Science.gov

Sample records for floating water bridge

  1. A floating water bridge produces water with excess charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Elmar C.; Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D.; Kuntke, Philipp; Woisetschläger, Jakob

    2016-03-01

    Excess positive and negative Bjerrum-defect like charge (protonic and ‘aterprotonic’, from ancient Greek ἄ'τɛρ, ‘without’) in anolyte and catholyte of high voltage electrolysis of highly pure water was found during the so-called ‘floating water bridge’ experiment. The floating water bridge is a special case of an electrohydrodynamic liquid bridge and constitutes an intriguing phenomenon that occurs when a high potential difference (~kV cm-1) is applied between two beakers of water. To obtain such results impedance spectroscopy was used. This measurement technique allows the depiction and simulation of complex aqueous systems as simple electric circuits. In the present work we show that there is an additional small contribution from the difference in conductivity between anolyte and catholyte which cannot be measured with a conductivity meter, but is clearly visible in an impedance spectrum.

  2. Proton production, neutralisation and reduction in a floating water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D.; Kuntke, Philipp; Wiltsche, Helmar; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Lankmayr, Ernst; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C.

    2015-10-01

    This work reports on proton production, transport, reduction and neutralization in floating aqueous bridges under the application of a high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’). Recently possible mechanisms for proton transfer through the bridge were suggested. In this work we visualize and describe the production of protons in the anolyte and their neutralization in the catholyte. Apart from that, protons are reduced to hydrogen due to electrolysis. Microbubbles are detached instantly, due to the electrohydrodynamic flow at the electrode surface. No larger, visible bubbles are formed and the system degasses through the bridge due to its higher local temperature. A detailed analysis of trace elements originating from beaker material, anode or the atmosphere is presented, showing that their influence on the overall conduction compared to the contribution of protons is negligible. Finally, an electrochemical rationale of high voltage electrolysis of low ionic strength solutions is presented.

  3. Investigation of the mid-infrared emission of a floating water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Elmar C.; Cherukupally, Anvesh; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H.; Agostinho, Luewton L. F.; Wexler, Adam D.; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Freund, Friedemann T.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the infrared emission of aqueous bridges under the application of high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’) over the range between 400 and 2500 cm-1 (4.0-10.3 µm). Comparison with bulk water of the same temperature reveals an additional broad peak at ˜2200 cm-1 as well as water vapour emission lines. Two complementary explanations are presented for the broad peak: first, a cooperative proton transfer comprising an orientational motion along the direction of conduction is suggested. Second, the electrolysis-less current flow is explained by a proton/defect-proton band mechanism, which is in line with the cooperative proton transfer. The water vapour emissions occur due to collision ionization of space charges with micro- and nano-droplets which are electrosprayed from the liquid/gas interface.

  4. The behaviour of a floating water bridge under reduced gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Elmar C.; Agostinho, Luewton L. F.; Wexler, Adam; Wagterveld, R. Martijn; Tuinstra, Jan; Woisetschläger, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    When high voltage is applied to pure water filled into two beakers close to each other, a connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge (Armstrong 1893 The Electrical Engineer pp 154-45, Uhlig W 2005 personal communication, Fuchs et al 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 6112-4, Fuchs et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 185502, Fuchs et al 2009 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 065502, Fuchs et al 2010 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 43 105502, Woisetschläger et al 2010 Exp. Fluids 48 121-31, Nishiumi and Honda 2009 Res. Lett. Phys. Chem. 2009 371650). This phenomenon is of special interest, since it comprises a number of phenomena currently tackled in modern water science. In this work, the behaviour of this phenomenon under reduced gravity conditions during a parabolic flight is presented by the means of high speed imaging with fringe projection. An analysis of the behaviour is presented and compared with theoretical considerations.

  5. Floating liquid bridge charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez; Gomes, Whyllerson Evaristo; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of liquid with electric fields is investigated in a configuration where up to 13 kV are applied between electrodes resulting in a 106 V/m electric field in the capillaries and where there is the formation of a free-standing fluid bridge in the interelectrode gap. The Mott-Gurney equation was fitted to the measured ionization current vs applied voltage curve which indicates that the ionization rate at the high-voltage anode electrode dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) interface and space charging in the interelectrode gap determine the floating liquid bridge current for a given cathode-to-anode voltage. Space charge effects were measured in the cathode becker and also at the liquid bridge since the ionized charges at the anode migrate to the bridge outer surface and decrease the interfacial tension from 43 mJ/m2 to 29 mJ/m2. Two distinct structural regions then form the bridge, a charged plastic (bulk modulus ˜100 MPa) conducting outer layer with a surface conductivity of ˜10-9 Ω-1, which shapes and supports the floating fluid structure, and an inner liquid cylinder, where DMSO molecules flow.

  6. Floating and flying ferrofluid bridges induced by external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongchao; Zhou, Yixin; Liu, Jing

    2015-04-01

    A ferrofluid is a mixture that exhibits both magnetism and fluidity. This merit enables the ferrofluid to be used in a wide variety of areas. Here we show that a floating ferrofluid bridge can be induced between two separated boards under a balanced external magnetic field generated by two magnets, while a flying ferrofluid bridge can be induced under an unbalanced external magnetic field generated by only one magnet. The mechanisms of the ferrofluid bridges were discussed and the corresponding mathematical equations were also established to describe the interacting magnetic force between the ferro particles inside the ferrofluid. This work answered a basic question that, except for the well-known floating water bridges that are related to electricity, one can also build up a liquid bridge that is related to magnetism.

  7. Floating liquid bridge tensile behavior: Electric-field-induced Young's modulus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, Omar; Mendez Soares, David; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz

    2013-12-01

    A floating bridge is formed spontaneously when high voltage is applied to polar fluids in two capillary tubes that were in contact and then separated. This bridge bends under its own weight, and its bending profile was used to calculate its Young's modulus. For electric field intensities of ˜106 V/m, water bridges exhibit viscoelastic behavior, with Young's moduli of ˜24 MPa; dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) bridges exhibited Young's moduli of ˜60 kPa. The scheme devised to measure the voltage drop across the water bridge for high voltages applied between the electrodes shows that the bulk water resistance decreases with increasing voltage.

  8. 77 FR 35900 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in... provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float- in and... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of...

  9. 77 FR 43557 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ...The Coast Guard proposes establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of the Elizabeth River in Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Chesapeake, VA. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float- in and bridge construction of span placement. This action is intended to restrict vessel traffic movement to protect mariners......

  10. Drill vessels float in aerated water

    SciTech Connect

    Hammett, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Model tests, calculations, and case studies prove that a floating vessel will not sink due to gas reducing the water density in or adjacent to a subsea blowout. Several floating drill vessels have been lost as a result of subsea blowouts. Reports have circulated that the rig sank into something similar to a hole in the ocean caused by gas bubbles suspended in the water reducing its specific gravity. These erroneous reports, believed as truth by many people, have resulted in the modification of operations resulting in decreased safety. Several subsea well control operations have caused accidents and losses because the riser was not disconnected. This action was taken in fear of sinking in aerated water. The losses occurred because the vessel winched itself off the drill site to get away from the subsea well before disconnecting. Due to the high riser/BOP angle, the riser could not be disconnected and well control was later lost and the gas/oil flowed directly to the rig floor where massive fire/explosion damage occurred. If there had been a better understanding of water density, the rig personnel could have closed all hatches, shut-down all engines, disconnected the riser and released mooring lines at one end of the rig, and safely removed the rig out of the aerated water. This paper presents some of the technical data and references available which prove that a floating vessel will not sink due to loss of water density.

  11. Estimation of Structure-Borne Noise Reduction Effect of Steel Railway Bridge Equipped with Floating Ladder Track and Floating Reinforced-Concrete Deck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Sogabe, Masamichi; Asanuma, Kiyoshi; Wakui, Hajime

    A number of steel railway bridges have been constructed in Japan. Thin steel members used for the bridges easily tend to vibrate and generate structure-borne noise. Accordingly, the number of constructions of steel railway bridges tends to decrease in the urban areas from a viewpoint of environmental preservation. Then, as a countermeasure against structure-borne noise generated from steel railway bridges, we have developed a new type of the steel railway bridge equipped with a floating-ladder track and a floating reinforced-concrete (RC) deck. As a result of train-running experiment, it became apparent that the new steel railway bridge installed by double floating system has reduced a vibration velocity level by 10.5 dB(A) at main girder web as compared with a steel railway bridge installed by directly fastened track. This reduction effect was achieved by the ladder track and RC deck supported by resilient materials.

  12. 77 FR 44544 - Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-In, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-In... notice of proposed rulemaking entitled ``Safety Zone; Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Chesapeake, Virginia'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 43557)....

  13. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline must... controls, and (2) The flotation system armed when the helicopter is over water and is flying at a...

  14. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline must... controls, and (2) The flotation system armed when the helicopter is over water and is flying at a...

  15. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline must... controls, and (2) The flotation system armed when the helicopter is over water and is flying at a...

  16. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline must... controls, and (2) The flotation system armed when the helicopter is over water and is flying at a...

  17. 14 CFR 136.11 - Helicopter floats for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Helicopter floats for over water. 136.11... floats for over water. (a) A helicopter used in commercial air tours over water beyond the shoreline must... controls, and (2) The flotation system armed when the helicopter is over water and is flying at a...

  18. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  19. 26. Mechanical float gages used to monitor level of water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Mechanical float gages used to monitor level of water in the filtration bed reservoir. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  20. 77 FR 75016 - Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... around the Gilmerton Bridge center span barge (77 FR 73541). Inadvertently, this rule included an error... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in... Federal Register an interim temporary final rule establishing a safety zone around the Gilmerton...

  1. 77 FR 73541 - Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River; Norfolk, Portsmouth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Gilmerton Bridge Area (77 FR 43557) on September 5-9, 2012. We received no comments on the proposed rule... CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: Gilmerton Bridge Center Span Float-in, Elizabeth River...-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR...

  2. 16. EAST ELEVATION OF FLOAT HOUSE AND FISH WATER RELEASE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. EAST ELEVATION OF FLOAT HOUSE AND FISH WATER RELEASE OUTLET. PART OF ENERGY DISSIPATING BAFFLE PIER SYSTEM IS VISIBLE AT LEFT. - Pit 4 Diversion Dam, Pit River west of State Highway 89, Big Bend, Shasta County, CA

  3. Evaporation dynamics of femtoliter water capillary bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Kim, Jung Gu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in confined space between two solid surfaces and particularly they have lower internal pressure than 1 atm at femtoliter scales. Femtoliter capillary bridges exhibit rapid evaporation rates. To quantify detailed evaporation kinetics of femtoliter bridges, we present a feasible protocol to directly visualize femtoliter water bridges that evaporate in still air between a microsphere and a flat substrate by utilizing transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation kinetics for water bridges indicate that lower water pressure than 1 atm can significantly decelerate evaporation by suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding would provide a consensus to understand evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges.

  4. Water rolling and floating upon water: marbles supported by a water/marble interface.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Musin, Albina

    2009-05-01

    Floating of liquid marbles on a water/air interface was studied. The critical density allowing floating marbles containing NaCl solution was established experimentally and compared with its calculated value. A satisfactory agreement between experimental and theoretical values of the critical density is reported. PMID:19251263

  5. Theory of water and charged liquid bridges.

    PubMed

    Morawetz, K

    2012-08-01

    The phenomenon of liquid bridge formation due to an applied electric field is investigated. A solution of a charged catenary is presented, which allows one to determine the static and dynamical stability conditions where charged liquid bridges are possible. The creeping height, the bridge radius and length, as well as the shape of the bridge are calculated showing an asymmetric profile, in agreement with observations. The flow profile is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equation leading to a mean velocity, which combines charge transport with neutral mass flow and which describes recent experiments on water bridges. PMID:23005849

  6. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    Floating fens are valuable wetlands, found in North-Western Europe, that are formed by floating root mats when old turf ponds are colonized by plants. These terrestrialization ecosystems are known for their biodiversity and the presence of rare plant species, and the root mats reveal different vegetation zones at a small scale. The vegetation zones are a result of strong gradients in abiotic conditions, including groundwater dynamics, nutrients and pH. To prevent irreversible drought effects such as land subsidence and mineralization of peat, water management involves import of water from elsewhere to maintain constant surface water levels. Imported water may have elevated levels of salinity during dry summers, and salt exposure may threaten the vegetation. To assess the risk of exposure of the rare plant species to salinity, the hydrology of such root mats must be understood. Physical properties of root mats have scarcely been investigated. We have measured soil characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, vertical root mat movement and groundwater dynamics in a floating root mat in the nature reserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, in the Netherlands. The root mat mostly consists of roots and organic material, in which the soil has a high saturated water content, and strongly varies in its stage of decomposition. We have found a distinct negative correlation between degree of decomposition and hydraulic conductivity, similar to observations for bogs in the literature. Our results show that the relatively young, thin edge of the root mat that colonizes the surface water has a high hydraulic conductivity and floats in the surface water, resulting in very small groundwater fluctuations within the root mat. The older part of the root mat, that is connected to the deeper peat layers is hydrologically more isolated and the material has a lower conductivity. Here, the groundwater fluctuates strongly with atmospheric forcing. The zones of hydraulic properties and vegetation, appear to

  7. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinsky, T.; Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2002-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured. The TPASS includes a square-cross-section aluminum rod 28 in. (approx. = 71 cm) long with floats attached at both ends. Each float includes five polystyrene foam disks about 3/4 in. (approx. = 1.9 cm) thick and 2.5 in. (approx. = 6.4 cm) in diameter. The disks are stacked to form cylinders, bolted to the rod, and covered with hollow plastic sleeves. A metal sleeve is clamped to the middle of the aluminum rod, from whence it hangs down into the water. Temperature probes (which can be thermocouples, thermistors, or resistance temperature devices) are placed within the sleeve at the desired measurement depths. Wires from the temperature probes are routed to the input terminals of a data logger. This work was done by Randy

  8. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2002-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured. The TPASS includes a square-cross-section aluminum rod 28 in. (=71 cm) long with floats attached at both ends. Each float includes five polystyrene foam disks about 3/4 in.(=1.9 cm) thick and 2.5 in. (=6.4 cm) in diameter. The disks are stacked to form cylinders, bolted to the rod, and covered with hollow plastic sleeves. A metal sleeve is clamped to the middle of the aluminum rod, from whence it hangs down into the water. Temperature probes (which can be thermocouples, thermistors, or resistance temperature devices) are placed within the sleeve at the desired measurement depths. Wires from the temperature probes are routed to the input terminals of a data logger.

  9. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2003-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. These types of measurements are used in computer models to relate remotely sensed water-surface temperature to bulkwater temperature. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured.

  10. Apparatus for removing oil and other floating contaminants from a moving body of water

    DOEpatents

    Strohecker, J.W.

    1973-12-18

    The patent describes a process in which floating contaminants such as oil and solid debris are removed from a moving body of water by employing a skimming system which uses the natural gravitational flow of the water. A boom diagonally positioned across the body of water diverts the floating contaminants over a floating weir and into a retention pond where an underflow weir is used to return contaminant-free water to the moving body of water. The floating weir is ballasted to maintain the contaminant-receiving opening therein slightly below the surface of the water during fluctuations in the water level for skimming the contaminants with minimal water removal.

  11. Performance of floating oil booms in unsheltered waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Gregorio; Castro, Alberte

    2013-04-01

    Oil booms are a fundamental tool to diminish the impact of an oil spill. They tend to perform reasonably well in sheltered waters, e.g. within a harbour. However, their performance is often inadequate in open water conditions, under waves, winds and currents. And it is precisely in those conditions that they are needed if oil slicks are to be prevented from reaching certain particularly sensitive areas, such as estuaries, rias, etc. (Castro et al., 2010; Iglesias et al., 2010). In this work the performance of floating oil booms under waves and currents is assessed on the basis of laboratory experiments carried out in a state-of-the-art wave-current flume. Different oil boom models are used, representative of booms with long and short skirts and with different weights. The results show that different booms behave very differently under waves and currents, hence the importance of selecting the boom design that is appropriate for the actual conditions under which it will have to contain the oil slick. Thus, different oil booms should be used for different areas. References A. Castro, G. Iglesias, R. Carballo, J.A. Fraguela, 2010. Floating boom performance under waves and currents, Journal of Hazardous Materials 174, 226-235 G. Iglesias, A.Castro, J.A.Fraguela, 2010. Artificial intelligence applied to floating boom behavior under waves and currents, Ocean Engineering 37, 1513-1521.

  12. Bridge over Troubled Water: Guidance Crosses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundson, Norm

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on a keynote presentation at an international conference where the focus was cross-over career guidance. Simon and Garfunkel's popular song, "Bridge over troubled water", was used as a metaphor for exploring the cross-over theme. Some of the concepts under consideration included the working alliance, the importance of a…

  13. Tasman Leakage of intermediate waters as inferred from Argo floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosell-Fieschi, Miquel; Rintoul, Stephen R.; Gourrion, Jeröme; Pelegrí, Josep L.

    2013-10-01

    use Argo float trajectories to infer ocean current velocity at the sea surface and 1000 dbar near Australia. The East Australian Current flows southward along the east coast of Australia at both surface and intermediate levels, but only the intermediate waters leak round the southern tip of Tasmania and cross the Great Australian Bight. We calculate the transport of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) between the southern Australian coast and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) as the velocity at 1000 dbar times the layer thickness. Between March 2006 and December 2012, the Eulerian AAIW transport through 147°E ranges between 0 and 12.0 sverdrup (Sv). The mean Tasman Leakage of intermediate waters from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean, obtained using all Argo data until March 2013, is 3.8 ± 1.3 Sv. The mean intermediate water transport into the Indian Ocean through 115°E increases to 5.2 ± 1.8 Sv due to contributions from the westward recirculation of ACC waters.

  14. A Floating Bridge Disrupts Seaward Migration and Increases Mortality of Steelhead Smolts in Hood Canal, Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Megan; Berejikian, Barry A.; Tezak, Eugene P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Habitat modifications resulting from human transportation and power-generation infrastructure (e.g., roads, dams, bridges) can impede movement and alter natural migration patterns of aquatic animal populations, which may negatively affect survival and population viability. Full or partial barriers are especially problematic for migratory species whose life histories hinge on habitat connectivity. Methodology/Principal Findings The Hood Canal Bridge, a floating structure spanning the northern outlet of Hood Canal in Puget Sound, Washington, extends 3.6 meters underwater and forms a partial barrier for steelhead migrating from Hood Canal to the Pacific Ocean. We used acoustic telemetry to monitor migration behavior and mortality of steelhead smolts passing four receiver arrays and several single receivers within the Hood Canal, Puget Sound, and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Twenty-seven mortality events were detected within the vicinity of the Hood Canal Bridge, while only one mortality was recorded on the other 325 receivers deployed throughout the study area. Migrating steelhead smolts were detected at the Hood Canal Bridge array with greater frequency, on more receivers, and for longer durations than smolts migrating past three comparably configured arrays. Longer migration times and paths are likely to result in a higher density of smolts near the bridge in relation to other sites along the migration route, possibly inducing an aggregative predator response to steelhead smolts. Conclusions/Significance This study provides strong evidence of substantial migration interference and increased mortality risk associated with the Hood Canal Bridge, and may partially explain low early marine survival rates observed in Hood Canal steelhead populations. Understanding where habitat modifications indirectly increase predation pressures on threatened populations helps inform potential approaches to mitigation. PMID:24039937

  15. Photo-active float for field water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Shwetharani, R; Balakrishna, R Geetha

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the antibacterial activity of a photoactive float fabricated with visible light active N-F-TiO2 for the disinfection of field water widely contaminated with Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria like, Salmonella typhimurium (Gram negative), Escherichia coli (Gram negative), Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive), Bacillus species (Gram positive), and Pseudomonas species (Gram negative). The antibacterial activity can be attributed to the unique properties of the photocatalyst, which releases reactive oxygen species in aqueous solution, under the illumination of sunlight. N-F-TiO2 nanoparticles efficiently photocatalyse the destruction of all the bacteria present in the contaminated water, giving clean water. The inactivation of bacteria is confirmed by a standard plate count method, MDA, RNA and DNA analysis. The purity of water was further validated by SPC indicating nil counts of bacteria after two days of storing and testing. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, BET measurement, SEM, EDX, UV-Vis and PL analysis. PMID:26924232

  16. Electrowetting in a water droplet with a movable floating substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Amir; Masud, A. R.; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-05-01

    Electrowetting (EW) enables facile manipulation of a liquid droplet on a hydrophobic surface. In this study, manipulation of an electrolyte droplet having a small floating object on it was investigated on a solid hydrophobic substrate under the EW process. Herein, the floating object exhibited a vertical motion under an applied electric field owing to the spreading and contraction of the droplet on its connecting substrates. The field-induced height variation of the floating object was significantly influenced by the thicknesses of the dielectric and hydrophobic materials. A small mass was also placed on the top floating object and its effect on the spreading of the droplet was observed. In this system, the height of the top floating object is precisely controllable under the application of an electric voltage. The proposed system is expected to be highly useful in the design of nano- and micro-oscillatory systems for microengineering.

  17. Electrowetting in a water droplet with a movable floating substrate.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Amir; Masud, A R; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-05-01

    Electrowetting (EW) enables facile manipulation of a liquid droplet on a hydrophobic surface. In this study, manipulation of an electrolyte droplet having a small floating object on it was investigated on a solid hydrophobic substrate under the EW process. Herein, the floating object exhibited a vertical motion under an applied electric field owing to the spreading and contraction of the droplet on its connecting substrates. The field-induced height variation of the floating object was significantly influenced by the thicknesses of the dielectric and hydrophobic materials. A small mass was also placed on the top floating object and its effect on the spreading of the droplet was observed. In this system, the height of the top floating object is precisely controllable under the application of an electric voltage. The proposed system is expected to be highly useful in the design of nano- and micro-oscillatory systems for microengineering. PMID:27300973

  18. 3D flexible water channel: stretchability of nanoscale water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jige; Wang, Chunlei; Wei, Ning; Wan, Rongzheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Artificial water channels can contribute to a better understanding of natural water channels and offer a highly selective, advanced conductance system. Most studies use nanotubes, however it is difficult to fabricate a flexible structure, and the nanosized diameter brings nanoconfinement effects, and nanotube toxicity arouses biosafety concerns. In this paper, we use an electric field to restrain the water molecules to form a nanoscale water bridge as an artificial water channel to connect a separated solid plate by molecular dynamics simulations. We observe strong 3D flexible stretchability in the water bridge, maintaining a variable length and an arbitrary angle for a considerably long time. The stretching of the water bridge enables it to be polarized at an arbitrary angle and the stretchability is linearly dependent upon the polarization strength. More interestingly, we show the possibility of establishing complex water networks, e.g., triangle, rectangle, hexagon, and tetrahedron-tetrahedron water networks. Our results may help realize structurally flexible and environmentally friendly water channels for lab-on-a-chip applications in nanofluidics.Artificial water channels can contribute to a better understanding of natural water channels and offer a highly selective, advanced conductance system. Most studies use nanotubes, however it is difficult to fabricate a flexible structure, and the nanosized diameter brings nanoconfinement effects, and nanotube toxicity arouses biosafety concerns. In this paper, we use an electric field to restrain the water molecules to form a nanoscale water bridge as an artificial water channel to connect a separated solid plate by molecular dynamics simulations. We observe strong 3D flexible stretchability in the water bridge, maintaining a variable length and an arbitrary angle for a considerably long time. The stretching of the water bridge enables it to be polarized at an arbitrary angle and the stretchability is linearly

  19. Floating production system for deep waters, marginal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    Concrete platform expertise developed by Norwegian Contractors has been applied to a floating production concept thought to offer considerable potential for marginal and deep-water oil fields. The design is based on a multicell Monotower solution and represents the outcome of studies reaching back to 1978. This work has focused chiefly on devising a production system for Gulf's gas/condensate discovery in 380 m water on Norwegian North Sea Block 35/8. Components covered by the conceptual design study include the catenary anchored concrete floater with condensate storage, subsea and riser systems for high-pressure gas production and topside facilities for gas and condensate treatment. A system also has been developed for periodic direct loading of condensate into a shuttle tanker, which is allowed to weathervane through 360/sup 0/ around the platform. Claimed to offer better motion characteristics than a conventional semisubmersible, the weight-stable platform comprises a series of cylindrical columns arranged in a circle, an inner ring of moonpool cells and a cantilevered base for storage.

  20. Water-Floating Giant Nanosheets from Helical Peptide Pentamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehun; Nam, Ki Tae

    One of the important challenges in the development of protein-mimetic materials is to understand the sequence specific assembly behavior and the dynamic folding change. Conventional strategies to construct two dimensional nanostructures from the peptides have been limited to beta-sheet forming sequences in use of basic building blocks because of their natural tendency to form sheet like aggregations. Here we identified a new peptide sequence, YFCFY that can form dimers by the disulfide bridge, fold into helix and assemble into macroscopic flat sheet at the air/water interface. Because of large driving force for two dimensional assembly and high elastic modulus of the resulting sheet, the peptide assembly induces the flattening of initially round water droplet. Additionally, we found that stabilization of helix by the dimerization is a key determinant for maintaining macroscopic flatness over a few tens centimeter even with a uniform thickness below 10 nm. Furthermore, the capability to transfer 2D film from water droplet to other substrates allows for the multiple stacking of 2D peptide nanostructure, suggesting possible applications in the biomimetic catalysts, biosensor and 2D related electronic devices. This work was supported by Samsung Research Funding Center of Samsung Electronics under Project Number SRFC-MA1401-01.

  1. A structural homologue of colipase in black mamba venom revealed by NMR floating disulphide bridge analysis.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, J; Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M; Jaquinod, M; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M; Marion, D

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of mamba intestinal toxin 1 (MIT1), isolated from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom, has been determined. This molecule is a cysteine-rich polypeptide exhibiting no recognised family membership. Resistance to MIT1 to classical specific endoproteases produced contradictory NMR and biochemical information concerning disulphide-bridge topology. We have used distance restraints allowing ambiguous partners between S atoms in combination with NMR-derived structural information, to correctly determine the disulphide-bridge topology. The resultant solution structure of MIT1, determined to a resolution of 0.5 A, reveals an unexpectedly similar global fold with respect to colipase, a protein involved in fatty acid digestion. Colipase exhibits an analogous resistance to endoprotease activity, indicating for the first time the possible topological origins of this biochemical property. The biochemical and structural homology permitted us to propose a mechanically related digestive function for MIT1 and provides novel information concerning snake venom protein evolution. PMID:9761684

  2. Effective Removal of Nitrogen and Phosphorus from Surface Water Using Constructed Comprehensive Floating Remediation Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Bai, S.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorus are the chief pollutants of our aquatic systems which may be resulted from different contamination sources and could cause serious environmental and ecological problems. For example, nitrate contamination of the water systems from agricultural practices may be contributing to the eutrophication of the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA, degrading water quality and aquatic habitats. Effective approaches for removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from our aquatic systems, particularly from surface water, is called for imminently. An in-situ remediation measure by constructed floating remediation islands has been developed and tested through the field experiments recently. Four pilot-scale settings with the different components and structures were constructed and operated in parallel in which a new type of the constructed floating remediation islands with multi-layers of substrate fillers, called the constructed multi-layer comprehensive floating remediation island, was included. The contaminated water taken directly from a river containing richly nitrogen and phosphorus was used for those experiments. The experiment results obtained from the four different experiment settings were examined. It was noticed that the degradation rates of both nitrogen and phosphorus in water in the setting with the constructed multi-layer comprehensive floating remediation island was greater than those in others. The mean removal rate of phosphorous in the experiment setting with the constructed multi-layer comprehensive floating remediation island was considerably higher than the removal rates of phosphorous in the other three experiment settings.

  3. Floating seaweed in the neustonic environment: A case study from Belgian coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandendriessche, Sofie; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2006-02-01

    Floating seaweeds form the most important natural component of all floating material found on the surface of oceans and seas. Notwithstanding the absence of natural rocky shores, ephemeral floating seaweed clumps are frequently encountered along the Belgian coast. From October 2002 to April 2003, seaweed samples and control samples (i.e. surface water samples from a seaweed-free area) were collected every other week. Multivariate analysis on neustonic macrofaunal abundances showed significant differences between seaweed and control samples in the fraction > 1 mm. Differences were less conspicuous in the 0.5-1 mm fraction. Seaweed samples were characterised by the presence of seaweed fauna e.g. Acari, Idotea baltica, Gammarus sp ., while control samples mainly contained Calanoida, Larvacea, Chaetognatha, and planktonic larvae of crustaceans and polychaetes. Seaweed samples (1 mm fraction) harboured considerably higher diversities (× 3), densities (× 18) and biomasses (× 49) compared to the surrounding water column (control samples). The impact of floating seaweeds on the neustonic environment was quantified by the calculation of the added values of seaweed samples considering biomass and density. These calculations resulted in mean added values of 311 ind m - 2 in density and 305 mg ADW m - 2 in biomass. The association degree per species was expressed as the mean percentage of individuals found in seaweed samples in proportion to the total density and biomass of that species (seaweed samples + control samples). Thirteen species showed an association percentage > 95%, and can therefore be considered members of the floating seaweed fauna.

  4. [N and P removal characters of eutrophic water body under planted float].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoping; Wang, Jianguo; Xue, Lihong; Xu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Linzhang

    2005-11-01

    The study on the N and P removal and N2O release of eutrophic water body under planted float Ipomoea aquatica and Oenanthe javanica showed that planted float had a good effect on the removal of N and P from eutrophic water body. The bioaccumulation of N and P by the plants accounted for 40.32% approximately 63.87% of the N and P removal, respectively, suggesting that plant uptake was the main removal process. Within the treating period, there was a rapid and sufficient nitrification but a slow and insufficient denitrification in the planted float system, and thereby, planted float system had a high NH4+-N removal rate and NO3(-)-N accumulation. The presence of planted float reduced the release flux of N2O, which was 17.14 microg N x m(-2) x h(-1) for Ipomoea aquatica, 37.38 microg N x m(-2) x h(-1) for Oenanthe javanica, and 85.08 microg N x m(-2) x h(-1) for the control. PMID:16471367

  5. Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  6. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, X.; L'Hegaret, P.; Baraille, R.

    2012-03-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, a few aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described. The Red Sea Outflow Water (RSOW) is concentrated in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found in this area at depths between 600 and 1000 m. RSOW is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, where intense and relatively barotropic gyres mix it with Indian ocean Central Water. RSOW is also detected along the northeastern coast of Socotra, and fragments of RSOW are found between one and three degrees of latitude north of this island. In the whole Gulf of Aden, the correlation between the deep motions of the floats and the sea-level anomaly measured by altimetry is strong, at regional scale. The finer scale details of the float trajectories are not sampled by altimetry and are often related to the anomalous water masses that the floats encounter. The Persian Gulf Water (PGW) is found in the float profiles near Ras ash Sharbatat (near 57° E, 18° N), again with 36.5 in salinity and about 18-19 °C in temperature. These observations were achieved in winter when the southwestward monsoon currents can advect PGW along the South Arabian coast. Fragments of PGW were also observed in the Arabian Sea between 18 and 20° N and 63 and 65° E in summer, showing that this water mass can escape the Gulf of Oman southeastward, during that season. Kinetic energy distributions of floats with respect to distance or angle share common features between the two regions (Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea), in particular peaks at 30, 50 and 150 km scales and along the axis of monsoon currents. Hydrological measurements by floats are also influenced by the seasonal variations of PGW and RSOW in these regions.

  7. Nitrate removal from polluted water by using a vegetated floating system.

    PubMed

    Bartucca, Maria Luce; Mimmo, Tanja; Cesco, Stefano; Del Buono, Daniele

    2016-01-15

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) water pollution is one of the most prevailing and relevant ecological issues. For instance, the wide presence of this pollutant in the environment is dramatically altering the quality of superficial and underground waters. Therefore, we set up a floating bed vegetated with a terrestrial herbaceous species (Italian ryegrass) with the aim to remediate hydroponic solutions polluted with NO3(-). The floating bed allowed the plants to grow and achieve an adequate development. Ryegrass was not affected by the treatments. On the contrary, plant biomass production and total nitrogen content (N-K) increased proportionally to the amount of NO3(-) applied. Regarding to the water cleaning experiments, the vegetated floating beds permitted to remove almost completely all the NO3(-) added from the hydroponic solutions with an initial concentration of 50, 100 and 150 mg L(-1). Furthermore, the calculation of the bioconcentration factor (BCF) indicated this species as successfully applicable for the remediation of solutions polluted by NO3(-). In conclusion, the results highlight that the combination of ryegrass and the floating bed system resulted to be effective in the remediation of aqueous solutions polluted by NO3(-). PMID:26562338

  8. Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea as revealed by ARGO floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, X.; L'Hegaret, P.

    2011-06-01

    By analysing ARGO float data over the last four years, some aspects of the mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian Sea are described. The Red Sea Water outflow is strong in the Southwestern Gulf of Aden, in particular when a cyclonic gyre predominates in this region. Salinities of 36.5 and temperatures of 16 °C are found there between 600 and 1000 m depths. The Red Sea Water is more dilute in the eastern part of the Gulf, and fragments of this water mass can be advected offshore across the gulf or towards its northern coast by the regional gyres. The Red Sea Water outflow is also detected along the northeastern coast of Socotra, and fragments of RSW are found between one and three degrees of latitude north of this island. In the whole Gulf of Aden, the correlation between the deep motions of the floats and the SSH measured by altimetry is strong, at regional scale. The finer scale details of the float trajectories are more often related to the anomalous water masses that they encounter. The Persian Gulf Water (PGW) is found in the float profiles near Ras ash Sharbatat (near 57° E, 18° N), again with 36.5 in salinity and about 18-19 °C in temperature. These observations were achieved in winter when the southwestward monsoon currents can advect PGW along the South Arabian coast. Fragments of PGW are found in the Arabian Sea between 18 and 20° N and 63 and 65° E, showing that this water mass can escape the Gulf of Oman southeastward, in particular during summer.

  9. ASCAN Precourt floats on life raft during Elgin AFB water survival training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Charles J. Precourt, wearing helmet and flight suit, floats in pool using an underarm flotation device and a single person life raft at Elgin Air Force Base (AFB) in Pensacola, Florida, during water survival exercises. The training familiarized the candidates with survival techniques necessary in the event of a water landing. ASCANs participated in the exercises from 08-14-90 through 08-17-90.

  10. Floating Vegetated Mats For Improving Surface Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of surface and ground waters is an environmental concern. Pollution from both point and nonpoint sources can render water unsuitable for use. Surface waters of concern include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, and wastewater lagoons. Lagooned wastewater from confined animal feedi...

  11. Measurements of salinity, temperature, and tides in south San Francisco Bay, California, at Dumbarton Bridge; 1990-93 water years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures salinity, temperature, and water levels (tides) in southern San Francisco Bay at Dumbarton Bridge as part of a cooperative program with the California State Department of Water Resources. During water years 1990-93, measurements were made at 15-minute intervals with electonic sensors located approximately one meter above the substrate in approximately six meters of water (at mean water level). During March and April of 1991 and 1992, salinity and temperature also were measured with a self-contained system floating one meter below the surface of the water. Sections of the data set were selected to illustrate influences of tidal currents, weather events, and seasonal and interannual variations in climate on salinity, temperature, and water levels at this location. The edited data are provided on high-density disks in comma-delimited, ASCII text files.

  12. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  13. ASCAN Ochoa floats in pool during Elgin AFB water survival training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Ellen Ochoa, wearing helmet and flight suit, climbs into a single person life raft while floating in a pool at Elgin Air Force Base (AFB) in Pensacola, Florida, during water survival exercises. Ochoa's underarm flotation device holds her above the water as she pulls herself into the life raft. The training familiarized the candidates with survival techniques necessary in the event of a water landing. ASCANs participated in the exercises from 08-14-90 through 08-17-90.

  14. Ignition of a floating droplet of organic coal-water fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakoryakov, V. E.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    The results of experimental investigations are presented for the ignition of droplets (particles) of organic coal-water fuels (OCWFs) floating in a flow of an oxidizer using a special combustion chamber from high-temperature quartz glass. The temperature and the velocity of motion of the oxidizer vary in the ranges of 500-900 K and 0.5-3 m/s. The initial sizes (radii) of fuel droplets amounted to 0.3-1.5 mm. As the basic OCWF components, particles (of 80-100 µm in size) of brown coal "B2," water, mazut, and waste castor and compressor oils are used. With use of the system of high-velocity video registration, the conditions providing for floating of OCWF particles without initiation of burning and with the subsequent steady ignition are established. Four modes of OCWF-droplet ignition with different trajectories of their motion in the combustion chamber are singled out. The times of the OCWF-ignition delay in dependence on the size of fuel particles and oxidizer temperatures are determined. The deviations of the OCWF-ignition-delay times obtained under conditions of suspension of a droplet on the thermocouple junction and while floating in the oxidizer flow are established.

  15. Magnetically driven floating foams for the removal of oil contaminants from water.

    PubMed

    Calcagnile, Paola; Fragouli, Despina; Bayer, Ilker S; Anyfantis, George C; Martiradonna, Luigi; Cozzoli, P Davide; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2012-06-26

    In this study, we present a novel composite material based on commercially available polyurethane foams functionalized with colloidal superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and submicrometer polytetrafluoroethylene particles, which can efficiently separate oil from water. Untreated foam surfaces are inherently hydrophobic and oleophobic, but they can be rendered water-repellent and oil-absorbing by a solvent-free, electrostatic polytetrafluoroethylene particle deposition technique. It was found that combined functionalization of the polytetrafluoroethylene-treated foam surfaces with colloidal iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increases the speed of oil absorption. Detailed microscopic and wettability studies reveal that the combined effects of the surface morphology and of the chemistry of the functionalized foams greatly affect the oil-absorption dynamics. In particular, nanoparticle capping molecules are found to play a major role in this mechanism. In addition to the water-repellent and oil-absorbing capabilities, the functionalized foams exhibit also magnetic responsivity. Finally, due to their light weight, they float easily on water. Hence, by simply moving them around oil-polluted waters using a magnet, they can absorb the floating oil from the polluted regions, thereby purifying the water underneath. This low-cost process can easily be scaled up to clean large-area oil spills in water. PMID:22577733

  16. Video-Bubbles Inserted Into a Floating Drop of Water on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. Inserting a bubble into a floating ball of water in space is difficult, as Pettit demonstrates in this video. Blowing the bubble is the easy part. Getting it to stay in the center of the ball of water is much more difficult. Watch the video to see the technique Dr. Pettit finally uses and see the resulting visual surprise offered by the ensuing optical properties.

  17. Shockwave generation by a semiconductor bridge operation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Zvulun, E.; Toker, G.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2014-05-28

    A semiconductor bridge (SCB) is a silicon device, used in explosive systems as the electrical initiator element. In recent years, SCB plasma has been extensively studied, both electrically and using fast photography and spectroscopic imaging. However, the value of the pressure buildup at the bridge remains unknown. In this study, we operated SCB devices in water and, using shadow imaging and reference beam interferometry, obtained the velocity of the shock wave propagation and distribution of the density of water. These results, together with a self-similar hydrodynamic model, were used to calculate the pressure generated by the exploding SCB. In addition, the results obtained showed that the energy of the water flow exceeds significantly the energy deposited into the exploded SCB. The latter can be explained by the combustion of the aluminum and silicon atoms released in water, which acts as an oxidizing medium.

  18. Floating bioplato for purification of waste quarry waters from mineral nitrogen compounds in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Evdokimova, Galina A; Ivanova, Lyubov A; Mozgova, Natalia P; Myazin, Vladimir A; Fokina, Nadezhda V

    2016-08-23

    A bioplato was organized at Kirovogorskiy pond-settling of OLKON Company (the city of Olenegorsk, in Murmansk region) to reduce the content of nitrogen mineral compounds in water which come into the pond with the quarry waters after blasting operations using nitrogen compounds. The assortment of aboriginal plants was selected, a method of fixing and growing them on the water surface was developed, and observations of their vegetation were carried out. The dynamics of nitrogen compounds was determined in the laboratory and with full-scale tests. The coverage area pond by plants for the effective reduction of mineral nitrogen compounds was calculated. The use of floating bioplato helped to reduce content of ammonium and nitrite to maximum permissible levels or even lower in pond water. Also there was a tendency towards reduction of nitrate concentrations in water. The developmental technology can be used in any climatic zone with a specific assortment of plants-ameliorants. PMID:27220259

  19. Buoyancy of a thin plate pressing a floating oil film on water.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiang-Ying; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2013-06-01

    Because of the superhydrophobicity of their legs, water striders and many other aquatic creatures can stand and walk effortlessly on water. Because of pollution, an oil film may exist on water in some practical situations. To date, however, it remains unclear how the presence of an oil film would affect the wetting behavior of an object floating on water. In this work, we investigated, both theoretically and experimentally, the buoyancy of a thin plate pressing the surface of a bilayered liquid system. In particular, the effect of the oil layer on the buoyancy force was examined. The critical depth and the corresponding buoyancy at the penetration of the plate into the liquids were obtained analytically. For a plate vertically pressing the liquid surface, the force-displacement loop during a complete advancing-receding cycle was analyzed. Experiments were also performed to verify the theoretical results. PMID:23659380

  20. Enhanced load-carrying capacity of hairy surfaces floating on water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yahui; Yuan, Huijing; Su, Weidong; Shi, Yipeng; Duan, Huiling

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency of hairy surfaces depends on the geometric arrangement of these hairs and enables different applications in both nature and engineering. We investigate the mechanism and optimization of a hairy surface floating on water to obtain its maximum load-carrying capacity by the free energy and force analyses. It is demonstrated that there is an optimum cylinder spacing, as a result of the compromise between the vertical capillary force and the gravity, so that the hairy surface has both high load-carrying capacity and mechanical stability. Our analysis makes it clear that the setae on water striders' legs or some insects' wings are in such an optimized geometry. Moreover, it is shown that surface hydrophobicity can further increase the capacity of a hairy surface with thick cylinders, while the influence is negligible when the cylinders are thin. PMID:24808757

  1. Enhanced load-carrying capacity of hairy surfaces floating on water

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yahui; Yuan, Huijing; Su, Weidong; Shi, Yipeng; Duan, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    Water repellency of hairy surfaces depends on the geometric arrangement of these hairs and enables different applications in both nature and engineering. We investigate the mechanism and optimization of a hairy surface floating on water to obtain its maximum load-carrying capacity by the free energy and force analyses. It is demonstrated that there is an optimum cylinder spacing, as a result of the compromise between the vertical capillary force and the gravity, so that the hairy surface has both high load-carrying capacity and mechanical stability. Our analysis makes it clear that the setae on water striders' legs or some insects' wings are in such an optimized geometry. Moreover, it is shown that surface hydrophobicity can further increase the capacity of a hairy surface with thick cylinders, while the influence is negligible when the cylinders are thin. PMID:24808757

  2. Nitrogen removal from eutrophic water by floating-bed-grown water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wu, Yue-Jin; Yu, Zeng-Liang; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with N(+) ion-beam implantation for removal of nutrient species from eutrophic water. The mutated water spinach was grown on floating beds, and growth chambers were used to examine the growth of three cultivars of water spinach with ion implantation for 14 days in simulated eutrophic water at both high and low nitrogen levels. The specific weight growth rates of three cultivars of water spinach with ion implantation were significantly higher than the control, and their NO(3)-N and NH(4)-N removal efficiencies were also greater than those of the control. Furthermore, compared with the control, the nitrogen contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were higher as well. PMID:17524443

  3. Development of floating plastic media filtration system for water treatment and wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Chiemchaisri, C; Panchawaranon, C; Rutchatanunti, S; Kludpiban, A; Ngo, H H; Vigneswaran, S

    2003-01-01

    Floating plastic media coupled with sand filtration system was applied for treating surface water and secondary effluent from municipal sewage treatment plant. The system employed floating plastic media for the removal of suspended solids in surface water and precipitated phosphorus from secondary effluent of sewage treatment plant. Sand filtration was then used to remove further the suspended solids. For the purposes of wastewater reuse, a zeolite layer was used instead of sand filter to absorb ammonium nitrogen. Application of system for surface water treatment suggested appropriate filtration rate of 5 m3/m2 h. Polyaluminum chloride was found to be the best coagulant with an appropriate plastic and sand bed depth of 40 cm. The system could produce average effluent turbidity and suspended solids of 0.71 NTU and 0.94 mg/L respectively. Average turbidity and suspended solids removal efficiencies were 96.26% and 95.48% with low headloss development of 40.4 cm at the end of 6 h operation period. When applying 1.50 m. floating plastic media bed for the treatment of synthetic raw water, short and long-term turbidity removal efficiencies were 96.79-97.72% and 81.81-94.61% for raw water containing turbidity of 20 and 40 NTU. It could produce the effluent with turbidity less than 5NTU while having less than 1.0 m. headloss. The system was also applied for the secondary effluent treatment. An optimum filtration rate of 5 m3/m2 h was obtained when using plastic and sand bed depth of 60 and 20cm under direct filtration mode. Average turbidity removal was 60.3% and 59.6% after 6 and 48 h of operation. It was also found that 1 m3/m2 h filtration rate and 50:30 cm of plastic:zeolite bed could be used to achieve both ammonium nitrogen and phosphate removal. Suspended solids, turbidity, BOD5, NH4+, and PO4(3-) removal efficiencies were 91.9, 94.6, 95.4, 97.3, and 99.5% respectively after 24 h. As a result, the effluent from the system had average NH4+ and PO4(3-) of 0.5 mg N

  4. Morphology-Induced Collective Behaviors: Dynamic Pattern Formation in Water-Floating Elements

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kohei; Ngouabeu, Aubery Marchel Tientcheu; Miyashita, Shuhei; Göldi, Maurice; Füchslin, Rudolf Marcel; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Complex systems involving many interacting elements often organize into patterns. Two types of pattern formation can be distinguished, static and dynamic. Static pattern formation means that the resulting structure constitutes a thermodynamic equilibrium whose pattern formation can be understood in terms of the minimization of free energy, while dynamic pattern formation indicates that the system is permanently dissipating energy and not in equilibrium. In this paper, we report experimental results showing that the morphology of elements plays a significant role in dynamic pattern formation. We prepared three different shapes of elements (circles, squares, and triangles) floating in a water-filled container, in which each of the shapes has two types: active elements that were capable of self-agitation with vibration motors, and passive elements that were mere floating tiles. The system was purely decentralized: that is, elements interacted locally, and subsequently elicited global patterns in a process called self-organized segregation. We showed that, according to the morphology of the selected elements, a different type of segregation occurs. Also, we quantitatively characterized both the local interaction regime and the resulting global behavior for each type of segregation by means of information theoretic quantities, and showed the difference for each case in detail, while offering speculation on the mechanism causing this phenomenon. PMID:22715370

  5. Microbial mechanisms of using enhanced ecological floating beds for eutrophic water improvement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Hu, Yue; Li, Shuqun; Peng, Sen; Zhao, Huabing

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced ecological floating beds were implemented to reduce nutrient quantity and improve the water quality of a eutrophic lake. The results showed that average removal efficiencies of CODCr, total nitrogen, NH3-N and total phosphorus for Canna indica L. set-up were 23.1%, 15.3%, 18.1% and 19.4% higher, respectively, than that of the setup with only substrate, and 14.2%, 12.8%, 7.9% and 11.9% higher than Iris pseudacorus L. ecological floating bed. The microbial community structure had obvious differences between devices and low similarity; bacteria were mainly attached on the fiber filling. The microbial population was abundant at the start and end of the experiment. Shannon index of samples selected ranged from 0.85 to 1.05. The sequencing results showed that fiber filling collected most uncultured bacteria species and the majority of bacteria on the plant roots were β-Proteobacteria and α-Proteobacteria. The co-dominant species attaching to the filling and plant was Nitrosomonadaceae. PMID:27035477

  6. Synthesis of highly hydrophobic floating magnetic polymer nanocomposites for the removal of oils from water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mudan; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Fenghe; Shen, Ping; Ma, Peichang; Gu, Junjun; Mao, Jianyu; Li, Fengsheng

    2013-12-01

    The removal of organic contaminants, particularly oil spills from water surface is of great technological importance for environmental protection. In this article, we present a novel, economic and environment-friendly core-shell composite material based on magnetic hollow Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs) that was fabricated by two-step process, which can fast and efficiently separate oils from water surface under a magnetic field. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with a polystyrene layer successfully to form water-repellent and oil-absorbing surfaces, which could float on water and selectively absorb lubricating oil up to 3 times of the particles’ weight while completely repelling water. More importantly, the oils could be readily removed from the surfaces of nanocomposites by a simple treatment and the nanocomposites still kept highly hydrophobic and superoleophilic characteristics, so the nanocomposites have an excellent recyclability in the oil-absorbent capacity. Several techniques such as transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used in the characterization of the materials. In addition, magnetic force and oils removal capability tests were also performed. It will open up a potential and broad application in wastewater treatment.

  7. The NACA Impact Basin and Water Landing Tests of a Float Model at Various Velocities and Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, Sidney A

    1944-01-01

    The first data obtained in the United States under the controlled testing conditions necessary for establishing relationships among the numerous parameters involved when a float having both horizontal and vertical velocity contacts a water surface are presented. The data were obtained at the NACA impact basin. The report is confined to a presentation of the relationship between resultant velocity and impact normal acceleration for various float weights when all other parameters are constant. Analysis of the experimental results indicated that the maximum impact normal acceleration was proportional to the square of the resultant velocity, that increases in float weight resulted in decreases in the maximum impact normal acceleration, and that an increase in the flight-path angle caused increased impact normal acceleration.

  8. Reconciling tracer and float observations of the export pathways of Labrador Sea Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, S. F.; Lozier, M. S.; Biastoch, A.; Böning, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    For more than fifty years, it has been generally accepted by oceanographers that the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) is the principal conduit of recently-convected Labrador Sea Water (LSW) exported from the high-latitude North Atlantic to the equator. Supporting this supposition is observational evidence that the waters of the DWBC have consistently greater equatorward velocities, higher concentrations of passive tracers, and younger ages compared to ocean interior waters. However, recent observations and simulations of floats launched in the DWBC in the Labrador Sea show that most water parcels are quickly ejected from the DWBC and follow instead interior pathways to the subtropics. Here, we show that tracer observations from the last three decades are compatible with the existence of both DWBC and basin-interior export pathways. From analyses of observational data and model output, we find that equatorward transport in the basin interior is consistent with the large-scale vorticity balance at mid-depth. Furthermore, from the modeling analysis we show that despite higher, localized concentrations of tracer and particles in the DWBC, only 5% of particles released in the Labrador Sea are transported from the subpolar to subtropical gyre via a continuous DWBC pathway. Thus, the interior pathway is a significant contributor to LSW export.

  9. Enhancing the water purification efficiency of a floating treatment wetland using a biofilm carrier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Zhao, Jing; Cui, Naxin; Dai, Yanran; Kong, Lingwei; Wu, Juan; Cheng, Shuiping

    2016-04-01

    Floating treatment wetlands (FTWs) and biofilm carriers are widely used in water purification. The objective of the present work was to explore whether and to what extent an FTW integrated with plants and biofilm carriers (FTW-I) could enhance the nutrient removal efficiency. Significantly higher removal rates of ammonia nitrogen (85.2 %), total phosphorus (82.7 %), and orthophosphate (82.5 %) were observed in the FTW-I treatment relative to the FTW with plants (FTW-P; 80.0, 78.5, and 77.6 %, respectively) and the FTW with biofilm carriers (FTW-B; 56.7, 12.9, and 13.4 %, respectively) (p < 0.05). The mass balance results indicated that plant uptake was the main pathway for N and P removal (accounting for 58.1 and 91.4 %, respectively) in FTW-I, in which only 1.2 % of the N and 5.7 % of the P was deposited on the bottom of the tank. In addition, the plants translocated 43.9 and 80.2 % of the N and P in the water and 83.5 and 88.3 % of the absorbed N and P, respectively, into their aboveground tissues. The combination of an FTW and biofilm carriers can improve the efficiency of water purification, and nutrients can be rapidly removed from the system by harvesting the aboveground plant tissues. PMID:26697862

  10. How Does the Gibbs Inequality Condition Affect the Stability and Detachment of Floating Spheres from the Free Surface of Water?

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong-Xia; Nguyen, Anh V

    2016-03-01

    Floating objects on the air-water interfaces are central to a number of everyday activities, from walking on water by insects to flotation separation of valuable minerals using air bubbles. The available theories show that a fine sphere can float if the force of surface tension and buoyancies can support the sphere at the interface with an apical angle subtended by the circle of contact being larger than the contact angle. Here we show that the pinning of the contact line at the sharp edge, known as the Gibbs inequality condition, also plays a significant role in controlling the stability and detachment of floating spheres. Specifically, we truncated the spheres with different angles and used a force sensor device to measure the force of pushing the truncated spheres from the interface into water. We also developed a theoretical modeling to calculate the pushing force that in combination with experimental results shows different effects of the Gibbs inequality condition on the stability and detachment of the spheres from the water surface. For small angles of truncation, the Gibbs inequality condition does not affect the sphere detachment, and hence the classical theories on the floatability of spheres are valid. For large truncated angles, the Gibbs inequality condition determines the tenacity of the particle-meniscus contact and the stability and detachment of floating spheres. In this case, the classical theories on the floatability of spheres are no longer valid. A critical truncated angle for the transition from the classical to the Gibbs inequality regimes of detachment was also established. The outcomes of this research advance our understanding of the behavior of floating objects, in particular, the flotation separation of valuable minerals, which often contain various sharp edges of their crystal faces. PMID:26837262

  11. Float-in powerhouses

    SciTech Connect

    Makela, G.A.

    1983-06-01

    The nation's inland waterway system affords a means of transporting large objects limited only by channel depth, size of locks and bridge clearances. The concept of prefabricating standardized, hydroelectric powerhouses at shipyards, transporting them along the inland waterways and installing them at navigation dams without powerhouses was examined for the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation system. It was found that construction costs for the float-in design was very close to those of conventional sitebuilt design. Experience at Greenup Dam on the Ohio River where a float-in powerhouse has been installed indicated that construction time could be reduced if the float-in design was used. This time saving, use of standardized designs and construction of the float-in module at a shipyard may offer advantages that should be examined in more detailed when the power potential of the nation's low navigation dams is assessed.

  12. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  13. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-03-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges.

  14. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  15. Spatial distribution of floating marine debris in offshore continental Portuguese waters.

    PubMed

    Sá, Sara; Bastos-Santos, Jorge; Araújo, Hélder; Ferreira, Marisa; Duro, Virginia; Alves, Flávia; Panta-Ferreira, Bruno; Nicolau, Lídia; Eira, Catarina; Vingada, José

    2016-03-15

    This study presents data on abundance and density of macro-floating marine debris (FMD), including their composition, spatial distribution and potential sources off continental Portugal. FMD were assessed by shipboard visual surveys covering ±252,833 km(2) until the 220 nm limit. The FMD average density was 2.98 items/km(2) and abundance amounted to 752,740 items. Unidentified plastics constitute the major bulk of FMD (density=0.46 items/km(2); abundance=117,390 items), followed by styrofoam, derelict or lost materials from fisheries, paper/cardboard and wood material. The North sector of the area presents higher FMD diversity and abundances, probably as a result of the high number of navigation corridors and fisheries operating in that sector. Most FMD originate from local sources, namely discharges from vessels and derelict material from fisheries. Considering the identifiable items, cables and fishing lines were the only fishing related items among the top ten FMD items in Portuguese offshore waters. PMID:26778496

  16. Photoactive titania float for disinfection of water; evaluation of cell damage by bioanalytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Shwetharani, R; Jyothi, M S; Laveena, P D; Geetha Balakrishna, R

    2014-01-01

    A photoactive float was fabricated with the modified titania to cause a feasible disinfection of water, contaminated with E. coli. The commercially available titania was doped with neodymium by pulverization technique to enhance its activity in sunlight and a multiapproach technique was used to evaluate the extended efficiency of the doped sample. X-ray diffraction patterns depicted the retention of anatase phase on doping and the existence of neodymium was confirmed by the energy dispersive atomic X-ray analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy and Bruner-Emmett-Teller analysis depicted a marginal increase in the particle size and a decrease in the surface area, respectively. Doping induces semiconductor behavior with lower band energy that could respond to visible light and exhibit better disinfection activity. The "f" and "d" transitions of the lanthanide in doped sample caused new electronic behavior of trapping/detrapping effect together with bandgap narrowing. The amount of malondialdehyde, protein, DNA and RNA released on destruction of E. coli was observed to be 0.915 × 10(-3) μg mL(-1), 859.912 μg mL(-1), 20.173 μg mL(-1) and 1146.073 μg mL(-1), respectively. The above analytical methods along with standard plate count method substantiated the enhanced disinfection efficiency of the doped sample in sunlight. PMID:24689654

  17. Assessment of floating plastic debris in surface water along the Seine River.

    PubMed

    Gasperi, Johnny; Dris, Rachid; Bonin, Tiffany; Rocher, Vincent; Tassin, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    This study is intended to examine the quality and quantity of floating plastic debris in the River Seine through use of an extensive regional network of floating debris-retention booms; it is one of the first attempts to provide reliable information on such debris at a large regional scale. Plastic debris represented between 0.8% and 5.1% of total debris collected by weight. A significant proportion consisted of food wrappers/containers and plastic cutlery, probably originating from voluntary or involuntary dumping, urban discharges and surface runoff. Most plastic items are made of polypropylene, polyethylene and, to a lesser extent, polyethylene terephthalate. By extrapolation, some 27 tons of floating plastic debris are intercepted annually by this network; corresponding to 2.3 g per Parisian inhabitant per year. Such data could serve to provide a first evaluation of floating plastic inputs conveyed by rivers. PMID:25240189

  18. Flow analysis on sea-water mists flows among bridge beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Masaaki; Oshiro, Daigo

    2014-04-01

    In the subtropical islands enclosed in the ocean, there is a problem that corrosion of structures progresses quickly because of high temperature and humidity and adhesion of sea-water mists flying from sea. Authors are interested in corrosion of bridge made of weatherability steel. Therefore, it needs to investigate the flow structure around bridge beams and motion of sea-water mist (droplet). In this paper, authors attempt flow visualization and PIV to understand the flow structures around bridge beams and numerical approach of motion of droplets to understand the collision of seawater mists on the bridge wall.

  19. First Autonomous Bio-Optical Profiling Float in the Gulf of Mexico Reveals Dynamic Biogeochemistry in Deep Waters

    PubMed Central

    Green, Rebecca E.; Bower, Amy S.; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX) float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012), the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local “hot spots”, including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62). Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49) was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87). In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing network

  20. First autonomous bio-optical profiling float in the Gulf of Mexico reveals dynamic biogeochemistry in deep waters.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca E; Bower, Amy S; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX) float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012), the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local "hot spots", including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62). Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49) was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87). In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing network for

  1. 18. Photocopy of photograph of WalpoleWestminster bridge at high water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph of Walpole-Westminster bridge at high water during flood of November, 1927; photograph from Walpole Historical Society scrapbook collection. View west: Walpole approach (railroad station and store) and Connecticut River at flood stage, November, 1927. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  2. Induced water condensation and bridge formation by electric fieldsin Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, G.M.; Verdaguer, A.; Salmeron, M.

    2006-02-22

    We present an analytical model that explains how in humidenvironments the electric field near a sharp tip enhances the formationof water meniscii and bridges between tip and sample. The predictions ofthe model are compared with experimental measurements of the criticaldistance where the field strength causes bridge formation.

  3. STS-46 MS PLC Hoffman floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander Jeffrey A. Hoffman floats in a one-person life raft during launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Hoffman, who has just tumbled out a side hatch mockup, waits for his life raft to fully inflate as a SCUBA-equipped diver looks on. The long cylindrical object in the foreground serves as a prop for the crew escape system (CES) pole. In the background MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz floats in a fully inflated life raft.

  4. Tank Tests of the Effect of Rivet Heads, etc., on the Water Performance of a Seaplane Float, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J. B.; Robertson, J. B., Jr.

    1936-01-01

    A 1/3.5 full-size model of the Mark V float of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, was tested in the NACA tank both with smooth painted bottom surfaces and with roundhead rivets, plate laps, and keel plates fitted to simulate the actual bottom of a metal float. The augmentation in water resistance due to the added roughness was found to be from 10-12% at the hum speed and from 12-14% at high speeds. The effect of the roughness of the afterbody was found to be negligible except at high trims. The model data were extrapolated to full size by the usual method which assumes the forces to vary according to Froude's law, and in the case of the smooth model by a method of separation that takes into account the effect of scale on the frictional resistance. It was concluded that the effect of rivet heads on the takeoff performance of a relatively high-powered float seaplane is of little consequence but that it may be of greater importance in the case of more moderately powered flying boats.

  5. Tank Tests to Show the Effect Rivet Heads on the Water Performance of a Seaplane-Float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J B

    1938-01-01

    A 1/3.5 full-sized model of a seaplane float constructed from lines supplied by the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, was tested first with smooth painted bottom surfaces and then with round-head rivets, plate laps, and keel plates fitted to simulate the actual bottom of a metal float. A percentage increase in water resistance caused by the added roughness was found to be from 5 to 20 percent at the hump speed and from 15 to 40 percent at high speeds. The effect of the roughness of the afterbody was found to be negligible except at high trims. The model data were extrapolated to full size by the usual method that assumes the forces to vary according to Froude's law and, in the case of the smooth model, by a method of separation that takes into account the effect of scale on the frictional resistance. It was concluded that the effect of rivet heads on the take-off performance of a relatively high-powered float seaplane is of little consequence, but it may be of greater importance in the case of more moderately powered flying boats.

  6. Use of Chironomidae (Diptera) Surface-Floating Pupal Exuviae as a Rapid Bioassessment Protocol for Water Bodies.

    PubMed

    Kranzfelder, Petra; Anderson, Alyssa M; Egan, Alexander T; Mazack, Jane E; Bouchard, R William; Rufer, Moriya M; Ferrington, Leonard C

    2015-01-01

    Rapid bioassessment protocols using benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages have been successfully used to assess human impacts on water quality. Unfortunately, traditional benthic larval sampling methods, such as the dip-net, can be time-consuming and expensive. An alternative protocol involves collection of Chironomidae surface-floating pupal exuviae (SFPE). Chironomidae is a species-rich family of flies (Diptera) whose immature stages typically occur in aquatic habitats. Adult chironomids emerge from the water, leaving their pupal skins, or exuviae, floating on the water's surface. Exuviae often accumulate along banks or behind obstructions by action of the wind or water current, where they can be collected to assess chironomid diversity and richness. Chironomids can be used as important biological indicators, since some species are more tolerant to pollution than others. Therefore, the relative abundance and species composition of collected SFPE reflect changes in water quality. Here, methods associated with field collection, laboratory processing, slide mounting, and identification of chironomid SFPE are described in detail. Advantages of the SFPE method include minimal disturbance at a sampling area, efficient and economical sample collection and laboratory processing, ease of identification, applicability in nearly all aquatic environments, and a potentially more sensitive measure of ecosystem stress. Limitations include the inability to determine larval microhabitat use and inability to identify pupal exuviae to species if they have not been associated with adult males. PMID:26274889

  7. Floating platform with monolithically formed float members and platform

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterwalder, U.

    1981-06-30

    Floating platforms for various offshore facilities are formed of float members monolithically connected to a superposed platform. The float members are spherically shaped and are formed of reinforced or prestressed concrete. The platform can be a hollow planar member or it can be curved in one or two directions, and the platforms are formed of prestressed concrete. Cylindrical shafts can be used to connect the spherically shaped floats and the platform. Individual floating platforms can be connected by expansion joints and used as a runway. The float members can be constructed at the shoreline, launched into the water and held in a regular pattern while decked over with the platform. After completion of the construction procedure, the floating platform can be moved to an offshore location for use.

  8. Boring crustaceans damage polystyrene floats under docks polluting marine waters with microplastic.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Boring isopods damage expanded polystyrene floats under docks and, in the process, expel copious numbers of microplastic particles. This paper describes the impacts of boring isopods in aquaculture facilities and docks, quantifies and discusses the implications of these microplastics, and tests if an alternate foam type prevents boring. Floats from aquaculture facilities and docks were heavily damaged by thousands of isopods and their burrows. Multiple sites in Asia, Australia, Panama, and the USA exhibited evidence of isopod damage. One isopod creates thousands of microplastic particles when excavating a burrow; colonies can expel millions of particles. Microplastics similar in size to these particles may facilitate the spread of non-native species or be ingested by organisms causing physical or toxicological harm. Extruded polystyrene inhibited boring, suggesting this foam may prevent damage in the field. These results reveal boring isopods cause widespread damage to docks and are a novel source of microplastic pollution. PMID:22763283

  9. Tracing organic matter removal in polluted coastal waters via floating bed phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lingfeng; Zhuo, Jianfu; Guo, Weidong; Spencer, Robert G M; Zhang, Zhiying; Xu, Jing

    2013-06-15

    Organic matter removal by cultured Sesuvium portulacastrum in constructed floating beds was studied during a 20 day greenhouse experiment and an 8 month field campaign in the polluted Yundang Lagoon (southeastern China). Experiments were traced via dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and absorption spectroscopy. Two 'terrestrial' humic-like, one 'marine' humic-like and one protein-like components were identified by parallel factor analysis. The 'terrestrial' humic-like and protein-like components, DOC and absorption coefficient (a280) decreased during the greenhouse experiment. The intensities of four fluorescence components were all reduced during the field experiment. These results demonstrate the clear potential of floating bed phytoremediation techniques for reducing organic pollution degree in brackish environments. The rhizosphere may play an important role during phytoremediation. Our results show that spectrophotometric measurements such as fluorescence provide a useful tool for examining the removal of different organic moieties during various bioremediation processes. PMID:23602265

  10. A FPGA-based automatic bridge over water recognition in high-resolution satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beulig, Sebastian; von Schönermark, Maria; Huber, Felix

    2012-11-01

    In this paper a novel algorithm for recognizing bridges over water is presented. The algorithm is designed to run on a small reconfigurable microchip, a so called Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Hence, the algorithm is computationally lightweight and high processing speeds can be reached. Furthermore no a-priory knowledge about a bridge is necessary. Even bridges with an irregular shape, e.g. with balconies, can be detected. As a result, the center point of the bridge is marked. Due to the low power consumption of the FPGA and the autonomous performance of the algorithm, it is suitable for an image analysis directly on-board of satellites. Meta-data like the coordinates of recognized bridges are immediately available. This could be useful, e.g. in case of a natural hazard, when quick information about the infrastructure is desired by the disaster management. The algorithm as well as experimental results on real satellite images are presented and discussed.

  11. Exploring Floating Concrete and Beam Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Billie G.; Snell, Luke M.

    2002-01-01

    Presents two construction activities that address both state and federal science standards and encourage students to consider career options in mathematics and science. Includes floating concrete and paper bridge activities. (YDS)

  12. Bridge over Troubled Waters: Training for Department Level Supervisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Gillian E.; Skipper, Barbara L.

    A clinical supervision training program has provided department level coordinators with support in their role as a bridge between administrators and teachers in six high schools and nine middle schools in a San Antonio, Texas, school district. This paper identifies major characteristics of the training program's model, describes the program, and…

  13. Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, T.; Buhagiar, D.; Farrugia, R. N.

    2014-06-01

    A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

  14. STS-32 MS Dunbar wearing LES floats in life raft during water egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Mission Specialist (MS) Bonnie J. Dunbar, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and lauch and entry helmet (LEH), in a single-occupant (one man) lift raft enlists the aid of two SCUBA-equipped divers as she floats in 25 ft deep pool located in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. During the exercises the crew practiced the procedures to follow in the event of an emergency aboard the Space Shuttle and familiarized themselves with post-Challenger pole system of emergency egress.

  15. Time resolved lateral dynamic force microscopy for exploring nanoscopic water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Chang, Sungjin; Sung, Baekman; Kwon, Soyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2010-03-01

    Lateral dynamic force microscopy based on time-resolved scheme is employed for a good understanding of dynamics of nanoscopic water bridge connecting a sharp tip with a flat sample. In its formation and stepped compression at which the tip and the sample in a true non-contact, the nanoscopic water bridge under oscillatory shear stress shows a transient response behavior for a long time ( >=10^2 ms). This observation obviously demonstrates that an inadequate fast measurement in dynamic force microscopy can lead a misunderstanding of dynamic physical properties of the nanoscopic water.

  16. Stools - floating

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorption of nutrients ( malabsorption ) or too much gas (flatulence). Considerations Most causes of floating stools are harmless. ... Bailey J. FPIN's Clinical Inquiries: Effective management of flatulence. Am Fam Physician Ohge H, Levitt MD. Intestinal ...

  17. Force exerted by a nanoscale capillary water bridge between two planar substrates.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Gerson E; Saavedra, Jorge H; Rozas, Roberto E; Toledo, Pedro G

    2016-04-20

    Molecular dynamics simulation of a nanoscale capillary water bridge between two planar substrates is used to determine the resulting force between the substrates without arbitrariness regarding geometry and location of the free surface of the bridge. The substrates are moderately hydrophilic. The force changes continuously as the separation between the substrates changes except for small gaps where it becomes discontinuous because the bridge is unable to adopt stable configurations at any distance apart. Further exploration of the bridge and the force as the substrates approach each other reveals an underlying oscillatory force with an increasing repulsive component at separation distances equivalent to few water molecules. According to the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule (HBN), at very small gap sizes, water molecules which are very close to the surfaces are unable to maximize HBN thus contributing to the repulsive force. Our simulation results of force versus gap size agree with calculations based on other methods, some very different, and also reproduce the typical magnitude of the experimental force. Finally, a macroscopic force balance correctly describes the force-distance curve except for bridges constituted of water layers only. PMID:27049515

  18. Biotransformation of arsenite and bacterial aox activity in drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses: Arsenic contamination in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    The potential arsenite bioteansformation activity of arsenic was investigated by examining bacterial arsenic arsenite-oxidizing gene such as aoxS, aoxR, aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD in high arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from the surface water of floating houses. There is a biogeochemical cycle of activity involving arsenite oxidase aox system and the ars (arsenic resistance system) gene operon and aoxR leader gene activity in Alcaligenes faecalis SRR-11 and aoxS leader gene activity in Achromobacter xylosoxidans TSL-66. Batch experiments showed that SRR-11 and TSL-66 completely oxidized 1 mM of As (III) to As (V) within 35-40 h. The leaders of aoxS and aoxR are important for gene activity, and their effects in arsenic bioremediation and mobility in natural water has a significant ecological role because it allows arsenite oxidase in bacteria to control the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses. PMID:26219073

  19. Atmospheric exchange of carbon dioxide and methane of a small water body and a floating mat in the Luther Marsh peatland, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Magdalena; Berger, Sina; Blodau, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that small water bodies cover larger areas in northern peatlands than previously assumed. Their role in the carbon cycle and gas exchange rates are poorly constrained so far. To address this issue we measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes on a small water body (ca. 700 m2) and the surrounding floating mat in the Luther Marsh peatland in Ontario, Canada from July to September 2014. To this end we used closed chambers combined with a portable Los Gatos high-resolution trace gas analyzer at different water depths and distances from the shore on the pond and with different dominating plant types on the floating mat surrounding the pond. In addition, CO2 concentrations were recorded in high temporal resolution using an infrared sensor system during selected periods. Air and water temperature, humidity and temperature of the floating mat, wind speed and direction, photosynthetically active radiation, air pressure and relative humidity were also recorded as auxiliary data at the study site. The results show that pond and floating mat were sources of methane throughout the whole measuring period. Methane emissions via the ebullition pathway occurred predominantly near the shore and on the floating mat. During the daytime measurements the floating mat acted as a net sink and the pond as a net source of CO2. The dynamics of CO2 exchange was also strongly time dependent, as CO2 emissions from the pond strongly increased after mid-August. This suggests that photosynthesis was more affected by seasonal decline than respiration process in the pond and that the allochthonous component of the CO2 flux increased in relative importance towards fall.

  20. Peptide salt bridge stability: From gas phase via microhydration to bulk water simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhařová, Eva; Marsalek, Ondrej; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-11-01

    The salt bridge formation and stability in the terminated lysine-glutamate dipeptide is investigated in water clusters of increasing size up to the limit of bulk water. Proton transfer dynamics between the acidic and basic side chains is described by DFT-based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. While the desolvated peptide prefers to be in its neutral state, already the addition of a single water molecule can trigger proton transfer from the glutamate side chain to the lysine side chain, leading to a zwitterionic salt bridge state. Upon adding more water molecules we find that stabilization of the zwitterionic state critically depends on the number of hydrogen bonds between side chain termini, the water molecules, and the peptidic backbone. Employing classical molecular dynamics simulations for larger clusters, we observed that the salt bridge is weakened upon additional hydration. Consequently, long-lived solvent shared ion pairs are observed for about 30 water molecules while solvent separated ion pairs are found when at least 40 or more water molecules hydrate the dipeptide. These results have implications for the formation and stability of salt bridges at partially dehydrated surfaces of aqueous proteins.

  1. Attraction of Two Floating Spheres at a Viscous Oil-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dani, Archit; Keiser, Geoff; Yeganeh, Mohsen; Maldarelli, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The aggregation rate of floating particles at a fluid/fluid interface by capillary forces has drawn significant interest. This 2D phenomenon plays a critical role in self-assembly arrangement relevant to pollination processes in biological contexts, the formation of dense particle laden interfaces for stabilizing emulsions in colloid science and in the bottom up assembly of materials in nanotechnologies. We present the first experiments on the merging of two Teflon particles at an interface between a mineral oil and an aqueous phase for a series of particle pairs, interfacial tension and oil viscosity. The separation distance as a function of time and pair aggregation time are both measured by optically following the movement of the particles. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with our theoretical formulation in which a drag correction accounts for the variation in particle depth of immersion.

  2. Temporal and spatial distribution of floating objects in coastal waters of central-southern Chile and Patagonian fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Iván A.; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.; Thiel, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Floating objects are suggested to be the principal vector for the transport and dispersal of marine invertebrates with direct development as well as catalysts for carbon and nutrient recycling in accumulation areas. The first step in identifying the ecological relevance of floating objects in a specific area is to identify their spatio-temporal distribution. We evaluated the composition, abundance, distribution, and temporal variability of floating objects along the continental coast of central-southern Chile (33-42°S) and the Patagonian fjords (42-50°S) using ship surveys conducted in austral winter (July/August) and spring (November) of the years 2002-2005 and 2008. Potential sources of floating items were identified with the aid of publicly available databases and scientific reports. We found three main types of floating objects, namely floating marine debris (mainly plastic objects and Styrofoam), wood (trunks and branches), and floating kelps ( Macrocystis pyrifera and Durvillaea antarctica). Floating marine debris were abundant along most of the examined transects, with markedly lower abundances toward the southern fjord areas. Floating marine debris abundances generally corresponded to the distribution of human activities, and were highest in the Interior Sea of Chiloé, where aquaculture activities are intense. Floating wood appeared sporadically in the study area, often close to the main rivers. In accordance with seasonal river run-off, wood was more abundant along the continental coast in winter (rainy season) and in the Patagonian fjords during the spring surveys (snow melt). Densities of the two floating kelp species were similar along the continental coast, without a clear seasonal pattern. M. pyrifera densities increased towards the south, peaking in the Patagonian fjords, where it was dominant over D. antarctica. Densities of M. pyrifera in the Patagonian fjords were highest in spring. Correlation analyses between the abundances of floating

  3. Investigation on bragg reflection of surface water waves induced by a train of fixed floating pontoon breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Huei-Tau; Chen, Kue-Hong; Tsai, Chi-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The water wave characteristics of Bragg reflections from a train of fixed floating pontoon breakwaters was studied numerically. A numerical model of boundary discretization type was developed to calculate the wave field. The model was verified by comparing to analytical data in literature and good agreements were achieved. Series of parametric studies were conducted systematically to investigate the dependence of the reflected coefficients by the Bragg scattering on the design variables, including the spacing between the breakwaters, the total number of installed breakwaters, the draft and width do the breakwater, and wave length. Certain wave characteristics of the Bragg reflections were observed and discussed in details which might be of help for practical engineering applications in shoreline protection from incident waves.

  4. Quantum Calculations on Salt Bridges with Water: Potentials, Structure, and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Sing; Green, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Salt bridges are electrostatic links between acidic and basic amino acids in a protein; quantum calculations are used here to determine the energetics and other properties of one form of these species, in the presence of water molecules. The acidic groups are carboxylic acids (aspartic and glutamic acids); proteins have two bases with pK above physiological pH: one, arginine, with a guanidinium basic group, the other lysine, which is a primary amine. Only arginine is modeled here, by ethyl guanidinium, while propionic acid is used as a model for either carboxylic acid. The salt bridges are accompanied by 0-12 water molecules; for each of the 13 systems, the energy-bond distance relation, natural bond orbitals (NBO), frequency calculations allowing thermodynamic corrections to room temperature, and dielectric constant dependence, were all calculated. The water molecules were found to arrange themselves in hydrogen bonded rings anchored to the oxygens of the salt bridge components. This was not surprising in itself, but it was found that the rings lead to a periodicity in the energy, and to a 'water addition' rule. The latter shows that the initial rings, with four oxygen atoms, become five member rings when an additional water molecule becomes available, with the additional water filling in at the bond with the lowest Wiberg index, as calculated using NBO. The dielectric constant dependence is the expected hyperbola, and the fit of the energy to the inverse dielectric constant is determined. There is an energy periodicity related to ring formation upon addition of water molecules. When 10 water molecules have been added, all spaces near the salt bridge are filled, completing the first hydration shell, and a second shell starts to form. The potentials associated with salt bridges depend on their hydration, and potentials assigned without regard to local hydration are likely to cause errors as large as or larger than kBT, thus suggesting a serious problem if these

  5. Treatment performance of artificial floating reed beds in an experimental mesocosm to improve the water quality of river Kshipra.

    PubMed

    Billore, S K; Prashant; Sharma, J K

    2009-01-01

    The discharge of untreated wastewater in River Kshipra had brought annual average of BOD, TKN and TS levels up to 39 mg/l, 38 mg/l and 781 mg/l respectively in the study area. Treatment performance by Artificial Floating Reed Beds (AFRB) was evaluated for removal efficiency of TS, NH4-N, NO3-N, TKN and BOD from river water, initially, under a pilot scale by an AFRB of size 200 m2 planted with local reed grass, Phragmites karka, in the part of River Kshipra at the confluence with meeting point of a wastewater stream. The system performance was recorded as 43% reduction in TS, 38% reduction in TKN and 39% BOD reduction. The experimental AFRBs were buoyant structure planted with reed grass, each unit had a rectangular size and covered an effective surface area of 2 m2. The experiment with the mesocosms with treatment of River water resulted that AFRB was reducing pollution load by 55-60% of TS, 45-55% of NH4-N, 33-45% of NO3-N, 45-50% of TKN and 40-50% of BOD. AFRB may be recommended as an in-situ, eco-friendly river water treatment structures for small shallow, slow flowing (or slightly stagnant) water bodies. PMID:19934506

  6. 75 FR 49408 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Bridges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ...This rule makes non-substantive changes throughout our regulations. The purpose of this rule is to make conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard bridge and navigable waters regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated...

  7. Sub-canopy evapotranspiration from floating vegetation and open water in a swamp forest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have demonstrated large discrepancies in the difference between evapotranspiration from wetland vegetation and evaporation from open water. In this study, we investigate evapotranspiration differences between water and vegetation in a scenario that has otherwise not been extensively...

  8. A co-beneficial system using aquatic plants: bioethanol production from free-floating aquatic plants used for water purification.

    PubMed

    Soda, S; Mishima, D; Inoue, D; Ike, M

    2013-01-01

    A co-beneficial system using constructed wetlands (CWs) planted with aquatic plants is proposed for bioethanol production and nutrient removal from wastewater. The potential for bioethanol production from aquatic plant biomass was experimentally evaluated. Water hyacinth and water lettuce were selected because of their high growth rates and easy harvestability attributable to their free-floating vegetation form. The alkaline/oxidative pretreatment was selected for improving enzymatic hydrolysis of the aquatic plants. Ethanol was produced with yields of 0.14-0.17 g-ethanol/ g-biomass in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation mode using a recombinant Escherichia coli strain or a typical yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Subsequently, the combined benefits of the CWs planted with the aquatic plants for bioethanol production and nutrient removal were theoretically estimated. For treating domestic wastewater at 1,100 m(3)/d, it was inferred that the anoxic-oxic activated sludge process consumes energy at 3,200 MJ/d, whereas the conventional activated sludge process followed by the CW consumes only 1,800 MJ/d with ethanol production at 115 MJ/d. PMID:23752400

  9. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  10. Floating in hydrocarbons: Water-based recreation and the future of Tennessee`s waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, J.M.; Sirk, R.A.

    1996-10-01

    Careful environmental monitoring and preservation practices, when applied to surface water systems, provide necessary maintenance for aquatic ecosystem and human-needs satisfaction. For much of the state of Tennessee, recent history has seen a significant increase in the standard of living. Here, as elsewhere, increase in standard of living has often translated into increased leisure time and disposable income. Tennessee offers a wealth of recreational waters, and an increase in the number and duration of recreational boating experiences serves as a visible reminder of this affluence. With increasing access comes the potential for explosive growth in hydrocarbon-based air and water pollution. Given the increased emphasis in pollution control under Clean Air and Clean Water acts legislation, petroleum-based water recreation should be an issue for coordinated examination. Paradoxically, pollution from water-based recreation has remained almost wholly unregulated.

  11. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  12. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  13. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  14. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each manned platform shall be provided with at least two approved life floats. The life floats shall have...

  15. Water vapor and air transport through ponds with floating aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Kirzhner, F; Zimmels, Y

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the evaporation rate in the purification of wastewater by aquatic plants with aeration. Evaporation of surface water is important in dewatering processes. In particular, this is true in arid climates, where evaporation rates are high. Aeration is known to enhance the wastewater purification process, but it increases concurrently the water evaporation rates. Evaporation and evapotranspiration rates were tested under field and laboratory conditions. Batch experiments were performed to study the levels of evaporation and evapotranspiration in free-water-surface, aquatic-plant systems. The experiments verified that, in these systems, the rate of evaporation increased as a result of aeration in the presence and absence of the aquatic plants. The evaporation rates resulting from aeration were found to be significant in the water balance governing the purification process. A preliminary model for description of the effect of rising air bubbles on the transport of water vapors was formulated. It is shown that aeration may account for a significant part of water losses that include surface evaporation. PMID:17059143

  16. Development of ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification of a floating organic droplet for determination of organochlorine pesticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bin; Yang, Zhaoguang; Lee, Hsiaowan; Qiu, Bo; Li, Haipu

    2016-02-01

    An ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic droplet followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of 13 organochlorine pesticides in water samples. In the proposed method, ultrasound was applied to achieve the emulsification without addition of any dispersive solvent. In consequence, the volume of extraction phase remained unaffected by the ion strength of aqueous phase and high extraction recoveries were obtained. It was also found that dilution of the floating phase with acetone was necessary for preventing peak splitting in chromatogram. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method provided good sensitivity (the detection limits of organochlorine pesticides ranged from 1.3 to 3.9 ng/L) and good repeatability of extraction (below 6.5%, n = 5). The recoveries in reservoir and river water samples were between 75.8% and 96.9%. PMID:26631905

  17. Air-water Gas Exchange Rates on a Large Impounded River Measured Using Floating Domes (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in rivers typically serve as the basis for whole-system estimates of greenhouse gas emission rates. An important component of these models is the exchange of dissolved gases between air and water. Controls on gas exchange rates (K) have be...

  18. Floating orbital molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Perlt, Eva; Brüssel, Marc; Kirchner, Barbara

    2014-04-21

    We introduce an alternative ab initio molecular dynamics simulation as a unification of Hartree-Fock molecular dynamics and the floating orbital approach. The general scheme of the floating orbital molecular dynamics method is presented. Moreover, a simple but sophisticated guess for the orbital centers is provided to reduce the number of electronic structure optimization steps at each molecular dynamics step. The conservation of total energy and angular momentum is investigated in order to validate the floating orbital molecular dynamics approach with and without application of the initial guess. Finally, a water monomer and a water dimer are simulated, and the influence of the orbital floating on certain properties like the dipole moment is investigated. PMID:24600690

  19. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... follows: EC28SE91.043 where— ρ=mass density of water (slugs/ft.2); V=volume of float (ft.2); C x... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a..., the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the float bottom to avoid excessive local...

  20. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... follows: EC28SE91.043 where— ρ=mass density of water (slugs/ft.2); V=volume of float (ft.2); C x... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a..., the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the float bottom to avoid excessive local...

  1. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... follows: EC28SE91.043 where— ρ=mass density of water (slugs/ft.2); V=volume of float (ft.2); C x... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a..., the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the float bottom to avoid excessive local...

  2. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... follows: EC28SE91.043 where— ρ=mass density of water (slugs/ft.2); V=volume of float (ft.2); C x... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a..., the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the float bottom to avoid excessive local...

  3. 14 CFR 25.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... follows: EC28SE91.043 where— ρ=mass density of water (slugs/ft.2); V=volume of float (ft.2); C x... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a..., the prescribed water loads may be distributed over the float bottom to avoid excessive local...

  4. Flame propagation over a layer of crude oil floating on water

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, M. ); Saito, K. ); Altenkirch, R.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The velocity of propagation of a flame over layers of three types of crude oil of various thicknesses on water was measured at different initial temperatures and times of exposure to the air. The rate of propagation was slower, and the width of the preheating zone was narrower the thinner the layer of crude oil. The pattern of propagation varied with the type of crude oil, its temperature, and the time of exposure, but, as the time of exposure increased, the effects of the type of crude oil and the temperature diminished, i.e., the diffusional flame is the controlling factor in this phenomenon.

  5. Keto-enol tautomerization of a peptide group with proton transfer through a water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    Calculations were performed for structures of the keto and enol forms of dipeptide N-glycylglycine and its complexes with water molecules using the quantum-chemical B3LYP/6-31+G** method. The barrier for the reactions of the dipeptide's keto-enol tautomerization that proceed by the mechanism of intramolecular proton transfer and proton transfer through water molecules connecting the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the (-CONH-) peptide group was calculated. It was found that the barrier of the keto-enol tautomerization reaction with proton transfer by an exchange mechanism through water molecules is decreased halved compared to direct intramolecular transfer. It was shown that addition of a second water molecule in the transfer chain leads to linearization of the H-bonds bridges and increases hydrogen bonding between the peptide group and water molecules, but has virtually no influence on the calculated value of the keto-enol tautomerization barrier of about 20 kcal/mol. The structures of the transition states of the reaction indicate that the transfer of protons along the H-bonds chain is in both cases concerted but asynchronous. The order of the protons translocations along the water bridge is explained on the basis of NBO analysis of the relative strength of H-bonds in the transfer chain when the proton involved in the strongest H-bond is transferred first.

  6. [Environmental Effects of Algae Bloom Cluster: Impact on the Floating Plant Water Hyacinth Photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Bao, Xian-ming; Gu, Dong-xiang; Wu, Ting-ting; Shi, Zu-liang; Liu, Guo-feng; Han Shi-qun; Zhou, Shi-qun; Zhou, Qing

    2015-06-01

    It is an efficient and effective ecological restoration method by using the adaptability, large biomass of aquatic plants to purify the polluted water at present. However, there is a lack of systematic research on the impact on the physiological ecology of aquatic plants and its environmental effects of algae blooms cluster in summer. The aim of this paper is to reveal the mechanism of macrophytes demise in a shallow ecosystem by studying the influence on photosynthesis of water hyacinth caused by the cynaobacterial blooms gathered, and also to provide the theoretical basis for full effects of purification function of macrophytes to reduce the negative effects on the aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered during the higher temperature (not lower 25 degrees C) through simulating experiments. Results showed the dissolved oxygen quickly consumed in root zone of aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered and showed a lack of oxygen (DO < 0.2 mg x L(-1)); and the ORP was lower than -100 mV after 1 d, and it declined to -200 mV at the end of the experiment, and pH declined 0. 7unit compared with that of control group ( CK). There were lots of nutrients releasing to the water after the algae cell died and the NH4+ -N concentration was 102 times higher than that of the control group root zone. And the macrophytes photosynthesis reduced quickly and the plant body damaged with the intimidation of higher NH4+ -N concentration (average content was 45.6 mg x L(-1)) and hypoxia after algae cell decomposed. The average net photosynthesis rate, leaf transpiration rate were 0.6 times, 0.55 times of the control group, and they reduced to 3.96 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), 1.38 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively. At the end of the experiment, they were 22.0 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and 7.61 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1) for the control group. Results also showed the algae bloom together had the irreversible damage to the aquatic plants. So in the practice of ecological restoration, it should

  7. Kinetics of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal from water by two floating macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Maine, M A; Hadad, H R; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Pedro, M C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal kinetics from water by Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia herzogii. The accumulation in plant tissues and the effects of both Cr forms on plant growth were also evaluated. Plants were exposed to 2 and 6 mg L(-1) of Cr(III) or Cr(VI) during 30 days. At the end of the experiment, Cr(VI) removal percentages were significantly lower than those obtained for Cr(III) for both macrophytes. Cr(III) removal kinetics involved a fast and a slow component. The fast component was primarily responsible for Cr(III) removal while Cr(VI) removal kinetics involved only a slow process. Cr accumulated principally in the roots. In the Cr(VI) treatments a higher translocation from roots to aerial parts than in Cr(III) treatments was observed. Both macrophytes demonstrated a high ability to remove Cr(III) but not Cr(VI). Cr(III) inhibited the growth at the highest studied concentration of both macrophytes while Cr(VI) caused senescence. These results have important implications in the use of constructed wetlands for secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Common primary treatments of effluents containing Cr(VI) consists in its reduction to Cr(III). Cr(III) concentrations in these effluents are normally below the highest studied concentrations in this work. PMID:26366503

  8. Environmental radiation levels in soil and sediment samples collected from floating water from a land runway resulting from heavy rains in the Jeddah region, KSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohery, M.; Baz, Shadiah; Kelany, Adel M.; Abdallah, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    The natural radiation levels in soil and sediment samples collected from floating water from a land runway resulting from heavy rains in the Jeddah region as well as the activity in the population of its surrounding environments were studied. In the regions surrounding Jeddah, the movements of floating water may increase the concentration of radioactivity due to the movement of soil due to heavy rains. In addition, the technological development of industry, agriculture and other sources around the Jeddah region has increased environmental pollution, resulting in noticeable concentrations of radioactivity. The measured activity concentrations of 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 208Tl, 40K, 226Ra and 228Ra in the studied area suggest that they are within the world average for soils and sediments, except those for water sample no. 4; the concentration in this sample was five times higher than the world average concentration (this water is not consumable). Herein, the radioactivity concentrations that were obtained from the analysis of soil and sediment samples that were collected from the investigated area are discussed. Additionally, the absorbed dose rate (D), radium equivalent activity (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) and annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) were evaluated. For the soil and sediment samples, the average radioactivity concentrations were determined for each site and are expressed in Becquerels per kilogram (Bq/kg) of dry weight, while for the measurement of both the 226Ra and 228Ra isotopes in the water samples, the activity concentration is expressed in picoCuries per liter (pCi/l). The obtained results were compared with other measurements from different countries. The movement of floating water around the Jeddah region increases the concentration of radioactivity due to the movement of soils with heavy rains.

  9. Synthesis and structures of ansa-titanocene complexes with diatomic bridging units for overall water splitting.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Monty; Hansen, Sven; Godemann, Christian; Spannenberg, Anke; Beweries, Torsten

    2013-05-10

    The synthesis of a series of ansa-titanocene dichlorides [Cp'2TiCl2] (Cp' = bridged η(5)-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl) and the corresponding titanocene bis(trimethylsilyl)acetylene complexes [Cp'2Ti(η(2)-Me3SiC2SiMe3)] is described. The ethanediyl-bridged complexes [C2H4(C5Me4)2TiCl2] (2-Cl2) and [C2H4(C5Me4)2Ti(η(2)-Me3SiC2SiMe3)] (2-btmsa; btmsa = η(2)-Me3SiC2SiMe3) can be obtained from the hitherto unknown calcocenophane complex [C2H4(C5Me4)2Ca(THF)2] (1). Furthermore, a heterodiatomic bridging unit containing both, a dimethylsilyl and a methylene group was introduced to yield the ansa-titanocene dichloride [Me2SiCH2(C5Me4)2TiCl2] (3-Cl2) and the bis(trimethylsilyl)acetylene complex [Me2SiCH2(C5Me4)2Ti(η(2)-Me3SiC2SiMe3)] (3-btmsa). Besides, tetramethyldisilyl- and dimethylsilyl-bridged metallocene complexes (structural motif 4 and 5, respectively) were prepared. All ansa-titanocene alkyne complexes were reacted with stoichiometric amounts of water; the hydrolysis products were isolated as model complexes for the investigation of the elemental steps of overall water splitting. Compounds 1, 2-btmsa, 2-(OH)2, 3-Cl2, 3-btmsa, 4-(OH)2, 3-alkenyl and 5-alkenyl were characterised by X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:23536432

  10. Surface residues dynamically organize water bridges to enhance electron transfer between proteins

    PubMed Central

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Babcock, Nathan S.; Řezáč, Jan; Sanders, Barry C.; Salahub, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy production depends on electron transfer (ET) between proteins. In this theoretical study, we investigate the impact of structural and conformational variations on the electronic coupling between the redox proteins methylamine dehydrogenase and amicyanin from Paracoccus denitrificans. We used molecular dynamics simulations to generate configurations over a duration of 40 ns (sampled at 100-fs intervals) in conjunction with an ET pathway analysis to estimate the ET coupling strength of each configuration. In the wild-type complex, we find that the most frequently occurring molecular configurations afford superior electronic coupling due to the consistent presence of a water molecule hydrogen-bonded between the donor and acceptor sites. We attribute the persistence of this water bridge to a “molecular breakwater” composed of several hydrophobic residues surrounding the acceptor site. The breakwater supports the function of nearby solvent-organizing residues by limiting the exchange of water molecules between the sterically constrained ET region and the more turbulent surrounding bulk. When the breakwater is affected by a mutation, bulk solvent molecules disrupt the water bridge, resulting in reduced electronic coupling that is consistent with recent experimental findings. Our analysis suggests that, in addition to enabling the association and docking of the proteins, surface residues stabilize and control interprotein solvent dynamics in a concerted way. PMID:20547871

  11. ICE911 Research: Floating Safe Inert Materials to Preserve Ice and Conserve Water in Order to Mitigate Climate Change Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Manzara, A.; Chetty, S.; Venkatesh, S.; Scholtz, A.

    2015-12-01

    bodies of water cooler using these floating materials could help avoid scenarios like the overheated lakes and streams that led to millions of fish killed this summer in Washington State. Third, Ice911's materials can later be removed if no longer needed, and could be repurposed to another area in need.

  12. Comparison of solidification of floating drop and homogenous liquid-liquid microextractions for the extraction of two plasticizers from the water kept in PET-bottles.

    PubMed

    Yamini, Yadollah; Ghambarian, Mahnaz; Khalili-Zanjani, Mohammad Reza; Faraji, Mohammad; Shariati, Shahab

    2009-09-01

    Two approaches based on solidification of floating drop microextraction (SFDME) and homogenous liquid-liquid microextraction (HLLE) were compared for the extraction and preconcentration of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) from the mineral water samples. In SFDME, a floated drop of the mixture of acetophenone/1-undecanol (1:8) was exposed on the surface of the aqueous solution and extraction was permitted to occur. In HLLE, a homogenous ternary solvent system was used by water/methanol/chloroform and the phase separation phenomenon occurred by salt addition. Under the optimal conditions, the LODs for the two target plasticizers (DEHA and DEHP), obtained by SFDME-GC-FID and HLLE-GC-FID, were ranged from 0.03 to 0.01 microg/L and 0.02 to 0.01 microg/L, respectively. HLLE provided higher preconcentration factors (472.5- and 551.2-fold) within the shorter extraction time as well as better RSDs (4.5-6.9%). While, in SFDME, high preconcentration factors in the range of 162-198 and good RSDs in the range of 5.2-9.6% were obtained. Both methods were applied for the analysis of two plasticizers in different water samples and two target plasticizers were found in the bottled mineral water after the expiring time and the boiling water was exposed to a polyethylene vial. PMID:19746401

  13. Floating Point Control Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  14. Flinking: Neither Floating nor Sinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger B.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an activity that challenges students to make an object that, when released under water, does not float up or sink down. The main concept this activity investigates is the density of ordinary objects in comparison to the density of water. (PR)

  15. New Water Vapor Barrier Film Based on Lamellar Aliphatic-Monoamine-Bridged Polysilsesquioxane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Ce; Ding, Ruimin; Cui, Xinmin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Qinghua; Xu, Yao

    2016-06-15

    Siloxane-based hybrid lamellar materials with ordered nanostructure units paralleling to the substrate have been widely used for water vapor barrier. However, it is very difficult to control the orientation of the lamellar units at molecular level. In this Research Article, a new lamellar bridged polysilsesquioxane (BPSQ) film, whose voids between lamellae were filled by pendant alkyl chains in the organic bridge, was prepared via the stoichiometric reaction between 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and aliphatic monoamine at 60 °C without catalyst. Experimental evidence obtained from FT-IR, MS, NMR, and GIXRD techniques suggested that the as-prepared BPSQ films were constructed by lamellar units with disordered orientation. Nonetheless, they possessed satisfactory water vapor barrier performance for potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) and deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) optical crystals, and the water vapor transmission rate through BPSQ film with thickness of 25 μm was as low as 20.3 g·m(-2)·d(-1). Those results proved that filling the voids between molecular lamellae with alkyl chains greatly weakened the effect of lamellar unit orientation on the vapor barrier property of BPSQ film. PMID:27224032

  16. Topoisomerase IV-quinolone interactions are mediated through a water-metal ion bridge: mechanistic basis of quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Katie J.; McPherson, Sylvia A.; Turnbough, Charles L.; Kerns, Robert J.; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Although quinolones are the most commonly prescribed antibacterials, their use is threatened by an increasing prevalence of resistance. The most common causes of quinolone resistance are mutations of a specific serine or acidic residue in the A subunit of gyrase or topoisomerase IV. These amino acids are proposed to serve as a critical enzyme-quinolone interaction site by anchoring a water-metal ion bridge that coordinates drug binding. To probe the role of the proposed water-metal ion bridge, we characterized wild-type, GrlAE85K, GrlAS81F/E85K, GrlAE85A, GrlAS81F/E85A and GrlAS81F Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV, their sensitivity to quinolones and related drugs and their use of metal ions. Mutations increased the Mg2+ concentration required to produce maximal quinolone-induced DNA cleavage and restricted the divalent metal ions that could support quinolone activity. Individual mutation of Ser81 or Glu85 partially disrupted bridge function, whereas simultaneous mutation of both residues abrogated protein–quinolone interactions. Results provide functional evidence for the existence of the water-metal ion bridge, confirm that the serine and glutamic acid residues anchor the bridge, demonstrate that the bridge is the primary conduit for interactions between clinically relevant quinolones and topoisomerase IV and provide a likely mechanism for the most common causes of quinolone resistance. PMID:23460203

  17. Bridging the Gap: The 'Soft Path' for Improving Resilience and Adaptability of Water Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleick, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    The failure of traditional water management systems in the 20th century -- what I call the "hard path for water" -- is evident in several ways, including the persistent inability to meet basic human needs for safe water and adequate sanitation for vast populations, ongoing and accelerating aquatic ecosystem collapses , and growing political disputes over water allocation, management, and use, even in regions where substantial investment in water has been made. Progress in resolving these problems, especially in the face of unavoidable climate changes, growing populations, and constrained financial systems, will require bridging hydrologic and social sciences in new ways. Integrating social and cultural knowledge with new economic and technological tools and classical hydrologic and climatological sciences can produce a new “soft path for water” that offers the opportunity to move toward sustainable water systems. This talk will define the soft path for water and offer examples of innovative steps already being taken along that path in the western United States, South Africa, India, and elsewhere.

  18. A Comparison of Platform Options for Deep-water Floating Offshore Vertical Axis Wind Turbines: An Initial Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L; Fowler, Matthew; Goupee, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    This analysis utilizes a 5 - MW VAWT topside design envelope created by Sandia National Laborator ies to compare floating platform options fo r each turbine in the design space. The platform designs are based on two existing designs, the OC3 Hywind spar - buoy and Principal Power's WindFloat semi - submersible. These designs are scaled using Froude - scaling relationships to determine an appropriately sized spar - buoy and semi - submersible design for each topside. Both the physical size of the required platform as well as mooring configurations are considered. Results are compared with a comparable 5 - MW HAWT in order to identify potential differences in the platform and mooring sizing between the VAWT and HAWT . The study shows that there is potential for cost savings due to reduced platform size requirements for the VAWT.

  19. 10. LOOKING DOWN ON TUG AND CAR FLOAT BEING UNLOADED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOOKING DOWN ON TUG AND CAR FLOAT BEING UNLOADED AT BRIDGE NO. 11 SHOWING TRACK, LOCKING MECHANISMS, AND MOORING WINCH IN FOREGROUND. LOOKING EAST. - Greenville Yard, Transfer Bridge System, Port of New York/New Jersey, Upper New York Bay, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  20. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  1. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  2. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  3. 33 CFR 144.01-15 - Alternates for life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternates for life floats. 144... for life floats. (a) Approved lifeboats, approved life rafts or approved inflatable life rafts may be used in lieu of approved life floats for either all or part of the capacity required. When...

  4. Competition between Free-Floating Plants Is Strongly Driven by Previously Experienced Phosphorus Concentrations in the Water Column.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Edwin T H M; Neefjes, Rozemarijn E M; Zuidam, Bastiaan G van

    2016-01-01

    Nutrients can determine the outcome of the competition between different floating plant species. The response of floating plants to current phosphorus levels may be affected by previously experienced phosphorus concentrations because some species have the ability to store excess phosphorus for later use. This might have an impact on their competition. Here, we investigate the effect of previous and actual phosphorus concentrations on the growth rate of free-floating plant species (Azolla filiculoides, Lemna minor/gibba and Ricciocarpus natans)and the effect of phosphorus history on the competition between L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides and between L. minor/gibba and R. natans. As expected, plant growth was lower when previously kept at low instead of high phosphorus concentrations. Growth of L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides with a phosphorus rich history was comparable for low and high actual phosphorus concentrations, however, internal phosphorus concentrations were significantly lower with low actual phosphorus concentration. This indicates that both species perform luxury phosphorus uptake. Furthermore, internal P concentration in Azolla and Lemna increased within two weeks after a period of P deficit without a strong increase in growth. A. filiculoides in a mixture with L. minor/gibba grew faster than its monoculture. Morphological differences may explain why A. filiculoides outcompeted L. minor/gibba and these differences may be induced by phosphorus concentrations in the past. Growth of L. minor/gibba was only reduced by the presence of A. filiculoides with a high phosphorus history. Growth of L. minor/gibba and R. natans in mixtures was positively affected only when they had a high phosphorus history themselves and their competitor a low phosphorus history. These observations clearly indicate that phosphorus history of competing plants is important for understanding the outcome of the competition. Therefore, actual and previously experienced phosphorus

  5. WATER QUALITY ISSUES AND EXPECTATIONS REGARDING RECONSTRUCTION OF THE HIX BRIDGE, WESTPORT, MA

    EPA Science Inventory

    At present there is a large deposit of rocks beneath and near the Hix Bridge located on the East Branch of the Westport River system. Following the 1938 hurricane, remnants of a 19th century bridge were apparently deposited into this constriction. The existing bridge, built in 19...

  6. Floating: sink or swim.

    PubMed

    Pronger, L

    1995-12-01

    Budget restrictions, fewer human resources and fluctuating patient populations have combined to increase the practice of floating general duty nurses. Floating occurs when a nurse from an overstaffed unit, based on patient load, is required to work in another unit that is understaffed. Floating is not a new practice, but it has always been an emotionally charged issue. Today, with more float pool nurses seeking the security of a permanent position in a home unit, the issue has increased in intensity. PMID:8713148

  7. The Design of Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1938-01-01

    Following a summary of the multiplicity of domestic and foreign floats and a brief enumeration of the requirements of floats, the essential form parameters and their effect on the qualities of floats are detailed. On this basis a standard float design is developed which in model families with varying length/beam ratio and angle of dead rise is analyzed by an experimental method which permits its best utilization on any airplane.

  8. Water-quality data for the Rio Grande between Picacho Bridge near Las Cruces and Calle del Norte Bridge near Mesilla, New Mexico, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    The City of Las Cruces is concerned about water quality in a reach of the Rio Grande that receives outfall from the City of Las Cruces wastewater-treatment plant. Water-quality samples were collected from the Rio Grande at Picacho Bridge near Las Cruces, New Mexico; from the sampling site at the City of Las Cruces wastewater-treatment plant; and from the Rio Grande at Calle del Norte Bridge near Mesilla, New Mexico. The samples were collected on 12 days from August 6, 1996, to February 28, 1997, and were analyzed for a suite of dissolved and total constituents including trace metals. Instantaneous stream discharge was measured concurrently with collection of the Rio Grande samples. At the wastewater- treatment plant, the City of Las Cruces provided instantaneous discharge rates concurrent with sampling. Quality-control measures used in this study to ensure analytical accuracy included replicate sampling, replicate analysis of split samples, ambient blanks, equipment blanks, and analysis of standard reference water samples.

  9. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic drop for extraction of organochlorine pesticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Leong, Mei-I; Huang, Shang-Da

    2009-11-01

    A new simple and rapid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method has been developed for the extraction and analysis of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in water samples. The method is based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) and is combined with gas chromatography/electron capture detection (GC/ECD). Very little solvent is required in this method. The disperser solvent (200microL acetonitrile) containing 10microL hexadecane (HEX) is rapidly injected by a syringe into the 5.0mL water sample. After centrifugation, the fine HEX droplets (6+/-0.5microL) float at the top of the screw-cap test tube. The test tube is then cooled in an ice bath. After 5min, the HEX solvent solidifies and is then transferred into a conical vial, where it melts quickly at room temperature, and 1microL of it is injected into a gas chromatograph for analysis. Under optimum conditions, the enrichment factors and extraction recoveries are high and range between 37-872 and 82.9-102.5%, respectively. The linear range is wide (0.025-20microgL(-1)), and the limits of detection are between 0.011 and 0.11microgL(-1) for most of the analytes. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 1microgL(-1) of OCPs in water was in the range of 5.8-8.8%. The performance of the method was gauged by analyzing samples of lake and tap water. PMID:19766234

  10. An improved understanding of the natural resonances of moonpools contained within floating rigid-bodies: Theory and application to oscillating water column devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L.

    2015-09-23

    The fundamental interactions between waves, a floating rigid-body, and a moonpool that is selectively open to atmosphere or enclosed to purposefully induce pressure fluctuations are investigated. The moonpool hydrodynamic characteristics and the hydrodynamic coupling to the rigid-body are derived implicitly through reciprocity relations on an array of field points. By modeling the free surface of the moonpool in this manner, an explicit hydrodynamic coupling term is included in the equations of motion. This coupling results in the migration of the moonpool's natural resonance frequency from the piston frequency to a new frequency when enclosed in a floating rigid-body. Two geometries that highlight distinct aspects of marine vessels and oscillating water column (OWC) renewable energy devices are analyzed to reveal the coupled natural resonance migration. The power performance of these two OWCs in regular waves is also investigated. The air chamber is enclosed and a three-dimensional, linear, frequency domain performance model that links the rigid-body to the moonpool through a linear resistive control strategy is detailed. Furthermore, an analytic expression for the optimal linear resistive control values in regular waves is presented.

  11. Vertical temperature dynamics in the Northern Baltic Sea based on 3D modelling and data from shallow-water Argo floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerlund, Antti; Tuomi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    3D hydrodynamic models often produce errors in the depth of the mixed layer and the vertical density structure. We used the 3D hydrodynamic model NEMO to investigate the effect of vertical turbulence parameterisations on seasonal temperature dynamics in the Bothnian Sea, Baltic Sea for the years 2012 and 2013. We used vertical profiles from new shallow-water Argo floats, operational in the area since 2012, to validate our model. We found that NEMO was able to reproduce the general features of the seasonal temperature variations in the study area, when meteorological forcing was accurate. The k-ε and k-ω schemes were selected for a more detailed analysis. Both schemes showed clear differences, but neither proved superior. While sea surface temperature was better simulated with the k-ω scheme, thermocline depth was clearly better with the k-ε scheme. We investigated the effect of wave-breaking on the mixing of the surface layer. The Craig and Banner parameterisation clearly improved the representation of thermocline depth. However, further tuning of the mixing parameterisations for the Baltic Sea is needed to better simulate the vertical temperature structure. We found the autonomous Baltic Sea Argo floats valuable for model validation and performance evaluation.

  12. An improved understanding of the natural resonances of moonpools contained within floating rigid-bodies: Theory and application to oscillating water column devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bull, Diana L.

    2015-09-23

    The fundamental interactions between waves, a floating rigid-body, and a moonpool that is selectively open to atmosphere or enclosed to purposefully induce pressure fluctuations are investigated. The moonpool hydrodynamic characteristics and the hydrodynamic coupling to the rigid-body are derived implicitly through reciprocity relations on an array of field points. By modeling the free surface of the moonpool in this manner, an explicit hydrodynamic coupling term is included in the equations of motion. This coupling results in the migration of the moonpool's natural resonance frequency from the piston frequency to a new frequency when enclosed in a floating rigid-body. Two geometriesmore » that highlight distinct aspects of marine vessels and oscillating water column (OWC) renewable energy devices are analyzed to reveal the coupled natural resonance migration. The power performance of these two OWCs in regular waves is also investigated. The air chamber is enclosed and a three-dimensional, linear, frequency domain performance model that links the rigid-body to the moonpool through a linear resistive control strategy is detailed. Furthermore, an analytic expression for the optimal linear resistive control values in regular waves is presented.« less

  13. Water2Invest: Global facility for calculating investments needed to bridge the climate-induced water gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Droogers, Peter; Brandsma, Jairus; Buytaert, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek; Meijer, Karen; van Aalst, Maaike; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Decision makers responsible for climate change adaptation investments are confronted with large uncertainties regarding future water availability and water demand, as well as the investment cost required to reduce the water gap. Moreover, scientists have worked hard to increase fundamental knowledge on climate change and its impacts (climate services), while practical use of this knowledge is limited due to a lack of tools for decision support under uncertain long term future scenarios (decision services). The Water2Invest project aims are to (i) assess the joint impact of climate change and socioeconomic change on water scarcity, (ii) integrate impact and potential adaptation in one flow, (iii) prioritize adaptation options to counteract water scarcity on their financial, regional socio-economic and environmental implications, and (iv) deliver all this information in an integrated user-friendly web-based service. Global water availability is computed between 2006 and 2100 using the PCR-GLOBWB water resources model at a 6 minute spatial resolution. Climate change scenarios are based on the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the IPCC Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) that defines four CO2 emission scenarios as representative concentration pathways. Water demand is computed for agriculture, industry, domestic, and environmental requirements based on socio-economic scenarios of increase in population and gross domestic product. Using a linear programming algorithm, water is allocated on a monthly basis over the four sectors. Based on these assessments, the user can evaluate various technological and infrastructural adaptation measures to assess the investments needed to bridge the future water gap. Regional environmental and socioeconomic effects of these investments are evaluated, such as environmental flows or downstream effects. A scheme is developed to evaluate the strategies on robustness and flexibility under climate change and scenario uncertainty

  14. Application of the Multi-Dimensional Surface Water Modeling System at Bridge 339, Copper River Highway, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.; Conaway, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    The Copper River Basin, the sixth largest watershed in Alaska, drains an area of 24,200 square miles. This large, glacier-fed river flows across a wide alluvial fan before it enters the Gulf of Alaska. Bridges along the Copper River Highway, which traverses the alluvial fan, have been impacted by channel migration. Due to a major channel change in 2001, Bridge 339 at Mile 36 of the highway has undergone excessive scour, resulting in damage to its abutments and approaches. During the snow- and ice-melt runoff season, which typically extends from mid-May to September, the design discharge for the bridge often is exceeded. The approach channel shifts continuously, and during our study it has shifted back and forth from the left bank to a course along the right bank nearly parallel to the road. Maintenance at Bridge 339 has been costly and will continue to be so if no action is taken. Possible solutions to the scour and erosion problem include (1) constructing a guide bank to redirect flow, (2) dredging approximately 1,000 feet of channel above the bridge to align flow perpendicular to the bridge, and (3) extending the bridge. The USGS Multi-Dimensional Surface Water Modeling System (MD_SWMS) was used to assess these possible solutions. The major limitation of modeling these scenarios was the inability to predict ongoing channel migration. We used a hybrid dataset of surveyed and synthetic bathymetry in the approach channel, which provided the best approximation of this dynamic system. Under existing conditions and at the highest measured discharge and stage of 32,500 ft3/s and 51.08 ft, respectively, the velocities and shear stresses simulated by MD_SWMS indicate scour and erosion will continue. Construction of a 250-foot-long guide bank would not improve conditions because it is not long enough. Dredging a channel upstream of Bridge 339 would help align the flow perpendicular to Bridge 339, but because of the mobility of the channel bed, the dredged channel would

  15. Floating Boats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a simple laboratory activity in which students collect a series of measurements and then use graphical analysis to determine the nature of the relationship between an object's mass and the volume of water it displaces. In this activity, students explore the relationships between the mass of a floating…

  16. Catalytic oxidation of water and alcohols by a robust iron(iii) complex bearing a cross-bridged cyclam ligand.

    PubMed

    Tan, Peng; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2015-08-01

    An iron(iii) complex bearing a cross-bridged cyclam ligand (4,11-dimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo[6.6.2]hexadecane) is an efficient catalyst for the oxidation of both water and alcohols using sodium periodate as the oxidant. In catalytic water oxidation a maximum turnover number (TON) of 1030 is achieved, while in catalytic alcohol oxidation >95% conversions and yields can be obtained. PMID:26126521

  17. Analysis of Vertical Dynamics in the Northern Baltic Sea based on 3D Modelling and Data from Shallow-Water Argo Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerlund, Antti; Tuomi, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Vertical mixing is a challenge for ocean models. 3D hydrodynamic models often produce considerable errors in mixed layer depths and vertical temperature structure that can be related to the vertical turbulence parameterisation. These errors can be pronounced in areas with complex hydrography. In the Baltic Sea, for example, there are high horizontal and vertical salinity gradients. Furthermore, thermocline and halocline are located at different depths. This produces stratification conditions challenging for all ocean models. We studied vertical mixing with modelling experiments and new observational data. NEMO 3D ocean model has been set up at Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) for the Baltic Sea, based on the NEMO Nordic configuration. The model has been discretized on a Baltic Sea - North Sea grid with 2 nautical mile resolution and 56 vertical layers, using FMI-HIRLAM atmospheric forcing. The observational data for Baltic Sea off-shore areas is sparse and new methods are needed to collect data for model validation and development. FMI has been testing Argo floats in the Baltic Sea since 2011 in order to increase the amount of observed vertical profiles of salinity and temperature. This is the first time Argo floats have been successfully used in the brackish, shallow waters of the Baltic Sea. This new data set is well suited for evaluating the capability of hydrodynamic models to produce the vertical structure of temperature. It provides a time series of profiles from the area of interest with good temporal resolution, showing the structure of temperature in the water column throughout the summer. We found that NEMO was able to reproduce the general features of the seasonal temperature variations in the study area, when meteorological forcing was accurate. We ran the model with different vertical turbulence parameterisations. The k-ɛ and k-ω schemes showed clear differences, but neither proved superior. While sea surface temperature was better simulated

  18. Reviewing the circulation and mixing of Antarctic Intermediate Water in the South Pacific using evidence from geochemical tracers and Argo float trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, Helen C.; Sutton, Phil J.; Williams, Michael J. M.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2013-03-01

    Evidence from physical and geochemical tracers measured during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) shows that there are four sub-types of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the South Pacific. The main formation region of AAIW is the southeast Pacific, where fresh, cold, high oxygen, low nutrient, intermediate waters are created. This AAIW is transported north and mixes with Equatorial Pacific Intermediate Waters (EqPIW), themselves a combination of AAIW and nutrient rich, old North Pacific deep waters. 'Tasman' AAIW found in the Coral and Tasman Seas is more saline and warmer than the main subtropical gyre, and appears to have formed from mixing of AAIW with thermocline waters in the Tasman Gyre. Tasman AAIW leaks out of the Tasman basin to the north of New Zealand and along Chatham Rise, and also in the South Tasman Sea via the Tasman Leakage. Another source of relatively fresh, high oxygen, low nutrient, young AAIW comes directly from the Southern Ocean, flowing into the southwest and central South Pacific Basin, west of the East Pacific Rise. This 'Southern Ocean' (SO) AAIW is most likely a mixture of AAIW formed locally at the Subantarctic Front (SAF), and AAIW formed along the SAF in the southeast Pacific or Indian oceans and transported by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Interpreting physical and geochemical tracers, combined with velocity estimates from Argo floats, and previous research, has allowed us to refine the detailed circulation pattern of AAIW in the South Pacific, especially in the topographically complex southwest Pacific.

  19. Calculation and experiment for dynamic response of bridge in deep water under seismic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-guang; Sun, Guo-shuai

    2014-08-01

    The fluid-structure interaction under seismic excitation is very complicated, and thus the damage identification of the bridge in deep water is the key technique to ensure the safe service. Based on nonlinear Morison equation considering the added mass effect and the fluid-structure interaction effect, the effect of hydrodynamic pressure on the structure is analyzed. A series of underwater shaking table tests are conducted in the air and in water. The dynamic characteristics affected by hydrodynamic pressure are discussed and the distribution of hydrodynamic pressure is also analyzed. In addition, the damage of structure is distinguished through the natural frequency and the difference of modal curvature, and is then compared with the test results. The numerical simulation and test of this study indicate that the effect of hydrodynamic pressure on the structure should not be neglected. It is also found that the presence of the damage, the location of the damage and the degree of the severity can be judged through the variation of structure frequency and the difference of modal curvature.

  20. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic droplet for the determination of thiamphenicol and florfenicol in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Al-Hamadani, Sulala M Z F; Zhou, Guangming; Liu, Mengzi; Zhu, Hui; Chen, Junhua

    2015-05-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of a floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO) followed by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection was applied for the determination of thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF) in water samples. 1-Undecanol was used as the extraction solvent which has lower density than water, low toxicity, and low melting point (19°C). A mixture of 800mL acetone (disperser solvent) and 80µL of 1-undecanol (extraction solvent) was injected into 20mL of aqueous solution. After 5min, 0.6g of NaCl was added and the sample vial was shaken. After 5min, the sample was centrifuged at 3500rpm for 3min, and then placed in an ice bath. When the extraction solvent floating on the aqueous solution had solidified, it was transferred into another conical vial where it was melted quickly at room temperature, and was diluted with methanol to 1mL, and analyzed by HPLC-UV detection. Parameters influencing the extraction efficiency were thoroughly examined and optimized. The extraction recoveries (ER) and the enrichment factors (EF) ranged from 67% to 72% and 223 to 241, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) (S/N=3) were 0.33 and 0.56µgL(-1) for TAP and FF, respectively. Linear dynamic range (LDR) was in the range of 1.0-550µgL(-1) for TAP and 1.5-700µgL(-1) for FF, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 2.6-3.5% and the recoveries of spiked samples ranged from 94% to 106%. PMID:25723132

  1. Drift trajectories of a floating human body simulated in a hydraulic model of Puget Sound.

    PubMed

    Ebbesmeyer, C C; Haglund, W D

    1994-01-01

    After a young man jumped off a 221-foot (67 meters) high bridge, the drift of the body that beached 20 miles (32 km) away at Alki Point in Seattle, Washington was simulated with a hydraulic model. Simulations for the appropriate time period were performed using a small floating bead to represent the body in the hydraulic model at the University of Washington. Bead movements were videotaped and transferred to Computer Aided Drafting (AutoCAD) charts on a personal computer. Because of strong tidal currents in the narrow passage under the bridge (The Narrows near Tacoma, WA), small changes in the time of the jump (+/- 30 minutes) made large differences in the distance the body traveled (30 miles; 48 km). Hydraulic and other types of oceanographic models may be located by contacting technical experts known as physical oceanographers at local universities, and can be utilized to demonstrate trajectories of floating objects and the time required to arrive at selected locations. Potential applications for forensic death investigators include: to be able to set geographic and time limits for searches; determine potential origin of remains found floating or beached; and confirm and correlate information regarding entry into the water and sightings of remains. PMID:8113703

  2. Discrete Element Modelling of Floating Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffey, Samantha; Liang, Qiuhua; Parkin, Geoff; Large, Andy; Rouainia, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Flash flooding is characterised by high velocity flows which impact vulnerable catchments with little warning time and as such, result in complex flow dynamics which are difficult to replicate through modelling. The impacts of flash flooding can be made yet more severe by the transport of both natural and anthropogenic debris, ranging from tree trunks to vehicles, wheelie bins and even storage containers, the effects of which have been clearly evident during recent UK flooding. This cargo of debris can have wide reaching effects and result in actual flood impacts which diverge from those predicted. A build-up of debris may lead to partial channel blockage and potential flow rerouting through urban centres. Build-up at bridges and river structures also leads to increased hydraulic loading which may result in damage and possible structural failure. Predicting the impacts of debris transport; however, is difficult as conventional hydrodynamic modelling schemes do not intrinsically include floating debris within their calculations. Subsequently a new tool has been developed using an emerging approach, which incorporates debris transport through the coupling of two existing modelling techniques. A 1D hydrodynamic modelling scheme has here been coupled with a 2D discrete element scheme to form a new modelling tool which predicts the motion and flow-interaction of floating debris. Hydraulic forces arising from flow around the object are applied to instigate its motion. Likewise, an equivalent opposing force is applied to fluid cells, enabling backwater effects to be simulated. Shock capturing capabilities make the tool applicable to predicting the complex flow dynamics associated with flash flooding. The modelling scheme has been applied to experimental case studies where cylindrical wooden dowels are transported by a dam-break wave. These case studies enable validation of the tool's shock capturing capabilities and the coupling technique applied between the two numerical

  3. Bridge-scour analysis using the water surface profile (WSPRO) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.

    1993-01-01

    A program was developed to extract hydraulic information required for bridge-scour computations, from the Water-Surface Profile computation model (WSPRO). The program is written in compiled BASIC and is menu driven. Using only ground points, the program can compute average ground elevation, cross-sectional area below a specified datum, or create a Drawing Exchange Format (DXF) fie of cross section. Using both ground points ad hydraulic information form the equal-conveyance tubes computed by WSPRO, the program can compute hydraulic parameters at a user-specified station or in a user-specified subsection of the cross section. The program can identify the maximum velocity in a cross section and the velocity and depth at a user-specified station. The program also can identify the maximum velocity in the cross section and the average velocity, average depth, average ground elevation, width perpendicular to the flow, cross-sectional area of flow, and discharge in a subsection of the cross section. This program does not include any help or suggestions as to what data should be extracted; therefore, the used must understand the scour equations and associated variables to the able to extract the proper information from the WSPRO output.

  4. Determination of boron in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop coupled with a fluorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Li, Haifang; Mmereki, Daniel; Lu, Ying; Zheng, Yongzan; Zhong, Zhihui; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a new, rapid and reliable method for the determination of boron in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) prior to fluorescence spectra analysis was developed. As a result of its complexation with boric acid, the method relies on the enhancement of the fluorescence (λex = 350 nm, λem = 373 nm) of chromotropic acid. The influences of DLLME-SFO parameters, including the extraction solvent type and its volume, pH, the disperser solvent type and its volume, and salt effects were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.11 ng L(-1), with a preconcentration factor of 86 times. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 0-40 nM. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to analyze real water samples and the relative recoveries of water samples ranged from 86.9 to 93.2%. PMID:26911625

  5. "Floating shoulder" injuries.

    PubMed

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    "Floating shoulder" is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described. PMID:26961729

  6. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  7. 22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  8. 40 CFR 63.1043 - Standards-Separator floating roof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards-Separator floating roof. 63...) National Emission Standards for Oil-Water Separators and Organic-Water Separators § 63.1043 Standards—Separator floating roof. (a) This section applies to owners and operators subject to this subpart...

  9. 33 CFR 144.01-1 - Life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Life floats. 144.01-1 Section 144.01-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-1 Life floats. Each...

  10. Lagrangian floats as sea floor imaging platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Chris; Inglis, Gabrielle; McGilvray, Bryan

    2011-10-01

    There is a persistent need for high resolution photographic images of the sea floor and associated biota for marine habitat classification and fisheries stock assessment. This paper presents a novel low cost Lagrangian imaging platform that offers high quality images with reduced operational demands in comparison to existing methodologies such as diver surveys, drop cameras, ship towed systems and dedicated remote or autonomous underwater vehicles. The platform consists of a recently developed bottom following Lagrangian float fit with down looking stereo cameras and strobe lighting. The float can use active ballasting to perform constant altitude photographic drift surveys in coastal waters over varying bathymetry. Images from the float can be used to create large photomosaics, stereographic bathymetry estimates and image-derived current measurements. Test data are presented to demonstrate the operation of the Lagrangian float and summarize the data products.

  11. Rapid analysis of chlorinated anilines in environmental water samples using ultrasound assisted emulsification microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet followed by HPLC-UV detection.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Abilasha; Ponnusamy, Vinoth Kumar; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2012-08-15

    The present study demonstrates a simple, rapid and efficient method for the determination of chlorinated anilines (CAs) in environmental water samples using ultrasonication assisted emulsification microextraction technique based on solidification of floating organic droplet (USAEME-SFO) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) detection. In this extraction method, 1-dodecanol was used as extraction solvent which is of lower density than water, low toxicity, low volatility, and low melting point (24 °C). After the USAEME, extraction solvent could be collected easily by keeping the extraction tube in ice bath for 2 min and the solidified organic droplet was scooped out using a spatula and transferred to another glass vial and allowed to thaw. Then, 10 μL of extraction solvent was diluted with mobile phase (1:1) and taken for HPLC-UV analysis. Parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, such as the kind and volume of extraction solvent, volume of sample, ultrasonication time, pH and salt concentration were thoroughly examined and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the method showed good linearity in the concentration range of 0.05-500 ng mL(-1) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9948 to 0.9957 for the three target CAs. The limit of detection based on signal to noise ratio of 3 ranged from 0.01 to 0.1 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) varied from 2.1 to 6.1% (n=3) and the enrichment factors ranged from 44 to 124. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to analyze real water samples and the relative recoveries of environmental water samples ranged from 81.1 to 116.9%. PMID:22841080

  12. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  13. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  14. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  15. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  16. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  17. 33 CFR 144.01-5 - Location and launching of life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Location and launching of life floats. 144.01-5 Section 144.01-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Location and launching of life floats. The life floats shall be distributed in accessible locations...

  18. 33 CFR 144.01-5 - Location and launching of life floats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Location and launching of life floats. 144.01-5 Section 144.01-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Location and launching of life floats. The life floats shall be distributed in accessible locations...

  19. 33 CFR 147.815 - ExxonMobil Hoover Floating OCS Facility safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false ExxonMobil Hoover Floating OCS Facility safety zone. 147.815 Section 147.815 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Floating OCS Facility safety zone. (a) Description. The ExxonMobil Hoover Floating OCS Facility,...

  20. 33 CFR 147.815 - ExxonMobil Hoover Floating OCS Facility safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false ExxonMobil Hoover Floating OCS Facility safety zone. 147.815 Section 147.815 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Floating OCS Facility safety zone. (a) Description. The ExxonMobil Hoover Floating OCS Facility,...

  1. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  2. Recorded seismic response of a base-isolated steel bridge carrying a steel water pipe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Brady, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    A set of strong motion records was obtained from the base-isolated Santa Ana River Pipeline Bridge during the magnitude 5.9 Whittier Narrows, California, earthquake of October 1, 1987. The analysis of the records show that the level of excitation was not strong enough to fully activate the base isolators. The dominant modes of the response are the translations of the abutment-bridge-pipe system in the longitudinal and transverse directions, and the bending of the steel truss between supports in the vertical direction.

  3. Floating--A Key to Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Norman

    1980-01-01

    Described are several activities to be used to help students grasp the concept of floating. The activities include the use of a spring scale to measure the weight of the objects in air, in water, and in salt water, and a discussion of why there are differences in these weights. (DS)

  4. Dragging a floating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-11-01

    A cylinder immersed in a fluid stream experiences a drag, and it is well known that the drag coefficient is a function of the Reynolds number only. Here we study the force exerted on a long horizontal cylinder that is dragged perpendicular to its axis while floating on an air-water interface with a high Reynolds number. In addition to the flow-induced drag, the floating body is subjected to capillary forces along the contact line where the three phases of liquid/solid/gas meet. We first theoretically predict the meniscus profile around the horizontally moving cylinder assuming the potential flow, and show that the profile is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Then we compare our theoretical predictions and experimental measurement results for the drag coefficient of a floating horizontal cylinder that is given by a function of the Weber number and the Bond number. This study can help us to understand the horizontal motion of partially submerged objects at air-liquid interface, such as semi-aquatic insects and marine plants.

  5. Skylab floating ice experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J. (Principal Investigator); Ramseier, R. O.; Weaver, R. J.; Weeks, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Coupling of the aircraft data with the ground truth observations proved to be highly successful with interesting results being obtained with IR and SLAR passive microwave techniques, and standard photography. Of particular interest were the results of the PMIS system which operated at 10.69 GHz with both vertical and horizontal polarizations. This was the first time that dual polarized images were obtained from floating ice. In both sea and lake ice, it was possible to distinguish a wide variety of thin ice types because of their large differences in brightness temperatures. It was found that the higher brightness temperature was invariably obtained in the vertically polarized mode, and as the age of the ice increases the brightness temperature increases in both polarizations. Associated with this change in age, the difference in temperature was observed as the different polarizations decreased. It appears that the horizontally polarized data is the most sensitive to variations in ice type for both fresh water and sea ice. The study also showed the great amount of information on ice surface roughness and deformation patterns that can be obtained from X-band SLAR observations.

  6. Floating wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  7. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  8. Concrete production floating platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneur, O.; Falcimaigne, J.

    1981-01-01

    The floating production platforms operating in the North Sea are adapted from drilling semisubmersibles which allow only a limited payload capacity. Experience of concrete production platforms constructed for the North Sea has led Sea Tank Co. to propose a floating platform which offers large payload and oil storage capacities similar to those of existing fixed platforms. Sea Tank Co. and Institut Francais du Petrole joined forces in early 1976 to study the feasibility of a concrete floating production platform incorporating the structure and the production riser together. The results of this 3-yr program show that the concrete floating structure is economically attractive for permanent utilization on a production site. Furthermore, concrete has definite advantages over other materials, in its long term behavior.

  9. Micromechanisms with floating pivot

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-03-06

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use floating pivot structures to relieve some of the problems encountered in the use of solid flexible pivots.

  10. Crossing the Water: Spiritual Growth in "Bridge to Terabithia" and "Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Trudelle

    2011-01-01

    The author analyses two award-winning juvenile novels, "Bridge to Terabithia" by Katherine Paterson and "Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy" by Gary Schmidt. Each novel portrays a deep friendship between a boy and girl who cross a stream (or river) into a world that includes fantasy, play, closeness to nature and animals, and a sense of the…

  11. Stabilized floating platforms

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, David G.

    1976-01-01

    The subject invention is directed to a floating platform for supporting nuclear reactors and the like at selected offshore sites. The platform is provided with a stabilizer mechanism which significantly reduces the effects of wave action upon the platform and which comprises a pair of relatively small floats attached by rigid booms to the platform at locations spaced therefrom for reducing wave pitch, acceleration, and the resonance period of the wave.

  12. Sterically hindered carboxylate ligands support water-bridged dimetallic centers that model features of metallohydrolase active sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwhan; Hung, Pei-Lin; Spingler, Bernhard; Lippard, Stephen J

    2002-02-11

    The synthesis and characterization of carboxylate-bridged dimetallic complexes are described. By using m-terphenyl-derived carboxylate ligands, a series of dicobalt(II), dicobalt(III), dinickel(II), and dizinc(II) complexes were synthesized. The compounds are [Co(2)(mu-O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)(O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)L(2)] (1), [Co(2)(mu-OH(2))(2)(mu-O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)(O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)L(2)] (2a-c), [Co(2)(mu-OH)(2)(mu-O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)(O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)L(2)] (3), [Ni(2)(mu-O(2)CAr(Tol))(4)L(2)] (4), [Ni(2)(mu-HO...H)(2)(mu-O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)(O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)L(2)] (5), and [Zn(2)(mu-O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)(O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)L(2)] (6), where Ar(Tol)CO(2)H = 2,6-di(p-tolyl)benzoic acid and L = pyridine, THF, or N,N-dibenzylethylenediamine. Structural analysis of these complexes revealed that additional bridging ligands can be readily accommodated within the [M(2)(mu-O(2)CAr(Tol))(2)](2+) core, allowing a wide distribution of M...M distances from 2.5745(6) to 4.0169(9) A. Unprecedented bridging units [M(2)(mu-OH(2))(2)(mu-O(2)CR)(2)](n+) and [M(2)(mu-HO...H)(2)(mu-O(2)CR)(2)](n+) were identified in 2a-c and 5, respectively, in which strong hydrogen bonding accommodates shifts of protons from bridging water molecules toward the dangling oxygen atoms of terminal monodentate carboxylate groups. Such a proton shift along the O...H...O coordinate attenuates the donor ability of the anionic carboxylate ligand, which can translate into increased Lewis acidity at the metal centers. Such double activation of bridging water molecules by a Lewis acidic metal center and a metal-bound general base may facilitate the reactivity of metallohydrolases such as methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). PMID:11825079

  13. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Auxiliary float loads. 23.535 Section 23.535 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 23.535 Auxiliary float loads. (a)...

  14. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear): (a) Up-load conditions in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 27.521 Float...

  15. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... factor is determined under § 29.473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 29.521 Float...

  16. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27.521 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 27.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for...

  17. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29.521 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 29.521 Float landing conditions. If certification for...

  18. 14 CFR 29.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... factor is determined under § 29.473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 29.521 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 29.521 Float...

  19. 14 CFR 27.521 - Float landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....473(b) or assumed to be equal to that determined for wheel landing gear): (a) Up-load conditions in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Float landing conditions. 27.521 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Water Loads § 27.521 Float...

  20. Bridge permeameter

    DOEpatents

    Graf, Darin C.; Warpinski, Norman R.

    1996-01-01

    A system for single-phase, steady-state permeability measurements of porous rock utilizes a fluid bridge arrangement analogous to a Wheatstone bridge. The arms of the bridge contain the sample and calibrated flow resistors.

  1. Wave drag on floating bodies

    PubMed Central

    Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Raphaël, Élie; Chevy, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    We measure the deceleration of liquid nitrogen drops floating at the surface of a liquid bath. On water, the friction force is found to be about 10 to 100 times larger than on a solid substrate, which is shown to arise from wave resistance. We investigate the influence of the bath viscosity and show that the dissipation decreases as the viscosity is increased, owing to wave damping. The measured resistance is well predicted by a model imposing a vertical force (i.e., the drop weight) on a finite area, as long as the wake can be considered stationary. PMID:21876186

  2. Capabilities and limitations of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop for the extraction of organic pollutants from water samples.

    PubMed

    Vera-Avila, Luz E; Rojo-Portillo, Tania; Covarrubias-Herrera, Rosario; Peña-Alvarez, Araceli

    2013-12-17

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) is one of the most interesting sample preparation techniques developed in recent years. Although several applications have been reported, the potentiality and limitations of this simple and rapid extraction technique have not been made sufficiently explicit. In this work, the extraction efficiency of DLLME-SFO for pollutants from different chemical families was determined. Studied compounds include: 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 5 pesticides (chlorophenoxy herbicides and DDT), 8 phenols and 6 sulfonamides, thus, covering a large range of polarity and hydrophobicity (LogKow 0-7, overall). After optimization of extraction conditions using 1-dodecanol as extractant, the procedure was applied for extraction of each family from 10-mL spiked water samples, only adjusting sample pH as required. Absolute recoveries for pollutants with LogKow 3-7 were >70% and recovery values within this group (18 compounds) were independent of structure or hydrophobicity; the precision of recovery was very acceptable (RSD<12%) and linear behavior was observed in the studied concentration range (r(2)>0.995). Extraction recoveries for pollutants with LogKow 1.46-2.8 were in the range 13-62%, directly depending on individual LogKow values; however, good linearity (r(2)>0.993) and precision (RSD<6.5%) were also demonstrated for these polar solutes, despite recovery level. DLLME-SFO with 1-dodecanol completely failed for extraction of compounds with LogKow≤1 (sulfa drugs), other more polar extraction solvents (ionic liquids) should be explored for highly hydrophilic pollutants. PMID:24296144

  3. The collection of clear-water contraction and abutment scour data at selected bridge sites in the coastal plain and piedmont of South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Andy W.

    1998-01-01

    Clear-water contraction and abutment scour data were collected at 128 bridge sites in South Carolina. In the sandy soils of the Coastal Plain, clear-water-scour data were collected at 63 sites (scour depths ranged from 0.4 to 7.2 meters.) In the clayey soils of the Piedmont, clear-water-scour data were collected at 47 sites (scour depths ranged from 0 to 1.4 meters.) In the sandy, clayey soils of the Piedmont, clear-water-scour data were collected at 18 sites (scour depths ranged from 0.9 to 5.5 meters.) The field data are to be compiled into a data base that will include bridge age; basin, soil and hydraulic characteristics; and theoretical scour data. The data are planned to be statistically analyzed for significant relations that may help explain and (or) predict maximum scour depths at bridges in South Carolina.

  4. Valuing water quality in urban watersheds: A comparative analysis of Johnson Creek, Oregon, and Burnt Bridge Creek, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netusil, Noelwah R.; Kincaid, Michael; Chang, Heejun

    2014-05-01

    This study uses the hedonic price method to investigate the effect of five water quality parameters on the sale price of single-family residential properties in two urbanized watersheds in the Portland, Oregon-Vancouver, Washington metropolitan area. Water quality parameters include E. coli or fecal coliform, which can affect human health, decrease water clarity and generate foul odors; pH, dissolved oxygen, and stream temperature, which can impact fish and wildlife populations; and total suspended solids, which can affect water clarity, aquatic life, and aesthetics. Properties within ¼ mile, ½, mile, one mile, or more than one mile from Johnson Creek are estimated to experience an increase in sale price of 13.71%, 7.05%, 8.18%, and 3.12%, respectively, from a one mg/L increase in dissolved oxygen levels during the dry season (May-October). Estimates for a 100 count per 100 mL increase in E. coli during the dry season are -2.81% for properties within ¼ mile of Johnson Creek, -0.86% (½ mile), -1.19% (one mile), and -0.71% (greater than one mile). Results for properties in Burnt Bridge Creek include a significantly positive effect for a one mg/L increase in dissolved oxygen levels during the dry season for properties within ½ mile (4.49%), one mile (2.95%), or greater than one mile from the creek (3.17%). Results for other water quality parameters in Burnt Bridge Creek are generally consistent with a priori expectations. Restoration efforts underway in both study areas might be cost justified based on their estimated effect on property sale prices.

  5. 14 CFR 25.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.533 Hull and main float bottom pressures. (a) General. The hull and main float structure, including frames and...

  6. 14 CFR 23.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 23... Water Loads § 23.533 Hull and main float bottom pressures. (a) General. The hull and main float....00213; K2=hull station weighing factor, in accordance with figure 2 of appendix I of this part;...

  7. 14 CFR 23.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 23... Water Loads § 23.533 Hull and main float bottom pressures. (a) General. The hull and main float....00213; K2=hull station weighing factor, in accordance with figure 2 of appendix I of this part;...

  8. 14 CFR 25.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.533 Hull and main float bottom pressures. (a) General. The hull and main float structure, including frames and...

  9. 14 CFR 25.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 25.533 Hull and main float bottom pressures. (a) General. The hull and main float structure, including frames and...

  10. 14 CFR 23.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 23... Water Loads § 23.533 Hull and main float bottom pressures. (a) General. The hull and main float....00213; K2=hull station weighing factor, in accordance with figure 2 of appendix I of this part;...

  11. 14 CFR 23.533 - Hull and main float bottom pressures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hull and main float bottom pressures. 23... Water Loads § 23.533 Hull and main float bottom pressures. (a) General. The hull and main float....00213; K2=hull station weighing factor, in accordance with figure 2 of appendix I of this part;...

  12. Floating nut retention system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, J. F.; Theakston, H. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A floating nut retention system includes a nut with a central aperture. An inner retainer plate has an opening which is fixedly aligned with the nut aperture. An outer retainer member is formed of a base plate having an opening and a surface adjacent to a surface of the inner retainer plate. The outer retainer member includes a securing mechanism for retaining the inner retainer plate adjacent to the outer retainer member. The securing mechanism enables the inner retainer plate to float with respect to the outer retainer number, while simultaneously forming a bearing surface for inner retainer plate.

  13. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V.; Vadivelu, Raja K.; John, James A. St.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface. PMID:26902930

  14. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V.; Vadivelu, Raja K.; John, James A. St.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-02-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface.

  15. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V; Vadivelu, Raja K; John, James A St; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface. PMID:26902930

  16. Tethered float liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Daily, III, William Dean

    2016-09-06

    An apparatus for sensing the level of a liquid includes a float, a tether attached to the float, a pulley attached to the tether, a rotation sensor connected to the pulley that senses vertical movement of said float and senses the level of the liquid.

  17. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  18. Pipe-type cable floated into place across river

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    In 1992, the 60-yr-old Portland Bridge across the Fore River in Maine had to be replaced with a completely new structure. Unfortunately for Central Maine Power Co, three 34.5-kV submarine cables and a 115-kV pipe-type cable (plus spare pipe), which paralleled the old structure, were directly in the path planned for the footing of the new bridge. Before construction could begin, these had to be relocated to the other side of the old bridge. Because of space limitations in the crossing area, the two 1200-ft replacement pipes were assembled one mile upstream and floated down to the bridge using specially made polystyrene floats. The trench, measuring 20 ft wide and 20 ft deep, was dredged across the river bottom and designed to accommodate both the submarine and pipe-type cables with adequate spacing. First, the two pipes were floated into position and sunk into the trench. Then the three submarine cables were laid simultaneously from a cable barge. Divers ensured that there was adequate spacing between the medium- and high-voltage cables. 10 figs.

  19. Improved photoactivity of TiO2-Fe2O3 nanocomposites for visible-light water splitting after phosphate bridging and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luan, Peng; Xie, Mingzheng; Fu, Xuedong; Qu, Yang; Sun, Xiaojun; Jing, Liqiang

    2015-02-21

    In this work, we have successfully constructed phosphate bridges in a TiO2-Fe2O3 nanocomposite using wet-chemical processes. Based on FTIR, XPS and TEM measurements it is confirmed that phosphate groups form bridges that effectively connect TiO2 and α-Fe2O3. From steady-state surface photovoltage spectra (SS-SPS) and transient-state surface photovoltage (TS-SPV) measurements in N2, it is clearly demonstrated that the separation and lifetime of the photogenerated charge carriers in the TiO2-Fe2O3 nanocomposite are greatly enhanced by the introduction of the phosphate bridges. As a consequence, the visible light photocatalytic activity in water reduction by methanol and the photoelectrochemical water oxidation were obviously improved after phosphate bridging. It is concluded mainly on the basis of ultra-low-temperature EPR signals, EIS spectra, and the normalized photocurrent action spectra that the photogenerated electrons of α-Fe2O3 under irradiation with visible light would transfer to TiO2 in the nanocomposite, and the built phosphate bridges are favorable for charge transportation, leading to the greatly-increased separation and lifetime of visible-light excited charge carriers. This work provides a feasible route to improve the photoactivity of other visible-response nanocomposites for water splitting. PMID:25598386

  20. Characterization of cement float buoyancy in the stalked barnacle Dosima fascicularis (Crustacea, Cirripedia).

    PubMed

    Zheden, Vanessa; Kovalev, Alexander; Gorb, Stanislav N; Klepal, Waltraud

    2015-02-01

    Dosima fascicularis is the only barnacle which can drift autonomously at the water surface with a foam-like cement float. The cement secreted by the animal contains numerous gas-filled cells of different size. When several individuals share one float, their size and not their number is crucial for the production of both volume and mass of the float. The gas content within the cells of the foam gives positive static buoyancy to the whole float. The volume of the float, the gas volume and the positive static buoyancy are positively correlated. The density of the cement float without gas is greater than that of seawater. This study shows that the secreted cement consists of more than 90% water and the gas volume is on average 18.5%. Our experiments demonstrate that the intact foam-like cement float is sealed to the surrounding water. PMID:25657839

  1. Characterization of cement float buoyancy in the stalked barnacle Dosima fascicularis (Crustacea, Cirripedia)

    PubMed Central

    Zheden, Vanessa; Kovalev, Alexander; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Klepal, Waltraud

    2015-01-01

    Dosima fascicularis is the only barnacle which can drift autonomously at the water surface with a foam-like cement float. The cement secreted by the animal contains numerous gas-filled cells of different size. When several individuals share one float, their size and not their number is crucial for the production of both volume and mass of the float. The gas content within the cells of the foam gives positive static buoyancy to the whole float. The volume of the float, the gas volume and the positive static buoyancy are positively correlated. The density of the cement float without gas is greater than that of seawater. This study shows that the secreted cement consists of more than 90% water and the gas volume is on average 18.5%. Our experiments demonstrate that the intact foam-like cement float is sealed to the surrounding water. PMID:25657839

  2. Transparent and Dense Ladder-Like Alkylene-Bridged Polymethylsiloxane Coating with Enhanced Water Vapor Barrier Property.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ce; Zhang, Cong; Cui, Xinmin; Sun, Jinghua; Ding, Ruimin; Zhang, Qinghua; Xu, Yao

    2015-10-14

    Organic-inorganic hybrid composites have been well-studied as water vapor barrier materials for their long diffusion length of water vapor in coatings which can be realized by improving the aspect ratio of inorganic components and regularity of nanostructure in coatings. In this paper, dense organic-inorganic hybrid coating based on ladder-like alkylene-bridged polymethylsiloxane (ABPMS) was successfully fabricated through the hydrosilylation reaction between polymethylhydrosiloxane and diene (1,5-hexadiene or 1,7-octadiene) in toluene under Pt/C catalysis. Its ladder-like structure was verified by 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, 13C MAS NMR, and in-plane and out-of-plane glance-incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) techniques. Its corresponding coating showed excellent water vapor barrier ability for a typical water-soluble crystal, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). When treated in 50% relative humidity (RH) condition at 25 °C for 8 months, the ABPMS coating with 100 nm thickness displayed a very low transmittance loss of 1.6% compared with the high transmittance loss of 10% for uncoated KDP. Moreover, the ABPMS coating showed good ultraviolet radiation resistance, thermal stability, low mechanical property, and excellent compatibility with hydrophobic antireflective (AR) coatings. PMID:26393288

  3. Bridging the Gap: Ideas for water sustainability in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, V. C.; Passell, H. D.; Roach, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Incremental improvements in water sustainability in the western U.S. may not be able to close the growing gap between increasing freshwater demand, climate driven variability in freshwater supply, and growing environmental consciousness. Incremental improvements include municipal conservation, improvements to irrigation technologies, desalination, water leasing, and others. These measures, as manifest today in the western U.S., are successful in themselves but limited in their ability to solve long term water scarcity issues. Examples are plainly evident and range from the steady and long term decline of important aquifers and their projected inability to provide water for future agricultural irrigation, projected declines in states' abilities to meet legal water delivery obligations between states, projected shortages of water for energy production, and others. In many cases, measures that can close the water scarcity gap have been identified, but often these solutions simply shift the gap from water to some other sector, e.g., economics. Saline, brackish or produced water purification, for example, could help solve western water shortages in some areas, but will be extremely expensive, and so shift the gap from water to economics. Transfers of water out of agriculture could help close the water scarcity gap in other areas; however, loss of agriculture will shift the gap to regional food security. All these gaps, whether in water, economics, food security, or other sectors, will have a negative impact on the western states. Narrowing these future gaps requires both technical and policy solutions as well as tools to understand the tradeoffs. Here we discuss several examples from across the western U.S. that span differing scales and decision spaces. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  4. Optimization of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets using an orthogonal array design and its application for the determination of fungicide concentrations in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoling; Yang, Miyi; Hou, Bang; Li, Songqing; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Runhua; Zhang, Sanbing

    2014-08-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of floating organic droplets was developed as a simple and sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of the concentrations of multiple fungicides (triazolone, chlorothalonil, cyprodinil, and trifloxystrobin) in water by high-performance liquid chromatography with variable-wavelength detection. After an approach varying one factor at a time was used, an orthogonal array design [L25 (5(5))] was employed to optimize the method and to determine the interactions between the parameters. The significance of the effects of the different factors was determined using analysis of variance. The results indicated that the extraction solvent volume significantly affects the efficiency of the extraction. Under optimal conditions, the relative standard deviation (n = 5) varied from 2.3 to 5.5% at 0.1 μg/mL for each analyte. Low limits of detection were obtained and ranged from 0.02 to 0.2 ng/mL. In addition, the proposed method was applied to the analysis of fungicides in real water samples. The results show that the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets is a potential method for detecting fungicides in environmental water samples, with recoveries of the target analytes ranging from 70.1 to 102.5%. PMID:24824837

  5. 1D and 3D inversion of VES data to outline a fresh water zone floating over saline water body at the northwestern coast of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, Usama; Soliman, Mamdouh; Taha, Ayman; Khozym, Ashraf; Salah, Hany

    2015-12-01

    Seawater intrusion is a widespread environmental problem in the Egyptian coastal aquifers. It affects the groundwater used in domestic and agricultural activities along these coasts. In this study, resistivity survey in the form of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) was conducted at ZAWYET EL HAWALA cultivated site, northwest coast of Egypt to outline a freshwater zone overlies the main saltwater body, and to determine the most suitable location for drilling water well for irrigation purposes. The VES data were measured at 11 stations in the studied site. After processing, the data were inverted in 1-D and 3-D schemes and the final model was presented as resistivity slices with depth. The results indicate that the effect of saltwater intrusion was observed, as low resistivity values, at 7.5 m below ground surface (bgs) at the northern part of the study area (toward the Mediterranean Sea), and extends southward with increasing depth covering the whole area at about 30 m bgs. The fresh water zone shows a minimum thickness of less than 7.5 m at the northern side and a maximum thickness of about 20 m at the southern side of the area. The proper site for drilling water well tap and the freshwater zone is the location of VES6 or VES9 with a maximum well depth of about 20 m bgs. The water withdrawal from the proposed well should be controlled not to raise the main saline water table in the well site. The main sources of the freshwater zone are the rainfall and surface runoff descending from the southern tableland. Excess rainfall and surface runoff can be avoided from direct discharge to the sea by collecting them in man-made outlined trenches and re-using the stored water in irrigation during the dry seasons.

  6. Bridging the gap between uncertainty analysis for complex watershed models and decision-making for watershed-scale water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Han, F.; Wu, B.

    2013-12-01

    Process-based, spatially distributed and dynamic models provide desirable resolutions to watershed-scale water management. However, their reliability in solving real management problems has been seriously questioned, since the model simulation usually involves significant uncertainty with complicated origins. Uncertainty analysis (UA) for complex hydrological models has been a hot topic in the past decade, and a variety of UA approaches have been developed, but mostly in a theoretical setting. Whether and how a UA could benefit real management decisions remains to be critical questions. We have conducted a series of studies to investigate the applicability of classic approaches, such as GLUE and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, in real management settings, unravel the difficulties encountered by such methods, and tailor the methods to better serve the management. Frameworks and new algorithms, such as Probabilistic Collocation Method (PCM)-based approaches, were also proposed for specific management issues. This presentation summarize our past and ongoing studies on the role of UA in real water management. Challenges and potential strategies to bridge the gap between UA for complex models and decision-making for management will be discussed. Future directions for the research in this field will also be suggested. Two common water management settings were examined. One is the Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) management for surface water quality protection. The other is integrated water resources management for watershed sustainability. For the first setting, nutrients and pesticides TMDLs in the Newport Bay Watershed (Orange Country, California, USA) were discussed. It is a highly urbanized region with a semi-arid Mediterranean climate, typical of the western U.S. For the second setting, the water resources management in the Zhangye Basin (the midstream part of Heihe Baisn, China), where the famous 'Silk Road' came through, was investigated. The Zhangye

  7. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  8. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  9. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  10. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  11. 33 CFR 118.100 - Retroreflective panels on bridge piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Retroreflective panels on bridge... SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.100 Retroreflective panels on bridge piers. The... 12 inches square. (c) To mark bridge piers or channel sides on bridges not required to have...

  12. Validation of Capillarity Theory at the Nanometer Scale by Atomistic Computer Simulations of Water Droplets and Bridges in Contact with Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Almeida, Alexandre; Alenkar, Adriano; Buldyrev, Sergey

    Capillarity is the study of interfaces between two immiscible liquids or between a liquid and a vapor. Capillarity theory (CT) was created in the early 1800s and it is applicable to macroscopic (>1 μm) systems. In general, macroscopic theories are expected to fail at <10 nm scales where molecular details may become relevant. We show that, surprisingly, CT provides satisfactory predictions at 210 nm scales. Specifically, we perform atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of water droplets and capillary bridges of different symmetry in contact with various surfaces. The surfaces correspond to hydroxilated silica, modified to cover a wide range of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity. In agreement with CT, it is found that (i) water contact angle is independent of the droplet/bridge geometry and depends only on the surface employed; (ii) CT provides the correct droplet/bridge profile for all hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces considered; and, remarkably, (iii) CT works even for the very small droplets/bridges studied, for which the smallest dimension is ~2 nm. We confirm the self-consistency of CT at 210 nm scales by calculating the capillary forces between different surfaces induced by capillary bridges; the agreement between MD simulations and CT theory is remarkable

  13. BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATERS? THE MOST "CENTRAL" MEMBERS OF PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY ASSOCIATIONS CA. 1900.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher D; Heidari, Crystal; Chiacchia, Daniel; Martin, Shane M

    2016-07-01

    There are many different ways to assess the significance of historical figures. Often we look at the influence of their writings, or at the important offices they held with disciplinary institutions such as universities, journals, and scholarly societies. In this study, however, we took a novel approach: we took the complete memberships, ca. 1900, of four organizations-the American Psychological Association, the Western Philosophical Association, the American Philosophical Association, and the Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology-and visualized them as a network. We then identified individuals who "bridged" between two or more of these groups and considered what might be termed their "centrality" to the psychological-philosophical community of their time. First, we examined these figures qualitatively, briefly describing their lives and careers. Then we approached the problem mathematically, considering several alternative technical realizations of "centrality" and then explaining our reasons for choosing eigenvector centrality as the best for our purposes. We found a great deal of overlap among the results of the qualitative and quantitative approaches, but also some telling differences. J. Mark Baldwin, Edward Buchner, Christine Ladd Franklin, and Frank Thilly consistently emerged as highly central figures. Some more marginal figures such as Max Meyer, and Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, Edward A. Pace, Edward H. Griffin played interesting roles as well. PMID:27163795

  14. Freely floating smectic films.

    PubMed

    May, Kathrin; Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    2014-05-19

    We have investigated the dynamics of freely floating smectic bubbles using high-speed optical imaging. Bubbles in the size range from a few hundred micrometers to several centimeters were prepared from collapsing catenoids. They represent ideal model systems for the study of thin-film fluid dynamics under well-controlled conditions. Owing to the internal smectic layer structure, the bubbles combine features of both soap films and vesicles in their unique shape dynamics. From a strongly elongated initial shape after pinch-off, they relax towards the spherical equilibrium, first by a slow redistribution of the smectic layers, and finally by weak, damped shape oscillations. In addition, we describe the rupture of freely floating smectic bubbles, and the formation and stability of smectic filaments. PMID:24692347

  15. Bridge permeameter

    DOEpatents

    Graf, D.C.; Warpinski, N.R.

    1996-08-13

    A system is described for single-phase, steady-state permeability measurements of porous rock which utilizes a fluid bridge arrangement analogous to a Wheatstone bridge. The arms of the bridge contain the sample and calibrated flow resistors. 8 figs.

  16. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  17. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-11-16

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

  18. 33 CFR 118.65 - Lights on fixed bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on fixed bridges. 118.65 Section 118.65 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.65 Lights on fixed bridges. (a) Each fixed bridge span over a...

  19. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70 Section 118.70 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges....

  20. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70 Section 118.70 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges....

  1. 33 CFR 115.50 - Application for bridge permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Application for bridge permits... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.50 Application for bridge permits. (a) Application. An application for authorization to construct a bridge across navigable waters...

  2. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70 Section 118.70 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges....

  3. 33 CFR 118.65 - Lights on fixed bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on fixed bridges. 118.65 Section 118.65 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.65 Lights on fixed bridges. (a) Each fixed bridge span over a...

  4. 33 CFR 115.50 - Application for bridge permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Application for bridge permits... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.50 Application for bridge permits. (a) Application. An application for authorization to construct a bridge across navigable waters...

  5. 33 CFR 118.65 - Lights on fixed bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on fixed bridges. 118.65 Section 118.65 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.65 Lights on fixed bridges. (a) Each fixed bridge span over a...

  6. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70 Section 118.70 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges....

  7. 33 CFR 115.50 - Application for bridge permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Application for bridge permits... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.50 Application for bridge permits. (a) Application. An application for authorization to construct a bridge across navigable waters...

  8. 33 CFR 115.50 - Application for bridge permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Application for bridge permits... BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.50 Application for bridge permits. (a) Application. An application for authorization to construct a bridge across navigable waters...

  9. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70 Section 118.70 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges....

  10. 33 CFR 118.65 - Lights on fixed bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on fixed bridges. 118.65 Section 118.65 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.65 Lights on fixed bridges. (a) Each fixed bridge span over a...