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Sample records for floodplains affect structure

  1. How does floodplain width affect floodplain river ecology? A preliminary exploration using simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Mary E.; Parker, Gary; Dietrich, William E.; Sun, Adrian

    1995-09-01

    Hydraulic food chain models allow us to explore the linkages of river discharge regimes and river-floodplain morphology to the structure and dynamics of modeled food webs. Physical conditions (e.g. depth, width, velocity) that vary with river discharge affect the performance (birth, growth, feeding, movement, or death rates) of organisms or trophic groups. Their performances in turn affect their impacts on food webs and ecosystems in channel and floodplain habitats. Here we explore the impact of floodplain width (modeled as 1 ×, 10× and 40× the channel width) on a food web with two energy sources (detritus and vegetation), invertebrates that consume these, a size structured fish population which consumes invertebrates and in which larger fish cannibalize small fish, and birds which feed on large fish. Hydraulic linkages to trophic dynamics are assumed to be mediated in three ways: birds feed efficiently only in shallow water; plant carrying capacity varies non-linearly with water velocity, and mobile and drifting organisms are diluted and concentrated with spillover of river discharge to the floodplain, and its reconfinement to the channel. Aspects of this model are based on field observations of Junk and Bailey from the Amazon, of Sparks from the Mississippi, and on our observations of the Fly River in Papua New Guinea. The model produced several counter-intuitive results. Biomass of invertebrates and fish increased with floodplain width, but much more rapidly from 1 × to 10 × floodplains than from 10 × to 40 × floodplains. For birds, maximum biomass occurred on the 10× floodplain. Initially high bird biomass on the 40 × floodplain declined to extinction over time, because although favorable fishing conditions (shallow water) were most prolonged on the widest floodplain, this advantage was more than offset by the greater dilution of prey after spillover. Bird predation on large fish sometimes increased their biomass, by reducing cannibalism and thereby

  2. Loss of Rare Fish Species from Tropical Floodplain Food Webs Affects Community Structure and Ecosystem Multifunctionality in a Mesocosm Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Richard M.; Hoeinghaus, David J.; Gomes, Luiz C.; Agostinho, Angelo A.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with realistic scenarios of species loss from multitrophic ecosystems may improve insight into how biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning. Using 1000 L mesocoms, we examined effects of nonrandom species loss on community structure and ecosystem functioning of experimental food webs based on multitrophic tropical floodplain lagoon ecosystems. Realistic biodiversity scenarios were developed based on long-term field surveys, and experimental assemblages replicated sequential loss of rare species which occurred across all trophic levels of these complex food webs. Response variables represented multiple components of ecosystem functioning, including nutrient cycling, primary and secondary production, organic matter accumulation and whole ecosystem metabolism. Species richness significantly affected ecosystem function, even after statistically controlling for potentially confounding factors such as total biomass and direct trophic interactions. Overall, loss of rare species was generally associated with lower nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton and zooplankton densities, and whole ecosystem metabolism when compared with more diverse assemblages. This pattern was also observed for overall ecosystem multifunctionality, a combined metric representing the ability of an ecosystem to simultaneously maintain multiple functions. One key exception was attributed to time-dependent effects of intraguild predation, which initially increased values for most ecosystem response variables, but resulted in decreases over time likely due to reduced nutrient remineralization by surviving predators. At the same time, loss of species did not result in strong trophic cascades, possibly a result of compensation and complexity of these multitrophic ecosystems along with a dominance of bottom-up effects. Our results indicate that although rare species may comprise minor components of communities, their loss can have profound ecosystem consequences across multiple trophic

  3. Loss of rare fish species from tropical floodplain food webs affects community structure and ecosystem multifunctionality in a mesocosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Richard M; Hoeinghaus, David J; Gomes, Luiz C; Agostinho, Angelo A

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with realistic scenarios of species loss from multitrophic ecosystems may improve insight into how biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning. Using 1000 L mesocoms, we examined effects of nonrandom species loss on community structure and ecosystem functioning of experimental food webs based on multitrophic tropical floodplain lagoon ecosystems. Realistic biodiversity scenarios were developed based on long-term field surveys, and experimental assemblages replicated sequential loss of rare species which occurred across all trophic levels of these complex food webs. Response variables represented multiple components of ecosystem functioning, including nutrient cycling, primary and secondary production, organic matter accumulation and whole ecosystem metabolism. Species richness significantly affected ecosystem function, even after statistically controlling for potentially confounding factors such as total biomass and direct trophic interactions. Overall, loss of rare species was generally associated with lower nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton and zooplankton densities, and whole ecosystem metabolism when compared with more diverse assemblages. This pattern was also observed for overall ecosystem multifunctionality, a combined metric representing the ability of an ecosystem to simultaneously maintain multiple functions. One key exception was attributed to time-dependent effects of intraguild predation, which initially increased values for most ecosystem response variables, but resulted in decreases over time likely due to reduced nutrient remineralization by surviving predators. At the same time, loss of species did not result in strong trophic cascades, possibly a result of compensation and complexity of these multitrophic ecosystems along with a dominance of bottom-up effects. Our results indicate that although rare species may comprise minor components of communities, their loss can have profound ecosystem consequences across multiple trophic

  4. Linking river, floodplain, and vadose zone hydrology to improve restoration of a coastal river affected by saltwater intrusion.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D; Muñoz-Carpena, R; Wan, Y; Hedgepeth, M; Zheng, F; Roberts, R; Rossmanith, R

    2010-01-01

    Floodplain forests provide unique ecological structure and function, which are often degraded or lost when watershed hydrology is modified. Restoration of damaged ecosystems requires an understanding of surface water, groundwater, and vadose (unsaturated) zone hydrology in the floodplain. Soil moisture and porewater salinity are of particular importance for seed germination and seedling survival in systems affected by saltwater intrusion but are difficult to monitor and often overlooked. This study contributes to the understanding of floodplain hydrology in one of the last bald cypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.] floodplain swamps in southeast Florida. We investigated soil moisture and porewater salinity dynamics in the floodplain of the Loxahatchee River, where reduced freshwater flow has led to saltwater intrusion and a transition to salt-tolerant, mangrove-dominated communities. Twenty-four dielectric probes measuring soil moisture and porewater salinity every 30 min were installed along two transects-one in an upstream, freshwater location and one in a downstream tidal area. Complemented by surface water, groundwater, and meteorological data, these unique 4-yr datasets quantified the spatial variability and temporal dynamics of vadose zone hydrology. Results showed that soil moisture can be closely predicted based on river stage and topographic elevation (overall Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency = 0.83). Porewater salinity rarely exceeded tolerance thresholds (0.3125 S m(-1)) for bald cypress upstream but did so in some downstream areas. This provided an explanation for observed vegetation changes that both surface water and groundwater salinity failed to explain. The results offer a methodological and analytical framework for floodplain monitoring in locations where restoration success depends on vadose zone hydrology and provide relationships for evaluating proposed restoration and management scenarios for the Loxahatchee River. PMID:21043263

  5. Exposure of wood in floodplains affects its chemical quality and its subsequent breakdown in streams.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Rubén; Gómez, Rosa

    2016-02-01

    In stream ecosystems, coarse organic matter from the riparian vegetation, a key food resource, is often retained in the floodplains before reaching the channel. During floodplain exposure, organic matter can be affected by abiotic and biotic processes ("preconditioning"), which alter its quality and affect its subsequent decomposition in streams. We analyzed the effect of floodplain preconditioning on wood quality (lignin, C, N, P, K, among others), and its subsequent aquatic breakdown, paying special attention to microbial activity. We simulated preconditioned standard wooden sticks on one arid stream floodplain for 3 and 4 months, and then monitored their breakdown in three different streams, together with control (non-preconditioned) sticks. Preconditioning reduced lignin mass and C:N and lignin:N ratios, caused the leaching of soluble nutrients such as P and K, as well as N immobilization by microbes. These changes enhanced the breakdown of wood in the first week of immersion, but had no effect on breakdown rates after 4 months of incubation in the streams, although N immobilization was diminished. Our results suggest that terrestrial preconditioning could alter the role of wood as a long-lasting nutrients and energy source for freshwater ecosystem. PMID:26613519

  6. Hydrologic linkages drive spatial structuring of bacterial assemblages and functioning in alpine floodplains

    PubMed Central

    Freimann, Remo; Bürgmann, Helmut; Findlay, Stuart E. G.; Robinson, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community assembly and microbial functions are affected by a number of different but coupled drivers such as local habitat characteristics, dispersal rates, and species interactions. In groundwater systems, hydrological flow can introduce spatial structure and directional dependencies among these drivers. We examined the importance of hydrology in structuring bacterial communities and their function within two alpine floodplains during different hydrological states. Piezometers were installed in stream sediments and surrounding riparian zones to assess hydrological flows and also were used as incubation chambers to examine bacterial community structures and enzymatic functions along hydrological flow paths. Spatial eigenvector models in conjunction with models based on physico-chemical groundwater characteristics were used to evaluate the importance of hydrologically-driven processes influencing bacterial assemblages and their enzymatic activities. Our results suggest a strong influence (up to 40% explained variation) of hydrological connectivity on enzymatic activities. The effect of hydrology on bacterial community structure was considerably less strong, suggesting that assemblages demonstrate large functional plasticity/redundancy. Effect size varied between hydrological periods but flow-related mechanisms always had the most power in explaining both bacterial structure and functioning. Changes in hydrology should be considered in models predicting ecosystem functioning and integrated into ecosystem management strategies for floodplains. PMID:26579113

  7. Hydrologic linkages drive spatial structuring of bacterial assemblages and functioning in alpine floodplains.

    PubMed

    Freimann, Remo; Bürgmann, Helmut; Findlay, Stuart E G; Robinson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community assembly and microbial functions are affected by a number of different but coupled drivers such as local habitat characteristics, dispersal rates, and species interactions. In groundwater systems, hydrological flow can introduce spatial structure and directional dependencies among these drivers. We examined the importance of hydrology in structuring bacterial communities and their function within two alpine floodplains during different hydrological states. Piezometers were installed in stream sediments and surrounding riparian zones to assess hydrological flows and also were used as incubation chambers to examine bacterial community structures and enzymatic functions along hydrological flow paths. Spatial eigenvector models in conjunction with models based on physico-chemical groundwater characteristics were used to evaluate the importance of hydrologically-driven processes influencing bacterial assemblages and their enzymatic activities. Our results suggest a strong influence (up to 40% explained variation) of hydrological connectivity on enzymatic activities. The effect of hydrology on bacterial community structure was considerably less strong, suggesting that assemblages demonstrate large functional plasticity/redundancy. Effect size varied between hydrological periods but flow-related mechanisms always had the most power in explaining both bacterial structure and functioning. Changes in hydrology should be considered in models predicting ecosystem functioning and integrated into ecosystem management strategies for floodplains. PMID:26579113

  8. Floodplain Heterogeneity Drives Riparian Vegetation Composition and Structure Through Channel Meander Migration and Channel Abandonment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremier, A. K.; Viers, J. H.; Hayden, M. K.; Stella, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    Riparian vegetation composition and structure reflect the legacy of fine- and coarse-scale patterns of hydrology, geomorphology and ecology. Understanding the dynamics of complex systems requires scaling-up mechanistic patterns and processes. Coupling hydro-geomorphic processes with vegetation development is an integral step in understanding habitat evolution in riparian corridors. We quantified floodplain deposition dynamics and topographic complexity to better understand how riparian forest structure and composition changed through time and over the floodplain. We used LiDAR data and a temporally-rich dataset of aerial photography coupled with field data to analyze landscape-scale patterns with species composition and floodplain dynamics. We examined the significance of two definable large-scale floodplain processes - meander migration and channel abandonment - that set-up the spatial structure of riparian forest dynamics. In addition, we analyzed the potential feedback of riparian vegetation on floodplain formation. Canopy structure and floodplain heterogeneity generally showed a log-linear relationship over time and were highly correlated with species composition changes over time and with a range of past hydrologies (inter- and intra- annual patterns). These data suggest that analysis of landscape formation processes, in particularly during the early stages, improves our understanding of riparian forest dynamics and that channel abandonment can be a significant alternative pathway to cottonwood recruitment. By analyzing the coupled eco-geomorphic processes we can more effectively scale-up riparian vegetation patterns by applying a functional knowledge of the corridor-wide channel dynamics and floodplain hydrology.

  9. Do weirs affect the physical and geochemical mobility of toxic metals in mining-impacted floodplain sediments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulcock, Amelia; Coleman, Alexandra; Whitfield, Elizabeth; Andres Lopez-Tarazon, Jose; Byrne, Patrick; Whitfield, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Weirs are common river structures designed to modify river channel hydraulics and hydrology for purposes of navigation, flood defence, irrigation and hydrometry. By design, weirs constrain natural flow processes and affect sediment flux and river channel forms leading to homogenous river habitats and reduced biodiversity. The recent movement towards catchment-wide river restoration, driven by the EU Water Framework Directive, has recognised weirs as a barrier to good ecological status. However, the removal of weirs to achieve more 'natural' river channels and flow processes is inevitably followed by a period of adjustment to the new flow regime and sediment flux. This period of adjustment can have knock-on effects that may increase flood risk, sedimentation and erosion until the river reaches a state of geomorphological equilibrium. Many catchments in the UK contain a legacy of toxic metals in floodplain sediments due to historic metal mining activities. The consequences of weir removal in these catchments may be to introduce 'stored' mine wastes into the river system with severe implications for water quality and biodiversity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impact of a weir on the physical and geochemical mobilisation of mine wastes in the formerly mined River Twymyn catchment, Wales. Our initial investigations have shown floodplain and riverbed sediments to be grossly contaminated (up to 15,500 mg/kg Pb) compared to soil from a pre-mining Holocene terrace (180 mg/kg Pb). Geomorphological investigations also suggest that weir removal will re-establish more dynamic river channel processes resulting in lateral migration of the channel and erosion of contaminated floodplain sediments. These data will be used as a baseline for more detailed investigations of the potential impact of weirs on the physical and geochemical mobilisation of contaminated sediments. We have two specific objectives. (1) Geomorphological assessments will use unmanned

  10. Biogeochemical factors affecting mercury methylation rate in two contaminated floodplain soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohne, T.; Rinklebe, J.; Langer, U.; Du Laing, G.; Mothes, S.; Wennrich, R.

    2012-01-01

    An automated biogeochemical microcosm system allowing controlled variation of redox potential (EH) in soil suspensions was used to assess the effect of various factors on the mobility of mercury (Hg) as well as on the methylation of Hg in two contaminated floodplain soils with different Hg concentrations (approximately 5 mg Hg kg-1 and >30 mg Hg kg-1). The experiment was conducted under stepwise variation from reducing (approximately -350 mV at pH 5) to oxidizing conditions (approximately 600 mV at pH 5). Results of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis indicate the occurrence of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) such as Desulfobacter species (10Me16:0, cy17:0, 10Me18:0, cy19:0) or Desulfovibrio species (18:2ω6,9), which are considered to promote Hg methylation. The products of the methylation process are lipophilic, highly toxic methyl mercury species such as the monomethyl mercury ion [MeHg+], which is named as MeHg here. The ln(MeHg/Hgt) ratio is assumed to reflect the net production of monomethyl mercury normalized to total dissolved Hg (Hgt) concentration. This ratio increases with rising dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to Hgt ratio (ln(DOC/Hgt) ratio) (R2 = 0.39, p<0.0001, n= 63) whereas the relation between ln(MeHg/Hgt ratio and lnDOC is weaker (R2 = 0.09; p<0.05; n = 63). In conclusion, the DOC/Hgt ratio might be a more important factor for the Hg net methylation than DOC alone in the current study. Redox variations seem to affect the biogeochemical behavior of dissolved inorganic Hg species and MeHg indirectly through related changes in DOC, sulfur cycle, and microbial community structure whereas EH and pH values, as well as concentration of dissolved Fe3+/Fe2+ and Cl- seem to play subordinate roles in Hg mobilization and methylation under our experimental conditions.

  11. Biogeochemical factors affecting mercury methylation rate in two contaminated floodplain soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohne, T.; Rinklebe, J.; Langer, U.; Du Laing, G.; Mothes, S.; Wennrich, R.

    2011-09-01

    An automated biogeochemical microcosm system allowing controlled variation of redox potential (EH) in soil suspensions was used to assess the effect of various factors on the mobility of mercury (Hg) as well as on the methylation of Hg in two contaminated floodplain soils with different Hg concentrations (approximately 5 mg kg-1 Hg and >30 mg kg-1 Hg). The experiment was conducted under stepwise variation from reducing (approximately -350 mV at pH 5) to oxidizing conditions (approximately 600 mV at pH 5). Results of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis indicate the occurrence of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) such as Desulfobacter species (10me16:0, cy17:0, 10me18:0, cy19:0) or Desulfovibrio species (18:2ω6,9), which are considered to promote Hg methylation. The products of the methylation process are lipophilic, highly toxic methyl mercury species such as the monomethyl mercury ion [MeHg+], which is named as MeHg here. The ln(MeHg/Hgt) ratio is assumed to reflect the net production of monomethyl mercury normalized to total dissolved Hg (Hgt) concentration. This ratio increases with rising dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to Hgt ratio (lnDOC/lnHgt ratio) (R2 = 0.39, p < 0.0001, n = 63) whereas the relation between ln(MeHg/Hgt) ratio and lnDOC is weaker (R2 = 0.09; p < 0.05; n = 63). In conclusion, the DOC/Hgt ratio might be a more important factor for the Hg net methylation than DOC alone in the current study. Redox variations seem to affect the biogeochemical behavior of dissolved inorganic Hg species and MeHg indirectly through related changes in DOC, sulfur cycle, and microbial community structure whereas E,H and pH values, as well as concentration of dissolved Fe,3+/Fe2+ and Cl- seem to play subordinate roles in Hg mobilization and methylation under our experimental conditions.

  12. Factors affecting fish biodiversity in floodplain lakes of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Dembkowski, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    River-floodplain ecosystems offer some of the most diverse and dynamic environments in the world. Accordingly, floodplain habitats harbor diverse fish assemblages. Fish biodiversity in floodplain lakes may be influenced by multiple variables operating on disparate scales, and these variables may exhibit a hierarchical organization depending on whether one variable governs another. In this study, we examined the interaction between primary variables descriptive of floodplain lake large-scale features, suites of secondary variables descriptive of water quality and primary productivity, and a set of tertiary variables descriptive of fish biodiversity across a range of floodplain lakes in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley of Mississippi and Arkansas (USA). Lakes varied considerably in their representation of primary, secondary, and tertiary variables. Multivariate direct gradient analyses indicated that lake maximum depth and the percentage of agricultural land surrounding a lake were the most important factors controlling variation in suites of secondary and tertiary variables, followed to a lesser extent by lake surface area. Fish biodiversity was generally greatest in large, deep lakes with lower proportions of watershed agricultural land. Our results may help foster a holistic approach to floodplain lake management and suggest the framework for a feedback model wherein primary variables can be manipulated for conservation and restoration purposes and secondary and tertiary variables can be used to monitor the success of such efforts.

  13. Hierarchy in factors affecting fish biodiversity in floodplain lakes of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dembkowski, D.J.; Miranda, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    River-floodplain ecosystems offer some of the most diverse and dynamic environments in the world. Accordingly, floodplain habitats harbor diverse fish assemblages. Fish biodiversity in floodplain lakes may be influenced by multiple variables operating on disparate scales, and these variables may exhibit a hierarchical organization depending on whether one variable governs another. In this study, we examined the interaction between primary variables descriptive of floodplain lake large-scale features, suites of secondary variables descriptive of water quality and primary productivity, and a set of tertiary variables descriptive of fish biodiversity across a range of floodplain lakes in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley of Mississippi and Arkansas (USA). Lakes varied considerably in their representation of primary, secondary, and tertiary variables. Multivariate direct gradient analyses indicated that lake maximum depth and the percentage of agricultural land surrounding a lake were the most important factors controlling variation in suites of secondary and tertiary variables, followed to a lesser extent by lake surface area. Fish biodiversity was generally greatest in large, deep lakes with lower proportions of watershed agricultural land. Our results may help foster a holistic approach to floodplain lake management and suggest the framework for a feedback model wherein primary variables can be manipulated for conservation and restoration purposes and secondary and tertiary variables can be used to monitor the success of such efforts. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  14. Impact of hydrology on methane flux patterns in a permafrost-affected floodplain in Northeast Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Min Jung; Beulig, Felix; Kuesel, Kirsten; Wildner, Marcus; Heimann, Martin; Zimov, Nikita; Zimov, Sergei; Goeckede, Mathias

    2015-04-01

    A large fraction of organic carbon stored in Arctic permafrost soil is at risk to be decomposed and released to the atmosphere under climate change. Thawing of ice-rich permafrost will re-structure the surface topography, with potentially significant effects on hydrology: water table depth (WTD) of depressed areas will increase, while that of the surrounding area will decrease. Changes in hydrology will trigger modifications in soil and vegetation, e.g. soil temperature, vegetation and microbial community structure. All of these secondary effects will alter carbon cycle processes, with the magnitude and even sign of the net effect yet unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate effects of drainage on methane fluxes in a floodplain of the Kolyma River near Cherskii, Northeast Siberia. The study site is separated into two areas, one that has been drained since 2004, and a nearby reference site. Methane flux was measured for ~16 weeks during summer and early winter of 2013, and summer of 2014. In addition, to separate different methane emission pathways, plant-mediated methane transport (through aerenchyma) as well as the proportion of ebullition were measured in 2014. Vegetation and microbial community structures were investigated and compared. After a decade of drainage history that lowered WTD by about 20cm in the drained area, Eriophorum (cotton grass) that previously dominated have to a large part been replaced by Carex (tussock-forming sedge) and shrub species. While WTD primarily influenced the methane flux rate, this vegetation change indirectly altered the flux as well in a way that sites with Eriophorum emitted more methane. Concerning the microbial community structure, the relative abundance of methanogen and ratio of methanotrophs to methanogens were well correlated with methane flux rates, implying that the methane flux is highly influenced by microorganisms. As a consequence of these changes, in the drained area less amount of methane was

  15. Optimised Mapping of Flood Extent and Floodplain Structures by Radar EO-Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabel, E.; Löffler, E.

    2004-06-01

    Today, river dynamics and hydrological behaviour are strongly influenced by human activities both in the catchment areas and the floodplains. The knowledge of recent and historical river dynamics and related morphological and structural changes on the land surface (e.g. sedimentation, accumulation, river bed movement) is an essential factor in assessing the flood risk and the vulnerability of human resources and structures. Operational Earth Observation (EO) systems provide data to monitor and to analyse both river dynamics and small surface changes. Especially, radar-based systems and interferometric data analysis are of high interest. Along selected sites in the River Odra area, we analysed the potential of radar-based EO-applications for the detection of structural changes, validated by fieldwork. It is shown that the coherence information is of great significance: On the one hand, it could be used to eliminate misclassifications of the flood extent caused by double bounce scattering, corner reflection and smooth surfaces. On the other hand the production of RGB's type Interferometric Signatures (coherence, average, difference of tandem pairs) proofed to be a powerful tool to visualise the flood dynamics in space and time but also the morphologic structure in the floodplain. As conclusion, it is shown that the combined analysis of radar backscatter and coherence information will be very useful in the flood application domain, especially with respect to risk assessment and vulnerability mapping. In addition, the methods described will support the collection of relevant base data claimed by the EU water framework directive. Keywords: Spaceborne Earth Observation, SAR Interferometry, Coherence Analysis, River Dynamics, Flood, Floodplain Structures, Floodplain Management

  16. Bacterial structures and ecosystem functions in glaciated floodplains: contemporary states and potential future shifts

    PubMed Central

    Freimann, Remo; Bürgmann, Helmut; Findlay, Stuart EG; Robinson, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    Glaciated alpine floodplains are responding quickly to climate change through shrinking ice masses. Given the expected future changes in their physicochemical environment, we anticipated variable shifts in structure and ecosystem functioning of hyporheic microbial communities in proglacial alpine streams, depending on present community characteristics and landscape structures. We examined microbial structure and functioning during different hydrologic periods in glacial (kryal) streams and, as contrasting systems, groundwater-fed (krenal) streams. Three catchments were chosen to cover an array of landscape features, including interconnected lakes, differences in local geology and degree of deglaciation. Community structure was assessed by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and microbial function by potential enzyme activities. We found each catchment to contain a distinct bacterial community structure and different degrees of separation in structure and functioning that were linked to the physicochemical properties of the waters within each catchment. Bacterial communities showed high functional plasticity, although achieved by different strategies in each system. Typical kryal communities showed a strong linkage of structure and function that indicated a major prevalence of specialists, whereas krenal sediments were dominated by generalists. With the rapid retreat of glaciers and therefore altered ecohydrological characteristics, lotic microbial structure and functioning are likely to change substantially in proglacial floodplains in the future. The trajectory of these changes will vary depending on contemporary bacterial community characteristics and landscape structures that ultimately determine the sustainability of ecosystem functioning. PMID:23842653

  17. Bacterial structures and ecosystem functions in glaciated floodplains: contemporary states and potential future shifts.

    PubMed

    Freimann, Remo; Bürgmann, Helmut; Findlay, Stuart E G; Robinson, Christopher T

    2013-12-01

    Glaciated alpine floodplains are responding quickly to climate change through shrinking ice masses. Given the expected future changes in their physicochemical environment, we anticipated variable shifts in structure and ecosystem functioning of hyporheic microbial communities in proglacial alpine streams, depending on present community characteristics and landscape structures. We examined microbial structure and functioning during different hydrologic periods in glacial (kryal) streams and, as contrasting systems, groundwater-fed (krenal) streams. Three catchments were chosen to cover an array of landscape features, including interconnected lakes, differences in local geology and degree of deglaciation. Community structure was assessed by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and microbial function by potential enzyme activities. We found each catchment to contain a distinct bacterial community structure and different degrees of separation in structure and functioning that were linked to the physicochemical properties of the waters within each catchment. Bacterial communities showed high functional plasticity, although achieved by different strategies in each system. Typical kryal communities showed a strong linkage of structure and function that indicated a major prevalence of specialists, whereas krenal sediments were dominated by generalists. With the rapid retreat of glaciers and therefore altered ecohydrological characteristics, lotic microbial structure and functioning are likely to change substantially in proglacial floodplains in the future. The trajectory of these changes will vary depending on contemporary bacterial community characteristics and landscape structures that ultimately determine the sustainability of ecosystem functioning. PMID:23842653

  18. Opportunities for Monitoring Vegetation Structure in River Floodplains Using High-Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooistra, Lammert; Romijn, Erika; Verrelst, Jochem

    2010-12-01

    Managers of large river catchments like the Rhine require regular information on the development of the vegetation structure in the river floodplains. The objective of this study was to develop a methodology for monitoring the location and structure properties of plant functional types in a river floodplain ecosystem using satellite-based multi-directional hyperspectral data. In this study we used data from the CHRIS sensor onboard the PROBA satellite acquired in 2005 over the test site Millingerwaard, a river floodplain ecosystem along the river Waal in the Netherlands. CHRIS data are particularly suitable for mapping vegetation structure because of its high spatial resolution (~17 m), spectral coverage (18 bands from 400 nm to 1050 nm) and angular sampling (5 viewing angles). Relevant vegetation structure properties such as leaf area index (LAI) and fractional cover (fCover) were quantified on a pixel-by-pixel basis by using the radiative transfer model FLIGHT that simulates canopy bidirectional reflectance by using Monte Carlo ray tracing. After classification of the nadir image into eight major land use classes, for three main classified plant functional types "herbaceous", "shrubs" and "forest", LAI and fCover maps were computed through model inversion of the CHRIS data. All three vegetation classes were modeled as a turbid medium in the 1D mode. LAI and fCover maps were computed for the nadir viewing direction. In order to assess the quality of the inversion, the resulting vegetation structure maps were validated with in situ LAI measurements that were collected using hemispherical photography and TRAC measurements. As a next step it will be assessed whether the inferred structural maps can be related to hydraulic roughness models and thereby leading to catchment-level water discharge capacity maps which can be used as input for modeling of future climate scenarios.

  19. Floodplains and wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2013-08-01

    Interactions between floodplains and wood date to the Carboniferous, when stable, multithread channel deposits appear with the evolution of tree-like plants. Foundational geologic texts, such as Lyell's, 1830Principles of Geology, describe floodplain-wood interactions, yet modern technical literature describes floodplain-wood interactions in detail for only a very limited range of environments. This likely reflects more than a century of deforestation, flow regulation, and channel engineering, including instream wood removal, which has resulted in severe wood depletion in most of the world's river networks. Instream wood affects floodplain form and process by altering flow resistance, conveyance and channel-floodplain connectivity, and influencing lateral and vertical accretion of floodplains. Instream wood reflects floodplain form and process as the floodplain influences wood recruitment via bank erosion and overbank flow, and wood transport and storage via floodplain effects on stage-discharge relations and flow resistance. Examining turnover times for instream wood at the reach scale in the context of a wood budget, floodplain characteristics influence fluvial transport and dynamics (wood recruitment), valley geometry (wood transport and storage), and hydraulics and river biota (wood decay and breakage). Accumulations of wood that vary from in situ jams and beaver dams in small channels to transport jams and log rafts in very large rivers can create stable, multithread channels and floodplain wetlands. Floodplain-wood interactions are best understood for a subset of small to medium-sized rivers in the temperate zone. We know little about these interactions on very large rivers, or on rivers in the tropical or boreal regions. This review suggests that most, if not all, channels and floodplains within forested catchments in the temperate zone historically had much greater wood loads and consequently much more obvious and important influences from wood than do

  20. Spatial structure of floodplain soil radionuclide contamination of the Enisey River near the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnik, V. G.; Brown, J. E.; Potapov, V. N.; Surkov, V. V.

    2012-04-01

    Enisey River floodplain soils were contaminated by technogenic radionuclides arising from operations at the Krasnoyarsk Mining Chemical Combine (KMCC) from 1958 to 1992. The radioecological situtation of the Enisey flood plain landscapes has been formed by the interaction of two factors: (i) characteristics of radionuclide discharges to the aquatic environment, (ii) hydrological regime of the Enisey River. The radionuclide discharge determined the potential extent of contamination, while the river hydrology was responsible for its transport over considerable distances. The erection of the dam of the Krasnoyarsk power station in 1970 changed the hydrological regime of the Enisey River. The water discharge and suspended sediments became uniform in all seasons and extreme floods, extending over high floodplain areas, ceased. The distribution of radioactive contamination within floodplain soils downstream from the KMCC was studied with the objectives of mapping contamination levels and analyzing the spatial structure of radionuclide distributions arising from floodplain formation. Based on a digital elevation model of floodplain landscapes at a strip of KMCC-Strelka the flooded area of the Enisey River was determined. In 1960 to 1970, deposition of contaminated sediments occurred at heights less than 6 m over an area of 99,2 km2, in 1970-1992 the flooded area with a height less than 3,5 m was of 38,2 km2. Since radiocaesium in the Enisey River primarily occurs in a well fixed sediment-associated form it is possible to use the analysis of landscape structure within the floodplain to detect lithologo-geomorphological zones corresponding to a varying degree of 137Cs contamination. Radionuclide contamination was measured using in situ gamma spectrometry and soil sampling undertaken at control points. Maximum 137Cs contamination densities (700 kBq m-2) were found on low- and middle-level floodplains of Beriozovy Island (16 km from the KMCC). The contamination density of 60

  1. [The role of the floodplain gradient in structuring of testate amoebae communities in the Ilych River].

    PubMed

    Mazeĭ, Iu A; Malysheva, E A; Lapteva, E M; Komarov, A A; Taskaeva, A A

    2012-01-01

    Forty-two testate amoebae taxa were identified in alluvial soils of floodplain islands in the Ilych River. Among the pedo- and eurybionts, there were aquatic rhizopods. Along the floodplain transect (willow --> meadow --> deciduous forest --> coniferous forest), the testate amoebae community changed directly. There are spatially homogeneous (low beta-diversity) testacean communities but species rich on the local level (high alpha-diversity) within forests. Within willows and meadows, communities are characterized by low alpha-diversity and high heterogeneity that leads to high gamma-diversity. PMID:22988761

  2. Individual Difference Variables, Affective Differentiation, and the Structures of Affect

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; McCrae, Robert R.; Hagemann, Dirk; Costa, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Methodological arguments are usually invoked to explain variations in the structure of affect. Using self-rated affect from Italian samples (N = 600), we show that individual difference variables related to affective differentiation can moderate the observed structure. Indices of circumplexity (Browne, 1992) and congruence coefficients to the hypothesized target were used to quantify the observed structures. Results did not support the circumplex model as a universal structure. A circular structure with axes of activation and valence was approximated only among more affectively differentiated groups: students and respondents with high scores on Openness to Feelings and measures of negative emotionality. A different structure, with unipolar Positive Affect and Negative Affect factors, was observed among adults and respondents with low Openness to Feelings and negative emotionality. The observed structure of affect will depend in part on the nature of the sample studied. PMID:12932207

  3. Individual difference variables, affective differentiation, and the structures of affect.

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Antonio; McCrae, Robert R; Hagemann, Dirk; Costa, Paul T

    2003-10-01

    Methodological arguments are usually invoked to explain variations in the structure of affect. Using self-rated affect from Italian samples (N=600), we show that individual difference variables related to affective differentiation can moderate the observed structure. Indices of circumplexity and congruence coefficients to the hypothesized target were used to quantify the observed structures. Results did not support the circumplex model as a universal structure. A circular structure with axes of activation and valence was approximated only among more affectively differentiated groups: students and respondents with high scores on Openness to Feelings and measures of negative emotionality. A different structure, with unipolar Positive Affect and Negative Affect factors, was observed among adults and respondents with low Openness to Feelings and negative emotionality. The observed structure of affect will depend in part on the nature of the sample studied. PMID:12932207

  4. QMRAcatch - faecal microbial quality of water resources in a river-floodplain area affected by urban sources and recreational visitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derx, Julia; Schijven, Jack; Sommer, Regina; Kirschner, Alexander; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2016-04-01

    QMRAcatch, a tool to simulate microbial water quality including infection risk assessment, was previously developed and successfully tested at a Danube river site (Schijven et al. 2015). In the tool concentrations of target faecal microorganisms and viruses (TMVs) are computed at a point of interest (PI) along the main river and the floodplain river at daily intervals for a one year period. Even though faecal microbial pathogen concentrations in water resources are usually below the sample limit of detection, this does not ensure, that the water quality complies with a certain required health based target. The aim of this study was therefore to improve the predictability of relevant human pathogenic viruses, i.e. enterovirus and norovirus, in the studied river/floodplain area. This was done by following an innovative calibration strategy based on human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) marker data which were determined following the HF183 TaqMan assay (Green et al. 2011). The MST marker is strongly associated with human faeces and communal sewage, occurring there in numbers by several magnitudes higher than for human enteric pathogens (Mayer et al 2015). The calibrated tool was then evaluated with measured enterovirus concentrations at the PI and in the floodplain river. In the simulation tool the discharges of 5 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were considered with point discharges along a 200 km reach of the Danube river. The MST marker and target virus concentrations at the PI at a certain day were computed based on the concentrations of the previous day, plus the wastewater concentrations times the WWTP discharge divided by the river discharge. A ratio of the river width was also considered, over which the MST marker and virus particles have fully mixed with river water. In the tool, the excrements from recreational visitors frequenting the floodplain area every day were assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the area. A binomial distributed

  5. QMRAcatch - faecal microbial quality of water resources in a river-floodplain area affected by urban sources and recreational visitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derx, Julia; Schijven, Jack; Sommer, Regina; Kirschner, Alexander; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2016-04-01

    QMRAcatch, a tool to simulate microbial water quality including infection risk assessment, was previously developed and successfully tested at a Danube river site (Schijven et al. 2015). In the tool concentrations of target faecal microorganisms and viruses (TMVs) are computed at a point of interest (PI) along the main river and the floodplain river at daily intervals for a one year period. Even though faecal microbial pathogen concentrations in water resources are usually below the sample limit of detection, this does not ensure, that the water quality complies with a certain required health based target. The aim of this study was therefore to improve the predictability of relevant human pathogenic viruses, i.e. enterovirus and norovirus, in the studied river/floodplain area. This was done by following an innovative calibration strategy based on human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) marker data which were determined following the HF183 TaqMan assay (Green et al. 2011). The MST marker is strongly associated with human faeces and communal sewage, occurring there in numbers by several magnitudes higher than for human enteric pathogens (Mayer et al 2015). The calibrated tool was then evaluated with measured enterovirus concentrations at the PI and in the floodplain river. In the simulation tool the discharges of 5 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were considered with point discharges along a 200 km reach of the Danube river. The MST marker and target virus concentrations at the PI at a certain day were computed based on the concentrations of the previous day, plus the wastewater concentrations times the WWTP discharge divided by the river discharge. A ratio of the river width was also considered, over which the MST marker and virus particles have fully mixed with river water. In the tool, the excrements from recreational visitors frequenting the floodplain area every day were assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the area. A binomial distributed

  6. Measuring spatial patterns in floodplains: A step towards understanding the complexity of floodplain ecosystems: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray Scown; Martin Thoms; DeJager, Nathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Floodplains can be viewed as complex adaptive systems (Levin, 1998) because they are comprised of many different biophysical components, such as morphological features, soil groups and vegetation communities as well as being sites of key biogeochemical processing (Stanford et al., 2005). Interactions and feedbacks among the biophysical components often result in additional phenomena occuring over a range of scales, often in the absence of any controlling factors (sensu Hallet, 1990). This emergence of new biophysical features and rates of processing can lead to alternative stable states which feed back into floodplain adaptive cycles (cf. Hughes, 1997; Stanford et al., 2005). Interactions between different biophysical components, feedbacks, self emergence and scale are all key properties of complex adaptive systems (Levin, 1998; Phillips, 2003; Murray et al., 2014) and therefore will influence the manner in which we study and view spatial patterns. Measuring the spatial patterns of floodplain biophysical components is a prerequisite to examining and understanding these ecosystems as complex adaptive systems. Elucidating relationships between pattern and process, which are intrinsically linked within floodplains (Ward et al., 2002), is dependent upon an understanding of spatial pattern. This knowledge can help river scientists determine the major drivers, controllers and responses of floodplain structure and function, as well as the consequences of altering those drivers and controllers (Hughes and Cass, 1997; Whited et al., 2007). Interactions and feedbacks between physical, chemical and biological components of floodplain ecosystems create and maintain a structurally diverse and dynamic template (Stanford et al., 2005). This template influences subsequent interactions between components that consequently affect system trajectories within floodplains (sensu Bak et al., 1988). Constructing and evaluating models used to predict floodplain ecosystem responses to

  7. Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevidimova, O.

    2009-04-01

    . Thus, the floodplain dynamics is determined by the amount of material Q(t), left as sediment (amount of warp on a unit of area) during the period of flooding, and the amount of material q(t), removed during the time between floods. With the floodplain height approaching some limit height Yl, which equals the maximal height of floods, Q(t)  0, а q(t)  max. From here, we can build a functional diagram of the floodplain height change depending on time: dY/dt=Q (t) - q (t) (1) This equation allows us to describe non-monotonous behavior of different floodplain massifs. As floodplain systems, like all geomorphosystems, are dissipative structures, they should eventually come to a stable condition: dY/dt=0. This mode is possible in cases: Q=q=0 and Q=q=const. In the first case, the floodplain level would reach the maximum height of flooding and would not be flooded any more. It would cause significant decrease in the amount of material left on its surface as sediments and the system would start to degrade. This variant is purely theoretical, as such conditions, where the streams of matter are absent, can appear only in a homogeneous environment. The second case characterizes the final stage in the formation of floodplain system as an integral unity in concrete external conditions and determines its dynamic equilibrium. In terms of the theory of dynamic systems, this condition corresponds to the limit cycle. Real floodplain systems never achieve it, but approach to it indefinitely closely, repeating themselves and not changing essentially in their basic morphological parameters. Thus, a high floodplain, approaching its limit height, shows morphological completeness. If for any reasons the floodplain surface becomes higher than the limit height Yl, it will not be flooded any more and will become a terrace, which means that the limit cycle of the floodplain system will be destroyed, as well as the system itself. The equation (1) allows to take into account the river

  8. Alpine Channel and Floodplain Dynamics in the Lake Tahoe Region, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liquori, M.; Chris, B.; Parris, A.; Heins, A.; Stofleth, J.; Wickland, M.

    2006-12-01

    Alpine floodplains provide diverse habitat components for terrestrial and aquatic species, and strongly influence bank stability and channel migration processes. They also present complex restoration challenges. Several systems in the Lake Tahoe region have been diagnosed with incised channel conditions that generate excessive mobile sediment from eroding banks, degrade riparian vegetation communities, and diminish floodplain wetland abundance and quality. Conventional efforts to restore these systems focus on reconnecting floodplains, primarily through channel or floodplain modifications designed to reestablish floodplain inundation frequency near a Q1.5 level. Recent observations along lower Squaw Creek and the Upper Truckee River suggest that human impacts and climate-induced shifts over the 20th Century appear to significantly change the processes and dynamics between channels and floodplains. Our observations highlight differences in alpine settings as compared with lowland environments. Increased rain-on-snow frequency appears to increase the importance of avulsion and channel widening processes over channel meander processes. Loss of channel sinuosity, increases in depth and changes in channel shape appear to follow rain-on-snow events. These changes affect the overall sediment transport regime, even as snowmelt duration continues to exert the primary influence over dominant discharge relationships. During floods, discontinuous, proximal deposition of coarse sediment replaces uniform, distal deposition of finer sediments, altering the structure of the channel bed and floodplain. Early snowmelt from developed hillslopes saturates floodplains even in the absence of regular flooding, potentially negating or eliminating the restorative benefit of increased flood frequency. These results suggest that effective long-term restoration strategies cannot rely on historic sinuosity patterns or simple flood frequency metrics, but must begin to understand how changes in

  9. Trace metal availability and effects on benthic community structure in floodplain lakes.

    PubMed

    van Griethuysen, Corine; van Baren, Joyce; Peeters, Edwin T H M; Koelmans, Albert A

    2004-03-01

    Effects of contaminants on communities are difficult to assess and poorly understood. We analyzed in situ effects of trace metals and common environmental variables on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in floodplain lakes. Alternative measures of trace metal availability were evaluated, including total metals, metals normalized on organic carbon (OC) or clay, simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), combinations of SEM and acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), and metals accumulated by detritivore invertebrates (Oligochaeta). Accumulated metal concentrations correlated positively with sediment trace metals and negatively with surface water dissolved OC. Sixty-eight percent of the variation in benthic community composition was explained by a combination of 11 environmental variables, including sediment, water, and morphological characteristics with trace metals. Metals explained 2 to 6% of the community composition when SEM-AVS or individual SEM concentrations were regarded. In contrast, total, normalized, and accumulated metals were not significantly linked to community composition. We conclude that examination of SEM or SEM - AVS concentrations is useful for risk assessment of trace metals on the community level. PMID:15285361

  10. Characterization of redox-related soil microbial communities along a river floodplain continuum by fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and 16S rRNA genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Redox states affect substrate availability and energy transformation, and, thus, play a crucial role in regulating soil microbial abundance, diversity, and community structure. We evaluated microbial communities in soils under oxic, intermittent, and anoxic conditions along a river floodplain conti...

  11. The floodplain large-wood cycle hypothesis: A mechanism for the physical and biotic structuring of temperate forested alluvial valleys in the North Pacific coastal ecoregion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Brian D.; Montgomery, David R.; Fetherston, Kevin L.; Abbe, Tim B.

    2012-02-01

    A 'floodplain large-wood cycle' is hypothesized as a mechanism for generating landforms and influencing river dynamics in ways that structure and maintain riparian and aquatic ecosystems of forested alluvial river valleys of the Pacific coastal temperate rainforest of North America. In the cycle, pieces of wood large enough to resist fluvial transport and remain in river channels initiate and stabilize wood jams, which in turn create alluvial patches and protect them from erosion. These stable patches provide sites for trees to mature over hundreds of years in river valleys where the average cycle of floodplain turnover is much briefer, thus providing a future source of large wood and reinforcing the cycle. Different tree species can function in the floodplain large-wood cycle in different ecological regions, in different river valleys within regions, and within individual river valleys in which forest composition changes through time. The cycle promotes a physically complex, biodiverse, and self-reinforcing state. Conversely, loss of large trees from the system drives landforms and ecosystems toward an alternate stable state of diminished biogeomorphic complexity. Reestablishing large trees is thus necessary to restore such rivers. Although interactions and mechanisms may differ between biomes and in larger or smaller rivers, available evidence suggests that large riparian trees may have similarly fundamental roles in the physical and biotic structuring of river valleys elsewhere in the temperate zone.

  12. Vegetation, soil, and flooding relationships in a blackwater floodplain forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, M.K.; King, S.L.; Gartner, D.; Eisenbies, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    Hydroperiod is considered the primary determinant of plant species distribution in temperate floodplain forests, but most studies have focused on alluvial (sediment-laden) river systems. Few studies have evaluated plant community relationships in blackwater river systems of the South Atlantic Coastal Plain of North America. In this study, we characterized the soils, hydroperiod, and vegetation communities and evaluated relationships between the physical and chemical environment and plant community structure on the floodplain of the Coosawhatchie River, a blackwater river in South Carolina, USA. The soils were similar to previous descriptions of blackwater floodplain soils but had greater soil N and P availability, substantially greater clay content, and lower soil silt content than was previously reported for other blackwater river floodplains. Results of a cluster analysis showed there were five forest communities on the site, and both short-term (4 years) and long-term (50 years) flooding records documented a flooding gradient: water tupelo community > swamp tupelo > laurel oak = overcup oak > mixed oak. The long-term hydrologic record showed that the floodplain has flooded less frequently from 1994 to present than in previous decades. Detrended correspondence analysis of environmental and relative basal area values showed that 27% of the variation in overstory community structure could be explained by the first two axes; however, fitting the species distributions to the DCA axes using Gaussian regression explained 67% of the variation. Axes were correlated with elevation (flooding intensity) and soil characteristics related to rooting volume and cation nutrient availability. Our study suggests that flooding is the major factor affecting community structure, but soil characteristics also may be factors in community structure in blackwater systems. ?? 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  13. Adaptive cycles of floodplain vegetation response to flooding and drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, R.; Thoms, M. C.; Parsons, M.; Reid, M.

    2016-02-01

    Flooding is a key driver of floodplain vegetation productivity. Adaptive cycles provide a model for examining the productivity of semi-arid floodplain vegetation in response to hydrology. We examined the response of vegetation productivity (measured as NDVI) through a hypothesised adaptive cycle to determine whether the cycle repeats over time and how it is affected by differently sized flood events. The area of floodplain inundation was associated with an adaptive cycle that repeated in four flood events through the following phases: wetting (exploitation phase), wet (conservation phase), drying (release phase) and dry (reorganisation phase). Vegetation productivity responses corresponded to these phases. The area and quality of floodplain vegetation productivity followed the hypothesised pattern of higher-quality vegetation vigour in the wetting and wet phases, lower vigour in the drying phase and lowest vigour in the dry phase. There were more transitions between NDVI classes in the wet phase, which was dominated by two-way transitions. Overall, the wetting, wet and drying phases were dominated by smaller-probability class changes, whereas in the dry phase, higher-probability class changes were more prominent. Although the four flood events exhibited an adaptive cycle the duration of the adaptive-cycle phases, and the nature of vegetation productivity response, differed with the character of the flood event. Vegetation response in two of the adaptive-cycle phases - the release and reorganisation phases - were as hypothesised, but in the exploitation and conservation phases, changes in vegetation productivity were more dynamic. The character of vegetation response through the adaptive cycle also indicates that semi-arid floodplain vegetation productivity is more vulnerable to changing state during the conservation and release phases and not during the exploitation and reorganisation phases as resilience theory suggests. Overall, the adaptive cycle represents a

  14. Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevidimova, O.

    2009-04-01

    . Thus, the floodplain dynamics is determined by the amount of material Q(t), left as sediment (amount of warp on a unit of area) during the period of flooding, and the amount of material q(t), removed during the time between floods. With the floodplain height approaching some limit height Yl, which equals the maximal height of floods, Q(t)  0, а q(t)  max. From here, we can build a functional diagram of the floodplain height change depending on time: dY/dt=Q (t) - q (t) (1) This equation allows us to describe non-monotonous behavior of different floodplain massifs. As floodplain systems, like all geomorphosystems, are dissipative structures, they should eventually come to a stable condition: dY/dt=0. This mode is possible in cases: Q=q=0 and Q=q=const. In the first case, the floodplain level would reach the maximum height of flooding and would not be flooded any more. It would cause significant decrease in the amount of material left on its surface as sediments and the system would start to degrade. This variant is purely theoretical, as such conditions, where the streams of matter are absent, can appear only in a homogeneous environment. The second case characterizes the final stage in the formation of floodplain system as an integral unity in concrete external conditions and determines its dynamic equilibrium. In terms of the theory of dynamic systems, this condition corresponds to the limit cycle. Real floodplain systems never achieve it, but approach to it indefinitely closely, repeating themselves and not changing essentially in their basic morphological parameters. Thus, a high floodplain, approaching its limit height, shows morphological completeness. If for any reasons the floodplain surface becomes higher than the limit height Yl, it will not be flooded any more and will become a terrace, which means that the limit cycle of the floodplain system will be destroyed, as well as the system itself. The equation (1) allows to take into account the river

  15. Fusion of UAV photogrammetry and digital optical granulometry for detection of structural changes in floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhammer, Jakub; Lendzioch, Theodora; Mirijovsky, Jakub

    2016-04-01

    Granulometric analysis represents a traditional, important and for the description of sedimentary material substantial method with various applications in sedimentology, hydrology and geomorphology. However, the conventional granulometric field survey methods are time consuming, laborious, costly and are invasive to the surface being sampled, which can be limiting factor for their applicability in protected areas.. The optical granulometry has recently emerged as an image analysis technique, enabling non-invasive survey, employing semi-automated identification of clasts from calibrated digital imagery, taken on site by conventional high resolution digital camera and calibrated frame. The image processing allows detection and measurement of mixed size natural grains, their sorting and quantitative analysis using standard granulometric approaches. Despite known limitations, the technique today presents reliable tool, significantly easing and speeding the field survey in fluvial geomorphology. However, the nature of such survey has still limitations in spatial coverage of the sites and applicability in research at multitemporal scale. In our study, we are presenting novel approach, based on fusion of two image analysis techniques - optical granulometry and UAV-based photogrammetry, allowing to bridge the gap between the needs of high resolution structural information for granulometric analysis and spatially accurate and data coverage. We have developed and tested a workflow that, using UAV imaging platform enabling to deliver seamless, high resolution and spatially accurate imagery of the study site from which can be derived the granulometric properties of the sedimentary material. We have set up a workflow modeling chain, providing (i) the optimum flight parameters for UAV imagery to balance the two key divergent requirements - imagery resolution and seamless spatial coverage, (ii) the workflow for the processing of UAV acquired imagery by means of the optical

  16. Metal accumulation in earthworms inhabiting floodplain soils.

    PubMed

    Vijver, Martina G; Vink, Jos P M; Miermans, Cornelis J H; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2007-07-01

    The main factors contributing to variation in metal concentrations in earthworms inhabiting floodplain soils were investigated in three floodplains differing in inundation frequency and vegetation type. Metal concentrations in epigeic earthworms showed larger seasonal variations than endogeic earthworms. Variation in internal levels between sampling intervals were largest in earthworms from floodplain sites frequently inundated. High and low frequency flooding did not result in consistent changes in internal metal concentrations. Vegetation types of the floodplains did not affect metal levels in Lumbricus rubellus, except for internal Cd levels, which were positively related to the presence of organic litter. Internal levels of most essential metals were higher in spring. In general, no clear patterns in metal uptake were found and repetition of the sampling campaign will probably yield different results. PMID:17254683

  17. Impact of Stream and Floodplain Rehabilitation on Macroinvertebrate Community Structure and Diversity on the Hammer Creek in Lancaster County, PA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, J. C.; Kondikof, B.; Wallace, J. R.

    2005-05-01

    Naturally occurring floodplains act as a barrier to adverse effects from anthropogenic sources, while retaining aquatic organism diversity and potentially increasing stream productivity. The purpose of the study is to examine macroinvertebrate communities in response to stream and floodplain rehabilitation. This is an on-going study initiated with pre-restoration sampling conducted in July/August 2001. Post-rehabilitation sampling began in December 2001 and is continuing until the present. Long-term monitoring is being conducted among five sampling sites: above the restored area (control site), two sites within the restored section of the stream, and two sites 100 and 2500 meters below the impacted reach. Macroinvertebrates were sampled from the sites using a modified Hess sampler (n=6 replicates samples/ site). Macroinvertebrates were identified to generic level and analyzed using several metrics such as, Shannon and Simpson biodiversity indices, percent EPT, Functional feeding group analyses, ratio of scrapers to collector-filterers, and ratio of EPT abundance to Chironomidae. We found that stream restoration "traumatized" the macroinvertebrate community and diversity exhibited a lag-time in recovery. Because of an increase in riffle habitat, a modification of flow regime, and potential for preservation of habitat heterogeneity within these riffle zones, macroinvertebrate diversity may respond according to this improvement in habitat.

  18. Risk-based zoning for urbanizing floodplains.

    PubMed

    Porse, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Urban floodplain development brings economic benefits and enhanced flood risks. Rapidly growing cities must often balance the economic benefits and increased risks of floodplain settlement. Planning can provide multiple flood mitigation and environmental benefits by combining traditional structural measures such as levees, increasingly popular landscape and design features (green infrastructure), and non-structural measures such as zoning. Flexibility in both structural and non-structural options, including zoning procedures, can reduce flood risks. This paper presents a linear programming formulation to assess cost-effective urban floodplain development decisions that consider benefits and costs of development along with expected flood damages. It uses a probabilistic approach to identify combinations of land-use allocations (residential and commercial development, flood channels, distributed runoff management) and zoning regulations (development zones in channel) to maximize benefits. The model is applied to a floodplain planning analysis for an urbanizing region in the Baja Sur peninsula of Mexico. The analysis demonstrates how (1) economic benefits drive floodplain development, (2) flexible zoning can improve economic returns, and (3) cities can use landscapes, enhanced by technology and design, to manage floods. The framework can incorporate additional green infrastructure benefits, and bridges typical disciplinary gaps for planning and engineering. PMID:25500464

  19. Association between wetland disturbance and biological attributes in floodplain wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Hubbard, D.E.; Werlin, K.B.; Haugerud, N.J.; Powell, K.A.; Thompson, John; Johnson, T.

    2006-01-01

    We quantified the influence of agricultural activities on environmental and biological conditions of floodplain wetlands in the upper Missouri River basin. Seasonally-flooded wetlands were characterized as low impact (non-disturbed) or high impact (disturbed) based on local land use. Biological data collected from these wetlands were used to develop a wetland condition index (WCI). Fourteen additional wetlands were sampled to evaluate the general condition of seasonally-flooded floodplain wetlands. Structural and functional attributes of macrophyte, algae, and macroinvertebrate communities were tested as candidate metrics for assessing biotic responses. The WCI we developed used six biological metrics to discriminate between disturbed and non-disturbed wetlands: 1) biomass of Culicidae larvae, 2) abundance of Chironomidae larvae, 3) macroinvertebrate diversity, 4) total number of plant species, 5) the proportion of exotic plant species, and 6) total number of sensitive diatom species. Disturbed wetlands had less taxa richness and species diversity and more exotic and nuisance (e.g., mosquitoes) species. Environmental differences between low and high impact wetlands included measures of total potassium, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, alkalinity, conductance, and sediment phosphorus concentration. Canonical analyses showed that WCI scores were weakly correlated (P = 0.057) with environmental variables in randomly selected wetlands. In addition, mean WCI score for random wetlands was higher than that for high impact wetlands, implying that floodplain wetlands were less impacted by the types of agricultural activities affecting high impact sites. Inter-year sampling of some wetlands revealed that WCI metrics were correlated in 2000 and 2001, implying that biological metrics provided useful indicators of disturbance in floodplain wetlands. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  20. Planning practice in support of economically and environmentally sustainable roads in floodplains: the case of the Mekong delta floodplains.

    PubMed

    Douven, Wim; Buurman, Joost

    2013-10-15

    Road development in relatively undisturbed floodplain systems, such as the floodplains of the Mekong River, will impact hydraulics and interrupt the natural flow of water. This affects the ecology and environment, and the livelihoods of people who depend on fishing and agriculture. On the other hand, floods can severely damage road infrastructure in years with large floods and can cause high annual maintenance costs. Improving road development practices in floodplains is a complex, multidimensional task involving hydraulic and geotechnical analysis, ecosystem analysis, socio-economic analysis, policy analysis, etc. This paper analyses the planning practice of road development and rehabilitation and how this practice can be improved in support of economically and environmentally sustainable roads in floodplains. It is concluded that although ample technical, planning and environmental assessment guidelines exist, guidelines need updating to address cumulative impacts at floodplain level and factors hampering the implementation in guidelines should be addressed in the guideline design (process). PMID:23735460

  1. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. PMID:26919895

  2. Synergies between Danube Floodplain revitalization, flood risk mapping and spatial planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichersu, Iulian; Marin, Eugenia; Mierla, Marian; Sela, Florentina; Nichersu, Iuliana; Trifanov, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    The Danube River must be considered more than a subject of hydraulics. Together with its major riverbed and flooded meadow, represents a very complex ecosystem that provides habitat for a very rich flora and fauna, and also a support for the socio-economical activities. During time, the ecological balance of Danube River has suffered alteration processes because of continuously development of human society. In the alteration process of the Danube have been destroyed dominating natural systems and created instead industrial structures with economical purpose such as navigation, hydro-energy, agriculture, harbors that are damaging the Danube River by losing the floodplains and natural morphological structures, determining the Danube Floodplain to struggle with increasing flood risks and actual floods in the last few years. Because the Danube was recently channelized and enclosed by dikes, there is hardly room for the reduction of peak flow during rainy periods or for the development of nature along the river. Due to climate change and large-scale deforestation, these peak flows occur not only more frequently, but they also carry a greater volume of water over a shorter time, as seen during the summers of 2004 and 2005 and spring 2006, 2010 when a large part of the region flooded and required large-scale evacuations. The catastrophic flood events in the Danube Basin in particular reveal the vulnerability of our society against extreme natural events. With the increase of population and industrialization, the settling areas and land use activities spread in floodplain areas seeming protected or hardly affected. Hence, the Romanian Danube Floodplain has been the subject of three major research projects: "Ecological and economical restoration of Lower Danube Floodplain - Romanian Sector", "Danube River revitalization" within SEE project 'Danube River Network of Protected Areas" and "Beneficiaries and flood risk assessment in Danube Floodplain". The synergic objective of

  3. Sedimentation patterns across a Coastal Plain floodplain: The importance of hydrogeomorphic influences and cross-floodplain connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaase, Christopher T.; Kupfer, John A.

    2016-09-01

    The floodplains of large Coastal Plain rivers in the southeastern U.S. are important long-term storage sites for alluvial sediment and nutrients. Yet considerable uncertainty surrounds sediment dynamics on many large river floodplains and, in particular, the local scale factors that affect the flux of sediment and nutrients from rivers onto their floodplains and their subsequent deposition. This research quantifies short-term rates of sediment deposition from 2012 to 2014 on floodplain sites at Congaree National Park using feldspar pads. Sediment deposition rates ranged from 0.1 to 15.6 cm (median = 1.46 cm) and were closely associated with inundation frequency and geomorphic position. Cross-floodplain distributary channels served as particularly important conduits for moving sediment onto the floodplain. Physical and chemical analyses of soil samples demonstrated that the most flood-exposed sites had higher major nutrient and micronutrient levels (especially of phosphorus) and more diverse nutrient compositions. This research advances current understandings of lateral floodplain connectivity by demonstrating the complex effects of regional hydrology and local floodplain environmental characteristics on the supply of sediment and nutrients.

  4. Morphodynamics of Floodplain Chute Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S. R.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplain chute channel formation is a key process that can enable rivers to transition from single-thread to multi-thread planform geometries. Floodplain chute channels are usually incisional channels connecting topographic lows across point bars and in the floodplain. Surprisingly, it is still not clear what conditions promote chute channel formation and what governs their morphodynamic behavior. Towards this end we have initiated an empirical and theoretical study of floodplain chute channels in Indiana, USA. Using elevation models and satellite imagery we mapped 3064 km2 of floodplain in Indiana, and find that 37.3% of mapped floodplains in Indiana have extensive chute channel networks. These chute channel networks consist of two types of channel segments: meander cutoffs of the main channel and chute channels linking the cutoffs together. To understand how these chute channels link meander cutoffs together and eventually create floodplain channel networks we use Delft3D to explore floodplain morphodynamics. Our first modeling experiment starts from a generic floodplain prepopulated with meander cutoffs to test under what conditions chute channels form.We find that chute channel formation is optimized at an intermediate flood discharge. If the flood discharge is too large the meander cutoffs erosively diffuse, whereas if the floodwave is too small the cutoffs fill with sediment. A moderately sized floodwave reworks the sediment surrounding the topographic lows, enhancing the development of floodplain chute channels. Our second modeling experiments explore how floodplain chute channels evolve on the West Fork of the White River, Indiana, USA. We find that the floodplain chute channels are capable of conveying the entire 10 yr floodwave (Q=1330m3/s) leaving the inter-channel areas dry. Moreover, the chute channels can incise into the floodplain while the margins of channels are aggrading, creating levees. Our results suggest that under the right conditions

  5. Modelling the effects of human disturbances on the flow and sediment dynamics of a large river floodplain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marina; Basile, Pedro; Riccardi, Gerardo; Rodriguez, Jose F.

    2015-04-01

    The flow and sediment dynamics of large river floodplains can be substantially affected by human disturbances like bridges and embankments. These effects are difficult to predict, mainly due to extent of the domain over which they can be important. In this contribution we present the application of a quasi-2D unsteady flow and sediment transport model of a large lowland river system, including its floodplain. We study the potential impact of a 56-km long road embankment constructed across the entire floodplain. The study area comprises a 208-km reach of the Paraná River between the cities of Diamante and Ramallo (Argentina) representing total a river-floodplain area of 8,100 km². The model uses an unstructured cells scheme to solve the water flow and sediment equations, relying on different simplifications of the 1D de Saint Venant equations to define the discharge laws between cells. The simulations allow for the analysis of the spatially-distributed transport and deposition of fine sediments throughout the river-floodplain and the backwater effects introduced by the structures. These dynamic changes are quantified for different extraordinary flood events.

  6. Impacts of inundation and drought on eukaryote biodiversity in semi-arid floodplain soils.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Darren S; Colloff, Matthew J; Rees, Gavin N; Chariton, Anthony A; Watson, Garth O; Court, Leon N; Hartley, Diana M; Morgan, Matthew J; King, Andrew J; Wilson, Jessica S; Hodda, Michael; Hardy, Christopher M

    2013-03-01

    Floodplain ecosystems are characterized by alternating wet and dry phases and periodic inundation defines their ecological character. Climate change, river regulation and the construction of levees have substantially altered natural flooding and drying regimes worldwide with uncertain effects on key biotic groups. In southern Australia, we hypothesized that soil eukaryotic communities in climate change affected areas of a semi-arid floodplain would transition towards comprising mainly dry-soil specialist species with increasing drought severity. Here, we used 18S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing to measure the eukaryote community composition in soils that had been depleted of water to varying degrees to confirm that reproducible transitional changes occur in eukaryotic biodiversity on this floodplain. Interflood community structures (3 years post-flood) were dominated by persistent rather than either aquatic or dry-specialist organisms. Only 2% of taxa were unique to dry locations by 8 years post-flood, and 10% were restricted to wet locations (inundated a year to 2 weeks post-flood). Almost half (48%) of the total soil biota were detected in both these environments. The discovery of a large suite of organisms able to survive nearly a decade of drought, and up to a year submerged supports the concept of inherent resilience of Australian semi-arid floodplain soil communities under increasing pressure from climatic induced changes in water availability. PMID:23379967

  7. The influence of floodplains on mercury availability

    SciTech Connect

    Wallschlaeger, D.; Wilken, R.D.

    1997-09-01

    The floodplains of the German river Elbe affect the mercury distribution in the river system in two different ways: they act both as a medium-term sink and as a long-term source. The large amounts of mercury deposited onto the floodplains during annual floodings are first effectively fixed in the soils, rendering them basically unavailable. Sequential extraction experiments reveal that only a small fraction of the mercury (< 3%) is present in available forms, whereas the vast majority is associated with humic substances or present in sulfidic binding forms. After deposition, a small fraction of the total mercury is gradually remobilized into the aqueous phase bound passively to water-soluble humic acids. The availability of mercury in these complexes is still low, since environmental influences such as changes in pH or redox potential and competition with other cations do not cause any mercury liberation. In the next step, reactions in the aqueous phase lead to the formation of the highly available volatile species Hg{sup 0} and dimethylmercury (DMM). Their evaporation gives rise to a strong mercury flux from the floodplains into the atmosphere. Preliminary mass balances indicate that the majority of the deposited mercury stays bound in the floodplain soils, while small amounts are emitted back into the river`s ecosystem. Atmospheric emission is more important as a remobilization pathway than aquatic export.

  8. Floodplain forest loss and changes in forest community composition and structure in the upper Mississippi River: a wildlife habitat at risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutson, M.G.; Klaas, E.E.

    1998-01-01

    Large floodplain forests represent a threatened and endangered type of ecosystem in the United States. Estimates of cumulative losses of floodplain forest range from 57% to 95% at different locations within the continental United Stales. Floodplain forests of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) have significantly declined in extent due to agriculture, lock and dam construction, and urban development since European settlement. We collected data on shrubs, herbs, and trees from 56 floodplain forest plots in 1992 and compared our results with a previous analysis of historical tree data from the same area recorded by the General Land Office Survey in the 1840s. Acer saccharinum strongly dominates among mature trees and its relative dominance has increased over time. Salix spp. And Betula nigra have declined in relative dominance. Tree sizes are similar to those of presettlement forests, but present forests have fewer trees. The lack of early successional tree species and a trend toward an increasing monoculture of A. Saccharinum in the mature stages indicate problems with regeneration. Because floodplain forests represent a rare habitat type, losses and changes in habitat quality could pose serious problems for wildlife that depend upon these habitats, especially birds.

  9. Floodplain ecosystem processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, John M.; Novo, Evlyn M. L. M.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Piedade, Maria T. F.; Maurice, Laurence

    Floodplains represent a major component of the central Amazon Basin and influence the hydrology, ecology, and biogeochemistry. Hess et al. (2003) used a classification of synthetic aperture radar data with 100 m resolution for a 1.77 million km2 quadrat in central Amazonia and identified 17% as wetland most of which was inundated a portion of each year. Total net production attributed to flooded forests (excluding wood increments), aquatic macrophytes, phytoplankton, and periphyton for the 1.77 million km2 quadrat was estimated to be about 300 Tg C a-1. Flooded forests accounted for 62% of the total, aquatic macrophytes accounted for 34%, and the remaining 4% was associated with periphyton and phytoplankton. Approximately 10% of the total is the amount of organic carbon exported annually by the Amazon River according to Richey et al. (1990), methane emission is about 2.5% according to Melack et al. (2004), and a similar percent is estimated to be buried in sediments. The remaining portion is close to being sufficient to fuel the respiration that results in the degassing of 210 ± 60 Tg C a-1 as carbon dioxide from the rivers and floodplains according to Richey et al. (2002). Variations in the distribution and inundation of floodplain habitats play a key role in the ecology and production of many commercially important freshwater fish. A significant relationship exists between maximum inundated area lagged by 5 years and annual yield of omnivores.

  10. Floodplain Backwater Restoration: A Case Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current thinking in stream ecology emphasizes the importance of floodplain backwaters within lowland riverine ecosystems. However, these types of habitat are becoming increasingly rare as development is transforming floodplain landscapes in fundamental ways. Two floodplain backwaters (severed mean...

  11. Protein crowding affects hydration structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuhei; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The effect of protein crowding on the structure and dynamics of water was examined from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of a series of protein G and protein G/villin systems at different protein concentrations. Hydration structure was analyzed in terms of radial distribution functions, three-dimensional hydration sites, and preservation of tetrahedral coordination. Analysis of hydration dynamics focused on self-diffusion rates and dielectric constants as a function of crowding. The results show significant changes in both structure and dynamics of water under highly crowded conditions. The structure of water is altered mostly beyond the first solvation shell. Diffusion rates and dielectric constants are significantly reduced following linear trends as a function of crowding reflecting highly constrained water in crowded environments. The reduced dynamics of diffusion is expected to be strongly related to hydrodynamic properties of crowded cellular environments while the reduced dielectric constant under crowded conditions has implications for the stability of biomolecules in crowded environments. The results from this study suggest a prescription for modeling solvation in simulations of cellular environments. PMID:22352398

  12. Recent Experience Affects the Strength of Structural Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaschak, Michael P.; Loney, Renrick A.; Borreggine, Kristin L.

    2006-01-01

    In two experiments, we explore how recent experience with particular syntactic constructions affects the strength of the structural priming observed for those constructions. The results suggest that (1) the strength of structural priming observed for double object and prepositional object constructions is affected by the relative frequency with…

  13. Ordination of breeding birds in relation to environmental gradients in three southeastern United States floodplain forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wakeley, J.S.; Guilfoyle, M.P.; Antrobus, T.J.; Fischer, R.A.; Barrow, W.C., Jr.; Hamel, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    We used an ordination approach to identify factors important to the organization of breeding bird communities in three floodplains: Cache River, Arkansas (AR), Iatt Creek, Louisiana (LA), and the Coosawhatchie River, South Carolina (SC), USA. We used 5-min point counts to sample birds in each study area each spring from 1995 to 1998, and measured ground-surface elevations and a suite of other habitat variables to investigate bird distributions and community characteristics in relation to important environmental gradients. In both AR and SC, the average number of Neotropical migrant species detected was lowest in semipermanently flooded Nyssa aquatica Linnaeus habitats and greatest in the highest elevation floodplain zone. Melanerpes carolinus Linnaeus, Protonotaria citrea Boddaert, Quiscalus quiscula Linnaeus, and other species were more abundant in N. aquatica habitats, whereas Wilsonia citrina Boddaert, Oporornis formosus Wilson, Vireo griseus Boddaert, and others were more abundant in drier floodplain zones. In LA, there were no significant differences in community metrics or bird species abundances among forest types. Canonical correspondence analyses revealed that structural development of understory vegetation was the most important factor affecting bird distributions in all three study areas; however, potential causes of these structural gradients differed. In AR and SC, differences in habitat structure were related to the hydrologic gradient, as indexed by ground-surface elevation. In LA, structural variations were related mainly to the frequency of canopy gaps. Thus, bird communities in all three areas appeared to be organized primarily in response to repeated localized disturbance. Our results suggest that regular disturbance due to flooding plays an important role in structuring breeding bird communities in floodplains subject to prolonged inundation, whereas other agents of disturbance (e.g., canopy gaps) may be more important in headwater systems

  14. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Disease screening instruments used for secondary prevention can facilitate early determination and treatment of pathogenic factors, effectively reducing disease incidence, mortality rates, and health complications. Therefore, people should be encouraged to receive health examinations for discovering potential pathogenic factors before symptoms occur. Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan. In total, 388 effective questionnaires were analyzed through structural model analysis. Consequently, this study yielded four crucial findings: (1) The established extended health belief model could effectively predict health examination behavioral intention; (2) Self-efficacy was the factor that most strongly influenced health examination behavioral intention, followed by health knowledge; (3) Self-efficacy substantially influenced perceived benefits and perceived barriers; (4) Health knowledge and social support indirectly influenced health examination behavioral intention. The preceding results can effectively increase the acceptance and use of health examination services among the public, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately reducing disease and mortality rates. PMID:27043606

  15. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Disease screening instruments used for secondary prevention can facilitate early determination and treatment of pathogenic factors, effectively reducing disease incidence, mortality rates, and health complications. Therefore, people should be encouraged to receive health examinations for discovering potential pathogenic factors before symptoms occur. Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan. In total, 388 effective questionnaires were analyzed through structural model analysis. Consequently, this study yielded four crucial findings: (1) The established extended health belief model could effectively predict health examination behavioral intention; (2) Self-efficacy was the factor that most strongly influenced health examination behavioral intention, followed by health knowledge; (3) Self-efficacy substantially influenced perceived benefits and perceived barriers; (4) Health knowledge and social support indirectly influenced health examination behavioral intention. The preceding results can effectively increase the acceptance and use of health examination services among the public, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately reducing disease and mortality rates. PMID:27043606

  16. Interactions among hydrogeomorphology, vegetation, and nutrient biogeochemistry in floodplain ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogeomorphic, vegetative, and biogeochemical processes interact in floodplains resulting in great complexity that provides opportunities to better understand linkages among physical and biological processes in ecosystems. Floodplains and their associated river systems are structured by four-dimensional gradients of hydrogeomorphology: longitudinal, lateral, vertical, and temporal components. These four dimensions create dynamic hydrologic and geomorphologic mosaics that have a large imprint on the vegetation and nutrient biogeochemistry of floodplains. Plant physiology, population dynamics, community structure, and productivity are all very responsive to floodplain hydrogeomorphology. The strength of this relationship between vegetation and hydrogeomorphology is evident in the use of vegetation as an indicator of hydrogeomorphic processes. However, vegetation also influences hydrogeomorphology by modifying hydraulics and sediment entrainment and deposition that typically stabilize geomorphic patterns. Nitrogen and phosphorus biogeochemistry commonly influence plant productivity and community composition, although productivity is not limited by nutrient availability in all floodplains. Conversely, vegetation influences nutrient biogeochemistry through direct uptake and storage as well as production of organic matter that regulates microbial biogeochemical processes. The biogeochemistries of nitrogen and phosphorus cycling are very sensitive to spatial and temporal variation in hydrogeomorphology, in particular floodplain wetness and sedimentation. The least-studied interaction is the direct effect of biogeochemistry on hydrogeomorphology, but the control of nutrient availability over organic matter decomposition and thus soil permeability and elevation is likely important. Biogeochemistry also has the more documented but indirect control of hydrogeomorphology through regulation of plant biomass. In summary, the defining characteristics of floodplain ecosystems

  17. 40 CFR 257.3-1 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floodplains. 257.3-1 Section 257.3-1... and Practices § 257.3-1 Floodplains. (a) Facilities or practices in floodplains shall not restrict the flow of the base flood, reduce the temporary water storage capacity of the floodplain, or result...

  18. 40 CFR 257.3-1 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Floodplains. 257.3-1 Section 257.3-1... and Practices § 257.3-1 Floodplains. (a) Facilities or practices in floodplains shall not restrict the flow of the base flood, reduce the temporary water storage capacity of the floodplain, or result...

  19. 40 CFR 257.3-1 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Floodplains. 257.3-1 Section 257.3-1... and Practices § 257.3-1 Floodplains. (a) Facilities or practices in floodplains shall not restrict the flow of the base flood, reduce the temporary water storage capacity of the floodplain, or result...

  20. 40 CFR 257.3-1 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floodplains. 257.3-1 Section 257.3-1... and Practices § 257.3-1 Floodplains. (a) Facilities or practices in floodplains shall not restrict the flow of the base flood, reduce the temporary water storage capacity of the floodplain, or result...

  1. 40 CFR 257.3-1 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Floodplains. 257.3-1 Section 257.3-1... and Practices § 257.3-1 Floodplains. (a) Facilities or practices in floodplains shall not restrict the flow of the base flood, reduce the temporary water storage capacity of the floodplain, or result...

  2. Floodplain Modulation of Solute Fluxes from Mountainous Regions: the Amazonian Madre de Dios River Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. A.; West, A. J.; Baronas, J. J.; Ponton, C.; Clark, K. E.; Feakins, S. J.; Galy, V.

    2015-12-01

    In many large river systems, solutes released by chemical weathering in mountainous regions are transported through floodplains before being discharged into the ocean. Chemical reactions within floodplains can both add and remove solutes, significantly modulating fluxes. Despite their importance in the relationship between tectonic uplift and solute fluxes to the ocean, many aspects of floodplain processes are poorly constrained since the chemistry of large rivers is also significantly affected by the mixing between multiple tributaries, which makes the separation and quantification of floodplain processes challenging. Here we explore how floodplain processes affect a suite of major and trace elements in the Madre de Dios River system in Peru. To separate floodplain processes from conservative mixing, we developed a tributary mixing model that uses water isotopic ratios and chloride concentrations measured in each tributary and upstream and downstream of each tributary confluence for all major tributaries along a floodplain reach. The results of the tributary mixing model allow for the chemical composition of the mainstem of the Madre de Dios River to be modeled assuming completely conservative mixing. Differences between the modeled and measured chemical composition of the mainstem are then used to identify and quantify the effects of floodplain processes on different solutes. Our results show that during both the wet and dry seasons, Li is removed and Ca, Mg, and Sr are added to the dissolved load during floodplain transit. Other solutes, like Na and SO4, appear to behave conservatively during floodplain transit. Likely, the removal of Li from the dissolved load reflects the precipitation of secondary silicate minerals in the floodplain. The release of Ca, Mg, and Sr likely reflects the dissolution of detrital carbonate minerals. Our analyses also show that tributaries with Andean headwaters contribute disproportionately to solute budgets while the water budget

  3. National Assessment of Floodplain Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. N.; Scott, D.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Harvey, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of riverine floodplains, hydrologic connectivity describes the water mediated exchange of matter and energy between the river and its adjacent floodplain. As riverine networks shift from headwater streams to large river systems, flood events transition from short, periodic episodes to longer, sustained flood pulses. While these processes are important to biogeochemical processing, little has been done to quantify the relative influence of physiography on floodplain-river interactions across the nation's river network. This study examined flow data from over 14,000 USGS gaging stations across the United States. The threshold for flooding, analogous to bankful stage, was estimated using a breakpoint analysis of each gage's rating curve. Individual floods were then identified across each respective flow record, and a series of metrics were calculated to characterize floodplain connectivity. The distribution and timing of flood events was strongly correlated with basin size and prevailing hydro-climatic conditions (e.g. coastal, interior, and snowmelt systems). Analysis of cumulative flood duration was extended to the entire US stream network, and floodplain connectivity was quantified by the product of stream length and inundation duration. Initial results suggest that floodplain connectivity increases with stream order and highlights the importance of large river floodplains in the fate and transport of materials within riverine networks.

  4. The Potential for Dams to Impact Lowland Meandering River Floodplain Geomorphology

    PubMed Central

    Marren, Philip M.; Grove, James R.; Webb, J. Angus; Stewardson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the world's floodplains are dammed. Although some implications of dams for riverine ecology and for river channel morphology are well understood, there is less research on the impacts of dams on floodplain geomorphology. We review studies from dammed and undammed rivers and include influences on vertical and lateral accretion, meander migration and cutoff formation, avulsion, and interactions with floodplain vegetation. The results are synthesized into a conceptual model of the effects of dams on the major geomorphic influences on floodplain development. This model is used to assess the likely consequences of eight dam and flow regulation scenarios for floodplain geomorphology. Sediment starvation downstream of dams has perhaps the greatest potential to impact on floodplain development. Such effects will persist further downstream where tributary sediment inputs are relatively low and there is minimal buffering by alluvial sediment stores. We can identify several ways in which floodplains might potentially be affected by dams, with varying degrees of confidence, including a distinction between passive impacts (floodplain disconnection) and active impacts (changes in geomorphological processes and functioning). These active processes are likely to have more serious implications for floodplain function and emphasize both the need for future research and the need for an “environmental sediment regime” to operate alongside environmental flows. PMID:24587718

  5. The potential for dams to impact lowland meandering river floodplain geomorphology.

    PubMed

    Marren, Philip M; Grove, James R; Webb, J Angus; Stewardson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the world's floodplains are dammed. Although some implications of dams for riverine ecology and for river channel morphology are well understood, there is less research on the impacts of dams on floodplain geomorphology. We review studies from dammed and undammed rivers and include influences on vertical and lateral accretion, meander migration and cutoff formation, avulsion, and interactions with floodplain vegetation. The results are synthesized into a conceptual model of the effects of dams on the major geomorphic influences on floodplain development. This model is used to assess the likely consequences of eight dam and flow regulation scenarios for floodplain geomorphology. Sediment starvation downstream of dams has perhaps the greatest potential to impact on floodplain development. Such effects will persist further downstream where tributary sediment inputs are relatively low and there is minimal buffering by alluvial sediment stores. We can identify several ways in which floodplains might potentially be affected by dams, with varying degrees of confidence, including a distinction between passive impacts (floodplain disconnection) and active impacts (changes in geomorphological processes and functioning). These active processes are likely to have more serious implications for floodplain function and emphasize both the need for future research and the need for an "environmental sediment regime" to operate alongside environmental flows. PMID:24587718

  6. Determinism in fish assemblages of floodplain lakes of the vastly disturbed Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.; Lucas, G.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Mississippi Alluvial Valley between southern Illinois and southern Louisiana contains hundreds of floodplain lakes, most of which have been adversely affected by landscape modifications used to control flooding and support agriculture. We examined fish assemblages in lakes of this region to determine whether deterministic patterns developed in relation to prominent abiotic lake characteristics and to explore whether relevant abiotic factors could be linked to specific assemblage structuring mechanisms. The distributions of 14 taxa in 29 lakes were governed primarily by two gradients that contrasted assemblages in terms of lake area, lake elongation, and water clarity. The knowledge of whether a lake was clear or turbid, large or small, and long or short helped determine fish assemblage characteristics. Abiotic factors influenced fish assemblage structures, plausibly through limitations on foraging and physiological tolerances. Determinism in assemblage organization of floodplain lakes relative to recurrence in physicochemical features has been documented for unaltered rivers. Whereas the Mississippi Alluvial Valley has been subjected to vast anthropogenic disturbances and is not a fully functional floodplain river, fish assemblages in its floodplain lakes remain deterministic and organized by the underlying factors that also dictate assemblages in unaltered rivers. In advanced stages of lake aging, fish assemblages in these lakes are expected to largely include species that thrive in turbid, shallow systems with few predators and low oxygen concentrations. The observed patterns related to physical characteristics of these lakes suggest three general conservation foci, including (1) watershed management to control erosion, (2) removal of sediments or increases in water level to alleviate depth reductions and derived detriments to water physicochemistry, and (3) management of fish populations through stockings, removals, and harvest regulations.

  7. Wetland tree transpiration modified by river-floodplain connectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Scott T; Krauss, Ken W.; Cochran, J. Wesley; King, Sammy L.; Keim, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrologic connectivity provisions water and nutrient subsidies to floodplain wetlands and may be particularly important in floodplains with seasonal water deficits through its effects on soil moisture. In this study, we measured sapflow in 26 trees of two dominant floodplain forest species (Celtis laevigata and Quercus lyrata) at two hydrologically distinct sites in the lower White River floodplain in Arkansas, USA. Our objective was to investigate how connectivity-driven water table variations affected water use, an indicator of tree function. Meteorological variables (photosynthetically active radiation and vapor pressure deficit) were the dominant controls over water use at both sites; however, water table variations explained some site differences. At the wetter site, highest sapflow rates were during a late-season overbank flooding event, and no flood stress was apparent. At the drier site, sapflow decreased as the water table receded. The late-season flood pulse that resulted in flooding at the wetter site did not affect the water table at the drier site; accordingly, higher water use was not observed at the drier site. The species generally associated with wetter conditions (Q. lyrata) was more positively responsive to the flood pulse. Flood water subsidy lengthened the effective growing season, demonstrating ecological implications of hydrologic connectivity for alleviating water deficits that otherwise reduce function in this humid floodplain wetland.

  8. Wetland tree transpiration modified by river-floodplain connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott T.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cochran, J. Wesley; King, Sammy L.; Keim, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrologic connectivity provisions water and nutrient subsidies to floodplain wetlands and may be particularly important in floodplains with seasonal water deficits through its effects on soil moisture. In this study, we measured sapflow in 26 trees of two dominant floodplain forest species (Celtis laevigata and Quercus lyrata) at two hydrologically distinct sites in the lower White River floodplain in Arkansas, USA. Our objective was to investigate how connectivity-driven water table variations affected water use, an indicator of tree function. Meteorological variables (photosynthetically active radiation and vapor pressure deficit) were the dominant controls over water use at both sites; however, water table variations explained some site differences. At the wetter site, highest sapflow rates were during a late-season overbank flooding event, and no flood stress was apparent. At the drier site, sapflow decreased as the water table receded. The late-season flood pulse that resulted in flooding at the wetter site did not affect the water table at the drier site; accordingly, higher water use was not observed at the drier site. The species generally associated with wetter conditions (Q. lyrata) was more positively responsive to the flood pulse. Flood water subsidy lengthened the effective growing season, demonstrating ecological implications of hydrologic connectivity for alleviating water deficits that otherwise reduce function in this humid floodplain wetland.

  9. The Characteristics of Turbulent Flows on Forested Floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, S. E.; Richardson, K.; Sear, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Forested floodplain environments represent the undisturbed land cover of most river systems, but they are under threat from human activities. An understanding of forest floodplain processes therefore has relevance to ecosystem conservation and restoration, and the interpretation of pre-historic river and floodplain evolution. However, relatively little research has been undertaken within forested floodplain environments, a particular limitation being an absence of empirical data regarding the hydraulic characteristics of over bank flows, which inhibits the development of flow, sediment and solute transport models. Forest floodplain flows are strongly modified by floodplain topography and the presence of vegetation and organic debris on the woodland floor. In such instances flow blockage and diversions are common, and there is the possibility of intense turbulence generation, both by wakes and by shear. To address this gap we have undertaken a study based on a floodplain reach located in the Highland Water Research Catchment (southern England), a UK national reference site for lowland floodplain forest streams. Given the difficulties of acquiring spatially-distributed hydraulic data sets during floods, our methodological approach has been to attempt to replicate over bank flow observed at the study site within a laboratory flume. This is necessary to acquire flow velocity data at sufficiently high spatial resolution to evaluate the underlying flow mechanics and has been achieved using (i) a large (21m) flume to achieve 1:1 hydraulic scaling and (ii) a novel method of precisely replicating the floodplain topography within the flume. Specifically, accurate replication of a representative floodplain patch was achieved by creating a 1:1 scale Physical Terrain Model (PTM) from high-density polyurethane using a computer-controlled milling process based on Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data, the latter acquired via terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) survey. The PTM was

  10. Understanding the behavior of floodplains as human-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, G.; Brandimarte, L.

    2012-12-01

    Floodplains are among the most valuable ecosystems for supporting biodiversity and providing services to the environment. Moreover, they are home of approximately one-sixth of the world population as they offer favorable conditions for economic development. As a result, flood disasters currently affect more than 100 million people a year. Sadly, flood losses and fatalities are expected to increase further in many countries because of population growth as well as changes in land use and climate. Given the relevance of floodplain systems, a number of social scientists have examined how the frequency and severity of flooding often determine whether human development in floodplains is desirable or not. Meanwhile, many earth scientists have investigated the impact of human activities (e.g. land-use changes, urbanization, river training) on the frequency and magnitude of floods. In fact, as human activities change the frequency of flooding, the frequency of flooding affects human developments in floodplain areas. Yet, these dynamic interactions between floods and societies and the associated feedback mechanisms remain largely unexplored and poorly understood. As a result, we typically consider humans as external forcing (or boundary condition) without representing the feedback loops and our prediction of future trajectories are therefore extremely limited. This presentation shows a first attempt to understand the behavior of floodplains as coupled human-water systems. In particular, we analyzed a number of long time series of hydrological and population data in the Po River Basin (Italy) to explore the feedback mechanisms, reciprocal effects, surprises, and threshold mechanisms, taking place in floodplain systems. The outcomes of the study enable a better understanding of how the occurrences of floods shape human developments while, at the same time, human activities shape the magnitude and frequency of floods. The presentation also discusses the opportunities offered by

  11. Evaluating the Influence of Floodplain-filling Styles on Channel-belt Stacking and Basin-scale Fluvial Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, E.; Hajek, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work in modern and ancient systems has shown a range of characteristic floodplain sedimentation patterns acting over a range of temporal and spatial scales. In aggradational fluvial systems floodplain sedimentation style influences where rivers relocate during avulsion, which in turn influences the distribution of channel-belt sandstones in stratigraphy over long timescales. Exploring the link between floodplain-sedimentation patterns and avulsions is therefore important for both predicting stratigraphic architecture and using stratigraphy to interpret paleo-floodplain sedimentation dynamics. Here we use an object-based model of basin filling to explore how different floodplain aggradation styles (including both uniform and exponential decay) affect the stratigraphic preservation of three different avulsion patterns: random (channels are equally likely to relocate anywhere on the floodplain), compensational (channels relocate to the lowest point on the floodplain), and clustered (channels relocate to a point near the previous channel position). Preliminary modeling results suggest that only clustered avulsion patterns are identifiable under uniform floodplain aggradation conditions, but that different avulsion patterns generate unique sand-body distributions under exponential floodplain sedimentation. This suggests that floodplain-aggradation styles influence how well we can interpret paleo-avulsion patterns in ancient deposits. We apply these insights to the Paleocene-Eocene Wasatch Formation in western Colorado to explore the relationship between preserved floodplain deposits and basin-scale sand-body architecture. We compare proxies for paleo-floodplain-aggradation patterns (including paleosol development, lateral continuity of paleosol horizons, and occurrence and distribution of splays) in three different members with quantitative metrics of channel-body organization at both sand-body and outcrop scales. Changes in floodplain deposits and sand

  12. Dams, floodplain land use, and riparian forest conservation in the semiarid Upper Colorado River Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, D.C.; Cooper, D.J.; Northcott, K.

    2007-01-01

    Land and water resource development can independently eliminate riparian plant communities, including Fremont cottonwood forest (CF), a major contributor to ecosystem structure and functioning in semiarid portions of the American Southwest. We tested whether floodplain development was linked to river regulation in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) by relating the extent of five developed land-cover categories as well as CF and other natural vegetation to catchment reservoir capacity, changes in total annual and annual peak discharge, and overall level of mainstem hydrologic alteration (small, moderate, or large) in 26 fourth-order subbasins. We also asked whether CF appeared to be in jeopardy at a regional level. We classified 51% of the 57,000 ha of alluvial floodplain examined along >2600 km of mainstem rivers as CF and 36% as developed. The proportion developed was unrelated to the level of mainstem hydrologic alteration. The proportion classified as CF was also independent of the level of hydrologic alteration, a result we attribute to confounding effects from development, the presence of time lags, and contrasting effects from flow alteration in different subbasins. Most CF (68% by area) had a sparse canopy (???5% cover), and stands with >50% canopy cover occupied <1% of the floodplain in 15 subbasins. We suggest that CF extent in the UCRB will decline markedly in the future, when the old trees on floodplains now disconnected from the river die and large areas change from CF to non-CF categories. Attention at a basinwide scale to the multiple factors affecting cottonwood patch dynamics is needed to assure conservation of these riparian forests. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. Gravel-bed river floodplains are the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauer, F. Richard; Locke, Harvey; Dreitz, Victoria; Hebblewhite, Mark; Lowe, Winsor; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Nelson, Cara; Proctor, Michael F; Rood, Stewart B.

    2016-01-01

    Gravel-bed river floodplains in mountain landscapes disproportionately concentrate diverse habitats, nutrient cycling, productivity of biota, and species interactions. Although stream ecologists know that river channel and floodplain habitats used by aquatic organisms are maintained by hydrologic regimes that mobilize gravel-bed sediments, terrestrial ecologists have largely been unaware of the importance of floodplain structures and processes to the life requirements of a wide variety of species. We provide insight into gravel-bed rivers as the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes. We show why gravel-bed river floodplains are the primary arena where interactions take place among aquatic, avian, and terrestrial species from microbes to grizzly bears and provide essential connectivity as corridors for movement for both aquatic and terrestrial species. Paradoxically, gravel-bed river floodplains are also disproportionately unprotected where human developments are concentrated. Structural modifications to floodplains such as roads, railways, and housing and hydrologicaltering hydroelectric or water storage dams have severe impacts to floodplain habitat diversity and productivity, restrict local and regional connectivity, and reduce the resilience of both aquatic and terrestrial species, including adaptation to climate change. To be effective, conservation efforts in glaciated mountain landscapes intended to benefit the widest variety of organisms need a paradigm shift that has gravel-bed rivers and their floodplains as the central focus and that prioritizes the maintenance or restoration of the intact structure and processes of these critically important systems throughout their length and breadth.

  14. Gravel-bed river floodplains are the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes.

    PubMed

    Hauer, F Richard; Locke, Harvey; Dreitz, Victoria J; Hebblewhite, Mark; Lowe, Winsor H; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Nelson, Cara R; Proctor, Michael F; Rood, Stewart B

    2016-06-01

    Gravel-bed river floodplains in mountain landscapes disproportionately concentrate diverse habitats, nutrient cycling, productivity of biota, and species interactions. Although stream ecologists know that river channel and floodplain habitats used by aquatic organisms are maintained by hydrologic regimes that mobilize gravel-bed sediments, terrestrial ecologists have largely been unaware of the importance of floodplain structures and processes to the life requirements of a wide variety of species. We provide insight into gravel-bed rivers as the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes. We show why gravel-bed river floodplains are the primary arena where interactions take place among aquatic, avian, and terrestrial species from microbes to grizzly bears and provide essential connectivity as corridors for movement for both aquatic and terrestrial species. Paradoxically, gravel-bed river floodplains are also disproportionately unprotected where human developments are concentrated. Structural modifications to floodplains such as roads, railways, and housing and hydrologic-altering hydroelectric or water storage dams have severe impacts to floodplain habitat diversity and productivity, restrict local and regional connectivity, and reduce the resilience of both aquatic and terrestrial species, including adaptation to climate change. To be effective, conservation efforts in glaciated mountain landscapes intended to benefit the widest variety of organisms need a paradigm shift that has gravel-bed rivers and their floodplains as the central focus and that prioritizes the maintenance or restoration of the intact structure and processes of these critically important systems throughout their length and breadth. PMID:27386570

  15. Gravel-bed river floodplains are the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, F. Richard; Locke, Harvey; Dreitz, Victoria J.; Hebblewhite, Mark; Lowe, Winsor H.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Nelson, Cara R.; Proctor, Michael F.; Rood, Stewart B.

    2016-01-01

    Gravel-bed river floodplains in mountain landscapes disproportionately concentrate diverse habitats, nutrient cycling, productivity of biota, and species interactions. Although stream ecologists know that river channel and floodplain habitats used by aquatic organisms are maintained by hydrologic regimes that mobilize gravel-bed sediments, terrestrial ecologists have largely been unaware of the importance of floodplain structures and processes to the life requirements of a wide variety of species. We provide insight into gravel-bed rivers as the ecological nexus of glaciated mountain landscapes. We show why gravel-bed river floodplains are the primary arena where interactions take place among aquatic, avian, and terrestrial species from microbes to grizzly bears and provide essential connectivity as corridors for movement for both aquatic and terrestrial species. Paradoxically, gravel-bed river floodplains are also disproportionately unprotected where human developments are concentrated. Structural modifications to floodplains such as roads, railways, and housing and hydrologic-altering hydroelectric or water storage dams have severe impacts to floodplain habitat diversity and productivity, restrict local and regional connectivity, and reduce the resilience of both aquatic and terrestrial species, including adaptation to climate change. To be effective, conservation efforts in glaciated mountain landscapes intended to benefit the widest variety of organisms need a paradigm shift that has gravel-bed rivers and their floodplains as the central focus and that prioritizes the maintenance or restoration of the intact structure and processes of these critically important systems throughout their length and breadth. PMID:27386570

  16. Factors Affecting Soil Microbial Community Structure in Tomato Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil and rhizosphere microbial communities in agroecosystems may be affected by soil, climate, plant species, and management. We identified some of the most important factors controlling microbial biomass and community structure in an agroecosystem utilizing tomato plants with the following nine tre...

  17. Evaluating the effects of local floodplain management policies on property owner behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollens, Scott A.; Kaiser, Edward J.; Burby, Raymond J.

    1988-05-01

    Floodplain management programs have been adopted by more than 85% of local governments in the nation with designated flood hazard areas. Yet, there has been little evaluation of the influence of floodplain policies on private sector decisions. This article examines the degree to which riverine floodplain management affects purchase and mitigation decisions made by owners of developed floodplain property in ten selected cities in the United States. We find that the stringency of such policies does not lessen floodplain property buying because of the overriding importance of site amenity factors. Indeed, flood protection measures incorporated into development projects appear to add to the attractiveness of floodplain location by increasing the perceived safety from the hazard. Property owner responses to the flood hazard after occupancy involve political action more often than individual on-site mitigation. Floodplain programs only minimally encourage on-site mitigation by the owner because most owners have not experienced a flood and many are unaware of the flood threat. It is suggested that floodplain programs will be more effective in meeting their objectives if they are directed at intervention points earlier in the land conversion process.

  18. 40 CFR 258.11 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Floodplains. 258.11 Section 258.11... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.11 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must...

  19. 40 CFR 257.8 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floodplains. 257.8 Section 257.8... Location Restrictions § 257.8 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new units, existing units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must demonstrate that the unit will not restrict...

  20. 40 CFR 258.11 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floodplains. 258.11 Section 258.11... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.11 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must...

  1. 32 CFR 644.320 - Floodplain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Floodplain management. 644.320 Section 644.320... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.320 Floodplain management. The requirements of Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, 42 FR 26951, (24 May 1977) and its implementation will be outlined in subpart H (to...

  2. 7 CFR 624.10 - Floodplain easements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Floodplain easements. 624.10 Section 624.10..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.10 Floodplain easements. (a) General. NRCS may purchase floodplain easements as an emergency measure. NRCS will only purchase...

  3. 32 CFR 644.320 - Floodplain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Floodplain management. 644.320 Section 644.320... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.320 Floodplain management. The requirements of Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, 42 FR 26951, (24 May 1977) and its implementation will be outlined in subpart H (to...

  4. 40 CFR 257.8 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Floodplains. 257.8 Section 257.8... Location Restrictions § 257.8 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new units, existing units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must demonstrate that the unit will not restrict...

  5. 40 CFR 257.8 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Floodplains. 257.8 Section 257.8... Location Restrictions § 257.8 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new units, existing units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must demonstrate that the unit will not restrict...

  6. 40 CFR 258.11 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Floodplains. 258.11 Section 258.11... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.11 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must...

  7. 7 CFR 624.10 - Floodplain easements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Floodplain easements. 624.10 Section 624.10..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.10 Floodplain easements. (a) General. NRCS may purchase floodplain easements as an emergency measure. NRCS will only purchase...

  8. 32 CFR 644.320 - Floodplain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Floodplain management. 644.320 Section 644.320... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.320 Floodplain management. The requirements of Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, 42 FR 26951, (24 May 1977) and its implementation will be outlined in subpart H (to...

  9. 7 CFR 624.10 - Floodplain easements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Floodplain easements. 624.10 Section 624.10..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.10 Floodplain easements. (a) General. NRCS may purchase floodplain easements as an emergency measure. NRCS will only purchase...

  10. 40 CFR 258.11 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floodplains. 258.11 Section 258.11... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.11 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must...

  11. 32 CFR 644.320 - Floodplain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Floodplain management. 644.320 Section 644.320... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.320 Floodplain management. The requirements of Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, 42 FR 26951, (24 May 1977) and its implementation will be outlined in subpart H (to...

  12. 40 CFR 257.8 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Floodplains. 257.8 Section 257.8... Location Restrictions § 257.8 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new units, existing units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must demonstrate that the unit will not restrict...

  13. 32 CFR 644.320 - Floodplain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floodplain management. 644.320 Section 644.320... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.320 Floodplain management. The requirements of Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, 42 FR 26951, (24 May 1977) and its implementation will be outlined in subpart H (to...

  14. An index of floodplain surface complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scown, M. W.; Thoms, M. C.; De Jager, N. R.

    2016-01-01

    Floodplain surface topography is an important component of floodplain ecosystems. It is the primary physical template upon which ecosystem processes are acted out, and complexity in this template can contribute to the high biodiversity and productivity of floodplain ecosystems. There has been a limited appreciation of floodplain surface complexity because of the traditional focus on temporal variability in floodplains as well as limitations to quantifying spatial complexity. An index of floodplain surface complexity (FSC) is developed in this paper and applied to eight floodplains from different geographic settings. The index is based on two key indicators of complexity, variability in surface geometry (VSG) and the spatial organisation of surface conditions (SPO), and was determined at three sampling scales. FSC, VSG, and SPO varied between the eight floodplains and these differences depended upon sampling scale. Relationships between these measures of spatial complexity and seven geomorphological and hydrological drivers were investigated. There was a significant decline in all complexity measures with increasing floodplain width, which was explained by either a power, logarithmic, or exponential function. There was an initial rapid decline in surface complexity as floodplain width increased from 1.5 to 5 km, followed by little change in floodplains wider than 10 km. VSG also increased significantly with increasing sediment yield. No significant relationships were determined between any of the four hydrological variables and floodplain surface complexity.

  15. 7 CFR 624.10 - Floodplain easements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Floodplain easements. 624.10 Section 624.10..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.10 Floodplain easements. (a) General. NRCS may purchase floodplain easements as an emergency measure. NRCS will only purchase...

  16. 40 CFR 258.11 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Floodplains. 258.11 Section 258.11... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.11 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must...

  17. 7 CFR 624.10 - Floodplain easements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Floodplain easements. 624.10 Section 624.10..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.10 Floodplain easements. (a) General. NRCS may purchase floodplain easements as an emergency measure. NRCS will only purchase...

  18. 40 CFR 257.8 - Floodplains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floodplains. 257.8 Section 257.8... Location Restrictions § 257.8 Floodplains. (a) Owners or operators of new units, existing units, and lateral expansions located in 100-year floodplains must demonstrate that the unit will not restrict...

  19. Floodplain Formation and Cottonwood Colonization Patterns on the Willamette River, Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Dykaar; Wigington

    2000-01-01

    / Using a series of aerial photographs taken between 1936 and 1996, we trace coevolution of floodplain and riparian forest on the Willamette River. Within-channel barforms appear to be the predominant incipient floodplain landform and habitat for primary succession. Interlinked development of bar(s) and erosion of near banks, filling of channels, and establishment and growth of cottonwoods and willows results in coalescence with older floodplain. Sizeand internal structure of riparian forest patches reflect evolution of underlying barforms or channel beds. Floodplain matures as the active channel migrates away by repetition of the bar formation and near-bank erosion process, or is progressively abandoned by infilling and/or constriction with a bar. Other parts of the floodplain are recycled as eroding banks provide the coarse sediment and large woody debris for building new bars. A multichannel planform is maintained as building bars split flow; channels lengthen as bars and islands join into larger assemblages. Avulsion appears to cut new channels only short distances. Given the central role of bars and islands in building new floodplain habitat, we identify their area as a geomorphic indicator of river-floodplain integrity. We measure an 80% decline in bar and island area between 1910 and 1988 within a 22-km section. Dams, riprap, logging, and gravel mining may all be contributing to diminished bar formation rates. Removing obstacles to natural riparian forest creation mechanisms is necessary to regenerate the river-floodplain system and realize its productive potential. PMID:10552104

  20. Floodplain heterogeneity and meander migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of horizontal heterogeneity of floodplain soils on rates and patterns of meander migration is analyzed with a Ikeda et al. (1981)-type model for hydrodynamics and bed morphodynamics, coupled with a physically-based bank erosion model according to the approach developed by Motta et al. (20...

  1. Reservoir floodplains support distinct fish assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Wigen, S. L.; Dagel, Jonah D.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs constructed on floodplain rivers are unique because the upper reaches of the impoundment may include extensive floodplain environments. Moreover, reservoirs that experience large periodic water level fluctuations as part of their operational objectives seasonally inundate and dewater floodplains in their upper reaches, partly mimicking natural inundations of river floodplains. In four flood control reservoirs in Mississippi, USA, we explored the dynamics of connectivity between reservoirs and adjacent floodplains and the characteristics of fish assemblages that develop in reservoir floodplains relative to those that develop in reservoir bays. Although fish species richness in floodplains and bays were similar, species composition differed. Floodplains emphasized fish species largely associated with backwater shallow environments, often resistant to harsh environmental conditions. Conversely, dominant species in bays represented mainly generalists that benefit from the continuous connectivity between the bay and the main reservoir. Floodplains in the study reservoirs provided desirable vegetated habitats at lower water level elevations, earlier in the year, and more frequently than in bays. Inundating dense vegetation in bays requires raising reservoir water levels above the levels required to reach floodplains. Therefore, aside from promoting distinct fish assemblages within reservoirs and helping promote diversity in regulated rivers, reservoir floodplains are valued because they can provide suitable vegetated habitats for fish species at elevations below the normal pool, precluding the need to annually flood upland vegetation that would inevitably be impaired by regular flooding. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, P; Billerman, S; Jesmer, B; Micheletti, S; Fortin, M.-J.; Funk, W.C.; Hapeman, P; Muths, Erin L.; Murphy, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations.

  3. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, Peter E.; Billerman, Shawn M.; Jesmer, Brett R.; Micheletti, Steven; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Funk, W. Chris; Hapeman, Paul; Muths, Erin; Murphy, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations. PMID:26442094

  4. Hydraulic analysis of measures for flood mitigation in floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentova, J.; Valenta, P.; Weyskrabova, L.; Dostal, T.

    2012-04-01

    The question of possible flood control and flood mitigation measures and their effects is still challenging. While the effect of purely technical flood control measures such as dams or levees is sufficiently described by using any of widely spread or more specific models, the effectiveness of close-to-nature ones (river restoration, appropriate land use, landscape structure regeneration, etc.) is not adequately verified and quantified. On that account, the benefits and feasibility of integration of the natural potential of floodplains to absorb and transform flood wave is being discussed. In addition, there are many side benefits of close-to-nature measures which are hard to evaluate and include into decision making processes. This contribution presents a part of the study related to river and floodplain restoration and revitalization measures in catchments and their flood-control effect. In the study the possibilities of using one-dimensional (HEC-RAS) and two-dimensional hydraulic mathematical models (FAST2D, DIFEM2D) of steady and unsteady flow for estimation of transformation effects of a floodplain were compared. The comparison of used models was made with respect to computed results and also to the availability of input data, mathematical stability, processes and accuracy demands and time requirements. The above mentioned methods of hydraulic modelling were applied to three case study localities in the Czech Republic. The parts of river channels and their floodplain differ in terms of morphology, river channel form and training situation and land-use. Case study areas were selected to represent the main types of floodplains within the Czech Republic for their further classification related to flood wave transformation potential. The transformation effect is compared not only for the natural state of the floodplain, but also for various theoretical scenarios in each locality. Keywords Hydraulic modelling, flood control, floodplain, storage capacity, river

  5. An index of floodplain surface complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scown, M. W.; Thoms, M. C.; De Jager, N. R.

    2015-04-01

    Floodplain surface topography is an important component of floodplain ecosystems. It is the primary physical template upon which ecosystem processes are acted out. There has been a limited appreciation of floodplain surface complexity because of the traditional focus on temporal variability in floodplains as well as limitations to quantifying spatial complexity. An index of floodplain surface complexity (FSC) is developed in this paper and applied to eight floodplains from different geographic settings. The index is based on the two key indicators of complexity; variability in surface geometry (VSG) and the spatial organization of surface conditions (SOC) and was determined at three sampling scales. Relationships between these measures of spatial complexity and environmental drivers, namely; flow variability (mean daily discharge [Q], the coefficient of variation of daily discharge [QCV], the coefficient of variation of mean annual discharge [QCVAnn], the coefficient of variation of maximum annual discharge [QCVMax]), sediment yield (SY), valley slope (Vs), and floodplain width (Fpw) were examined. FSC, VSG, and SOC varied between the eight floodplains and this was dependent upon sampling scale. All complexity values declined with increasing Fpw in either a power, logarithmic, or exponential function. There was little change in surface complexity with floodplain widths greater than 10 km. VSG was significantly related to SY and no significant relationships were determined between any of the hydrological variables and floodplain surface complexity.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Floodplain Heterogeneity Effects on Meanders Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoni, M.; Lanzoni, S.; Putti, M.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplains and sinuous rivers have a close relationship with each other, mutually influencing their evolutions in time and space. The heterogeneity in erosional resistance has a crucial role on meander planform evolution. It depends on external factors, like land use and cover, but also on the composition of the floodplain, which is due to the ancient geological composition and to the processes associated to long-term river migration. In particular, banks erosion and deposition cause a variation of the superficial composition of the soil, therefore the river patterns are influenced by the previous trends. Based on some recent works, the aim of this contribution is to collect numerical information on the relations between meander migration and the heterogeneity of floodplains caused by oxbow lakes. Numerical simulations have been performed to analyze the temporal and spatial behavior of meanders with a range of values of the erosional resistance of the plain. These values are set as a function of some factors: the characteristic grain size of sediment transported by the flow, the deposition age of the sediments, the eventual presence of vegetation on the banks. The statistical analysis of characteristic geometrical quantities of meanders are able to show the dependence of the simulation results on the meander history. In particular we try to answer to the following questions: how do the rivers affect themselves during their spatial and temporal evolution, modifying the distribution of the floodplain erodibility? Do the migration history plays a main role on the meanders migration modeling?

  7. How differentiated do children experience affect? An investigation of the within- and between-person structure of children's affect.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Anja; Könen, Tanja; Dirk, Judith; Schmiedek, Florian

    2016-05-01

    Research on the structure of children's affect is limited. It is possible that children's perception of their own affect might be less differentiated than that of adults. Support for the 2-factor model of positive and negative affect and the pleasure-arousal model suggests that children in middle childhood can distinguish positive and negative affect as well as valence and arousal. Whether children are able to differentiate further aspects of affect, as proposed by the 3-dimensional model of affect (good-bad mood, alertness-tiredness, calmness-tension), is an unresolved issue. The aim of our study was the comparison of these 3 affect models to establish how differentiated children experience their affect and which model best describes affect in children. We examined affect structures on the between- and within-person level, acknowledging that affect varies across time and that no valid interpretation of either level is feasible if both are confounded. For this purpose, 214 children (age 8-11 years) answered affect items once a day for 5 consecutive days on smartphones. We tested all affect models by means of 2-level confirmatory factor analysis. Although all affect models had an acceptable fit, the 3-dimensional model best described affect in children on both the within- and between-person level. Thus, children in middle childhood can already describe affect in a differentiated way. Also, affect structures were similar on the within- and between-person level. We conclude that in order to acquire a thorough picture of children's affect, measures for children should include items of all 3 affect dimensions. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26280488

  8. Can the structure of an explosive caldera affect eruptive behaviour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcox, C. P.; Branney, M.; Carrasco-Nuñez, G.; Barford, D.

    2010-12-01

    Explosive caldera volcanoes cause catastrophic events at the Earth’s surface, yet we know little about how their internal structures evolve with time, and whether this can affect both differentiation and eruptive behaviour. Distinguishing how structural evolution impacts upon eruption behaviour and periodicity is challenging because the resolution of eruption frequencies can be difficult at ancient exhumed calderas, whereas at young volcanoes, most of the caldera floor faults and associated conduits are hidden. Some exhumed calderas reveal caldera floor faults and conduits; some of these apparently underwent a single collapse event that was piecemeal, i.e. fragmentation into several, variously subsided fault-blocks (e.g. Scafell caldera, UK). In contrast, the present study tests whether some caldera volcanoes may become more intensely fractured with time as a result of successive distinct caldera-collapse eruptions (“multi-cyclic calderas”). It has been proposed that this scenario could lead to an increase in eruption frequency, with smaller eruptions over time. Magma leakage through the increasingly fractured volcano might also lead to less evolved compositions with time due to shorter residence times. We have returned to the volcano where this hypothesis was formulated, the ~ 20 km diameter, hydrothermally active Los Humeros caldera in eastern central México. We aim to see how well the structural evolution of this modern caldera can be reconstructed, and whether changes in structure affected the styles and periodicity of large explosive eruptions. How a caldera evolves structurally could have important implications for predicting future catastrophic eruptions. Detailed structural mapping (e.g. of fault scarps, vent positions, and tilted strata), documentation of draping and cross-cutting field relations, together with logging, optical and SEM petrography, XRF major and trace element geochemistry and new 40Ar-39Ar and radiocarbon dating of the pyroclastic

  9. Does Question Structure Affect Exam Performance in the Geosciences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; D'Arcy, M. K.; Craig, L.; Streule, M. J.; Passmore, E.; Irving, J. C. E.

    2015-12-01

    The jump to university level exams can be challenging for some students, often resulting in poor marks, which may be detrimental to their confidence and ultimately affect their overall degree class. Previous studies have found that question structure can have a strong impact on the performance of students in college level exams (see Gibson et al., 2015, for a discussion of its impact on physics undergraduates). Here, we investigate the effect of question structure on the exam results of geology and geophysics undergraduate students. Specifically, we analyse the performance of students in questions that have a 'scaffolded' framework and compare them to their performance in open-ended questions and coursework. We also investigate if observed differences in exam performance are correlated with the educational background and gender of students, amongst other factors. It is important for all students to be able to access their degree courses, no matter what their backgrounds may be. Broadening participation in the geosciences relies on removing systematic barriers to achievement. Therefore we recommend that exams are either structured with scaffolding in questions at lower levels, or students are explicitly prepared for this transition. We also recommend that longitudinal studies of exam performance are conducted within individual departments, and this work outlines one approach to analysing performance data.

  10. Changes in lowland floodplain sedimentation processes: pre-disturbance to post-rehabilitation, Cosumnes River, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsheim, Joan L.; Mount, Jeffrey F.

    2003-12-01

    generally upward coarsening sequence that reflects depositional processes and land use changes that continue to affect the lowland Cosumnes River floodplain.

  11. A Geomorphic Analysis of Floodplain Lakes along the Embanked Lower Mississippi River for Managing Hydrologic Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Paul; Boot, Dax; Sounny-Slitinne, M. Anwar; Kristensen, Kristiaan

    2015-04-01

    A Geomorphic Analysis of Floodplain Lakes along the Embanked Lower Mississippi River for Managing Hydrologic Connectivity Floodplain lakes are vital to the environmental integrity of lowland rivers. Embankment by levees (dikes) for flood control greatly reduces the size of lowland floodplains and is detrimental to the quality and functioning of floodplain water bodies, presenting a challenge to government agencies charged with environmental management. The embanked floodplain of the Lower Mississippi River is an enormous surface which includes a variety of lake types formed by geomorphic and anthropogenic processes. While much is known about the channel and hydrologic regime, very little is known about the physical structure and functioning of the embanked floodplain of the lower Mississippi. Importantly, management agencies do not have an inventory of the basic characteristics (e.g., type, frequency, location, size, shape) of water bodies within the lower Mississippi embanked floodplain. An analysis of lakes along the Lower Mississippi River embanked floodplain is performed by utilizing the National Hydrographic Dataset (NHD) from the U.S. Geological Survey, a LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM), as well as streamflow data from the USGS. The vector NHD data includes every official mapped water body (blue line polygons) on USGS topographic maps at scales of 1:100,000 and 1:24,000. Collectively, we identify thousands of discreet water bodies within the embanked floodplain. Utilizing planimetric properties the water bodies were classified into the following lake types: cutoffs (neck and chute), sloughs, crevasse (scour), local drainage (topographic), and borrow pits. The data is then statistically analyzed to examine significant differences in the spatial variability in lake types along the entire lower Mississippi embanked floodplain in association with geomorphic divisions and hydrologic regime. The total embanked floodplain area of the LMR is 7,303 km2,. The total

  12. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone’s micro-structural strength; and, ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and µCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr−/−, a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups; and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r2=0.85, p=10−5). Collagen-density models yielded 1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and 2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction. PMID:24795172

  13. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-07-18

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because (i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone׳s micro-structural strength; and, (ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and μCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr(-/-), a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r(2)=0.85, p=10(-5)). Collagen-density models yielded (1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and (2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction. PMID:24795172

  14. Designing transthyretin mutants affecting tetrameric structure: implications in amyloidogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, C; Damas, A M; Saraiva, M J

    2000-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that convert soluble transthyretin (TTR) tetramers into insoluble amyloid fibrils are still unknown; dissociation of the TTR tetramer is a pre-requisite for amyloid formation in vitro and involvement of monomers and/or dimers in fibril formation has been suggested by structural studies. We have designed four mutated proteins with the purpose of stabilizing [Ser(117)-->Cys (S117C) and Glu(92)-->Cys (E92C)] or destabilizing [Asp(18)-->Asn (D18N) and Leu(110)-->Ala (D110A)] the dimer/tetramer interactions in TTR, aiming at elucidating structural determinants in amyloidogenesis. The resistance of the mutated proteins to dissociation was analysed by HPLC studies of diluted TTR preparations. Both 'stabilized' mutants migrated as tetramers and, upon dilution, no other TTR species was observed, confirming the increased resistance to dissociation. For the 'destabilized' mutants, a mixture of tetrameric and monomeric forms co-existed at low dilution and the latter increased upon 10-fold dilution. Both of the destabilizing mutants formed amyloid in vitro when acidified. This result indicated that both the AB loop of TTR, destabilized in D18N, and the hydrophobic interactions affecting the dimer-dimer interfaces in L110A are implicated in the stability of the tetrameric structure. The stabilized mutants, which were dimeric in nature through disulphide bonding, were unable to polymerize into amyloid, even at pH 3.2. When the amyloid formation assay was repeated in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, upon disruption of the S-S bridges of these stable dimers, amyloid fibril formation was observed. This experimental evidence suggests that monomers, rather than dimers, are the repeating structural subunit comprising the amyloid fibrils. PMID:10794728

  15. Groundwater flooding in an urbanised floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, D.; Peach, D.; Dixon, A.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, risk management associated with groundwater flooding has been recognised as an area requiring improved understanding in the United Kingdom. Government figures suggest as many as 1.6 million properties may be at risk from this form of flooding. Further, the recently enforced EU Floods Directive requires hazard mapping associated with groundwater flooding to be undertaken. The city of Oxford is situated within a narrow valley in the upper reaches of the River Thames in the south of the United Kingdom. Although much of the city sits above the current floodplain of the River Thames, approximately 3600 properties are located within the 1 in 100 year return flood envelope. The floodplain is underlain by a shallow alluvial aquifer in good hydraulic connection with the River Thames and its tributaries. The city suffers from recurrent floods, most recently in July 2007, when a 1 in 20 year event impacted over 200 properties. A significant number of these properties were affected by flooding from rising groundwater which was either the sole cause of flooding or the initial cause prior to inundation from fluvial waters. A study has been undertaken by the British Geological Survey, in collaboration with the environment regulator and linked with the local flood risk management scheme, to assess the role of groundwater in flooding in Oxford. The study has shown that groundwater flooding in the city occurs in low-lying areas protected from direct fluvial flooding, at least in the early stages of an event, by high ground associated with urbanisation. Although direct rainfall recharge associated with extreme events can cause significant groundwater level rise in these low-lying areas, the primary mechanism for groundwater flooding is the movement of water through the permeable subsurface from fluvial flooded zones. Groundwater flooding is often the only form of flooding for the isolated low-lying areas for medium-to-high probability flood events. As a result

  16. Floodplain architecture of an actively meandering river (the Ploučnice River, the Czech Republic) as revealed by the distribution of pollution and electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matys Grygar, T.; Elznicová, J.; Tůmová, Š.; Faměra, M.; Balogh, M.; Kiss, T.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the floodplain architecture of the Ploučnice River, a naturally meandering river in the Czech Republic, using manual drill coring, the element analysis of sediments, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The Ploučnice River has received diffuse pollution since the early twentieth century (mainly Pb) followed by a prominent, temporally well-defined pollution pulse from uranium mining in the 1970s and 1980s (mainly U and 226Ra). The pollution created a chemostratigraphic (temporal) framework for overbank fines. We used geographical information systems (GIS) to describe the channel's dynamics and visualise fluvial landforms. We sampled and analysed the finest floodplain sediments in the top 1 to 2 m of the floodplain fill (silty and sandy deposits), and we used ERT to visualise bodies of coarser and deeper strata at depths down to ~ 3 m. Several limits of ERT imaging have been found by a comparison of the resistivity domains with lithological descriptions of the cores: several decimetre-thick strata were not revealed (they are below the spatial resolution of that method), and humidity affected the results that were obtained in the topmost strata. The space for deposition of fluvial sediments in the Ploučnice River is being created by (1) natural lateral shifts in the channel (up to 0.5 m/year); (2) meander loop development and cutoffs at the timescale of decades to centuries and spatial scale of up to ~ 1/4 of the floodplain width; and (3) more substantial reorganisation of the channel structure by avulsions, probably at the timescale of centuries. These processes continuously create space for the deposition of overbank fines on the top of former point bars and in swales and abandoned channels. As a consequence of the speed of the channel shifts, at least 80% of the fine-grained top of the floodplain fill (overbank fines) was reworked over approximately three centuries.

  17. ISWS FLOODPLAIN STUDY MODEL DATA INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This dataset is a list of the floodplain study models (data) in the Floodplain Information collection at the Illinois State Water Survey (ISWS). Most of the models are Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) engineering "backup data" for Flood Insurance Studies (FISs) in Illin...

  18. Floodplain management: Land acquisition versus preservation of historic buildings in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Wendy J.; Mitchell, Bruce

    1983-07-01

    Non-structural adjustments in floodplain management are often avoided because they are seen to infringe on personal rights, adversely affect property values and restrict local tax bases. Land acquisition programs in urban areas encounter a further problem when they lead to demolition of buildings and other structures considered to have historical or architectural value. An experience in Cambridge, Ontario demonstrates that the potential conflict between flood damage reduction and historical preservation objectives can be exacerbated as a result of uncoordinated planning efforts, inflexibility in interpreting mandates, unclear roles for participating agencies, and lack of cooperation Many of these dilemmas can be resolved through consultation and discussion early in the planning process as well as through a willingness to be flexible and to search for a compromise

  19. Free floodplains of hazwaste facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, T.P. )

    1994-03-01

    Only when the waters from last year's flooding along the Mississippi River fully recede will the extent of the damage be known. However, property losses are only the most obvious effects; floods also pose less visible threats by spreading contaminated water and sediment over wide areas. Factories, oil-tank farms, bulk-chemical storage facilities and sewage treatment plants historically have been located along water-ways and within floodplains. Such facilities are built to withstand some flooding; however, a major flood can destroy barriers, rupture storage tanks, and wash out material from hazardous and solid waste landfills, and surface impoundments. Water infiltration can lead to increased leachate production, contaminating groundwater and adjacent surface water. The long-term effects from hazardous materials and waste entering floodwaters during the 1993 flood are significant and difficult to mitigate. Regulations and policies should be evaluated, and practical changes instituted to reduce long-term effects from contaminated floodwaters. Such changes include prohibiting hazardous waste management units in floodplains.

  20. [Characteristics of distribution and composition of organic carbon in Dongting Lake floodplain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-ju; Peng, Pei-qin; Tong, Cheng-li; Wang, Xiao-li; Wu, Jin-shui

    2005-05-01

    Distribution and composition of organic carbon (OC) at nine soil profiles of three types of wetlands in Dongting Lake floodplain were analyzed. Results show that the OC content at top layer (0-10 cm) in Carex spp-dominated floodplain was much higher (>40 g/kg) than that in Phragmites-dominated floodplain (20 +/- 2.8) g/kg and paddy soil (28 +/- 8.6) g/kg. The OC content decreased with increasing depth from 0 to 30 cm, while it was relatively stable (around 15 g/kg) at depths deeper than 30 cm in Carex spp-dominated and Phragmites-dominated floodplain. However, there was a substantial variability in OC content in paddy soil profiles. In terms of the composition of OC, at top layer (0-10 cm), light fraction carbon in Carex spp-dominated floodplain accounted for more than 20% of the total organic carbon, whereas more than 90% of total organic carbon were heavy fraction that were much more difficult to be decomposed in Phragmites-dominated floodplain and paddy soils. The ratio of light fraction to total organic carbon at the soil profiles was greatly affected by the origin of organic matter. Statistical analyses indicate that there were significant correlations between heavy fraction and total organic carbon, between bulk density and total organic carbon, and between OC and nitrogen in heavy fraction (p<0.01). PMID:16124470

  1. The Future Of European Floodplain Wetlands Under A Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christof; Flörke, Martina; Geerling, Gertjan; Duel, Harm; Grygoruk, Mateusz; Okruszko, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    large geographical differences in directions and causes. First results of our analysis indicate that in snow affected catchments (e.g. in Eastern Europe), duration and volume of inundation are expected to decrease in the 2050s and inundation may appear earlier in the year. Higher temperatures are reducing the proportion of precipitation falling as snow as well as the duration of snow cover. Hence, our results show considerably reduced snowmelt induced flood peaks. As a consequence, habitat for fish, vertebrates, water birds and floodplain specific vegetation will be reduced causing a loss in biodiversity, floodplain productivity and fish production. In warmer regions, inundation strongly depends on the simulated precipitation patterns rather than temperature. To take into account the uncertainty of climate modelling, two SRES emission scenarios from three different global climate models are applied. This allows identifying regions with contradictory results (e.g. in France) for future floodplain inundation. Junk, W.J., Bayley, P.B. & Sparks, R.E. 1989 The flood pulse concept in river-floodplain systems. Canadian Special Publication of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 110-127.

  2. Characterising the Geomorphology of Forested Floodplains Using High Resolution Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sear, D. A.; Brasington, J.; Darby, S. E.

    2007-12-01

    Forested floodplain environments represent the undisturbed land cover of most temperate and tropical river systems, but they are under threat from human resource management (Hughes et al., 2005, FLOBAR II Project report). A scientific understanding of forest floodplain processes therefore has relevance to ecosystem conservation and restoration, and the interpretation of pre-historic river and floodplain evolution. Empirical research has highlighted how overbank flows are relatively shallow and strongly modified by floodplain topography and the presence of vegetation and organic debris on the woodland floor [Jeffries et al., 2003, Geomorphology, 51, 61-80; Millington and Sear, 2007, Earth. Surf. Proc. Landforms, 32, doi: 10.1002/esp.1552]. In such instances flow blockage and diversions are common, and there is the possibility of frequent switches from sub-critical to locally super-critical flow. Such conditions also favour turbulence generation, both by wakes and by shear. Consequently, the floodplain terrain (where we take 'terrain' to include the underlying topography, root structures, and organic debris) plays a key role in modulating the processes of erosion and sedimentation that underpin the physical habitat diversity and hydraulic characteristics of complex wooded floodplain surfaces. However, despite the importance of these issues, as yet there are no formal, quantitative, descriptions of the highly complex and spatially diverse micro- and meso-topography that appears to be characteristic of forested floodplain surfaces. To address this gap, we have undertaken detailed surveys on a small floodplain reach within the Highland Water Research Catchment (HWRC: see http://www.geog.soton.ac.uk/research/nfrc/default.asp), which is a UK national reference site for lowland floodplain forest streams. This involved the deployment of a Leica ScanStation terrestrial laser-scanner from 14 setups and ranges of less than 30 m to acquire an extremely high resolution, accurate

  3. Sediment dynamics within the intertidal floodplain of the lower Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, A. T.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Ogston, A. S.; Nowacki, D. J.; Asp, N. E.; Souza Filho, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal influence extends ~800 kilometers upstream of the Amazon River mouth, producing semidiurnal oscillations in water elevation and slowing or reversing the flow of the world's largest river. This tidally influenced reach, known as the tidal river, is flanked by an expansive intertidal floodplain, and includes confluences with two large tributaries, the Xingu and Tapajós. The relative magnitude of the seasonal and tidal signals changes along the length of the tidal river, yielding diverse floodplain environments that span a range of seasonal and tidal influence. Near the upstream limit of tides, natural levees isolate the river from the floodplain during low to moderate flows, while in the lower tidal river, natural levees are absent and river-floodplain exchange is dominated by the tides rather than seasonal variation in river stage. This difference between fluvial and tidal systems strongly affects the nature of sediment exchange between the channel and floodplain, including frequency, duration, and depth of inundation. Here we present data on the impact of this fluvial-tidal continuum on sedimentary processes in the floodplain and resultant depositional signatures. Changes in levee prominence, grain size, and sediment accumulation combine to produce the distinct morphologies of floodplain lakes, intertidal backswamps, and intertidal flats. In addition to sediment accumulation on the periodically exposed floodplain, Amazon River sediment accumulates within the drowned tributary confluences of the Xingu and Tapajós Rivers. Here seasonal and tidal changes in water temperature, discharge, and suspended-sediment concentration drive barotropic and baroclinic flows that transport Amazon River sediment into tributary basins. These findings help to constrain the fate of sediment within the ungauged Amazon tidal river, and will help in understanding the response of the lower Amazon River to changes in accommodation space associated with rising sea level, and changes

  4. 10 CFR 1022.13 - Floodplain or wetland assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland assessment. 1022.13 Section 1022.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.13 Floodplain or...

  5. 24 CFR 55.21 - Notification of floodplain hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 58 of the hazards of the floodplain location before the execution of documents completing... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Notification of floodplain hazard... Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Procedures for Making Determinations on Floodplain...

  6. 24 CFR 55.21 - Notification of floodplain hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 58 of the hazards of the floodplain location before the execution of documents completing... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notification of floodplain hazard... Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Procedures for Making Determinations on Floodplain...

  7. 10 CFR 1022.13 - Floodplain or wetland assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland assessment. 1022.13 Section 1022.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.13 Floodplain or...

  8. 24 CFR 55.21 - Notification of floodplain hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 58 of the hazards of the floodplain location before the execution of documents completing... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Notification of floodplain hazard... Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Procedures for Making Determinations on Floodplain...

  9. 10 CFR 1022.13 - Floodplain or wetland assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland assessment. 1022.13 Section 1022.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.13 Floodplain or...

  10. 24 CFR 55.21 - Notification of floodplain hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 58 of the hazards of the floodplain location before the execution of documents completing... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Notification of floodplain hazard... Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Procedures for Making Determinations on Floodplain...

  11. 10 CFR 1022.13 - Floodplain or wetland assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland assessment. 1022.13 Section 1022.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.13 Floodplain or...

  12. 10 CFR 1022.13 - Floodplain or wetland assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland assessment. 1022.13 Section 1022.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.13 Floodplain or...

  13. Floodplain denitrification within contrasting hydrologic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D.; Harvey, J. W.; Noe, G. B.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Forested wetlands are an important ecosystem across the southern US. During high-water, the adjacent river actively exchanges dissolved and particulate materials including nutrients (e.g., nitrogen) and suspended sediment with extensive floodplains that are inundated at any time of year during significant storms. Here, we examined the fate of nitrate during active inundation of the floodplain to determine denitrification rates and variation in those rates caused by the influence of hydrologic fluxes across the water-sediment interface. A ^{15}NO_{3}^{-} and Br^{-} addition experiment was carried out during the recession limb of the flood within two adjacent floodplain sloughs that were similar in size and connectivity with the river but differed in their ground surface elevation. Relative elevation of floodplain sloughs influenced the extent to which water flowed into floodplain sediment (i.e. recharge) or flowed out of sediment (discharge). Hydrologic measurements confirmed that the 2 sloughs were distinct - the higher elevation slough was actively recharging, versus in the second slough where exchange across the sediment water interface was absent. Measured rates of denitrification were higher in the recharging slough, and nitrification was only detected in this slough. Collectively, our results suggest that denitrification was important throughout the floodplain of this southeastern U.S. river, however recharging zones on the floodplain have greater nitrogen transformation rates and ultimately higher net nitrogen removal.

  14. Himalayan sediment fluxes and the floodplain transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupker, Maarten; Lavé, Jérôme; France-Lanord, Christian; Blard, Pierre Henri

    2013-04-01

    Erosion produces sediments and thereby redistributes mass at the Earth surface. A better understanding of these erosion processes can be gained by studying the products of erosion, i.e. the nature, magnitude and variability of sediment fluxes. On continents, rivers are the main conveyer belts that transport these sediments from source to sink. Owing to the integrative nature of river networks, a downstream river reach can be used to infer erosion processes that occur in upstream catchments. However on large spatial scales, sediment transport processes may affect the sedimentary signal so that the quantification of upstream erosion may not be straightforward. This is especially the case for continental scale basins: sediment sources are separated from sedimentary basins by large alluvial floodplains, where sediments are transported over hundreds to thousands of kilometers. The floodplain transfer function needs to be understood whenever modern river sediments or sedimentary archives are used to reconstruct present and past erosion processes. In this contribution we discuss the magnitude of sediment fluxes from the Himalayan system using sediment gauging and cosmogenic nuclide data and address to what extent sediment transport may bias these estimates. The central part of the Himalayan range is drained by two major rivers, the Ganga and Brahmaputra that convey the products of Himalayan erosion over an extensive floodplain and ultimately to the Indian Ocean. This transfer may bias erosion rates derived from gauged sediment fluxes as part of the sediment flux is trapped in the subsiding foreland basin. This storage term remains however limited and can be quantified using a geochemical budget approach [1]. Floodplain transfer may also affect cosmogenic nuclide derived sediment budgets as sediments may accumulate nuclides during transport which will increase the overall nuclide concentration and hence lead to under-estimate denudation rates. By comparing cosmogenic

  15. Nitrate-transformations during simulated drought on a restored floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, B.; Russo, T. A.; Schmidt, C. M.; Tran, D.

    2015-12-01

    Water resources in the California Central Valley face challenges due to recurring drought, aging levee systems, and nitrate contamination. As decisions are made to restore floodplain connectivity, soil microbial metabolic pathways such as denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) transform nitrate under saturated soil conditions and may each affect downstream water quality. However, few studies have quantified the contribution of all three pathways to nitrate retention in freshwater systems, and specifically in restored floodplains. Additionally, no former studies quantify the rates of these microbial nitrate transformations during floods after prolonged periods of drought. To test how flood duration impacts nitrogen cycling we added 15N-enriched tracer to soil mesocosms to measure denitrification, anammox, and DNRA transformation rates. In July 2015, we extracted seven soil mesocosms from the floodplain and riverbed of the Lower Cosumnes River in the San Joaquin Basin of California. Cosumnes River water enriched with 15N-NO3- tracer was pumped into each mesocosm at a constant rate simulating flood durations of 20 h, 30 h, and 96 h. Samples were collected from the surface water, soil pore water, drain water, and sediment for measurements of NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, gas isotopes, and DNA extraction. This study aims to demonstrate the relevance of anammox and DNRA to total nitrate retention and characterize the hydrologic conditions most favorable to each pathway.

  16. Sediment transport and sedimentation along the Amazon floodplain

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, T.; Mertes, A.K.L.; Meade, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    As the Amazon River leaves the Andean foothills and crosses the structural trough in its Brazilian segment, it receives a large increment of discharge, but a small increase in sediment load from the bounding cratons. The gradient of the river declines gradually from Iquitos, Peru, downstream to Coari, Brazil, before increasing downstream to the vicinity of Manaus as the river crosses a structural arch. Between Manaus and Obidos, the river slope declines sharply. The interplay of the variable gradient and increasing discharge creates a pattern of boundary shear stress and sediment transport which the authors have defined by measurement and calculation. The downstream divergence of suspended and bed load transport is responsible for the patterns of aggradation, channel behavior and floodplain morphology. Aggradation has been computed on the basis of three years of sediment transport measurements; floodplain morphology was documented from radar photography and navigation charts; and channel migration from these charts and from aerial and satellite photography. In the reach between the Peruvian border and Coari, the river deposits sand bars within and alongside the channel and shifts laterally at a relatively rapid rate, forming a scroll-bar floodplain topography with long, narrow lakes. In the middle, steeper reach no net aggradation was measured, sand-bar development and channel shifting are limited. Below Manaus, the rapid decline in gradient and the large influx of Andean sediment from the Rio Madeira result in deposition of almost the entire sand load and a portion of the silt.

  17. Changes in agrophysical properties of floodplain soils under different anthropogenic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkaeva, V. F.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Sapozhnikov, P. M.; Shchepot'ev, V. N.

    2009-02-01

    Agrophysical properties of alluvial soils were studied in the floodplains of the Oka River and the small rivers of Besputa (the Oka tributary) and Pol’noi Voronezh (the Voronezh tributary). The properties of the soils under different land use types (plowland, hayfield, pasture, and meadow) were compared. The features and degrees of alteration of the properties of the floodplain soils under different uses were determined. The greatest changes in the properties were found for saturated alluvial meadow soils of the Oka River floodplain under plowland. In these areas, strong degradation of the physical status of the soils was noted: compaction of the plow and subplow soil layers, an increase in the content of coarse aggregates and clods, changes in the porespace structure, and a decrease in the soil water permeability. It was shown that the soils of small river floodplains were sensitive to anthropogenic loads. In saturated alluvial soddy soils of the Besputa River floodplain, the soil water permeability decreased because of their compaction under the impact of cattle grazing. Saturated alluvial meadow soils of the Pol’noi Voronezh River floodplain were resistant to anthropogenic loads. Only a tendency towards an increase in the topsoil bulk density was observed under the impact of cattle grazing.

  18. Selecting reconnaissance strategies for floodplain surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollers, S. C.; Rango, A.; Henninger, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Multispectral aircraft and satellite data over the West Branch of the Susquehanna River were analyzed to evaluate potential contributions of remote sensing to flood-plain surveys. Multispectral digital classifications of land cover features indicative of floodplain areas were used by interpreters to locate various floodprone area boundaries. The digital approach permitted LANDSAT results to be displayed at 1:24,000 scale and aircraft results at even larger scales. Results indicate that remote sensing techniques can delineate floodprone areas more easily in agricultural and limited development areas as opposed to areas covered by a heavy forest canopy. At this time it appears that the remote sensing data would be best used as a form of preliminary planning information or as an internal check on previous or ongoing floodplain studies. In addition, the remote sensing techniques can assist in effectively monitoring floodplain activities after a community enters into the National Flood Insurance Program.

  19. The negative relief of large river floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, John; Ashworth, Philip J.

    2014-02-01

    Large floodplains have multiple and complex negative relief assemblages in which depressions fall below local or general floodplain surfaces at a variety of scales. The generation and dynamics of negative relief along major alluvial corridors are described and compared. Such depressions are significant for the storage and passage of surface waters, the creation of a range of riparian, wetland, lacustrine and flowing-water habitats, and the long-term accumulation of organic materials.

  20. The fate of carbon in floodplain sediments: A biogeochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderson, Danielle; Evans, Martin; Rothwell, James; Boult, Stephen; Rhodes, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Inland waters including fluvial systems and their associated sediments have been predominantly overlooked as part of global carbon budgets until recently. In the UK, peatlands are dynamically eroding, with the eventual result being 'off-site' greenhouse gas emissions, which must be incorporated into carbon budgets for management strategies. Evans et al. (2013) concluded fluvial systems are active cyclers of carbon, with 50-90% of particulate organic carbon (POC) exported from peatlands eventually emitted as CO2. Floodplains, although commonly regarded as zones of carbon storage, have been identified as potential hotspots of carbon cycling in the fluvial system with a key process being decomposition of POC. Decomposition is known to involve mass loss with selective transformation of labile compounds such as polysaccharides, and preferential preservation of more resistant compounds (refractory aromatics or aliphatics). Several decomposition proxies including FTIR band intensities, hydrogen indices and C/N ratios, correlated with molecular structure determinations using pyrolysis GC-MS, have been used successfully in peat cores (Biester et al., 2013), to disentangle changes due to decomposition and those that are related to vegetation variation. The aim of this research is to determine whether similar techniques can be applied to arguably more complex systems such as floodplains, to examine stratigraphic records of carbon cycling. Initial results from sediment cores taken within a floodplain environment downstream of the Bleaklow Plateau in the Peak District, UK will be presented. An initial OSL date of 640±90 years BP together with assessment of the valley morphology using high resolution LiDAR DEM's indicate potential interaction of post glacial landslide features with the onset of substantial peat erosion, conditioning the landscape to interrupt the transport of carbon down the fluvial network. The floodplain under investigation is a potential hotspot for carbon

  1. Floodplain Hyporheic Response under Dam Release Hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Ward, A. S.; O'Connor, B. L.; Endreny, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Hydropower operations cause altered hydrograph patterns downstream of dams, which regulates the direction and magnitude of floodplain and riverbed hyporheic flux. Periodic adjustments in river stage changes temporal and spatial patterns in hydraulic pressure, initiates propagation of lateral and vertical hyporheic flux, and affects the riparian ecological system by changing the hyporheic penetration distance, hyporheic flux rate, and thermal conditions in river banks. While this issue has been largely neglected by watershed scientists and managers, there is the potential to use hyporheic metrics in setting dam release rules and restoring downstream river reaches. In order to evaluate the hyporheic feedbacks of various dam release patterns, this study applied a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate the interaction of open water hydrographs on porous media lateral hyporheic exchange for the Green River, Utah, downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam. The CFD initially represented the river as a straight channel with a thick porous media extending from the channel banks and bottom. The dam release hydrographs changed the patterns of hyporheic flux at the river banks, the penetration distance of the hyporheic flux, the subsurface thermal patterns, and the residence time of water in the subsurface. The results suggest the undulating river stage downstream of dam releases can initiate patterns of hyporheic exchange similar to those induced by restoration of river bed morphology.

  2. How Knowledge Management Is Affected by Organizational Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmoudsalehi, Mehdi; Moradkhannejad, Roya; Safari, Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Identifying the impact of organizational structure on knowledge management (KM) is the aim of this study, as well as recognizing the importance of each variable indicator in creating, sharing and utility of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: For understanding relationships between the main variables (organizational structure-KM), the…

  3. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Flood Dynamics and Restoration Potential of Lower Missouri River Floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Lower Missouri River floodplains have the potential to provide multiple ecosystem services including agricultural production, floodwater storage, nutrient processing, and provision of habitats. In this research, a 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model of a representative looped floodplain bottom of approximately 20 km is utilized to explore how floodplain inundation contributes to ecosystem benefits and costs. High resolution 2-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling provides insights into the way velocities, flood stages, residence times, and transported constituents (sediment, nutrients, and fish larvae, for example) are affected by levee geometry, floodplain vegetation patterns, and flood magnitude and duration. The utility of 2-dimensional numerical hydraulic models to represent the channel and floodplain are demonstrated at a scale relevant to understanding processes that control channel/floodplain dynamics. The sensitivity of model response to alternative land use scenarios, including levee setbacks and variable overbank roughness, is quantified using hydraulic parameters such as velocity, water level, conveyance, and residence time. The 2-dimensional models are calibrated to existing 1-dimensional modeling solutions and field measurements of water surface from 1993 and 2007 for the 2-year, 5-year, and 10-year recurrence intervals. Calibration runs with current levee configurations are matched to approximately ±0.1 meters. Simulations of alternative land use scenarios demonstrate the tradeoffs between ecological restoration and flood risk reductions. Levee setbacks with low hydraulic roughness associated with traditional row crop agriculture on the floodplains have the greatest potential for flood stage reductions, while native plant communities with higher roughness can negate the effects of the setbacks by increasing water levels due to enhanced frictional resistance. Residence times, which are presumed to be related to ecosystem services, demonstrate increasingly

  4. Cosmogenic nuclide budgeting of floodplain sediment transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, H.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2009-08-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides produced in quartz may either decay or accumulate while sediment is moved through a river basin. A change in nuclide concentration resulting from storage in a floodplain is potentially important in large drainage basins in which sediment is prone to repeated burial and remobilization as a river migrates through its floodplain. We have modeled depth- and time-dependent cosmogenic nuclide concentration changes for 10Be, 26Al, and 14C during sediment storage and mixing in various active floodplain settings ranging from confined, shallow rivers with small floodplains to foreland-basin scale floodplains traversed by deep rivers. Floodplain storage time, estimated from channel migration rates, ranges from 0.4 kyr for the Beni River basin (Bolivia) to 7 kyr for the Amazon River basin, while floodplain storage depth, estimated from channel depth, ranges from 1 to 25 m. For all modeled active floodplain settings, the long-lived nuclides 10Be and 26Al show neither significant increase in nuclide concentration from irradiation nor decrease from decay. We predict a hypothetical response time after which changes in 10Be or 26Al concentrations become analytically resolvable. This interval ranges from 0.07 to 2 Myr and exceeds in all cases the typical residence time of sediment in a floodplain. Due to the much shorter half life of 14C, nuclide concentrations modeled for the in situ-produced variety of this nuclide are, however, sensitive to floodplain storage on residence times of < 20 kyr. The cosmogenic nuclide composition of old deposits in currently inactive floodplains that have been isolated for periods of millions of years from the river that once deposited them is predicted to either increase or decrease in 10Be and 26Al concentration, depending on the depositional depth. These conditions can be evaluated using the 26Al/ 10Be ratio that readily discloses the depth and duration of storage. We illustrate these models with examples from the Amazon basin

  5. Preliminary paleohydrological interpretation of an Amazon floodplain system based on seismic stratigraphy: Varzea do Lago Grande do Curuai, Pará, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, M. A.; Moreira-Turcq, P.; Turcq, B.

    2009-04-01

    The aquatic lacustrine ecosystems are depositional environments that register in yours sediments the process that occurs on the own site and in the all drainage basin. The Amazonas River and its tributaries are followed along your upward and downward course by several floodplains that cover a large area of environs 300.000 km2. These sites are dynamic and complexes systems. Floodplains affect the erosion the transport and the sedimentation flux in the system and it has a special importance for carbon cycle due yours high productivity. In the floodplains systems the sediment deposition occurs in a different scale of time period. In these work, we study the "Varzea Grande do Curuai" which size varies from 1340km2 during the dry season, to 3600 km2 during the wet season, according to the level of the river. This floodplain is located on the southern margin of the Amazonas River, close to the city of Óbidos, Pará-Brazil, in the Lower Amazonas. The floodplain contains several white water lakes such as Grande, Poção, Santa Ninha and Salé Lakes, and black water lakes such as the Curumucuri and Açaí Lakes. These lakes are connected to each other and to the Amazonas River by small channels, some of which are permanently connected to the river and others not, depending on the variations of the water level. The purpose of this work is to reconstruct past sedimentary processes using seismic stratigraphy profiles realized all along the floodplain lakes and sediment cores collected at strategic sites. The sedimentary patterns observed in the seismic profiles are horizontal layers, highly reflective unpenetrated levels and paleochannels that could have been formed during the Holocene. The larger quantity of paleochannels along the lakes has been observed in the Grande and Salé lakes. The paleochannels in the Grande Lake would indicate a migration of actual depositional ridge that separates the floodplain from the river. In the Salé Lake, the paleochannels indicate that

  6. A faster and economical approach to floodplain mapping using the SSURGO soil database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, N.; Merwade, V.

    2014-12-01

    Floods are the most damaging of all natural disasters, adversely affecting millions of lives and causing financial losses worth billions of dollars every year across the globe. Flood inundation maps play a key role in the assessment and mitigation of potential flood hazards. However, there are several communities in the United States where flood risk maps are not available due to the lack of the resources needed to create such maps through the conventional modeling approach. The objective of this study is to develop and examine an economical alternative approach to floodplain mapping using widely available SSURGO soil data in the United States. By using the state of Indiana as a test case, floodplain maps are developed for the entire state by identifying the flood-prone soil map units based on their attributes recorded in the SSURGO database. For validation, the flood extents obtained from the soil data are compared with the extents predicted by other floodplain maps, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) issued Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), flood extents observed during past floods, and other flood maps derived using Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In general, SSURGO based floodplain maps are found to be largely in agreement with flood inundation maps created by FEMA. Comparison between the FEMA maps and the SSURGO derived floodplain maps show an overlap ranging from 65 to 90 percent. Similar results are also found when the SSURGO derived floodplain maps are compared with FEMA maps for recent flood events in other states including Minnesota, Washington and Wisconsin. Although not in perfect conformance with reference flood maps, the SSURGO soil data approach offers an economical and faster alternative to floodplain mapping in areas where detailed flood modeling and mapping has not been conducted.

  7. Impacts of Hurricane Katrina on floodplain forests of the Pearl River: Chapter 6A in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faulkner, Stephen; Barrow, Wylie; Couvillion, Brady R.; Conner, William; Randall, Lori; Baldwin, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Floodplain forests are an important habitat for Neotropical migratory birds. Hurricane Katrina passed through the Pearl River flood plain shortly after making landfall. Field measurements on historical plots and remotely sensed data were used to assess the impact of Hurricane Katrina on the structure of floodplain forests of the Pearl River.

  8. Can microcystins affect zooplankton structure community in tropical eutrophic reservoirs?

    PubMed

    Paes, T A S V; Costa, I A S; Silva, A P C; Eskinazi-Sant'Anna, E M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess whether cyanotoxins (microcystins) can affect the composition of the zooplankton community, leading to domination of microzooplankton forms (protozoans and rotifers). Temporal variations in concentrations of microcystins and zooplankton biomass were analyzed in three eutrophic reservoirs in the semi-arid northeast region of Brazil. The concentration of microcystins in water proved to be correlated with the cyanobacterial biovolume, indicating the contributions from colonial forms such as Microcystis in the production of cyanotoxins. At the community level, the total biomass of zooplankton was not correlated with the concentration of microcystin (r2 = 0.00; P > 0.001), but in a population-level analysis, the biomass of rotifers and cladocerans showed a weak positive correlation. Cyclopoid copepods, which are considered to be relatively inefficient in ingesting cyanobacteria, were negatively correlated (r2 = - 0.01; P > 0.01) with the concentration of cyanotoxins. Surprisingly, the biomass of calanoid copepods was positively correlated with the microcystin concentration (r2 = 0.44; P > 0.001). The results indicate that allelopathic control mechanisms (negative effects of microcystin on zooplankton biomass) do not seem to substantially affect the composition of mesozooplankton, which showed a constant and high biomass compared to the microzooplankton (rotifers). These results may be important to better understand the trophic interactions between zooplankton and cyanobacteria and the potential effects of allelopathic compounds on zooplankton. PMID:26959954

  9. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  10. Large scale distribution of bacterial communities in the upper Paraná River floodplain

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramonte, Josiane Barros; Roberto, Maria do Carmo; Pagioro, Thomaz Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial community has a central role in nutrient cycle in aquatic habitats. Therefore, it is important to analyze how this community is distributed throughout different locations. Thirty-six different sites in the upper Paraná River floodplain were surveyed to determine the influence of environmental variable in bacterial community composition. The sites are classified as rivers, channels, and floodplain lakes connected or unconnected to the main river channel. The bacterial community structure was analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, based on frequency of the main domains Bacteria and Archaea, and subdivisions of the phylum Proteobacteria (Alpha-proteobacteria, Beta-proteobacteria, Gamma-proteobacteria) and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster. It has been demonstrated that the bacterial community differed in density and frequency of the studied groups. And these differences responded to distinct characteristics of the three main rivers of the floodplain as well as to the classification of the environments found in this floodplain. We conclude that dissimilarities in the bacterial community structure are related to environmental heterogeneity, and the limnological variables that most predicted bacterial communities in the upper Paraná River floodplain was total and ammoniacal nitrogen, orthophosphate and chlorophyll-a. PMID:25763022

  11. Seasonal and spatial aspects of the eco-distribution of methanotrophic bacteria in floodplain soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodelier, P. L. E.; Meima-Franke, M.; Kamst, M.; Bodrossy, L.; Stralis-Pavese, N.; Hefting, M. M.; Laanbroek, R.

    2009-04-01

    METHECO is the acronym of a consortium of research groups funded by the European Science foundation (ESF) within the EuroDIVERSITY program. The consortium investigates the role of microbial diversity in the dynamics and stability of global methane consumption. The consortium covers various habitats (i.e. Landfills, rice paddies, alpine meadows, littoral wetlands, forests, arctic wetlands, peat soils and river floodplains) and assesses the effects of natural environmental perturbation on the function structure relationship of methane-consuming microbial communities. Consortium members follow the same experimental and methodological scheme using DNA and RNA based techniques (i.e. pmoA-based cloning, DGGE, micro arrays, Real Time PCR, stable isotope probing). This paper presents the results obtained in a river floodplain along the river Rhine in the Netherlands, a habitat anticipated to be subjected to major changes in flooding regime due to climate change. Experiments were carried out to assess methanotrophic diversity, methane oxidation kinetics and spatial variability of function and structure of methane-oxidizing communities. Flooding events affected methane consumption negatively on short term. However, the long -term consequences of the flooding regime where the establishment of a distinct maximum methane consumption activity exactly in the part of the floodplain intermediate between permanently and irregularly flooded, where moisture and organic matter content were optimal for methane cycling. The methanotrophic community composition as analysed by pmoA micro array mirrored the result of the activity measurements, demonstrating that the communities differed clearly according to the flooding gradient. Diversity as assessed by micro array and activity components (initial consumption, Vmax, Vmax/Km) were positively correlated. QPCR analyses showed that main types of methanotrophic bacteria were differentially distributed throughout the flooding gradient. Type I

  12. Stage structure alters how complexity affects stability of ecological networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudolf, V.H.W.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving how complexity affects stability of natural communities is of key importance for predicting the consequences of biodiversity loss. Central to previous stability analysis has been the assumption that the resources of a consumer are substitutable. However, during their development, most species change diets; for instance, adults often use different resources than larvae or juveniles. Here, we show that such ontogenetic niche shifts are common in real ecological networks and that consideration of these shifts can alter which species are predicted to be at risk of extinction. Furthermore, niche shifts reduce and can even reverse the otherwise stabilizing effect of complexity. This pattern arises because species with several specialized life stages appear to be generalists at the species level but act as sequential specialists that are hypersensitive to resource loss. These results suggest that natural communities are more vulnerable to biodiversity loss than indicated by previous analyses.

  13. Structural and leakage integrity of tubes affected by circumferential cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hernalsteen, P.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper the author deals with the notion that circumferential cracks are generally considered unacceptable. He argues for the need to differentiate two facets of such cracks: the issue of the size and growth rate of a crack; and the issue of the structural strength and leakage potential of the tube in the presence of the crack. In this paper the author tries to show that the second point is not a major concern for such cracks. The paper presents data on the structural strength or burst pressure characteristics of steam generator tubes derived from models and data bases of experimental work. He also presents a leak rate model, and compares the performance of circumferential and axial cracks as far as burst strength and leak rate. The final conclusion is that subject to improvement in NDE capabilities (sizing, detection, growth), that Steam Generator Defect Specific Management can be used to allow circumferentially degraded tubes to remain in service.

  14. Hydromorphological control of nutrient cycling in complex river floodplain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, T.; Bondar-Kunze, E.; Felkl, M.; Habersack, H.; Mair, M.; Pinay, G.; Tritthart, M.; Welti, N.

    2009-04-01

    Riparian zones and floodplains are key components within river ecosystems controlling nutrient cycling by promoting transformation processes and thus, act as biogeochemical hot spots. The intensity of these processes depends on the exchange conditions (the connectivity) with the main channel and the morphological setting of the water bodies. At the landscape scale, three interrelated principles of hydromorphological dynamics can be formulated regarding the cycling and transfer of carbon and nutrients in large rivers ecosystems: a) The mode of carbon and nutrient delivery affects ecosystem functioning; b) Increasing residence time and contact area impact nutrient transformation; c) Floods and droughts are natural events that strongly influence pathways of carbon and nutrient cycling. These three principles of hydromorphological dynamics control the nutrient uptake and retention and are linked over different temporal and spatial scales. All three factors can be strongly affected by natural disturbances or anthropogenic impacts, through a change in either the water regime or the geomorphologic setting of the river valley. Any change in natural water regimes will affect the biogeochemistry of riparian zones and floodplains as well as their ability to cycle and mitigate nutrient fluxes originating from upstream and/or upslope. Especially these areas have been altered by river regulation and land use changes over the last 200 years leading to the deterioration of the functioning of these compartments within the riverine landscape. The resulting deficits have prompted rehabilitation and restoration measures aiming to increase the spatial heterogeneity, the complexity, of these ecosystems. Yet, a more integrated approach is needed considering the present status of nutrient dynamics and the effects of restoration measures at different scales. The present paper analyses the effects of river side-arm restoration on ecosystem functions within the side-arm and highlights

  15. Adaptation services of floodplains and wetlands under transformational climate change.

    PubMed

    Colloff, Matthew; Lavorel, Sandra; Wise, Russell M; Dunlop, Michael; Overton, Ian C; Williams, Kristen J

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation services are the ecosystem processes and services that benefit people by increasing their ability to adapt to change. Benefits may accrue from existing but newly used services where ecosystems persist or from novel services supplied following ecosystem transformation. Ecosystem properties that enable persistence or transformation are important adaptation services because they support future options. The adaptation services approach can be applied to decisions on trade-offs between currently valued services and benefits from maintaining future options. For example, ecosystem functions and services of floodplains depend on river flows. In those regions of the world where climate change projections are for hotter, drier conditions, floods will be less frequent and floodplains will either persist, though with modified structure and function, or transform to terrestrial (flood-independent) ecosystems. Many currently valued ecosystem services will reduce in supply or become unavailable, but new options are provided by adaptation services. We present a case study from the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, for operationalizing the adaptation services concept for floodplains and wetlands. We found large changes in flow and flood regimes are likely under a scenario of +1.6°C by 2030, even with additional water restored to rivers under the proposed Murray-Darling Basin Plan. We predict major changes to floodplain ecosystems, including contraction of riparian forests and woodlands and expansion of terrestrial, drought-tolerant vegetation communities. Examples of adaptation services under this scenario include substitution of irrigated agriculture with dryland cropping and floodplain grazing; mitigation of damage from rarer, extreme floods; and increased tourism, recreational, and cultural values derived from fewer, smaller wetlands that can be maintained with environmental flows. Management for adaptation services will require decisions on where intervention can

  16. The turbidity behavior in an Amazon floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcântara, E.; Novo, E.; Stech, J.; Lorenzzetti, J.; Barbosa, C.; Assireu, A.; Souza, A.

    2009-05-01

    The main objective of this study is to understand the turbidity behavior of an Amazon Floodplain Lake. Observations of turbidity provide quantitative information about water quality. However, the number of available in situ measurements for water quality determination is usually limited in time and space. Here, we present an analysis of the temporal and spatial variability using two approaches: (i) the first is based on wavelet analysis of a turbidity time series measured by an automatic monitoring system; (ii) the second is based on turbidity samples measured in different locations and then interpolated by an ordinary kriging algorithm. The space/time turbidity variability is clearly related to the Amazon River flood pulses in the floodplain. When the water level in the floodplain is rising or receding, the exchange between the Amazon River and the floodplain is the major driving force in turbidity variability. At high water level, the turbidity variability is controlled by the lake bathymetry. Finally, when the water level is low, the wind action and lake morphometry are the main causes of turbidity variability. The combined use of temporal and spatial data showed a great potential for understanding the turbidity behavior in a complex aquatic system, like the Amazon floodplain.

  17. Cyanobacteria Affect Fitness and Genetic Structure of Experimental Daphnia Populations.

    PubMed

    Drugă, Bogdan; Turko, Patrick; Spaak, Piet; Pomati, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Zooplankton communities can be strongly affected by cyanobacterial blooms, especially species of genus Daphnia, which are key-species in lake ecosystems. Here, we explored the effect of microcystin/nonmicrocystin (MC/non-MC) producing cyanobacteria in the diet of experimental Daphnia galeata populations composed of eight genotypes. We used D. galeata clones hatched from ephippia 10 to 60 years old, which were first tested in monocultures, and then exposed for 10 weeks as mixed populations to three food treatments consisting of green algae combined with cyanobacteria able/unable of producing MC. We measured the expression of nine genes potentially involved in Daphnia acclimation to cyanobacteria: six protease genes, one ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene, and two rRNA genes, and then we tracked the dynamics of the genotypes in mixed populations. The expression pattern of one protease and the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme genes was positively correlated with the increased fitness of competing clones in the presence of cyanobacteria, suggesting physiological plasticity. The genotype dynamics in mixed populations was only partially related to the growth rates of clones in monocultures and varied strongly with the food. Our results revealed strong intraspecific differences in the tolerance of D. galeata clones to MC/non-MC-producing cyanobacteria in their diet, suggesting microevolutionary effects. PMID:26943751

  18. Does small scale structure significantly affect cosmological dynamics?

    PubMed

    Adamek, Julian; Clarkson, Chris; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The large-scale homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe is generally thought to imply a well-defined background cosmological model. It may not. Smoothing over structure adds in an extra contribution, transferring power from small scales up to large. Second-order perturbation theory implies that the effect is small, but suggests that formally the perturbation series may not converge. The amplitude of the effect is actually determined by the ratio of the Hubble scales at matter-radiation equality and today-which are entirely unrelated. This implies that a universe with significantly lower temperature today could have significant backreaction from more power on small scales, and so provides the ideal testing ground for understanding backreaction. We investigate this using two different N-body numerical simulations-a 3D Newtonian and a 1D simulation which includes all relevant relativistic effects. We show that while perturbation theory predicts an increasing backreaction as more initial small-scale power is added, in fact the virialization of structure saturates the backreaction effect at the same level independently of the equality scale. This implies that backreaction is a small effect independently of initial conditions. Nevertheless, it may still contribute at the percent level to certain cosmological observables and therefore it cannot be neglected in precision cosmology. PMID:25699430

  19. Earthworm ecology affects the population structure of their Verminephrobacter symbionts.

    PubMed

    Viana, Flávia; Jensen, Christopher Erik; Macey, Michael; Schramm, Andreas; Lund, Marie Braad

    2016-05-01

    Earthworms carry species-specific Verminephrobacter symbionts in their nephridia (excretory organs). The symbionts are vertically transmitted via the cocoon, can only colonize the host during early embryonic development, and have co-speciated with their host for about 100 million years. Although several studies have addressed Verminephrobacter diversity between worm species, the intra-species diversity of the symbiont population has never been investigated. In this study, symbiont population structure was examined by using a multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) approach on Verminephrobacter isolated from two contrasting ecological types of earthworm hosts: the high population density, fast reproducing compost worms, Eisenia andrei and Eisenia fetida, and the low-density, slow reproducing Aporrectodea tuberculata, commonly found in garden soils. Three distinct populations were investigated for both types and, according to MLST analysis of 193 Verminephrobacter isolates, the symbiont community in each worm individual was very homogeneous. The more solitary A. tuberculata carried unique symbiont populations in 9 out of 10 host individuals, whereas the symbiont populations in the social compost worms were homogeneous across host individuals from the same population. These data suggested that host ecology shaped the population structure of Verminephrobacter symbionts. The homogeneous symbiont populations in the compost worms led to the hypothesis that Verminephrobacter could be transferred bi-parentally or via leaky horizontal transmission in high-density, frequently mating worm populations. PMID:27040820

  20. Connectivity and variability: metrics for riverine floodplain backwater rehabilitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of floodplain backwaters within lowland riverine ecosystems is well established. However, these types of habitat are becoming increasingly rare as development is transforming floodplain landscapes in fundamental ways. Therefore, rehabilitation, protection, and management of riverine b...

  1. Documentation and significance of the perirheic zone on inundated floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertes, Leal A. K.

    The transfer of water, sediment, and other materials to floodplains is a function of the hydrology of inundation. Inundation of floodplains by regional water, that is, overbank flow from the main river channel, and local water, that is, groundwater, hyporheic water, local tributary water, and direct precipitation onto the floodplain, is such that some rivers inundate dry floodplains, while other rivers inundate fully saturated floodplains. Remote sensing and field data from the large rivers Missouri, Mississippi, Amazon, Ob'-Irtysh, Taquari, and Altamaha show a variety of water types on inundated floodplains, including areas of mixing of river and local water defined as the ``perirheic zone.'' For the rivers examined here, only the Missouri River flooded its entire valley with sediment-rich river water. Therefore the floodplains of these large rivers from the Arctic to the Amazon are only partially inundated with river water during floods and the corresponding perirheic zones may encompass a significant floodplain ecotone.

  2. Elasticity of vesicles affects hairless mouse skin structure and permeability.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, B A; Bouwstra, J A; Junginger, H E; Wertz, P W

    1999-12-01

    One of the possibilities for increasing the penetration rate of drugs through the skin is the use of vesicular systems. Currently, special attention is paid to the elastic properties of liquid-state vesicles, which are supposed to have superior properties compared to gel-state vesicles with respect to skin interactions. In this study, the effects of vesicles on hairless mouse skin, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied in relation to the composition of vesicles. The interactions of elastic vesicles containing the single chain surfactant octaoxyethylene laurate-ester (PEG-8-L) and sucrose laurate-ester (L-595) with hairless mouse skin were studied, in vivo, after non-occlusive application for 1, 3 and 6 h. The skin ultrastructure was examined by ruthenium tetroxide electron microscopy (TEM) and histology. The extent, to which vesicle constituents penetrated into the stratum corneum, was quantified by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The interactions of the elastic vesicles containing PEG-8-L and L-595 surfactants were compared with those observed after treatment with rigid vesicles containing the surfactant sucrose stearate-ester (Wasag-7). Furthermore, skin permeability experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of treatment with PEG-8-L micelles, elastic vesicles (containing PEG-8-L and L-595 surfactants) or rigid Wasag-7 vesicles on the 3H(2)O transport through hairless mouse skin, in vitro, after non-occlusive application. Treatment of hairless mouse skin with the elastic vesicles affected the ultrastructure of the stratum corneum: distinct regions with lamellar stacks derived from the vesicles were observed in intercellular spaces of the stratum corneum. These stacks disrupted the organization of skin bilayers leading to an increased skin permeability, whereas no changes in the ultrastructure of the underlying viable epidermis were observed. Treatment with rigid Wasag-7 vesicles did not affect the skin ultrastructure or skin permeability. TLC

  3. Microhabitat use affects brain size and structure in intertidal gobies.

    PubMed

    White, Gemma E; Brown, Culum

    2015-01-01

    The ecological cognition hypothesis poses that the brains and behaviours of individuals are largely shaped by the environments in which they live and the associated challenges they must overcome during their lives. Here we examine the effect of environmental complexity on relative brain size in 4 species of intertidal gobies from differing habitats. Two species were rock pool specialists that lived on spatially complex rocky shores, while the remainder lived on dynamic, but structurally simple, sandy shores. We found that rock pool-dwelling species had relatively larger brains and telencephalons in particular, while sand-dwelling species had a larger optic tectum and hypothalamus. In general, it appears that various fish species trade off neural investment in specific brain lobes depending on the environment in which they live. Our previous research suggests that rock pool species have greater spatial learning abilities, enabling them to navigate their spatially complex environment, which may account for their enlarged telencephalon, while sand-dwelling species likely have a reduced need for spatial learning, due to their spatially simple habitat, and a greater need for visual acuity. The dorsal medulla and cerebellum size was unaffected by the habitat in which the fish lived, but there were differences between species indicative of species-specific trade-offs in neural investment. PMID:25896449

  4. Floodplain sedimentation in the Upper Mississippi Valley: Natural versus human accelerated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, James C.

    2006-09-01

    Understanding the time scales and pathways for response and recovery of rivers and floodplains to episodic changes in erosion and sedimentation has been a long standing issue in fluvial geomorphology. Floodplains are an important component of watershed systems because they affect downstream storage and delivery of overbank flood waters, and they also serve as sources and temporary sinks for sediments and toxic substances delivered by river systems. Here, 14C and 137Cs isotopic dating methods are used along with ages of culturally related phenomena associated with mining and agriculture to determine rates of sedimentation and morphologic change for a reach of the upper Mississippi River and adjacent tributaries in southwestern Wisconsin and northwestern Illinois. The most important environmental change that influenced fluvial activity in this region during last 10,000 years involved the conversion of a late Holocene mosaic of prairie and forest to a landscape dominated by cropland and pastureland associated with Euro-American settlement. Results presented herein for the Upper Mississippi Valley (UMV) show that the shift from pre-agriculture, natural land cover to landscape dominance by agricultural land use of the last 175-200 years typically increased rates and magnitudes of floodplain sedimentation by at least an order of magnitude. Accelerated overbank flooding led to increased bank heights on tributary streams and, in turn, contributed to more frequent deep flows of high energy. These high energy flows subsequently promoted bank erosion and lateral channel migration, and the formation of a historical meander belt whose alluvial surface constitutes a new historical floodplain inset against the earlier historical floodplain. The new historical floodplain serves as a "flume-like" channel that provides efficient downstream transport of water and sediment associated with moderate and large magnitude floods. Floodplains on lower tributaries, however, continue to

  5. Restoration of floodplain topography by sand-splay complex formation in response to intentional levee breaches, Lower Cosumnes River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsheim, Joan L.; Mount, Jeffrey F.

    2002-04-01

    Restoration of sustainable geomorphic processes that create floodplain topography through development of sand-splay complexes at intentional breaches is one method to promote variability in physical structure needed for habitat restoration. The topography of splay complexes provides a range of floodplain elevations that creates local variability in (i) inundation duration and frequency and depth to ground water that influence riparian vegetation establishment; and (ii) flow depth and velocity that create refuge for fish. Two intentional levee breaches along the lowland Cosumnes River, Central Valley, CA, were evaluated during water years 1999 and 2000 in order to document changes in morphology and relief associated with deposition of sand-splay complexes. During the study period, annual peak-flow recurrence intervals ranged from ˜1 to 3 years, and water flowed through the breaches for a minimum of 55 days during water year 1999 and 53 days during water year 2000. At the two study sites, rapid vertical accretion and scour occurred within the first several years after intentionally breaching the levee at the Accidental Forest floodplain (constructed in 1995) and at the Corps Breach floodplain (constructed in 1997). Splay complexes are organized into a variety of landforms, including lateral levees and lobes separated by new floodplain channels. Maximum deposition measured on the splay surface is 0.36 m/year, while maximum scour in channels is 0.27 m/year. Juxtaposition of floodplain splay deposition and adjacent channel scour creates relief ranging from ˜1.6 to 0.25 m that decreases with distance from the breach and that becomes more pronounced over time as higher magnitude floods scour channels in the old floodplain sediment and deposit new sand and silt onto the surface of the splay. The ratio of splay complex height to depth of formative flow is estimated as ˜0.4. Progradation of main and secondary splay channels takes place by down-floodplain sand transport

  6. Modelling impacts of regulation on flows to the Lowbidgee floodplain of the Murrumbidgee River, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shiquan; Kingsford, Richard T.

    2014-11-01

    Major wetland systems have been significantly affected by alteration of flows by dams and subsequent abstraction upstream around the world. Estimating the level of this impact is particularly difficult where there is high flow variability, such as dryland rivers in Australia. Such information remains critical for assessing ecological impacts to ecosystems (e.g. long-lived flood-dependent trees). To determine effects of flow reduction to a large floodplain wetland, we built statistical flow models, integrated flow and flood modelling (IFFM), for the extensive and ecologically important Lowbidgee wetland, supplied by the Murrumbidgee River, based on local annual rainfall and upstream flow data (1880-2010). Large volumes of water are diverted upstream primarily for irrigation and to Australia's capital city, Canberra, achieved with 26 large dams: Burrinjuck Dam, Snowy Mountains Scheme dams and other upper catchment dams. We identified two periods using structural change analysis, low (before 1957) and high (after 1958) regulated periods; the year marked significant alteration in monthly flow at Redbank gauge, within the Lowbidgee wetland, after which most major dams were built. To determine differences in flow between these periods, we developed two models for three flow gauges on the lower Murrumbidgee River: Hay, Maude and Redbank. The latter two were within the floodplain wetland. The models were based on annual rainfall from stations in the upper catchment and flow, using LOESS and leave-one-out samples without overfitting. This flexible local polynomial regression method was a useful approach to modelling complex processes without theoretical models. The proposed low and high regulated models performed well using the goodness of fit (Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency ⩾91.5%) and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (p > 0.9999), i.e., there was no significant difference between the observed and fitted distributions of flow data at the Hay, Maude and Redbank flow

  7. Do terrestrial invertebrates experience floodplains as landscape mosaics? Immediate and longer-term effects of flooding on ant assemblages in a floodplain forest.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Andrea; Lake, P S; Nally, Ralph Mac

    2007-05-01

    Considering the floodplain landscape as a mosaic of habitat patches at different successional stages is useful for understanding (1) the processes associated with individual floods and (2) the legacy of flood history. Here, we investigate the applicability of the mosaic model to opportunistic ant species inhabiting the floodplain. Ground-active ant assemblages in river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) floodplain forest in south-eastern Australia were sampled before and for two years after a major flood in 2000-2001 at 24 sites with different inundation histories. Despite the mobility and opportunistic life history traits of floodplain ants, flood history appeared to impose a persistent mosaic structure on ant assemblages. Increasing duration of inundation of the forest floor was associated with decreasing species richness. beta-diversity was low, with the ant species at the most inundation-prone sites being a subset of those at drier sites. Less extensive flooding occurred in 2002-2003, enabling the consistency of short-term responses to inundation to be assessed. Flooding acts as a resetting mechanism, creating a characteristic ant assemblage. After floodwaters receded, there was little evidence of convergence in the structure of ant assemblages through time between sites flooded for different durations. The persistence of dissimilarities in ant assemblages suggests that succession towards terrestrialization was either not occurring or that it was operating at a rate that was too slow to be detected. PMID:17221254

  8. Seasonality of Laboulbenia phaeoxanthae (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniales) and its host Phaeoxantha aequinoctialis (Coleoptera, Carabidae) at a central Amazonian blackwater floodplain.

    PubMed

    Zerm, Matthias; Adis, Joachim

    2004-05-01

    Terrestrial invertebrates in central Amazonian floodplains must cope with annual long-term inundation. Parasites should be affected mainly indirectly through the specific life-cycles of their hosts. We studied the temporal structure of a beetle-fungus system at a central Amazonian blackwater floodplain (Rio Negro, Brazil). The host species Phaeoxantha aequinoctialis (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Cicindelinae) showed a seasonal, univoltine life-cycle triggered by the annual flood pulse. Infestation frequency of its fungal parasite, Laboulbenia phaeoxanthae (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniales), varied seasonally. However, the seasonality was opposed in host and parasite: the lowest infestation frequencies were observed during periods of highest beetle abundance and vice versa. Periods of lowest beetle abundance coincided with the end of the old generation, those with highest abundance with the appearance of new adults. The resulting annual patterns of a slow spread in the host population resembled the few records of temporal patterns from temperate regions. It is explicitly demonstrated that older adult female beetles are more frequently infested than younger ones. Future studies may reveal whether this is simply the result of specific host life-cycles (driven by a flood pulse, winter, or other factors), or might also be related to potentially easier infestation in older individuals. PMID:15230009

  9. Drought responses of flood-tolerant trees in Amazonian floodplains

    PubMed Central

    Parolin, Pia; Lucas, Christine; Piedade, Maria Teresa F.; Wittmann, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Background Flood-tolerant tree species of the Amazonian floodplain forests are subjected to an annual dry period of variable severity imposed when low river-water levels coincide with minimal precipitation. Although the responses of these species to flooding have been examined extensively, their responses to drought, in terms of phenology, growth and physiology, have been neglected hitherto, although some information is found in publications that focus on flooding. Scope The present review examines the dry phase of the annual flooding cycle. It consolidates existing knowledge regarding responses to drought among adult trees and seedlings of many Amazonian floodplain species. Main Findings Flood-tolerant species display variable physiological responses to dry periods and drought that indicate desiccation avoidance, such as reduced photosynthetic activity and reduced root respiration. However, tolerance and avoidance strategies for drought vary markedly among species. Drought can substantially decrease growth, biomass and photosynthetic activity among seedlings in field and laboratory studies. When compared with the responses to flooding, drought can impose higher seedling mortality and slower growth rates, especially among evergreen species. Results indicate that tolerance and avoidance strategies for drought vary markedly between species. Both seedling recruitment and photosynthetic activity are affected by drought, Conclusions For many species, the effects of drought can be as important as flooding for survival and growth, particularly at the seedling phase of establishment, ultimately influencing species composition. In the context of climate change and predicted decreases in precipitation in the Amazon Basin, the effects of drought on plant physiology and species distribution in tropical floodplain forest ecosystems should not be overlooked. PMID:19880423

  10. Depth as an organizer of fish assemblages in floodplain lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Depth reduction is a natural process in floodplain lakes, but in many basins has been accelerated by anthropogenic disturbances. A diverse set of 42 floodplain lakes in the Yazoo River Basin (Mississippi, USA) was examined to test the hypothesis of whether depth reduction was a key determinant of water quality and fish assemblage structure. Single and multiple variable analyses were applied to 10 commonly monitored water variables and 54 fish species. Results showed strong associations between depth and water characteristics, and between depth and fish assemblages. Deep lakes provided less variable environments, clearer water, and a wider range of microhabitats than shallow lakes. The greater environmental stability was reflected by the dominant species in the assemblages, which included a broader representation of large-body species, species less tolerant of extreme water quality, and more predators. Stability in deep lakes was further reflected by reduced among-lake variability in taxa representation. Fish assemblages in shallow lakes were more variable than deep lakes, and commonly dominated by opportunistic species that have early maturity, extended breeding seasons, small adult size, and short lifespan. Depth is a causal factor that drives many physical and chemical variables that contribute to organizing fish assemblages in floodplain lakes. Thus, correlations between fish and water transparency, temperature, oxygen, trophic state, habitat structure, and other environmental descriptors may ultimately be totally or partly regulated by depth. In basins undergoing rapid anthropogenic modifications, local changes forced by depth reductions may be expected to eliminate species available from the regional pool and could have considerable ecological implications. ?? 2010 Springer Basel AG (outside the USA).

  11. Trace metal dynamics in floodplain soils of the river Elbe: a review.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Zunkel, Christiane; Krueger, Frank

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews trace metal dynamics in floodplain soils using the Elbe floodplains in Germany as an example of extraordinary importance because of the pollution level of its sediments and soils. Trace metal dynamics are determined by processes of retention and release, which are influenced by a number of soil properties including pH value, redox potential, organic matter, type and amount of clay minerals, iron-, manganese- and aluminum-oxides. Today floodplains act as important sinks for contaminants but under changing hydraulic and geochemical conditions they may also act as sources for pollutants. In floodplains such changes may be extremes in flooding or dry periods that particularly lead to altered redox potentials and that in turn influence the pH value, the mineralization of organic matter as well as the charge of the pedogenic oxides. Such reactions may affect the bioavailability of trace metals in soils and it can be clearly seen that the bioavailability of metals is an important factor for estimating trace metal remobilization in floodplain soils. However as bioavailability is not a constant factor, there is still a lack of quantification of metal mobilization particularly on the basis of changing geochemical conditions. Moreover, mobile amounts of metals in the soil solution do not indicate to which extent remobilized metals will be transported to water bodies or plants and therefore potentially have toxicological effects. Consequently, floodplain areas still need to be taken into consideration when studying the role and behavior of sediments and soils for transporting pollutants within river systems, particularly concerning the Water Framework Directive. PMID:19465710

  12. Nitrate loss from a restored floodplain on the lower Cosumnes River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheibley, R. W.; Ahearn, D. S.; Santoriello, P.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    Floodplain habit was recreated on the lower Cosumnes River by breaching levees that previously protected agricultural lands from seasonal flooding. This study examined the ability of restored floodplains to retain nutrients from the river during flood events. The study looked at the potential for nitrate loss utilizing two techniques: (i) potential denitrification rates of floodplain soils and (ii) nitrate loss from floodplain waters during in situ microcosm experiments. Soils samples were collected from 13 locations within the floodplain and analyzed for denitrification potential. Denitrification potentials ranged from 0.06 to 27.5 nmol N2O cm-3 hr-1 and correlated with the concentrations of total N, organic C, sand and silt in the soils. Furthermore, denitrification potential correlated well with microbial respiration rates suggesting that concentrations of labile carbon strongly affect microbial activity and subsequent denitrification. Microcosm experiments were conducted by inserting polycarbonate tubes approximately 20 cm into the sediment. In addition, a replicate set of columns was studied which excluded the sediment layer to distinguish water column processes from those occurring within the sediments. The overlying water was spiked with nitrate and bromide to observe changing nitrate concentrations over time. Three different levels of nitrate were examined: ambient, +1 ppm nitrate, and +5 ppm nitrate. Results showed that nitrate loss from the water column was rapid and a function of the initial nitrate concentration. Nitrate was completely removed within 68 to 163 hours for the background and +5ppm treatments, respectively. Rates of nitrate disappearance were ~ 2.5 times greater in the sediment/water treatment, with approximately 20-30% of the nitrate being lost from water column alone. Results from this study document the potential role of these floodplain habitats to reduce the amount of nitrate that is transported downstream to sensitive aquatic

  13. Legacy effects of colonial millponds on floodplain sedimentation, bank erosion, and channel morphology, MID-Atlantic, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, E.R.; Hupp, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Many rivers and streams of the Mid-Atlantic Region, United States (U.S.) have been altered by postcolonial floodplain sedimentation (legacy sediment) associated with numerous milldams. Little Conestoga Creek, Pennsylvania, a tributary to the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay, is one of these streams. Floodplain sedimentation rates, bank erosion rates, and channel morphology were measured annually during 2004-2007 at five sites along a 28-km length of Little Conestoga Creek with nine colonial era milldams (one dam was still in place in 2007). This study was part of a larger cooperative effort to quantify floodplain sedimentation, bank erosion, and channel morphology in a high sediment yielding region of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Data from the five sites were used to estimate the annual volume and mass of sediment stored on the floodplain and eroded from the banks for 14 segments along the 28-km length of creek. A bank and floodplain reach based sediment budget (sediment budget) was constructed for the 28 km by summing the net volume of sediment deposited and eroded from each segment. Mean floodplain sedimentation rates for Little Conestoga Creek were variable, with erosion at one upstream site (-5 mm/year) to deposition at the other four sites (highest = 11 mm/year) despite over a meter of floodplain aggradation from postcolonial sedimentation. Mean bank erosion rates range between 29 and 163 mm/year among the five sites. Bank height increased 1 m for every 10.6 m of channel width, from upstream to downstream (R2 = 0.79, p < 0.0001) resulting in progressively lowered hydraulic connectivity between the channel and the floodplain. Floodplain sedimentation and bank erosion rates also appear to be affected by the proximity of the segments to one existing milldam, which promotes deposition upstream and scouring downstream. The floodplain and bank along the 28-km reach produced a net mean sediment loss of 5,634 Mg/year for 2004-2007, indicating that bank

  14. The Department of Energy's floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE's floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE's floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE's requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action's impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  15. The Department of Energy`s floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE`s floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE`s floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE`s requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action`s impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  16. Inventory and Comparison of Floodplain Embankment along Large Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Flood control is a fundamental human response to flood risk, and floodplain embankment by dike (levee) construction is among the oldest forms of societal impacts to natural systems. Large lowland alluvial valleys are some of Earth's most distinctive environments and represent high levels of geodiversity and biodiversity. Embankment of large lowland alluvial river valleys alters fundamental processes related to floodplain hydrology, sedimentation, and ecology and eventually results in a transformation of the embanked floodplain environment. Since embankment, many large lowland floodplains have been heaviliy modified for floodplain agriculture and include high population densities, increasing flood risk. While there is much discussion about the pros and cons of dike construction and the impact to floodplain environments there is no systematic inventory which documents the magnitude and intensity of floodplain embankment to lowland rivers. In this study we characterize and inventory floodplain embankment along large lowland alluvial valleys. The review includes some of Earth's largest embanked fluvial systems, and primarilly focuses on northern hemisphere rivers in the United States, Europe and Asia. Data sources includes the U.S. National Levee Database, SRTM DEM, recently obtained high resolution satellite imagery, various national topographic map series, and hydrologic data from the published literature. These data are integrated into a GIS framework to facilitate the measurement and characterisation of floodplain embankment. Spatial indices of floodplain embankment are constructed, including the intensity of embankment and how it relates to the natural floodplain and constriction of flooding.

  17. Mapping Floodplain Stratigraphy at an Archaeological Site in Upstate New York Using Shallow Sub-Surface Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbargen, L. E.; Klink, C.; Johnson, E.; Anthony, D.

    2008-12-01

    across the floodplain collecting 1 meter-spaced profiles. We surveyed endpoints of each profile using global positioning system receivers and a total station electronic distance measurement tool. Thus, we could hang the profiles in a geospatial reference frame, and combine our data with other georeferenced data sets. The profiles extend to roughly 1.3 m depth, at which point the signal was strongly attenuated. A strongly reflective irregular surface, which we interpret as channel and bar structures, can be traced for considerable distance across the floodplain in the subsurface. The buried channels run approximately parallel to the modern channel. They are not obviously related to the shallow flood channels on the modern floodplain. Our results rule out a simple growth of the floodplain via a laterally sweeping channel. The presence of multiple channels and bars implies abrupt shifts of the main channel. Modern channel and floodplain features nearby exhibit similar channel and bar structures with floodplains etched by small flood channels, thus providing a direct analog for understanding the subsurface features at the Pine Lake floodplain.

  18. The influence of river regulation and land use on floodplain forest regeneration in the semi-arid upper Colorado River Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northcott, K.; Andersen, D.C.; Cooper, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Flow regulation effects on floodplain forests in the semi-arid western United States are moderately well understood, whereas effects associated with changes in floodplain land use are poorly documented. We mapped land cover patterns from recent aerial photos and applied a classification scheme to mainstem alluvial floodplains in 10 subjectively selected 4th order hydrologic units (subbasins) in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) in order to document land use patterns (floodplain development) and assess their effects on Fremont cottonwood forest (CF) regeneration. Three of the mainstem rivers were unregulated, five were moderately regulated and two were highly regulated. We classified polygons as Undeveloped (with two categories, including CF) and Developed (with five categories). We ground-truthed 501 randomly selected polygons (4-28% of the floodplain area in each subbasin) to verify classification accuracy and to search for cottonwood regeneration, defined as stands established since regulation began or 1950, whichever is most recent. From 40% to 95% of the floodplain area remained undeveloped, but only 19-70% of the floodplain area was classified as forest. Regeneration occupied a mean of 5% (range 1-17%) of the floodplain. The likelihood of the presence of regeneration in a polygon was reduced 65% by development and independently in a complex manner by flow regulation. Our analyses indicate that floodplain forests may be in jeopardy on both regulated and unregulated rivers and that information on historical forest extent is needed to better understand their current status in the UCRB. Conservation efforts need to be coordinated at a regional level and address the potentially adverse affects of both flow regulation and floodplain development.

  19. The role of run-of-river impoundments in CO2 and CH4 emissions from floodplains of the Delaware Piedmont, Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Vargas, R.

    2014-12-01

    There is strong interest in understanding how run-of-river impoundments affect streams and their floodplains. Most recent work has focused on the fate of sediment within these dammed systems both past and current, the geomorphic impacts associated with sediment, and issues associated with removing run-of-the-river dams. Here, we assess how run-of-river impoundments alter the floodplain effluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). We sampled two pairs of floodplains on the Red Clay Creek (140 km2) located in the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory. The floodplain pairs were centered on a current and a former location of a run-of-river dam (one floodplain upstream, one downstream of dam location). Each floodplain was subjected to a suite of measurements that included bi-weekly gas flux (CO2, CH4, and H2O), bi-weekly soil moisture and temperature, monthly biomass sampling, C/N ratio sampling from O and A horizons, and cores that constrain the total organic carbon and nitrogen at depth as well as provide a description of the stratigraphy. Preliminary findings show that all floodplains are sources of CH4 (0.18 - 1.12 nmol m-2s-1) and CO2 (0.42 - 3.12 µmol m-2s-1). Despite temporal variability, the upstream floodplains produce more CH4 and CO2 than downstream floodplains. Our results may suggest that run-of-the-river dams enhance release of carbon from floodplains into the atmosphere.

  20. 28 CFR 0.191 - Changes which affect the overall structure of the Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changes which affect the overall structure of the Department. 0.191 Section 0.191 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Sections and Subunits § 0.191 Changes which affect the overall...

  1. The Internal Structure of Positive and Negative Affect: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PANAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuccitto, Daniel E.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Leite, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested five confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) models of the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to provide validity evidence based on its internal structure. A sample of 223 club sport athletes indicated their emotions during the past week. Results revealed that an orthogonal two-factor CFA model, specifying error…

  2. Floodplain Organic Carbon Storage in the Central Yukon River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lininger, K.; Wohl, E.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplain storage of organic carbon is an important aspect of the global carbon cycle that is not well understood or quantified. Although it is understood that rivers transport organic carbon to the ocean, little is known about the quantity of stored carbon in boreal floodplains and the influence of fluvial processes on this storage. We present results on total organic carbon (TOC) content within the floodplains of two rivers, the Dall River and Preacher Creek, in the central Yukon River Basin in the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge of Alaska. The results indicate that organic carbon storage is influenced by fluvial disturbance and grain size. The Dall River, which contains a large amount of floodplain carbon, is meandering and incised, with well-developed floodplain soils, a greater percentage of relatively old floodplain surfaces and a slower floodplain turnover time, and finer grain sizes. Preacher Creek stores less TOC, transports coarser grain sizes, and has higher rates of avulsion and floodplain turnover time. Within the floodplain of a particular river, large spatial heterogeneity in TOC content also exists as a function of depositional environment and age and vegetation community of the site. In addition, saturated regions of the floodplains, such as abandoned channels and oxbow lakes, contain more TOC compared to drier floodplain environments. Frozen alluvial soils likely contain carbon that could be released into the environment with melting permafrost, and thus quantifying the organic carbon content in the active layer of floodplain soils could provide insight into the characteristics of the permafrost beneath. The hydrology in these regions is changing due to permafrost melt, and floodplain areas usually saturated could be dried out, causing breakdown and outgassing of carbon stored in previously saturated soils. Ongoing work will result in a first-order estimate of active-layer floodplain carbon storage for the central Yukon River Basin.

  3. Struggle in the flood: tree responses to flooding stress in four tropical floodplain systems

    PubMed Central

    Parolin, Pia; Wittmann, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims In the context of the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth in 1809, this study discusses the variation in structure and adaptation associated with survival and reproductive success in the face of environmental stresses in the trees of tropical floodplains. Scope We provide a comparative review on the responses to flooding stress in the trees of freshwater wetlands in tropical environments. The four large wetlands we evaluate are: (i) Central Amazonian floodplains in South America, (ii) the Okavango Delta in Africa, (iii) the Mekong floodplains of Asia and (iv) the floodplains of Northern Australia. They each have a predictable ‘flood pulse’. Although flooding height varies between the ecosystems, the annual pulse is a major driving force influencing all living organisms and a source of stress for which specialized adaptations for survival are required. Main points The need for trees to survive an annual flood pulse has given rise to a large variety of adaptations. However, phenological responses to the flood are similar in the four ecosystems. Deciduous and evergreen species respond with leaf shedding, although sap flow remains active for most of the year. Growth depends on adequate carbohydrate supply. Physiological adaptations (anaerobic metabolism, starch accumulation) are also required. Conclusions Data concerning the ecophysiology and adaptations of trees in floodplain forests worldwide are extremely scarce. For successful floodplain conservation, more information is needed, ideally through a globally co-ordinated study using reproducible comparative methods. In the light of climatic change, with increasing drought, decreased groundwater availability and flooding periodicities, this knowledge is needed ever more urgently to facilitate fast and appropriate management responses to large-scale environmental change. PMID:22476061

  4. Transportation infrastructure, river confinement, and impacts on floodplain and channel habitat, Yakima and Chehalis rivers, Washington, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Paul; Marcus, W. Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Although floodplain roads and railroads are recognized as confining features with potentially large environmental impacts, few studies have explored the linkages between these structures and the natural disturbance regime that creates and maintains channel and riparian habitat. This study compares paired floodplain reaches with or without transportation infrastructure confining the riparian zone along the Yakima and Chehalis rivers in Washington State. Channel and floodplain habitat were degraded in the artificially confined reaches. Confined channels were narrower, simpler in planform, and relatively devoid of depositional surfaces such as bars and islands. Floodplains adjacent to confined channels exhibited degraded riparian forest and less refugium habitat such as side channels, ponds, and alcoves important for endangered salmonids and other biota. The results support hypotheses about how human modification of the floodplain landscape disrupts the flow regime and connectivity along riparian corridors. Neither simple buffer zones nor metrics such as valley width index adequately capture the disturbance-based landscape processes that drive riparian and channel habitat integrity. Future studies and indices of valley confinement, a critical driver of fluvial geomorphic processes, need to pay closer attention to artificial confinement of the channel, the riparian zone, and the active floodplain surfaces in order to portray the true constraints on fluvial processes.

  5. Hydrological Controls on Macrophyte Productivity in the Amazon Floodplain Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. S.; Novo, E. M.; Melack, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    The Amazon River floodplain is an important source of atmospheric CO2 and CH4, but the relative contribution of allochthonous and autochthonous sources to floodplain emissions is still uncertain. Macrophytes comprise an important carbon source, growing during both low and high water conditions, and averaging 5,000 g.m-2.yr-1 in dry weight. The controls exerted by the annual flooding on macrophyte productivity result from two opposing mechanisms: the "horizontal expansion" of plant stands during low water levels and the stem elongation ("vertical growth") promoted by rising water levels. As studies suggest more frequent and intense droughts for the Amazon, determining how these mechanisms interact to control macrophyte net primary productivity (NPP) can lead to a better understanding of the effects of extreme hydrological conditions on autochthonous carbon fixation in the Amazon floodplain. Our study combines remote sensing estimates of macrophyte cover, in situ measurements of macrophyte biomass, historical water level records, and statistical modeling and simulation to answer 1) how plant horizontal expansion and vertical growth respond to inter-annual flooding variability, 2) how these responses modulate annual NPP, and 3) how climatic changes will affect the contribution of macrophytes to the carbon budget of the Amazon floodplain. Biomass data was collected along a stretch of the Lower Amazon Floodplain, at monthly intervals in 2004, and a time series of Radarsat-1 and EOS-MODIS images was acquired for the same area for the 2003-2005 period. Daily river stage data was acquired from the Brazilian National Water Agency (ANA) for the Óbidos station, covering the 1970 - 2011 period. Macrophyte cover was estimated for each available image in the series, using a multitemporal object-based image analysis algorithm. Empirical regression models were used to model the relationship between flood levels and both plant biomass and cover area, and combined into a semi

  6. Long-term management of AAR-affected structures - An international perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Charlwood, R.G.; Solymar, Z.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the paper is to review international practice and comment on progress made in the long-term management of existing AAR-affected dams and hydroelectric plants. A updated detailed worldwide listing which now includes 104 AAR-affected structures constructed since 1900 will be presented. The listing gives summary data on the year of construction, the year that significant problems were noted, aggregate and cement types, measured expansion rates, test data, time to initial deterioration, duration of reaction, damage to the structures and effects on equipment, and repairs or replacement. A comprehensive bibliography will also be given. Analysis of the database and significant case histories will be used to identify issues affecting dam safety, plant operations, remedial measures and long-term performance of AAR-affected structures. The presentation will be illustrated by several case histories where remedial measures have been implemented.

  7. School and Classroom Goal Structures: Effects on Affective Responses in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkoukis, Vassilis; Koidou, Eirini; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Grouios, George

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the relative impact of school and classroom goal structures on students' affective responses and the mediating role of motivation. The sample of the study consisted of 368 high school students, who completed measures of school and classroom goal structures, motivational regulations in physical education, boredom, and…

  8. Creating a national scale floodplain map for the United States using soil information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merwade, V.; Du, L.; Sangwan, N.

    2015-12-01

    Floods are the most damaging of all natural disasters, adversely affecting millions of lives and causing financial losses worth billions of dollars every year across the globe. Flood inundation maps play a key role in the assessment and mitigation of potential flood hazards. However, there are several communities in the United States where flood risk maps are not available due to the lack of the resources needed to create such maps through the conventional modeling approach. The objective of this study is to develop and examine an economical alternative approach to floodplain mapping using widely available gSSURGO soil data in the United States. The gSSURGO dataset is used to create floodplain maps for the entire United States by using attributes related to soil taxonomy, flood frequency and geomorphic description. For validation, the flood extents obtained from the soil data are compared with existing maps, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) issued Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), flood extents observed during past floods, and other flood maps derived using Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Preliminary results show that overlap between the SSURGO based floodplain maps and FEMA maps range from 65 to 90 percent. While these results are promising, a more comprehensive validation of these maps must be conducted. The soil based approach floodplain mapping approach offers an objective, economical and faster alternative in areas where detailed flood modeling and mapping has not been conducted.

  9. Geomorphic adjustment to hydrologic modifications along a meandering river: Implications for surface flooding on a floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Brandon L.; Keim, Richard F.; Johnson, Erin L.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Marre, Saraline; King, Sammy L.

    2016-09-01

    Responses of large regulated rivers to contemporary changes in base level are not well understood. We used field measurements and historical analysis of air photos and topographic maps to identify geomorphic trends of the lower White River, Arkansas, USA, in the 70 years following base-level lowering at its confluence with the Mississippi River and concurrent with flood control by dams. Incision was identified below a knickpoint area upstream of St. Charles, AR, and increases over the lowermost ~90 km of the study site to ~2 m near the confluence with the Mississippi River. Mean bankfull width increased by 30 m (21%) from 1930 to 2010. Bank widening appears to be the result of flow regulation above the incision knickpoint and concomitant with incision below the knickpoint. Hydraulic modeling indicated that geomorphic adjustments likely reduced flooding by 58% during frequent floods in the incised, lowermost floodplain affected by backwater flooding from the Mississippi River and by 22% above the knickpoint area. Dominance of backwater flooding in the incised reach indicates that incision is more important than flood control on the lower White River in altering flooding and also suggests that the Mississippi River may be the dominant control in shaping the lower floodplain. Overall, results highlight the complex geomorphic adjustment in large river-floodplain systems in response to anthropogenic modifications and their implications, including reduced river-floodplain connectivity.

  10. Floodplain hydrology in an Amazon floodplain lake (Lago Grande de Curuaí)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, M. P.; Barroux, G.; Martinez, J. M.; Seyler, F.; Moreira-Turcq, P.; Cochonneau, G.; Melack, J. M.; Boaventura, G.; Maurice-Bourgoin, L.; León, J. G.; Roux, E.; Calmant, S.; Kosuth, P.; Guyot, J. L.; Seyler, P.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThe floodplains of the Amazon basin influence the hydrology and fluxes of suspended solids and solutes on multiple scales. Our study focused on the floodplain of Lago Grande de Curuaí (Óbidos, Brazil), a 4000 km 2 segment of floodplain and local upland catchment representative of the lower Amazon. Based on in situ and satellite data acquired from 1997 to 2003, we calculated the exchanges of water between the floodplain and the river and determined the temporal dynamics of flooded area water derived from river flooding, rainfall, runoff, and exchange with groundwater annually for six years. The Amazon River dominated the inputs of water to the flooded area year-round, accounting about 77% of the annual total inputs; rainfall and runoff accounted for about 9% and 10%, respectively, while seepage from the groundwater system accounted for 4%. The hydrologic residence time of the lake was about three months, and the floodplain made a net contribution of water to the river. The exported volume (net balance between water input and losses) varied between 4.2 and 7.3 km 3 depending on the year and represented about 0.75 times the maximal storage reached each year.

  11. Methane flux from the Central Amazonian Floodplain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, Karen B.; Crill, Patrick M.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Harriss, Robert C.; Wilson, John O.; Melack, John M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 186 methane measurements from the three primary Amazon floodplain environments of open water lakes, flood forests, and floating grass mats were made over the period 18 July through 2 September 1985. These data indicate that emissions were lowest over open water lakes. Flux from flooded forests and grass mats was significantly higher. At least three transport processes contribute to tropospheric emissions: ebullition from sediments, diffusion along the concentration gradient from sediment to overlaying water to air, and transport through the roots and stems of aquatic plants. Measurements indicate that the first two of these processes are most significant. It was estimated that on the average bubbling makes up 49% of the flux from open water, 54% of that from flooded forests, and 64% of that from floating mats. If the measurements were applied to the entire Amazonian floodplain, it is calculated that the region could supply up to 12% of the estimated global natural sources of methane.

  12. Hydrologic connectivity of floodplains, northern Missouri: implications for management and restoration of floodplain forest communities in disturbed landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, R.; Faust, T.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrologic connectivity between the channel and floodplain is thought to be a dominant factor determining floodplain processes and characteristics of floodplain forests. We explored the role of hydrologic connectivity in explaining floodplain forest community composition along streams in northern Missouri, USA. Hydrologic analyses at 20 streamgages (207–5827 km2 area) document that magnitudes of 2-year return floods increase systematically with increasing drainage area whereas the average annual number and durations of floodplain-connecting events decrease. Flow durations above the active-channel shelf vary little with increasing drainage area, indicating that the active-channel shelf is in quasi-equilibrium with prevailing conditions. The downstream decrease in connectivity is associated with downstream increase in channel incision. These relations at streamflow gaging stations are consistent with regional channel disturbance patterns: channel incision increases downstream, whereas upstream reaches have either not incised or adjusted to incision by forming new equilibrium floodplains. These results provide a framework to explain landscape-scale variations in composition of floodplain forest communities in northern Missouri. Faust () had tentatively explained increases of flood-dependent tree species, and decreases of species diversity, with a downstream increase in flood magnitude and duration. Because frequency and duration of floodplain-connecting events do not increase downstream, we hypothesize instead that increases in relative abundance of flood-dependent trees at larger drainage area result from increasing size of disturbance patches. Bank-overtopping floods at larger drainage area create large, open, depositional landforms that promoted the regeneration of shade-intolerant species. Higher tree species diversity in floodplains with small drainage areas is associated with non-incised floodplains that are frequently connected to their channels and

  13. Roles of Biological Mechanisms in Floodplain Construction and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T.; Pollock, M.

    2006-12-01

    Biological mechanisms force patchy and episodic construction of floodplain surfaces across a wide gradient of climatic environments. Common biological mechanisms include sediment trapping by beaver dams, bed load accumulation at wood jams, and settling of suspended sediments in floodplain vegetation. Each of these mechanisms is a direct control on ΔS (change in sediment storage) in the framework of reach-level sediment budgets (ΔS=Input-Output). However, floodplain construction is discontinuous in both lateral and longitudinal dimensions, which complicates estimation of rates of floodplain construction. In this paper we illustrate how biological mechanisms drive rates and dynamics of floodplain construction in rivers in semi-arid regions of the Columbia River basin, as well as in the densely forested Olympic and Cascade Mountain ranges, USA. Floodplain sedimentation rates in the semi-arid region vary depending upon sediment source and biological retention mechanism. Rivers draining fined-grained source lithologies have silt-dominated sediment loads, and floodplains aggrade primarily by settling of particles on vegetated floodplains (10^{0} cm/yr), or by infilling behind beaver dams (101 cm/yr). Typical longitudinal spacing between beaver dams is several hundred meters, and filling of beaver ponds occurs within 10^{0} to 101 years. Hence, new floodplain patches are created on roughly decadal intervals and at longitudinal spacing of ~102 meters. Abandonment and failure of old dams erodes portions of some floodplain surfaces, but significant terraces remain and new beaver dams initiate construction of additional floodplain surfaces. Where beaver dams are sparse, aggradation rates are spatially more uniform, but slower as the aggradation rate in floodplain vegetation is one order of magnitude lower than in beaver ponds. Floodplains of semi-arid rivers dominated by coarse sediment loads aggrade primarily by overbank deposition in sparsely forested riparian zones, and

  14. Evolution and floodplain history of the Middle Sacramento River from the late Quaternary to modern times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, M.; Aalto, R. E.; Fuchs, M.

    2011-12-01

    California has an extensive and storied research history in fluvial geomorphology dating back to G.K.Gilbert's studies of sediment transport in the Feather and Sacramento Rivers a century ago. Given the importance of Californian river systems in the field of geomorphology it is therefore surprising that there are still major gaps in understanding the late Quaternary evolution of the Sacramento River and the continuing responses of the modern system. Studies of river response to environmental change have been popular in Europe, but the Western US lacks so many similar investigations of the late Quaternary evolution of major rivers. We help to address this shortcoming by presenting detailed geochronology and other results from a research campaign along the largest natural reach of the largest river in California. The unique ownership history of the Rancho Llano Seco has preserved a near-pristine floodplain structure with an extensive network of natural floodplain channels. This therefore provides an excellent research environment to investigate natural occurring infilling processes and to study the fluvial history of the Sacramento River and modern floodplain development. Our research documents both the long-term evolution of the Sacramento River system and provides extensive, quantitative insight into modern day sedimentation rates in regards to topographic location. At Llano Seco there are 3 types of channels interpreted as Holocene meander belt, and anastomosing or braiding floodplain channel systems, and other floodplain units - these have been previously mapped from air photos and geologic surveys. However, the temporal control on these geologic units has been poor, with no absolute dating. To provide dates we sampled and analyzed 22 deep pits (3-5m) and more than 70 shallow cores (~1m), establishing a thorough chronology with OSL and 14-C (for long-term system dynamics) and high resolution 210-Pb and 137-Cs dating (to document modern evolution of an extensive

  15. 76 FR 17427 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Floodplain Management and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Floodplain Management... funds for projects within floodplains or wetlands provide information indicating compliance with...: Floodplain Management and Protection of Wetlands. OMB Approval Number: 2506-0151. Form Numbers:...

  16. 75 FR 82041 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Floodplain Management and Protection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Floodplain Management and... Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Floodplain Management and Protection of..., ``Floodplain Management,'' and Executive Order 11990, ``Protection of Wetlands.'' Each respondent that...

  17. Factors that affect reliability of nondestructive detection of flaws in structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The factors that affect reliability of nondestructive detection of flaws in structural ceramics by microfocus radiography and scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) were investigated. Reliability of void detection in silicon nitride and silicon carbide by microfocus X-rays was affected by photon energy level, material chemistry in the immediate vicinity of the void, and the presence of loose powder aggregates inside the void cavity. The sensitivity of SLAM to voids was affected by material microstructure, the level of porosity, and the condition of the specimen surfaces. Statistical results are presented in the form of probability of detection as a function of void diameter for green compacts and sintered materials.

  18. Geomorphic Framework to assess changes to aquatic habitat due to flow regulation and channel and floodplain alteration, Cedar River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Little, Rand

    2010-01-01

    Flow regulation, bank armoring, and floodplain alteration since the early 20th century have contributed to significant changes in the hydrologic regime and geomorphic processes of the Cedar River in Washington State. The Cedar River originates in the Cascade Range, provides drinking water to the Seattle metropolitan area, and supports several populations of anadromous salmonids. Flow regulation currently has limited influence on the magnitude, duration, and timing of high-flow events, which affect the incubation of salmonids as well as the production and maintenance of their habitat. Unlike structural changes to the channel and floodplain, flow regulation may be modified in the short-term to improve the viability of salmon populations. An understanding of the effects of flow regulation on those populations must be discerned over a range of scales from individual floods that affect the size of individual year classes to decadal high flow regime that influences the amount and quality of channel and off-channel habitat available for spawning and rearing. We present estimates of reach-scale sediment budgets and changes to channel morphology derived from historical orthoimagery, specific gage analyses at four long-term streamflow-gaging stations to quantify trends in aggradation, and hydrologic statistics of the magnitude and duration of peak streamflows. These data suggest a gradient of channel types from unconfined, sediment-rich segments to confined, sediment-poor segments that are likely to have distinct responses to high flows. Particle-size distribution data and longitudinal water surface and streambed profiles for the 56 km downstream of Chester Morse Lake measured in 2010 show the spatial extent of preferred salmonid habitat along the Cedar River. These historical and current data constitute a geomorphic framework to help assess different river management scenarios for salmonid habitat and population viability. PDF version of a presentation on changes to aquatic

  19. A spatial simulation model for forest succession in the Upper Mississippi River floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, Y.; Wu, Y.; Bartell, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    A Markov-chain transition model (FORSUM) and Monte Carlo simulations were used to simulate the succession patterns and predict a long-term impact of flood on the forest structure and growth in the floodplain of the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois River. Model variables, probabilities, functions, and parameters were derived from the analysis of two comprehensive field surveys conducted in this floodplain. This modeling approach describes the establishment, growth, competition, and death of individual trees for modeled species on a 10,000-ha landscape with spatial resolution of 1 ha. The succession characteristics of each Monte Carlo simulation are summed up to describe forest development and dynamics on a landscape level. FORSUM simulated the impacts of flood intensity and frequency on species composition and dynamics in the Upper Mississippi River floodplain ecosystem. The model provides a useful tool for testing hypotheses about forest succession and enables ecologists and managers to evaluate the impacts of flood disturbances and ecosystem restoration on forest succession. The simulation results suggest that the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method is an efficient tool to help organize the existing data and knowledge of forest succession into a system of quantitative predictions for the Upper Mississippi River floodplain ecosystem. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. A comparison of small-mammal communities in a desert riparian floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Laura E.; van Riper, Charles, III

    1998-01-01

    We compared small-mammal communities between inactive floodplain and actively flooded terraces of riparian habitat in the Verde Valley of central Arizona. We used species diversity, abundance, weight of adult males, number of juveniles, number of reproductively active individuals, longevity, residency status, and patterns of microhabitat use to compare the two communities. Although abundances of small mammals tended to be higher in the active floodplain, species diversity was greater in the inactive floodplain. Results were inconsistent with our initial prediction that actively flooded riparian habitat acts as a species source, whereas inactive floodplain acts as a sink or dispersal site for small mammals. Within each habitat type, we found evidence of significant microhabitat separation among the three most abundant small-mammal species (Peromyscus boylii, P. eremicus, and Neotoma albigula). Percent cover by annual and perennial grasses and shrubs, substrate, and frequency of shrubs, trees, and debris were significant determinants of small-mammal distribution within a habitat type. We found that the three most abundant species selected a nonrandom subset of available habitat. Nonrandom use of habitat and microhabitat separation were the two most important mechanisms structuring small-mammal communities in riparian habitat of central Arizona.

  1. Quantitative model of the growth of floodplains by vertical accretion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional model is developed to quantitatively predict the change in elevation, over a period of decades, for vertically accreting floodplains. This unsteady model approximates the monotonic growth of a floodplain as an incremental but constant increase of net sediment deposition per flood for those floods of a partial duration series that exceed a threshold discharge corresponding to the elevation of the floodplain. Sediment deposition from each flood increases the elevation of the floodplain and consequently the magnitude of the threshold discharge resulting in a decrease in the number of floods and growth rate of the floodplain. Floodplain growth curves predicted by this model are compared to empirical growth curves based on dendrochronology and to direct field measurements at five floodplain sites. The model was used to predict the value of net sediment deposition per flood which best fits (in a least squares sense) the empirical and field measurements; these values fall within the range of independent estimates of the net sediment deposition per flood based on empirical equations. These empirical equations permit the application of the model to estimate of floodplain growth for other floodplains throughout the world which do not have detailed data of sediment deposition during individual floods. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  2. Geomorphometric floodplain classification in a hill region of Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lóczy, Dénes; Pirkhoffer, Ervin; Gyenizse, Péter

    2012-04-01

    A sufficiently detailed floodplain typology is assumed to be useful in the estimation of local flood risk, planning flood control and river restoration measures and for the survey of landscape ecological patterns. Although floodplains are defined by a range of hydrological, geomorphological and geoecological criteria, floodplain classification should start with geomorphometric characterization of stream channels and floodplains in a valley setting. The study areas selected for the geomorphometric analyses are two representative catchments in the hill regions of Southwest-Hungary: the Kapos River, a river of medium size by Hungarian standards (a tributary of the Sió Canal and of the Danube), and a small tributary in the Drava River system, the Bükkösd Stream. For the delimitation and characterization of their floodplains Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), archive military surveys, and topographic maps have been used. The diagnostic parameters selected for the classification are floodplain width, floodplain (or valley floor) slope, valley confinement (expressed by a longitudinal profile index, LPI), channel sinuosity (indicating river mechanism), and valley depth. They have been analyzed in relationship with the distribution of tributary confluences along the river longitudinal profile. Currently, a large majority of watercourses in the region are channelized and some are dammed for fish-ponds, but the present-day floodplains had been built earlier by seminatural streams. Therefore, the classification is based on pre-regulation floodplain conditions (reconstructed from archive sources), which should be target conditions for any future management or restoration efforts. A visual comparison of the distribution of floodplain parameter values along the longitudinal profile shows that the LPI index is a useful tool for the characterization of the floodplain segments. The floodplain types are classified as 1) no floodplain (LPI values are > 0.25, mostly > 0.5); 2

  3. Floodplain ecohydrology: Climatic, anthropogenic, and local physical controls on partitioning of water sources to riparian trees

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Michael Bliss; Sargeant, Christopher I; Piégay, Hervé; Riquier, Jérémie; Wilson, Rob J S; Evans, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal and annual partitioning of water within river floodplains has important implications for ecohydrologic links between the water cycle and tree growth. Climatic and hydrologic shifts alter water distribution between floodplain storage reservoirs (e.g., vadose, phreatic), affecting water availability to tree roots. Water partitioning is also dependent on the physical conditions that control tree rooting depth (e.g., gravel layers that impede root growth), the sources of contributing water, the rate of water drainage, and water residence times within particular storage reservoirs. We employ instrumental climate records alongside oxygen isotopes within tree rings and regional source waters, as well as topographic data and soil depth measurements, to infer the water sources used over several decades by two co-occurring tree species within a riparian floodplain along the Rhône River in France. We find that water partitioning to riparian trees is influenced by annual (wet versus dry years) and seasonal (spring snowmelt versus spring rainfall) fluctuations in climate. This influence depends strongly on local (tree level) conditions including floodplain surface elevation and subsurface gravel layer elevation. The latter represents the upper limit of the phreatic zone and therefore controls access to shallow groundwater. The difference between them, the thickness of the vadose zone, controls total soil moisture retention capacity. These factors thus modulate the climatic influence on tree ring isotopes. Additionally, we identified growth signatures and tree ring isotope changes associated with recent restoration of minimum streamflows in the Rhône, which made new phreatic water sources available to some trees in otherwise dry years. Key Points Water shifts due to climatic fluctuations between floodplain storage reservoirs Anthropogenic changes to hydrology directly impact water available to trees Ecohydrologic approaches to integration of hydrology afford new

  4. Applicability of the flood-pulse concept in a temperate floodplain river ecosystem: Thermal and temporal components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schramm, H.L., Jr.; Eggleton, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Annual growth increments were calculated for blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) and flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) from the lower Mississippi River (LMR) to assess hypothesized relationships between fish growth and floodplain inundation as predicted by the Flood-Pulse Concept. Variation in catfish growth increment was high for all age classes of both species, and growth increments were not consistently related to various measures of floodplain inundation. However, relationships became stronger, and usually direct, when water temperature was integrated with area and duration of floodplain inundation. Relationships were significant for four of six age classes for blue catfish, a species known to utilize floodplain habitats. Though similar in direction, relationships were weaker for flathead catfish, which is considered a more riverine species. Our results indicate the Flood-Pulse Concept applies more strongly to temperate floodplain-river ecosystems when thermal aspects of flood pulses are considered. We recommend that future management of the LMR should consider ways to 'recouple' the annual flood and thermal cycles. An adaptive management approach will allow further determination of important processes affecting fisheries production in the LMR. Copyright ?? John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Dynamics of Murray-Darling floodplain forests under multiple stressors: The past, present, and future of an Australian icon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Nally, Ralph; Cunningham, Shaun C.; Baker, Patrick J.; Horner, Gillis J.; Thomson, James R.

    2011-12-01

    We review the human actions, proximal stressors and ecological responses for floodplain forests Australia's largest river system—the Murray-Darling Basin. A conceptual model for the floodplain forests was built from extensive published information and some unpublished results for the system, which should provide a basis for understanding, studying and managing the ecology of floodplains that face similar environmental stresses. Since European settlement, lowlands areas of the basin have been extensively cleared for agriculture and remnant forests heavily harvested for timber. The most significant human intervention is modification of river flows, and the reduction in frequency, duration and timing of flooding, which are compounded by climate change (higher temperatures and reduced rainfall) and deteriorating groundwater conditions (depth and salinity). This has created unfavorable conditions for all life-history stages of the dominant floodplain tree (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh.). Lack of extensive flooding has led to widespread dieback across the Murray River floodplain (currently 79% by area). Management for timber resources has altered the structure of these forests from one dominated by large, widely spreading trees to mixed-aged stands of smaller pole trees. Reductions in numbers of birds and other vertebrates followed the decline in habitat quality (hollow-bearing trees, fallen timber). Restoration of these forests is dependent on substantial increases in the frequency and extent of flooding, improvements in groundwater conditions, re-establishing a diversity of forest structures, removal of grazing and consideration of these interacting stressors.

  6. Remote sensing of floodplain geomorphology as a surrogate for biodiversity in a tropical river system (Madre de Dios, Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Stephen K.; Kellndorfer, Josef; Lehner, Bernhard; Tobler, Mathias

    2007-09-01

    The complex floodplains of large rivers offer a striking example of how geomorphology, by dictating patterns in the frequency and duration of soil saturation and surface flooding, influences ecosystem structure and function. This study draws on multiple sources of data from remote sensing, together with ground observations and water sampling, to distinguish floodplain ecosystems in the Madre de Dios River, a tributary of the Amazon River in Perú. This remote tropical river meanders across sub-Andean alluvial deposits in a tectonically active region and creates floodplain surfaces of varying ages, including terraces that are above the reach of present-day river floods. Data from Landsat ETM+ (optical multispectral), JERS-1 (L-band radar), and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (C-band interferometric Digital Elevation Models) were integrated in an object-oriented image analysis approach to distinguish five classes of floodplain vegetation. Vegetation classes generally correspond with successional age and reflect the activity of the riverine meander belt. Stage data for the river show erratic fluctuations and an annual range exceeding 8 m, but the maximum depth of floodplain inundation varied from > 1 m close to the river to approximately 0.1 m on more elevated terraces. The major ion composition of standing waters on the floodplain during the dry season indicated the importance of emergence of local groundwater in maintaining saturated soils, particularly further from the river, where backswamp vegetation is distinct and includes palm swamps. Thus, a hydrological continuum exists from deep but sporadic river inundation near the river to constant soil saturation by groundwater emergence in distal backswamps, reflecting the geomorphological origin and age of the floodplain deposits. This hydrogeomorphic continuum results in fundamental ecological differences. The exceptionally rich biodiversity of the sub-Andean region may be ascribed in part to the enhanced

  7. Floodplain and wetlands assessment of the White Oak Creek Embayment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This report describes the proposed methods for dealing with contaminants that have accumulated in White Oak Creek, White Oak Lake, and the White Oak Creek Embayment as a result of process releases and discharges from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Alternative methods of cleaning up the area which were considered in accordance with regulatory guidelines are listed, and information supporting the selected methods is provided. Also included are results of a site survey conducted at the White Oak Creek Embayment and the expected effects of the proposed control structures on the floodplain and wetlands. The appendix contains figures showing the nine cross-sections of the stream channel surveyed during studies of the White Oak Creek area.

  8. Channelization and floodplain forests: Impacts of accelerated sedimentation and valley plug formation on floodplain forests of the Middle Fork Forked Deer River, Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oswalt, S.N.; King, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the severe degradation of floodplain habitats resulting from channelization and concomitant excessive coarse sedimentation on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River in west Tennessee from 2000 to 2003. Land use practices have resulted in excessive sediment in the tributaries and river system eventually resulting in sand deposition on the floodplain, increased overbank flooding, a rise in the groundwater table, and ponding of upstream timber. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the composition of floodplain vegetation communities along the degraded river reach, (2) to isolate relationships among these communities, geomorphic features, and environmental variables and (3) evaluate successional changes based on current stand conditions. Vegetation communities were not specifically associated with predefined geomorphic features; nevertheless, hydrologic and geomorphic processes as a result of channelization have clearly affected vegetation communities. The presence of valley plugs and continued degradation of upstream reaches and tributaries on the impacted study reach has arrested recovery of floodplain plant communities. Historically common species like Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Quercus spp. L. were not important, with importance values (IV) less than 1, and occurred in less than 20% of forested plots, while Acer rubrum L., a disturbance-tolerant species, was the most important species on the site (IV = 78.1) and occurred in 87% of forested plots. The results of this study also indicate that channelization impacts on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River are more temporally and spatially complex than previously described for other river systems. Rehabilitation of this system necessitates a long-term, landscape-scale solution that addresses watershed rehabilitation in a spatially and temporally hierarchical manner. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors Affecting Higher Order Thinking Skills of Students: A Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budsankom, Prayoonsri; Sawangboon, Tatsirin; Damrongpanit, Suntorapot; Chuensirimongkol, Jariya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to develop and identify the validity of factors affecting higher order thinking skills (HOTS) of students. The thinking skills can be divided into three types: analytical, critical, and creative thinking. This analysis is done by applying the meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) based on a database of…

  10. Is Long-Term Structural Priming Affected by Patterns of Experience with Individual Verbs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaschak, Michael P.; Borreggine, Kristin L.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent papers have reported long-term structural priming effects in experiments where previous patterns of experience with the double object and prepositional object constructions are shown to affect later patterns of language production for those constructions. The experiments reported in this paper address the extent to which these…

  11. Relationship between Microtubule Network Structure and Intracellular Transport in Cultured Endothelial Cells Affected by Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Susumu; Ikezawa, Kenji; Ikeda, Mariko; Tanishita, Kazuo

    Endothelial cells (ECs) that line the inner surface of blood vessels are barriers to the transport of various substances into or from vessel walls, and are continuously exposed to shear stress induced by blood flow in vivo. Shear stress affects the cytoskeleton (e.g., microtubules, microfilaments, intermediate filaments), and affects the transport of macromolecules. Here, the relationship between the microtubule network structure and this transport process for albumin uptake within cultured aortic endothelial cells affected by shear stress was studied. Based on fluorescent images of albumin uptake obtained by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), both the microtubule network and albumin uptake in ECs were disrupted by colchicine and were affected by shear stress loading.

  12. Flood variability recorded by crevasse-splay sedimentation of large river floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, C. R.; Darby, S. E.; Aalto, R. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Clayton, A.; Schwendel, A.; Leyland, J.; Nicholas, A. P.; Best, J.

    2015-12-01

    During rapid rise flood events, crevasse-splay complexes are a key conduit through which sediment and water are passed from the main channel onto the floodplain, particularly for large rivers. These crevasse-splay systems may therefore be key loci of floodplain sedimentation, as well as conditioning the location of avulsions. As such they may preserve climatic signals within the depositional record of large alluvial rivers. Despite recent advances in our capabilities to model the development and evolution of these systems, our understanding of the passage, storage and reworking of water and sediment across them remains relatively poor. A key limitation concerns the point that, since floodplain topography is a first-order control on the hydrodynamics of crevasse-splays, publicly available topographic data sets (e.g. SRTM, ASTER) are currently unable to resolve key processes at the necessary spatial resolution. Here we employ Structure-from-Motion (SfM) on low-level aerial photography to obtain high-resolution (3m grid cell) georectified topographic data (horizontal error = 0.02 m; vertical error = 0.2 m) for a representative crevasse-splay complex (27 km2) located along the Mekong River, Cambodia. We use the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model, Delft-3D to simulate sedimentation patterns for a series of idealised and observed rapid-rise flood events. We model floodplain deposition and erosion and validate simulated spatial and temporal variations against observed patterns of sedimentation determined through analysis of 210Pb geochronology of a network of floodplain cores and in-situ, post-event surface scrapings.

  13. Insights into geomorphic and vegetation spatial patterns within dynamic river floodplains using soft classification approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guneralp, I.; Filippi, A. M.; Guneralp, B.; You, M.

    2014-12-01

    Lowland rivers in broad alluvial floodplains create one of the most dynamic landscapes, governed by multiple, and commonly nonlinear, interactions among geomorphic, hydrologic, and ecologic processes. Fluvial landforms and land-cover patches composing the floodplains of lowland rivers vary in their shapes and sizes because of variations in vegetation biomass, topography, and soil composition (e.g., of abandoned meanders versus accreting bars) across space. Such floodplain heterogeneity, in turn, influences future river-channel evolution by creating variability in channel-migration rates. In this study, using Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper data and alternative image-classification approaches, we investigate geomorphic and vegetation spatial patterns in a dynamic large tropical river. Specifically, we examine the spatial relations between river-channel planform and fluvial-landform and land-cover patterns across the floodplain. We classify the images using both hard and soft classification algorithms. We characterize the structure of geomorphic landform and vegetation components of the floodplain by computing a range of class-level landscape metrics based on the classified images. Results indicate that comparable classification accuracies are accrued for the inherently hard and (hardened) soft classification images, ranging from 89.8% to 91.8% overall accuracy. However, soft classification images provide unique information regarding spatially-varying similarities and differences in water-column properties of oxbow lakes and the main river channel. Proximity analyses, where buffer zones along the river with distances corresponding to 5, 10, and 20 river-channel widths are constructed, reveal that the average size of forest patches first increase away from the river banks but they become sparse after a distance of 10 channel widths away from the river.

  14. Coevolution of floodplain and riparian forest dynamics on large, meandering rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, J. C.; Riddle, J. D.; Battles, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    On large meandering rivers, riparian forests coevolve with the floodplains that support them. Floodplain characteristics such as local disturbance regime, deposition rates and sediment texture drive plant community dynamics, which in turn feed back to the abiotic processes. We investigated floodplain and riparian forest coevolution along the along the Sacramento River (California, USA), a large, mediterranean-climate river that has been extensively regulated for 70 years, but whose 160-km middle reach (Red Bluff to Colusa) retains some channel mobility and natural forest stands. Guided by maps of floodplain change over time and current vegetation cover, we conducted an extensive forest inventory and chronosequence analysis to quantify how abiotic conditions and forest structural characteristics such as tree density, basal area and biomass vary with floodplain age. We inventoried 285 fixed-area plots distributed across 19 large point bars within vegetation patches ranging in age from 4 to 107 years. Two successional trajectories were evident: (1) shifting species dominance over time within forested areas, from willow to cottonwood to walnut, boxelder and valley oak; and (2) patches of shrub willow (primarily Salix exigua) that maintained dominance throughout time. Sediment accretion was reduced in the persistent willow plots compared to the successional forest stands, suggesting an association between higher flood energy and arrested succession. Forested stands 40-60 years old were the most extensive across the chronosequence in terms of floodplain area, and supported the highest biomass, species diversity, and functional wildlife habitat. These stands were dominated by Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) and reached their maxima in terms of tree size and biomass at age 50 years. The persistent willow stands reached their structural maxima earlier (32 years) and supported lower biomass. Basal area and abundance of large trees decreased in stands >90 years old

  15. 7 CFR 650.25 - Flood-plain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flood-plain management. 650.25 Section 650.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES COMPLIANCE WITH NEPA Related Environmental Concerns § 650.25 Flood-plain management. Through...

  16. 10 CFR 1022.11 - Floodplain or wetland determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... safety basis documents as defined at 10 CFR part 830; and (4) DOE environmental documents, e.g., NEPA and... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland determination. 1022.11 Section 1022.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND...

  17. 10 CFR 1022.11 - Floodplain or wetland determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... safety basis documents as defined at 10 CFR part 830; and (4) DOE environmental documents, e.g., NEPA and... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland determination. 1022.11 Section 1022.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND...

  18. 78 FR 68719 - Floodplain Management and Protection of Wetlands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... (42 FR 26951), with incorporating floodplain management goals and wetland protection considerations in... December 12, 2011, HUD proposed revising its regulations governing floodplain management (76 FR 77162, as... agencies (agencies) are charged by E.O. 11990, entitled Protection of Wetlands, dated May 24, 1977 (42...

  19. 76 FR 79145 - Floodplain Management and Protection of Wetlands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Parts 50, 55, and 58 RIN 2501-AD51 Floodplain Management and Protection of...-wetlands area reviewable action or an year floodplain outside of the amendment) \\1\\ Floodways Coastal high hazard outside coastal 100-year and areas high hazard area within the 500- and floodways year...

  20. 10 CFR 1022.11 - Floodplain or wetland determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... safety basis documents as defined at 10 CFR part 830; and (4) DOE environmental documents, e.g., NEPA and... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland determination. 1022.11 Section 1022.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND...

  1. 24 CFR 55.21 - Notification of floodplain hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... designee, e.g., a mortgagor) or a responsible entity subject to 24 CFR part 58 of the hazards of the... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Notification of floodplain hazard... Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT AND PROTECTION OF WETLANDS Procedures for Making...

  2. 10 CFR 1022.11 - Floodplain or wetland determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... safety basis documents as defined at 10 CFR part 830; and (4) DOE environmental documents, e.g., NEPA and... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland determination. 1022.11 Section 1022.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND...

  3. 10 CFR 1022.11 - Floodplain or wetland determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... safety basis documents as defined at 10 CFR part 830; and (4) DOE environmental documents, e.g., NEPA and... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Floodplain or wetland determination. 1022.11 Section 1022.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND...

  4. Using Canopy Temperature to Infer Hydrologic Processes in Floodplain Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemon, M. G.; Allen, S. T.; Keim, R.; Edwards, B. L.; King, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Decreased water availability due to hydrologic modifications, groundwater withdrawal, and climate change threaten the hydrological architecture of floodplain forests globally. The relative contributions of different sources of water (e.g., precipitation, surface flooding, and groundwater) to soil moisture on floodplains is poorly constrained, so identification of areas of water stress within a floodplain can provide valuable information about floodplain hydrology. Canopy temperature is a useful indicator of moisture stress and has long been used in agricultural and natural landscapes. Accordingly, thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data (spatial resolution of 1 km) from NASA's MODIS sensor was used to examine patterns of spatiotemporal variation in water stress in two floodplain forests over 12 growing seasons. On the upper Sabine River floodplain, Texas, increasing rainfall-derived soil moisture corresponded with increased heterogeneity of LST but there was weak association between river stage and heterogeneity. On the lower White River floodplain, Arkansas, distinct differences in LST between two reaches were observed during low flow years, while little relationship was observed between LST spatial variability and rainfall-derived soil moisture on either reach. The differences in hydrological control on these floodplain ecosystems have important ramifications for varying resilience to climate change and water resource management.

  5. Cognitive structure from childhood to adulthood in kindreds densely affected by schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Cellard, Caroline; Rouleau, Nancie; Moreau, Isabel; Gilbert, Elsa; Paccalet, Thomas; Roy, Marc-André; Jomphe, Valérie; Mérette, Chantal; Maziade, Michel

    2015-09-30

    The developmental aspects of cognitive structures from childhood until adulthood and across different levels of risk for psychopathology have been little studied. The aim of the current study was to explore the cognitive factorial structure in subsamples from highly familial and densely affected kindreds of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder - i.e. affected adult members, non-affected adult members and high-risk youth. The same neuropsychological battery was administered in a sample of 480 participants: schizophrenia and bipolar patients (n=51), young high-risk offspring (n=61), non-affected adult relatives of patients (n=96), and controls (n=272). Exploratory Factorial Analysis was performed in the control sample and yielded a 5-factor solution: verbal comprehension, processing speed/working memory, visual learning and memory, verbal learning and memory, reasoning and problem solving. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the hierarchical 5-factor solution was well suited for the young high-risk offspring, the non-affected adult relatives of patient and the patients. A hierarchical model with a "g" factor was a good fit for all subsamples. These results suggest that cognitive impairments may aggregate in highly familial individuals. PMID:26233828

  6. Non-linearities in Holocene floodplain sediment storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notebaert, Bastiaan; Nils, Broothaerts; Jean-François, Berger; Gert, Verstraeten

    2013-04-01

    Floodplain sediment storage is an important part of the sediment cascade model, buffering sediment delivery between hillslopes and oceans, which is hitherto not fully quantified in contrast to other global sediment budget components. Quantification and dating of floodplain sediment storage is data and financially demanding, limiting contemporary estimates for larger spatial units to simple linear extrapolations from a number of smaller catchments. In this paper we will present non-linearities in both space and time for floodplain sediment budgets in three different catchments. Holocene floodplain sediments of the Dijle catchment in the Belgian loess region, show a clear distinction between morphological stages: early Holocene peat accumulation, followed by mineral floodplain aggradation from the start of the agricultural period on. Contrary to previous assumptions, detailed dating of this morphological change at different shows an important non-linearity in geomorphologic changes of the floodplain, both between and within cross sections. A second example comes from the Pre-Alpine French Valdaine region, where non-linearities and complex system behavior exists between (temporal) patterns of soil erosion and floodplain sediment deposition. In this region Holocene floodplain deposition is characterized by different cut-and-fill phases. The quantification of these different phases shows a complicated image of increasing and decreasing floodplain sediment storage, which hampers the image of increasing sediment accumulation over time. Although fill stages may correspond with large quantities of deposited sediment and traditionally calculated sedimentation rates for such stages are high, they do not necessary correspond with a long-term net increase in floodplain deposition. A third example is based on the floodplain sediment storage in the Amblève catchment, located in the Belgian Ardennes uplands. Detailed floodplain sediment quantification for this catchments shows

  7. Hydrologic conditions, habitat characteristics, and occurrence of fishes in the Apalachicola River floodplain, Florida; second annual report of progress, October 1993-September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, Helen M.; Darst, Melanie R.; Grubbs, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress and interim results of the second year of a 4-year study. The purpose of the 4-year study is to describe aquatic habitat types in the Apalachicola River floodplain and quantify the amount of habitat inundated by the river at various stages. Final results will be used to determine possible effects of altered flows on floodplain habitats and their associated fish communities. The study is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Northwest Florida Water Management District as part of a comprehensive study of water needs throughout two large river basins in Florida, Georgia, and Alabama. By the end of the second year, approxi- mately 80 to 90 percent of field data collection was completed. Water levels at 56 floodplain and main channel locations at study sites were read numerous times during low water and once or twice during high water. Rating curves estimating the relationship between stage at a floodplain site and flow of the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee are presented for 3 sites in the upper river. Elevation, substrate type, and amount of vegetative structure were described at 27 cross sections representing eight different floodplain tributary types at upper, middle, and lower river study sites. A summary of substrate and structure information from all cross sections is presented. Substrate and structure characteristics of floodplain habitats inundated when river flow was at record low flow, mean annual low flow, and mean flow are described for 3 cross sections in the upper river. Digital coverage of high-altitude infra-red aerial photography was processed for use in a Geographic Information System which will be used to map aquatic habitats in the third year of the study. A summary of the literature on fish utilization of floodplain habitats is described. Eighty-one percent of the species collected in the main channel of the Apalachicola River are known to occur in floodplain habitats of eastern

  8. Reprint of: Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and floodplain geomorphic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, Amy E.; Pess, George R.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Logan, Joshua B.; Randle, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Minear, Justin T.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Liermann, Martin C.; McHenry, Michael L.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-10-01

    the Elwha River have important ecological implications, affecting aquatic habitat structure, benthic fauna, salmonid fish spawning and rearing potential, and riparian vegetation. The response of the river to dam removal represents a unique opportunity to observe and quantify fundamental geomorphic processes associated with a massive sediment influx, and also provides important lessons for future river-restoration endeavors.

  9. Floodplain geomorphic processes and environmental impacts of human alteration along coastal plain rivers, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, C.R.; Pierce, A.R.; Noe, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    Human alterations along stream channels and within catchments have affected fluvial geomorphic processes worldwide. Typically these alterations reduce the ecosystem services that functioning floodplains provide; in this paper we are concerned with the sediment and associated material trapping service. Similarly, these alterations may negatively impact the natural ecology of floodplains through reductions in suitable habitats, biodiversity, and nutrient cycling. Dams, stream channelization, and levee/canal construction are common human alterations along Coastal Plain fluvial systems. We use three case studies to illustrate these alterations and their impacts on floodplain geomorphic and ecological processes. They include: 1) dams along the lower Roanoke River, North Carolina, 2) stream channelization in west Tennessee, and 3) multiple impacts including canal and artificial levee construction in the central Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana. Human alterations typically shift affected streams away from natural dynamic equilibrium where net sediment deposition is, approximately, in balance with net erosion. Identification and understanding of critical fluvial parameters (e.g., stream gradient, grain-size, and hydrography) and spatial and temporal sediment deposition/erosion process trajectories should facilitate management efforts to retain and/or regain important ecosystem services. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  10. The effects of activity-elicited humor and group structure on group cohesion and affective responses.

    PubMed

    Banning, M R; Nelson, D L

    1987-08-01

    The ability to analyze the therapeutic components of an activity is an important skill for occupational therapists. This study examined two potentially significant factors in activity analysis: the use of humor and the effect of group structure. Four groups (two with a parallel structure and two with a project structure) participated in a hat-making activity designed to elicit humor. Four groups (two with a parallel structure and two with a project structure) participated in a bookmark-making activity. The 28 female subjects' affective responses were measured by Osgood's short-form semantic differential, and the cohesion among group members was assessed by the Group Environment Scale. Results indicated that subjects who participated in groups which included humor rated their activity significantly higher on two factors of affective meaning (evaluation and action) and significantly higher in terms of cohesion. There was a significant interaction between the two activities and group structure in terms of the action factor and cohesion. In both cases the parallel groups making bookmarks received particularly low scores. The findings have implications for conceptualizing occupational therapy group activities. PMID:3434603

  11. Landscape structure affects specialists but not generalists in naturally fragmented grasslands.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jesse E D; Damschen, Ellen I; Harrison, Susan P; Grace, James B

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how biotic communities respond to landscape spatial structure is critically important for conservation management as natural habitats become increasingly fragmented. However, empirical studies of the effects of spatial structure on plant species richness have found inconsistent results, suggesting that more comprehensive approaches are needed. We asked how landscape structure affects total plant species richness and the richness of a guild of specialized plants in a multivariate context. We sampled herbaceous plant communities at 56 dolomite glades (insular, fire-adapted grasslands) across the Missouri Ozarks, USA, and used structural equation modeling (SEM) to analyze the relative importance of landscape structure, soil resource availability, and fire history for plant communities. We found that landscape spatial structure, defined as the area-weighted proximity of glade habitat surrounding study sites (proximity index), had a significant effect on total plant species richness, but only after we controlled for environmental covariates. Richness of specialist species, but not generalists, was positively related to landscape spatial structure. Our results highlight that local environmental filters must be considered to understand the influence of landscape structure on communities and that unique species guilds may respond differently to landscape structure than the community as a whole. These findings suggest that both local environment and landscape context should be considered when developing management strategies for species of conservation concern in fragmented habitats. PMID:26909437

  12. Landscape structure affects specialists but not generalists in naturally fragmented grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Jesse E.D.; Damschen, Ellen Ingman; Harrison, Susan P.; Grace, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how biotic communities respond to landscape spatial structure is critically important for conservation management as natural landscapes become increasingly fragmented. However, empirical studies of the effects of spatial structure on plant species richness have found inconsistent results, suggesting that more comprehensive approaches are needed. In this study, we asked how landscape structure affects total plant species richness and the richness of a guild of specialized plants in a multivariate context. We sampled herbaceous plant communities at 56 dolomite glades (insular, fire-adapted grasslands) across the Missouri Ozarks, and used structural equation modeling (SEM) to analyze the relative importance of landscape structure, soil resource availability, and fire history for plant communities. We found that landscape spatial structure-defined as the area-weighted proximity of glade habitat surrounding study sites (proximity index)-had a significant effect on total plant species richness, but only after we controlled for environmental covariates. Richness of specialist species, but not generalists, was positively related to landscape spatial structure. Our results highlight that local environmental filters must be considered to understand the influence of landscape structure on communities, and that unique species guilds may respond differently to landscape structure than the community as a whole. These findings suggest that both local environment and landscape context should be considered when developing management strategies for species of conservation concern in fragmented habitats.

  13. Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: river channel and floodplain geomorphic change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Amy E.; Pess, George R.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Logan, Joshua; Randle, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Minear, Justin T.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Liermann, Martin C.; McHenry, Michael L.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-01-01

    As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of ~ 1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool–riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to tenfold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (in terms of bed elevation change magnitude) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through deposits of the initial sediment wave, ~ 1.2 million t of new sediment (~ 10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed sediment grain size along the Elwha River have important ecological implications, affecting aquatic habitat structure, benthic fauna, salmonid fish spawning and rearing potential, and riparian vegetation. The response of the river to dam removal represents a unique opportunity to observe and quantify fundamental geomorphic processes associated with a massive sediment influx, and also provides important lessons for future river-restoration endeavors.

  14. Methane flux from the central Amazonian floodplain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, Karen B.; Crill, Patrick M.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Harriss, Robert C.; Wilson, John O.

    1988-01-01

    A total of 186 methane measurements from the three primary Amazon floodplain environments of open water lakes, flood forests, and floating grass mats were made over the period 18 July through 2 September 1985. These data indicate that emissions were lowest over open water lakes. Flux from flooded forests and grass mats was significantly higher. At least three transport processes contribute to tropospheric emissions: ebullition from sediments, diffusion along the concentration gradient from sediment to overlaying water to air, and transport through the roots and stems of aquatic plants. Measurements indicate that the first two of these processes are most significant. It was estimated that on the average bubbling makes up 49 percent of the flux from open water, 54 percent of that from flooded forests, and 64 percent of that from floating mats. If the measurements were applied to the entire Amazonian floodplain, it is calculated that the region could supply up to 12 percent of the estimated global natural sources of methane.

  15. Global self-esteem in relation to structural models of personality and affectivity.

    PubMed

    Watson, David; Suls, Jerry; Haig, Jeffrey

    2002-07-01

    Three studies examined global self-esteem in relation to structural models of personality and affectivity. In every study, self-esteem was strongly negatively correlated with Neuroticism/Negative Affectivity and moderately to strongly related to Extraversion/Positive Affectivity. Additional findings, however, revealed that self-esteem is better viewed at the lower order level. For instance, global self-esteem correlated -.79 with the Depression facet of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (P. T. Costa, Jr., & R. R. McCrae, 1992) in Study 3. Moreover, confirmatory factor analyses produced very strong correlations between self-esteem and depression in both Study 2 (r = -.82) and Study 3 (r = -.86). Taken together, the data suggest that global self-esteem measures define one end of a bipolar continuum, with trait indicators of depression defining the other. PMID:12088125

  16. The structure and size of sensory bursts encode stimulus information but only size affects behavior.

    PubMed

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2010-04-01

    Cricket ultrasound avoidance is a classic model system for neuroethology. Avoidance steering is triggered by high-firing-rate bursts of spikes in the auditory command neuron AN2. Although bursting is common among sensory neurons, and although the detailed structure of bursts may encode information about the stimulus, it is as yet unclear whether this information is decoded. We address this question in two ways: from an information coding point of view, by showing the relationship between stimulus and burst structure; and also from a functional point of view by showing the relationship between burst structure and behavior. We conclude that the burst structure carries detailed temporal information about the stimulus but that this has little impact on the behavioral response, which is affected mainly by burst size. PMID:20213110

  17. Impact of drying and re-flooding of sediment on phosphorus dynamics of river-floodplain systems.

    PubMed

    Schönbrunner, Iris M; Preiner, Stefan; Hein, Thomas

    2012-08-15

    One of the consequences of human impacts on floodplains is a change in sedimentation leading to enhanced floodplain aggradation. Thus, accumulated sediments rich in nutrients might interfere with floodplain restoration. In this study we investigated the phosphorus release behavior of sediments from shallow backwaters of an isolated floodplain of the Danube River situated east of the city of Vienna with the aim to understand the effects of changes in dry/wet cycles on established floodplain sediments. In the light of restoration plans aiming at increased surface water exchange with the river main channel, the response of sediments to frequent alternations between desiccation and inundation periods is a key issue as changes of sediment properties are expected to affect phosphorus release. In order to determine the effect of changing hydrological conditions on internal phosphorus loading, we exposed sediments to different dry/wet treatments in a laboratory experiment. Total phosphorus (TP) release from sediments into the water column increased with increasing duration of dry periods prior to re-wetting. Partial correlation analysis showed significant positive correlations between ΔTP and ΔNH(4)(+) as well as between ΔTP and ΔFe(3+) concentrations (Δ refers to the difference between the final and initial concentration during the wetting period), indicating that enhanced mineralization rates leading to a concomitant release of NH(4)(+) and TP and the reduction of iron hydroxides leading to a concomitant release of Fe(3+) and TP are the mechanisms responsible for the rise in TP. Repeated drying and wetting resulted in elevated phosphorus release. This effect was more pronounced when drying periods led to an 80% reduction in water content, indicating that the degree of drying is a major determinant controlling phosphorus release upon re-wetting. The reconnection of isolated floodplains will favor fluctuating hydrologic conditions and is therefore expected to

  18. Impact of drying and re-flooding of sediment on phosphorus dynamics of river-floodplain systems

    PubMed Central

    Schönbrunner, Iris M.; Preiner, Stefan; Hein, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    One of the consequences of human impacts on floodplains is a change in sedimentation leading to enhanced floodplain aggradation. Thus, accumulated sediments rich in nutrients might interfere with floodplain restoration. In this study we investigated the phosphorus release behavior of sediments from shallow backwaters of an isolated floodplain of the Danube River situated east of the city of Vienna with the aim to understand the effects of changes in dry/wet cycles on established floodplain sediments. In the light of restoration plans aiming at increased surface water exchange with the river main channel, the response of sediments to frequent alternations between desiccation and inundation periods is a key issue as changes of sediment properties are expected to affect phosphorus release. In order to determine the effect of changing hydrological conditions on internal phosphorus loading, we exposed sediments to different dry/wet treatments in a laboratory experiment. Total phosphorus (TP) release from sediments into the water column increased with increasing duration of dry periods prior to re-wetting. Partial correlation analysis showed significant positive correlations between ΔTP and ΔNH4+ as well as between ΔTP and ΔFe3 + concentrations (Δ refers to the difference between the final and initial concentration during the wetting period), indicating that enhanced mineralization rates leading to a concomitant release of NH4+ and TP and the reduction of iron hydroxides leading to a concomitant release of Fe3 + and TP are the mechanisms responsible for the rise in TP. Repeated drying and wetting resulted in elevated phosphorus release. This effect was more pronounced when drying periods led to an 80% reduction in water content, indicating that the degree of drying is a major determinant controlling phosphorus release upon re-wetting. The reconnection of isolated floodplains will favor fluctuating hydrologic conditions and is therefore expected to initially lead

  19. Effects of Reduced Summer Precipitation on Productivity and Forage Quality of Floodplain Meadows at the Elbe and the Rhine River

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Kristin; Donath, Tobias W.; Zelle, Bianka; Eckstein, R. Lutz; Mosner, Eva; Otte, Annette; Jensen, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Background Floodplain meadows along rivers are semi-natural habitats and depend on regular land use. When used non-intensively, they offer suitable habitats for many plant species including rare ones. Floodplains are hydrologically dynamic ecosystems with both periods of flooding and of dry conditions. In German floodplains, dry periods may increase due to reduced summer precipitation as projected by climate change scenarios. Against this background, the question arises, how the forage quantity and quality of these meadows might change in future. Methods We report results of two field trials that investigated effects of experimentally reduced summer precipitation on hay quantity and quality of floodplain meadows at the Rhine River (2011-2012) and at two Elbe tributaries (2009-2011). We measured annual yield, the amount of hay biomass, and contents of crude protein, crude fibre, energy, fructan, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Results The annual yield decreased under precipitation reduction at the Rhine River. This was due to reduced productivity in the second cut hay at the Rhine River in which, interestingly, the contents of nitrogen and crude protein increased. The first cut at the Rhine River was unaffected by the treatments. At the Elbe tributaries, the annual yield and the hay quantity and quality of both cuts were only marginally affected by the treatments. Conclusion We conclude that the yield of floodplain meadows may become less reliable in future since the annual yield decreased under precipitation reduction at the Rhine River. However, the first and agriculturally more important cut was almost unaffected by the precipitation reduction, which is probably due to sufficient soil moisture from winter/spring. As long as future water levels of the rivers will not decrease during spring, at least the use of the hay from the first cut of floodplain meadows appears reliable under climate change. PMID:25950730

  20. Familiarity affects social network structure and discovery of prey patch locations in foraging stickleback shoals

    PubMed Central

    Atton, N.; Galef, B. J.; Hoppitt, W.; Webster, M. M.; Laland, K. N.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous factors affect the fine-scale social structure of animal groups, but it is unclear how important such factors are in determining how individuals encounter resources. Familiarity affects shoal choice and structure in many social fishes. Here, we show that familiarity between shoal members of sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) affects both fine-scale social organization and the discovery of resources. Social network analysis revealed that sticklebacks remained closer to familiar than to unfamiliar individuals within the same shoal. Network-based diffusion analysis revealed that there was a strong untransmitted social effect on patch discovery, with individuals tending to discover a task sooner if a familiar individual from their group had previously done so than if an unfamiliar fish had done so. However, in contrast to the effect of familiarity, the frequency with which individuals had previously associated with one another had no effect upon the likelihood of prey patch discovery. This may have been due to the influence of fish on one another's movements; the effect of familiarity on discovery of an empty ‘control’ patch was as strong as for discovery of an actual prey patch. Our results demonstrate that factors affecting fine-scale social interactions can also influence how individuals encounter and exploit resources. PMID:25009061

  1. Seasonal dynamics of the shoreline vegetation in the Zapatosa floodplain lake complex, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Mumm, Udo; Janauer, Georg

    2014-09-01

    Floodplain lakes and associated wetlands in tropical dry climates are controlled by pronounced and severe seasonal hydrologic fluctuations. We examined the plant community response to a bimodal flooding pattern in the Zapatosa Floodplain Lake Complex (ZFLC), Northern Colombia. We measured floristic and quantitative change in four sampling periods emphasizing seasonal differences in plant abundance and life-form structure. Of 79 species identified in the lake complex, 52 were used to characterize eight community types via classification and ordination procedures. Results showed that community structure does not change significantly during the flooding/receding stages. But maximum drawdown phase significantly disrupts the aquatic community structure and the exposed shorelines become colonized by ruderal terrestrial plants. Early rainfalls at the beginning of the wet season are emphasized as an important feature of plant regeneration and community development. The general strategy of the ZFLC vegetation can be framed into the flood pulse concept of river-floodplain systems. Thus, plant communities are mainly responding to disturbances and destruction events imposed by extreme water level fluctuations. PMID:25412537

  2. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  3. Abandoned floodplain plant communities along a regulated dryland river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, L. V.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; House, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Rivers and their floodplains worldwide have changed dramatically over the last century because of regulation by dams, flow diversions and channel stabilization. Floodplains no longer inundated by river flows following dam-induced flood reduction comprise large areas of bottomland habitat, but the effects of abandonment on plant communities are not well understood. Using a hydraulic flow model, geomorphic mapping and field surveys, we addressed the following questions along the Bill Williams River, Arizona: (i) What per cent of the bottomland do abandoned floodplains comprise? and (ii) Are abandoned floodplains quantitatively different from adjacent xeric and riparian surfaces in terms of vegetation composition and surface sediment? We found that nearly 70% of active channel and floodplain area was abandoned following dam installation. Abandoned floodplains along the Bill Williams River tend to be similar to each other yet distinct from neighbouring habitats: they have been altered physically from their historic state, leading to distinct combinations of surface sediments, hydrology and plant communities. Abandoned floodplains may transition to xeric communities over time but are likely to retain some riparian qualities as long as there is access to relatively shallow ground water. With expected increases in water demand and drying climatic conditions in many regions, these surfaces and associated vegetation will continue to be extensive in riparian landscapes worldwide

  4. Dynamic meandering in response to upstream perturbations and floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuurman, F.; Shimizu, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    River meandering results from spatially alternating bank erosion and bar growth. Recent flume experiments and theory suggest that a continuous inflow perturbation is a requirement for sustained meandering. Furthermore, flume experiments suggest that bar-floodplain conversion is an additional requirement. Here, we tested the effects of continuous inflow perturbation and bar-floodplain conversion on meander migration using three numerical morphodynamic models: a 1D-model, and two 2D-models with one of them using adaptive moving grid. We focused on the interaction between bars and bends that leads to meander initiation, and the effect of different methods to model bank erosion and floodplain accretion processes on meander migration. The results showed that inflow perturbations have large effects on meander dynamics of high-sinuosity channels, with strong excitation when the inflow is periodically perturbed. In contrast, inflow perturbations have rather small effect in low-sinuosity channels. Steady alternate bars alone are insufficient to cause high-sinuosity meandering. For high-sinuosity meandering, bar-floodplain conversion is required that prevents chute-cutoffs and enhances flow asymmetry, whilst meandering with chute-cutoffs requires merely weak floodplain formation, and braiding occurs without floodplain formation. Thus, this study demonstrated that both dynamic upstream inflow perturbation and bar-floodplain conversion are required for sustained high-sinuosity meandering.

  5. Modernizing the U.S. Vertical Datum: Effects on Floodplain Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngman, M.; Childers, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    The current vertical component of the National Spatial Reference system (NSRS), the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88), provides a height system based upon leveling data and realized on >500,000 monuments. Inherent errors and biases in NAVD 88 have been demonstrated through comparison with the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite gravity. In response, NGS launched the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project in 2008 to replace NAVD88 with a more accurate, gravitationally-based vertical datum by 2022. The goal of the project is to make orthometric heights available to the user community through GNSS measurement that is accurate to 2 cm. GRAV-D's primary thrust involves collecting medium-resolution airborne gravity data over the entire U.S and its territories. Each survey spans approximately a 400 km x 500 km region, large enough for spectral blending with GRACE and GOCE data while the 20 km resolution allows for the evaluation of and spectral blending with surface gravity (terrestrial and marine). Regions are surveyed in the order based upon expected impacts, and the new official datum will be released at the end of the project. Top priorities include Alaska, the Great Lakes, and coastal CONUS. Height changes in these areas may be significant, depending on the application. One major consideration is how changing the datum will affect the diverse fields that use the NSRS. An analysis of one application, floodplain mapping, provided a number of insights into what areas may be more or less affected. The study, The Effects of Modernizing the National Datums on Floodplain Mapping, examined a riverine flood model for a stream in North Carolina and analyzed how products, including the floodplain, would change as a result of the coordinate shift. Data were transformed to proxy datums, which were the most recent available horizontal and vertical datum. The original and transformed data were run through the

  6. Floodplain complexity and surface metrics: influences of scale and geomorphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scown, Murray W.; Thoms, Martin C.; DeJager, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies of fluvial geomorphology and landscape ecology examine a single river or landscape, thus lack generality, making it difficult to develop a general understanding of the linkages between landscape patterns and larger-scale driving variables. We examined the spatial complexity of eight floodplain surfaces in widely different geographic settings and determined how patterns measured at different scales relate to different environmental drivers. Floodplain surface complexity is defined as having highly variable surface conditions that are also highly organised in space. These two components of floodplain surface complexity were measured across multiple sampling scales from LiDAR-derived DEMs. The surface character and variability of each floodplain were measured using four surface metrics; namely, standard deviation, skewness, coefficient of variation, and standard deviation of curvature from a series of moving window analyses ranging from 50 to 1000 m in radius. The spatial organisation of each floodplain surface was measured using spatial correlograms of the four surface metrics. Surface character, variability, and spatial organisation differed among the eight floodplains; and random, fragmented, highly patchy, and simple gradient spatial patterns were exhibited, depending upon the metric and window size. Differences in surface character and variability among the floodplains became statistically stronger with increasing sampling scale (window size), as did their associations with environmental variables. Sediment yield was consistently associated with differences in surface character and variability, as were flow discharge and variability at smaller sampling scales. Floodplain width was associated with differences in the spatial organization of surface conditions at smaller sampling scales, while valley slope was weakly associated with differences in spatial organisation at larger scales. A comparison of floodplain landscape patterns measured at different

  7. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  8. Small but Powerful: Top Predator Local Extinction Affects Ecosystem Structure and Function in an Intermittent Stream

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators’ extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a ‘mesopredator release’, affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to ‘mesopredator release’, and also to ‘prey release’ despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem’s structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers’ extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been

  9. Assemblage patterns of fish functional groups relative to habitat connectivity and conditions in floodplain lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miyazono, S.; Aycock, J.N.; Miranda, L.E.; Tietjen, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the influences of habitat connectivity and local environmental factors on the distribution and abundance patterns of fish functional groups in 17 floodplain lakes in the Yazoo River Basin, USA. The results of univariate and multivariate analyses showed that species-environmental relationships varied with the functional groups. Species richness and assemblage structure of periodic strategists showed strong and positive correlations with habitat connectivity. Densities of most equilibrium and opportunistic strategists decreased with habitat connectivity. Densities of certain equilibrium and opportunistic strategists increased with turbidity. Forested wetlands around the lakes were positively related to the densities of periodic and equilibrium strategists. These results suggest that decreases in habitat connectivity, forested wetland buffers and water quality resulting from environmental manipulations may cause local extinction of certain fish taxa and accelerate the dominance of tolerant fishes in floodplain lakes. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Geomorphic process and vegetation diversity in the active riverbed and the floodplain in the Kamikochi valley, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamikochi valley is located in a mountainous area in central Japan. The R. Azusa in this valley is a braided river with floodplains. Dense riparian forests cover the floodplains and fragmented small pioneer plant patches and isolated old pioneer trees are distributed in the active riverbed. This study aims to discuss the relationships between geomorphic processes of the river and vegetation diversity. Yearly mapping of the riverbed micro-landforms revealed that channel migrations and landform changes in the active riverbed occurs once every one or several years during a bankfull flood in the rainy season. Germination ages of riparian trees using a dendrochronological technique, their established layers and landform structure were examined to reconstruct floodplain dynamics. Major channel migrations destroyed the riparian forest repeatedly and the recent event occurred about 100 years ago. This caused a longitudinal zonal structure of the riparian forest vegetation, elm-fir forest, mature pioneer forest and young pioneer forests. The young pioneer forest is located alongside the present riverbed. The mature pioneer forest lies between the older elm-fir forests. The pioneer plants germinated simultaneously on the abandoned channel after channel migration. These trees became the mature pioneer forest. Ditches and lobes including boulders are found in the floodplain. The ditches extend parallel to the direction of the present and former channels. The lobes are distributed alongside them. Younger trees under the canopy grow on the lobes in the inner part of the floodplain. These young trees and lobes show that dominant sedimentation process in the floodplain is not lateral flooding, but longitudinal flooding. Sediments from the present channel flew downward through the ditches and were overflowed on the floodplain. This process destroyed the vegetation in and alongside the ditches causing vegetation diversity in the inner part of the riparian forest. Several species