged outer membrane characteristic of Gram-negative bacteria. Specific results are shown where a cationic CPE with a degree of polymerization of 49 exhibits pronounced light-activated killing of E. coli when present in the cell suspension at a concentration of 1 μg mL(-1). PMID:21755955

  1. Light and immune systems: activation of immunological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Light has been used to treat diseases for hundreds of years. Convenient and powerful light sources such as lasers make photomedicine a major branch in diseases treatment and detection. Originally, light was often used for local treatment, using photomechanical, photochemical, photothermal reactions and photomodulation as the major mechanisms. More and more investigators have become interested in the systemic effects of light, particularly in its effects on immune systems. Much work has been done to activate and/or enhance the host immune system to combat cancer, either using light as a direct tool or as an adjuvant method. Light has long been used for assisting disease detection and diagnosis. Advances in light technology have made photo-diagnostics ever more precise spatially and temporally. Many techniques facilitate observation of bio-molecule interactions and other biological processes at the cellular level, hence providing opportunities to detect and monitor immune activities. This manuscript will review recent photo-immunological research in treatment of cancer. The recent development of combination therapies involving lasers will be presented. Specifically, the results of cancer treatment using laser photothermal interaction, either with or without additional immunological stimulation will be discussed. The immunological effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), and of its combination with immunotherapy in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Much interest has been recently concentrated in the immunological responses after laser treatment. Such responses at cellular and molecular levels will be discussed. The effect of these treatment modalities on the distant metastases also showed promise of light induced antitumor immunity. The combination therapy and induced immunological responses appear to be the key for long-term control of tumors.

  2. Antibacterial nanofiber materials activated by light.

    PubMed

    Jesenská, Soňa; Plíštil, Lukáš; Kubát, Pavel; Lang, Kamil; Brožová, Libuše; Popelka, Stěpán; Szatmáry, Lórant; Mosinger, Jiří

    2011-12-15

    Electrospun polymeric nanofiber materials doped with 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) photosensitizer were prepared from four different polymers and were characterized with microscopic methods, steady-state, and time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The polymers used included polyurethane Larithane™ (PUR), polystyrene (PS), polycaprolactone (PCL), and polyamide 6 (PA6). The antibacterial activity of all nanofiber materials against E. coli was activated by visible light and it was dependent on oxygen permeability/diffusion coefficients and the diameter of the polymeric nanofibers. This activity is based on oxidation ability of singlet oxygen O₂(¹Δ(g)) that is generated upon irradiation. All tested nanofiber materials exhibited prolonged antibacterial properties, even in the dark after long-duration irradiation. The post-irradiation effect was explained by the photogeneration of H₂O₂, which provided the material with long-lasting antibacterial properties. PMID:21972201

  3. Float pool orientation.

    PubMed

    Libby, D L; Bolduc, P C

    1995-01-01

    Orienting new staff members to competently deliver care on a single unit is a challenging endeavor. This challenge escalates when orienting float staff members to 10 medical/surgical and 2 parent-child units. In this article, the authors describe the process for development and implementation of a competency-based orientation for float pool staff members. These principles also may be used to cross-train nursing staff members who occasionally float. PMID:8699265

  4. Floating portable pump

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, H. A.

    1985-11-19

    A floating portable pump is constructed of a float defining a well for containing water, a centrifugal pump supported on the float with its impeller shaft extending vertically and with its suction inlet submerged in water in the well, and an internal combustion engine arranged to drive the pump impeller. The pump and engine are secured together on the float in an arrangement such that the engine causes rotation of the pump impeller to cause the pump to draw water from the well through its suction inlet and discharge water from the pump discharge.

  5. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  6. "Floating shoulder" injuries.

    PubMed

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    "Floating shoulder" is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described. PMID:26961729

  7. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3) high-temperature superconducting materials that carry electricity with no loss for efficient power transmission lines; and (4) materials for solid-state lighting with half of the present power consumption. Excitement about NSLS-II is evident in many ways, most notably the extraordinary response we had to the 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the anticipated 60 or more beamlines that NSLS-II will ultimately host. A total of 54 proposals were submitted and, after extensive review, 34 were approved. Funding from both the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health has already been secured to support the design and construction of a number of these beamlines. FY11 is a challenging and exciting year for the NSLS-II Project as we reach the peak of our construction activity. We remain on track to complete the project by March 2014, a full 15 months ahead of schedule and with even more capabilities than originally planned. The Photon Sciences Directorate is well on its way to fulfilling our vision of being a provider of choice for world-class photon sciences and facilities.

  8. A floating type holographic display.

    PubMed

    Son, Jung-Young; Lee, Chun-Hae; Chernyshov, Oleksii O; Lee, Beom-Ryeol; Kim, Sung-Kyu

    2013-08-26

    A floating image type holographic display which projects an electronically generated holographic image together with a background image displayed on a monitor/TV to enhance the visual effects of the former image is introduced. This display can display a holographic image with a spatial volume floating in the front space of the display with use of PDLC sheets as the focused plane of the image. This display can preserve and enhance the main property of holographic image from a display chip, i.e., a spatial image with a volume. This property had not been appealed by the previous holographic displays due to the much brighter active surface image accompanied with the reconstructed image and the diffuser used for viewing the image. PMID:24105588

  9. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  10. Micromechanisms with floating pivot

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-03-06

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use floating pivot structures to relieve some of the problems encountered in the use of solid flexible pivots.

  11. Application of floating silicon-based linear multielectrode arrays for acute recording of single neuron activity in awake behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Luca; Maranesi, Monica; Livi, Alessandro; Bruni, Stefania; Fogassi, Leonardo; Holzhammer, Tobias; Paul, Oliver; Ruther, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in behavioral neurophysiology in awake animals is the steady recording of action potentials of many single neurons for as long as possible. Here, we present single neuron data obtained during acute recordings mainly from premotor cortices of three macaque monkeys using a silicon-based linear multielectrode array. The most important aspect of these probes, compared with similar models commercially available, is that, once inserted into the brain using a dedicated insertion device providing an intermediate probe fixation by means of vacuum, they can be released and left floating in the brain. On the basis of our data, these features appear to provide (i) optimal physiological conditions for extracellular recordings, (ii) good or even excellent signal-to-noise ratio depending on the recorded brain area and cortical layer, and (iii) extreme stability of the signal over relatively long periods. The quality of the recorded signal did not change significantly after several penetrations into the same restricted cortical sector, suggesting limited tissue damage due to probe insertion. These results indicate that these probes offer several advantages for acute neurophysiological experiments in awake monkeys, and suggest the possibility to employ them for semichronic or even chronic studies. PMID:24434299

  12. Floating wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  13. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori

    2003-06-12

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  14. Lightly stuffed pyrochlore structure of single-crystalline Yb2Ti2O7 grown by the optical floating zone technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. A.; Proffen, Th.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Quilliam, J. A.; Yaraskavitch, L. R.; Kycia, J. B.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2012-11-01

    Recent neutron scattering and specific heat studies on the pyrochlore Yb2Ti2O7 have revealed variations in its magnetic behavior below 265 mK. In the best samples, a sharp anomaly in the specific heat is observed at T=265 mK. Other samples, especially single crystals, have broad features in the specific heat which vary in sharpness and temperature depending on the sample, indicating that the magnetic ground state may be qualitatively different in such samples. We performed detailed comparisons of the chemical structure of a pulverized single crystal of Yb2Ti2O7, grown by the floating zone technique, to a sintered powder sample of Yb2Ti2O7. Rietveld refinements of neutron powder diffraction data on these samples reveal that the crushed single crystal is best described as a “stuffed” pyrochlore, Yb2(Ti2-xYbx)O7-x/2 with x = 0.046(4), despite perfectly stoichiometric starting material. Substituting magnetic Yb3+ on the nonmagnetic Ti4+ sublattice would introduce random exchange bonds and local lattice deformations. These are expected to be the mechanism leading to the variation of the delicate magnetic ground state of Yb2Ti2O7. Determination of the cubic cell length a could be useful as a method for characterizing the stoichiometry of nonpulverized single crystals at room temperature.

  15. Light and dark active phosphodiesterase regulation in salamander rods

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We studied the activation of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) by using a cell-permeant enzyme inhibitor. Rods of Ambystoma tigrinum held in a suction electrode were jumped into a stream of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), 0.01-1 mM. Initial transient light-sensitive currents fit the notion that dark and light-activated forms of PDE contributed independently to metabolic activity and were equivalently inhibited by IBMX (apparent Ki 30 microns). Inhibition developed within 50 ms, producing a step decrease of enzyme velocity, which could be offset by activation with flashes or steps of light. The dark PDE activity was equivalent to light activation of enzyme by 1,000 isomerization rod-1s-1, sufficient to hydrolyze the free cGMP pool (1/e) in 0.6 s. Steady light activated PDE in linear proportion to isomerization rate, the range from darkness to current saturation amounting to a 10-fold increase. The conditions for simultaneous onset of inhibitor and illumination to produce no net change of membrane current defined the apparent lifetime of light- activated PDE, TPDE* = 0.9 s, which was independent of both background illumination and current over the range 0-3 x 10(5) isomerization s-1, from 50 to 0 pA. Adaptation was a function of current rather than isomerization: jumps with different proportions of IBMX concentration to steady light intensity produced equal currents, and followed the same course of adaptation in maintained light, despite a 10-fold difference of illumination. Judged from the delay between IBMX- and light-induced currents, the dominant feedback regulatory site comes after PDE on the signal path. The dark active PDE affects the hydrolytic flux and cytoplasmic diffusion of cGMP, as well as the proportional range of the cGMP activity signal in response to light. PMID:1722240

  16. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  17. Floating Versus Sinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Small objects that are more dense than water may still float at the air-water interface because of surface tension. Whether this is possible depends not only on the density and size of the object, but also on its shape and surface properties, whether other objects are nearby, and how gently the object is placed at the interface. This review surveys recent work to quantify when objects can float and when they must sink. Much interest in this area has been driven by studies of the adaptations of water-walking insects to life at interfaces. I therefore discuss these results in the context of this and other applications.

  18. Floating nut retention system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, J. F.; Theakston, H. A. (inventors)

    1980-01-01

    A floating nut retention system includes a nut with a central aperture. An inner retainer plate has an opening which is fixedly aligned with the nut aperture. An outer retainer member is formed of a base plate having an opening and a surface adjacent to a surface of the inner retainer plate. The outer retainer member includes a securing mechanism for retaining the inner retainer plate adjacent to the outer retainer member. The securing mechanism enables the inner retainer plate to float with respect to the outer retainer number, while simultaneously forming a bearing surface for inner retainer plate.

  19. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    In FY 1998, following the 50th Anniversary Year of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven Science Associates became the new Managers of BNL. The new start is an appropriate time to take stock of past achievements and to renew or confirm future goals. During the 1998 NSLS Annual Users Meeting (described in Part 3 of this Activity Report), the DOE Laboratory Operations Board, Chaired by the Under Secretary for Energy, Ernest Moniz met at BNL. By chance all the NSLS Chairmen except Martin Blume (acting NSLS Chair 84-85) were present as recorded in the picture. Under their leadership the NSLS has improved dramatically: (1) The VUV Ring current has increased from 100 mA in October 1982 to nearly 1 A today. For the following few years 10 Ahrs of current were delivered most weeks - NSLS now exceeds that every day. (2) When the first experiments were performed on the X-ray ring during FY1985 the electron energy was 2 GeV and the current up to 100 mA - the X-Ray Ring now runs routinely at 2.5 GeV and at 2.8 GeV with up to 350 mA of current, with a very much longer beam half-life and improved reliability. (3) Starting in FY 1984 the proposal for the Phase II upgrade, mainly for a building extension and a suite of insertion devices and their associated beamlines, was pursued - the promises were delivered in full so that for some years now the NSLS has been running with two undulators in the VUV Ring and three wigglers and an undulator in the X-Ray Ring. In addition two novel insertion devices have been commissioned in the X13 straight. (4) At the start of FY 1998 the NSLS welcomed its 7000th user - attracted by the opportunity for pursuing research with high quality beams, guaranteed not to be interrupted by 'delivery failures', and welcomed by an efficient and caring user office and first class teams of PRT and NSLS staff. R & D have lead to the possibility of running the X-Ray Ring at the higher energy of 2.8 GeV. Figure 1 shows the first user beam, which was provided thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  20. Floating--A Key to Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Norman

    1980-01-01

    Described are several activities to be used to help students grasp the concept of floating. The activities include the use of a spring scale to measure the weight of the objects in air, in water, and in salt water, and a discussion of why there are differences in these weights. (DS)

  1. Measurement of action spectra of light-activated processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Justin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Upcroft, Jacqui; Upcroft, Peter; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a new experimental technique suitable for measurement of light-activated processes, such as fluorophore transport. The usefulness of this technique is derived from its capacity to decouple the imaging and activation processes, allowing fluorescent imaging of fluorophore transport at a convenient activation wavelength. We demonstrate the efficiency of this new technique in determination of the action spectrum of the light mediated transport of rhodamine 123 into the parasitic protozoan Giardia duodenalis.

  2. Floating Vegetation in Pantanal

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Mass of floating vegetation (embalsado)on Rio Negro river on the border between Paraguay and Bolivia. Located near RAMSAR site and Rio Negro National Park in the Pantanal ecoregion. This region, situated in the extreme northeastern corner of western Paraguay and extending south along the Paraguay ri...

  3. Floating Vegetation in Pantanal

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Mass of floating vegetation (embalsado) on Rio Negro river along the border between Paraguay and Bolivia. Located near RAMSAR site and Rio Negro National Park in the Pantanal ecoregion. This region, situated in the extreme northeastern corner of western Paraguay and extending south along the Paragua...

  4. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work explaining how one class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses.

  6. Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world`s brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director`s message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users` executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff.

  7. Light Bridge in a Developing Active Region. I. Observation of Light Bridge and its Dynamic Activity Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Katsukawa, Yukio; Cheung, Mark C. M.

    2015-10-01

    Light bridges, the bright structures that divide the umbra of sunspots and pores into smaller pieces, are known to produce a wide variety of activity events in solar active regions (ARs). It is also known that the light bridges appear in the assembling process of nascent sunspots. The ultimate goal of this series of papers is to reveal the nature of light bridges in developing ARs and the occurrence of activity events associated with the light bridge structures from both observational and numerical approaches. In this first paper, exploiting the observational data obtained by Hinode, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate the detailed structure of the light bridge in NOAA AR 11974 and its dynamic activity phenomena. As a result, we find that the light bridge has a weak, horizontal magnetic field, which is transported from the interior by a large-scale convective upflow and is surrounded by strong, vertical fields of adjacent pores. In the chromosphere above the bridge, a transient brightening occurs repeatedly and intermittently, followed by a recurrent dark surge ejection into higher altitudes. Our analysis indicates that the brightening is the plasma heating due to magnetic reconnection at lower altitudes, while the dark surge is the cool, dense plasma ejected from the reconnection region. From the observational results, we conclude that the dynamic activity observed in a light bridge structure such as chromospheric brightenings and dark surge ejections are driven by magnetoconvective evolution within the light bridge and its interaction with the surrounding magnetic fields.

  8. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V.; Vadivelu, Raja K.; John, James A. St.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface. PMID:26902930

  9. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V; Vadivelu, Raja K; John, James A St; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface. PMID:26902930

  10. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V.; Vadivelu, Raja K.; John, James A. St.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-02-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface.

  11. Light-activated antibacterial surfaces comprise photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Cahan, Rivka; Schwartz, Ronen; Langzam, Yakov; Nitzan, Yeshayahu

    2011-01-01

    Antibacterial surfaces were prepared using a base polyethylene sheet topped with a layer containing a mixed powder of poly (vinylidene fluoride) and photosensitizers (PSs). A crimpled stamp was placed on the mixed powder, and then it was passed through a heating and pressing device. The three chosen PSs were rose bengal, toluidine blue O and methylene blue. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed that the PS surface texture was coarse and highly developed. Measurement of the apparent contact angles of the droplets deposited on the PS surfaces using goniometry showed that all three surfaces were hydrophobic. Photodynamic analysis of the surfaces into which the PSs were incorporated indicated significant reactive oxygen species formation after illumination with light fluency rate of 1.46 mW cm(-2) for 30 min. Photodynamic inactivation assays performed in nutrient broth demonstrated more than 4 log reduction of the attached Escherichia coli after illumination (1.46 mW cm(-2)) for 24 h when the inoculum was 10(3) CFU mL(-1). However, more than 4 log reduction of Staphylococcus aureus occurred even when the cultures were illuminated for only 6 h. Our results provide an inexpensive, simple, state-of-the-art method for preparing antibacterial surfaces that may help prevent infections in hospital surroundings and in some medical devices. PMID:21883241

  12. Freely floating smectic films.

    PubMed

    May, Kathrin; Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    2014-05-19

    We have investigated the dynamics of freely floating smectic bubbles using high-speed optical imaging. Bubbles in the size range from a few hundred micrometers to several centimeters were prepared from collapsing catenoids. They represent ideal model systems for the study of thin-film fluid dynamics under well-controlled conditions. Owing to the internal smectic layer structure, the bubbles combine features of both soap films and vesicles in their unique shape dynamics. From a strongly elongated initial shape after pinch-off, they relax towards the spherical equilibrium, first by a slow redistribution of the smectic layers, and finally by weak, damped shape oscillations. In addition, we describe the rupture of freely floating smectic bubbles, and the formation and stability of smectic filaments. PMID:24692347

  13. Blue Light Stimulates Cognitive Brain Activity in Visually Blind Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Vandewalle, Gilles; Collignon, Olivier; Hull, Joseph T.; Daneault, Vronique; Albouy, Genevive; Lepore, Franco; Phillips, Christophe; Doyon, Julien; Czeisler, Charles A.; Dumont, Marie; Lockley, Steven W.; Carrier, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Light regulates multiple non-image-forming (or non-visual) circadian, neuroendocrine and neurobehavioral functions, via outputs from intrinsically-photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Exposure to light directly enhances alertness and performance, so that light is an important regulator of wakefulness and cognition. The roles of rods, cones and ipRGCs in the impact of light on cognitive brain functions remain unclear, however. A small percentage of blind individuals retain non-image-forming photoreception and offer a unique opportunity to investigate light impacts in the absence of conscious vision, presumably through ipRGCs. Here, we show that three such patients were able to choose non-randomly about the presence of light despite their complete lack of sight. Furthermore, 2s of blue light modified EEG activity when administered simultaneously to auditory stimulations. FMRI further showed that, during an auditory working memory task, less than a minute of blue light triggered the recruitment of supplemental prefrontal and thalamic brain regions involved in alertness and cognition regulation, as well as key areas of the default mode network. These results, which have to be considered as a proof of concept, show that non-image-forming photoreception triggers some awareness for light and can have a more rapid impact on human cognition than previously understood, if brain processing is actively engaged. Furthermore, light stimulates higher cognitive brain activity, independently of vision, and engages supplemental brain areas to perform an ongoing cognitive process. To our knowledge, our results constitute the first indication that ipRGC signaling may rapidly affect fundamental cerebral organization, so that it could potentially participate to the regulation of numerous aspects of human brain function. PMID:23859643

  14. Advanced light source. Activity report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the breadth, variety, and interest of the scientific program and ongoing R&D efforts in a form that is accessible to a broad audience. Recent research results are presented in six sections, each representing an important theme in ALS science. These results are designed to demonstrate the capabilities of the ALS, rather than to give a comprehensive review of 1995 experiments. Although the scientific program and facilities report are separate sections, in practice the achievements and accomplishments of users and ALS staff are interdependent. This user-staff collaboration is essential to help us direct our efforts toward meeting the needs of the user community, and to ensure the continued success of the ALS as a premier facility.

  15. Light-activated reassembly of split green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kent, Kevin P; Boxer, Steven G

    2011-03-23

    Truncated green fluorescent protein (GFP) with the 11th β-strand removed is potentially interesting for bioconjugation, imaging, and the preparation of semisynthetic proteins with novel spectroscopic or functional properties. Surprisingly, the truncated GFP generated by removing the 11th strand, once refolded, does not reassemble with a synthetic peptide corresponding to strand 11 but does reassemble following light activation. The mechanism of this process has been studied in detail by absorption, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy. The chromophore in this refolded truncated GFP is found to be in the trans configuration. Upon exposure to light a photostationary state is formed between the trans and cis conformations of the chromophore, and only truncated GFP with the cis configuration of the chromophore binds the peptide. A kinetic model describing the light-activated reassembly of this split GFP is discussed. This unique light-driven reassembly is potentially useful for controlling protein-protein interactions. PMID:21351768

  16. 46 CFR 180.137 - Stowage of life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... dark color or of a type certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light; and (3) If... to deterioration from ultraviolet light. (e) If the vessel carries more than one life float...

  17. 46 CFR 180.137 - Stowage of life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... dark color or of a type certified to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light; and (3) If... to deterioration from ultraviolet light. (e) If the vessel carries more than one life float...

  18. Design, synthesis, and cercaricidal activity of novel high-efficient, low-toxic self-spreading PEG-N-salicylanilide derivatives against cercariae larvae of Schistosome Japonicum floating on the water surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Lv-Yin; Wu, Ren-Miao; Fan, Xiao-Lin

    2015-05-01

    Novel cercaricides of PEG-N-salicylanilide derivatives that could self-spread and float on the water surface were designed and synthesized according to the particular habit of cercariae larvae of Schistosome japonicum. The structures of the cercaricides were characterized by the infrared spectra (IR), magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), and mass spectrum (MS). The images of the floating cercaricides on the water surface were investigated by the Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). When the cercaricides were dropped on the water surface, they could spread along the air-water interface automatically and form thin membranes floating on the water surface immediately. The lethality rate of cercariae for 5a and 6a was more than 90% in 120 min at a surface concentration of 0.008 mg/cm(2) . The non-ionic surfactant-cercaricides not only showed strong cercaricidal activities against the cercariae larvae but also exhibited low toxicities, which offered an effective and environment-friendly approach for the reduction of population infection rate and the realization of schistosome control. PMID:25244005

  19. Light modulation of the activity of protochlorophyllide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Mapleston, R E; Griffiths, W T

    1980-01-01

    Illumination of etiolated plants effects the activity of protochlorophyllide reductase (NADPH-protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase) in the plastids. Constant illumination or a 2-min light-triggering of etiolated plants leads to an approx. 80% decrease in activity of the enzyme, a change that can be reversed by returning the plants to darkness. The change in activity results from an alteration of the Vmax. rather than Km. Despite the fact that exogenous pigments effect the activity of the enzyme in vitro, no correlation could be drawn between the concentrations of pigments in vivo and activity of the enzyme. PMID:7458898

  20. Infrared light utilized for photodynamic therapy by activation of rare earth phosphors for visible light generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Lakshman, Thiru V.; Finlay, Jarod E.; Kumar, Ajith; Bell, Howard; Nguyen, Ba T.; Belov, Valery; Luo, Jun; Friedberg, Joseph S.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment for cancer requiring activation of a photosensitizer for light-mediated tumor cytotoxicity. PDT is limited by tissue penetration because visible light is required for photosensitizer activation. Sunstones TM are rare-earth phosphors which up-convert energy from infrared wavelengths to emit higher energy in the visible spectrum. We utilized this unique characteristic to generate light of appropriate intensity and wavelength for photosensitizer activation and subsequent tumor cell eradication. Methods: Sunstones TM with infrared absorption at 808 and 980nm and visible two-photon emission at 549.9 and 663.1nm were used. A murine NSCLC line was used to determine in vitro toxicity of Sunstones TM and dose response curves for Sunstones TM-mediated PDT. Human NSCLC cells were incubated with/without Photofrin TM (photosensitizer). Experimental groups included: Infrared light treatment (IR), IR+Photofrin TM, IR+Sunstones TM, and IR+Sunstones TM+Photofrin TM. Groups were exposed to 2.5W of 808nm light and assayed for metabolic activity. Results: In vitro toxicity assays showed no significant toxicological side effects after 1 week incubation with Sunstones TM and demonstrated linear response in cytotoxicity as treatment times and infrared dose increased. IR+Sunstones TM+Photofri TM group showed significantly decreased metabolic activity compared to control cells, cells treated with IR+Sunstones TM, and IR alone. Conclusion: Sunstones TM are nontoxic nanocrystals capable of activating photosensitizers for PDT. Future directions include conjugation of up-converters to a novel photosensitizer and managing the selective uptake of conjugate by tumor cells.

  1. Regioselective chromatic orthogonality with light-activated metathesis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Levin, Efrat; Mavila, Sudheendran; Eivgi, Or; Tzur, Eyal; Lemcoff, N Gabriel

    2015-10-12

    The ability to selectively guide consecutive chemical processes towards a preferred pathway by using light of different frequencies is an appealing concept. Herein we describe the coupling of two photochemical reactions, one the photoisomerization and consequent activation of a sulfur-chelated latent olefin-metathesis catalyst at 350?nm, and the other the photocleavage of a silyl protecting group at 254?nm. Depending on the steric stress exerted by a photoremovable neighboring chemical substituent, we demonstrate the selective formation of either five- or six-membered-ring frameworks by light-triggered ring-closing metathesis. The orthogonality of these light-induced reactions allows the initiation of these processes independently and in interchangeable order, according to the wavelength of light used to promote them. PMID:25782974

  2. Floating offshore structure

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, M.; Narita, H.; Tabuchi, H.; Yashima, N.

    1985-05-28

    A floating offshore structure which is moored at a fixed position on the sea by means of mooring hawsers and anchors connected to the ends thereof respectively for conducting a submarine excavating operation from a deck of the structure. The structure includes a moorage hull part provided with a vertical through-hole formed therein for receiving an excavating drill pipe and the mooring hawsers and a movable hull part connected to the moorage hull part so as to be rotatable within a horizontal plane. The movable hull part is constituted as a hull defining the outer wall of the floating offshore structure and connected with the moorage hull part by inserting it into a moorage hull part receiving hole formed at a position closer to the bow thereof. The movable hull part has near its water plane a horizontal section with a substantially oval shape formed by a fore draft part in a substantially circular or polygonal shape, with the moorage hull part receiving hole as a center and an after draft part taperingly projecting aft from the fore draft part.

  3. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  4. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  5. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  6. Seabirds and floating plastic debris.

    PubMed

    Cade, Gerhard C

    2002-11-01

    80% of floating plastic debris freshly washed ashore on a Dutch coast showed peckmarks made by birds at sea. They either mistake these debris for cuttlebones or simply test all floating objects. Ingestion of plastic is deleterious for marine organisms. It is urgent to set measures to plastic litter production. PMID:12523529

  7. Obesity = physical activity + dietary intake + sleep stages + light exposure.

    PubMed

    Partonen, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Daily levels of physical activity and calories from dietary intake have been the focus of obesity prevention measures. Recent findings have made a twist in the line of thinking. The timing of physical exercise and that of dietary intake are also important to obesity prevention. Night-time sleep and exposure to light are therefore important targets of intervention. PMID:25088724

  8. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Annette

    1999-03-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

  9. Selenium bond decreases ON resistance of light-activated switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Vitrified amorphous selenium bond decreases the ON resistance of a gallium arsenide-silicon light-activated, low-level switch. The switch is used under a pulse condition to prolong switch life and minimize errors due to heating, devitrification, and overdrawing.

  10. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  11. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-11-16

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

  12. The effect of rf plasma fluctuation on floating harmonic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Kyunghyun; Jeon, Sangbum; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of electron temperature, plasma density and ion flux with floating harmonic method (FHM) has several advantages for RF plasma diagnosis. In principle, RF oscillation of plasma does not distort the characteristic of the probe at a floating potential. Thus, an active or passive RF compensation is unnecessary. However, in fact, the uncompensated probe results in higher electron temperature than the rf compensated probe especially at low plasma density. Plasma parameters from the FHM and that of Langmuir probe was compared, and it shows that the measured plasma parameter from RF compensated floating probe (FHM) has great agreements with Langmuir probe.

  13. Melatonin administration modifies circadian motor activity under constant light depending on the lighting conditions during suckling.

    PubMed

    Carpentieri, Agata R; Oliva, Clara; Dez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat

    2015-08-01

    Early lighting conditions have been described to produce long-term effects on circadian behavior, which may also influence the response to agents acting on the circadian system. It has been suggested that melatonin (MEL) may act on the circadian pacemaker and as a scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Here, we studied the oxidative and behavioral changes caused by prolonged exposure to constant light (LL) in groups of rats that differed in MEL administration and in lighting conditions during suckling. The rats were exposed to either a light-dark cycle (LD) or LL. At 40 days old, rats were treated for 2 weeks with a daily subcutaneous injection of MEL (10 mg/kg body weight) or a vehicle at activity onset. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment, to determine catalase (CAT) activity and nitrite level in plasma. As expected, LL-reared rats showed a more stable motor activity circadian rhythm than LD rats. MEL treatment produced more reactivity in LD- than in LL rats, and was also able to alter the phase of the rhythm in LD rats. There were no significant differences in nitrite levels or CAT activity between the groups, although both variables increased with time. Finally, we also tested depressive signs by means of sucrose consumption, and anhedonia was found in LD males treated with MEL. The results suggest that the lighting conditions in early infancy are important for the long-term functionality of the circadian system, including rhythm manifestation, responses to MEL and mood alterations. PMID:26204329

  14. Poking a floating sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovitch, Benny; Huang, Jiangshui; Menon, Narayanan; Russell, Thomas P.; Vella, Dominic

    2014-03-01

    Poking of liquid surface leads to a simple deformation of the surface, whose characteristic scale is nothing but the capillary length. In contrast, the poking of a circular solid sheet floating on a liquid bath demonstrates a surprisingly complex phenomenology, with numerous distinct length scales that are determined by the capillary length as well as by the poking amplitude and the stretching modulus of the sheet. The fundamental physical mechanism that underlies this complex response is intimately related to the emergence of an highly anisotropic stress, whose radial component is tensile and its hoop component is asymptotically compression-free. In this talk I will discuss the various parameter regimes that describe this problem and will identify the characteristic patterns of the poked sheet in these regimes. Experimental results will be presented and compared to theoretical predictions.

  15. Floating on oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihua; Deng, Xu; Butt, Hans-Jrgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that disk-shaped steel meshes coated with a superamphiphobic layer are able to float on water and on organic liquids. A coated disk-shaped steel mesh of 1 cm radius has a loading capacity of 17 mN in water and still remarkable 9 mN in n-hexadecane. Experimentally measured supporting forces and loading capacities agree well with theoretical predictions. Inspired by the giant water lily, pan-shaped "oil lilies" with even higher loading capacity and artificial oil striders carrying more than 10 times their own weight are designed. Even after the artificial devices are fully immersed into different liquids, they show self-draining properties due to capillary forces. PMID:25109826

  16. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  17. Light-Activated Proteolysis for the Spatiotemporal Control of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Quentin; Li, Chenge; Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Aujard, Isabelle; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2015-07-17

    The regulation of proteolysis is an efficient way to control protein function in cells. Here, we present a general strategy enabling to increase the spatiotemporal resolution of conditional proteolysis by using light activation as trigger. Our approach relies on the auxin-inducible degradation system obtained by transposing components of the plant auxin-dependent degradation pathway in mammalian cells. We developed a photoactivatable auxin that acts as a photoactivatable inducer of degradation. Upon local and short light illumination, auxin is released in cells and triggers the degradation of a protein of interest with spatiotemporal control. PMID:25938742

  18. Activity rhythms and adiurnal light-dark control.

    PubMed

    Goff, M L; Finger, F W

    1966-12-01

    The running-wheel activity pattern of mature male rats was successfully synchronized to light-dark cycles as long as 48 hours and as short as 16 hours. Even after 6 months' exposure to "days" longer than the normal 24 hours, the animals returned promptly to circadian rhythmicity when placed under freerunning conditions of continuous dark. That such rhythms also reappeared when the light condition of the 36-hour cycle was reduced from 660 to 33 lumens per square meter suggests that brightness may be the critical factor in the unexpectedly broad range of entrainment demonstrated. PMID:5925067

  19. Floating into Deep Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Frenais, R.; Saraceno, T.; Powell, J.

    2014-04-01

    Is it possible for spaceflight to become more sustainable? Artist and architect Tomas Saraceno proposes a long-term artscience research project based on his initial work with solar balloons to join with the efforts of engineers such as John Powell, working on the Airship to Orbit experiments, which describe a three stage process of using airships to fly to a large suborbital "Dark Sky Station' then literally floating into orbit with additional electrical and chemical propulsion. (See: http://www.jpaerospace.com) In his artworks Tomás Saraceno proposes cell-like flying cities as possible architectonic living spaces in direct reference to Buckminster Fuller's Cloud Nine (circa 1960). The fantastic architectural utopia Cloud Nine consists of a freely floating sphere measuring one mile in diameter that offers living space to several autonomous communities encompassing thousands of inhabitants each. The notion of the cloud is essential to the artist's work. The cloud as metaphor stands for artistic intention, for the meaning of territory and border in today's (urban) society, and for exploring possibilities for the sustainable development of the human living environment. In Saraceno's work this environment is not limited to the earth, but is explicitly conceived to reach into outer space. (Biomimetic Constructions- On the works of Tomás Saraceno By Katharina Schlüter) Saraceno is also interested in human factors experiments using his existing constructions as analogue environments for living on Mars and is proposing carry out a series of workshops, experiments and solar balloon launces in White Sands desert in early 2016 in collaboration with the curator Dr Rob La Frenais, the Rubin Center at The University of Texas at El Paso and various scientific partners.

  20. Biocidal activity of a light-absorbing fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liangde; Rininsland, Frauke H; Wittenburg, Shannon K; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; McBranch, Duncan W; Whitten, David G

    2005-10-25

    Herein we describe studies that indicate a cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte shows biocidal activity against gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, E. coli, BL21, with plasmids for Azurin and ampicillin resistance) and gram-positive bacterial spores (Bacillus anthracis, Sterne, B. anthracis, Sterne). These studies were carried out with aqueous suspensions of the conjugated polyelectrolyte, with the polyelectrolyte in supported formats and with samples in which the conjugated polyelectrolyte was coated on the bacteria. The results are interesting in that the biocidal activity is light-induced and appears effective due to the ability of the conjugated polyelectrolyte to form a surface coating on both types of bacteria. The effects observed here should be general and suggest that a range of conjugated polyelectrolytes in different formulations may provide a useful new class of biocides for both dark and light-activated applications. PMID:16229539

  1. Active control of light beam in transformation optics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    The control of electromagnetic radiation in transformation optical metamaterials brings the development of vast variety of optical devices. Of a particular importance is the possibility to control the propagation of light with light. In this work, we use a structured planar cavity to enhance the thermo-optic effect in a transformation optical waveguide. In the process, a control laser produces apparent inhomogeneous refractive index change inside the waveguides. The trajectory of a second probe laser beam is then continuously tuned in the experiment. The experimental results agree well with the developed theory. The reported method can provide a new approach toward development of transformation optical devices where active all-optical control of the impinging light can be achieved.

  2. Wiring the retinal circuits activated by light during early development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Light information is sorted by neuronal circuits to generate image-forming (IF) (interpretation and tracking of visual objects and patterns) and non-image-forming (NIF) tasks. Among the NIF tasks, photic entrainment of circadian rhythms, the pupillary light reflex, and sleep are all associated with physiological responses, mediated mainly by a small group of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs). Using Xenopus laevis as a model system, and analyzing the c-fos expression induced by light as a surrogate marker of neural activity, we aimed to establish the developmental time at which the cells participating in both systems come on-line in the retina. Results We found that the peripheral retina contains 80% of the two melanopsin-expressing cell types we identified in Xenopus: melanopsin-expressing horizontal cells (mHCs; opn4m+/opn4x+/Prox1+) and mRGCs (2.7% of the total RGCs; opn4m+/opn4x+/Pax6+/Isl1), in a ratio of 6:1. Only mRGCs induced c-fos expression in response to light. Dopaminergic (tyrosine hydroxylase-positive; TH+) amacrine cells (ACs) may be part of the melanopsin-mediated circuit, as shown by preferential c-fos induction by blue light. In the central retina, two cell types in the inner nuclear layer (INL) showed light-mediated induction of c-fos expression [(On-bipolar cells (Otx2+/Isl1+), and a sub-population of ACs (Pax6−/Isl1−)], as well as two RGC sub-populations (Isl1+/Pax6+ and Isl1+/Pax6−). Melanopsin and opsin expression turned on a day before the point at which c-fos expression could first be activated by light (Stage 37/38), in cells of both the classic vision circuit, and those that participate in the retinal component of the NIF circuit. Key to the classic vision circuit is that the component cells engage from the beginning as functional ‘unit circuits’ of two to three cells in the INL for every RGC, with subsequent growth of the vision circuit occurring by the wiring in of more units. Conclusions We identified melanopsin-expressing cells and specific cell types in the INL and the RGC layer which induce c-fos expression in response to light, and we determined the developmental time when they become active. We suggest an initial formulation of retinal circuits corresponding to the classic vision pathway and melanopsin-mediated circuits to which they may contribute. PMID:24521229

  3. Quality Control and Application of Oxygen Data from Profiling Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Y.; Martz, T. R.; Johnson, K. S.; Plant, J.; Riser, S.; Gilbert, D.

    2010-12-01

    Profiling floats provide a near-ideal platform for monitoring the seasonal evolution of both physical and chemical processes at the regional, basin, and global scale. Although temperature, salinity, and pressure data must pass well-defined Quality Control protocols at Global Data Assembly Centers, no such protocol exists for chemical data (oxygen and nitrate) now being measured on 348 “Argo Equivalents” (of which ~150 are still active) within the ~3200 float array. With the number of chemical measurements returned from the Argo array rapidly growing, it is important to develop and evaluate new QC procedures for these data in order to use the chemical Argo dataset for quantitative descriptions of oceanic biogeochemical processes. We initiated a preliminary assessment of quality control protocols for profiling float data, with the ultimate goal of using the QC'd dataset for biogeochemical studies, including use of float oxygen data to constrain a model that calculates rates of Net Community Production. Profiling float oxygen data prior to June 2010 were compared to the World Ocean Atlas 2009 monthly climatology. Large deviations from the climatology were observed for many floats, indicating the need for a QC protocol for float oxygen data, and possibly also indicating real processes not accounted for in the climatology. Approximately 100 floats were selected to calculate net community production in the euphotic zone. Here we discuss different QC methods that we have explored, and evaluate how each method affects the calculated NCP rates. Depending on which QC method is used, the sign of the NCP rates can change, thus further highlighting the importance of establishing a proper QC protocol for float oxygen data.

  4. Channelrhodopsins: visual regeneration and neural activation by a light switch.

    PubMed

    G, Natasha; Tan, Aaron; Farhatnia, Yasmin; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Hamblin, Michael R; Khaw, Peng T; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2013-06-25

    The advent of optogenetics provides a new direction for the field of neuroscience and biotechnology, serving both as a refined investigative tool and as potential cure for many medical conditions via genetic manipulation. Although still in its infancy, recent advances in optogenetics has made it possible to remotely manipulate in vivo cellular functions using light. Coined Nature Methods' 'Method of the Year' in 2010, the optogenetic toolbox has the potential to control cell, tissue and even animal behaviour. This optogenetic toolbox consists of light-sensitive proteins that are able to modulate membrane potential in response to light. Channelrhodopsins (ChR) are light-gated microbial ion channels, which were first described in green algae. ChR2 (a subset of ChR) is a seven transmembrane ? helix protein, which evokes membrane depolarization and mediates an action potential upon photostimulation with blue (470 nm) light. By contrast to other seven-transmembrane proteins that require second messengers to open ion channels, ChR2 form ion channels themselves, allowing ultrafast depolarization (within 50 milliseconds of illumination). It has been shown that integration of ChR2 into various tissues of mice can activate neural circuits, control heart muscle contractions, and even restore breathing after spinal cord injury. More compellingly, a plethora of evidence has indicated that artificial expression of ChR2 in retinal ganglion cells can reinstate visual perception in mice with retinal degeneration. PMID:23664865

  5. The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Elizabeth G.; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum ‘white’ light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these ‘light-intolerant’ bat species. PMID:27008274

  6. The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights.

    PubMed

    Rowse, Elizabeth G; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum 'white' light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these 'light-intolerant' bat species. PMID:27008274

  7. Activation of visual pigments by light and heat.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dong-Gen; Yue, Wendy W S; Ala-Laurila, Petri; Yau, King-Wai

    2011-06-10

    Vision begins with photoisomerization of visual pigments. Thermal energy can complement photon energy to drive photoisomerization, but it also triggers spontaneous pigment activation as noise that interferes with light detection. For half a century, the mechanism underlying this dark noise has remained controversial. We report here a quantitative relation between a pigment's photoactivation energy and its peak-absorption wavelength, ?(max). Using this relation and assuming that pigment activations by light and heat go through the same ground-state isomerization energy barrier, we can predict the relative noise of diverse pigments with multi-vibrational-mode thermal statistics. The agreement between predictions and our measurements strongly suggests that pigment noise arises from canonical isomerization. The predicted high noise for pigments with ?(max) in the infrared presumably explains why they apparently do not exist in nature. PMID:21659602

  8. 14 CFR 23.757 - Auxiliary floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Auxiliary floats. 23.757 Section 23.757... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 23.757 Auxiliary floats. Auxiliary floats must be arranged so that, when completely submerged...

  9. 14 CFR 23.757 - Auxiliary floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Auxiliary floats. 23.757 Section 23.757... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 23.757 Auxiliary floats. Auxiliary floats must be arranged so that, when completely submerged...

  10. 14 CFR 23.757 - Auxiliary floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Auxiliary floats. 23.757 Section 23.757... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 23.757 Auxiliary floats. Auxiliary floats must be arranged so that, when completely submerged...

  11. 14 CFR 23.757 - Auxiliary floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Auxiliary floats. 23.757 Section 23.757... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 23.757 Auxiliary floats. Auxiliary floats must be arranged so that, when completely submerged...

  12. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  13. Control development for floating wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Feike; Peeringa, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Control of a floating wind turbine has proven to be challenging, but essential for lowering the cost of floating wind energy. Topic of a recent joint R&D project by GustoMSC, MARIN and ECN, is the concept design and verification with coupled simulations and model tests of the GustoMSC Tri-Floater. Only using an integral design approach, including mooring and control design, a cost effective system can be obtained. In this project, ECN developed a general floating wind turbine control strategy and applied this in a case study to the GustoMSC Tri-Floater and the OC3Hywind spar, both equipped with the NREL 5MW RWT. The designed controller ensures stable operation, while maintaining proper speed and power regulation. The motions of the floating support are reduced and substantial load reduction has been achieved.

  14. Extra-strong "floating nut"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, J. F.; Theakston, H.

    1979-01-01

    Increased bearing area withstands much higher torque than previous designs. Floating nut makes it possible to fasten parts on heavy-duty equipment, such as tractors and cranes, even though they can be reached for tightening from one side only.

  15. Skylab floating ice experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J. (Principal Investigator); Ramseier, R. O.; Weaver, R. J.; Weeks, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Coupling of the aircraft data with the ground truth observations proved to be highly successful with interesting results being obtained with IR and SLAR passive microwave techniques, and standard photography. Of particular interest were the results of the PMIS system which operated at 10.69 GHz with both vertical and horizontal polarizations. This was the first time that dual polarized images were obtained from floating ice. In both sea and lake ice, it was possible to distinguish a wide variety of thin ice types because of their large differences in brightness temperatures. It was found that the higher brightness temperature was invariably obtained in the vertically polarized mode, and as the age of the ice increases the brightness temperature increases in both polarizations. Associated with this change in age, the difference in temperature was observed as the different polarizations decreased. It appears that the horizontally polarized data is the most sensitive to variations in ice type for both fresh water and sea ice. The study also showed the great amount of information on ice surface roughness and deformation patterns that can be obtained from X-band SLAR observations.

  16. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  17. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  18. bioLights: light emitting wear for visualizing lower-limb muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Naoto; Suzuki, Kenji; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of muscle activity by electrophysiological techniques is commonly used to analyze biomechanics. Although the simultaneous and intuitive understanding of both muscle activity and body motion is important in various fields, it is difficult to realize. This paper proposes a novel technique for visualizing physiological signals related to muscle activity by means of surface electromyography. We developed a wearable light-emitting interface that indicates lower-limb muscle activity or muscular tension on the surface of the body in real time by displaying the shape of the activated muscle. The developed interface allows users to perceive muscle activity in an intuitive manner by relating the level of the muscle activity to the brightness level of the glowing interface placed on the corresponding muscle. In order to verify the advantage of the proposed method, a cognitive experiment was conducted to evaluate the system performance. We also conducted an evaluation experiment using the developed interface in conjunction with an exoskeleton robot, in order to investigate the possible applications of the developed interface in the field of neurorehabilitation. PMID:21096701

  19. Photocatalytic activities of various pentavalent bismuthates under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Takahiro; Haramoto, Rie; Dong, Qiang; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Yonesaki, Yoshinori; Kinomura, Nobukazu; Mano, Takayuki; Nishimoto, Shunsuke; Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Miyake, Michihiro

    2011-08-15

    LiBiO{sub 3}, NaBiO{sub 3}, MgBi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, KBiO{sub 3}, ZnBi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, SrBi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, AgBiO{sub 3}, BaBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and PbBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} were synthesized by various processes such as hydrothermal treatment, heating and so on. These materials were examined for their photocatalytic activities in the decolorization of methylene blue and decomposition of phenol under visible light irradiation. For methylene blue decolorization, the presence of KBiO{sub 3} resulted in complete decoloration within 5 min. For phenol decomposition, NaBiO{sub 3} showed the highest activity, while LiBiO{sub 3}, SrBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and BaBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} possessed almost comparable decomposition rates. Their decomposition rates were apparently higher than that by anatase (P25) under UV irradiation. - Graphical abstract: Nine pentavalent bismuthates were synthesized and were examined for their photocatalytic activities by decomposition of phenol under visible light irradiation. NaBiO{sub 3}, LiBiO{sub 3}, SrBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and BaBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} indicated faster decomposition rate than that of anatase (P25) under UV-vis light irradiation. Highlights: > KBiO{sub 3} decolorize methylene blue aqueous solution immediately within 5 min. > NaBiO{sub 3}, LiBiO{sub 3}, SrBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and BaBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} indicated high decomposition rate of phenol. > The d electron of Zn, Ag and Pb form broad conduction band. > The broad conduction band poses to diminish photocatalytic activity.

  20. Floating intake reduces pump damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kronig, A.

    1993-12-31

    The solution to a costly sand erosion problem at the Grande Dixence hydroelectric project in Switzerland turned out to be as simple as a floating pump. The 726-MW Grande Dixence project drains a 350-square-kilometer reach of the Zermatt and Herens valleys in the southwestern Swiss Alps. About half of the drainage area is covered by active glaciers. Because the glaciers in Zermatt Valley are so low in altitude, their water is collected in Z`mutt Reservoir at the base of the Matterhorn, then pumped up 500 meters for transport to the main Grande Disence Reservoir near Sion. The glacier water is heavily laden with sand. In spite of a gravel pass and a desilter, the 700,000-acubic-meter Z`mutt Reservoir receives large quantities of sand. The sand tends to remain in solution because of the low water temperatures (1 to 2 degrees Centigrade). In the original intake system, the sand would be sucked into the pump intakes, causing extensive erosion to the pump wheels and an expensive yearly program of repair. (Pump damage averaged 200,000 Swiss Francs ($284,000 U.S.) per year between 1980 and 1985.)

  1. Plasmonic Metamaterials for Active and Passive Light Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Danyong Dylan

    Fundamental study on plasmonics excites surface plasmons opening possibility for stronger light-matter interaction at nanoscales and optical frequencies. On the other hand, metamaterials, known as artificial materials built with designable subwavelength units, offer unprecedented new material properties not existing in nature. By combining unique advantages in these two areas, plasmonic metamaterials gain tremendous momentum for fundamental research interest and potential practical applications through the active and passive interaction with and control of light. This thesis is focused on the theoretical and experimental study of plasmonic metamaterials with tunable plasmonic properties, and their applications in controlling spontaneous emission process of quantum emitters, and manipulating light propagation, scattering and absorption. To break the limitation of surface plasmon properties by existing metal materials, composite- and multilayer-based metamaterials are investigated and their tunable plasmonic properties are demonstrated. Nanopatterned multilayer metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion relations are further utilized to enhance spontaneous emission rates of molecules at desired frequencies with improved far-field radiative power through the Purcell effect. Theoretical calculations and experimental lifetime characterizations show the tunable broadband Purcell enhancement of 76 fold on the hyperbolic metamaterials that better aligns with spontaneous emission spectra and the emission intensity improvement of 80 fold achieved by the out-coupling effect of nanopatterns. This concept is later applied to quantum-well light emitting devices for improving the light efficiency and modulation speed at blue and green wavelengths. On the passive light manipulation, in contrast to strong plasmonic scattering from metal patterns, anomalously weak scattering by patterns in multilayer hyperbolic metamaterials is observed and experimentally demonstrated to be insensitive to pattern sizes, shapes and incident angles, and has potential applications in scattering cross-section engineering, optical encryption, low-observable conductive probes and opto-electric devices. Lastly, the concept of metamaterials is also extended to selective control of light absorption and reflection for potential solar energy applications. A high-performance spectrally selective coating based on multi-scaled metamaterials is designed and fabricated with 90-95% solar absorptivity and <30% infrared emissivity near the peak of 500 C black body radiation, which can be utilized for designing solar absorbers with high thermal efficiency for future high temperature concentrating solar power systems.

  2. Design, Synthesis, and Monitoring of Light-Activated Motorized Nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Pinn-Tsong

    Our group has developed a family of single molecules termed nanocars, which are aimed at performing controllable motion on surfaces. In this work, a series of light-activated motorized nanomachines incorporated with a MHz frequency light-activated unidirectional rotary motor were designed and synthesized. We hope the light-activated motor can serve as the powering unit for the nanomachines, and perform controllable translational motion on surfaces or in solution. A series of motorized nanovehicles intended for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging were designed and synthesized. A p-carborane-wheeled motorized nanocar was synthesized and monitored by STM. Single-molecule imaging was accomplished on a Cu(111) surface. However, further manipulations did lead to motor induced lateral motion. We attributed this result to the strong molecule-surface interactions between the p-carborane-wheeled nanocar and the Cu(111) surface and possible energy transfer between the rotary motor and the Cu(111) surface. To fine-tune the molecule-surface interactions, an adamantane-wheeled motorized nanocar and a three-wheel nanoroadster were designed and synthesized. In addition, the STM substrates will be varied and different combinations of molecule-surface interactions will be studied. As a complimentary imaging method to STM, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy (SMFM) also provides single-molecule level resolution. Unlike STM experiment requires ultra-high vacuum and conductive substrate, SMFM experiment is conducted at ambient conditions and uses non-conductive substrate. This imaging method allows us to study another category of molecule-surface interactions. We plan to design a fluorescent motorized nanocar that is suitable for SMFM studies. However, both the motor and fluorophore are photochemically active molecules. In proximity, some undesired energy transfer or interference could occur. A cyanine 5- (cy5-) tagged motorized nanocar incorporated with the MHz motor was designed and synthesized in order to minimize the potential energy transfer or interference between the motor and the fluorophore. The SMFM study of this cy5-tagged motorized nanocar is currently undergoing. The design of light-activated motorized nanocar inspired the design of nanosubmarines. We used fluorescence quenching and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of single molecules. The fluorescence quenching experiments of Ru(bpy)3+2 by a quenching nanosubmarine was conducted, but no motor induced acceleration of the molecule were observed. Another fluorescent nanosubmarine was monitored by FCS, and no increase of diffusion coefficient was found. Finally, a 1-D channel approach was adopted for decreasing the effects of Brownian motion, and acceleration of nanosubmarine was observed.

  3. Asymmetric photoredox transition-metal catalysis activated by visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Haohua; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhang, Lilu; Rse, Philipp; Chen, Liang-An; Harms, Klaus; Marsch, Michael; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is seen as one of the most economical strategies to satisfy the growing demand for enantiomerically pure small molecules in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. And visible light has been recognized as an environmentally friendly and sustainable form of energy for triggering chemical transformations and catalytic chemical processes. For these reasons, visible-light-driven catalytic asymmetric chemistry is a subject of enormous current interest. Photoredox catalysis provides the opportunity to generate highly reactive radical ion intermediates with often unusual or unconventional reactivities under surprisingly mild reaction conditions. In such systems, photoactivated sensitizers initiate a single electron transfer from (or to) a closed-shell organic molecule to produce radical cations or radical anions whose reactivities are then exploited for interesting or unusual chemical transformations. However, the high reactivity of photoexcited substrates, intermediate radical ions or radicals, and the low activation barriers for follow-up reactions provide significant hurdles for the development of efficient catalytic photochemical processes that work under stereochemical control and provide chiral molecules in an asymmetric fashion. Here we report a highly efficient asymmetric catalyst that uses visible light for the necessary molecular activation, thereby combining asymmetric catalysis and photocatalysis. We show that a chiral iridium complex can serve as a sensitizer for photoredox catalysis and at the same time provide very effective asymmetric induction for the enantioselective alkylation of 2-acyl imidazoles. This new asymmetric photoredox catalyst, in which the metal centre simultaneously serves as the exclusive source of chirality, the catalytically active Lewis acid centre, and the photoredox centre, offers new opportunities for the `green' synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules.

  4. Asymmetric photoredox transition-metal catalysis activated by visible light.

    PubMed

    Huo, Haohua; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhang, Lilu; Rse, Philipp; Chen, Liang-An; Harms, Klaus; Marsch, Michael; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is seen as one of the most economical strategies to satisfy the growing demand for enantiomerically pure small molecules in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. And visible light has been recognized as an environmentally friendly and sustainable form of energy for triggering chemical transformations and catalytic chemical processes. For these reasons, visible-light-driven catalytic asymmetric chemistry is a subject of enormous current interest. Photoredox catalysis provides the opportunity to generate highly reactive radical ion intermediates with often unusual or unconventional reactivities under surprisingly mild reaction conditions. In such systems, photoactivated sensitizers initiate a single electron transfer from (or to) a closed-shell organic molecule to produce radical cations or radical anions whose reactivities are then exploited for interesting or unusual chemical transformations. However, the high reactivity of photoexcited substrates, intermediate radical ions or radicals, and the low activation barriers for follow-up reactions provide significant hurdles for the development of efficient catalytic photochemical processes that work under stereochemical control and provide chiral molecules in an asymmetric fashion. Here we report a highly efficient asymmetric catalyst that uses visible light for the necessary molecular activation, thereby combining asymmetric catalysis and photocatalysis. We show that a chiral iridium complex can serve as a sensitizer for photoredox catalysis and at the same time provide very effective asymmetric induction for the enantioselective alkylation of 2-acyl imidazoles. This new asymmetric photoredox catalyst, in which the metal centre simultaneously serves as the exclusive source of chirality, the catalytically active Lewis acid centre, and the photoredox centre, offers new opportunities for the 'green' synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules. PMID:25373679

  5. Near-infrared light activated azo-BF2 switches.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin; Hughes, Russell P; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2014-09-24

    Increasing the electron density in BF2-coodinated azo compounds through para-substitution leads to a bathochromic shift in their activation wavelength. When the substituent is dimethyl amine, or the like, the trans/cis isomerization process can be efficiently modulated using near infrared light. The electron donating capability of the substituent also controls the hydrolysis half-life of the switch in aqueous solution, which is drastically longer for the cis isomer, while the BF2-coodination prevents reduction by glutathione. PMID:25222380

  6. Peculiarities of Cometary Light Curves and Outburst Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonenko, V. S.; Churyumov, K. I.

    2003-03-01

    We give an overview of the main results of our works on the revision of cometary light curves and on the search for new patterns and features in the evolution of the integrated brightness of comets as they move in circumsolar space. These works revealed several new, previously unknown phenomena in the integrated-brightness variations and outburst activity of comets. Our results supplement and expand the body of observational data that provides a basis for constructing a model of the cometary nucleus and developing a theory of the cometary evolution.

  7. Light Activated Serotonin for Exploring Its Action in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Adam C.; Vandenberg, Laura N.; Ball, Rebecca E.; Snouffer, Ashley A.; Hudson, Alicia G.; Zhu, Yue; McLain, Duncan E.; Johnston, Lindsey L.; Lauderdale, James D.; Levin, Michael; Dore, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator involved in regulating mood, appetite, memory, learning, pain, and establishment of left-right (LR) asymmetry in embryonic development. To explore the role of 5-HT in a variety of physiological contexts, we have created two forms of “caged” 5-HT, BHQ-O-5HT and BHQ-N-5HT. When exposed to 365- or 740-nm light, BHQ-O-5HT releases 5-HT through 1- or 2-photon excitation, respectively. BHQ-O-5HT mediated changes in neural activity in cultured primary sensory neurons from mouse and the trigeminal ganglion and optic tectum of intact zebrafish larvae in the form of high amplitude spiking in response to light. In Xenopus laevis embryos, 5-HT released from BHQ-O-5HT upon exposure to light increased the occurrence of LR patterning defects. Maximal rates of LR defects were observed when 5-HT was released at stage 5 compared to stage 8. These experiments show the potential for BHQ-caged serotonins in studying 5-HT-regulated physiological processes. PMID:24333002

  8. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  9. Influence of different types of low substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose on tableting, disintegration, and floating behaviour of floating drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Dis, Pter; Pernecker, Tivadar; Nagy, Sndor; Pl, Szilrd; Dvay, Attila

    2014-01-01

    The object of the present study is to evaluate the effect of application of low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (L-HPC) 11 and B1 as excipients promoting floating in gastroretentive tablets. Directly compressed tablets were formed based on experimental design. Face-centred central composite design was applied with two factors and 3 levels, where amount of sodium alginate (X1) and L-HPC (X2) were the numerical factors. Applied types of L-HPCs and their 1:1 mixture were included in a categorical factor (X3). Studied parameters were floating lag time, floating time, floating force, swelling behaviour of tablets and dissolution of paracetamol, which was used as a model active substance. Due to their physical character, L-HPCs had different water uptake and flowability. Lower flowability and lower water uptake was observed after 60min at L-HPC 11 compared to L-HPC B1. Shorter floating times were detected at L-HPC 11 and L-HPC mixtures with 0.5% content of sodium alginate, whereas alginate was the only significant factor. Evaluating results of drug release and swelling studies on floating tablets revealed correlation, which can serve to help to understand the mechanism of action of L-HPCs in the field development of gastroretentive dosage forms. PMID:26702261

  10. Alternative chromophores for use in light-activated surgical adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Brian D.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2003-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using alternative chromophores in light-activated surgical adhesives. Two commonly used chromophores, indocyanine green (ICG), and methylene blue (MB) were investigated, as well as three different food colorings: red #40, blue #1, and green food coloring consisting of yellow #5 and blue #1. The study consisted of three components. First, the absorption profiles of the five chromophores, both diluted in deionized water and bound to protein, were recorded with a UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer. Second, the effect of accumulated thermal dosages on the stability of the absorption profiles was investigated. Third, the stability of the absorption profiles of the chromophore solutions when exposed to ambient light for an extended period of time was investigated. The peak absorption wavelengths of ICG, MB, red #40, and blue #1, were found to be 780 nm, 665 nm, 500 nm, and 630 nm respectively. The green food coloring had two absorption peaks at 417 nm and 630 nm, corresponding to the two dye components comprising this color. The peak absorption wavelength of the ICG shifted to 805 nm when bound to protein. ICG and MB showed a significant decrease in absorbance units with increased time and temperature when heated to temperatures up to 100 degrees C. Negligible change in absorption with accumulated thermal dose was observed for any of the three food colorings investigated. Photobleaching was observed in both ICG and MB solutions with exposure to a white light source. An 88% decrease in absorption was seen in ICG deionized water solution after 7 days of exposure with a corresponding 33% decrease in absorption seen in the MB deionized water solution. A negligible drop in absorption was observed from exposure to ambient light for a 12-week period with the three food colorings investigated.

  11. Radium equivalent activity in the light of UNSCEAR report.

    PubMed

    Tufail, Muhammad

    2012-09-01

    Radium equivalent activity (Ra ( eq )) has been in practice for the last 40 years for the assessment of radiological hazard of radioactivity in environmental materials. The in-practice model for the calculation of the Ra ( eq ) has been critically reviewed in the light of the UNSCEAR 2000 report. Annual effective dose (E) values of (232)Th and (40)K were found to be not equal to that of (226)Ra derived from the activity concentrations of these radionuclides used in the expression for the Ra ( eq ). Therefore, a modified model has been proposed for the determination of the Ra ( eq ) for outdoor external exposure to gamma rays. The relation between the E and Ra ( eq ) has been explored. It is recommended that while describing the radiological hazard of the materials containing radioactivity, there should be no need to calculate the Ra ( eq ) if the E has already been determined or vice versa. PMID:21915591

  12. Manipulation of P2X Receptor Activities by Light Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Seong

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors are involved in amplification of inflammatory responses in peripheral nociceptive fibers and in mediating pain-related signals to the CNS. Control of P2X activation has significant importance in managing unwanted hypersensitive neuron responses. To overcome the limitations of chemical ligand treatment, optical stimulation methods of optogenetics and photoswitching achieve efficient control of P2X activation while allowing specificity at the target site and convenient stimulation by light illumination. There are many potential applications for photosensitive elements, such as improved uncaging methods, photoisomerizable ligands, photoswitches, and gold nanoparticles. Each technique has both advantages and downsides, and techniques are selected according to the purpose of the application. Technical advances not only provide novel approaches to manage inflammation or pain mediated by P2X receptors but also suggest a similar approach for controlling other ion channels. PMID:26884649

  13. Visible-light active conducting polymer nanostructures with superior photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Kouame, Natalie Amoin; Remita, Samy; Ramos, Laurence; Goubard, Fabrice; Aubert, Pierre-Henri; Dazzi, Alexandre; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Remita, Hynd

    2015-01-01

    The development of visible-light responsive photocatalysts would permit more efficient use of solar energy, and thus would bring sustainable solutions to many environmental issues. Conductive polymers appear as a new class of very active photocatalysts under visible light. Among them poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is one of the most promising conjugated polymer with a wide range of applications. PEDOT nanostructures synthesized in soft templates via chemical oxidative polymerization demonstrate unprecedented photocatalytic activities for water treatment without the assistance of sacrificial reagents or noble metal co-catalysts and turn out to be better than TiO2 as benchmark catalyst. The PEDOT nanostructures exhibit a narrow band gap (E?=?1.69?eV) and are characterized by excellent ability to absorb light in visible and near infrared region. The novel PEDOT-based photocatalysts are very stable with cycling and can be reused without appreciable loss of activity. Interestingly, hollow micrometric vesicular structures of PEDOT are not effective photocatalysts as compared to nanometric spindles suggesting size and shape dependent photocatalytic properties. The visible-light active photocatalytic properties of the polymer nanostructures present promising applications in solar light harvesting and broader fields. PMID:26657168

  14. Visible-light active conducting polymer nanostructures with superior photocatalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Kouame, Natalie Amoin; Remita, Samy; Ramos, Laurence; Goubard, Fabrice; Aubert, Pierre-Henri; Dazzi, Alexandre; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Remita, Hynd

    2015-01-01

    The development of visible-light responsive photocatalysts would permit more efficient use of solar energy, and thus would bring sustainable solutions to many environmental issues. Conductive polymers appear as a new class of very active photocatalysts under visible light. Among them poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is one of the most promising conjugated polymer with a wide range of applications. PEDOT nanostructures synthesized in soft templates via chemical oxidative polymerization demonstrate unprecedented photocatalytic activities for water treatment without the assistance of sacrificial reagents or noble metal co-catalysts and turn out to be better than TiO2 as benchmark catalyst. The PEDOT nanostructures exhibit a narrow band gap (E = 1.69 eV) and are characterized by excellent ability to absorb light in visible and near infrared region. The novel PEDOT-based photocatalysts are very stable with cycling and can be reused without appreciable loss of activity. Interestingly, hollow micrometric vesicular structures of PEDOT are not effective photocatalysts as compared to nanometric spindles suggesting size and shape dependent photocatalytic properties. The visible-light active photocatalytic properties of the polymer nanostructures present promising applications in solar light harvesting and broader fields. PMID:26657168

  15. Visible-light active conducting polymer nanostructures with superior photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Kouame, Natalie Amoin; Remita, Samy; Ramos, Laurence; Goubard, Fabrice; Aubert, Pierre-Henri; Dazzi, Alexandre; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Remita, Hynd

    2015-12-01

    The development of visible-light responsive photocatalysts would permit more efficient use of solar energy, and thus would bring sustainable solutions to many environmental issues. Conductive polymers appear as a new class of very active photocatalysts under visible light. Among them poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is one of the most promising conjugated polymer with a wide range of applications. PEDOT nanostructures synthesized in soft templates via chemical oxidative polymerization demonstrate unprecedented photocatalytic activities for water treatment without the assistance of sacrificial reagents or noble metal co-catalysts and turn out to be better than TiO2 as benchmark catalyst. The PEDOT nanostructures exhibit a narrow band gap (E = 1.69 eV) and are characterized by excellent ability to absorb light in visible and near infrared region. The novel PEDOT-based photocatalysts are very stable with cycling and can be reused without appreciable loss of activity. Interestingly, hollow micrometric vesicular structures of PEDOT are not effective photocatalysts as compared to nanometric spindles suggesting size and shape dependent photocatalytic properties. The visible-light active photocatalytic properties of the polymer nanostructures present promising applications in solar light harvesting and broader fields.

  16. Mechanism of activation of light-activated phosphodiesterase and evidence for homology with hormone-activated adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yamazaki, A.; Wheeler, M.A.; George, J.S.; Rasenick, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    Light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) is one of the effector proteins in the rod outer segments in vertebrate retina. The hydrolysis of cGMP in rod occurs with a speed and light sensitivity which suggests a role for this hydrolysis in visual transduction. In fact, there is electrophysiological data which supports the possibility that cGMP could regulate rod membrane voltage. PDE shows very rapid activation in the presence of photons and GTP. We have called attention to the intriguing analogy between light activated rod phosphodiesterase and hormone activated adenylate cyclase. A number of studies have implicated the binding of GTP to a GTP binding protein as a factor in the hormone dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. Moreover, Cassel and Selinger have shown that hydrolysis of GTP is a component in the inactivation of the hormone dependent adenylate cyclase. We review here recent additional data which provide specific molecular details of the mechanism of light activation of rod PDE as well as demonstrate the exchange of components between light activated PDE and hormone activated cyclase.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Floating-Harbor syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... unusually high-pitched voice; and, in males, undescended testes (cryptorchidism). How common is Floating-Harbor syndrome? Floating- ... motor ; mutation ; philtrum ; protein ; short stature ; stature ; syndrome ; testes You may find definitions for these and many ...

  18. Floats, integers, and single source shortest paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorup, Mikkel

    Floats are ugly, but to everyone but theoretical computer scientists, they are the real thing. A linear time algorithm is presented for the undirected single source shortest paths problem with positive floating point weights.

  19. Active dielectric antenna on chip for spatial light modulation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ciyuan; Chen, Jianbo; Xia, Yang; Xu, Qianfan

    2012-01-01

    Integrated photonic resonators are widely used to manipulate light propagation in an evanescently-coupled waveguide. While the evanescent coupling scheme works well for planar optical systems that are naturally waveguide based, many optical applications are free-space based, such as imaging, display, holographics, metrology and remote sensing. Here we demonstrate an active dielectric antenna as the interface device that allows the large-scale integration capability of silicon photonics to serve the free-space applications. We show a novel perturbation-base diffractive coupling scheme that allows a high-Q planer resonator to directly interact with and manipulate free-space waves. Using a silicon-based photonic crystal cavity whose resonance can be rapidly tuned with a p-i-n junction, a compact spatial light modulator with an extinction ratio of 9.5 dB and a modulation speed of 150 MHz is demonstrated. Method to improve the modulation speed is discussed. PMID:23152946

  20. Floating ports: Design and construction practices

    SciTech Connect

    Tsinker, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a guide to designing and constructing floating piers, wharves, docks, mooring systems, and small craft marinas. It presents engineering fundamentals and techniques. After a general introduction to floating marine terminals, the book discusses design loads and forces, and examines floating pier design requirements and considerations. Buoyancy and stability of various floating designs are discussed in detail, along with mooring systems and approach bridges. The concluding chapter contains case histories.

  1. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  2. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  3. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  4. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  5. 40 CFR 65.45 - External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. 65.45 Section 65.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... External floating roof converted into an internal floating roof. The owner or operator who elects...

  6. Diamond light emitting diode activated with Xe optical centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, A. M.; Bergman, A. A.; Gorokhovsky, A. A.; Huang, Mengbing

    2006-02-01

    A diamond light emitting diode (LED) activated with Xe-related optical centres is reported. The device was made on a high quality single crystal CVD diamond substrate using B+ and Li+ ion implantation, subsequent implantation by Xe+ ions and vacuum annealing to 1400 °C. A diode behaviour with the rectification ratio of 105 at 100 V was achieved. The electroluminescence (EL) of the device was found to concentrate at the B+ ion doped p-type area likely as a result of dominating injection of holes. The room temperature EL spectrum in the range 450 to 850 nm was presented by a narrow band emission of the zero phonon lines 812.5 nm and 794 nm of the Xe centre on a low emission background of the 575 nm nitrogen-related centre.

  7. Designing seaplane hulls and floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit,

    1926-01-01

    Experimental data, such as the results of tank tests of models, render it possible to predict, at least in principle, as to how a hull or float of a given shape will comport itself. We will see further along, however, how uncertain these methods are and how they leave room for empiricism, which will reign for a long time yet in seaplane research bureaus.

  8. Light-activated shape memory polymers and associated applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, Ernie; Snyder, Emily A.; Tong, Tat H.

    2005-05-01

    Continuous product development and technology integration efforts using shape memory polymers (SMPs) have uncovered a need for faster response times. As with most smart materials, SMP responds to a specific stimulus. Traditionally SMP is triggered by thermal stimulus; increasing the temperature of the SMP above a Tg will transition the polymer from a glassy state to a rubbery state. The transition is reversible upon cooling below the Tg. It has been determined that many SMP applications can be significantly enhanced with non-thermal triggering. Non-thermal triggering eliminates the need for heating mechanisms and reduces cycle time. Furthermore, it has been found that with a faster response time many new applications become viable. Previous successful attempts have been made to improve response time of SMP by increasing its thermal conductivity with various thermally conductive additives1. However, thermal heating and cooling of polymers and composites of substantial thickness, thermally conductive or not, takes time. In an effort to facilitate system integration and increase the response time of SMP, researchers at Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) have sought to eliminate the thermal dependency of SMP by developing light-activated shape memory polymer (LASMP). In this work, monomers which contain photo-crosslinkable groups in addition to the primary polymerizable groups were developed. These monomers were formulated and cured with other monomers to form LASMP. The mechanical properties of these materials, the kinetics, and the reversibility of the light-activated shape memory effect were studied. The near-, mid-, and far-term potential of this new material technology for system level applications is discussed.

  9. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or beach any boat, barge, or other floating object on Wake Island in any location or manner other than...

  10. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or beach any boat, barge, or other floating object on Wake Island in any location or manner other than...

  11. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or beach any boat, barge, or other floating object on Wake Island in any location or manner other than...

  12. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or beach any boat, barge, or other floating object on Wake Island in any location or manner other than...

  13. 32 CFR 935.165 - Floating objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floating objects. 935.165 Section 935.165... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Public Safety 935.165 Floating objects. No person may anchor, moor, or beach any boat, barge, or other floating object on Wake Island in any location or manner other than...

  14. Have Floating Rates Been a Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higham, David

    1983-01-01

    Floating exchange rates have not lived up to all expectations, but neither have they performed as badly as some critics have suggested. Examined are the impact of floating rates on balance of payments adjustment, domestic economic policy, and inflation and the claim that floating rates have displayed excessive fluctuations. (Author/RM)

  15. Optics: Light, Color, and Their Uses. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    This educator's guide from discusses optics, light, color and their uses. Activities include: (1) "Reflection of Light with a Plane (Flat) Mirror--Trace a Star"; (2) "Reflection of Light with Two Plane Mirrors--Double Mirrors Placed at a 90-Degree Angle"; (3) "Reflection of Light with Two Plane Mirrors--Double Mirrors Placed at a Number of…

  16. 75 FR 52326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's Light-Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's Light-Duty In-Use Vehicle... owners of light-duty vehicles. Title: EPA's Light Duty In-Use Vehicle Testing Program (Renewal). ICR... has an ongoing program to evaluate the emission performance of in-use light-duty (passenger car...

  17. Some Activities with Polarized Light from a Laptop LCD Screen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakhruddin, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    The LCD screen of a laptop computer provides a broad, bright, and extended source of polarized light. A number of demonstrations on the properties of polarized light from a laptop computer screens are presented here.

  18. The dying of the light: crepuscular activity in Culicoides and impact on light trap efficacy at temperate latitudes.

    PubMed

    Meiswinkel, R; Elbers, A R W

    2016-03-01

    The light trap is the tool of choice for conducting large-scale Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) vector surveillance programmes. Its efficacy is in doubt, however. To assess this, hourly changes in Culicoides activity over the 24-h diel were determined comparatively by way of light trapping and aerial sweeping, and correlated against light intensity. In the Netherlands, sweeping around cattle at pasture revealed that, in early summer, Culicoides are active throughout the diel, and that their abundance peaks during the crepuscular period and falls to a low during the brightest hours of the day. By contrast, the light trap was able to accumulate Culicoides only at night (i.e. after illuminance levels had dropped to 0 lux and midge activity had begun to decline). Although Culicoides chiopterus and species of the Culicoides obsoletus complex were similarly abundant around livestock, they differed critically in their hours of peak activity, being largely diurnal and nocturnal, respectively. This polarity helps to explain why, routinely, the C. obsoletus complex dominates light trap collections and C. chiopterus does not. Inability to accumulate Culicoides at light intensity levels above 0 lux means that, at ever-higher latitudes, particularly beyond 45 N, the progressive northward lengthening of the twilight period will have an increasingly adverse impact upon the efficacy of the light trap as a vector surveillance tool. PMID:26555116

  19. Will My Fossil Float?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesser, Sharon; Airey, Linda

    1993-01-01

    Explains how young students can be introduced to fossils. Suggests books to read and science activities including "Fossils to Eat" where students make fossils from peanut butter, honey, and powdered milk. (PR)

  20. Phytoremediation of perchlorate by free floating macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar; Vijaya Nadaraja, Anupama; Tumbath, Soumya; Babu Shah, Liji; Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil, Prajeesh

    2013-09-15

    Phytoremediation of perchlorate by free floating macrophytes (Eichornia, Pistia, Salvinia and Lemna) was evaluated in this study. Among the plants tested, Pistia showed 63.8 4% (w/v) removal of 5 mg/L level perchlorate in 7 days, whereas the removal was absent in other plants. Phyto-accumulation (18.2%) and rhizo-degradation (45.68%) were identified as the mechanisms involved in perchlorate removal in Pistia. Whole plant extraction yielded 45.4 ?g perchlorate/g dry weight biomass in 7 days period. High intensity of light and presence of nitrate negatively affected perchlorate removal by Pistia. An enrichment of Pistia root homogenate exhibited faster reduction of perchlorate where 100mg/L of the compound was reduced completely in 48 h under anoxic condition. A novel perchlorate reducing bacterium, isolated from Pistia root homogenate enrichment was identified as Acinetobacter sp. NIIST (Genbank JX467695). PMID:23872336

  1. Photosynthetic activity of far-red light in green plants.

    PubMed

    Pettai, Hugo; Oja, Vello; Freiberg, Arvi; Laisk, Agu

    2005-07-15

    We have found that long-wavelength quanta up to 780 nm support oxygen evolution from the leaves of sunflower and bean. The far-red light excitations are supporting the photochemical activity of photosystem II, as is indicated by the increased chlorophyll fluorescence in response to the reduction of the photosystem II primary electron acceptor, Q(A). The results also demonstrate that the far-red photosystem II excitations are susceptible to non-photochemical quenching, although less than the red excitations. Uphill activation energies of 9.8+/-0.5 kJ mol(-1) and 12.5+/-0.7 kJ mol(-1) have been revealed in sunflower leaves for the 716 and 740 nm illumination, respectively, from the temperature dependencies of quantum yields, comparable to the corresponding energy gaps of 8.8 and 14.3 kJ mol(-1) between the 716 and 680 nm, and the 740 and 680 nm light quanta. Similarly, the non-photochemical quenching of far-red excitations is facilitated by temperature confirming thermal activation of the far-red quanta to the photosystem II core. The observations are discussed in terms of as yet undisclosed far-red forms of chlorophyll in the photosystem II antenna, reversed (uphill) spill-over of excitation from photosystem I antenna to the photosystem II antenna, as well as absorption from thermally populated vibrational sub-levels of photosystem II chlorophylls in the ground electronic state. From these three interpretations, our analysis favours the first one, i.e., the presence in intact plant leaves of a small number of far-red chlorophylls of photosystem II. Based on analogy with the well-known far-red spectral forms in photosystem I, it is likely that some kind of strongly coupled chlorophyll dimers/aggregates are involved. The similarity of the result for sunflower and bean proves that both the extreme long-wavelength oxygen evolution and the local quantum yield maximum are general properties of the plants. PMID:15950173

  2. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among the characteristics of these curricula are: (1) use of a learning cycle in which students are challenged to compare predictions—discussed with their peers in small groups—to observations of the physical world, (2) use of guided hands-on work to construct basic concepts from observations, and (3) use of computer-based tools. It has been possible to change the lecture and laboratory learning environments at a large number of universities, colleges, and high schools without changing the structure of the introductory course. For example, in the United States, nearly 200 physics departments have adopted RTP, and many others use pre-publication, open-source versions or have adopted the RTP approach to develop their own labs. Examples from RTP and ILDs (including optics magic tricks) are described in this paper.

  3. Three floating metatarsals and a half-floating cuneiform.

    PubMed

    Madi, Sandesh; Vijayan, Sandeep; Naik, Monappa; Rao, Sharath

    2015-01-01

    Floating metatarsals are rare and complex injury patterns in the world of foot trauma. The injury is typically characterised by concomitant dislocations of the metatarsals from both articular ends ('bipolar dislocations'). Fascination arises from the fact that there have been only 15 cases reported in the English literature from 1964 to date. The first metatarsal has been more frequently reported than the lesser metatarsals. More than one floating metatarsal is also extremely uncommon. Inter-cuneiform diastasis is another rare entity seen in low velocity injuries and sports injuries; this condition is very difficult to diagnose clinically and radiologically. The occurrence of these two injury patterns in isolation is itself rare, making their combination even more unique. PMID:26452415

  4. 33 CFR 143.120 - Floating OCS facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT OCS Facilities 143.120 Floating OCS facilities... CFR part 107 which relate to the facility. All plans and information must be submitted according to... (Marine Engineering) and J (Electrical Engineering) of 46 CFR chapter I and 46 CFR part 108 (Design...

  5. Advanced Light Source activity report 1996/97

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Ten years ago, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) existed as a set of drawings, calculations, and ideas. Four years ago, it stored an electron beam for the first time. Today, the ALS has moved from those ideas and beginnings to a robust, third-generation synchrotron user facility, with eighteen beam lines in use, many more in planning or construction phases, and hundreds of users from around the world. Progress from concepts to realities is continuous as the scientific program, already strong in many diverse areas, moves in new directions to meet the needs of researchers into the next century. ALS staff members who develop and maintain the infrastructure for this research are similarly unwilling to rest on their laurels. As a result, the quality of the photon beams the authors deliver, as well as the support they provide to users, continues to improve. The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the results of these efforts in an accessible form for a broad audience. The Scientific Program section, while not comprehensive, shares the breadth, variety, and interest of recent research at the ALS. (The Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports provides a more comprehensive and more technical view.) The Facility Report highlights progress in operations, ongoing accelerator research and development, and beamline instrumentation efforts. Although these Activity Report sections are separate, in practice the achievements of staff and users at the ALS are inseparable. User-staff collaboration is essential as they strive to meet the needs of the user community and to continue the ALS's success as a premier research facility.

  6. Float zone experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoeven, J. D.; Noack, M. A.; Gill, W. N.; Hau, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    The molten zone/freezing crystal interface system and all the mechanisms were examined. If Marangoni convection produces oscillatory flows in the float zone of semiconductor materials, such as silicon, then it is unlikely that superior quality crystals can be grown in space using this process. The major goals were: (1) to determine the conditions for the onset of Marangoni flows in molten tin, a model system for low Prandtl number molten semiconductor materials; (2) to determine whether the flows can be suppressed by a thin oxide layer; and (3) based on experimental and mathematical analysis, to predict whether oscillatory flows will occur in the float zone silicon geometry in space, and if so, could it be suppressed by thin oxide or nitride films. Techniques were developed to analyze molten tin surfaces in a UHV system in a disk float zone geometry to minimize buoyancy flows. The critical Marangoni number for onset of oscillatory flows was determined to be greater than 4300 on atomically clean molten tin surfaces.

  7. Dragging a floating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-11-01

    A cylinder immersed in a fluid stream experiences a drag, and it is well known that the drag coefficient is a function of the Reynolds number only. Here we study the force exerted on a long horizontal cylinder that is dragged perpendicular to its axis while floating on an air-water interface with a high Reynolds number. In addition to the flow-induced drag, the floating body is subjected to capillary forces along the contact line where the three phases of liquid/solid/gas meet. We first theoretically predict the meniscus profile around the horizontally moving cylinder assuming the potential flow, and show that the profile is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Then we compare our theoretical predictions and experimental measurement results for the drag coefficient of a floating horizontal cylinder that is given by a function of the Weber number and the Bond number. This study can help us to understand the horizontal motion of partially submerged objects at air-liquid interface, such as semi-aquatic insects and marine plants.

  8. Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (AMOLED) Environmental Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, George A.

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits from the environmental testing results by understanding its performance limitations/shortcomings to improve subsequent generations of AMOLED technology. Note that the AMOLED used in this test was not deSigned for the space environment but rather for commercial/industrial terrestrial applications.

  9. Planet signatures in collisionally active debris discs: scattered light images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebault, P.; Kral, Q.; Ertel, S.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Planet perturbations have been often invoked as a potential explanation for many spatial structures that have been imaged in debris discs. So far this issue has been mostly investigated with pure N-body numerical models, which neglect the crucial effect collisions within the disc can have on the disc's response to dynamical perturbations. Aims: We numerically investigate how the coupled effect of collisions and radiation pressure can affect the formation and survival of radial and azimutal structures in a disc perturbed by a planet. We consider two different set-ups: a planet embedded within an extended disc and a planet exterior to an inner debris ring. One important issue we want to address is under which conditions a planet's signature can be observable in a collisionally active disc. Methods: We use our DyCoSS code, which is designed to investigate the structure of perturbed debris discs at dynamical and collisional steady-state, and derive synthetic images of the system in scattered light. The planet's mass and orbit, as well as the disc's collisional activity (parameterized by its average vertical optical depth ?0) are explored as free parameters. Results: We find that collisions always significantly damp planet-induced spatial structures. For the case of an embedded planet, the planet's signature, mostly a density gap around its radial position, should remain detectable in head-on images if Mplanet ? MSaturn. If the system is seen edge-on, however, inferring the presence of the planet is much more difficult, as only weak asymmetries remain in a collisionally active disc, although some planet-induced signatures might be observable under very favourable conditions. For the case of an inner ring and an external planet, planetary perturbations cannot prevent collision-produced small fragments from populating the regions beyond the ring. The radial luminosity profile exterior to the ring is in most cases close to the one it should have in the absence of the external planet. The most significant signature left by a Jovian planet on a circular orbit are precessing azimutal structures that can be used to indirectly infer its presence. For a planet on an eccentric orbit, we show that the ring becomes elliptic and that the well known pericentre glow effect is visible despite of collisions and radiation pressure, but that detecting such features in observed discs is not an unambiguous indicator of the presence of an outer planet. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Engineering of a red-light-activated human cAMP/cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Carlos; Taiber, Sandra; Yeh, Chen-Min; Wittig, Charlotte Helene; Hegemann, Peter; Ryu, Soojin; Wunder, Frank; Mglich, Andreas

    2014-06-17

    Sensory photoreceptors elicit vital physiological adaptations in response to incident light. As light-regulated actuators, photoreceptors underpin optogenetics, which denotes the noninvasive, reversible, and spatiotemporally precise perturbation by light of living cells and organisms. Of particular versatility, naturally occurring photoactivated adenylate cyclases promote the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP under blue light. Here, we have engineered a light-activated phosphodiesterase (LAPD) with complementary light sensitivity and catalytic activity by recombining the photosensor module of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome with the effector module of Homo sapiens phosphodiesterase 2A. Upon red-light absorption, LAPD up-regulates hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP by up to sixfold, whereas far-red light can be used to down-regulate activity. LAPD also mediates light-activated cAMP and cGMP hydrolysis in eukaryotic cell cultures and in zebrafish embryos; crucially, the biliverdin chromophore of LAPD is available endogenously and does not need to be provided exogenously. LAPD thus establishes a new optogenetic modality that permits light control over diverse cAMP/cGMP-mediated physiological processes. Because red light penetrates tissue more deeply than light of shorter wavelengths, LAPD appears particularly attractive for studies in living organisms. PMID:24889611

  11. Temporal and spatial distribution of floating objects in coastal waters of central-southern Chile and Patagonian fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Iván A.; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.; Thiel, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Floating objects are suggested to be the principal vector for the transport and dispersal of marine invertebrates with direct development as well as catalysts for carbon and nutrient recycling in accumulation areas. The first step in identifying the ecological relevance of floating objects in a specific area is to identify their spatio-temporal distribution. We evaluated the composition, abundance, distribution, and temporal variability of floating objects along the continental coast of central-southern Chile (33-42°S) and the Patagonian fjords (42-50°S) using ship surveys conducted in austral winter (July/August) and spring (November) of the years 2002-2005 and 2008. Potential sources of floating items were identified with the aid of publicly available databases and scientific reports. We found three main types of floating objects, namely floating marine debris (mainly plastic objects and Styrofoam), wood (trunks and branches), and floating kelps ( Macrocystis pyrifera and Durvillaea antarctica). Floating marine debris were abundant along most of the examined transects, with markedly lower abundances toward the southern fjord areas. Floating marine debris abundances generally corresponded to the distribution of human activities, and were highest in the Interior Sea of Chiloé, where aquaculture activities are intense. Floating wood appeared sporadically in the study area, often close to the main rivers. In accordance with seasonal river run-off, wood was more abundant along the continental coast in winter (rainy season) and in the Patagonian fjords during the spring surveys (snow melt). Densities of the two floating kelp species were similar along the continental coast, without a clear seasonal pattern. M. pyrifera densities increased towards the south, peaking in the Patagonian fjords, where it was dominant over D. antarctica. Densities of M. pyrifera in the Patagonian fjords were highest in spring. Correlation analyses between the abundances of floating objects and the distance to the nearest sources were generally non-significant, suggesting that post-supply processes affect the distribution of the floating objects in the study region. The identification of several major retention zones supports this idea. Accumulation areas of floating objects appear to be more common in the fjord zones. In general, the results underscore the abundance of floating objects throughout the study region and the fact that floating marine debris sources are mostly local, whereas floating algae may be dispersed over greater distances. Future studies should focus on the ecological role of floating objects in biota dispersal and nutrient cycling.

  12. Design of optical metamaterial mirror with metallic nanoparticles for floating-gate graphene optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Kim, Juyoung

    2015-08-01

    A general metallic mirror (i.e., a flat metallic surface) has been a popular optical component that can contribute broadband light absorption to thin-film optoelectronic devices; nonetheless, such electric mirror with a reversal of reflection phase inevitably causes the problem of minimized electric field near at the mirror surface (maximized electric field at one quarter of wavelength from mirror). This problem becomes more elucidated, when the deep-subwavelength-scaled two-dimensional (2D) material (e.g., graphene and molybdenum disulfide) is implemented into optoelectronic device as an active channel layer. The purpose of this work was to conceive the idea for using a charge storage layer (spherical Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), embedded into dielectric matrix) of the floating-gate graphene photodetector as a magnetic mirror, which allows the device to harness the increase in broadband light absorption. In particular, we systematically examined whether the versatile assembly of spherical AuNP monolayer within a dielectric matrix (i.e., optical metamaterial mirror), which should be designed to be placed right below the graphene channel layer for floating-gate device, can be indeed treated as the effective magnetic mirror. In addition to being capable of the enhancement of broadband light absorption, versatile access to various structural motifs of AuNPs benefitting from recent advances in chemical synthesis promises compelling opportunities for sophisticated engineering of optical metamaterial mirror. High amenability of the AuNP assembly with the semiconductor-related procedures may make this strategy widely applicable to various thin film optoelectronic devices. Our study thereby illustrates advantages in advancing the design of mirror for rational engineering of light-matter interaction within deep-subwavelength-scaled optoelectronic devices.

  13. Tank Tests of Twin Seaplane Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrman, H; Kempf, G; Kloess, H

    1928-01-01

    The following report contains the most essential data for the hydrodynamic portion of the twin-float problem. The following points were successfully investigated: 1) difference between stationary and nonstationary flow; 2) effect of the shape of the step; 3) effect of distance between floats; 4) effect of nose-heavy and tail-heavy moments; 5) effect of the shape of floats; 6) maneuverability.

  14. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float design. 29.753 Section 29.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand (1) The maximum pressure...

  15. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float design. 27.753 Section 27.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 27.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand (1) The maximum pressure...

  16. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float design. 29.753 Section 29.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand (1) The maximum pressure...

  17. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float design. 29.753 Section 29.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand (1) The maximum pressure...

  18. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float design. 27.753 Section 27.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 27.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand (1) The maximum pressure...

  19. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float design. 27.753 Section 27.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 27.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand (1) The maximum pressure...

  20. 14 CFR 29.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 29.753 Section 29.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 29.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure...

  1. 14 CFR 27.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 27.753 Section 27.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 27.753 Main float design. (a) Bag floats. Each bag float must be designed to withstand— (1) The maximum pressure...

  2. Modeling International Space Station (ISS) Floating Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Gardner, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The floating potential of the International Space Station (ISS) as a function of the electron current collection of its high voltage solar array panels is derived analytically. Based on Floating Potential Probe (FPP) measurements of the ISS potential and ambient plasma characteristics, it is shown that the ISS floating potential is a strong function of the electron temperature of the surrounding plasma. While the ISS floating potential has so far not attained the pre-flight predicted highly negative values, it is shown that for future mission builds, ISS must continue to provide two-fault tolerant arc-hazard protection for astronauts on EVA.

  3. Preliminary study for improving the VIIRS DNB low light calibration accuracy with ground based active light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changyong; Zong, Yuqing; Bai, Yan; Shao, Xi

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the science and user community in the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) low light detection capabilities at night for quantitative applications such as airglow, geophysical retrievals under lunar illumination, light power estimation, search and rescue, energy use, urban expansion and other human activities. Given the growing interest in the use of the DNB data, a pressing need arises for improving the calibration stability and absolute accuracy of the DNB at low radiances. Currently the low light calibration accuracy was estimated at a moderate 15%-100% while the long-term stability has yet to be characterized. This study investigates selected existing night light point sources from Suomi NPP DNB observations and evaluates the feasibility of SI traceable nightlight source at radiance levels near 3 nW·cm-2·sr-1, that potentially can be installed at selected sites for VIIRS DNB calibration/validation. The illumination geometry, surrounding environment, as well as atmospheric effects are also discussed. The uncertainties of the ground based light source are estimated. This study will contribute to the understanding of how the Earth's atmosphere and surface variability contribute to the stability of the DNB measured radiances, and how to separate them from instrument calibration stability. It presents the need for SI traceable active light sources to monitor the calibration stability, radiometric and geolocation accuracy, and point spread functions of the DNB. Finally, it is also hoped to address whether or not active light sources can be used for detecting environmental changes, such as aerosols.

  4. Synthesis and polymorphic control for visible light active titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewgun, Sujaree

    Titania (TiO2) is useful for many applications in photocatalysis, antimicrobials, pigment, deodorization, and decomposition of harmful organics and undesirable compounds in the air and waste water under UV irradiation. Among the three phases of TiO2, Rutile, Anatase, and Brookite, studies have been more focused on the anatase and rutile phases. Pure brookite is the most difficult phase to prepare, even under hydrothermal conditions. Predominantly brookite phase TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by the Water-based Ambient Condition Sol (WACS) process in our laboratory. The objectives of this research were to enhance visible light active (VLA) photocatalytic properties of polymorphic brookite TiO2 by minimizing the lattice defects and narrowing band gap of titania by nitrogen and/or carbon chromophone, and to investigate the deactivation, reusability, and regeneration of the VLA titania in order to design better titania catalysts for organic compound degradation applications. In order to study the influence of hydroxyl content on photocatalytic activities (PCAs) of polymorphic titania nanoparticles, the WACS samples were post-treated by a Solvent-based Ambient Condition Sol (SACS) process in sec-butanol (sec-BuOH). All samples were characterized for phase composition, surface area, hydroxyl contamination, and particle morphology by x-ray diffraction, N2 physisorption, FT-IR, solid state 1H NMR and scanning electron microscopy, and then compared to a commercial titania, Degussa P25. Evaluation of methyl orange (MO) degradation under UV irradiation results showed that the lower lattice hydroxyl content in SACS titania enhanced the PCA. As-prepared titania and SACS samples, which have similar surface areas and crystallinity, were compared in order to prove that the superior PCA came from the reduction in the lattice hydroxyl content. To enhance PCA and VLA properties of WACS, an alternative high boiling point polar solvent, N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), was utilized in the SACS process at a higher treatment temperature to modify polymorphic titania nanoparticles. This SACS sample was called "SACS-NMP". SACS, using NMP as the solvent, could also extract lattice hydroxyls, and decorate nitrogen on the titania surface. The PCA of SACS-NMP was superior to that of SACS-sec-BuOH. Nitrogen incorporation of SACS-NMP titania was investigated by CHN analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). VL absorbance for all samples was characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectrophotometry. PCA of MO degradation under UV and VL showed that SACS-NMP is a powerful treatment to enhance PCA by minimizing lattice hydroxyls and doping the titania surface with nitrogen. The effect of calcination conditions on SACS-NMP samples was also studied. The calcination conditions, especially the temperature and calcination atmosphere, have an influence on the BET surface area, crystallite size, titania phase content, and PCA under VL irradiation. SACS-NMP samples calcined in air at 200C for 2 hours showed the best VL activated photocatalytic performance in this research. Additionally, the SACS-NMP sample exhibited superior VL properties to several available reference anatase titania samples. This could be explained as the effective charge separation by the intercrystalline electron transport from brookite to anatase grains complemented by strong VL absorption by the nitrogen species in NMP. The deactivation and regeneration of the VLA titania were investigated and compared to a commercial titania, Kronos VLP7000. PCA of the titania under VL for MO decolorization gradually decreased with increasing testing time and the number of runs. The cause of the deactivation was identified as the deposition of the decomposed MO or the carbonaceous deposit. Among the possible regeneration procedures for used SACS-NMP samples, methanol washing was shown to be the most effective up to 80% of the PCA recovery. Accordingly, the SACS-NMP samples could not be completely recovered since a regeneration process would possibly remove some of nitrogen species responsib

  5. Light/dark modulation of enzyme activity in developing barley leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, M.H.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1989-12-01

    Light/dark modulation of the ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, NADP{sup +}-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity was measured in the developing primary leaf of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings. Ribulose-5-phosphate kinase and NADP{sup +}-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were fully light activated even at the earliest developmental stage sampled. In contrast, light modulation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase exhibited a complex response to leaf developmental status. Light stimulation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity (measured at pH 8.0) increased progressively during leaf development. On the other hand, acid fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity (measured at pH 6.0) was inhibited by light, and this light inhibition was greater in the base of the leaf than in the tip of the leaf.

  6. Wave drag on floating bodies

    PubMed Central

    Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Raphaël, Élie; Chevy, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    We measure the deceleration of liquid nitrogen drops floating at the surface of a liquid bath. On water, the friction force is found to be about 10 to 100 times larger than on a solid substrate, which is shown to arise from wave resistance. We investigate the influence of the bath viscosity and show that the dissipation decreases as the viscosity is increased, owing to wave damping. The measured resistance is well predicted by a model imposing a vertical force (i.e., the drop weight) on a finite area, as long as the wake can be considered stationary. PMID:21876186

  7. Floating patella associated with lymphoedema

    PubMed Central

    Vun, Shen Hwa; Bayam, Levent; Drampalos, Efstathios; Jesry, Mohammed; Fadel, George

    2015-01-01

    Ipsilateral injury of more than one component of the knee extensor apparatus is rare. It is mostly associated with previous trauma, surgery, immunosuppression therapy and systemic disease. We present the first documented case of a spontaneous bifocal disruption of the knee extensor apparatus (i.e. floating patella) associated with lymphoedema. This case highlights the importance of considering lymphoedema as another risk factor for rupture of the knee extensor apparatus. It also highlights the importance of assessing all components of the knee extensor apparatus in patients presenting with acute knee injuries. PMID:25802253

  8. Floating platform well production apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Nobileau, P.C.

    1980-10-21

    A plurality of wells are clustered around a central riser which is maintained under tension from a floating platform. A plurality of spiders on the riser carry funnels in vertical alignment with the wells. The funnels are sufficiently large to permit the passage of wellhead connectors and master block valves, and the production risers include centralizers which brace the production riser from the funnels through a limited vertical range. Tensioning of the production riser is with a lower force and through a limited range which precludes disengagement of the centralizers from the funnel. Some centralizers are located to facilitate entry and attachment to the wellhead.

  9. Nanoflare Properties throughout Active Regions: Comparing SDO/AIA Observations with Modeled Active Region Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall, Nicholeen

    2012-01-01

    Coronal plasma in active regions is typically measured to be at temperatures near 1-3 MK. Is the majority of the coronal plasma in hydrostatic equilibrium, maintained at these temperatures through a form of quasi-steady heating, or is this simply a measure of the average temperature of widely varying, impulsively heated coronal plasma? Addressing this question is complicated by the fact that the corona is optically thin: many thousands of flux tubes which are heated completely independently are contributing to the total emission along a given line of sight. There is a large body of work focused on the heating of isolated features - coronal loops - which are impulsively heated, however it is the diffuse emission between loops which often comprises the majority of active region emission. Therefore in this study we move beyond isolated features and analyze all of the emission in an entire active region from all contributing flux tubes. We investigate light curves systematically using SDO/AIA observations. We also model the active region corona as a line-of-sight integration of many thousands of completely independently heated flux tubes. The emission from these flux tubes may be time dependent, quasi-steady, or a mix of both, depending on the cadence of heat release. We demonstrate that despite the superposition of randomly heated flux tubes, different distributions of nanoflare cadences produce distinct signatures in light curves observed with multi-wavelength and high time cadence data, such as those from SDO/AIA. We conclude that the majority of the active region plasma is not maintained in hydrostatic equilibrium, rather it is undergoing dynamic heating and cooling cycles. The observed emission is consistent with heating through impulsive nanoflares, whose energy is a function of location within the active region.

  10. The paradox of the floating candle that continues to burn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, Stavros; Aristidou, Charalambos

    2012-08-01

    What happens after lighting a paraffin candle that is barely floating in water and kept upright with the aid of an appropriately weighted nail attached to its bottom? Presumably, it should sink because the buoyant force will decrease more than the weight. Surprisingly, the candle will continue to burn, rising slowly above the surface of the water. The reason for this is that the flame forms a well around the wick filled with molten paraffin, while the water keeps the outer walls of the candle cool and unscathed. Thus, the buoyancy hardly changes while the weight is reduced through burning, resulting in a floating candle that will rise above water. We present a quantitative model that describes the formation of the well and verify it experimentally, examining first the case of a candle in the air and then the case of a candle immersed in water.

  11. 76 FR 79157 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... December 31, 2011 (75 FR 10564, February 25, 2011). Description of the Specified Activity SGRLPS proposes... Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station Restoration and Maintenance at Northwest Seal Rock, Del... Reef Light Station on Northwest Seal Rock (NWSR) in the northeast Pacific Ocean from the period...

  12. Global Night-Time Lights for Observing Human Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hipskind, Stephen R.; Elvidge, Chris; Gurney, K.; Imhoff, Mark; Bounoua, Lahouari; Sheffner, Edwin; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Pettit, Donald R.; Fischer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present a concept for a small satellite mission to make systematic, global observations of night-time lights with spatial resolution suitable for discerning the extent, type and density of human settlements. The observations will also allow better understanding of fine scale fossil fuel CO2 emission distribution. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey recommends more focus on direct observations of human influence on the Earth system. The most dramatic and compelling observations of human presence on the Earth are the night light observations taken by the Defence Meteorological System Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Beyond delineating the footprint of human presence, night light data, when assembled and evaluated with complementary data sets, can determine the fine scale spatial distribution of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Understanding fossil fuel carbon emissions is critical to understanding the entire carbon cycle, and especially the carbon exchange between terrestrial and oceanic systems.

  13. Sequential Folding using Light-activated Polystyrene Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yonghee; Lee, Hyeok; Hwang, Taesoon; Lee, Jong-Gu; Cho, Maenghyo

    2015-01-01

    A pre-strained polystyrene (PS) polymer sheet is deformed when it approaches the glass transition state as a result of light absorption. By controlling the light absorption of the polymer sheet, non-contact sequential folding can be accomplished. Line patterns of different transparencies and shapes are used to control the light absorption. The line pattern shape is closely related to the folding angle and folding start time. The relation between the line pattern design and folding performance was evaluated experimentally to develop a technique for folding PS sheets. The results show that sequential folding of PS sheets can be accomplished by changing the degree of transparency of the line pattern. Using the technique developed in this study, self-folding origami structures with complicated shapes can be designed and manufactured. PMID:26559611

  14. Sequential Folding using Light-activated Polystyrene Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yonghee; Lee, Hyeok; Hwang, Taesoon; Lee, Jong-Gu; Cho, Maenghyo

    2015-11-01

    A pre-strained polystyrene (PS) polymer sheet is deformed when it approaches the glass transition state as a result of light absorption. By controlling the light absorption of the polymer sheet, non-contact sequential folding can be accomplished. Line patterns of different transparencies and shapes are used to control the light absorption. The line pattern shape is closely related to the folding angle and folding start time. The relation between the line pattern design and folding performance was evaluated experimentally to develop a technique for folding PS sheets. The results show that sequential folding of PS sheets can be accomplished by changing the degree of transparency of the line pattern. Using the technique developed in this study, self-folding origami structures with complicated shapes can be designed and manufactured.

  15. Floating liquid bridge charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez; Gomes, Whyllerson Evaristo; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of liquid with electric fields is investigated in a configuration where up to 13 kV are applied between electrodes resulting in a 106 V/m electric field in the capillaries and where there is the formation of a free-standing fluid bridge in the interelectrode gap. The Mott-Gurney equation was fitted to the measured ionization current vs applied voltage curve which indicates that the ionization rate at the high-voltage anode electrode dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) interface and space charging in the interelectrode gap determine the floating liquid bridge current for a given cathode-to-anode voltage. Space charge effects were measured in the cathode becker and also at the liquid bridge since the ionized charges at the anode migrate to the bridge outer surface and decrease the interfacial tension from 43 mJ/m2 to 29 mJ/m2. Two distinct structural regions then form the bridge, a charged plastic (bulk modulus 100 MPa) conducting outer layer with a surface conductivity of 10-9 ?-1, which shapes and supports the floating fluid structure, and an inner liquid cylinder, where DMSO molecules flow.

  16. Combinatorial Control of Light Induced Chromatin Remodeling and Gene Activation in Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, Cigdem; Ha, Nati; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Tesorero, Rafael; Fisher, Tamas; Brunner, Michael; Sancar, Gencer

    2015-01-01

    Light is an important environmental cue that affects physiology and development of Neurospora crassa. The light-sensing transcription factor (TF) WCC, which consists of the GATA-family TFs WC1 and WC2, is required for light-dependent transcription. SUB1, another GATA-family TF, is not a photoreceptor but has also been implicated in light-inducible gene expression. To assess regulation and organization of the network of light-inducible genes, we analyzed the roles of WCC and SUB1 in light-induced transcription and nucleosome remodeling. We show that SUB1 co-regulates a fraction of light-inducible genes together with the WCC. WCC induces nucleosome eviction at its binding sites. Chromatin remodeling is facilitated by SUB1 but SUB1 cannot activate light-inducible genes in the absence of WCC. We identified FF7, a TF with a putative O-acetyl transferase domain, as an interaction partner of SUB1 and show their cooperation in regulation of a fraction of light-inducible and a much larger number of non light-inducible genes. Our data suggest that WCC acts as a general switch for light-induced chromatin remodeling and gene expression. SUB1 and FF7 synergistically determine the extent of light-induction of target genes in common with WCC but have in addition a role in transcription regulation beyond light-induced gene expression. PMID:25822411

  17. A Variable Light Domain Fluorogen Activating Protein Homodimerizes To Activate Dimethylindole Red

    SciTech Connect

    Senutovitch, Nina; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Bhattacharyya, Shantanu; Rule, Gordon S.; Wilson, Ian A.; Armitage, Bruce A.; Waggoner, Alan S.; Berget, Peter B.

    2012-07-11

    Novel fluorescent tools such as green fluorescent protein analogues and fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs) are useful in biological imaging for tracking protein dynamics in real time with a low fluorescence background. FAPs are single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) selected from a yeast surface display library that produce fluorescence upon binding a specific dye or fluorogen that is normally not fluorescent when present in solution. FAPs generally consist of human immunoglobulin variable heavy (V{sub H}) and variable light (V{sub L}) domains covalently attached via a glycine- and serine-rich linker. Previously, we determined that the yeast surface clone, V{sub H}-V{sub L} M8, could bind and activate the fluorogen dimethylindole red (DIR) but that the fluorogen activation properties were localized to the M8V{sub L} domain. We report here that both nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction methods indicate the M8V{sub L} forms noncovalent, antiparallel homodimers that are the fluorogen activating species. The M8V{sub L} homodimers activate DIR by restriction of internal rotation of the bound dye. These structural results, together with directed evolution experiments with both V{sub H}-V{sub L} M8 and M8V{sub L}, led us to rationally design tandem, covalent homodimers of M8V{sub L} domains joined by a flexible linker that have a high affinity for DIR and good quantum yields.

  18. A Variable Light Domain Fluorogen Activating Protein Homodimerizes to Activate Dimethylindole Red

    PubMed Central

    Senutovitch, Nina; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Bhattacharyya, Shantanu; Rule, Gordon S.; Wilson, Ian A.; Armitage, Bruce A.; Waggoner, Alan S.; Berget, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Novel fluorescent tools such as green fluorescent protein analogs and Fluorogen Activating Proteins (FAPs) are useful in biological imaging to track protein dynamics in real-time with low fluorescence background. FAPs are single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) selected from a yeast surface display library that produce fluorescence upon binding a specific dye or fluorogen that is normally not fluorescent when present in solution. FAPs generally consist of human immunoglobulin variable heavy (VH) and variable light (VL) domains covalently attached via a glycine and serine rich linker. Previously, we determined that the yeast surface clone, VH-VL M8, could bind and activate the fluorogen dimethylindole red (DIR), but that the fluorogen activation properties were localized to the M8VL domain. We report here that both NMR and X-ray diffraction methods indicate the M8VL forms non-covalent, anti-parallel homodimers that are the fluorogen activating species. The M8VL homodimers activate DIR by restriction of internal rotation of the bound dye. These structural results, together with directed evolution experiments of both VH-VL M8 and M8VL, led us to rationally design tandem, covalent homodimers of M8VL domains joined by a flexible linker that have a high affinity for DIR and good quantum yield. PMID:22390683

  19. Future float zone development in industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandfort, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The present industrial requirements for float zone silicon are summarized. Developments desired by the industry in the future are reported. The five most significant problems faced today by the float zone crystal growth method in industry are discussed. They are economic, large diameter, resistivity uniformity, control of carbon, and swirl defects.

  20. Vertical pump with free floating check valve

    DOEpatents

    Lindsay, Malcolm (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

  1. The Role of Age in Moderating the Association Between Disability and Light-Intensity Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Prizer, Lindsay P; Gay, Jennifer L; Gerst-Emerson, Kerstin; Froehlich-Grobe, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There's a lack of evidence on the association between light-intensity physical activity and disability. This study examines the relationships in activity by self-reported physical function in five domains (i.e., activities of daily living [ADL], instrumental ADL, leisure activities, lower extremity, and general activities), and whether this association varies by age. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 waves. Subjects Participants included 5700 men and women ages 20 to 85 years. Measures Difficulty with various activities was measured with the Physical Functioning Questionnaire, accelerometer-measured physical activity, demographics, and self-rated health. Analysis Ordinary least squares regression models were run to examine the relationship between physical function in each domain, light-intensity activity, and the moderating effect of age. Analyses controlled for body mass index, moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity, self-reported health, accelerometer wear time, and gender. Results Little variation was seen in light-intensity physical activity among younger adults regardless of disability status. Older adults reporting difficulty with activities engaged in significantly less light-intensity physical activity compared to those with no disability (271.8 vs. 316.5 minutes). Age significantly moderated the association between light-intensity physical activity and leisure activities (p = .048), and lower extremity mobility (p = .039). Age did not moderate other domains of disability. Conclusion Younger age may be protective regarding the influence of disability on light-intensity activity. In addition, disability may be more debilitating for some older individuals. Interventions to increase light-intensity activity should aim to address disability at all ages, with increased attention for older adults. PMID:25973969

  2. Visible-light-driven surface reconstruction of mesoporous TiO2: toward visible-light absorption and enhanced photocatalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhong; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Guo, Junfang; Fan, Jie

    2011-08-14

    The surface structure of mesoporous TiO(2) is reconstructed via a visible-light-driven reaction with benzyl alcohol molecules at mild, anaerobic conditions, which substantially extends its visible-light absorption and photocatalytic activities. PMID:21709863

  3. Floating plant dominance as a stable state

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Marten; Szab, Sndor; Gragnani, Alessandra; van Nes, Egbert H.; Rinaldi, Sergio; Kautsky, Nils; Norberg, Jon; Roijackers, Rudi M. M.; Franken, Rob J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Invasion by mats of free-floating plants is among the most important threats to the functioning and biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems ranging from temperate ponds and ditches to tropical lakes. Dark, anoxic conditions under thick floating-plant cover leave little opportunity for animal or plant life, and they can have large negative impacts on fisheries and navigation in tropical lakes. Here, we demonstrate that floating-plant dominance can be a self-stabilizing ecosystem state, which may explain its notorious persistence in many situations. Our results, based on experiments, field data, and models, represent evidence for alternative domains of attraction in ecosystems. An implication of our findings is that nutrient enrichment reduces the resilience of freshwater systems against a shift to floating-plant dominance. On the other hand, our results also suggest that a single drastic harvest of floating plants can induce a permanent shift to an alternative state dominated by rooted, submerged growth forms. PMID:12634429

  4. Ambipolar organic thin-film transistor-based nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memory

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jinhua; Wang, Wei Ying, Jun; Xie, Wenfa

    2014-01-06

    An ambipolar organic thin-film transistor-based nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memory was demonstrated, with discrete distributed gold nanoparticles, tetratetracontane (TTC), pentacene as the floating-gate layer, tunneling layer, and active layer, respectively. The electron traps at the TTC/pentacene interface were significantly suppressed, which resulted in an ambipolar operation in present memory. As both electrons and holes were supplied in the channel and trapped in the floating-gate by programming/erasing operations, respectively, i.e., one type of charge carriers was used to overwrite the other, trapped, one, a large memory window, extending on both sides of the initial threshold voltage, was realized.

  5. Laser-activated remote phosphor light engine for projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Martin; Mehl, Oliver; Hartwig, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in blue emitting laser diodes enable attractive solutions in projection applications using phosphors for efficient light conversion with very high luminance levels. Various commercially available projectors incorporating this technology have entered the market in the past years. While luminous flux levels are still comparable to lamp-based systems, lifetime expectations of classical lamp systems are exceeded by far. OSRAM GmbH has been exploring this technology for several years and has introduced the PHASER® brand name (Phosphor + laser). State-of-the-art is a rotating phosphor wheel excited by blue laser diodes to deliver the necessary primary colors, either sequentially for single-imager projection engines, or simultaneously for 3-panel systems. The PHASER® technology enables flux and luminance scaling, which allows for smaller imagers and therefore cost-efficient projection solutions. The resulting overall efficiency and ANSI lumen specification at the projection screen of these systems is significantly determined by the target color gamut and the light transmission efficiency of the projection system. With increasing power and flux level demand, thermal issues, especially phosphor conversion related, dominate the opto-mechanical system design requirements. These flux levels are a great challenge for all components of an SSL-projection system (SSL:solid-state lighting). OSRAḾs PHASER® light engine platform is constantly expanded towards higher luminous flux levels as well as higher luminance levels for various applications. Recent experiments employ blue laser pump powers of multiple 100 Watts to excite various phosphors resulting in luminous flux levels of more than 40 klm.

  6. LIGHT, a member of the TNF superfamily, activates Stat3 mediated by NIK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Chun, Jae Yeon; Hu, Yan; Dutt, Smitha; Lin, Xin; Gao, Allen C. . E-mail: allen.gao@roswellpark.org

    2007-07-27

    Stat3, a member of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family, is a key signal transduction protein activated by numerous cytokines, growth factors, and oncoproteins that controls cell proliferation, differentiation, development, survival, and inflammation. Constitutive activation of Stat3 has been found frequently in a wide variety of human tumors and induces cellular transformation and tumor formation. In this study, we demonstrated that LIGHT, a member of tumor necrosis factor superfamily, activates Stat3 in cancer cells. LIGHT induces dose-dependent activation of Stat3 by phosphorylation at both the tyrosine 705 and serine 727 residues. The activation of Stat3 by LIGHT appears to be mediated by NIK phosphorylation. Expression of a kinase-inactive NIK mutant abolished LIGHT induced Stat3 activation. Overexpression of an active NIK induces Stat3 activation by phosphorylation at the both tyrosine 705 and serine 727 residues. Activation of Stat3 by NIK requires NIK kinase activity as showed by kinase assays. In addition, LIGHT increases the expression of Stat3 target genes including cyclin D1, survivin, and Bcl-xL, and stimulates human LNCaP prostate cancer cell growth in vitro which can be blocked by expression of a dominant-negative Stat3 mutant. Taken together, these results indicate that in addition to activating NF-{kappa}B/p52, LIGHT also activates Stat3. Activation of Stat3 together with activating non-canonical NF-{kappa}B/p52 signaling by LIGHT may maximize its effects on cellular proliferation, survival, and inflammation.

  7. El Hierro's floating stones as messengers of crust-magma interaction at depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchardt, S.; Troll, V. R.; Schmeling, H.; Koyi, H.; Blythe, L. S.; Longpr, M. A.; Deegan, F. M.

    2012-04-01

    During the early stages of the submarine eruption that started on October 10 2011 south of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain, peculiar eruption products were found floating on the sea surface. These centimetre- to decimetre-sized "bombs" have been termed "restingolites" after the nearby village La Restinga and consist of a basaltic rind and a white to light grey core that resembles pumice in texture. According to Troll et al. (2011; see also Troll et al. EGU 2012 Abstracts), this material consists of a glassy matrix hosting extensive vesicle networks, which results in extremely low densities allowing these rocks to float on sea water. Mineralogical and geochemical analyses reveal that the "restingolites" originate from the sedimentary rocks (sand-, silt-, and mudstones) that form layer 1 of the oceanic crust beneath El Hierro. During the onset and early stages of the eruption, magma ponded at the base of this sedimentary sequence, breaking its way through the sedimentary rocks to the ocean floor. The textures of the "restingolites" reveal that crust-magma interaction during fragmentation and transport of the xenoliths involved rapid partial melting and volatile exsolution. Xenoliths strikingly similar to those from El Hierro are known from eruptions on other Canary Islands (e.g. La Palma, Gran Canaria, and Lanzarote). In fact, they resemble in texture xenoliths of various protoliths from volcanic areas worldwide (e.g. Krakatao, Indonesia, Cerro Quemado, Guatemala, Laacher See, Germany). This indicates that the process of partial melting and volatile exsolution, which the "restingolites" bear witness of, is probably occurring frequently during shallow crustal magma emplacement. Thermomechanical numerical models of the effect of the density decrease associated with the formation of vesicle networks in partially molten xenoliths show that xenoliths of crustal rocks initially sink in a magma chamber, but may start to float to the chamber roof once they start to heat up and vesiculate. The "floating stones" from El Hierro thus represent the products of crust-magma interaction beneath the Canary Islands, but is probably relevant in most volcanic areas and tectonic settings. In addition, xenolith devolatilisation has important general implications for the mechanics of crustal recycling, magma emplacement into the upper crust and volatile release from active volcanic systems.

  8. Night-Time Light Data: A Good Proxy Measure for Economic Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Mellander, Charlotta; Lobo, Jos; Stolarick, Kevin; Matheson, Zara

    2015-01-01

    Much research has suggested that night-time light (NTL) can be used as a proxy for a number of variables, including urbanization, density, and economic growth. As governments around the world either collect census data infrequently or are scaling back the amount of detail collected, alternate sources of population and economic information like NTL are being considered. But, just how close is the statistical relationship between NTL and economic activity at a fine-grained geographical level? This paper uses a combination of correlation analysis and geographically weighted regressions in order to examine if light can function as a proxy for economic activities at a finer level. We use a fine-grained geo-coded residential and industrial full sample micro-data set for Sweden, and match it with both radiance and saturated light emissions. We find that the correlation between NTL and economic activity is strong enough to make it a relatively good proxy for population and establishment density, but the correlation is weaker in relation to wages. In general, we find a stronger relation between light and density values, than with light and total values. We also find a closer connection between radiance light and economic activity, than with saturated light. Further, we find the link between light and economic activity, especially estimated by wages, to be slightly overestimated in large urban areas and underestimated in rural areas. PMID:26496428

  9. Light- and singlet oxygen-mediated antifungal activity of phenylphenalenone phytoalexins.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Alejandra; Corominas, Montserrat; Mart, Cristina; Flors, Cristina; Izquierdo, Laura R; Grillo, Teresa A; Luis, Javier G; Nonell, Santi

    2004-07-01

    The light-induced singlet oxygen production and antifungal activity of phenylphenalenone phytoalexins isolated from infected banana plants (Musa acuminata) are reported. Upon absorption of light energy all studied phenylphenalenones sensitise the production of singlet oxygen in polar and non-polar media. Antifungal activity of these compounds towards Fusarium oxysporum is enhanced in the presence of light. These results, together with the correlation of IC50 values under illumination with the quantum yield of singlet oxygen production and the enhancing effect of D2O on the antifungal activity, suggest the intermediacy of singlet oxygen produced by electronic excitation of the phenylphenalenone phytoalexins. PMID:15239009

  10. Near-infrared light activated delivery platform for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Gao, Yan; Hornicek, Francis; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian; Amiji, Mansoor; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-12-01

    Cancer treatment using conventional drug delivery platforms may lead to fatal damage to normal cells. Among various intelligent delivery platforms, photoresponsive delivery platforms are becoming popular, as light can be easily focused and tuned in terms of power intensity, wavelength, and irradiation time, allowing remote and precise control over therapeutic payload release both spatially and temporally. This unprecedented controlled delivery manner is important to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing side effects. However, most of the existing photoactive delivery platforms require UV/visible excitation to initiate their function, which suffers from phototoxicity and low level of tissue penetration limiting their practical applications in biomedicine. With the advanced optical property of converting near infrared (NIR) excitation to localized UV/visible emission, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have emerged as a promising photoactive delivery platform that provides practical applications for remote spatially and temporally controlled release of therapeutic payload molecules using low phototoxic and high tissue penetration NIR light as the excitation source. This article reviews the state-of-the-art design, synthesis and therapeutic molecular payload encapsulation strategies of UCNP-based photoactive delivery platforms for cancer therapy. Challenges and promises for engineering of advanced delivery platforms are also highlighted. PMID:26520243

  11. Remote control of molecular motors using light-activated gearshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Zev

    2013-03-01

    Engineering molecular motors with dynamically controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in vivo and provide sophisticated components for directed nanoscale transport in vitro. We previously constructed myosin motors that respond to a change in [Ca++] by reversing their direction of motion along the polarized actin filament. To expand the potential applications of controllable molecular motors, we have now developed myosins that shift gears in response to blue light illumination. Light is a versatile control signal that can be readily modulated in time and space, and is generally orthogonal to cellular signaling. Using structure-guided protein engineering, we have incorporated LOV photoreceptor domains into the lever arms of chimeric myosins, resulting in motors that robustly speed up, slow down, or switch directions upon illumination. These genetically encoded motors should be directly deployable inside living cells. Our successful designs include constructs based on two different myosin classes, and we show that optical velocity control can be implemented in motors that move at microns/sec speeds, enabling practical biological and bioengineering applications.

  12. Contact effects in light activated GaAs switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, P. S.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the effects of various types of contacts on the switching behavior of a light-triggered power switch. The switch was constructed from a homogeneous wafer of chromium-doped gallium arsenide; the contacts were either ohmic, non-ohmic, or Schottky barriers. These were formed on the wafer in two geometries; both contacts on one side, and one contact spacings were used to permit the effects of the location of the existing laser pulse to be studied. A high voltage power supply (zero to 20 kV) was employed as the bias supply. A Nd:YAG laser, in the pulsed mode, was used to trigger the switch, which was mounted on a cold finger cooled to near liquid nitrogen temperature. Cooling reduced the dark current to manageable values (less than 1 micro A), and also reduced the avalanche breakdown voltage. The results of the measurements indicate that ohmic contacts produced more reliable switching than the non-ohmic or Schottky contacts, in as much as the shape of the output current pulse was better, and the number of pulses which the switches could sustain before the pulse shape deteriorated was greater, for the ohmic contacts. Surface discharge between the one-sided contacts obscured any differences in switching characteristics which might have depended on the location of the pulsed light excitation, so that no correlation between position and behavior could be obtained.

  13. Double floating probe measurements on S3-A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Cauffman, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Model calculations are made to explain the behavior of the potential of a pair of symmetrical floating probes used for the measurement of dc electric fields inside the plasmapause on the S3-A satellite launched on Nov. 15, 1971, into an eccentric orbit. Data representing the behavior of three regions of the plasmapause on and around Dec. 17, 1971, are discussed. The behavior of the plasmapause is found to be generally similar to that determined by previous observations involving variable magnetic activity.

  14. WindWaveFloat Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alla Weinstein, Dominique Roddier, Kevin Banister

    2012-03-30

    Principle Power Inc. and National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) have completed a contract to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating wave energy converters into the WindFloat, resulting in a new concept called the WindWaveFloat (WWF). The concentration of several devices on one platform could offer a potential for both economic and operational advantages. Wind and wave energy converters can share the electrical cable and power transfer equipment to transport the electricity to shore. Access to multiple generation devices could be simplified, resulting in cost saving at the operational level. Overall capital costs may also be reduced, provided that the design of the foundation can be adapted to multiple devices with minimum modifications. Finally, the WindWaveFloat confers the ability to increase energy production from individual floating support structures, potentially leading to a reduction in levelized energy costs, an increase in the overall capacity factor, and greater stability of the electrical power delivered to the grid. The research conducted under this grant investigated the integration of several wave energy device types into the WindFloat platform. Several of the resulting system designs demonstrated technical feasibility, but the size and design constraints of the wave energy converters (technical and economic) make the WindWaveFloat concept economically unfeasible at this time. Not enough additional generation could be produced to make the additional expense associated with wave energy conversion integration into the WindFloat worthwhile.

  15. 75 FR 80471 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station Restoration and Maintenance at Northwest Seal Rock, Del... Reef Light Station on Northwest Seal Rock (NWSR) in the northeast Pacific Ocean. Pursuant to the Marine... National Register of Historic Places, is located on Northwest Seal Rock (NWSR) offshore of Crescent...

  16. Efficacy of a novel light-activated antimicrobial coating for disinfecting hospital surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Salim; Perni, Stefano; Pratten, Jonathan; Parkin, Ivan; Wilson, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Silicone polymers containing the light-activated antimicrobial agent methylene blue with or without gold nanoparticles were evaluated for their ability to reduce the microbial load on surfaces in a clinical environment. When irradiated with white light, polymers containing nanogold were more effective in this respect than those containing only methylene blue. PMID:22011544

  17. Evaluation, 1979: a look at conservation projects and activities at Seattle City Light

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The attempt at systematic evaluation of energy conservation activities and programs at Seattle City Light is reviewed. In 1979, 22 projects/activities were evaluated and categorized in-house, i.e., commercial/industrial; residential; outreach efforts;support activities; (not targeting the public); research, development, and demonstration; and in-house conservation activities. Details of each of these projects are presented. Four studies conducted by outside consultants are: Evaluation of the Seattle City Light Neighborhood Energy Conservation Program (Battelle Institute); Seattle City Light Conservation Office Evaluation Plan Review (Communication Design); Residential Customer Conservation Attitude and Awareness Study (Communication Design); and A Case Study of Seattle City Light's Utility/Bank/Contractor Insulation Program (Brown and Caldwell). Summaries of the reports are included as appendices.

  18. Challenges for reducing the size of laser activated remote phosphor light engines for DLP projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Ulrich; Bruemmer, Mathias

    2014-12-01

    Laser activated remote phosphor (LARP) is an upcoming technology for high luminance SSL light engines. This presentation outlines some of the challenges met reducing the engine's size, so it can be retrofitted into DLP-projectors.

  19. Young Scientists Explore Light & Color. Book 12--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of light and color. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each

  20. Detailed neuropsychological evaluation in a patient with Floating Harbor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pouliquen, D; Goldenberg, A; Hannequin, D; Lecointre, C; Lechevallier, J; Cormier-Daire, V; Martinaud, O

    2012-01-01

    The Floating Harbor syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by a triad of clinical signs: specific dysmorphic facial features, short stature with delayed bone age, and language and speech disorders. These signs are, in most cases, associated with borderline normal intelligence to moderate delay concerning intellectual functioning. We report an extensive neuropsychological evaluation for an adult female patient and show, in particular, a severe visuospatial impairment. We discuss this deficit in the light of the previous reported cases and suggest that visuospatial abilities should be explored more systematically. PMID:22263687

  1. Effect of light on soluble guanylyl cyclase activity in Pharbitis nil seedlings.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Kopcewicz, Jan

    2008-10-16

    Cyclic GMP acts as a chemical switch in plant cells to modulate cellular reactions. However, its metabolism has not been extensively explored and is still poorly understood. Previous experiments suggest that an endogenous cGMP system could participate in the mechanism of phytochrome controlled photoperiodic flower induction in Pharbitis nil. In order to gain further information on the role of cGMP, we have begun to study the enzyme of cGMP synthesis. In this article, the presence of the enzyme with guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity in soluble protein fractions of P. nil is reported. A large portion of the enzymatic activity is present in the cotyledons, where enzyme activity amounted to 0.45 pmol cGMP/min/mg protein. The enzyme exhibited a K(m) 0.5mM for GTP. A plot of 1/v versus 1/[GTP] was linear and V(max) was 0.74 pmol cGMP/min/mg protein. It was shown that the anti-sGC antibody recognise a 40 kDa protein. Moreover, the NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and YC-1, as a NO-independent stimulator, enhanced enzyme activity. The NS 2028 (a potent GC inhibitor) treatments provoked a 3-fold reduction of the enzyme activity in comparison to the untreated fractions. Furthermore, the influence of light on GC activity was analysed. It was noted that cGMP level increased in cool white light, and darkness inhibited enzyme activity. Exposure to blue light acts to stimulate cGMP formation, whereas in red light a rapid decrease in GC activity was observed that returned to the high level when far-red light was applied after the red light treatment. The results presented in this work strongly argue that an enzyme with guanylyl cyclase activity is present in P. nil organs and its activity is controlled by light via the photoreceptors-dependent pathways. PMID:18674925

  2. The Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Molecule LIGHT Promotes Keratinocyte Activity and Skin Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Herro, Rana; Antunes, Ricardo Da S; Aguilera, Amelia R; Tamada, Koji; Croft, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Several inflammatory diseases including scleroderma and atopic dermatitis display dermal thickening, epidermal hypertrophy, or excessive accumulation of collagen. Factors that might promote these features are of interest for clinical therapy. We previously reported that LIGHT, a TNF superfamily molecule, mediated collagen deposition in the lungs in response to allergen. We therefore tested whether LIGHT might similarly promote collagen accumulation and features of skin fibrosis. Strikingly, injection of recombinant soluble LIGHT into naive mice, either subcutaneously or systemically, promoted collagen deposition in the skin and dermal and epidermal thickening. This replicated the activity of bleomycin, an antibiotic that has been previously used in models of scleroderma in mice. Moreover skin fibrosis induced by bleomycin was dependent on endogenous LIGHT activity. The action of LIGHT in vivo was mediated via both of its receptors, HVEM and LT?R, and was dependent on the innate cytokine TSLP and TGF-?. Furthermore, we found that HVEM and LT?R were expressed on human epidermal keratinocytes and that LIGHT could directly promote TSLP expression in these cells. We reveal an unappreciated activity of LIGHT on keratinocytes and suggest that LIGHT may be an important mediator of skin inflammation and fibrosis in diseases such as scleroderma or atopic dermatitis. PMID:25789702

  3. Measuring circadian and acute light responses in mice using wheel running activity.

    PubMed

    LeGates, Tara A; Altimus, Cara M

    2011-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are physiological functions that cycle over a period of approximately 24 hours (circadian- circa: approximate and diem: day). They are responsible for timing our sleep/wake cycles and hormone secretion. Since this timing is not precisely 24-hours, it is synchronized to the solar day by light input. This is accomplished via photic input from the retina to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) which serves as the master pacemaker synchronizing peripheral clocks in other regions of the brain and peripheral tissues to the environmental light dark cycle. The alignment of rhythms to this environmental light dark cycle organizes particular physiological events to the correct temporal niche, which is crucial for survival. For example, mice sleep during the day and are active at night. This ability to consolidate activity to either the light or dark portion of the day is referred to as circadian photoentrainment and requires light input to the circadian clock. Activity of mice at night is robust particularly in the presence of a running wheel. Measuring this behavior is a minimally invasive method that can be used to evaluate the functionality of the circadian system as well as light input to this system. Methods that will covered here are used to examine the circadian clock, light input to this system, as well as the direct influence of light on wheel running behavior. PMID:21339719

  4. A Constitutively Active Allele of Phytochrome B Maintains Circadian Robustness in the Absence of Light.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew Alan; Hu, Wei; Litthauer, Suzanne; Lagarias, J Clark; Harmer, Stacey Lynn

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity of the circadian system to light allows entrainment of the clock, permitting coordination of plant metabolic function and flowering time across seasons. Light affects the circadian system via both photoreceptors, such as phytochromes and cryptochromes, and sugar production by photosynthesis. In the present study, we introduce a constitutively active version of phytochrome B-Y276H (YHB) into both wild-type and phytochrome null backgrounds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to distinguish the effects of photoreceptor signaling on clock function from those of photosynthesis. We find that the YHB mutation is sufficient to phenocopy red light input into the circadian mechanism and to sustain robust rhythms in steady-state mRNA levels even in plants grown without light or exogenous sugars. The pace of the clock is insensitive to light intensity in YHB plants, indicating that light input to the clock is constitutively activated by this allele. Mutation of YHB so that it is retained in the cytoplasm abrogates its effects on clock function, indicating that nuclear localization of phytochrome is necessary for its clock regulatory activity. We also demonstrate a role for phytochrome C as part of the red light sensing network that modulates phytochrome B signaling input into the circadian system. Our findings indicate that phytochrome signaling in the nucleus plays a critical role in sustaining robust clock function under red light, even in the absence of photosynthesis or exogenous sources of energy. PMID:26157113

  5. Measuring Circadian and Acute Light Responses in Mice using Wheel Running Activity

    PubMed Central

    LeGates, Tara A.; Altimus, Cara M.

    2011-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are physiological functions that cycle over a period of approximately 24 hours (circadian- circa: approximate and diem: day)1, 2. They are responsible for timing our sleep/wake cycles and hormone secretion. Since this timing is not precisely 24-hours, it is synchronized to the solar day by light input. This is accomplished via photic input from the retina to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) which serves as the master pacemaker synchronizing peripheral clocks in other regions of the brain and peripheral tissues to the environmental light dark cycle3-7. The alignment of rhythms to this environmental light dark cycle organizes particular physiological events to the correct temporal niche, which is crucial for survival8. For example, mice sleep during the day and are active at night. This ability to consolidate activity to either the light or dark portion of the day is referred to as circadian photoentrainment and requires light input to the circadian clock9. Activity of mice at night is robust particularly in the presence of a running wheel. Measuring this behavior is a minimally invasive method that can be used to evaluate the functionality of the circadian system as well as light input to this system. Methods that will covered here are used to examine the circadian clock, light input to this system, as well as the direct influence of light on wheel running behavior. PMID:21339719

  6. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  7. Comparisons of three practical field devices used to measure personal light exposures and activity levels

    PubMed Central

    Figueiro, M G; Hamner, R; Bierman, A; Rea, M S

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents the spectral and spatial performance characteristics of two new versions of the Daysimeter, devices developed and calibrated by the Lighting Research Center to measure and record personal circadian light exposure and activity levels, and compares them to those of the Actiwatch Spectrum (Philips Healthcare). Photometric errors from the Daysimeters and the Actiwatch Spectrum were also determined for various types of light sources. The Daysimeters had better photometric performance than the Actiwatch Spectrum. To assess differences associated with measuring light and activity levels at different locations on the body, older adults wore four Daysimeters and an Actiwatch Spectrum for five consecutive days. Wearing the Daysimeter or Actiwatch Spectrum on the wrist compromises accurate light measurements relative to locating a calibrated photosensor at the plane of the cornea. PMID:24443644

  8. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  9. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.757 Hull and auxiliary float strength. The hull, and auxiliary floats if used, must withstand...

  10. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads 27.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for float operation is requested, the rotorcraft, with floats, must be...

  11. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.757 Hull and auxiliary float strength. The hull, and auxiliary floats if used, must withstand...

  12. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  13. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  14. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  15. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads 27.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for float operation is requested, the rotorcraft, with floats, must be...

  16. 14 CFR 25.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float design. 25.753 Section 25.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 25.753 Main float design. Each main float must be approved and must meet the requirements of 25.521....

  17. 14 CFR 29.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 29.751 Section 29.751... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft...

  18. 14 CFR 29.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 29.751 Section 29.751... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft...

  19. 14 CFR 27.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 27.751 Section 27.751... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 27.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft in...

  20. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads 29.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for float operation (including float amphibian operation) is requested,...

  1. 14 CFR 25.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 25.751 Section 25.751... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 25.751 Main float buoyancy. Each main float must have (a) A buoyancy of 80 percent in excess of that required to support...

  2. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads 29.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for float operation (including float amphibian operation) is requested,...

  3. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads 29.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for float operation (including float amphibian operation) is requested,...

  4. 14 CFR 23.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float design. 23.753 Section 23.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 23.753 Main float design. Each seaplane main float must meet the requirements of 23.521....

  5. 14 CFR 29.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 29.751 Section 29.751... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft...

  6. 14 CFR 29.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 29.751 Section 29.751... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.751 Main float buoyancy. (a) For main floats, the buoyancy necessary to support the maximum weight of the rotorcraft...

  7. 14 CFR 25.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 25.751 Section 25.751... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 25.751 Main float buoyancy. Each main float must have (a) A buoyancy of 80 percent in excess of that required to support...

  8. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads 27.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for float operation is requested, the rotorcraft, with floats, must be...

  9. 14 CFR 25.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Main float design. 25.753 Section 25.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 25.753 Main float design. Each main float must be approved and must meet the requirements of 25.521....

  10. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads 27.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for float operation is requested, the rotorcraft, with floats, must be...

  11. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads 29.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for float operation (including float amphibian operation) is requested,...

  12. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 29.757 Hull and auxiliary float strength. The hull, and auxiliary floats if used, must withstand...

  13. 14 CFR 25.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 25.751 Section 25.751... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 25.751 Main float buoyancy. Each main float must have (a) A buoyancy of 80 percent in excess of that required to support...

  14. 14 CFR 23.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float design. 23.753 Section 23.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 23.753 Main float design. Each seaplane main float must meet the requirements of 23.521....

  15. 14 CFR 23.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float design. 23.753 Section 23.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 23.753 Main float design. Each seaplane main float must meet the requirements of 23.521....

  16. 14 CFR 25.751 - Main float buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Main float buoyancy. 25.751 Section 25.751... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 25.751 Main float buoyancy. Each main float must have (a) A buoyancy of 80 percent in excess of that required to support...

  17. 14 CFR 25.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Main float design. 25.753 Section 25.753... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls 25.753 Main float design. Each main float must be approved and must meet the requirements of 25.521....

  18. 14 CFR 23.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 23.753 Section 23.753... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 23.753 Main float design. Each seaplane main float must meet the requirements of § 23.521....

  19. Surface tension supported floating of heavy objects: Why elongated bodies float better?

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward

    2016-02-01

    Floating of bodies heavier than the supporting liquid is discussed. Floating of cylindrical, ellipsoidal bodies and rectangular plates possessing lateral dimensions smaller than the capillary length is treated. It is demonstrated that more elongated bodies of a fixed volume are better supported by capillary forces, due to the increase in the perimeter of the triple line. Thus, floating of metallic needles obtains reasonable explanation. PMID:26513731

  20. Rapid prototyping of reflectors for vehicle lighting using laser activated remote phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmayer, Roland; Kloppenburg, Gerolf; Wolf, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Bright white light sources are of significant importance for automotive front lighting systems. Today's upper class vehicles mainly use HID or LED as light source. As a further step in this development laser diode based systems offer high luminance, efficiency and allow the realization of new styling concepts and new dynamic lighting functions. These white laser diode systems can either be realized by mixing different spectral sources or by combining diodes with specific phosphors. Based on the approach of generating light using a laser and remote phosphor, lighting modules are manufactured. Four blue laser diodes (450 nm) are used to activate a phosphor coating and thus to achieve white light. A segmented paraboloid reflector generates the desired light distribution for an additional car headlamp. We use high speed milling and selective laser melting to build the reflector system for this lighting module. We compare the spectral reflection grade of these materials. Furthermore the generated modules are analyzed regarding their efficiency and light distribution. The use of Rapid Prototyping technologies allows an early validation of the chosen concept and is supposed to reduce cost and time in the product development process significantly. Therefor we discuss costs and times of the applied manufacturing technologies.

  1. Light activates rotations of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Ahl, P L; Cone, R A

    1984-01-01

    To investigate how a photoactivated chromophore drives the proton pump mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin, we have observed how the chromophore rotates during the photocyle. To do this, we examined the dichroism induced in aqueous suspensions of purple membrane fragments by flashes of linearly polarized light. We find that the flash stimulates both the photocycling chromophores and their noncycling neighbors to undergo large (greater than 10 degrees - 20 degrees) rotations within the membrane during the photocycle, and that these two chromophore populations undergo distinctly different sequences of rotations. All these rotations could be eliminated by glutaraldehyde fixation as well as by embedding unfixed fragments in polyacrylamide or agarose gels. Thus, in these immbolizing preparations the chromophore can photocycle without rotating inside a bacteriorhodopsin monomer by more than our detection limit of 2 degrees - 5 degrees. The large rotations we observed in aqueous suspensions of purple membranes were probably due to rotations of entire protein monomers. The process by which a photocycling monomer causes its noncycling neighbors to rotate may help explain the highly cooperative behavior bacteriorhodopsin exhibits when it is aggregated into crystalline arrays of trimers. PMID:6743741

  2. Preparation and evaluation of floating tablets of pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Navjot; Kumar, Rakesh; Sarwal, Amita; Sinha, V R

    2016-04-01

    Floating tablets of pregabalin were prepared using different concentrations of the gums (xanthan gum and guar gum), Carbopol 974P NF and HPMC K100. Optimized formulations were studied for physical tests, floating time, swelling behavior, in vitro release studies and stability studies. In vitro drug release was higher for tablet batches containing guar and xanthan gum as compared to the batches containing Carbopol 974P NF. Tablet batches were subjected to stability studies and evaluated by different parameters (drug release, drug content, FTIR and DSC studies). The optimized tablet batch was selected for in vivo pharmacodynamic studies (PTZ induced seizures). The results obtained showed that the onset of jerks and clonus were delayed and extensor phase was abolished with time in treated groups. A significant difference (p?>?0.05) was observed in control and treated group behavior indicating an excellent activity of the formulation for a longer period (>12?h). PMID:26146770

  3. Construction of Control System for Floating High Energy Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Zachary; Bellan, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The circuitry for the Caltech magnetic reconnection experiment under construction requires two independent floating high energy capacitor power supplies to create linked plasma loops. This project requires the building of systems for controlling plasma generation, including timing circuitry to control the sequences of operation. Unlike with previous designs, timing functions are completely contained on a single printed circuit board. This allows the design to be easily replicated for use with the multiple independent capacitor involved. The timing circuitry first activates a high voltage power supply, then connects the power supply to the capacitor, and then disconnects the power supply so that the charged capacitor is floating. The circuitry then sends out a ``ready'' signal to a sequencer, which sequentially triggers the gas puff valves, bias magnetic field supply, and ignitron switch for the capacitor. The control circuit sequencing has been tested successfully with the capacitor discharging into a dummy load.

  4. Extended Onshore Control of a Floating Wind Turbine with Wave Disturbance Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, S.; Knudsen, T.; Bak, T.

    2014-12-01

    Reaching for higher wind resources beyond the water depth limitations of monopile wind turbines, there has arisen the alternative of using floating wind turbines. But the response of wave induced loads significantly increases for floating wind turbines. Applying conventional onshore control strategies to floating wind turbines has been shown to impose negative damped oscillations in fore-aft due to the low natural frequency of the floating structure. Thus, we suggest a control loop extension of the onshore controller which stabilizes the system and reduces the wave disturbance. The results shows that when adding the suggested control loop with disturbance reduction to the system, improved performance is observed in power fluctuations, blade pitch activity, and platform oscillations.

  5. Pigmented spherical body floating within the globe.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ali S; Hoffman, Jeremy; Kirthi, Varo

    2016-01-01

    Vitreous cysts are rare ocular malformations. We report an unusual case of a pigmented free-floating vitreous cyst incidentally detected in a highly myopic 28-year-old woman who was referred by her optometrist. PMID:26759331

  6. Comparison of self-cleaning properties of three titania coatings on float glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piispanen, Minna; Hupa, Leena

    2011-11-01

    This work compares the self-cleaning properties of experimental TiO2 and TiO2-Ag coatings on float glass with a commercial self-cleaning glass. In the experimental surfaces, TiO2 coating was applied to float glass via the sol-gel route, while TiO2-Ag coating was applied by the liquid flame spray method, which deposits TiO2-Ag composite nanoparticles on the surface. The effect of the coatings on the surface wettability and the activation time for achieving hydrophilicity was studied through water contact angle as a function of exposure time to UV light. The surface morphology was investigated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal optical microscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the coatings was examined with methylene blue and stearic acid degradation tests. Finally, the soil attachment to the surfaces was tested with a sebum-based model soil. The sol-gel TiO2 coating became superhydrophilic within a few hours, while the activation time needed for the commercial titania coated glass was several days. The surface with the TiO2-Ag nanoparticles did not show any marked changes in the water contact angle. The commercial titania coated and the sol-gel TiO2 surfaces showed self-cleaning properties and clearly lower attachment of soil than the uncoated and TiO2-Ag coated surfaces. The difference in the interaction of the surfaces with the organic contaminants was assumed to depend mainly on differences in the thickness of the coatings.

  7. Intermittent long-wavelength red light increases the period of daily locomotor activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, John R; Hofstetter, Amelia R; Hughes, Amanda M; Mayeda, Aimee R

    2005-01-01

    Background We observed that a dim, red light-emitting diode (LED) triggered by activity increased the circadian periods of lab mice compared to constant darkness. It is known that the circadian period of rats increases when vigorous wheel-running triggers full-spectrum lighting; however, spectral sensitivity of photoreceptors in mice suggests little or no response to red light. Thus, we decided to test the following hypotheses: dim red light illumination triggered by activity (LEDfb) increases the circadian period of mice compared to constant dark (DD); covering the LED prevents the effect on period; and DBA2/J mice have a different response to LEDfb than C57BL6/J mice. Methods The irradiance spectra of the LEDs were determined by spectrophotometer. Locomotor activity of C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice was monitored by passive-infrared sensors and circadian period was calculated from the last 10 days under each light condition. For constant dark (DD), LEDs were switched off. For LED feedback (LEDfb), the red LED came on when the mouse was active and switched off seconds after activity stopped. For taped LED the red LED was switched on but covered with black tape. Single and multifactorial ANOVAs and post-hoc t-tests were done. Results The circadian period of mice was longer under LEDfb than under DD. Blocking the light eliminated the effect. There was no difference in period change in response to LEDfb between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice. Conclusion An increase in mouse circadian period due to dim far-red light (1 lux at 652 nm) exposure was unexpected. Since blocking the light stopped the response, sound from the sensor's electronics was not the impetus of the response. The results suggest that red light as background illumination should be avoided, and indicator diodes on passive infrared motion sensors should be switched off. PMID:15927074

  8. Activating neurons by light in free-moving adult flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Chin; Hsiao, Po-Yen; Chu, Li-An; Lin, Yen-Yin; Fu, Chien-Chung; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation, we show our preliminary results which is related to neurons activation in vivo by laser. A laser scanning system was adopted to guide laser beam to an assigned fly and an assigned position. A 473-nm laser can be a heat punishment source to restrain a wild-type fly's moving area. Furthermore, neurons in optogenetics transgene flies can be triggered by the blue laser in this system.

  9. Archimedes' floating bodies on a spherical Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorres, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Archimedes was the first to systematically find the centers of gravity of various solid bodies and to apply this concept in determining stable configurations of floating bodies. In this paper, we discuss an error in a proof developed by Archimedes that involves determining whether a uniform, spherical cap will float stably with its base horizontal in a liquid on a spherical Earth. We present a simpler, corrected proof and discuss aspects of his proof regarding a spherical cap that is not uniform.

  10. Multiple valued floating potentials of Langmuir probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Cheol-Hee; Hershkowitz, N.; Cho, M. H.; Intrator, T.; Diebold, D.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that Langmuir probes can have three different floating potentials in plasmas produced by a hot filament discharge in a multi-dipole device when the primary and secondary electron currents are comparable. The measured floating potential depends on the probe's initial condition - the most negative and the least negative potentials are found to be stable and the in-between value is found to be unstable. Results are compared to a simple theoretical model.

  11. Tests on airplane fuselages, floats and hulls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1927-01-01

    This report is a compilation of test data on airplane fuselages, nacelles, airship cars, seaplane floats, and seaplane hulls, prepared by the Bureau of Aeronautics, at the requests of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The discussion of the data includes the derivation of a scale correction curve to be used in obtaining the full scale drag. Composite curves of drag and L/D for floats and hulls are also given. (author)

  12. Cadmium uptake by floating macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Maine, M A; Duarte, M V; Su, N L

    2001-08-01

    Cd uptake capacity of a group of floating macrophytes (Salvinia herzogii, Pistia stratiotes, Hydromistia stolonifera and Eichhornia crassipes) was determined in outdoors experiments during the lowest temperature period of the year. Although all studied species were highly efficient in the Cd uptake, Pistia stratiotes was selected for further research because of its superior performance and its higher average relative growth rate. Cadmium% removal by Pistia stratiotes was greater in the first 24 h of the experiments (63, 65, 72 and 74% of the added Cd for 1, 2, 4 and 6 mg Cd 1(-1), respectively). After 31 days of growth, Pistia statiotes efficiently removed Cd at the studied concentrations. The macrophyte was able to keep its capacity for Cd removal even though some toxicity symptoms appeared at 4 and 6 mg Cd 1(-1). The greater the initial concentration, the greater Cd bioaccumulation rates. The increase of Cd concentration in plant tissues occurred especially in roots and was linearly related to the quantity of Cd added. Cd sorption by roots is faster than translocation to the plant aerial part and it occurs mainly during the first 24h. PMID:11456161

  13. Floating cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, J.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes a floating cylinder internal combustion engine. It comprises: a slidable having an intake port and an exhaust port; a reentrant cylinder head connected to a cylinder block, the cylinder block having an intake passage and an exhaust passage communicating with the intake port and the exhaust port respectively, the intake passage and the exhaust passage formed in the cylinder block having a longitudinal dimension with respect to the cylinder axis of grater length than a longitudinal dimension with respect to the cylinder axis of the intake port and the exhaust port, the cylinder slidably positioned inside the cylinder block, the cylinder having a top portion slidably positioned within an annular recess between the reentrant cylinder head and the cylinder block; a piston slidably positioned within the cylinder, and a port timing control means interactive with the cylinder for adjusting a position of the intake port and the exhaust port during movement of the piston with respect to the longitudinal dimension of the intake passage and the exhaust passage, the port timing control means causing the cylinder to move independently with respect to the movement of the piston within the cylinder.

  14. Capillary attraction between floating cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harish; Homsy, George M. (Bud)

    2011-11-01

    Capillary attraction between floating particles is a phenomenon of everyday experience and causes the particles at fluid interfaces to agglomerate. This is sometimes called the ``Cheerios effect.'' The calculation of the force of attraction for even simple particle shapes is enormously difficult due to the presence of nonlinearity in the equations governing the interface shape. Most of the earlier approaches to obtained analytical expression for the force of attraction rely on the ``superposition principle'' by linearizing the Young-Laplace equation. We use a systematic perturbation technique in the limit of small Bond number. We present asymptotic solutions in a static configuration obtained for two problems: (i) attraction between two isolated cylinders, and (ii) attraction for an infinite array of cylinders. It is also found that the background curvature of an interface modifies the force of attraction. These forces are important in many technological applications: one such example is the problem of dip-coating of plates which will be discussed during the meeting.

  15. NSLS 2003 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2003)

    SciTech Connect

    MILLER,L.

    2004-05-01

    The scientific productivity of the NSLS continues to be outstanding and the research conducted here has high impact. 2003 was no exception and some of the many highlights from this year's research activity are included in this Activity Report. We are especially pleased that one of our users, Professor Roderick MacKinnon (Rockefeller University), was the co-recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work, much of which was done at the NSLS, explaining how proteins known as ion channels help to generate nerve impulses. It is also a particular pleasure to note that NSLS accelerator physicist Li Hua Yu was awarded the 2003 International Free Electron Laser Prize in recognition of his outstanding achievements, especially demonstrating High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) at the DUV-FEL. Our vision for the NSLS in the next five to 10 years is for it to continue to serve as a vital resource for the nation and especially for the strong Northeast research community. To accomplish this, we are working to preserve and enhance its outstanding scientific productivity by providing increased user support and upgrading beamline and endstation instrumentation. For example, this past year we collaborated with scientists from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the BNL Biology Department to develop a new undulator beamline, X29, to meet the needs of macromolecular crystallography for high brightness x-rays. A new endstation on the undulator beamline X13B is being equipped with optics and instrumentation for microdiffraction and microprobe experiments. The wiggler beamline, X21, is being upgraded to provide high intensity and increased capacity for small angle x-ray scattering experiments on nanotemplated soft matter, biomaterials, and other systems. We are collaborating with the BNL Center for Functional Nanomaterials to develop a beamline for LEEM/PEEM studies, which will add important new capabilities for nanoscience and catalysis research. A new high-speed, high-resolution curved position sensitive detector for powder diffraction was also developed and made available to users to enable time-resolved studies of reaction mechanisms, phase transformations, chemical kinetics, and material dynamics. At the DUV-FEL, this past year saw the achievement of HGHG light at 266 nm, with a substantial third harmonic at 89 nm. User science experiments were initiated and published in Physical Review Letters and a successful workshop was held to identify the new scientific opportunities in the chemical sciences enabled by this unique light source. These and many other important projects are described more fully in the Facility Report.

  16. Daily activity and light exposure levels for five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark S; Figueiro, Mariana G; Jones, Geoffrey E; Glander, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Light is the primary synchronizer of all biological rhythms, yet little is known about the role of the 24-hour luminous environment on nonhuman primate circadian patterns, making it difficult to understand the photic niche of the ancestral primate. Here we present the first data on proximate light-dark exposure and activity-rest patterns in free-ranging nonhuman primates. Four individuals each of five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center (Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta, Propithecus coquereli, Varecia rubra, and Varecia variegata variegata) were fitted with a Daysimeter-D pendant that contained light and accelerometer sensors. Our results reveal common as well as species-specific light exposure and behavior patterns. As expected, all five species were more active between sunrise and sunset. All five species demonstrated an anticipatory increase in their pre-sunrise activity that peaked at sunrise with all but V. rubra showing a reduction within an hour. All five species reduced activity during mid-day. Four of the five stayed active after sunset, but P. coquereli began reducing their activity about 2 hours before sunset. Other subtle differences in the recorded light exposure and activity patterns suggest species-specific photic niches and behaviors. The eventual application of the Daysimeter-D in the wild may help to better understand the adaptive evolution of ancestral primates. PMID:24318943

  17. Light and Excess Manganese1

    PubMed Central

    González, Alonso; Steffen, Kenneth L.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of light intensity on antioxidants, antioxidant enzymes, and chlorophyll content was studied in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) exposed to excess Mn. Leaves of bean genotypes contrasting in Mn tolerance were exposed to two different light intensities and to excess Mn; light was controlled by shading a leaflet with filter paper. After 5 d of Mn treatment ascorbate was depleted by 45% in leaves of the Mn-sensitive genotype ZPV-292 and by 20% in the Mn-tolerant genotype CALIMA. Nonprotein sulfhydryl groups and glutathione reductase were not affected by Mn or light treatment. Ten days of Mn-toxicity stress increased leaf ascorbate peroxidase activity of cv ZPV-292 by 78% in low light and by 235% in high light, and superoxide dismutase activity followed a similar trend. Increases of ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity observed in cv CALIMA were lower than those observed in the susceptible cv ZPV-292. The cv CALIMA had less ascorbate oxidation under excess Mn-toxicity stress. Depletion of ascorbate occurred before the onset of chlorosis in Mn-stressed plants, especially in cv ZPV-292. Lipid peroxidation was not detected in floating leaf discs of mature leaves exposed to excess Mn. Our results suggest that Mn toxicity may be mediated by oxidative stress, and that the tolerant genotype may maintain higher ascorbate levels under stress than the sensitive genotype. PMID:9765534

  18. The Light Wavelength Affects the Ontogeny of Clock Gene Expression and Activity Rhythms in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Viviana; Frigato, Elena; Lpez-Olmeda, Jos F.; Snchez-Vzquez, Francisco J.; Bertolucci, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Light plays a key role in synchronizing rhythms and setting the phase of early development. However, to date, little is known about the impact of light wavelengths during the ontogeny of the molecular clock and the behavioural rhythmicity. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of light of different wavelengths (white, blue and red) on the onset of locomotor activity and clock gene (per1b, per2, clock1, bmal1 and dbp) expression rhythms. For this purpose, 4 groups of zebrafish embryo/larvae were raised from 0 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) under the following lighting conditions: three groups maintained under light:dark (LD) cycles with white (full visible spectrum, LDW), blue (LDB), or red light (LDR), and one group raised under constant darkness (DD). The results showed that lighting conditions influenced activity rhythms. Larvae were arrhythmic under DD, while under LD cycles they developed wavelength-dependent daily activity rhythms which appeared earlier under LDB (4 dpf) than under LDW or LDR (5 dpf). The results also revealed that development and lighting conditions influenced clock gene expression. While clock1 rhythmic expression appeared in all lighting conditions at 7 dpf, per1b, per2 and dbp showed daily variations already at 3 dpf. Curiously, bmal1 showed consistent rhythmic expression from embryonic stage (0 dpf). Summarizing, the data revealed that daily rhythms appeared earlier in the larvae reared under LDB than in those reared under LDW and LDR. These results emphasize the importance of lighting conditions and wavelengths during early development for the ontogeny of daily rhythms of gene expression and how these rhythms are reflected on the behavioural rhythmicity of zebrafish larvae. PMID:26147202

  19. 2001 NSLS ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE).

    SciTech Connect

    CORWIN, M.A.

    2002-05-01

    The year 2001 has been another highly productive year at the NSLS, with over 2500 users, including 720 first time users, conducting nearly 1200 experiments in fields ranging from the life, materials, chemical, and environmental sciences to applied science and technology. An impressive array of highlights from this scientific activity is included in this Activity Report. They include the first demonstration of a direct structural probe of the superconducting ground state in the cuprates by utilizing anomalous soft x-ray resonance effects to selectively enhance the scattering from doped holes. Another highly significant result was the determination of the structure of the potassium channel membrane protein. This is especially significant as it provides insight into how the channel functions and how it selects a particular kind of ion. In the nanoscience area, small angle x-ray scattering measurements played an essential role in determining that preferential sequestering of tailored metal nanocrystals into a self-assembled lamellar diblock copolymer can produce high quality metallodielectric photonic bandgap structures, demonstrating the potential of these nanocomposites for photonic crystal engineering. The infrared microscopy program continued to yield noteworthy results, including an important study that characterized the types and abundances of organic materials in contaminated and uncontaminated sediments from the New York/New Jersey Harbor. These results will be useful in devising improved methods for the destruction or removal of these environmental contaminants.

  20. Body Size, Rather Than Male Eye Allometry, Explains Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae) Activity in Low Light.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Palermo, N A; Theobald, J C; Wells, J D

    2015-01-01

    Male Chrysomya megacephala (F.) blow fly compound eyes contain an unusual area of enlarged dorsal facets believed to allow for increased light capture. This region is absent in females and has been hypothesized to aid in mate tracking in low light conditions or at greater distances. Many traits used in the attraction and capture of mates are allometric, growing at different rates relative to body size. Previous reports concerning C. megacephala eye properties did not include measurements of body size, making the relationship between the specialized eye region and body size unclear. We examined different morphological features of the eye among individuals of varying sizes. We found total eye size scaled proportionately to body size, but the number of enlarged dorsal facets increased as body size increased. This demonstrated that larger males have an eye that is morphologically different than smaller males. On the basis of external morphology, we hypothesized that since larger males have larger and a greater number of dorsally enlarged facets, and these facets are believed to allow for increased light capture, larger males would be active in lower light levels than smaller males and females of equal size. In a laboratory setting, larger males were observed to become active earlier in the morning than smaller males, although they did not remain active later in the evening. However, females followed the same pattern at similar light levels suggesting that overall body size rather than specialized male eye morphology is responsible for increased activity under low light conditions. PMID:26411786

  1. The twilight zone: ambient light levels trigger activity in primitive ants

    PubMed Central

    Narendra, Ajay; Reid, Samuel F.; Hemmi, Jan M.

    2010-01-01

    Many animals become active during twilight, a narrow time window where the properties of the visual environment are dramatically different from both day and night. Despite the fact that many animals including mammals, reptiles, birds and insects become active in this specific temporal niche, we do not know what cues trigger this activity. To identify the onset of specific temporal niches, animals could anticipate the timing of regular events or directly measure environmental variables. We show that the Australian bull ant, Myrmecia pyriformis, starts foraging only during evening twilight throughout the year. The onset occurs neither at a specific temperature nor at a specific time relative to sunset, but at a specific ambient light intensity. Foraging onset occurs later when light intensities at sunset are brighter than normal or earlier when light intensities at sunset are darker than normal. By modifying ambient light intensity experimentally, we provide clear evidence that ants indeed measure light levels and do not rely on an internal rhythm to begin foraging. We suggest that the reason for restricting the foraging onset to twilight and measuring light intensity to trigger activity is to optimize the trade-off between predation risk and ease of navigation. PMID:20129978

  2. Body Size, Rather Than Male Eye Allometry, Explains Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae) Activity in Low Light

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. L.; Palermo, N. A.; Theobald, J. C.; Wells, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Male Chrysomya megacephala (F.) blow fly compound eyes contain an unusual area of enlarged dorsal facets believed to allow for increased light capture. This region is absent in females and has been hypothesized to aid in mate tracking in low light conditions or at greater distances. Many traits used in the attraction and capture of mates are allometric, growing at different rates relative to body size. Previous reports concerning C. megacephala eye properties did not include measurements of body size, making the relationship between the specialized eye region and body size unclear. We examined different morphological features of the eye among individuals of varying sizes. We found total eye size scaled proportionately to body size, but the number of enlarged dorsal facets increased as body size increased. This demonstrated that larger males have an eye that is morphologically different than smaller males. On the basis of external morphology, we hypothesized that since larger males have larger and a greater number of dorsally enlarged facets, and these facets are believed to allow for increased light capture, larger males would be active in lower light levels than smaller males and females of equal size. In a laboratory setting, larger males were observed to become active earlier in the morning than smaller males, although they did not remain active later in the evening. However, females followed the same pattern at similar light levels suggesting that overall body size rather than specialized male eye morphology is responsible for increased activity under low light conditions. PMID:26411786

  3. Photodynamic treatment with BPD-MA (verteporfin) activated with light within different spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Anna M.; Jain, Ashok K.; Canaan, Alice J.; Bower, Robert D.; North, Janice; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Levy, Julia G.

    1997-12-01

    Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A [BPD-MA (verteporfin) or BPD], a second generation photosensitizer tested in clinical trials in combination with red light was compared for its PDT efficiency in vitro and in vivo upon activation with light in the UVA, blue and red spectral ranges. PDT efficiency, calculated based on the BPD absorption spectrum and spectral output of the different light sources, was compared with actual PDT efficiency determined in vitro and in vivo. Results obtained in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay, in which aliquots of murine P815 cells, pre-incubated for 1 h with BPD at 5 ng/mL, were exposed simultaneously to various light doses delivered within UVA, blue and red spectral ranges showed that in this test system PDT efficiency was governed by BPD absorption and light source emission spectra. Similar results were obtained in an in vitro BPD photobleaching test. Thus in vitro, values for calculated, theoretical PDT efficiency corresponded to the actual PDT efficiency. However, in vivo factors, such as depth of tissue penetration with light and localization of the target, had an important influence on PDT efficiency. In mouse models of skin photosensitivity and the cutaneous hypersensitivity immune response (CHS) assay, because of the thinness of mouse skin, PDT efficiency approximated the theoretical PDT efficiency, although blue light was somewhat more efficient in PDT than UVA, and red light was somewhat more efficient than blue or UVA. In a pig skin photosensitivity model, red light induced the highest skin response manifested by erythema and swelling, while blue light caused erythema and minimal swelling and UVA caused only erythema. These differences could be related to the thickness of pig skin and the depth of tissue penetration characteristic of each spectral range. Fluence rate was found to be an additional factor which modifies the effect of BPD and light. In conclusion, BPD can be efficiently activated with light within the UVA, blue and red spectral ranges. Moreover, light doses, deemed safe for red light, can be utilized with light of other spectral ranges, but only after a very careful evaluation of the conditions under which they were determined and the conditions under which they will be used.

  4. A Classroom Demonstration of Rayleigh Light Scattering in Optically Active and Inactive Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecina, Monica Avalos; Smith, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that the concept of optical activity is vague to students because it is difficult for instructors to demonstrate the phenomenon in the classroom. Presents a demonstration that allows students to observe and manipulate the optical path of polarized light through optically inactive and active solutions. (CCM)

  5. 78 FR 1838 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... conduct of the same activities from 2010 to 2012 (75 FR 4774, January 29, 2010; 76 FR 10564, February 25, 2011; and 77 FR 8811, February 15, 2012). This is the Society's fourth request for an IHA; the current... Specified Activities; St. George Reef Light Station Restoration and Maintenance at Northwest Seal Rock,...

  6. Rapid light-induced activation of retinal microglia in mice lacking Arrestin-1

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Emily S.; Zam, Azhar; Zhang, Pengfei; Pechko, Alina; Wang, Xinlei; FitzGerald, Paul; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Burns, Marie E.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia dynamically prune synaptic contacts during development, and digest waste that accumulates in degeneration and aging. In many neurodegenerative diseases, microglial activation and phagocytosis gradually increase over months or years, with poorly defined initial triggering events. Here, we describe rapid retinal microglial activation in response to physiological light levels in a mouse model of photoreceptor degeneration that arises from defective rhodopsin deactivation and prolonged signaling. Activation, migration and proliferation of microglia proceeded along a well-defined time course apparent within 12 hours of light onset. Retinal imaging in vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed dramatic increases in light-scattering from photoreceptors prior to the outer nuclear layer thinning classically used as a measure of retinal neurodegeneration. This model is valuable for mechanistic studies of microglial activation in a well-defined and optically accessible neural circuit, and for the development of novel methods for detecting early signs of pending neurodegeneration in vivo. PMID:25091460

  7. Effects of special blue fluorescent light on hepatic mixed-function oxidase activity in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.R.; Yeary, R.A.; Randall, G.

    1981-01-01

    Phototherapy has been widely used in the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Recent reports, however, have indicated that fluorescent light may be toxic and mutagenic to mammalian cells. these findings suggest possible long-term side effects with the use of phototherapy. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of phototherapy on hepatic microsomal enzyme activity. The exposure of Sprague-Dawley and Gunn rats to special blue fluorescent light at an average irradiance of 1,200 microW/cm2 resulted in no significant changes in liver microsomal enzyme activity for aniline hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole-O-demethylase, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, cytochrome c reductase or the quantity of cytochrome P-450. A significant decrease in aniline hydroxylase and p-nitroanisole-O-demethylase activity was observed when liver microsomes were exposed in vitro to special blue fluorescent light. Photoactivated bilirubin did not effect the activity of the mixed-function oxidase enzymes measured under the conditions of this study.

  8. Rapid light-induced activation of retinal microglia in mice lacking Arrestin-1.

    PubMed

    Levine, Emily S; Zam, Azhar; Zhang, Pengfei; Pechko, Alina; Wang, Xinlei; FitzGerald, Paul; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J; Burns, Marie E

    2014-09-01

    Microglia dynamically prune synaptic contacts during development, and digest waste that accumulates in degeneration and aging. In many neurodegenerative diseases, microglial activation and phagocytosis gradually increase over months or years, with poorly defined initial triggering events. Here, we describe rapid retinal microglial activation in response to physiological light levels in a mouse model of photoreceptor degeneration that arises from defective rhodopsin deactivation and prolonged signaling. Activation, migration and proliferation of microglia proceeded along a well-defined time course apparent within 12 h of light onset. Retinal imaging in vivo with optical coherence tomography revealed dramatic increases in light-scattering from photoreceptors prior to the outer nuclear layer thinning classically used as a measure of retinal neurodegeneration. This model is valuable for mechanistic studies of microglial activation in a well-defined and optically accessible neural circuit, and for the development of novel methods for detecting early signs of pending neurodegeneration in vivo. PMID:25091460

  9. Modification of enzymatic activity following laser irradiation through the light-induced electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat, Albert; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2006-02-01

    When cells are irradiated with visible and near-infrared wavelengths a variety of stimulatory effects are observed in their metabolism. To explain the observed light effects, researchers try to identify the chromophores that are involved in the processes. However, the mechanism of light absorption by a chromophore does not explain many of the experimental observations and therefore the primary mechanism for cellular light responses remains unproven. In addition to the ability of photons to produce electronic excitation in chromophores, light induces an alternating electric field in a medium that is able to interact with polar structures and produce dipole transitions. The effect of the light induced electric field in enzymatic molecules is analyzed in the present article, and it will be described how enzymatic activity is enhanced by this mechanism.

  10. Developmental Alcohol Exposure Alters Light-Induced Phase Shifts of the Circadian Activity Rhythm in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farnell, Yuhua Z.; West, James R.; Chen, Wei-Jung A.; Allen, Gregg C.; Earnest, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Developmental alcohol (EtOH) exposure produces long-term changes in the photic regulation of rat circadian behavior. Because entrainment of circadian rhythms to 24-hr light/dark cycles is mediated by phase shifting or resetting the clock mechanism, we examined whether developmental EtOH exposure also alters the phase-shifting effects of light pulses on the rat activity rhythm. Methods Artificially reared Sprague-Dawley rat pups were exposed to EtOH (4.5 g/kg/day) or an isocaloric milk formula (gastrostomy control; GC) on postnatal days 4 to 9. At 2 months of age, rats from the EtOH, GC, and suckle control groups were housed individually, and wheel-running behavior was continuously recorded first in a 12-hr light/12-hr dark photoperiod for 10 to 14 days and thereafter in constant darkness (DD). Once the activity rhythm was observed to stably free-run in DD for at least 14 days, animals were exposed to a 15-min light pulse at either 2 or 10 hr after the onset of activity [i.e., circadian time (CT) 14 or 22, respectively], because light exposure at these times induces maximal phase delays or advances of the rat activity rhythm. Results EtOH-treated rats were distinguished by robust increases in their phase-shifting responses to light. In the suckle control and GC groups, light pulses shifted the activity rhythm as expected, inducing phase delays of approximately 2 hr at CT 14 and advances of similar amplitude at CT 22. In contrast, the same light stimulus produced phase delays at CT 14 and advances at CT 22 of longer than 3 hr in EtOH-treated rats. The mean phase delay at CT 14 and advance at CT 22 in EtOH rats were significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the light-induced shifts observed in control animals. Conclusions The data indicate that developmental EtOH exposure alters the phase-shifting responses of the rat activity rhythm to light. This finding, coupled with changes in the circadian period and light/dark entrainment observed in EtOH-treated rats, suggests that developmental EtOH exposure may permanently alter the clock mechanism in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and its regulation of circadian behavior. PMID:15252288

  11. Floating ice-algal aggregates below melting arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K; Fernndez-Mndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A; Hudson, Stephen R; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H H; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year. PMID:24204642

  12. Floating Ice-Algal Aggregates below Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    PubMed Central

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K.; Fernndez-Mndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H. H.; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year. PMID:24204642

  13. Imaging Microglial Activation with TSPO PET: Lighting Up Neurologic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Vivash, Lucy; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric diseases. For over 20 years, (11)C-PK11195 PET, which aims to image expression of the translocator protein (TSPO) on activated microglia in the brain, has been used in preclinical and clinical research to investigate neuroinflammation in vivo in patients with brain diseases. However, (11)C-PK11195 suffers from two major limitations: its low brain permeability and high nonspecific and plasma binding results in a low signal-to-noise ratio, and the use of (11)C restricts its use to PET research centers and hospitals with an on-site cyclotron. In recent years, there has been a great deal of work into the development of new TSPO-specific PET radiotracers. This work has focused on fluorinated radiotracers, which would enable wider use and improved signal-to-noise ratios. These radiotracers have been utilized in preclinical and clinical studies of several neurologic diseases with varying degrees of success. Unfortunately, the application of these second-generation TSPO radiotracers has revealed additional problems, including a polymorphism that affects TSPO binding. In this review, the developments in TSPO imaging are discussed, and current limitations and suggestions for future directions are explored. PMID:26697963

  14. Light-activated hypericin induces cellular destruction of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. S.; Leung, A. W. N.

    2010-01-01

    Hypericin from Hypericum perforatum plants shows an important promise in the photodynamic therapy on malignant tumor. The present study investigated that light-activated hypericin induced the cellular destruction of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The result showed that hypericin resulted in a drug- and light-dose dependent cytotoxicity in the CNE-2 cells, meaning the photocytotoxicity of hypericin depends on both of the drug concentration (0 - 2.5 ?M) and light-doses (1 - 8 J/cm2). We further investigated the apoptosis of the CNE-2 cells 8 hours after photosensitization of hypericin using fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. Flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC and PI staining was used to analyze early and late apoptosis. These data demonstrated that light-activated hypericin could significantly lead to the cellular destruction of the CNE-2 cells and induce early apoptosis as a prominent mode of cell death.

  15. Spatio-temporally precise activation of engineered receptor tyrosine kinases by light

    PubMed Central

    Grusch, Michael; Schelch, Karin; Riedler, Robert; Reichhart, Eva; Differ, Christopher; Berger, Walter; Ingls-Prieto, lvaro; Janovjak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a large family of cell surface receptors that sense growth factors and hormones and regulate a variety of cell behaviours in health and disease. Contactless activation of RTKs with spatial and temporal precision is currently not feasible. Here, we generated RTKs that are insensitive to endogenous ligands but can be selectively activated by low-intensity blue light. We screened light-oxygen-voltage (LOV)-sensing domains for their ability to activate RTKs by light-activated dimerization. Incorporation of LOV domains found in aureochrome photoreceptors of stramenopiles resulted in robust activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and rearranged during transfection (RET). In human cancer and endothelial cells, light induced cellular signalling with spatial and temporal precision. Furthermore, light faithfully mimicked complex mitogenic and morphogenic cell behaviour induced by growth factors. RTKs under optical control (Opto-RTKs) provide a powerful optogenetic approach to actuate cellular signals and manipulate cell behaviour. PMID:24986882

  16. A Fluorometric Activity Assay for Light-Regulated Cyclic-Nucleotide-Monophosphate Actuators.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Krschen, Heinz G; Nicol, Christopher; Gasser, Carlos; Seifert, Reinhard; Schwrzel, Martin; Mglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As a transformative approach in neuroscience and cell biology, optogenetics grants control over manifold cellular events with unprecedented spatiotemporal definition, reversibility, and noninvasiveness. Sensory photoreceptors serve as genetically encoded, light-regulated actuators and hence embody the cornerstone of optogenetics. To expand the scope of optogenetics, ever more naturally occurring photoreceptors are being characterized, and synthetic photoreceptors with customized, light-regulated function are being engineered. Perturbational control over intracellular cyclic-nucleotide-monophosphate (cNMP) levels is achieved via sensory photoreceptors that catalyze the making and breaking of these second messengers in response to light. To facilitate discovery, engineering and quantitative characterization of such light-regulated cNMP actuators, we have developed an efficient fluorometric assay. Both the formation and the hydrolysis of cNMPs are accompanied by proton release which can be quantified with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This assay equally applies to nucleotide cyclases, e.g., blue-light-activated bPAC, and to cNMP phosphodiesterases, e.g., red-light-activated LAPD. Key benefits include potential for parallelization and automation, as well as suitability for both purified enzymes and crude cell lysates. The BCECF assay hence stands to accelerate discovery and characterization of light-regulated actuators of cNMP metabolism. PMID:26965118

  17. The light express roadshow: a case study in a successful secondary school's photonics outreach activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Pearl; Wilcox, Keith; Patel, Sunil

    2005-10-01

    The schools outreach programme of the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southampton has reached over six thousand school children during the last five years. The outreach programme centres on a traveling 'Light Express Roadshow'; a laser light show and photonics lecture provided free to schools throughout the South East of England. This paper explores the technical, educational and funding issues associated with providing a successful outreach activity to inspire and encourage a new generation of physicists.

  18. A light-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system for control of endogenous gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic systems enable precise spatial and temporal control of cell behavior. We engineered a light-activated CRISPR/Cas9 effector (LACE) system that induces transcription of endogenous genes in the presence of blue light. This was accomplished by fusing the light-inducible heterodimerizing proteins CRY2 and CIB1 to a transactivation domain and the catalytically inactive dCas9, respectively. The versatile LACE system can be easily directed to new DNA sequences for the dynamic regulation of endogenous genes. PMID:25664691

  19. KillerOrange, a Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer Activated by Blue and Green Light.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Zlobovskaya, Olga A; Gorbachev, Dmitry A; Bozhanova, Nina G; Sharonov, George V; Staroverov, Dmitriy B; Egorov, Evgeny S; Ryabova, Anastasia V; Solntsev, Kyril M; Mishin, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded photosensitizers, proteins that produce reactive oxygen species when illuminated with visible light, are increasingly used as optogenetic tools. Their applications range from ablation of specific cell populations to precise optical inactivation of cellular proteins. Here, we report an orange mutant of red fluorescent protein KillerRed that becomes toxic when illuminated with blue or green light. This new protein, KillerOrange, carries a tryptophan-based chromophore that is novel for photosensitizers. We show that KillerOrange can be used simultaneously and independently from KillerRed in both bacterial and mammalian cells offering chromatic orthogonality for light-activated toxicity. PMID:26679300

  20. KillerOrange, a Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer Activated by Blue and Green Light

    PubMed Central

    Bozhanova, Nina G.; Sharonov, George V.; Staroverov, Dmitriy B.; Egorov, Evgeny S.; Ryabova, Anastasia V.; Solntsev, Kyril M.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded photosensitizers, proteins that produce reactive oxygen species when illuminated with visible light, are increasingly used as optogenetic tools. Their applications range from ablation of specific cell populations to precise optical inactivation of cellular proteins. Here, we report an orange mutant of red fluorescent protein KillerRed that becomes toxic when illuminated with blue or green light. This new protein, KillerOrange, carries a tryptophan-based chromophore that is novel for photosensitizers. We show that KillerOrange can be used simultaneously and independently from KillerRed in both bacterial and mammalian cells offering chromatic orthogonality for light-activated toxicity. PMID:26679300

  1. Control of Protein Activity and Cell Fate Specification via Light-Mediated Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Seth P.; Bear, James E.; Goldstein, Bob; Hahn, Klaus; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Light-activatable proteins allow precise spatial and temporal control of biological processes in living cells and animals. Several approaches have been developed for controlling protein localization with light, including the conditional inhibition of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) with the Light Oxygen Voltage (AsLOV2) domain of phototropin 1 from Avena sativa. In the dark, the switch adopts a closed conformation that sterically blocks the NLS motif. Upon activation with blue light the C-terminus of the protein unfolds, freeing the NLS to direct the protein to the nucleus. A previous study showed that this approach can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins in mammalian tissue culture cells. Here, we extend this result by characterizing the binding properties of a LOV/NLS switch and demonstrating that it can be used to control gene transcription in yeast. Additionally, we show that the switch, referred to as LANS (light-activated nuclear shuttle), functions in the C. elegans embryo and allows for control of nuclear localization in individual cells. By inserting LANS into the C. elegans lin-1 locus using Cas9-triggered homologous recombination, we demonstrated control of cell fate via light-dependent manipulation of a native transcription factor. We conclude that LANS can be a valuable experimental method for spatial and temporal control of nuclear localization in vivo. PMID:26083500

  2. Microwave Induced Morphology Evolution of Bismuth Tungstate Photocatalyst: Evaulation of Phocatalytic Activity Under Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Rajesh; Trital, Hira Mani; Rajbhandari, Armila; Won, Jonghan; Wohn Lee, Soo

    2015-09-01

    Bismuth tungstate photocatalyst was synthesized by facile microwave hydrothermal method and the morphology evolution was investigated under wide range of microwave irradiation time. Structural, morphological, compositional and optical properties were analyzed by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS) methods. Photocatalytic activity was performed by the decomposition of Rhodamine B (Rh B) under visible light irradiation. Results revealed that the microwave irradiation time is crucial in order to control the morphology of bismuth tungstate nanoparticles. Different morphologies were obtained under different microwave irradiation time and the best conditions of microwave irradiation time for the best photocatalytic activity under visible light were investigated which proves that the microwave could induce various morphology of bismuth tungstate photocatalyst to exhibit the best photocatalytic activity under visible light. PMID:26716318

  3. Enhanced Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity of Br-Doped Bismuth Oxide Formate Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Cui, Wen; Zhong, Junbo; Liu, Xiaoying; Dong, Fan; Zhang, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    A facile method was developed to enhance the visible light photocatalytic activity of bismuth oxide formate (BiOCOOH) nanosheets via Br-doping. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, and N? adsorption-desorption isotherms measurement. The Br- ions replaced the COOH- ions in the layers of BiOCOOH, result in a decreased layer distance. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared materials was evaluated by removal of NO in qir at ppb level. The results showed that the Br-doped BiOCOOH nanosheets showed enhanced visible light photocatalytic activtiy with a NO removal of 37.8%. The enhanced activity can be ascribed to the increased visible light absorption and the promoted charge separation. PMID:26506332

  4. Battery charging in float vs. cycling environments

    SciTech Connect

    COREY,GARTH P.

    2000-04-20

    In lead-acid battery systems, cycling systems are often managed using float management strategies. There are many differences in battery management strategies for a float environment and battery management strategies for a cycling environment. To complicate matters further, in many cycling environments, such as off-grid domestic power systems, there is usually not an available charging source capable of efficiently equalizing a lead-acid battery let alone bring it to a full state of charge. Typically, rules for battery management which have worked quite well in a floating environment have been routinely applied to cycling batteries without full appreciation of what the cycling battery really needs to reach a full state of charge and to maintain a high state of health. For example, charge target voltages for batteries that are regularly deep cycled in off-grid power sources are the same as voltages applied to stand-by systems following a discharge event. In other charging operations equalization charge requirements are frequently ignored or incorrectly applied in cycled systems which frequently leads to premature capacity loss. The cause of this serious problem: the application of float battery management strategies to cycling battery systems. This paper describes the outcomes to be expected when managing cycling batteries with float strategies and discusses the techniques and benefits for the use of cycling battery management strategies.

  5. Floating seal system for rotary devices

    DOEpatents

    Banasiuk, H.A.

    1983-08-23

    This invention relates to a floating seal system for rotary devices to reduce gas leakage around the rotary device in a duct and across the face of the rotary device to an adjacent duct. The peripheral seal bodies are made of resilient material having a generally U-shaped cross section wherein one of the legs is secured to a support member and the other of the legs forms a contacting seal against the rotary device. The legs of the peripheral seal form an extended angle of intersection of about 10[degree] to about 30[degree] in the unloaded condition to provide even sealing forces around the periphery of the rotary device. The peripheral seal extends around the periphery of the support member except where intersected by radial seals which reduce gas leakage across the face of the rotary device and between adjacent duct portions. The radial seal assembly is fabricated from channel bars, the smaller channel bar being secured to the divider of the support member and a larger inverted rigid floating channel bar having its legs freely movable over the legs of the smaller channel bar forming therewith a tubular channel. A resilient flexible tube is positioned within the tubular channel for substantially its full length to reduce gas leakage across the tubular channel. A spacer extends beyond the face of the floating channel near each end of the floating channel a distance to provide desired clearance between the floating channel and the face of the rotary device. 5 figs.

  6. Floating seal system for rotary devices

    DOEpatents

    Banasiuk, Hubert A. (Chicago, IL)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a floating seal system for rotary devices to reduce gas leakage around the rotary device in a duct and across the face of the rotary device to an adjacent duct. The peripheral seal bodies are made of resilient material having a generally U-shaped cross section wherein one of the legs is secured to a support member and the other of the legs forms a contacting seal against the rotary device. The legs of the peripheral seal form an extended angle of intersection of about 10.degree. to about 30.degree. in the unloaded condition to provide even sealing forces around the periphery of the rotary device. The peripheral seal extends around the periphery of the support member except where intersected by radial seals which reduce gas leakage across the face of the rotary device and between adjacent duct portions. The radial seal assembly is fabricated from channel bars, the smaller channel bar being secured to the divider of the support member and a larger inverted rigid floating channel bar having its legs freely movable over the legs of the smaller channel bar forming therewith a tubular channel. A resilient flexible tube is positioned within the tubular channel for substantially its full length to reduce gas leakage across the tubular channel. A spacer extends beyond the face of the floating channel near each end of the floating channel a distance to provide desired clearance between the floating channel and the face of the rotary device.

  7. Visible light photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles hybridized by conjugated derivative of polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoquan; Liu, Longchen; Song, Jinran; Liang, Jiudi; Luo, Qingzhi; Wang, Desong

    2014-05-01

    A series of conjugated polymer/TiO2 (CP/TiO2) nanocomposites were prepared from TiO2 and commercial polybutadiene. The as-prepared CP/TiO2 nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman Spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photocatalytic activities of CP/TiO2 nanocomposites were investigated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. The effects of preparation conditions (such as the mass ratio of PB to TiO2 in suspensions for PB/TiO2 preparation, heat-treatment temperature and time) of CP/TiO2 nanocomposites on their visible light photocatalytic activity were investigated. The results show that the CP/TiO2 nanocomposites have excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. As the content of conjugated polymer on the TiO2 surface, heat-treatment temperature and time increase, the visible light photocatalytic activity increases at first and then decreases. The visible light photocatalytic mechanism of the CP/TiO2 nanocomposites has been discussed.

  8. Compressive strength of dental composites photo-activated with different light tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvo, M. R.; Caldas, S. G. F. R.; Calabrez-Filho, S.; Campos, E. A.; Bagnato, V. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of microhybrid (Filtek Z250) and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT) composite resins photo-activated with two different light guide tips, fiber optic and polymer, coupled with one LED. The power density was 653 mW cm-2 when using the fiber optic light tip and 596 mW cm-2 with the polymer. After storage in distilled water at 37 2?C for seven days, the samples were subjected to mechanical testing of compressive strength in an EMIC universal mechanical testing machine with a load cell of 5 kN and speed of 0.5 mm min-1. The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA with a confidence interval of 95% and Tamhanes test. The results showed that the mean values of compressive strength were not influenced by the different light tips (p > 0.05). However, a statistical difference was observed (p < 0.001) between the microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip and the nanofilled composite resin. Based on these results, it can be concluded that microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip showed better results than nanofilled, regardless of the tip used, and the type of the light tip did not influence the compressive strength of either composite. Thus, the presented results suggest that both the fiber optic and polymer light guide tips provide adequate compressive strength to be used to make restorations. However, the fiber optic light tip associated with microhybrid composite resin may be an interesting option for restorations mainly in posterior teeth.

  9. The Effect of Multiple Sequential Light Sources to Activate Aminolevulinic Acid in the Treatment of Actinic Keratoses: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Mitchel P.; Fabi, Sabrina G.; Guiha, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of research regarding the sequential use of multiple light sources for topical 5-aminolevulinic acid activation in photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis. This study evaluated 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis using blue light combined with red light, pulsed dye laser, and/or intense pulsed light in a retrospective fashion. Field-directed 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy was performed with blue light only, blue light + pulsed dye laser, blue light + intense pulsed light, blue light + pulsed dye laser + intense pulsed light, or blue light + red light + pulsed dye laser + intense pulsed light for nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses of face, scalp, or upper trunk. Blue light + intense pulsed light + pulsed dye laser produced greater patient-reported improvement in actinic keratoses than blue light or blue light + intense pulsed light and greater subject-reported improvement in overall skin quality than blue light + intense pulsed light. The addition of red light led to no further benefit in either outcome measure. Photodynamic therapy with multiple, sequential laser and light sources led to greater patient-graded improvement in actinic keratoses than that with a single light source (blue light), without significant differences in post-treatment adverse events. However, the small, widely disparate number of patients between groups and follow-up times between patients, as well as retrospective assessments based on subjective patient recall, severely limit the significance of these findings. Nevertheless, the results raise interesting questions regarding the use of multiple light and laser sources for photodynamic therapy of actinic keratoses and warrant further research with a prospective, randomized, controlled study. PMID:25276272

  10. Development and Progress in Enabling the Photocatalyst Ti02 Visible-Light-Active

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Clausen, Christian A.

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of organic contaminants is a promising air and water quality management approach which offers energy and cost savings compared to thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO). The most widely used photocatalyst, anatase TiO2, has a wide band gap (3.2 eV) and is activated by UV photons. Since solar radiation consists of less than 4% UV, but contains 45% visible light, catalysts capable of utilizing these visible photons need to be developed to make peo approaches more efficient, economical, and safe. Researchers have attempted various approaches to enable TiO2 to be visible-light-active with varied degrees of success'. Strategies attempted thus far fall into three categories based on their electrochemical' mechanisms: 1) narrowing the band gap of TiO2 by implantation of transition metal elements or nonmetal elements such as N, S, and C, 2) modifying electron-transfer processes during PCO by adsorbing sensitizing dyes, and 3) employing light-induced interfacial electron transfer in the heteronanojunction systems consisting of narrow band gap semiconductors represented by metal sulfides and TiO2. There are diverse technical approaches to implement each of these strategies. This paper presents a review of these approaches and results of the photocatalytic activity and photonic efficiency of the end .products under visible light. Although resulting visible-light-active (VLA) photocatalysts show promise, there is often no comparison with unmodified TiO2 under UV. In a limited number of studies where such comparison was provided, the UV-induced catalytic activity of bare TiO2 is much greater than the visible-light-induced catalytic activity of the VLA catalyst. Furthermore, VLA-catalysts have much lower quantum efficiency compared to the approx.50% quantum efficiency of UV-catalysts. This stresses the need for continuing research in this area.

  11. Light- and GTP-activated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in squid photoreceptor membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, K.M.; Saibil, H.R.

    1988-01-05

    Light stimulates the hydrolysis of exogenous, (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PtdInsP2) added to squid photoreceptor membranes, releasing inositol trisphosphate (InsP3). At free calcium levels of 0.05 microM or greater, hydrolysis of the labeled lipid is stimulated up to 4-fold by GTP and light together, but not separately. This activity is the biochemical counterpart of observations on intact retina showing that a rhodopsin-activated GTP-binding protein is involved in visual transduction in invertebrates, and that InsP3 release is correlated with visual excitation and adaptation. Using an in vitro assay, we investigated the calcium and GTP dependence of the phospholipase activity. At calcium concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 microM, some hydrolysis occurs independently of GTP and light, with a light- and GTP-activated component superimposed. At 1 microM calcium there is no background activity, and hydrolysis absolutely requires both GTP and light. Ion exchange chromatography on Dowex 1 (formate form) of the water-soluble products released at 1 microM calcium reveals that the product is almost entirely InsP3. Invertebrate rhodopsin is homologous in sequence and function to vertebrate visual pigment, which modulates the concentration of cyclic GMP through the mediation of the GTP-binding protein transducin. While there is some evidence that light also modulates PtdInsP2 content in vertebrate photoreceptors, the case for its involvement in phototransduction is stronger for the invertebrate systems. The results reported here support the scheme of rhodopsin----GTP-binding protein----phospholipase C activation in invertebrate photoreceptors.

  12. Pattern of stylet penetration activity by Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) adults in relation to environmental temperature and light conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of ambient spring air temperature and light intensity on stylet penetration activities of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) were studied outdoors, at ambient light and temperatures, using an electrical penetration graph (EPG). EPG waveforms representing saliva...

  13. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS capabilities and much-needed beam time for the life sciences, soft condensed matter physics, and nanoscience communities. Looking toward the future, a significant step has been made in expanding the user base and diversifying the work force by holding the first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Professors' Workshop. The workshop, which brought 11 professors to the NSLS to learn how to become successful synchrotron users, concluded with the formation of an HBCU User Consortium. Finally, significant contributions were made in optics and detector development to enhance the utilization of the NSLS and address the challenges of NSLS-II. In particular, x-ray detectors developed by the NSLS Detector Section have been adopted by an increasing number of research programs both at the NSLS and at light sources around the world, speeding up measurement times by orders of magnitude and making completely new experiments feasible. Significant advances in focusing and high-energy resolution optics have also been made this year.

  14. Vibration characteristics of floating slab track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chen-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yi

    2008-11-01

    Coupled equilibrium equations of suspended wheels and floating slab track system were solved with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to obtain the deflections, vibration velocities, and wheel-rail contact forces. The program was validated through several aspects. Cases with various vehicle speed, slab mass, and stiffness of slab bearing were analyzed to reveal the effects of slab bearing on track responses. The correlation between wheel-rail resonance and train speed was also discussed. It was found that rail deflections increase significantly as train speed increases. Although large slab mass may lower tuning frequency, it could also result in higher wheel-rail contact force and rail deflections. The floating slab track is effective in isolating loading above 10 Hz, which might present in some railway sections with irregularities. Adopting floating slab track for vibration control for environment along the railway may cause concerns about ride quality and track damages.

  15. Floating zone melting of cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Wen-Ming; Regel, L. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    To produce superior crystals of cadmium telluride, floating zone melting in space has been proposed. Techniques required for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride are being developed. We have successfully float-zoned cadmium telluride on earth using square rods. A resistance heater was constructed for forming the molten zone. Evaporation of the molten zone was controlled by adding excess cadmium to the growth ampoule combined with heating of the entire ampoule. An effective method to hold the feed rod was developed. Slow rotation of the growth ampoule was proven experimentally to be necessary to achieve a complete symmetric molten zone. Most of the resultant cylindrical rods were single crystals with twins. Still needed is a suitable automatic method to control the zone length. We tried a fiber optical technique to control the zone length, but experiments showed that application of this technique to automate zone length control is unlikely to be successful.

  16. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00092c

  17. Preparation of hollow titania spheres and their photocatalytic activity under visible light.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Yin, Hengbo; Shi, Liping; Wang, Aili; Feng, Yonghai; Shen, Linqin; Wu, Zhanao; Wu, Gang; Jiang, Tao

    2014-09-01

    Hollow titania spheres with different shell thicknesses were facilely prepared starting from TiCl4 and using ploystyrene methyl acrylic acid latexes as the sacrificial templates. The average diameters of the hollow titania spheres ranging from 294 to 340 nm were tuned by changing the weight ratios of TiO2 to ploystyrene methyl acrylic acid latex from 0.8:1 to 1.4:1. The hollow titania spheres were constructed by the small-sized anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with the average diameter of ca. 18 nm (SEM). In addition to UV light absorption caused by the primary anatase TiO2 nanoparticles, the hollow titania spheres also had visible light absorption performance. Photocatalytic results showed that all the hollow titania spheres had higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of phenol under visible light irradiation than the commercial TiO2 nanoparticles (P25). The photocatalytic activity of the hollow titania spheres increased with the increase in sell thickness, being consistent with their visible light absorbance. The visible light photocatalytic activity was probably due to the presence of additional energy levels between valence and conduction bands, which were caused by the formation of oxygen bridging bonds between the primary TiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:25924373

  18. Effects of hydroxyl radical scavengers KCN and CO on ultraviolet light-induced activation of crude soluble guanylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, J.O.; Axelsson, K.L.; Andersson, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The crude soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) from bovine mesenteric artery was stimulated by ultraviolet (UV) light (366 nm). Addition of free radical scavengers, dimethylsulfoxide or superoxide dismutase and/or catalase to the GC assay did not abolish the stimulatory effect of UV light. On the contrary, the UV light-induced activation was enhanced in the presence of these scavengers. KCN (1 mM) did not affect the UV light-induced activation, while 0.1 mM of CO potentiated the activation. These results may indicate that UV light is operating through a direct interaction with the ferrous form of the GC-heme.

  19. Development of White-Light Emitting Active Layers in Nitride Based Heterostructures for Phosphorless Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Jan Talbot; Kailash Mishra

    2007-12-31

    This report provides a summary of research activities carried out at the University of California, San Diego and Central Research of OSRAM SYLVANIA in Beverly, MA partially supported by a research contract from US Department of Energy, DE-FC26-04NT422274. The main objective of this project was to develop III-V nitrides activated by rare earth ions, RE{sup 3+}, which could eliminate the need for phosphors in nitride-based solid state light sources. The main idea was to convert electron-hole pairs injected into the active layer in a LED die to white light directly through transitions within the energy levels of the 4f{sup n}-manifold of RE{sup 3+}. We focused on the following materials: Eu{sup 3+}(red), Tb{sup 3+}(green), Er{sup 3+}(green), Dy{sup 3+}(yellow) and Tm{sup 3+}(blue) in AlN, GaN and alloys of AlN and GaN. Our strategy was to explore candidate materials in powder form first, and then study their behavior in thin films. Thin films of these materials were to be deposited on sapphire substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The photo- and cathode-luminescence measurements of these materials were used to investigate their suitability for white light generation. The project proceeded along this route with minor modifications needed to produce better materials and to expedite our progress towards the final goal. The project made the following accomplishments: (1) red emission from Eu{sup 3+}, green from Tb{sup 3+}, yellow from Dy{sup 3+} and blue from Tm{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (2) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN powder; (3) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} in alloys of GaN and AlN; (4) green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films by PLD; (5) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films deposited by MOVPE; (6) energy transfer from host to RE{sup 3+}; (7) energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (8) emission from AlN powder samples codoped with (Eu{sup 3+} ,Tb{sup 3+} ) and (Dy{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}); and (9) white emission from AlN codoped with Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}. We also extensively studied the stabilities of rare earth ions in GaN, and the nature of oxygen defects in GaN and its impact on the optical properties of the host material, using first principles method. Results from these theoretical calculations together with fluorescence measurements from the materials essentially proved the underlying concepts for generating white light using RE{sup 3+}-activated nitrides. For this project, we successfully built a horizontal MOVPE reactor and used it to deposit thin films of undoped and doped nitrides of GaN and InGaN, which is a very significant achievement. Since this reactor was designed and built by in-house experts, it could be easily modified and reassembled for specific research purposes. During this study, it was successfully modified for homogeneous distribution of rare earth ions in a deposited film. It will be an ideal tool for future research involving novel thin film material concepts. We examined carefully the suitability of various metal organic precursors for incorporating RE{sup 3+}. In order to avoid oxygen contamination, several oxygen-free RE{sup 3+} precursors were identified. Both oxygen-free and oxygen- containing metal organic precursors were used for certain rare earth ions (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}). However, the suitability of any particular type of precursor for MOVPE deposition was not established during this study, and further study is needed. More intensive research in the future is needed to improve the film quality, and eliminate the separation of rare earth oxide phases during the deposition of thin films by MOVPE. The literature in the area of the chemistry of rare earth ions in nitrides is almost nonexistent, in spite of the significant research on luminescence of RE{sup 3+} in nitrides. Consequently, MOVPE as a method of deposition of RE{sup 3+}-activated nitrides is relatively unexplored. In the following sections of this report, the outcomes from this study are described in detail. The present investigations have clearly validated the underlying concepts for generating white light within the LED die itself and its importance for fabricating a new generation of solid state light sources. Yet, significant research is still needed to transform these concepts into products.

  20. New light sources and sensors for active optical 3D inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, Wolfgang; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    1999-11-01

    The implementation of active processing strategies in optical 3D-inspection needs the availability of flexible hardware solutions. The system components illumination and sensor/detector are actively involved in the processing chain by a feedback loop that is controlled by the evaluation process. Therefore this article deals with new light sources and sensor which appeared recently on the market and can be applied successfully for the implementation of active processing principles. Some applications where such new components are used to implement an active measurement strategy are presented.

  1. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  2. Light and Heavy Heterosexual Activities of Young Canadian Adolescents: Normative Patterns and Differential Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Trish; Connolly, Jennifer; Cribbie, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to explore patterns of heterosexual activity in early adolescence and to examine the differential pathways to light and heavy heterosexuality. We utilized the National Longitudinal Survey of Canadian Children and Youth (NLSCY) in which heterosexual behaviors, as well as puberty, parenting processes, peer

  3. Slow-light enhancement of spontaneous emission in active photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Sara; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Lunnemann Hansen, Per; Yvind, Kresten; Mrk, Jesper

    2012-03-01

    Photonic crystal defect waveguides with embedded active layers containing single or multiple quantum wells or quantum dots have been fabricated. Spontaneous emission spectra are enhanced close to the bandedge, consistently with the enhancement of gain by slow light effects. These are promising results for future compact devices for terabit/s communication, such as miniaturised semiconductor optical amplifiers and mode-locked lasers.

  4. The Examination of the Educational Effects of Some Writing Activities in the Light of Student Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturan Sagirli, Meryem

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research is to discover and compare the effects of writing prompt and expository writing from an educational perspective in the light of student opinions. The study was conducted according to qualitative research approach and content analysis was conducted. Two activities which were prepared with respect to objectives of writing

  5. Optics: Light, Color, and Their Uses. An Educator's Guide With Activities In Science and Mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This document includes information on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope, the Next Generation Space Telescope, Soft X-Ray Imager, and the Lightning Imaging System. Classroom activities from grades K-12 are included, focusing on light and color, using mirrors, lenses, prisms, and filters.

  6. Prolonged daily light exposure increases body fat mass through attenuation of brown adipose tissue activity.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Sander; van den Berg, Rosa; Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Boon, Mariëtte R; Kuipers, Eline N; Loef, Marieke; Zonneveld, Tom C M; Lucassen, Eliane A; Sips, Hetty C M; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Meijer, Johanna H; Coomans, Claudia P; Biermasz, Nienke R; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2015-05-26

    Disruption of circadian rhythmicity is associated with obesity and related disorders, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Specifically, prolonged artificial light exposure associates with obesity in humans, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we report that increasing the daily hours of light exposure increases body adiposity through attenuation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity, a major contributor of energy expenditure. Mice exposed to a prolonged day length of 16- and 24-h light, compared with regular 12-h light, showed increased adiposity without affecting food intake or locomotor activity. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that prolonged day length decreases sympathetic input into BAT and reduces β3-adrenergic intracellular signaling. Concomitantly, prolonging day length decreased the uptake of fatty acids from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, as well as of glucose from plasma selectively by BAT. We conclude that impaired BAT activity is an important mediator in the association between disturbed circadian rhythm and adiposity, and anticipate that activation of BAT may overcome the adverse metabolic consequences of disturbed circadian rhythmicity. PMID:25964318

  7. In vivo light-induced activation of neural circuitry in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2.

    PubMed

    Arenkiel, Benjamin R; Peca, Joao; Davison, Ian G; Feliciano, Catia; Deisseroth, Karl; Augustine, George J; Ehlers, Michael D; Feng, Guoping

    2007-04-19

    Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a light-gated, cation-selective ion channel isolated from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we report the generation of transgenic mice that express a ChR2-YFP fusion protein in the CNS for in vivo activation and mapping of neural circuits. Using focal illumination of the cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb, we demonstrate a highly reproducible, light-dependent activation of neurons and precise control of firing frequency in vivo. To test the feasibility of mapping neural circuits, we exploited the circuitry formed between the olfactory bulb and the piriform cortex in anesthetized mice. In the olfactory bulb, individual mitral cells fired action potentials in response to light, and their firing rate was not influenced by costimulated glomeruli. However, in piriform cortex, the activity of target neurons increased as larger areas of the bulb were illuminated to recruit additional glomeruli. These results support a model of olfactory processing that is dependent upon mitral cell convergence and integration onto cortical cells. More broadly, these findings demonstrate a system for precise manipulation of neural activity in the intact mammalian brain with light and illustrate the use of ChR2 mice in exploring functional connectivity of complex neural circuits in vivo. PMID:17442243

  8. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  9. Carbon nanotube-assisted optical activation of TGF-? signalling by near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Ling; Zhao, Bing; Xie, Ran; Lin, Wei; Li, He; Li, Yaya; Shi, Minlong; Chen, Ye-Guang; Springer, Timothy A.; Chen, Xing

    2015-05-01

    Receptor-mediated signal transduction modulates complex cellular behaviours such as cell growth, migration and differentiation. Although photoactivatable proteins have emerged as a powerful tool for controlling molecular interactions and signalling cascades at precise times and spaces using light, many of these light-sensitive proteins are activated by ultraviolent or visible light, which has limited tissue penetration. Here, we report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-assisted approach that enables near-infrared light-triggered activation of transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) signal transduction, an important signalling pathway in embryonic development and cancer progression. The protein complex of TGF-? and its latency-associated peptide is conjugated onto SWCNTs, where TGF-? is inactive. Upon near-infrared irradiation, TGF-? is released through the photothermal effect of SWCNTs and becomes active. The released TGF-? activates downstream signal transduction in live cells and modulates cellular behaviours. Furthermore, preliminary studies show that the method can be used to mediate TGF-? signalling in living mice.

  10. The Effects of Computer-Aided Concept Cartoons and Outdoor Science Activities on Light Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Güliz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to create an awareness of light pollution on seventh grade students via computer aided concept cartoon applications and outdoor science activities and to help them develop solutions; and to determine student opinions on the practices carried out. The study was carried out at a middle school in Mugla province of Aegean…

  11. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.

    1995-05-01

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

  12. Prolonged daily light exposure increases body fat mass through attenuation of brown adipose tissue activity

    PubMed Central

    Kooijman, Sander; van den Berg, Rosa; Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Boon, Mariëtte R.; Kuipers, Eline N.; Loef, Marieke; Zonneveld, Tom C. M.; Lucassen, Eliane A.; Sips, Hetty C. M.; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Meijer, Johanna H.; Coomans, Claudia P.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythmicity is associated with obesity and related disorders, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Specifically, prolonged artificial light exposure associates with obesity in humans, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we report that increasing the daily hours of light exposure increases body adiposity through attenuation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity, a major contributor of energy expenditure. Mice exposed to a prolonged day length of 16- and 24-h light, compared with regular 12-h light, showed increased adiposity without affecting food intake or locomotor activity. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that prolonged day length decreases sympathetic input into BAT and reduces β3-adrenergic intracellular signaling. Concomitantly, prolonging day length decreased the uptake of fatty acids from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, as well as of glucose from plasma selectively by BAT. We conclude that impaired BAT activity is an important mediator in the association between disturbed circadian rhythm and adiposity, and anticipate that activation of BAT may overcome the adverse metabolic consequences of disturbed circadian rhythmicity. PMID:25964318

  13. Highly Efficient, Simplified, Solution-Processed Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient, simplified, solution-processed thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes can be realized by using pure-organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters and a multifunctional buffer hole-injection layer, in which high EQE (?24%) and current efficiency (?73 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated. High-efficiency fluorescence red-emitting and blue-emitting devices can also be fabricated in this manner. PMID:26619309

  14. Inhibition of Cathepsin Activity in a Cell-Based Assay by a Light-Activated Ruthenium Compound

    PubMed Central

    Respondek, Tomasz; Sharma, Rajgopal; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Garner, Robert N.; Knoll, Jessica D.; Cueny, Eric; Turro, Claudia; Podgorski, Izabela; Kodanko, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Light-activated inhibition of cathepsin activity was demonstrated with in a cell-based assay. Inhibitors of cathepsin K, Cbz-Leu-NHCH2CN (2) and Cbz-Leu-Ser(OBn)-CN (3), were caged within the complexes cis-[Ru(bpy)2(2)2]Cl2 (4) and cis-[Ru(bpy)2(3)2](BF4)2 (5), where bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine, as 1:1 mixtures of Δ- and Λ stereoisomers. Complexes 4 and 5 were characterized by 1H NMR, IR and UV-vis spectroscopies and electrospray mass spectrometry. Photochemical experiments confirm that 4 releases two molecules of 2 upon exposure to visible light for 15 min, whereas release of 3 by 5 requires longer irradiation times. IC50 determinations against purified cathepsin K under light and dark conditions with 4 and 5 confirm that inhibition is enhanced from 35 to 88-fold, respectively, upon irradiation with visible light. No apparent toxicity was observed for 4 in the absence or presence of irradiation in bone marrow macrophage (BMM) or PC-3 cells, as judged by the MTT assay, at concentrations up to 10 μM. Compound 5 is well tolerated at lower concentrations (<1 μM) but does show growth inhibitory effects at higher concentrations. Confocal microscopy experiments show that 4 reduces intracellular cathepsin activity in osteoclasts with light activation. These results support further development of caged nitrile-based inhibitors as chemical tools for investigating spatial aspects of proteolysis within living systems. PMID:24729544

  15. Lipid Peroxidation in Membranes: The Peroxyl Radical Does Not "Float".

    PubMed

    Garrec, Julian; Monari, Antonio; Assfeld, Xavier; Mir, Lluis M; Tarek, Mounir

    2014-05-15

    Lipid peroxidation is a fundamental phenomenon in biology and medicine involved in a wide range of diseases. Some key microscopic aspects of this reaction in cell membranes are still poorly studied. In particular, it is commonly accepted that the propagation of the radical reaction in lipid bilayers is hampered by the rapid diffusion of peroxyl intermediates toward the water interface, that is, out of the reaction region. We investigated the validity of this "floating peroxyl radical" hypothesis by means of molecular modeling. Combining quantum calculations of model systems and atomistic simulations of lipid bilayers containing lipid oxidation products, we show that the peroxyl radical does not "float" at the surface of the membrane. Instead, it remains located quite deep inside the bilayer. In light of our findings, several critical aspects of biological membranes' peroxidation, such as their protection mechanisms, need to be revisited. Our data moreover help in the design of more efficient antioxidants, localized within reach of the reaction propagating radical. PMID:26270361

  16. Maximizing the captured information of integral floating microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jong-Young; Jeong, Youngmo; Kim, Jonghyun; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-10-01

    To capture the three-dimensional (3D) information of microscopic (micro) object, the light field microscopy (LFM) has been studied. A lens array is inserted into the conventional microscope and 3D information of micro object is captured in single shot. However, since the lateral resolution decreases severely because of lens array, the integral floating microscopy (IFM) is proposed. The IFM is modified version of the LFM which concentrates on the lateral resolution rather than the angular resolution by changing the location of specimen and the lens array. The specimen should be located at the front focal plane and the lens array should be located at the back focal plane of the objective lens in the IFM but it is hard to locate the lens array into the back focal length of the objective lens because the back focal length lies in the barrel of the objective lens in general. In this paper, we propose the modified version of the integral floating microscopy which can place the lens array at the optimum position. The structure of the whole system is changed and the relay lens is added to relay the back focal length outside. By placing the lens array at the optimum position, the captured information could be maximized, and by changing the focal length of the relay lens, the field of view (FOV) mismatch problem can be also mitigated. The relationship between the captured information and the specification of the system is analyzed and proper experiments are presented for the verification.

  17. Observation of ambipolar switching in a silver nanoparticle single-electron transistor with multiple molecular floating gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Shinohara, Shuhei; Tamada, Kaoru; Ishii, Hisao; Noguchi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Ambipolar switching behavior was observed in a silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-based single-electron transistor (SET) with tetra-tert-butyl copper phthalocyanine (ttbCuPc) as a molecular floating gate. Depending on the wavelength of the incident light, the stability diagram shifted to the negative and positive directions along the gate voltage axis. These results were explained by the photoinduced charging of ttbCuPc molecules in the vicinity of AgNPs. Moreover, multiple device states were induced by the light irradiation at a wavelength of 600 nm, suggesting that multiple ttbCuPc molecules individually worked as a floating gate.

  18. Strategies of making TiO2 and ZnO visible light active.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Shama; Ullah, Ruh; Butt, A M; Gohar, N D

    2009-10-30

    In modern purification techniques employing semiconductor mediated photooxidation of toxic substances, zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are the most widely used metal oxides due to their unique blend of properties. However, the band edges of these semiconductors lie in the UV region which makes them inactive under visible light irradiation. Researchers have been interested in the modification of electronic and optical properties of these metal oxides for their efficient use in water and air purification under visible light irradiation. Visible light activity has been induced in TiO2 and ZnO by surface modification via organic materials/semiconductor coupling and band gap modification by doping with metals and nonmetals, co-doping with nonmetals, creation of oxygen vacancies and oxygen sub-stoichiometry. This paper encompasses the progress and developments made so far through these techniques in the visible light photocatalysis with TiO2 and ZnO. Recently, nitrogen doping in titania has been extensively carried out and therefore somewhat detailed discussion in this respect has been presented. Visible light activation of titania clusters encapsulated in zeolite-Y by nitrogen doping and incorporation of dye or organic sensitizers inside the zeolite framework, has also been highlighted in this review. PMID:19540666

  19. Leishmania tropica: the effect of darkness and light on biological activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Ates, Sezen Canim; Bagirova, Malahat; Elcicek, Serhat; Oztel, Olga Nehir

    2011-08-01

    Leishmania parasites can be exposed to effects of light in their vectors and hosts, at various periods. However, there is no information about the effects of light on Leishmania parasites. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of light on various cell parameters of Leishmania tropica, in vitro. All experiments were conducted on L. tropica promastigotes and amastigote-macrophage cultures, using flow cytometric analysis, MTT and phenol-sulfuric acid assay, DAPI and Giemsa. The results showed that the morphology of parasites has changed; the cell cycle has been affected and this caused parasites to remain at G0/G1 phase. Furthermore the proliferation, infectivity, glucose consumption and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activities of parasites were decreased. Thus, for the first time, in this study, the effects of light on biological activities of Leishmania parasites were shown. These new information about parasites' biology, would be very important to investigate the effects of light on the parasites in infected vectors and hosts. PMID:21510933

  20. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Toms; Gomez, Mara del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-06-23

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the "circadian" receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca(2+) fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates. PMID:26056310

  1. Oxygen deficient ZnO 1-x nanosheets with high visible light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong-Li; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Xi-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Xie, Xiao; Xu, An-Wu

    2015-04-28

    Zinc oxide is one of the most important wide-band-gap (3.2 eV) materials with versatile properties, however, it can not be excited by visible light. In this work, we have developed an exquisite and simple way to prepare oxygen-deficient ZnO 1-x nanosheets with a gray-colored appearance and excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. Detailed analysis based on UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra confirms the existence of oxygen vacancies in ZnO 1-x. The incorporation of oxygen defects could effectively extend the light absorption of ZnO 1-x into the visible-light region due to the fact that the energy of the localized state is located in the forbidden gap. Thus, our obtained ZnO 1-x shows a higher photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) compared to defect-free ZnO under visible light illumination. Additionally, the high content of ?OH radicals with a strong photo-oxidation capability over the ZnO 1-x nanosheets significantly contributes to the improvement in the photocatalytic performance. Our oxygen deficient ZnO 1-x sample shows a very high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO even after 5 cycles without any obvious decline. The results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the optoelectronic and photocatalytic performances of nanomaterials. PMID:25812132

  2. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Toms; Gomez, Mara del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the circadian receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca2+ fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates. PMID:26056310

  3. Association of Light Exposure on Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Young People

    PubMed Central

    Aggio, Daniel; Smith, Lee; Fisher, Abigail; Hamer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate whether light exposure was associated with objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviour in young people. Methods: Participants (n = 229, 46.7% female) were young people (mean 8.8 years [SD 2.2]) from the borough of Camden, UK. Daily sedentary time, moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA) and light exposure were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer with an ambient light sensor during the summer. Multiple linear regression models examined associations between average daily light exposure, sedentary time and time in MVPA. Models were repeated investigating weekdays and weekend days separately. Analyses were adjusted for pre-specified covariables, including age, sex, device wear time, ethnic group, school and body fat. Results: There were significant associations between average daily light exposure and time sedentary (? coefficient = ?11.2, 95% CI, ?19.0 to ?3.4) and in MVPA (? coefficient = 3.5, 95% CI, 1.2 to 5.9). Light exposure was significantly associated with weekend sedentary time (? coefficient = ?10.0, 95% CI, ?17.6, ?2.4), weekend MVPA (? coefficient = 3.7, 95% CI, 1.7, 5.7), weekday sedentary time (? coefficient = ?15.0, 95% CI, ?22.7 to ?7.2), but not weekday MVPA (? coefficient = 2.0, 95% CI, ?0.5 to 4.5). Conclusion: Average daily light exposure is positively associated with time in MVPA and negatively associated with sedentary time. Increasing daylight exposure may be a useful intervention strategy for promoting physical activity. PMID:25764057

  4. Contribution of Occupation to High Doses of Light-Intensity Activity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Mexican American Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Jennifer L.; Kohl, Harold W.; Salinas, Jennifer J.; McCormick, Joseph B.; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between light-intensity activity and cardiovascular disease risk is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of light-intensity activity with census-based occupational activity classifications and cardiovascular risk factors among Mexican American adults. Methods 118 Mexican American adults (68.6% female) provided cross-sectional accelerometer and biological data. Self-reported occupations were classified by activity level (sedentary, low, moderate). Participants were classified as At-Risk for BMI, glucose, triglycerides, HDL, blood pressure, waist circumference, and percent body fat. Results Participants engaged in > 5 hours of light-intensity activity on average, and those in sedentary occupations engaged in fewer light-intensity activity minutes than low-active or moderately active workers (P < .001). Self-reported occupation explained 14% of the variation in light-intensity activity (P < .001). Participants in moderately active occupations were at increased risk for high %body fat than other workers (P = .01), but no other associations between occupation and cardiovascular risk were detected. Conclusion Early work in physical activity underscored the importance of occupational activity. This study presents evidence of a dose-response association for light-intensity activity by occupational category such that workers in sedentary occupations had less light-intensity activity than employees in more active occupations. Future research on how light-intensity activity derived from occupation may reduce the risk of chronic disease will contribute to improved interventions as light-intensity activity participation may be more feasible than meeting current physical activity guidelines. PMID:24368819

  5. Dealing with Human Death: The Floating Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Gary M.

    1991-01-01

    Explores approach to dealing with human death. Describes floating perspective, based on insights from Choron and Jaspers, as suggesting it is possible to deal with human death by refraining from taking ultimate position on the problem. Position encourages openness to death. Examines role of anxiety and describes possible meaningful outcomes of

  6. Immunohistochemistry on freely floating fixed tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry on free floating tissue sections is done for many reasons, all of which involve labeling tissue to visualize a certain cell type, protein, or structural component. Visualization is aided by mounting sections on microscope slides for stabilization, and is in most cases necessary for the appropriate use of objectives with a high numerical aperture and high degree of magnification. PMID:24182925

  7. 14 CFR 29.757 - Hull and auxiliary float strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hull and auxiliary float strength. 29.757 Section 29.757 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... 29.757 Hull and auxiliary float strength. The hull, and auxiliary floats if used, must withstand...

  8. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  9. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  10. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant...

  11. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant...

  12. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  13. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant...

  14. 40 CFR 65.44 - External floating roof (EFR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false External floating roof (EFR). 65.44... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels 65.44 External floating roof (EFR). (a) EFR... emissions by using an external floating roof shall comply with the design requirements listed in...

  15. 40 CFR 65.44 - External floating roof (EFR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false External floating roof (EFR). 65.44... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels 65.44 External floating roof (EFR). (a) EFR... emissions by using an external floating roof shall comply with the design requirements listed in...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1063 - Floating roof requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subpart, whichever occurs first. (ii) External floating roof. An EFR shall be equipped with one of the... degassed, or every 5 years, whichever occurs first. (2) External floating roofs. External floating roofs... surface that it is intended to seal. (2) Tank-top inspections of IFR's shall be conducted by...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1063 - Floating roof requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart, whichever occurs first. (ii) External floating roof. An EFR shall be equipped with one of the... degassed, or every 5 years, whichever occurs first. (2) External floating roofs. External floating roofs... surface that it is intended to seal. (2) Tank-top inspections of IFR's shall be conducted by...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1063 - Floating roof requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart, whichever occurs first. (ii) External floating roof. An EFR shall be equipped with one of the... degassed, or every 5 years, whichever occurs first. (2) External floating roofs. External floating roofs... surface that it is intended to seal. (2) Tank-top inspections of IFR's shall be conducted by...

  19. 40 CFR 65.44 - External floating roof (EFR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false External floating roof (EFR). 65.44... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels 65.44 External floating roof (EFR). (a) EFR... emissions by using an external floating roof shall comply with the design requirements listed in...

  20. 40 CFR 65.44 - External floating roof (EFR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false External floating roof (EFR). 65.44... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels 65.44 External floating roof (EFR). (a) EFR... emissions by using an external floating roof shall comply with the design requirements listed in...

  1. 40 CFR 65.44 - External floating roof (EFR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false External floating roof (EFR). 65.44... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Storage Vessels 65.44 External floating roof (EFR). (a) EFR... emissions by using an external floating roof shall comply with the design requirements listed in...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1063 - Floating roof requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subpart, whichever occurs first. (ii) External floating roof. An EFR shall be equipped with one of the... degassed, or every 5 years, whichever occurs first. (2) External floating roofs. External floating roofs... surface that it is intended to seal. (2) Tank-top inspections of IFR's shall be conducted by...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1043 - Standards-Separator floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards-Separator floating roof. 63...Separator floating roof. (a) This section applies to owners and operators subject to this subpart and controlling air emissions from an oil-water separator or organic-water separator using a floating roof....

  4. 40 CFR 63.1043 - Standards-Separator floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards-Separator floating roof. 63...Separator floating roof. (a) This section applies to owners and operators subject to this subpart and controlling air emissions from an oil-water separator or organic-water separator using a floating roof....

  5. 40 CFR 63.1043 - Standards-Separator floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards-Separator floating roof. 63...Separator floating roof. (a) This section applies to owners and operators subject to this subpart and controlling air emissions from an oil-water separator or organic-water separator using a floating roof....

  6. 40 CFR 63.1043 - Standards-Separator floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards-Separator floating roof. 63...Separator floating roof. (a) This section applies to owners and operators subject to this subpart and controlling air emissions from an oil-water separator or organic-water separator using a floating roof....

  7. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Auxiliary float loads. 25.535 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads 25.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a) General. Auxiliary floats and their attachments and supporting structures must be designed for...

  8. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Auxiliary float loads. 23.535 Section 23....535 Auxiliary float loads. (a) General. Auxiliary floats and their attachments and supporting... paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the...

  9. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Auxiliary float loads. 23.535 Section 23....535 Auxiliary float loads. (a) General. Auxiliary floats and their attachments and supporting... paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the...

  10. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Auxiliary float loads. 25.535 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads 25.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a) General. Auxiliary floats and their attachments and supporting structures must be designed for...

  11. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Auxiliary float loads. 23.535 Section 23....535 Auxiliary float loads. (a) General. Auxiliary floats and their attachments and supporting... paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the...

  12. 14 CFR 25.753 - Main float design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main float design. 25.753 Section 25.753 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 25.753 Main float...

  13. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant...

  14. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  15. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly marked or painted on each life float or buoyant...

  16. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  17. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Leng Jinsong; Yu Kai; Lan Xin; Zhang Dawei; Liu Yanju

    2010-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  18. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  19. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Nakanotani, Hajime; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  20. Lightening up Light Therapy: Activation of Retrograde Signaling Pathway by Photobiomodulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Pyo

    2014-11-01

    Photobiomodulation utilizes monochromatic (or quasimonochromatic) light in the electromagnetic region of 600?1000 nm for the treatment of soft tissues in a nondestructive and nonthermal mode. It is conceivable that photobiomodulation is based upon the ability of the light to alter cell metabolism as it is absorbed by general hemoproteins and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in particular. Recently it has been suggested radiation of visible and infrared (IR) activates retrograde signaling pathway from mitochondria to nucleus. In this review, the role of COX in the photobiomodulation will be discussed. Further a possible role of water as a photoreceptor will be suggested. PMID:25489415

  1. Lightening up Light Therapy: Activation of Retrograde Signaling Pathway by Photobiomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Photobiomodulation utilizes monochromatic (or quasimonochromatic) light in the electromagnetic region of 600?1000 nm for the treatment of soft tissues in a nondestructive and nonthermal mode. It is conceivable that photobiomodulation is based upon the ability of the light to alter cell metabolism as it is absorbed by general hemoproteins and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in particular. Recently it has been suggested radiation of visible and infrared (IR) activates retrograde signaling pathway from mitochondria to nucleus. In this review, the role of COX in the photobiomodulation will be discussed. Further a possible role of water as a photoreceptor will be suggested. PMID:25489415

  2. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Reduce Microglial Activation and Neurodegenerative Events in Light Damaged Retina

    PubMed Central

    Fiorani, Lavinia; Passacantando, Maurizio; Santucci, Sandro; Di Marco, Stefano; Bisti, Silvia; Maccarone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The first target of any therapy for retinal neurodegeneration is to slow down the progression of the disease and to maintain visual function. Cerium oxide or ceria nanoparticles reduce oxidative stress, which is known to play a pivotal role in neurodegeneration. Our aim was to investigate whether cerium oxide nanoparticles were able to mitigate neurodegeneration including microglial activation and related inflammatory processes induced by exposure to high intensity light. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were injected intravitreally or intraveinously in albino Sprague-Dawley rats three weeks before exposing them to light damage of 1000 lux for 24 h. Electroretinographic recordings were performed a week after light damage. The progression of retinal degeneration was evaluated by measuring outer nuclear layer thickness and TUNEL staining to quantify photoreceptors death. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to evaluate retinal stress, neuroinflammatory cytokines and microglial activation. Only intravitreally injected ceria nanoparticles were detected at the level of photoreceptor outer segments 3 weeks after the light damage and electoretinographic recordings showed that ceria nanoparticles maintained visual response. Moreover, this treatment reduced neuronal death and hot spot extension preserving the outer nuclear layer morphology. It is noteworthy that in this work we demonstrated, for the first time, the ability of ceria nanoparticles to reduce microglial activation and their migration toward outer nuclear layer. All these evidences support ceria nanoparticles as a powerful therapeutic agent in retinal neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26469804

  3. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Reduce Microglial Activation and Neurodegenerative Events in Light Damaged Retina.

    PubMed

    Fiorani, Lavinia; Passacantando, Maurizio; Santucci, Sandro; Di Marco, Stefano; Bisti, Silvia; Maccarone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The first target of any therapy for retinal neurodegeneration is to slow down the progression of the disease and to maintain visual function. Cerium oxide or ceria nanoparticles reduce oxidative stress, which is known to play a pivotal role in neurodegeneration. Our aim was to investigate whether cerium oxide nanoparticles were able to mitigate neurodegeneration including microglial activation and related inflammatory processes induced by exposure to high intensity light. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were injected intravitreally or intraveinously in albino Sprague-Dawley rats three weeks before exposing them to light damage of 1000 lux for 24 h. Electroretinographic recordings were performed a week after light damage. The progression of retinal degeneration was evaluated by measuring outer nuclear layer thickness and TUNEL staining to quantify photoreceptors death. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to evaluate retinal stress, neuroinflammatory cytokines and microglial activation. Only intravitreally injected ceria nanoparticles were detected at the level of photoreceptor outer segments 3 weeks after the light damage and electoretinographic recordings showed that ceria nanoparticles maintained visual response. Moreover, this treatment reduced neuronal death and "hot spot" extension preserving the outer nuclear layer morphology. It is noteworthy that in this work we demonstrated, for the first time, the ability of ceria nanoparticles to reduce microglial activation and their migration toward outer nuclear layer. All these evidences support ceria nanoparticles as a powerful therapeutic agent in retinal neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26469804

  4. Human Cryptochrome-1 Confers Light Independent Biological Activity in Transgenic Drosophila Correlated with Flavin Radical Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Jacqueline; Jones, Alex R.; Danon, Antoine; Sakuma, Michiyo; Hoang, Nathalie; Robles, David; Tait, Shirley; Heyes, Derren J.; Picot, Marie; Yoshii, Taishi; Helfrich-Frster, Charlotte; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Klarsfeld, Andr; Rouyer, Francois; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Ahmad, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes are conserved flavoprotein receptors found throughout the biological kingdom with diversified roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in animals. Light perception is proposed to occur through flavin radical formation that correlates with biological activity in vivo in both plants and Drosophila. By contrast, mammalian (Type II) cryptochromes regulate the circadian clock independently of light, raising the fundamental question of whether mammalian cryptochromes have evolved entirely distinct signaling mechanisms. Here we show by developmental and transcriptome analysis that Homo sapiens cryptochrome - 1 (HsCRY1) confers biological activity in transgenic expressing Drosophila in darkness, that can in some cases be further stimulated by light. In contrast to all other cryptochromes, purified recombinant HsCRY1 protein was stably isolated in the anionic radical flavin state, containing only a small proportion of oxidized flavin which could be reduced by illumination. We conclude that animal Type I and Type II cryptochromes may both have signaling mechanisms involving formation of a flavin radical signaling state, and that light independent activity of Type II cryptochromes is a consequence of dark accumulation of this redox form in vivo rather than of a fundamental difference in signaling mechanism. PMID:22427812

  5. Light is an active contributor to the vital effects of coral skeleton proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet-Leclerc, Anne; Reynaud, Stphanie; Dissard, Delphine; Tisserand, Guillaume; Ferrier-Pags, Christine

    2014-09-01

    Symbiotic colonies of the coral Acropora sp. were cultured in a factorial design of three temperatures (21, 25 and 28 C) and two light intensities (200 and 400 ?mol photon m-2 s-1), under constant conditions. A temperature of 25 C and a light intensity of 200 ?mol photon m-2 s-1 was the starting culture condition. Metabolic (photosynthesis, respiration, calcification and surface expansion rate) and geochemical measurements (?18O, ?13C, Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) were conducted on 6 colonies for each experimental condition. Metabolic measurements confirmed that respiration, photosynthesis, calcification and surface expansion rate responded to the combined effect of temperature and light. Under each light intensity, mean calcification rate was linearly correlated with mean photosynthetic activity. Geochemical measurements were also influenced by temperature and, to a lesser degree, by light. All geochemical proxies measured on 6 nubbins showed a wide scattering of values, regardless of the environmental condition. Compared to the other proxies, ?18O exhibited a different behavior. It was the only proxy exhibiting temperature tracer behavior. However, while mean values of Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca and ?13C were well correlated, the correlation between the later and mean ?18O differed with light level. This suggests that both skeleton deposition and temperature oxygen fractionation differs according to light intensity. Overall, the effect of light on geochemical values seems to compromise the use of proxy calibrations solely based on temperature influence. Under high light conditions, the great amplitude shown by individual net photosynthesis is directly proportional to the highly variable zooxanthellae density. As light is affecting all of the proxies, we thus assume that the strong geochemical variability observed could be explained by various algae densities, each nubbin responding according to its zooxanthellae amount. Accordingly, we suggest that each symbiosome (the assemblage of few corallites with their symbionts) presents its own vital effect influence over time. Therefore, at a bulk sample scale, light could be considered as one of the major causes of what is commonly referred to as the vital effect. The meaning of ?18O calibration versus temperature established from distinct colonies differs from calibration calculated from samples collected following the growth axis of a single coral head. Finally, in order to quantitatively reconstruct climatic condition, we suggest a new paradigm based on the statistical treatment of the combination of time-series information from several proxies, all measured on the same sample from a continuous symbiosome.

  6. Visible-Light-Induced Effects of Au Nanoparticle on Laccase Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sijie; Li, Hao; Liu, Juan; Yang, Yanmei; Kong, Weiqian; Qiao, Shi; Huang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Zhenhui

    2015-09-23

    A deep understanding of the interaction between the nanoparticle and enzyme is important for biocatalyst design. Here, we report the in situ synthesis of laccase-Au NP (laccase-Au) hybrids and its catalytic activity modulation by visible light. In the present hybrid system, the activity of laccase was significantly improved (increased by 91.2% vs free laccase) by Au NPs. With a short time visible light illumination (λ > 420 nm, within 3 min), the activity of laccase-Au hybrids decreased by 8.1% (vs laccase-Au hybrid without light), which can be restored to its initial one when the illumination is removed. However, after a long time illumination (λ > 420 nm, over 10 min), the catalytic activity of laccase-Au hybrids consecutively decreases and is not reversible even after removing the illumination. Our experiments also suggested that the local surface plasma resonance effect of Au NPs causes the structure change of laccase and local high temperature near the Au NPs. Those changes eventually affect the transportation of electrons in laccase, which further results in the declined activity of laccase. PMID:26322738

  7. [Preparation and characterization of visible-light response activated carbon with antibacterial behavior].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Shu; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Shou-Xin

    2011-01-01

    A visible-light response activated carbon with antibacterial activity was prepared by calcinations of the mixture of TiO2 precursor obtained by acid catalyzed hydrolysis method and commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) in NH3/N2 atmosphere. The antibacterial activity of the prepared activated carbon towards E. coil was investigated under the visible-light irradiation. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and N2 adsorption analyser were used to characterize the crystal phase structure, surface morphology, spectral characteristics and pore properties. The results show there is no influence for crystal phase structure of TiO2 supported AC. The crystal size of TiO2 is 9.8 nm. Non-crystal phase layer and strong adsorption force of carrier can inhibit the grain growth of TiO2, and AC combines with TiO2 in Ti-O-C so that TiO2 formestight film on AC. The sample calcinated at 500 degrees C for 5 h exhibits the highest bactericidal performance, and the bactericidal rate reached up to 67% after 4 h irradiation, which was better than that of nature light (39%) in the same condition. PMID:21404678

  8. Characterization of nucleoside triphosphatase activity in isolated pea nuclei and its photoreversible regulation by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. R.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    A nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) present in highly purified preparations of pea nuclei was partially characterized. The activity of this enzyme was stimulated by divalent cations (Mg2+ = Mn2+ > Ca2+), but was not affected by the monovalent cations, Na+ and K+. The Mg(2+)-dependent activity was further stimulated by concentrations of Ca2+ in the low micromolar range. It could catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP, all with a pH optimum of 7.5. The nuclear NTPase activity was not inhibited by vanadate, oligomycin, or nitrate, but was inhibited by relatively low concentrations of quercetin and the calmodulin inhibitor, compound 48/80. The NTPase was stimulated more than 50% by red light, and this effect was reversed by subsequent irradiation with far-red light. The photoreversibility of the stimulation indicated that the photoreceptor for this response was phytochrome, an important regulator of photomorphogenesis and gene expression in plants.

  9. Influence of softening test and light-activation protocols on resin composite polymer structure

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Maria Ceclia Caldas; Lima, Dbora Alves Nunes Leite; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ambrosano, Glucia Maria; Aguiar, Flvio Henrique Baggio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study analyzed the influences of the light-activation protocol and softening test on the degree of conversion (DC) and Knoop Hardness (KHN) of a microhybrid resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) was light-activated with a third-generation light-emitting diode (Valo Ultradent) by three protocols standard, high power, and plasma emulation or with a quartz-tungsten halogen XL 3000 (3M ESPE) in conventional mode. All modes were set to deliver 19 J/cm2. The DC (N = 20) was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry on the top (T) and bottom (B) surfaces. For the KHN test, samples were subdivided in four groups (n = 5 each) according to the storage media: absolute ethanol, 75% ethanol, distilled water, and air (control group). The KHN values were evaluated on T and B before and 24 h after immersion in the storage media. Data were analyzed by split-plot analysis of variance (ANOVA; for DC) or repeated-measures split-plot ANOVA (for KHN), followed by Tukey's test (? = 0.05). Results: For the DC, the light-activation protocol did not influence the results and there was no difference between T and B. For the KHN test, the light-activation protocol did not influence the results and T showed higher microhardness values than B for all experimental conditions. There were significant differences in KHN depending on the storage media. Samples immersed in absolute ethanol generally presented lower KHN values, with no differences compared to samples in 75% ethanol. Conclusion: The storage media affected the outcomes of the softening test. PMID:24966740

  10. Chloroplast Sulfhydryl Groups and the Light Activation of Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphatase 1

    PubMed Central

    Slovacek, Rudolf E.; Vaughn, Sharon

    1982-01-01

    Studies of isolated intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts reveal that most of the available sulfhydryl groups are associated with stromal protein as opposed to a thylakoid membrane fraction under non-denaturing conditions. Increases in sulfhydryl content of approximately 50% occurred with illumination and could be correlated kinetically with a reductive activation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase during CO2-assimilation. Inhibition of linear electron flow with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea prevented light driven increases in both fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity and the relative sulfhydryl number. These results provide evidence for the operation of a reductive enzyme activating system in vivo. PMID:16662654

  11. Mass spectrometry footprinting reveals the structural rearrangements of cyanobacterial orange carotenoid protein upon light activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijun; Zhang, Hao; King, jeremy D; Wolf, Nathan R; Prado, Mindy; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2014-12-01

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP), a member of the family of blue light photoactive proteins, is required for efficient photoprotection in many cyanobacteria. Photoexcitation of the carotenoid in the OCP results in structural changes within the chromophore and the protein to give an active red form of OCP that is required for phycobilisome binding and consequent fluorescence quenching. We characterized the light-dependent structural changes by mass spectrometry-based carboxyl footprinting and found that an ? helix in the N-terminal extension of OCP plays a key role in this photoactivation process. Although this helix is located on and associates with the outside of the ?-sheet core in the C-terminal domain of OCP in the dark, photoinduced changes in the domain structure disrupt this interaction. We propose that this mechanism couples light-dependent carotenoid conformational changes to global protein conformational dynamics in favor of functional phycobilisome binding, and is an essential part of the OCP photocycle. PMID:25256653

  12. AgVO3 nanorods: Synthesis, characterization and visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, V.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Narayanan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale and high purity silver vanadate (AgVO3) nanorods were synthesized by thermal decomposition method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Ultraviolet-Visible (DRS-UV-Visible) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to characterize the structure, light absorption capacity and morphology of the as-synthesized sample. The photocatalytic activity of AgVO3 nanorods was examined by degradation of methylene blue (MB) as a model organic pollutant. The degradation efficiency is 85.02% in the 120 min visible light illumination. Further, the AgVO3 nanorods were used as a photocatalyst for industrial effluent. 95.4% degradation efficiency was obtained within the visible light irradiation of 120 min. The possible photocatalytic mechanism has also been proposed.

  13. Biomechanical model produced from light-activated dental composite resins: a holographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelić, Dejan; Vasiljević, Darko; Blažić, Larisa; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Nikolić, Marko

    2013-11-01

    Light-activated dental composites, commonly applied in dentistry, can be used as excellent material for producing biomechanical models. They can be cast in almost any shape in an appropriate silicone mold and quickly solidified by irradiation with light in the blue part of the spectrum. In that way, it is possible to obtain any number of nearly identical casts. The models can be used to study the behavior of arbitrary structure under mechanical loads. To test the technique, a simple mechanical model of the tooth with a mesio-occluso-distal cavity was manufactured. Composite resin restoration was placed inside the cavity and light cured. Real-time holographic interferometry was used to analyze the contraction of the composite resin and its effect on the surrounding material. The results obtained in the holographic experiment were in good agreement with those obtained using the finite element method.

  14. Homeostatic regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking and degradation by light-controlled single synaptic activation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qingming; Gilbert, James; Man, Heng-Ye

    2011-01-01

    During homeostatic adjustment in response to alterations in neuronal activity, synaptic expression of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is globally tuned up- or down so that the neuronal activity is restored to a physiological range. Given that a central neuron receives multiple presynaptic inputs, whether and how AMPAR synaptic expression is homeostatically regulated at individual synapses remains unclear. In cultured hippocampal neurons, we report that when activity of an individual presynaptic terminal is selectively elevated by light-controlled excitation, AMPAR abundance at the excited synapses is selectively down-regulated in an NMDAR-dependent manner. The reduction in surface AMPARs is accompanied by enhanced receptor endocytosis and dependent on proteasomal activity. Synaptic activation also leads to a site-specific increase in the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 and polyubiquitination levels, consistent with AMPAR ubiquitination and degradation in the spine. These results indicate that AMPAR accumulation at individual synapses is subject to autonomous homeostatic regulation in response to synaptic activity. PMID:22153376

  15. Light-Intensity Activity Attenuates Functional Decline in Older Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Cindy K.; Morey, Miriam C.; Desmond, Renee A.; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Sloane, Richard; Snyder, Denise C.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    While moderate-vigorous intensity physical activities (MVPA) confer the greatest health benefits, evidence suggests that light-intensity activities are also beneficial, particularly for older adults and individuals with moderate-severe comorbidities. Purpose To examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between light-intensity activity and physical function in older cancer survivors at increased risk for age- and treatment-related comorbidities, including accelerated functional decline. Methods The analysis included data from 641 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors (54% female) aged 65 and older who participated in a 1-year, home-based diet and exercise intervention designed to reduce the rate of physical function decline. ANCOVA was used to compare means of physical function across levels of PA intensity (low-light (LLPA): 1.5-2.0 METs; high-light (HLPA): 2.1-2.9 METs; MVPA: ?3.0 METs). Results In cross-sectional analyses, increasing tertiles of light-intensity activity were associated with higher scores for all 3 measures of physical function (all p-values <0.005), after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, comorbidity, symptoms, and MVPA. Associations were stronger for HLPA than for LLPA. Compared with survivors who decreased or remained stable in MVPA and HLPA at the post-intervention follow-up, those who increased in HLPA, but decreased or remained stable in MVPA, reported higher physical function scores (LSMeans (95% CI): SF-36 physical function subscale: -5.58 (-7.96, -3.20) vs. -2.54 (-5.83, 0.75), p=0.14; basic lower extremity function: -2.00 (-3.45, -0.55) vs. 0.28 (-1.72, 2.28), p=0.07; advanced lower extremity function: -2.58 (-4.00, -1.15) vs. 0.44 (-1.52, 2.40), p=0.01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that increasing light-intensity activities, especially HLPA, may be a viable approach to reducing the rate of physical function decline in individuals who are unable or reluctant to initiate or maintain adequate levels of moderate-intensity activities. PMID:24389524

  16. Blue-light-activated phototropin2 trafficking from the cytoplasm to Golgi/post-Golgi vesicles.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Chhavi; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Borghetti, Carolina; Labuz, Justyna; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Gabryś, Halina

    2014-07-01

    Phototropins are plasma membrane-localized UVA/blue light photoreceptors which mediate phototropism, inhibition of primary hypocotyl elongation, leaf positioning, chloroplast movements, and stomatal opening. Blue light irradiation activates the C-terminal serine/threonine kinase domain of phototropin which autophosphorylates the receptor. Arabidopsis thaliana encodes two phototropins, phot1 and phot2. In response to blue light, phot1 moves from the plasma membrane into the cytosol and phot2 translocates to the Golgi complex. In this study the molecular mechanism and route of blue-light-induced phot2 trafficking are demonstrated. It is shown that Atphot2 behaves in a similar manner when expressed transiently under 35S or its native promoter. The phot2 kinase domain but not blue-light-mediated autophosphorylation is required for the receptor translocation. Using co-localization and western blotting, the receptor was shown to move from the cytoplasm to the Golgi complex, and then to the post-Golgi structures. The results were confirmed by brefeldin A (an inhibitor of the secretory pathway) which disrupted phot2 trafficking. An association was observed between phot2 and the light chain2 of clathrin via bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The fluorescence was observed at the plasma membrane. The results were confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation. However, tyrphostin23 (an inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis) and wortmannin (a suppressor of receptor endocytosis) were not able to block phot2 trafficking, indicating no involvement of receptor endocytosis in the formation of phot2 punctuate structures. Protein turnover studies indicated that the receptor was continuously degraded in both darkness and blue light. The degradation of phot2 proceeded via a transport route different from translocation to the Golgi complex. PMID:24821953

  17. Active-region Tilt Angles: Magnetic versus White-light Determinations of Joy's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Colaninno, R. C.; Baranyi, T.; Li, J.

    2015-01-01

    The axes of solar active regions are inclined relative to the east-west direction, with the tilt angle tending to increase with latitude ("Joy's law"). Observational determinations of Joy's law have been based either on white-light images of sunspot groups or on magnetograms, where the latter have the advantage of measuring directly the physically relevant quantity (the photospheric field), but the disadvantage of having been recorded routinely only since the mid-1960s. White-light studies employing the historical Mount Wilson (MW) database have yielded tilt angles that are smaller and that increase less steeply with latitude than those obtained from magnetic data. We confirm this effect by comparing sunspot-group tilt angles from the Debrecen Photoheliographic Database with measurements made by Li and Ulrich using MW magnetograms taken during cycles 21-23. Whether white-light or magnetic data are employed, the median tilt angles significantly exceed the mean values, and provide a better characterization of the observed distributions. The discrepancy between the white-light and magnetic results is found to have two main sources. First, a substantial fraction of the white-light "tilt angles" refer to sunspots of the same polarity. Of greater physical significance is that the magnetograph measurements include the contribution of plage areas, which are invisible in white-light images but tend to have greater axial inclinations than the adjacent sunspots. Given the large uncertainties inherent in both the white-light and the magnetic measurements, it remains unclear whether any systematic relationship exists between tilt angle and cycle amplitude during cycles 16-23.

  18. ACTIVE-REGION TILT ANGLES: MAGNETIC VERSUS WHITE-LIGHT DETERMINATIONS OF JOY'S LAW

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Colaninno, R. C.; Baranyi, T.; Li, J. E-mail: robin.colaninno@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: jli@igpp.ucla.edu

    2015-01-01

    The axes of solar active regions are inclined relative to the east-west direction, with the tilt angle tending to increase with latitude ({sup J}oy's law{sup )}. Observational determinations of Joy's law have been based either on white-light images of sunspot groups or on magnetograms, where the latter have the advantage of measuring directly the physically relevant quantity (the photospheric field), but the disadvantage of having been recorded routinely only since the mid-1960s. White-light studies employing the historical Mount Wilson (MW) database have yielded tilt angles that are smaller and that increase less steeply with latitude than those obtained from magnetic data. We confirm this effect by comparing sunspot-group tilt angles from the Debrecen Photoheliographic Database with measurements made by Li and Ulrich using MW magnetograms taken during cycles 21-23. Whether white-light or magnetic data are employed, the median tilt angles significantly exceed the mean values, and provide a better characterization of the observed distributions. The discrepancy between the white-light and magnetic results is found to have two main sources. First, a substantial fraction of the white-light ''tilt angles'' refer to sunspots of the same polarity. Of greater physical significance is that the magnetograph measurements include the contribution of plage areas, which are invisible in white-light images but tend to have greater axial inclinations than the adjacent sunspots. Given the large uncertainties inherent in both the white-light and the magnetic measurements, it remains unclear whether any systematic relationship exists between tilt angle and cycle amplitude during cycles 16-23.

  19. Light-dependent activation of G proteins by two isoforms of chicken melanopsins.

    PubMed

    Torii, Masaki; Kojima, Daisuke; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2015-11-01

    In the chicken pineal gland, light stimuli trigger signaling pathways mediated by two different subtypes, Gt and G11. These G proteins may be activated by any of the three major pineal opsins, pinopsin, OPN4-1 and OPN4-2, but biochemical evidence for the coupling has been missing except for functional coupling between pinopsin and Gt. Here we investigated the relative expression levels and the functional difference among the three pineal opsins. In the chicken pineal gland, the pinopsin mRNA level was significantly more abundant than the others, of which the OPN4-2 mRNA level was higher than that of OPN4-1. In G protein activation assays, Gt was strongly activated by pinopsin in a light-dependent manner, being consistent with previous studies, and weakly activated by OPN4-2. Unexpectedly, illuminated OPN4-2 more efficiently activated G protein(s) that was endogenously expressed in HEK293T cells in culture. On the other hand, Gq, the closest analogue of G11, was activated only by OPN4-1 although the activity was relatively weak under these conditions. These results suggest that OPN4-1 and OPN4-2 couple with Gq and Gt, respectively. Two melanopsins, OPN4-1 and OPN4-2, appear to have acquired mutually different functions through the evolution. PMID:26411960

  20. Light-activated endosomal escape using upconversion nanoparticles for enhanced delivery of drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasammandhan, Muthu Kumara; Bansal, Akshaya; Zhang, Yong

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs has gained a lot of prominence recently but the main problem hampering efficient delivery of payload is the clearing or degradation of nanoparticles by endosomes. Various strategies have been used to overcome this issue and one such effective solution is Photochemical Internalization (PCI). This technique involves the activation of certain photosensitizing compounds by light, which accumulate specifically in the membranes of endocytic vesicles. The activated photosensitizers induce the formation of reactive oxygen species which in turn induces localized disruption of endosomal membranes. But the drawback of this technique is that it needs blue light for activation and hence confined to be used only in in-vitro systems due to the poor tissue penetration of blue light. Here, we report the use of Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNs) as a transducer for activation of the photosensitizer, TPPS 2a. NIR light has good tissue penetrating ability and thus enables PCI in greater depths. Highly monodisperse, uniformly-sized, sub-100 nm, biocompatible upconversion nanoparticles were synthesized with a mesoporous silica coating. These UCNs activated TPPS 2a efficiently in solution and in cells. Paclitaxel, an anti-cancer drug was used as a model drug and was loaded into the mesoporous silica coating. B16F0 cells transfected with drug-loaded UCNs and irradiated with NIR showed significantly higher nanoparticle uptake and in turn higher cell death caused by the delivered drug. This technique can be used to enhance the delivery of any therapeutic molecule and thus increase the therapeutic efficiency considerably.

  1. Converting visible light into UVC: microbial inactivation by Pr(3+)-activated upconversion materials.

    PubMed

    Cates, Ezra L; Cho, Min; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2011-04-15

    Herein we report the synthesis and properties of light-activated antimicrobial surfaces composed of lanthanide-doped upconversion luminescent nano- and microcrystalline Y(2)SiO(5). Unlike photocatalytic surfaces, which convert light energy into reactive chemical species, this work describes surfaces that inactivate microorganisms through purely optical mechanisms, wherein incident visible light is partially converted into germicidal UVC radiation. Upconversion phosphors utilizing a Pr(3+) activator ion were synthesized and their visible-to-ultraviolet conversion capabilities were confirmed via photoluminescence spectroscopy. Polycrystalline films were prepared on glass substrates, and the extent of surface microbial inactivation and biofilm inhibition under visible light excitation were investigated. Results show that, under normal visible fluorescent lamp exposure, a sufficient amount of UVC radiation was emitted to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and to inactivate Bacillus subtilis spores on the dry surfaces. This new application of upconversion luminescence shows for the first time its ability to deter microbial contamination and could potentially lead to new material strategies for disinfection of surfaces and water. PMID:21428395

  2. Dark pulses affect the circadian rhythm of activity in hamsters kept in constant light.

    PubMed

    Ellis, G B; McKlveen, R E; Turek, F W

    1982-01-01

    We compared the effects of light pulses in constant darkness (DD) and dark pulses in constant light (LL) on the free-running rhythm of locomotor activity in male golden hamsters. Light pulses yielded advances, delays, or no change in the rhythm of activity. These data conform to a typical phase-response curve; this curve was unaffected by pinealectomy. Dark pulses occurring either late in the subjective night or early in the subjective day had little effect. In contrast, dark pulses occurring either late in the subjective day or early in the subjective night altered the rhythm in one of three ways: advance of the rhythm; splitting into two components; or induction of a new component, in phase with the pulse. Because dark pulses in LL perturb the circadian system in a different manner than do light pulses in DD, they may have value in identifying heretofore unknown aspects of circadian systems. As such, the use of dark pulses to perturb circadian rhythmicity will be a useful tool in examining the formal properties of circadian systems. PMID:7058930

  3. Visible-Light-Induced Bactericidal Activity of Titanium Dioxide Co-doped with Nitrogen and Silver

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pinggui; Xie, Rongcai; Imlay, Kari; Shang, Jian-Ku

    2011-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles co-doped with nitrogen and silver (Ag2O/TiON) were synthesized by the sol-gel process and found to be an effective visible light driven photocatalyst. The catalyst showed strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) under visible light irradiation (λ> 400 nm). In x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction characterization of the samples, the as-added Ag species mainly exist as Ag2O. Spin trapping EPR study showed Ag addition greatly enhanced the production of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) under visible light irradiation. The results indicate that the Ag2O species trapped eCB− in the process of Ag2O/TiON photocatalytic reaction, thus inhibiting the recombination of eCB− and hVB+ in agreement with the stronger photocatalytic bactericidal activity of Ag2O/TiON. The killing mechanism of Ag2O/TiON under visible light irradiation is shown to be related to oxidative damages in the forms of cell wall thinning and cell disconfiguration. PMID:20726520

  4. Small-Molecule-Triggered and Light-Controlled Reversible Regulation of Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Song, Yanyan; Wang, Jiaqi; Fu, Boshi; He, Zhiyong; Xu, Xianqun; Li, Anling; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Shaoru; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-01-27

    The fine control of enzyme activity is essential for the regulation of many important cellular and organismal functions. The light-regulation of proteins serves as an important method for the spatiotemporal control over the production and degradation of an enzyme product. This area is of intense interest for researchers. To the best of our knowledge, the use of small molecules as light-triggered molecular switches to reversibly control enzyme activity at the protein level has not yet been studied. In the present study, we demonstrate the light-controlled reversible regulation of the enzyme using a small-molecule-triggered switch, which is based on molecular recognition between an azobenzene derivative and telomere DNA. This molecule interconverts between the trans and cis states under alternate 365 nm UV and visible light irradiation, which consequently triggers the compaction and extension of telomere DNA. We further provide direct evidence for this structural switch using a circular dichroism study. Furthermore, our strategy has been successfully used to effectively control blood clotting in human plasma. PMID:26741151

  5. Enhanced catalytic activity of the surface modified TiO2-MWCNT nanocomposites under visible light.

    PubMed

    Božič, Mojca; Vivod, Vera; Vogrinčič, Robert; Ban, Irena; Jakša, Gregor; Hribernik, Silvo; Fakin, Darinka; Kokol, Vanja

    2016-03-01

    Fusing multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with TiO2 at the nano-scale level promotes the separation of those electron-hole charges generated upon UV and daylight irradiation. In this study, we investigated facile sonochemical synthesis, combined with the calcination process for the preparations of TiO2-MWCNT composites with different mole ratios of titanium and carbon. In order to produce stable nano dispersions we exploited an innovative biotechnology-based approach for the covalent functionalizations of TiO2-MWCNTs with in-situ synthesized soluble phenoxazine dye molecules. The none and functionalized TiO2-MWCNTs composites were analyzed by a range of analytical techniques including XRD, Raman, XPS, SEM and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated toward the liquid-phase degradation of MB in aqueous solution under both UV and visible light irradiation. TiO2-MWCNTs with optimized mole ratio exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity and stability than bare TiO2. The as-prepared TiO2-MWCNTs photocatalyst possessed good adsorptivity of dyes, extended light absorption range and efficient charge separation properties simultaneously. The results indicated that the soluble phenoxazine dyes and amino-benzenesulfonic acid monomers were covalently grafted on to the surfaces of TiO2-MCNTs, which promoted good aquatic dispersibility and extended light absorption, resulting in increased photocatalytic efficiency. PMID:26669495

  6. An improved chloride-conducting channelrhodopsin for light-induced inhibition of neuronal activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wietek, Jonas; Beltramo, Riccardo; Scanziani, Massimo; Hegemann, Peter; Oertner, Thomas G.; Simon Wiegert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins are light-gated cation channels that have been widely used for optogenetic stimulation of electrically excitable cells. Replacement of a glutamic acid in the central gate with a positively charged amino acid residue reverses the ion selectivity and produces chloride-conducting ChRs (ChloCs). Expressed in neurons, published ChloCs produced a strong shunting effect but also a small, yet significant depolarization from the resting potential. Depending on the state of the neuron, the net result of illumination might therefore be inhibitory or excitatory with respect to action potential generation. Here we report two additional amino acid substitutions that significantly shift the reversal potential of improved ChloC (iChloC) to the reversal potential of endogenous GABAA receptors. As a result, light-evoked membrane depolarization was strongly reduced and spike initiation after current injection or synaptic stimulation was reliably inhibited in iChloC-transfected neurons in vitro. In the primary visual cortex of anesthetized mice, activation of iChloC suppressed spiking activity evoked by visual stimulation. Due to its high operational light sensitivity, iChloC makes it possible to inhibit neurons in a large volume of brain tissue from a small, point-like light source. PMID:26443033

  7. Light Intensity and Carbon Dioxide Availability Impact Antioxidant Activity in Green Onions (Allium fistulosumm L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Lanfang; Bisbee, Patricia; Pare, Paul

    The prospect of long-duration manned space missions poses many challenges, including the development of a sustainable life support system and effective methods of space-radiation protection. To mitigate the risk of increased space-radiation, functional foods rich in antioxidant properties such as green onions are of particular interest. However it has yet to be established whether antioxidant properties can be preserved or enhanced in space environment where carbon dioxide, lighting intensity, gravity and pressure differ from which plants have acclimated to on earth. In this study, green onions (Allium fistulosumm L. cultivar Kinka) rich in antioxidant flavonoids are used as a model system to investigate variations in antioxidant capacity with plants grown under varying light intensities and CO2 concentrations. The antioxidant potential is determined using both radical cation scavenging and oxygen radical absorbance assays. For all light intensities assayed, antioxidant potential in water extract of green onions per gram biomass declined with CO2 increases up to 1200 ppm, and then leveled off with further CO2 increase to 4000 ppm. This inverse carbon dioxide versus antioxidant activity correlation suggests lower accumulation rates for water soluble antioxidant compounds compared to total biomass under increasing CO2 concentrations. The effect of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration on antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts were light intensity dependent. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of traditional plant antioxidants including vitamin C and the major onion flavonoid quercetin.

  8. Activation of retinal tyrosine hydroxylase: tolerance induced by chronic treatment with haloperidol does not modify response to light

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Neff, N.H.

    1982-05-01

    A single dose of haloperidol administered to rats in the dark increases the activity of retinal tyrosine hydroxylase. The ability of haloperidol to activate the enzyme is diminished 24 hr after terminating 22 to 30 days of treatment with haloperidol. The retinal enzyme is also tolerant to activation by treatment with chlorpromazine. In contrast, exposure of the animals to light activates the enzyme to the same extent in chronic haloperidol-treated and control animals. Thus, chronic haloperidol treatment does not modify the ability of the retinal enzyme system to respond to the physiological stimulus, light. Apparently, activation of retinol tyrosine hydroxylase by haloperidol and light occurs by independent mechanisms.

  9. Photoactive titania float for disinfection of water; evaluation of cell damage by bioanalytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Shwetharani, R; Jyothi, M S; Laveena, P D; Geetha Balakrishna, R

    2014-01-01

    A photoactive float was fabricated with the modified titania to cause a feasible disinfection of water, contaminated with E. coli. The commercially available titania was doped with neodymium by pulverization technique to enhance its activity in sunlight and a multiapproach technique was used to evaluate the extended efficiency of the doped sample. X-ray diffraction patterns depicted the retention of anatase phase on doping and the existence of neodymium was confirmed by the energy dispersive atomic X-ray analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy and Bruner-Emmett-Teller analysis depicted a marginal increase in the particle size and a decrease in the surface area, respectively. Doping induces semiconductor behavior with lower band energy that could respond to visible light and exhibit better disinfection activity. The "f" and "d" transitions of the lanthanide in doped sample caused new electronic behavior of trapping/detrapping effect together with bandgap narrowing. The amount of malondialdehyde, protein, DNA and RNA released on destruction of E. coli was observed to be 0.915 10(-3) ?g mL(-1), 859.912 ?g mL(-1), 20.173 ?g mL(-1) and 1146.073 ?g mL(-1), respectively. The above analytical methods along with standard plate count method substantiated the enhanced disinfection efficiency of the doped sample in sunlight. PMID:24689654

  10. An advanced tunnel oxide layer process for 65 nm NOR floating-gate flash memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Shengfen; Xu, Yue; Ji, Xiaoli; Liao, Yiming; Wu, Fuwei; Yan, Feng

    2015-10-01

    An advanced tunnel oxide layer process for 65 nm NOR-type floating-gate flash memory is proposed to improve tunnel oxide quality by an additive sacrificial oxide layer growth. The sacrificial oxide layer process effectively controls the thickness variation of tunnel oxide and improves the flatness of the SiO2/Si interface across the active area. The interface traps generation during program/erase cycling of flash cells is found to be reduced, and the reliability property is significantly improved as compared to flash cells without the sacrificial oxide layer process. The technology is applicable to further scaled floating-gate flash memories.

  11. [Characteristic of combined floating bed ecosystem for water purification under dynamic condition].

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Ning; Song, Hai-Liang; Zhu, Guang-Can; Li, Da-Cheng; L, Xi-Wu

    2007-11-01

    A new type of ecological floating bed was developed that combined hydrophyte, aquatic animal and biofilm. The dynamic pilot study on purification characteristic and mechanism of the floating bed for eutrophic was carried out. Result shows that the removal efficiencies of TN, TP and COD(Mn), are 53.8%, 86.0% and 35.4% respectively under the water exchange period of 7 days. Main purification role is played by artificial medium and aquatic macrophyte in pollutants removal, but the Corbicula fluminea introduced to food chain of combined floating bed enhances the purification effect through the ways as follows: improving the resolvability, ammonification and biodegradability of particulate organic matters, meliorating the substrate supply condition for absorption of plant and degradation of microorganism attached on artificial medium, hastening the growth and activity of microorganism. PMID:18290463

  12. Effect of light-activation with different light-curing units and time intervals on resin cement bond strength to intraradicular dentin.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Almeida, Maria Eleonora; Azevedo, Mario Lucio da Costa; Rached-Jnior, Fuad Abi; Oliveira, Camila Favero; Silva, Ricardo Gariba; Messias, Danielle Cristine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of a resin cement to intraradicular dentin varying the light-curing unit and the moment at which the light was applied. Post spaces of endodontically treated canines were prepared. The roots were distributed into 6 groups (n=10) according to the light-curing unit and the moment of light exposure: I) Quartz tungsten halogen-600 mW/cm (QTH) + immediate light activation (t0); II) QTH + light activation after 10 min (t10); III) Light-emitting diodes (LED)-800 mW/cm (LED-800)+ t0; IV) LED-800 + t10; V) LED-1,500 mW/cm (LED-1500)+ t0; VI) LED-1500 + t10. After post cementation, slices from coronal, middle and apical post/root regions were submitted to the push-out test and failure evaluation. It was verified that LED-800 (4.40 3.00 MPa) and LED-1500 (4.67 3.04 MPa) provided bond strength statistically superior to QTH (3.13 1.76 MPa) (p<0.05), and did not differ from each other (p>0.05). There was no significant difference between t0 and t10 (p>0.05). Coronal post/root region (4.75 3.10 MPa) presented significantly higher bond strength than the apical (3.32 2.30 MPa) (p<0.05) and middle regions (4.14 2.99 MPa) showed intermediate values. Adhesive failures were predominant when using QTH. Adhesive and mixed failures occurred more frequently in the apical region. Higher adhesion of the resin cement to intraradicular dentin was observed in the coronal region with LED light-activation, regardless of the moment of light exposure. PMID:23207850

  13. Construction of carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide and their visible-light sensitive photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fanyong; Kong, Depeng; Fu, Yang; Ye, Qianghua; Wang, Yinyin; Chen, Li

    2016-03-15

    Herein we designed a simple and effective method for synthesizing carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide nanocomposite with high photocatalytic activity. The as-prepared carbon nanodots/ tungsten trioxide has strong photoabsorption under visible light irradiation. Then, carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide was successfully applied to the degradation of methylene blue. The photodegradation efficiency of methylene blue can be reached as high as 100% after 0.5h visible light illumination. In addition, carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide could also be used to degrade rhodamine B and methyl orange. Most importantly, the photocatalytic activity of carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide did not exhibit obvious changes after five cycles. The results indicate that carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide has potential applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in industrial waste water. PMID:26745743

  14. Preparation and characterization of porous C-modified anatase titania films with visible light catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yi; Zhao Xiujian Chen Yunxia; Zhao Qingnan; Yuan Qihua

    2007-12-15

    Visible-light-activated C-modified anatase titania films have been synthesized from TiCl{sub 4} and carbonic ink by using the sol-gel route. The synthesized photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical measurements. The modifying carbon not only produces homogeneous worm-like structure with uniform pores, but also extends the absorbance spectra of the as-prepared films into visible region. The results of visible-light-induced degradation of methyl orange (MO) show that the C-modified titania films exhibits much higher photocatalytic activities than that of pure titania film prepared at the same conditions. - Graphical abstract: Carbon modifying not only produces homogeneous worm-like structure with uniform pores, but also extends the absorbance spectra of the as-prepared titania films into visible region.

  15. Rapidly light-activated surgical protein glue inspired by mussel adhesion and insect structural crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun Young; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Bum Jin; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Jung, Gyu Yong; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-10-01

    Currently approved surgical tissue glues do not satisfy the requirements for ideal bioadhesives due to limited adhesion in wet conditions and severe cytotoxicity. Herein, we report a new light-activated, mussel protein-based bioadhesive (LAMBA) inspired by mussel adhesion and insect dityrosine crosslinking chemistry. LAMBA exhibited substantially stronger bulk wet tissue adhesion than commercially available fibrin glue and good biocompatibility in both invitro and invivo studies. Besides, the easily tunable, light-activated crosslinking enabled an effective on-demand wound closure and facilitated wound healing. Based on these outstanding properties, LAMBA holds great potential as an ideal surgical tissue glue for diverse medical applications, including sutureless wound closures of skin and internal organs. PMID:26197411

  16. Optimization of an advanced non-invasive light activated disinfection strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, S.; Kishen, A.

    2007-07-01

    A photosensitizer formulation and strategy was developed based on the photophysical, photochemical and photobiological characteristics of methylene blue (MB) for the disinfection of root canal using light activated therapy. Disinfection of matured E. faecalis biofilms on root canal dentine was tried with the newly developed 'Advanced Non- Invasive Light Activated Disinfection' (ANILAD), conventional photodynamic therapy, and conventional root canal therapy alone or in combination with ANILAD. The results showed that, although complete disinfection of nonmatured biofilm is possible by ANILAD alone, a combination of conventional root canal treatment (RCT) with ANILAD could achieve significantly higher bacterial killing (6log 10-7log 10 bacterial reduction) compared to any other tested treatment in matured biofilm (p<0.001).

  17. Luminopsins integrate opto- and chemogenetics by using physical and biological light sources for opsin activation.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Ken; Clissold, Kara; Li, Haofang E; Wen, Lei; Park, Sung Young; Gleixner, Jan; Klein, Marguerita E; Lu, Dongye; Barter, Joseph W; Rossi, Mark A; Augustine, George J; Yin, Henry H; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2016-01-19

    Luminopsins are fusion proteins of luciferase and opsin that allow interrogation of neuronal circuits at different temporal and spatial resolutions by choosing either extrinsic physical or intrinsic biological light for its activation. Building on previous development of fusions of wild-type Gaussia luciferase with channelrhodopsin, here we expanded the utility of luminopsins by fusing bright Gaussia luciferase variants with either channelrhodopsin to excite neurons (luminescent opsin, LMO) or a proton pump to inhibit neurons (inhibitory LMO, iLMO). These improved LMOs could reliably activate or silence neurons in vitro and in vivo. Expression of the improved LMO in hippocampal circuits not only enabled mapping of synaptic activation of CA1 neurons with fine spatiotemporal resolution but also could drive rhythmic circuit excitation over a large spatiotemporal scale. Furthermore, virus-mediated expression of either LMO or iLMO in the substantia nigra in vivo produced not only the expected bidirectional control of single unit activity but also opposing effects on circling behavior in response to systemic injection of a luciferase substrate. Thus, although preserving the ability to be activated by external light sources, LMOs expand the use of optogenetics by making the same opsins accessible to noninvasive, chemogenetic control, thereby allowing the same probe to manipulate neuronal activity over a range of spatial and temporal scales. PMID:26733686

  18. Luminopsins integrate opto- and chemogenetics by using physical and biological light sources for opsin activation

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Ken; Clissold, Kara; Li, Haofang E.; Wen, Lei; Park, Sung Young; Gleixner, Jan; Klein, Marguerita E.; Lu, Dongye; Barter, Joseph W.; Rossi, Mark A.; Augustine, George J.; Yin, Henry H.; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Luminopsins are fusion proteins of luciferase and opsin that allow interrogation of neuronal circuits at different temporal and spatial resolutions by choosing either extrinsic physical or intrinsic biological light for its activation. Building on previous development of fusions of wild-type Gaussia luciferase with channelrhodopsin, here we expanded the utility of luminopsins by fusing bright Gaussia luciferase variants with either channelrhodopsin to excite neurons (luminescent opsin, LMO) or a proton pump to inhibit neurons (inhibitory LMO, iLMO). These improved LMOs could reliably activate or silence neurons in vitro and in vivo. Expression of the improved LMO in hippocampal circuits not only enabled mapping of synaptic activation of CA1 neurons with fine spatiotemporal resolution but also could drive rhythmic circuit excitation over a large spatiotemporal scale. Furthermore, virus-mediated expression of either LMO or iLMO in the substantia nigra in vivo produced not only the expected bidirectional control of single unit activity but also opposing effects on circling behavior in response to systemic injection of a luciferase substrate. Thus, although preserving the ability to be activated by external light sources, LMOs expand the use of optogenetics by making the same opsins accessible to noninvasive, chemogenetic control, thereby allowing the same probe to manipulate neuronal activity over a range of spatial and temporal scales. PMID:26733686

  19. Real-time RMS active damping augmentation: Heavy and very light payload evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Flueckiger, Karl W.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1994-01-01

    Controls-Structures Integration Technology has been applied to the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) to improve on-orbit performance. The objective was to actively damp undesired oscillatory motions of the RMS following routine payload maneuvering and Shuttle attitude control thruster firings. Simulation of active damping was conducted in the real-time, man-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The simulator was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative data on active damping performance from astronaut operators. Using a simulated three-axis accelerometer mounted on the RMS, 'sensed' vibration motions were used to generate joint motor commands that reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the RMS with heavy and light attached payloads was demonstrated in this study. Five astronaut operators examined the performance of active damping following operator commanded RMS maneuvers and Shuttle thruster firings. Noticeable improvements in the damping response of the RMS with the heavy, Hubble Space Telescope payload and the very light, astronaut in Manipulator Foot Restraint payload were observed. The potential of active damping to aid in precisely maneuvering payloads was deemed significant.

  20. Cystic acne improved by photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid and sequential combination of intense pulsed light and blue light activation.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid (Levulan Kerastick, Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) and activation by intense pulsed light in an initial treatment and blue light in 3 subsequent treatments has resulted in significant improvement in severity of acne, reduction in the number of lesions, improvement in skin texture, and smoothing of scar edges in an Asian patient with severe (class 4) facial cystic acne and scarring. PMID:16302560

  1. Effect of light on the activity of motor cortex neurons during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Armer, Madison C.; Nilaweera, Wijitha U.; Rivers, Trevor J.; Dasgupta, Namrata M.; Beloozerova, Irina N.

    2013-01-01

    The motor cortex plays a critical role in accurate visually guided movements such as reaching and target stepping. However, the manner in which vision influences the movement-related activity of neurons in the motor cortex is not well understood. In this study we have investigated how the locomotion-related activity of neurons in the motor cortex is modified when subjects switch between walking in the darkness and in light. Three adult cats were trained to walk through corridors of an experimental chamber for a food reward. On randomly selected trials, lights were extinguished for approximately four seconds when the cat was in a straight portion of the chamber's corridor. Discharges of 146 neurons from layer V of the motor cortex, including 51 pyramidal tract cells (PTNs), were recorded and compared between light and dark conditions. It was found that while cats movements during locomotion in light and darkness were similar (as judged from the analysis of three-dimensional limb kinematics and the activity of limb muscles), the firing behavior of 49% (71/146) of neurons was different between the two walking conditions. This included differences in the mean discharge rate (19%, 28/146 of neurons), depth of stride-related frequency modulation (24%, 32/131), duration of the period of elevated firing ([PEF], 19%, 25/131), and number of PEFs among stride-related neurons (26%, 34/131). 20% of responding neurons exhibited more than one type of change. We conclude that visual input plays a very significant role in determining neuronal activity in the motor cortex during locomotion by altering one, or occasionally multiple, parameters of locomotion-related discharges of its neurons. PMID:23680161

  2. Visible Light Mediated Organocatalytic Activation of Ethyl Bromofluoroacetate: Coupling with Indoles and Anilines.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Santosh D; Bakshi, Debanjan; Singh, Anand

    2015-10-16

    The activation of ethyl bromofluoroacetate employing a visible light mediated, Eosin Y catalyzed photoredox transformation is reported. Using indoles and anilines as nucleophiles, the reaction leads to the formation of two C(sp(2))-C(sp(3)) bonds resulting in an efficient synthesis of bisindolyl and bisanilinoyl acetate derivatives. Application of this method to the direct synthesis of unsymmetrical diarylacetates featuring indoles and N-substituted anilines was also demonstrated. PMID:26393927

  3. Characterization of a light-responding trans-activator responsible for differentially controlling reaction center and light-harvesting-I gene expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Buggy, J J; Sganga, M W; Bauer, C E

    1994-01-01

    The purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus regulates synthesis of its photosystem in response to two environmental stimuli, oxygen tension and light intensity. Here we describe the identification and characterization of the trans-acting regulatory gene hvrA, which we show is involved in differentially controlling reaction center and light-harvesting gene expression in response to alterations in light intensity. An hvrA mutant strain is shown to lack the capability to trans-activate light-harvesting-I and reaction center gene expression but retain normal light-harvesting-II and photopigment regulation, in response to a reduction in light intensity. As a consequence of altered expression, hvrA mutant strains exhibit reduced photosynthetic growth capabilities under dim-light conditions. The results of this study and additional studies indicate that regulated synthesis of the photosystem involves complex sets of overlapping regulatory circuits that differentially control photosystem gene expression in response to environmental stimuli such as oxygen tension and light intensity. Images PMID:7961455

  4. Influence of green, red and blue light emitting diodes on multiprotein complex proteins and photosynthetic activity under different light intensities in lettuce leaves (Lactuca sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Kim, Eun Jeong; Park, Jeong Suk; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the response of light emitting diodes (LEDs) at different light intensities (70 and 80 for green LEDs, 88 and 238 for red LEDs and 80 and 238 ?mol m-2 s-1 for blue LEDs) at three wavelengths in lettuce leaves. Lettuce leaves were exposed to (522 nm), red (639 nm) and blue (470 nm) LEDs of different light intensities. Thylakoid multiprotein complex proteins and photosynthetic metabolism were then investigated. Biomass and photosynthetic parameters increased with an increasing light intensity under blue LED illumination and decreased when illuminated with red and green LEDs with decreased light intensity. The expression of multiprotein complex proteins including PSII-core dimer and PSII-core monomer using blue LEDs illumination was higher at higher light intensity (238 ?mol m-2 s-1) and was lowered with decreased light intensity (70-80 ?mol m-2 s-1). The responses of chloroplast sub-compartment proteins, including those active in stomatal opening and closing, and leaf physiological responses at different light intensities, indicated induced growth enhancement upon illumination with blue LEDs. High intensity blue LEDs promote plant growth by controlling the integrity of chloroplast proteins that optimize photosynthetic performance in the natural environment. PMID:24642884

  5. Influence of Green, Red and Blue Light Emitting Diodes on Multiprotein Complex Proteins and Photosynthetic Activity under Different Light Intensities in Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Kim, Eun Jeong; Park, Jeong Suk; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the response of light emitting diodes (LEDs) at different light intensities (70 and 80 for green LEDs, 88 and 238 for red LEDs and 80 and 238 ?mol m?2 s?1 for blue LEDs) at three wavelengths in lettuce leaves. Lettuce leaves were exposed to (522 nm), red (639 nm) and blue (470 nm) LEDs of different light intensities. Thylakoid multiprotein complex proteins and photosynthetic metabolism were then investigated. Biomass and photosynthetic parameters increased with an increasing light intensity under blue LED illumination and decreased when illuminated with red and green LEDs with decreased light intensity. The expression of multiprotein complex proteins including PSII-core dimer and PSII-core monomer using blue LEDs illumination was higher at higher light intensity (238 ?mol m?2 s?1) and was lowered with decreased light intensity (7080 ?mol m?2 s?1). The responses of chloroplast sub-compartment proteins, including those active in stomatal opening and closing, and leaf physiological responses at different light intensities, indicated induced growth enhancement upon illumination with blue LEDs. High intensity blue LEDs promote plant growth by controlling the integrity of chloroplast proteins that optimize photosynthetic performance in the natural environment. PMID:24642884

  6. Oxygen deficient ZnO1-x nanosheets with high visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong-Li; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Xi-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Xie, Xiao; Xu, An-Wu

    2015-04-01

    Zinc oxide is one of the most important wide-band-gap (3.2 eV) materials with versatile properties, however, it can not be excited by visible light. In this work, we have developed an exquisite and simple way to prepare oxygen-deficient ZnO1-x nanosheets with a gray-colored appearance and excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. Detailed analysis based on UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra confirms the existence of oxygen vacancies in ZnO1-x. The incorporation of oxygen defects could effectively extend the light absorption of ZnO1-x into the visible-light region due to the fact that the energy of the localized state is located in the forbidden gap. Thus, our obtained ZnO1-x shows a higher photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) compared to defect-free ZnO under visible light illumination. Additionally, the high content of &z.rad;OH radicals with a strong photo-oxidation capability over the ZnO1-x nanosheets significantly contributes to the improvement in the photocatalytic performance. Our oxygen deficient ZnO1-x sample shows a very high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO even after 5 cycles without any obvious decline. The results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the optoelectronic and photocatalytic performances of nanomaterials.Zinc oxide is one of the most important wide-band-gap (3.2 eV) materials with versatile properties, however, it can not be excited by visible light. In this work, we have developed an exquisite and simple way to prepare oxygen-deficient ZnO1-x nanosheets with a gray-colored appearance and excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. Detailed analysis based on UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra confirms the existence of oxygen vacancies in ZnO1-x. The incorporation of oxygen defects could effectively extend the light absorption of ZnO1-x into the visible-light region due to the fact that the energy of the localized state is located in the forbidden gap. Thus, our obtained ZnO1-x shows a higher photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) compared to defect-free ZnO under visible light illumination. Additionally, the high content of &z.rad;OH radicals with a strong photo-oxidation capability over the ZnO1-x nanosheets significantly contributes to the improvement in the photocatalytic performance. Our oxygen deficient ZnO1-x sample shows a very high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO even after 5 cycles without any obvious decline. The results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the optoelectronic and photocatalytic performances of nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00271k

  7. UV and visible light active aqueous titanium dioxide colloids stabilized by surfactants.

    PubMed

    Pacia, Micha?; Warszy?ski, Piotr; Macyk, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Attempts to increase the stability of photocatalytically active nanodispersions of titanium dioxide over a wide range of pH (3-10) were undertaken. Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) with different molecular weights and polyoxyethylenesorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) were tested as stabilizing agents of TiO2 nanoparticles. The results of DLS measurements proved the stabilizing effect of Tween 80 while the systems involving PEGs, independently of the polymer concentration, showed a tendency to form aggregates in neutral solutions. The colloids stabilized with Tween 80 were photosensitized with 2,3-naphthalenediol (nd) or 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid (hn) or catechol (cat). The photocatalytic activity of such colloids has been assessed in an azure B degradation reaction using both UV and visible light. The nd@TiO2 + Tween colloid appeared particularly photoactive upon visible light irradiation. Moreover, the comparison of activities of nd@TiO2 + Tween and TiO2 + Tween revealed a significantly better performance of the former nanodispersion, independently of the irradiation conditions (UV or visible light). This effect has been explained by different structures of micelles formed in the case of TiO2 and nd@TiO2 stabilized with Tween 80. PMID:24781390

  8. The Stellar Activity of an M Dwarf Binary from Deconvolved Kepler Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, John C.; Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Wilkinson, Tessa D.

    2015-01-01

    The M5+M5 pair GJ 1245AB was monitored almost continuously by Kepler for four years, providing a unique opportunity to study the stellar activity of two coeval, nearly-equal mass M dwarfs that are fully convective. The stars are 7" apart on the sky, and separate light curves for each star cannot be generated via aperture photometry due to Kepler's large 4"/pixel plate scale. Instead, we generated separate light curves from the target pixel files using the PyKE pixel response function modeling procedures. Intriguingly, the angular separation of the two stars decreases over the four years of Kepler observations in a manner consistent with an astrometric perturbation from the much fainter, unseen M8 (GJ 1245C) companion to GJ 1245A. Analyzing the separated light curves, we observe long lived starspot features on both stars that evolve on multi-year timescales. Both stars flare at nearly the same rate, despite having rotation rates that differ by almost a factor of three. Consistent with recent studies of active M dwarf binaries, these results provide further insight into the roles of age and rotation rate in stellar activity.

  9. Study of microparticles' anomalous diffusion in active bath using speckle light fields (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pince, Ercag; Sabareesh, Sabareesh K. P.; Volpe, Giorgio; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni S.

    2015-08-01

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomenon. Examples can be given from organelles as molecular machines of cells performing physical tasks in a populated cytoplasm to human mobility in patchy environment at larger scales. Our recent results showed that it is possible to use the disordered landscape generated by speckle light fields to perform advanced manipulation tasks at the microscale. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion of micron size silica particles (5 μm) in the presence of active microswimmers. The microswimmers we used in the experiments are motile bacteria, Escherichia coli (E.coli). They constitute an active background constantly agitating passive silica particles within complex optical potentials. The speckle fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power (maximum power = 12 μW/μm2) is needed to obtain an effective random landscape pattern for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the anomalous diffusion of silica particles undergoing collisions with swimming bacteria. We observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bath of E.coli inside speckle light fields: this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interests.

  10. Plants Actively Avoid State Transitions upon Changes in Light Intensity: Role of Light-Harvesting Complex II Protein Dephosphorylation in High Light1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Suorsa, Marjaana; Rantala, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) core and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) proteins in plant chloroplasts undergo reversible phosphorylation upon changes in light intensity (being under control of redox-regulated STN7 and STN8 kinases and TAP38/PPH1 and PSII core phosphatases). Shift of plants from growth light to high light results in an increase of PSII core phosphorylation, whereas LHCII phosphorylation concomitantly decreases. Exactly the opposite takes place when plants are shifted to lower light intensity. Despite distinct changes occurring in thylakoid protein phosphorylation upon light intensity changes, the excitation balance between PSII and photosystem I remains unchanged. This differs drastically from the canonical-state transition model induced by artificial states 1 and 2 lights that concomitantly either dephosphorylate or phosphorylate, respectively, both the PSII core and LHCII phosphoproteins. Analysis of the kinase and phosphatase mutants revealed that TAP38/PPH1 phosphatase is crucial in preventing state transition upon increase in light intensity. Indeed, tap38/pph1 mutant revealed strong concomitant phosphorylation of both the PSII core and LHCII proteins upon transfer to high light, thus resembling the wild type under state 2 light. Coordinated function of thylakoid protein kinases and phosphatases is shown to secure balanced excitation energy for both photosystems by preventing state transitions upon changes in light intensity. Moreover, PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION5 (PGR5) is required for proper regulation of thylakoid protein kinases and phosphatases, and the pgr5 mutant mimics phenotypes of tap38/pph1. This shows that there is a close cooperation between the redox- and proton gradient-dependent regulatory mechanisms for proper function of the photosynthetic machinery. PMID:25902812

  11. Facile synthesis of phosphorus doped graphitic carbon nitride polymers with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ligang; Chen, Xiufang; Guan, Jing; Jiang, Yijun; Hou, Tonggang; Mu, Xindong

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • P-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} has been prepared by a one-pot green synthetic approach. • The incorporation of P resulted in favorable textural and electronic properties. • Doping with P enhanced the visible-light photocatalytic activity of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • A postannealing treatment further enhanced the activity of P-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Photogenerated holes were the main species responsible for the activity. - Abstract: Phosphorus-doped carbon nitride materials were prepared by a one-pot green synthetic approach using dicyandiamide monomer and a phosphorus containing ionic liquid as precursors. The as-prepared materials were subjected to several characterizations and investigated as metal-free photocatalysts for the degradation of organic pollutants (dyes like Rhodamine B, Methyl orange) in aqueous solution under visible light. Results revealed that phosphorus-doped carbon nitride have a higher photocatalytic activity for decomposing Rhodamine B and Methyl orange in aqueous solution than undoped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, which was attributed to the favorable textural, optical and electronic properties caused by doping with phosphorus heteroatoms into carbon nitride host. A facile postannealing treatment further improved the activity of the photocatalytic system, due to the higher surface area and smaller structural size in the postcalcined catalysts. The phosphorus-doped carbon nitride showed high visible-light photocatalytic activity, making them promising materials for a wide range of potential applications in photochemistry.

  12. 33 CFR 144.01-5 - Location and launching of life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location and launching of life floats. 144.01-5 Section 144.01-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms ...

  13. Floating and Sinking: Second Teacher Trials. Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 121.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddulph, Fred; And Others

    Two booklets were developed by the Learning in Science Project (primary)--LISP(P)--to help teachers adopt an approach to science teaching which would enhance children's understanding of floating and sinking; the strategy enables teachers to reconceptualize their teaching task from activity-driven, didactic teaching to conceptual-change teaching.

  14. Floating and Sinking: First Teacher Trials. Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 120.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleton, Ken; And Others

    Two booklets were developed by the Learning in Science Project (Primary)--LISP(P)--to help teachers adopt an approach to primary science teaching which would enhance children's understanding of floating and sinking. Both booklets were designed to enable teachers to reconceptualize their teaching task from activity-driven, didactic teaching to

  15. Sink or Float. Modified Primary. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defendorf, Jean, Ed.

    This publication provides information and activities for teaching about water, whether certain objects will sink or float, and process skills including observing, classifying, inferring, measuring, predicting, and collecting and interpreting data. There are 14 lessons in the unit. The first four lessons deal with the classification of objects and

  16. Electrowetting propulsion of water-floating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sang Kug; Ryu, Kyungjoo; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2009-07-01

    This letter describes a propulsion principle along with experimental verification of this principle by which an air-to-water interface vertically oscillated by ac electrowetting generates a quasisteady, "streaming" flow that can be utilized to propel water-floating objects. This propulsion does not require any mechanical moving parts. Using a centimeter-sized boat whose outer surfaces were covered with microfabricated electrowetting electrodes, linear, and rotational motions of the boat were achieved up to maximum speeds of 5 mm/s and 20 rpm, respectively. By combining the above two motions, the boat was successfully propelled and steered along a curvilinear pathline. A potential application of this principle is to propel and maneuver various water-floating mini/microrobots and boats used for water/air quality monitoring or surveillance/security purposes.

  17. OCD metrology by floating n/k

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shinn-Sheng; Huang, Jacky; Ke, Chih-Ming; Gau, Tsai-Sheng; Lin, Burn J.; Yen, Anthony; Lane, Lawrence; Vuong, Vi; Chen, Yan

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, one of the major contributions to the OCD metrology error, resulting from within-wafer variation of the refractive index/extinction coefficient (n/k) of the substrate, is identified and quantified. To meet the required metrology accuracy for the 65-nm node and beyond, it is suggested that n/k should be floating when performing the regression for OCD modeling. A feasible way of performing such regression is proposed and verified. As shown in the presented example, the measured CDU (3σ) with n/k fixed and n/k floating is 1.94 nm and 1.42 nm, respectively. That is, the metrology error of CDU committed by assuming n/k fixed is more than 35% of the total CDU.

  18. Biodiversity and importance of floating weeds of Dara Ismail, Khan District of KPK, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Marwat, Sarfaraz Khan; Khan, Mir Ajab; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    The present paper is based on the results of taxonomic research work conducted in Dera Ismail Khan District of KPK, Pakistan, during 2005 - 2007. The area was extensively surveyed in order to collect floating aquatic weeds. From the study area 11 floating aquatic weed species belonging to 9 genera and 9 families were collected and identified in the light of available literature. These plants include Bryophytes: 1 species, Ricciocarpus natans (L.) Corda; Pteridophytes: 2 species, Azolla pinnata R.Br. and Marselia quadrifolia L., and Spermatophytes: 8 species, Lemna aequinoctialis Welw., L. gibba L., Marselia quadrifoliata L. Nelumbo nucifera Gaerth., Nymphoides cristata (Roxb.) O. Ketze. Nymphoides indica (L.) Kuntze:, Pistia stratiotes L. Potamogeton nodosus Poiret and Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid. Floating weeds on one hand cause serious problems and on the other hand they are used for various purposes. Data inventory consists of botanical name, family, major group, habit and habitat, flowering period, availability, distribution in D.I.Khan, Pakistan and world, beneficial and harmful effects. Key to the floating aquatic species of the area was developed for easy and correct identification and differentiation. PMID:22754062

  19. Time Variant Floating Mean Counting Algorithm

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-06-03

    This software was written to test a time variant floating mean counting algorithm. The algorithm was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and a provisional patent has been filed on the algorithm. The test software was developed to work with the Val Tech model IVB prototype version II count rate meter hardware. The test software was used to verify the algorithm developed by WSRC could be correctly implemented with the vendor''s hardware.

  20. Microwave hydrothermal synthesis of AgInS{sub 2} with visible light photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Danzhen; Chen, Zhixin; Sun, Meng; Li, Wenjuan; Lin, Qiang; Fu, Xianzhi

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} AgInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by a microwave hydrothermal method. {yields} This method involves no organic solvents, catalysts, or surfactants. {yields} AgInS{sub 2} showed higher activity for photocatalytic degradation MO than TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}. {yields} Holes, O{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} played an important role in the photocatalytic process. -- Abstract: AgInS{sub 2} nanoparticles with superior visible light photocatalytic activity were successfully synthesized by a microwave hydrothermal method. This method is a highly efficient and rapid route that involves no organic solvents, catalysts, or surfactants. The photocatalytic activity of AgInS{sub 2} nanoparticles was investigated through the degradation of dyes under visible light irradiation. Compared with TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}, AgInS{sub 2} has exhibited a superior activity for photocatalytic degradation MO under the same condition. The experiment results showed that superoxide radicals (O{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}), hydrogen peroxides (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and holes (h{sup +}) were the mainly active species for the degradation of organic pollutants over AgInS{sub 2}. Through the determination of flat band potential, the energy band structure of the sample was obtained. A possible mechanism for the degradation of organic pollutant over AgInS{sub 2} was proposed.

  1. Effect of Dopant Activation on Device Characteristics of InGaN-based Light Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroce, Nicholas; Liu, Guangyu; Tan, Chee-Keong; Arif, Ronald A.; Lee, Soo Min; Tansu, Nelson

    2015-03-01

    Achieving high uniformity in growths and device characteristics of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is important for large scale manufacturing. Dopant activation and maintaining control of variables affecting dopant activation are critical steps in the InGaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) fabrication process. In the epitaxy of large scale production LEDs, in-situ post-growth annealing is used for activating the Mg acceptor dopant in the p-AlGaN and p-GaN of the LEDs. However, the annealing temperature varies with respect to position in the reactor chamber, leading to severe uniform dopant activation issue across the devices. Thus, it is important to understand how the temperature gradient and the resulting variance in Mg acceptor activation will alter the device properties. In this work, we examine the effect of varying p-type doping levels in the p-GaN layers and AlGaN electron blocking layer of the GaN LEDs on the optoelectronic properties including the band profile, carrier concentration, current density, output power and quantum efficiency. By understanding the variations and its effect, the identification of the most critical p-type doping layer strategies to address this variation will be clarified.

  2. Mixed layer depth and chlorophyll a: Profiling float observations in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Sachihiko; Yasuda, Ichiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Tsuda, Atsushi; Komatsu, Kosei

    2015-11-01

    Variability in the chlorophyll a concentration (Chl) in relation to fluctuations in the mixed layer (ML) was investigated together with turbidity (Tur) in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension region, using profiling floats. A particular focus was the validity of two hypotheses concerning the spring bloom: the critical depth hypothesis (CDH) and the recently proposed alternative, the disturbance-recovery hypothesis (DRH). During the period from winter to early spring, Chl and Tur integrated over the photosynthetically active layer (PL; defined as the greatest depth of the ML and the euphotic layer) increased with increasing PL depth (PLD), indicating an increase in the phytoplankton biomass. This result is partly consistent with the DRH in that the observed increase in biomass was not explained by an increase in production. Instead, it was more likely attributable to a reduction in the loss rate. However, theoretical analyses revealed that grazer dilution alone could not cause this increase in biomass because such an increase in the ML in the real ocean (as opposed to a dilution experiment within a bottle) would cause a reduction in the mean light intensity. Despite the loss-controlled fluctuation in biomass during the period of low light, a production-driven fluctuation in biomass was also revealed. This occurred when the light intensity was elevated, particularly after late spring, and was consistent with the CDH. Thus, the present study suggests that both the production-driven and loss-driven hypotheses are responsible for the dynamics of the phytoplankton dynamics from winter to spring in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension region.

  3. Floating debris in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Suaria, Giuseppe; Aliani, Stefano

    2014-09-15

    Results from the first large-scale survey of floating natural (NMD) and anthropogenic (AMD) debris (>2 cm) in the central and western part of the Mediterranean Sea are reported. Floating debris was found throughout the entire study area with densities ranging from 0 to 194.6 items/km(2) and mean abundances of 24.9 AMD items/km(2) and 6.9 NMD items/km(2) across all surveyed locations. On the whole, 78% of all sighted objects were of anthropogenic origin, 95.6% of which were petrochemical derivatives (i.e. plastic and styrofoam). Maximum AMD densities (>52 items/km(2)) were found in the Adriatic Sea and in the Algerian basin, while the lowest densities (<6.3 items/km(2)) were observed in the Central Tyrrhenian and in the Sicilian Sea. All the other areas had mean densities ranging from 10.9 to 30.7 items/km(2). According to our calculations, more than 62 million macro-litter items are currently floating on the surface of the whole Mediterranean basin. PMID:25127501

  4. Liquid encapsulated float zone process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (inventor); Frazier, Donald O. (inventor); Lehoczky, Sandor L. (inventor); Vlasse, Marcus (inventor); Facemire, Barbara R. (inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The process and apparatus for growing crystals using float zone techniques are described. A rod of crystalline materials is disposed in a cylindrical container, leaving a space between the rod and container walls. This space is filled with an encapsulant, selected to have a slightly lower melting point than the crystalline material. The rod is secured to a container end cap at one end and to a shaft at its other end. A piston slides over the rod and provides pressure to prevent loss of volatile components upon melting of the rod. Prior to melting the rod the container is first heated to melt the encapsulant, with any off-gas from this step being vented to a cavity behind the piston. The piston moves slightly forward owing to volume change upon melting of the encapsulant, and the vent passageway is closed. The container is then moved longitudinally through a heated zone to progressively melt sections of the rod as in conventional float zone processes. The float zone technique may be used in the microgravity environment of space.

  5. Capillary induced buckling of floating sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineirua, Miguel; Bico, Jose; Roman, Benoit; Menon, Narayanan

    2012-02-01

    When a water droplet is deposited over a thin floating sheet, radial wrinkles appear in the vicinity of the droplet as a result of capillary forces exerted at the contact line [1]. However, determining the stress state at the contact line is still challenging and limits the full description of the wrinkling pattern. In order to avoid this contact line ambiguities, we propose the experimental study of the buckling of a macroscopic annulus floating on the surface of water and submitted to a difference in surface tension between its inner and outer edges. This particular configuration allows to generate radial wrinkles on the membrane with well defined border conditions. The topography of the wrinkled patterns are precisely measured using a synthetic Schlieren technique. Based on the standard buckling theory, we develop scaling laws for the buckling threshold of the annulus as well as for the wave length and radial extension of the wrinkles, which are compared to our experimental results and numerical simulations. [4pt] [1] J. Huang, M. Juszkiewicz, W.H. de Jeu, E. Cerda, T. Emrick, N. Menon, and T.P. Russell. Capillary wrinkling of floating thin polymer films. Science, 317(5838):650-653, 2007.

  6. Capillary effects on floating cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harish N.; Homsy, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we develop a systematic perturbation procedure in the small parameter, B1/2, where B is the Bond number, to study capillary effects on small cylindrical particles at interfaces. Such a framework allows us to address many problems involving particles on flat and curved interfaces. In particular, we address four specific problems: (i) capillary attraction between cylinders on flat interface, in which we recover the classical approximate result of Nicolson ["The interaction between floating particles," Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 45, 288-295 (1949), 10.1017/S0305004100024841], thus putting it on a rational basis; (ii) capillary attraction and aggregation for an infinite array of cylinders arranged on a periodic lattice, where we show that the resulting Gibbs elasticity obtained for an array can be significantly larger than the two cylinder case; (iii) capillary force on a cylinder floating on an arbitrary curved interface, where we show that in the absence of gravity, the cylinder experiences a lateral force which is proportional to the gradient of curvature; and (iv) capillary attraction between two cylinders floating on an arbitrary curved interface. The present perturbation procedure does not require any restrictions on the nature of curvature of the background interface and can be extended to other geometries.

  7. FPP [Floating Potential Probe] Results, Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    2007-01-01

    The Floating Potential Probe (FPP) operated on the International Space Station (ISS) from December 2000 to April 2001. During that time, it took many measurements of the ISS floating potential and the electron density and temperature. Those measurements were used as inputs to the Environments WorkBench (EWB) model of ISS potentials (originally developed by SAIC, but now sometimes called the Boeing model) that is used even today to predict charging levels for ISS. FPP is now completely defunct, having been removed and ejected from ISS. With the advent of the new Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) on ISS, and the beginning of ISS operations with two large solar array panels instead of just one, a review of FPP measurements can offer comparisons with the new FPMU data and perhaps improve the accuracy of future ISS charging predictions. In particular, FPP measurements during times of low electron temperature and high electron density (the times of worst ISS charging) will be brought forward for comparison with the newly obtained FPMU data.

  8. Studies of floating dosage forms of furosemide: in vitro and in vivo evaluations of bilayer tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, N; Ordu, S; Ozkan, Y

    2000-08-01

    For the purpose of enhancement the bioavailability of furosemide (FR), a floating dosage form with controlled release of FR was designed in this study. Because of the lower solubility of active material in the gastric medium, it was first enhanced by preparing an inclusion complex of FR with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) in a 1:1 proportion using the kneading method. Following the design of dosage form, bilayer floating tablets were prepared. After dissolution rate studies were performed using the continuous flow-through cell method, the formulation that provided delivery of active material near the target profile was given to six healthy male volunteer subjects, and in vivo tests were performed. It was determined by radiographs that floating tablets prepared by adding BaSO4 stayed in the stomach for 6 hr. Further, values of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) obtained with the floating dosage form were about 1.8 times those of the conventional FR tablet in blood analyses; maximum and minimum plasma concentrations were also found to be between the desired limits. In urine analyses, the peak diuretic effect seen in classical preparations was decreased and prolonged in floating dosage forms. Also, a considerably significant correlation was detected between in vivo results and in vitro data of the dissolution rate, and it was concluded that the modified continuous flow-through cell method is usable for in vitro dissolution rate tests of floating dosage forms. PMID:10900542

  9. The Peptide Microarray-Based Resonance Light Scattering Assay for Sensitively Detecting Intracellular Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    The peptide microarray technology is a robust, reliable, and efficient technique for large-scale determination of enzyme activities, and high-throughput profiling of substrate/inhibitor specificities of enzymes. Here, the activities of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in different cell lysates have been detected by a peptide microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes. Highly sensitive detection of PKA activity in 0.1 ?g total cell proteins of SHG-44 (human glioma cell) cell lysate (corresponding to 200 cells) is achieved by a selected peptide substrate. The experimental results also demonstrate that the RLS assay can be employed to evaluate the chemical regulation of intracellular kinase activity. PMID:26490469

  10. Helicobacter pylori CagA Disrupts Epithelial Patterning by Activating Myosin Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Muyskens, Jonathan B.; Guillemin, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a leading cause of ulcers and gastric cancer. We show that expression of the H. pylori virulence factor CagA in a model Drosophila melanogaster epithelium induces morphological disruptions including ectopic furrowing. We find that CagA alters the distribution and increases the levels of activated myosin regulatory light chain (MLC), a key regulator of epithelial integrity. Reducing MLC activity suppresses CagA-induced disruptions. A CagA mutant lacking EPIYA motifs (CagAEPISA) induces less epithelial disruption and is not targeted to apical foci like wild-type CagA. In a cell culture model in which CagAEPISA and CagA have equivalent subcellular localization, CagAEPISA is equally potent in activating MLC. Therefore, in our transgenic system, CagA is targeted by EPIYA motifs to a specific apical region of the epithelium where it efficiently activates MLC to disrupt epithelial integrity. PMID:21445303

  11. Slow-light Airy wave packets and their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2013-07-01

    We propose a scheme to generate (3+1)-dimensional slow-light Airy wave packets in a resonant ?-type three-level atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that in the absence of dispersion the Airy wave packets formed by a probe field consist of two Airy wave packets accelerated in transverse directions and a longitudinal Gaussian pulse with a constant propagating velocity lowered to 10-5c (c is the light speed in vacuum). We also show that in the presence of dispersion it is possible to generate another type of slow-light Airy wave packet consisting of two Airy beams in transverse directions and an Airy wave packet in the longitudinal direction. In this case, the longitudinal velocity of the Airy wave packet can be further reduced during propagation. Additionally, we further show that the transverse accelerations (or bending) of the both types of slow-light Airy wave packets can be completely eliminated and the motional trajectories of them can be actively manipulated and controlled by using a Stern-Gerlach gradient magnetic field.

  12. Light- and pH-activated intracellular drug release from polymeric mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Kong, Yi; Li, Xiaojian; Wu, Jun; Ko, Alex C-T; Xing, Malcolm

    2015-10-01

    Surface modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with reduced toxicity were prepared for light and pH dual triggerable drug delivery system. Both 413 nm light and acidic environment can activate the drug release process, improving the pharmacological action. By applying rhodamine B (RhB) as a model drug, the accumulative RhB release is as high as 95% in pH 5.0 and in irradiation of 413 nm light, compared to only 55% in pH 7.4 and in dark. The anti-cancer drug camptothecin (CPT) loaded nanoparticles can kill cancer cells with IC?? value of 0.02 ?g mL(-1) in exposure of 413 nm light, which is much lower than free CPT (about 0.1 ?g mL(-1)). Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging microscopy (NLOM) was employed to acquire in vitro coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) images of live MCF-7 cells and showed that the nanoparticles can be taken up by breast tumor cell MCF-7 with high efficiency, indicating its great potential for anti-cancer drug delivery system. PMID:26188470

  13. Sedentary behaviors and light-intensity activities in relation to colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Keum, NaNa; Cao, Yin; Oh, Hannah; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Orav, John; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S; Cho, Eunyoung; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-05-01

    A recent meta-analysis found that sedentary behaviors are associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Yet, the finding on TV viewing time, the most widely used surrogate of sedentary behaviors, was based on only two studies. Furthermore, light-intensity activities (e.g., standing and slow walking), non-sedentary by posture but close to sedentary behaviors by Metabolic Equivalent Task values, have not been investigated in relation to CRC risk. Thus, we prospectively analyzed the relationships based on 69,715 women from Nurses' Health Study (1992-2010) and 36,806 men from Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1988 - 2010). Throughout follow-up, time spent on sedentary behaviors including sitting watching TV and on light-intensity activities were assessed repeatedly; incidence of CRC was ascertained. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models from each cohort. A total of 1,119 and 913 incident cases were documented from women and men, respectively. The multivariable HR comparing ≥ 21 versus < 7 hr/week of sitting watching TV was 1.21 (95% CI = 1.02 to 1.43, ptrend =.01) in women and 1.06 (95% CI = 0.84 to 1.34, ptrend =.93) in men. In women, those highly sedentary and physically less active had an approximately 41% elevated risk of CRC (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.92) compared with those less sedentary and physically more active. The other sedentary behaviors and light-intensity activities were not related to CRC risk in women or men. In conclusion, we found that prolonged sitting time watching TV was associated with an increased CRC risk in women but not in men. PMID:26649988

  14. Visible light activated photocatalytic behaviour of rare earth modified commercial TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tobaldi, D.M.; Seabra, M.P.; Labrincha, J.A.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • RE gave more surface hydroxyl groups attached to the photocatalyst's surface. • RE gave the modified and fired samples a high specific surface area. • Photocatalytic activity was assessed in gas–solid phase under visible-light exposure. • Thermal treated RE-TiO{sub 2}s showed a superior visible-light photocatalytic activity. • La-TiO{sub 2} was the best performing photocatalyst. - Abstract: A commercial TiO{sub 2} nanopowder, Degussa P25, was modified with several rare earth (RE) elements in order to extend its photocatalytic activity into the visible range. The mixtures were prepared via solid-state reaction of the precursor oxides, and thermally treated at high temperature (900 and 1000 °C), with the aim of investigating the photocatalytic activity of the thermally treated samples. This thermal treatment was chosen for a prospective application as a surface layer in materials that need to be processed at high temperatures. The photocatalytic activity (PCA) of the samples was assessed in gas–solid phase – monitoring the degradation of isopropanol (IPA) – under visible-light irradiation. Results showed that the addition of the REs lanthanum, europium and yttrium to TiO{sub 2} greatly improved its photocatalytic activity, despite the thermal treatment, because of the presence of more surface hydroxyl groups attached to the photocatalyst's surface, together with a higher specific surface area (SSA) of the modified and thermally treated samples, with regard to the unmodified and thermally treated Degussa P25. The samples doped with La, Eu and Y all had excellent PCA under visible-light irradiation, even higher than the untreated Degussa P25 reference sample, despite their thermal treatment at 900 °C, with lanthanum producing the best results (i.e. the La-, Eu- and Y-TiO{sub 2} samples, thermally treated at 900 °C, had, respectively, a PCA equal to 26, 27 and 18 ppm h{sup −1} – in terms of acetone formation – versus 15 ppm h{sup −1} for the 900 °C thermally treated Degussa P25). On the other hand, Ce–TiO{sub 2}s had no significant photocatalytic activity.

  15. Dextran causes aggregation of mitochondria and influences their oxidoreductase activities and light scattering.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V; Solano, Sigifredo; López, Luis F; Rendón, Dairo A; Ghafourifar, Pedram; Gómez, Luis A

    2003-04-15

    It has been reported that dextrans diminish the intermembrane space of mitochondria, increase the number of contact sites between the inner and the outer mitochondrial membranes, decrease the outer membrane permeability to adenosine 5(')-diphosphate, and change the kinetic properties of mitochondrial kinases. In the present work the influence of dextran M40 (5% w/v) on the oxidoreductase activities of the inner and outer membranes of mitochondria, the interaction of cytochrome c with mitochondrial membranes, and the light scattering by rat liver mitochondria were studied. No influence of dextran on the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria or its interaction with mitochondrial membranes was observed. Decreases in the NADH-oxidase (to 80+/-2% of the control), NADH-cytochrome c reductase (to 26+/-2%), succinate-cytochrome c reductase (to 70+/-5%), and NADH-ferricyanide reductase (to 75+/-3%) activities induced by dextran, which may be due to the mitochondrial aggregation, were observed. The formation of aggregates was registered by light scattering, confirmed by light microscopy, and explained within the framework of the Gouy-Chapman theory of the electrical double layer. The observed mitochondrial aggregation seems to be useful also for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial condensation and perinuclear clustering during apoptosis. PMID:12667481

  16. Light-activated serotonin for exploring its action in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Rea, Adam C; Vandenberg, Laura N; Ball, Rebecca E; Snouffer, Ashley A; Hudson, Alicia G; Zhu, Yue; McLain, Duncan E; Johnston, Lindsey L; Lauderdale, James D; Levin, Michael; Dore, Timothy M

    2013-12-19

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator involved in regulating mood, appetite, memory, learning, pain, and establishment of left-right (LR) asymmetry in embryonic development. To explore the role of 5-HT in physiology, we have created two forms of "caged" 5-HT, BHQ-O-5HT and BHQ-N-5HT. When exposed to 365 or 740nm light, BHQ-O-5HT releases 5-HT through one- or two-photon excitation, respectively. BHQ-O-5HT mediated changes in neural activity in cultured mouse primary sensory neurons and the trigeminal ganglion and optic tectum of intact zebrafish larvae in the form of high-amplitude spiking in response to light. In Xenopus laevis embryos, light-activated 5-HT increased the occurrence of LR patterning defects. Maximal rates of LR defects were observed when 5-HT was released at stage 5 compared with stage 8. These experiments show the potential for BHQ-caged serotonins in studying 5-HT-regulated physiological processes. PMID:24333002

  17. Accurate measurement of volume and shape of resting and activated blood platelets from light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A.; Chikova, Elena D.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for determination of volume and shape of individual blood platelets modeled as an oblate spheroid from angle-resolved light scattering with flow-cytometric technique. The light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets were measured with the scanning flow cytometer and the platelet characteristics were determined from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem using the precomputed database of theoretical LSPs. We revealed a phenomenon of parameter compensation, which is partly explained in the framework of anomalous diffraction approximation. To overcome this problem, additional a priori information on the platelet refractive index was used. It allowed us to determine the size of each platelet with subdiffraction precision and independent of the particular value of the platelet aspect ratio. The shape (spheroidal aspect ratio) distributions of platelets showed substantial differences between native and activated by 10 ?M adenosine diphosphate samples. We expect that the new approach may find use in hematological analyzers for accurate measurement of platelet volume distribution and for determination of the platelet activation efficiency.

  18. The activation of directional stem cell motility by green light-emitting diode irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wei-Kee; Chen, How-Foo; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fu, Yun-Ju; Wong, Yi-Shan; Yen, Da-Jen; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng; Chien, Shu; Ho, Jennifer Hui-Chun

    2013-03-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation is potentially a photostimulator to manipulate cell behavior by opsin-triggered phototransduction and thermal energy supply in living cells. Directional stem cell motility is critical for the efficiency and specificity of stem cells in tissue repair. We explored that green LED (530 nm) irradiation directed the human orbital fat stem cells (OFSCs) to migrate away from the LED light source through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)/MAP kinase/p38 signaling pathway. ERK inhibitor selectively abrogated light-driven OFSC migration. Phosphorylation of these kinases as well as green LED irradiation-induced cell migration was facilitated by increasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in OFSCs after green LED exposure, and which was thermal stress-independent mechanism. OFSCs, which are multi-potent mesenchymal stem cells isolated from human orbital fat tissue, constitutionally express three opsins, i.e. retinal pigment epithelium-derived rhodopsin homolog (RRH), encephalopsin (OPN3) and short-wave-sensitive opsin 1 (OPN1SW). However, only two non-visual opsins, i.e. RRH and OPN3, served as photoreceptors response to green LED irradiation-induced OFSC migration. In conclusion, stem cells are sensitive to green LED irradiation-induced directional cell migration through activation of ERK signaling pathway via a wavelength-dependent phototransduction. PMID:23261211

  19. Floating Oil-Spill Containment Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous oil containment booms have an open top that allows natural gas to escape, and have significant oil leakage due to wave action. Also, a subsea pyramid oil trap exists, but cannot move relative to moving oil plumes from deepsea oil leaks. The solution is to have large, moveable oil traps. One version floats on the sea surface and has a flexible tarp cover and a lower weighted skirt to completely entrap the floating oil and natural gas. The device must have at least three sides with boats pulling at each apex, and sonar or other system to track the slowly moving oil plume, so that the boats can properly locate the booms. The oil trap device must also have a means for removal of the oil and the natural gas. A second design version has a flexible pyramid cover that is attached by lines to ballast on the ocean floor. This is similar to fixed, metal pyramid oil capture devices in the Santa Barbara Channel off the coast of California. The ballast lines for the improved design, however, would have winches that can move the pyramid to always be located above the oil and gas plume. A third design is a combination of the first two. It uses a submerged pyramid to trap oil, but has no anchor and uses boats to locate the trap. It has ballast weights located along the bottom of the tarp and/or at the corners of the trap. The improved floating oil-spill containment device has a large floating boom and weighted skirt surrounding the oil and gas entrapment area. The device is triangular (or more than three sides) and has a flexible tarp cover with a raised gas vent area. Boats pull on the apex of the triangles to maintain tension and to allow the device to move to optimum locations to trap oil and gas. The gas is retrieved from a higher buoyant part of the tarp, and oil is retrieved from the floating oil layer contained in the device. These devices can be operated in relatively severe weather, since waves will break over the devices without causing oil leaking. Also, natural gas is entrapped and can be retrieved. All designs can use sonar to locate the moving oil plume, and then be relocated by using boats or winches to move the oil trapping devices. These devices can be constructed of treated, non-permeable DuPont Kevlar cloth (or similar material).

  20. Float processing of high-temperature complex silicate glasses and float baths used for same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Reid Franklin (Inventor); Cook, Glen Bennett (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A float glass process for production of high melting temperature glasses utilizes a binary metal alloy bath having the combined properties of a low melting point, low reactivity with oxygen, low vapor pressure, and minimal reactivity with the silicate glasses being formed. The metal alloy of the float medium is exothermic with a solvent metal that does not readily form an oxide. The vapor pressure of both components in the alloy is low enough to prevent deleterious vapor deposition, and there is minimal chemical and interdiffusive interaction of either component with silicate glasses under the float processing conditions. Alloys having the desired combination of properties include compositions in which gold, silver or copper is the solvent metal and silicon, germanium or tin is the solute, preferably in eutectic or near-eutectic compositions.

  1. Secular light curve of 2P/Encke, a comet active at aphelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrín, Ignacio

    2008-09-01

    We present the secular light curve of Comet 2P/Encke in two phase spaces, the log plot, and the time plot. The main conclusions of this work are: (a) The comet shows activity at perihelion and aphelion, caused by two different active areas: Source 1, close to the south pole, active at perihelion, and Source 2, at the north pole, centered at aphelion. (b) More than 18 physical parameters are measured from the secular light curves, many of them new, and are listed in the individual plots of the comet. Specifically we find for Source 1 the location of the turn on and turn off points of activity, R=-1.63±0.03 AU, R=+1.49±0.20 AU, T=-87±5 d, T=+94±15 d, the time lag, LAG(q)=6±1 d, the total active time, T=181±16 d, and the amplitude of the secular light curve, A(1,1)=4.8±0.1 mag. (c) From this information the photometric age and the time-age defined in Ferrín [2005a. Icarus 178, 493-516; 2006. Icarus 185, 523-543], can be calculated, and we find P-AGE = 97 ± 8 comet years and T-AGE = 103 ± 9 comet years (cy). Thus Comet 2P/Encke is an old comet entering the methuselah stage (100 cy < age). (d) The activity at aphelion (Source 2), extends for T=815±30 d and the amplitude of the secular light curve is A(1,Q)=3.0±0.2 mag. (e) From a new phase diagram an absolute magnitude and phase coefficient for the nucleus are determined, and we find R(1,1,0)=15.05±0.14, and β=0.066±0.003. From this data we find a nucleus effective diameter D=5.12(+2.5;-1.7) km. These values are not much different from previous determinations but exhibit smaller errors. (f) The activity of Source 1 is due to H 2O sublimation because it shows curvature. The activity of Source 2 might also be due to H 2O due to the circumstantial situation that the poles point to the Sun at perihelion and aphelion. (g) We found a photometric anomaly at aphelion, with minimum brightness between +393 and +413 days after perihelion that may be an indication of topography. (h) We have re-reduced the 1858 secular light curve of Kamel [1991. Icarus 93, 226-245]. There are secular changes in 7 physical parameters, and we achieve for the first time, an absolute age calibration. We find that the comet entered the inner Solar System and began sublimating in 1645±40 AD. (i) It is concluded that the secular light curve can place constraints on the pole orientation of the nucleus of some comets, and we measure the ecliptic longitude of the south pole of 2P/Encke equal to 213.2±4.5°, in excellent agreement with other determinations of this parameter, but with smaller error. (j) Using the observed absolute magnitude of 1858 and 2003 and a suitable theoretical model, the extinction date of the comet is determined. We obtain ED=2056±3 AD, implying that the comet's lifetime is 125±12 revolutions about the Sun after entering the inner Solar System.

  2. Effects of modal and sectional aerosol representations on aerosol activation and light extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhola, T.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol distribution can be represented in many ways in an aerosol model. Most common one is modal representation, its computationally the most feasible but it also has problems representing the distribution realistically during physical processes. We are currently studying how different distribution representations affect the aerosol activation during cloud formation and also how they affect light extinction. We use modal model with freely moving and size restricted modes, and also a more accurate but significantly computationally heavier sectional model. The results from calculations of cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) and light extinction coefficients are then compared between the models in various different scenarios. Depending on the situation the differences of the CDNC can be significant and in the case of extinction coefficients moderate.

  3. Earthquake lights and the stress-activation of positive hole charge carriers in rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    St-Laurent, F.; Derr, J.S.; Freund, F.T.

    2006-01-01

    Earthquake-related luminous phenomena (also known as earthquake lights) may arise from (1) the stress-activation of positive hole (p-hole) charge carriers in igneous rocks and (2) the accumulation of high charge carrier concentrations at asperities in the crust where the stress rates increase very rapidly as an earthquake approaches. It is proposed that, when a critical charge carrier concentration is reached, the p-holes form a degenerated solid state plasma that can break out of the confined rock volume and propagate as a rapidly expanding charge cloud. Upon reaching the surface the charge cloud causes dielectric breakdown at the air-rock interface, i.e. corona discharges, accompanied by the emission of light and high frequency electromagnetic radiation. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation of hollow porous Cu2O microspheres and photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cu2O p-type semiconductor hollow porous microspheres have been prepared by using a simple soft-template method at room temperature. The morphology of as-synthesized samples is hollow spherical structures with the diameter ranging from 200 to 500?nm, and the surfaces of the spheres are rough, porous and with lots of channels and folds. The photocatalytic activity of degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation was investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy. The results show that the hollow porous Cu2O particles were uniform in diameters and have an excellent ability in visible light-induced degradation of MO. Meanwhile, the growth mechanism of the prepared Cu2O was also analyzed. We find that sodium dodecyl sulfate acted the role of soft templates in the synthesis process. The hollow porous structure was not only sensitive to the soft template but also to the amount of reagents. PMID:22738162

  5. Very Low Frequency Shift Light Scattering from a Sers Active Electrode.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Kevin Francis

    An experiment has been designed to study very low frequency shift (<100 cm('-1)) light scattered from a SERS active electrode. A single mode argon ion laser and an iodine vapor cell were used to achieve a high rejection of elastically scattered light. The particular goal of this thesis was to study the low frequency mode (LFM) found in SERS spectra at (TURN)10 cm('-1). Using a 0.75 m double monochromator to disperse the light and an intensified diode array, spectra were measured in an electrochemical environment from a silver electrode as a function of potential during oxidation-reduction cycles and subsequent voltage sweeps. In addition to the LFM, a large signal, centered on the excitation frequency, was observed and was shown to be inelastic scattering. This inelastically scattered light is attributed to the inelastic background signal which always accompanies SERS spectra. Elastically scattered light, which was diffusely reflected from the silver electrode surface, was also measured by replacing the iodine vapor cell with neutral density filters. By dividing the observed LFM signal by the Bose -Einstein function, the LFM was found to consist of a very broad peak extending from (TURN)3 cm('-1) to (TURN)170 cm('-1). The frequency at which the maximum of the LFM occurred depended on the particular anion present in the electrolyte. For Kl, KBr, KCl, KHPO(,4), and Kl with pyridine, the maximum occurred at 8.6, 12.2, 8.0, 8.8, and 8.4 cm(' -1) respectively. It was found that the intensity of the LFM as a function of potential increased as the voltage was swept negatively. The potential dependence of the LFM intensity was observed to closely correspond to the potential dependence of SERS signals of adsorbed ions and molecules. Further, in the region of potential where SERS signals are irreversibly lost, shifts were observed in the position of the maximum of the LFM with frequency.

  6. An in vitro thermal analysis during different light-activated hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Pereira, T. M.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-09-01

    This study measured the critical temperature reaching time and also the variation of temperature in the surface of the cervical region and within the pulp chamber of human teeth submitted to dental bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by three different light sources. The samples were randomly divided into 3 groups ( n = 15), according to the catalyst light source: Halogen Light (HL), High Intensity Diode Laser (DL), and Light Emmited Diode (LED). The results of temperature variation were submitted to the analysis of variance and Tukey test with p < 0.05. The temperature increase (mean value and standard deviation) inside the pulp chamber for the HL group was 6.8 ± 2.8°C; for the DL group was 15.3 ± 8.8°C; and for the LED group was 1.9 ± 1.0°C for. The temperature variation (mean value and standard deviation) on the tooth surface, for the group irradiated with HL was 9.1 ± 2.2°C; for the group irradiated with DL were 25.7 ± 18.9°C; and for the group irradiated with LED were 2.6 ± 1.4°C. The mean temperature increase values were significantly higher for the group irradiated with DL when compared with groups irradiated with HL and LED ( p < 0.05). When applying the inferior limits of the interval of confidence of 95%, an application time of 38.7 s was found for HL group, and 4.4 s for DL group. The LED group did not achieve the critical temperatures for pulp or the periodontal, even when irradiated for 360 s. The HL and DL light sources may be used for dental bleaching for a short period of time. The LED source did not heat the target tissues significantly within the parameters used in this study.

  7. Functional exchange of components between light-activated photoreceptor phosphodiesterase and hormone-activated adenylate cyclase systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; Wheeler, M.A.; Rasenick, M.M.; Yamazaki, A.; Stein, P.J.; Halliday, K.R.; Wheeler, G.L.

    1982-06-01

    Previous studies have noted profound similarities between the regulation of light-activated (3',5'-cyclic-nucleotide 5'-nucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.17) in retinal rods and hormone-activated adenylate cyclase (ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1) in a variety of tissues. We report ere the functional exchange of components isolated from the photoreceptor system, which displayed predicted functional characteristics when incubated with recipient adenylate cyclase systems from rat cerebral cortical and hypothalamic synaptic membranes and frog erythrocyte ghosts. We demonstrate functional exchange of photoreceptor components at each of three loci: the hormone receptor, the GTP-binding protein (GBP), and the catalytic moiety of adenylate cyclase. Illuminated (but not unilluminated) rhodopsin was found to mimic the hormone-receptor complex, causing GTP-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. The photoreceptor GBP complexed with guanosine 5'-(..beta..,..gamma..)imidotriphosphate (p(NH)ppG) produced a marked activation of recipient adenylate cyclase systems. Much smaller activation was observed when GBP was not complexed with p(NH)ppG. A heat-stable photoreceptor phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduced both basal and Mn/sup 2 +/-activated adenylate cyclase activites and this inhibition was reversed by photoreceptor GBPp(NH)ppG. These data demonstrate a remarkable functional compatibility between subunits of both systems and furthermore imply that specialized peptide domains responsible for protein-protein interactions are highly conserved.

  8. Direct observation of frequency modulated transcription in single cells using light activation

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Daniel R; Fritzsch, Christoph; Sun, Liang; Meng, Xiuhau; Lawrence, David S; Singer, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has revealed that transcription is dynamic and stochastic, but tools are lacking that can determine the mechanism operating at a single gene. Here we utilize single-molecule observations of RNA in fixed and living cells to develop a single-cell model of steroid-receptor mediated gene activation. We determine that steroids drive mRNA synthesis by frequency modulation of transcription. This digital behavior in single cells gives rise to the well-known analog dose response across the population. To test this model, we developed a light-activation technology to turn on a single steroid-responsive gene and follow dynamic synthesis of RNA from the activated locus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00750.001 PMID:24069527

  9. Direct observation of frequency modulated transcription in single cells using light activation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Daniel R; Fritzsch, Christoph; Sun, Liang; Meng, Xiuhau; Lawrence, David S; Singer, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has revealed that transcription is dynamic and stochastic, but tools are lacking that can determine the mechanism operating at a single gene. Here we utilize single-molecule observations of RNA in fixed and living cells to develop a single-cell model of steroid-receptor mediated gene activation. We determine that steroids drive mRNA synthesis by frequency modulation of transcription. This digital behavior in single cells gives rise to the well-known analog dose response across the population. To test this model, we developed a light-activation technology to turn on a single steroid-responsive gene and follow dynamic synthesis of RNA from the activated locus. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00750.001. PMID:24069527

  10. Cost-effectiveness of clustered unit vs. unclustered nurse floating.

    PubMed

    McHugh, M L

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated costs and staffing balance outcomes comparing unrestricted unit floating (UUF) with cluster [by related patient population or technical requirements] unit floating (CUF) practices. Researchers used a computer simulation model with data from a 400 bed VA hospital. Literature suggested a high nurse turnover rate associated with dissatisfaction engendered by forced floating to unfamiliar units. Direct wage cost differences were negligible when UUF and CUF floating patterns were compared, so absolute costs were not the defining issue. UUF staffing patterns produced significantly fewer understaffed shifts (by nursing hours) than CUF floating permitted. The essential quality of care trade-off is between the UUF pattern that provided sufficient nursing hours of care vs. the CUF pattern that provided less absolute availability in hours of nursing care, but a better oriented staff. The author suggests seeking staff input when deciding which of these two floating patterns would be most acceptable in a particular institution. PMID:9416095

  11. The influence of negative ionization of the air on motor activity in Syrian hamsters ( Masocricetus auratus Waterhouse) in light conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkiewicz, Zofia; Dabrowska, Barbara; Schiffer, Zofia

    1989-12-01

    The motor activity of Syrian hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus Waterhouse) under the influence of negative ionization of the atmosphere applied for 10, 20 or 30 min per day was investigated. An ionizer with output of 14000 light negative ions per 1 cm3 of air was used. Studies carried out in the light phase of a 12?12 h light/dark regime revealed a relation between the reaction of the animal and the time of day at which ionization was applied. Ionization for 20 or 30 min in the light phase decreased motor activity, while 10 min of ionization increased it compared to control animals. Ionization in the dark phase gave a more distinct rise in activity than that applied in the light phase for all three durations of ionization.

  12. Floating and fixed artificial habitats: Spatial and temporal patterns of benthic communities in a coral reef environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkol-Finkel, S.; Zilman, G.; Sella, I.; Miloh, T.; Benayahu, Y.

    2008-04-01

    While natural marine habitats with motion capabilities, e.g., kelps and seaweeds, have been studied alongside their associated fouling communities, little is known of the effect of motion on the communities of floating artificial habitats such as buoys, rafts, and pontoons, particularly in tropical systems. Hydrodynamic features greatly differ between floating and fixed artificial substrata, which in turn affect the structure of their associated communities. This study tested the hypothesis that floating and fixed artificial installations in a tropical reef system (Eilat, Red Sea) would support different benthic communities throughout space and time. Specifically, we examined differences in communities recruited onto settlement plates between floating and fixed installations deployed at three different sites, along a two-year monitoring period. The three sites exhibited distinct differences in species assemblages between the monitoring dates (6, 12, 18 and 24 months post deployment), mainly between the first and the last two dates. The average level of dissimilarity between floating and fixed installations increased over time at all sites. Over 50% of the dissimilarity between the floating and fixed installations resulted from five taxonomic groups i.e., bryozoans, bivalves, barnacles, sponges, including the amount of bare space on the settlement plates. The contribution of these groups to the dissimilarity changed both temporally within each site, and spatially among sites. The observed differences were related to the hydrodynamic characteristics of floating and fixed habitats, interacting with biotic features such as predation, successional processes and seasonality; and abiotic features including small-scale spatial changes, light, and position in the water column.

  13. Nonmetal species in the carbon modified TiO2 and its visible light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanfen; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jinlong

    2013-01-01

    A carbon modified TiO2 (CT) was synthesized by hydrolyzing titanium tetrachloride with diethylamine and calcination at 400 °C. CT was then handled with a NaOH aqueous solution elution and a subsequent re-assembling treatment. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) were then used to assess the changes of CT during the whole process. It is revealed that carbon in the CT should mostly be presented as surface deposited organic matters but not likely doped into the TiO2 lattice. CT exhibits obvious visible absorption and high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) under visible light irradiation. Meanwhile, CT photocatalyst possesses excellent stability and reusability. NaOH solution elution washes off a large amount of surface deposited organics and worsens the visible absorbance and photocatalytic activity of CT, which can be well recovered by the re-assembling treatment. The re-assembled photocatalyst, CTSL, exhibits exhibits a very similar photocataytic activity with CT for degradation of DCP under the visible light irradiation, but is much higher than that of CTS.

  14. Experience the magic of light and color: outreach activity by Universidad del Valle student chapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Claudia; Reyes, Camilo; Osorio, Alberto; Solarte, Efrain

    2010-08-01

    During 2007, the Universidad del Valle Student Chapter presented a proposal for developing an educational outreach activity for children from an underprivileged zone to the Optical Society of America Foundation (OSAF) and to SPIE. The activity was carried out jointly by OSA and SPIE Universidad del Valle Student Chapters in the hillsides of Santiago de Cali, in a zone known as "Pueblo Joven" during 2008. It was aimed to boys and girls with ages between 8 and 13 years and was called "Experience the magic of light and color". The main purpose was to bring the children some basic concepts on optics and to encourage them to explore science through optics. The Universidad del Valle Student Chapters designed a series of talks and practical workshops where children participated in hands-on experiments that easily explain the fundamental concepts of light phenomena. Afterwards the children presented their achievements in a small science fair offered to the community and tried to explain in their own words what they learned and built. In this work, we present the most successful experimental designs and the educational standards we tried to develop with this activity.

  15. Effects of light activated in-office bleaching on permeability, microhardness, and mineral content of enamel.

    PubMed

    Parreiras, S O; Vianna, P; Kossatz, S; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the permeability (PE), microhardness (KHN), and mineral change in enamel after LED/laser activated in-office bleaching. For PE, the coronal portion of premolars (n=51) was subjected to bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP Maxx, FGM Dental Products, Joinville, SC, Brazil). The samples were stained via the histochemical method, which involves a copper sulphate solution and rubeanic acid. The penetration of dye into the enamel was measured. The KHN of enamel was assessed before treatment, immediately after the bleaching treatment, and again after one week. The calcium and phosphorus content were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope with energy-dispersive X-ray (JSM 6360LV, Jeol Ltd, Tokyo, Japan). The data set from each test was subjected to appropriate parametric statistical analysis (?=0.05). No significant differences were observed for PE in NLA and LA compared to the control group (p=0.98), as well as for calcium (p=0.16) and phosphorus (p=0.80) content. Significant reduction of KHN after bleaching occurred for both groups (p<0.001). After immersion in artificial saliva, the KHN of the enamel for all groups was similar to that seen before bleaching. Light activation during in-office bleaching does not produce significant changes in the enamel compared to a non-light-activated technique. PMID:24815914

  16. A coronagraph based on two spatial light modulators for active amplitude apodizing and phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Zhen; Chen, Rui; Liu, Chengchao; Yang, Feng; Yang, Chao

    2014-08-01

    Almost all high-contrast imaging coronagraphs proposed until now are based on passive coronagraph optical components. Recently, Ren and Zhu proposed for the first time a coronagraph that integrates a liquid crystal array (LCA) for the active pupil apodizing and a deformable mirror (DM) for the phase corrections. Here, for demonstration purpose, we present the initial test result of a coronagraphic system that is based on two liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLM). In the system, one SLM is served as active pupil apodizing and amplitude correction to suppress the diffraction light; another SLM is used to correct the speckle noise that is caused by the wave-front distortions. In this way, both amplitude and phase error can be actively and efficiently compensated. In the test, we use the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to control two SLMs, which is based on the point spread function (PSF) sensing and evaluation and optimized for a maximum contrast in the discovery area. Finally, it has demonstrated a contrast of 10-6 at an inner working angular distance of ~6.2 ?/D, which is a promising technique to be used for the direct imaging of young exoplanets on ground-based telescopes.

  17. Cognition-Activated Low-Frequency Modulation of Light Absorption in Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, B.; Zhuang, Z.; Unah, C.; Alter, C.; Lipton, L.

    1993-04-01

    Animal model studies indicate light-absorption changes of the exposed animal brain in response to visual stimulation. Here we report observations of red-light absorbancy changes, attributable to repetitive blood concentration changes in response to stimulation in the human brain frontal region by a cognitive process. These responses are observed as low-frequency recurrence of changes by Fourier transform analysis and are attributed to blood concentration change stimulated by the increased metabolic rate of brain tissue in cognitive function. A simple, portable dual wavelength spectrophotometer was attached noninvasively to the human forehead to measure the low frequency and power spectra of fluctuations of absorbancies attributed to variations of brain blood concentration in the frontal region. The responses are associated with brain activity in responses to problem solving of analogies presented visually that require an associative function in the frontal region. The method of subtraction of test - rest Fourier transforms minimizes the arterial pulse frequency contributions and identifies specific frequencies-for example, 0.8, 1.6, 1.8 Hz in 24 of 28 tests of nine individuals (85%). Tests in which no increased brain activity was elicited (rest - rest) showed small differences. It is concluded that low-frequency recurrences of brain activity linked to blood concentration increases can be detected in human subjects with an optical device of potentiality for simplified tests of cognitive function in the 0- to 3-Hz region and with modifications for wider band recordings in localized tissue volumes by time-resolved spectroscopy.

  18. Activation of the General Stress Response of Bacillus subtilis by Visible Light.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Jeroen B; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge for microbiology is to understand how evolution has shaped the wiring of regulatory networks. This is amplified by the paucity of information of power-spectra of physicochemical stimuli to which microorganisms are exposed. Future studies of genome evolution, driven by altered stimulus regimes, will therefore require a versatile signal transduction system that allows accurate signal dosing. Here, we review the general stress response of Bacillus subtilis, and its upstream signal transduction network, as a candidate system. It can be activated by red and blue light, and by many additional stimuli. Signal integration therefore is an intricate function of this system. The blue-light response is elicited via the photoreceptor YtvA, which forms an integral part of stressosomes, to activate expression of the stress regulon of B. subtilis. Signal transfer through this network can be assayed with reporter enzymes, while intermediate steps can be studied with live-cell imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins. Different parts of this system have been studied in vitro, such that its computational modeling has made significant progress. One can directly relate the microscopic characteristics of YtvA with activation of the general stress regulon, making this system a very well-suited system for network evolution studies. PMID:26189730

  19. A Light-Controlled TLR4 Agonist and Selectable Activation of Cell Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Stutts, Lalisa; Esser-Kahn, Aaron P

    2015-08-17

    The spatial and temporal aspects of immune cell signaling are key parameters in defining the magnitude of an immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on innate immune cells are important in the early detection of pathogens and initiation of an immune response. Controlling the spatial and temporal signaling of TLRs would enable further study of immune synergies and assist in the development of new vaccines. Here, we show a light-based method for the spatial control of TLR4 signaling. A TLR4 agonist, pyrimido[5,4-b]indole, was protected with a cage at a position critical for receptor binding. This afforded a photocontrollable agonist that was inactive while caged, yet effected NF-?B activity in cells following UV photocontrolled deprotection. We demonstrated spatial control of NF-?B activation within a population of cells by treating all cells with the caged TLR4 agonist and constraining light exposure and consequent activation to a region of interest. PMID:26097006

  20. Monolithic crystalline cladding microstructures for efficient light guiding and beam manipulation in passive and active regimes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuechen; Cheng, Chen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Castillo, Gabriel R.; Rabes, Blanca del Rosal; Tan, Yang; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Miniature laser sources with on-demand beam features are desirable devices for a broad range of photonic applications. Lasing based on direct-pump of miniaturized waveguiding active structures offers a low-cost but intriguing solution for compact light-emitting devices. In this work, we demonstrate a novel family of three dimensional (3D) photonic microstructures monolithically integrated in a Nd:YAG laser crystal wafer. They are produced by the femtosecond laser writing, capable of simultaneous light waveguiding and beam manipulation. In these guiding systems, tailoring of laser modes by both passive/active beam splitting and ring-shaped transformation are achieved by an appropriate design of refractive index patterns. Integration of graphene thin-layer as saturable absorber in the 3D laser structures allows for efficient passive Q-switching of tailored laser radiations which may enable miniature waveguiding lasers for broader applications. Our results pave a way to construct complex integrated passive and active laser circuits in dielectric crystals by using femtosecond laser written monolithic photonic chips. PMID:25100561