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Sample records for floor biofeedback treatment

  1. Pelvic Floor Biofeedback via a Smart Phone App for Treatment Of Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Starr, Julie A; Drobnis, Erma Z; Cornelius, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback can be useful for treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Many women have difficulty isolating their pelvic floor muscles and adhering to a daily exercise regimen. This case study highlights a woman's experience using PeriCoach, a home biofeedback device that assists women in strengthening their pelvic floor muscles through Bluetooth technology using a smartphone. PMID:27281866

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial Shows Biofeedback to be Superior to Alternative Treatments for Patients with Pelvic Floor Dyssynergia-type Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Heymen, Steve; Scarlett, Yolanda; Jones, Kenneth; Ringel, Yehuda; Drossman, Douglas; Whitehead, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether biofeedback is more effective than diazepam or placebo in a randomized controlled trial for patients with pelvic floor dyssynergia-type constipation, and whether instrumented biofeedback is necessary for successful training. Methods One hundred seventeen patients participated in a 4-week run-in (education and medical management). The 84 who remained constipated were randomized to Biofeedback (n=30); Diazepam (n=30); or Placebo (n=24). All patients were trained to do pelvic floor muscle exercises to correct pelvic floor dyssynergia during 6 biweekly 1-hour sessions, but only Biofeedback patients received electromyography feedback. All other patients received pills 1-2 hours before attempting defecation. Diary data on cathartic use, straining, incomplete bowel movements, Bristol stool scores, and compliance with homework were reviewed biweekly. Results Before treatment, the groups did not differ on demographic (average age 50, 85 percent females), physiologic or psychologic characteristics, severity of constipation, or expectation of benefit. Biofeedback was superior to diazepam by intention to treat analysis (70 percent vs. 23 percent reported adequate relief of constipation 3 months after treatment, χ2 = 13.1, p < 0.001), and also superior to placebo (38 percent successful, χ2 = 5.7, p = 0.017). Biofeedback patients had significantly more unassisted bowel movements at follow-up compared to Placebo (p = .005), with a trend favoring biofeedback over diazepam (p = .067). Biofeedback patients reduced pelvic floor electromyography during straining significantly more than diazepam patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions This investigation provides definitive support for the efficacy of biofeedback for pelvic floor dyssynergia and shows that instrumented biofeedback is essential to successful treatment. PMID:19966605

  3. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training. PMID:25233622

  4. MR defecography: a diagnostic test for the evaluation of pelvic floor motion in patients with dyssynergic defecation after biofeedback therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nikjooy, Afsaneh; Maroufi, Nader; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismaeil; Hadizdeh Kharazi, Homayoun; Mahjoubi, Bahar; Azizi, Rasoul; Haghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dyssynergic defecation is a major cause of chronic functional constipation as a common digestive complaint. We clinically evaluated the effects of biofeedback therapy on the pelvic floor motion indices through magnetic resonance (MR) defecography, quality of life and depression in patients with dyssynergic defecation. Methods: In this clinical trial study, among patients referring to the Colorectal Clinic of Hazrat Rasoul Hospital, 22 subjects were randomly assigned into two equal groups (n= 11) to receive either standard only or biofeedback and standard therapy. Dynamic changes of the pelvic floor were measured by MR defecography. During the simulated defecation, two MR defecography dynamic indices including abnormal anorectal angle change and perineal descent were measured before and after treatment. The effects of biofeedback therapy on patients’ symptoms, quality of life and severity of depression were assessed and compared with the standard therapy. Statistical analysis was carried out using independent _t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Paradox index (p< 0.001), perineal descent index (p< 0.001), depression (p< 0.1), physical function (p< 0.001), vitality (p< 0.001) and role emotion (p< 0.001) significantly improved in the biofeedback therapy group in contrast to the standard therapy SDT group. Conclusion: Biofeedback therapy appears to be effective in improving symptoms of functional constipation and dysfunction of pelvic floor motion as well as patient’s quality of life and depression state. MR defecography is able to show the changes in dynamic indices of the pelvic floor through biofeedback therapy. PMID:26034741

  5. Biofeedback

    MedlinePlus

    Biofeedback is a technique that measures bodily functions and gives you information about them in order to ... Biofeedback is most often based on measurements of: Blood pressure Brain waves ( EEG ) Breathing Heart rate Muscle ...

  6. Biofeedback in rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature relating to the biofeedback used in physical rehabilitation. The biofeedback methods used in rehabilitation are based on biomechanical measurements and measurements of the physiological systems of the body. The physiological systems of the body which can be measured to provide biofeedback are the neuromuscular system, the respiratory system and the cardiovascular system. Neuromuscular biofeedback methods include electromyography (EMG) biofeedback and real-time ultrasound imaging (RTUS) biofeedback. EMG biofeedback is the most widely investigated method of biofeedback and appears to be effective in the treatment of many musculoskeletal conditions and in post cardiovascular accident (CVA) rehabilitation. RTUS biofeedback has been demonstrated effective in the treatment of low back pain (LBP) and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. Cardiovascular biofeedback methods have been shown to be effective in the treatment of a number of health conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, asthma, fibromyalgia and even psychological disorders however a systematic review in this field has yet to be conducted. Similarly, the number of large scale studies examining the use of respiratory biofeedback in rehabilitation is limited. Measurements of movement, postural control and force output can be made using a number of different devices and used to deliver biomechanical biofeedback. Inertial based sensing biofeedback is the most widely researched biomechanical biofeedback method, with a number of studies showing it to be effective in improving measures of balance in a number of populations. Other types of biomechanical biofeedback include force plate systems, electrogoniometry, pressure biofeedback and camera based systems however the evidence for these is limited. Biofeedback is generally delivered using visual displays, acoustic or haptic signals, however more recently virtual reality (VR) or exergaming technology have been used as biofeedback

  7. Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a prevalent problem that can drastically affect quality of life. Pelvic floor rehabilitation is an important first-line treatment for patients with FI, and many published case reports and a small number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide limited evidence for its efficacy. Pelvic floor rehabilitation approaches to the treatment of FI include pelvic floor muscle training, biofeedback, and volumetric training with rectal balloon catheters. Various forms of external electrical stimulation have also been described and may be of added benefit. Behavioral bowel retraining is an important part of a good rehabilitative approach as well. Pelvic floor rehabilitation treatment for FI is thought to be effective and safe, with reported success rates in a majority of studies at 50 to 80%. Many more high-quality RCTs are needed to define optimal treatment protocols. PMID:25320568

  8. Direction of Attentional Focus in Biofeedback Treatment for /R/ Misarticulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister Byun, Tara; Swartz, Michelle T.; Halpin, Peter F.; Szeredi, Daniel; Maas, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maintaining an external direction of focus during practice is reported to facilitate acquisition of non-speech motor skills, but it is not known whether these findings also apply to treatment for speech errors. This question has particular relevance for treatment incorporating visual biofeedback, where clinician cueing can direct the…

  9. Biofeedback treatment of chronic constipation: myths and misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Chiarioni, G

    2016-09-01

    Chronic constipation is a prevalent disorder with considerable impact on healthcare costs and quality of life. Most patients would respond to conservative measures in primary care. Patients with refractory constipation are commonly referred to dedicated centers for appropriate investigations and management. After testing, three main subtypes of constipation are commonly identified: normal colon transit, slow transit, and functional defecation disorders. The etiology of functional defecation disorders is consistent with maladaptive behavior, and biofeedback therapy has been considered a valuable treatment option. Being safe and only marginally invasive, retraining has been historically employed to manage all types of refractory constipation. There are a number of strongly held beliefs about biofeedback therapy that are not evidence-based. The aim of this review was to address these beliefs concerning protocols, efficacy, indications, and safety, with a special focus on the relevance of identifying patients with a functional defecation disorder who are ideal candidates for retraining. Randomized controlled trials support the effectiveness of biofeedback therapy for severe, refractory constipation due to functional defecation disorders. Limitations of the treatment are discussed, but biofeedback remains the safest option to successfully manage this hard-to-treat subtype of constipation. PMID:27450533

  10. Integrating electrodermal biofeedback into pharmacologic treatment of grand mal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Scrimali, Tullio; Tomasello, Damiana; Sciuto, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) and electrodermal biofeedback, when integrated with pharmacologic treatments, indicate promising methods for the treatment of grand mal seizures. They can be used to monitor patient arousal and help patients learn new strategies to better cope with stress and anxiety. Our proposed method can possibly reduce the number of crises for patients who are dependent on pharmacologic therapy and can improve their quality of life. This article describes the scientific background of electrodermal monitoring and electrodermal biofeedback for patients affected by grand mal seizures. In this study, we have reported a clinical case study. The patient was treated for 2 years with electrodermal biofeedback to augment pharmacologic treatments. The trial has been designed in accordance with “n = 1 case study research”. Our results have shown that our methods could achieve a significant reduction in grand mal seizures and sympathetic arousal when applied. The patient under consideration was also relaxed and exhibited greater competency to cope with stress. Additionally, the patient’s sense of mastery and self-efficacy was enhanced. PMID:26029078

  11. Integrating electrodermal biofeedback into pharmacologic treatment of grand mal seizures.

    PubMed

    Scrimali, Tullio; Tomasello, Damiana; Sciuto, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) and electrodermal biofeedback, when integrated with pharmacologic treatments, indicate promising methods for the treatment of grand mal seizures. They can be used to monitor patient arousal and help patients learn new strategies to better cope with stress and anxiety. Our proposed method can possibly reduce the number of crises for patients who are dependent on pharmacologic therapy and can improve their quality of life. This article describes the scientific background of electrodermal monitoring and electrodermal biofeedback for patients affected by grand mal seizures. In this study, we have reported a clinical case study. The patient was treated for 2 years with electrodermal biofeedback to augment pharmacologic treatments. The trial has been designed in accordance with "n = 1 case study research". Our results have shown that our methods could achieve a significant reduction in grand mal seizures and sympathetic arousal when applied. The patient under consideration was also relaxed and exhibited greater competency to cope with stress. Additionally, the patient's sense of mastery and self-efficacy was enhanced. PMID:26029078

  12. [Treatment of the dysfunction of the pelvic floor].

    PubMed

    Pena Outeiriño, J M; Rodríguez Pérez, A J; Villodres Duarte, A; Mármol Navarro, S; Lozano Blasco, J M

    2007-01-01

    The perineum is formed by muscle-aponeurotic elements that are integrated under the control of the nervous system. Their alterations are responsible for urogynecological, coloproctologic and sexual pathologies. In order to obtain a successful treatment, it is obliged not to forget the role that plays the perineum in those pathologies. The treatment of the dysfunction of the pelvic floor groups conservative techniques and procedures like changes in life habits, behavioural therapy, biofeedback, electroestimulation (neuromodulation and peripheral electrical stimulation) and training with muscular exercises of the pelvic floor (perineal rehabilitation). The objective of all of them is to improve or to obtain the urinary continence, the strengthening of its musculature to be able to balance pelvic static, to improve the local vascularization and the anorrectal function besides securing a satisfactory sexuality. PMID:17902464

  13. The Role of Home Practice in the Thermal Biofeedback Treatment of Migraine Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, Janel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined role of home practice of hand warming in thermal biofeedback treatment of migraine headache. Seventeen female migraine sufferers were assigned to thermal biofeedback with or without regular home practice. Subjects on home practice group experienced decreases in headache activity and medication intake that were both statistically and…

  14. Use of Electromyographic Biofeedback and Cue-Controlled Relaxation in the Treatment of Test Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counts, D. Kenneth; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Studied use of electromyographic (CMG) biofeedback to increase efficacy of cue-controlled relaxation training in treatment of test anxiety. Results indicated cue-controlled relaxation was effective in increasing test performance for test-anxious subjects. EMG biofeedback did not contribute to effectiveness. Self-report measures of anxiety are…

  15. Biofeedback: A Proposed Model for the Treatment of Teacher Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joseph M.

    1981-01-01

    The proposed model defines teacher anxiety as a teacher's somatic reactions and psychological state that, in the face of threat recognition, becomes defensive. An individual approach to teacher anxiety using biofeedback techniques, relaxation training, and systematic desensitization is proposed. (RC)

  16. Botulinum toxin type-A injection to treat patients with intractable anismus unresponsive to simple biofeedback training

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhen-Ning; He, Lei; Gao, Ge; Zhai, Qing; Yin, Zhi-Tao; Zeng, Xian-Dong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injection to the puborectalis and external sphincter muscle in the treatment of patients with anismus unresponsive to simple biofeedback training. METHODS: This retrospective study included 31 patients suffering from anismus who were unresponsive to simple biofeedback training. Diagnosis was made by anorectal manometry, balloon expulsion test, surface electromyography of the pelvic floor muscle, and defecography. Patients were given botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection and pelvic floor biofeedback training. Follow-up was conducted before the paper was written. Improvement was evaluated using the chronic constipation scoring system. RESULTS: BTX-A injection combined with pelvic floor biofeedback training achieved success in 24 patients, with 23 maintaining persistent satisfaction during a mean period of 8.4 mo. CONCLUSION: BTX-A injection combined with pelvic floor biofeedback training seems to be successful for intractable anismus. PMID:25253964

  17. The treatment of myofascial pain-dysfunction syndrome using the biofeedback principle.

    PubMed

    Clarke, N G; Kardachi, B J

    1977-10-01

    Facial pain is a relatively common sequel to bruxism and the biofeedback principle was used on seven subjects experiencing this syndrome. The results obtained were satisfactory and support the concept that the etiology of the M.P.D. syndrome is psychophysiological. This study showed that biofeedback is both a logical and appropriate form of treatment. However, the result with subject 7 indicates that not all patients are willing to wear the equipment but conselling and empathy probably form an equally satisfactory form of treatment. PMID:269245

  18. Meta-Analysis of Biofeedback for Tension-Type Headache: Efficacy, Specificity, and Treatment Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestoriuc, Yvonne; Rief, Winfried; Martin, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present meta-analysis were to investigate the short- and long-term efficacy, multidimensional outcome, and treatment moderators of biofeedback as a behavioral treatment option for tension-type headache. A literature search identified 74 outcome studies, of which 53 were selected according to predefined inclusion criteria.…

  19. Retroflex Versus Bunched in Treatment for Rhotic Misarticulation: Evidence From Ultrasound Biofeedback Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Tara McAllister; Hitchcock, Elaine R.; Swartz, Michelle T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To document the efficacy of ultrasound biofeedback treatment for misarticulation of the North American English rhotic in children. Because of limited progress in the first cohort, a series of two closely related studies was conducted in place of a single study. The studies differed primarily in the nature of tongue-shape targets (e.g., retroflex, bunched) cued during treatment. Method Eight participants received 8 weeks of individual ultrasound biofeedback treatment targeting rhotics. In Study 1, all 4 participants were cued to match a bunched tongue-shape target. In Study 2, participants received individualized cues aimed at eliciting the tongue shape most facilitative of perceptually correct rhotics. Results Participants in Study 1 showed only minimal treatment effects. In Study 2, all participants demonstrated improved production of rhotics in untreated words produced without biofeedback, with large to very large effect sizes. Conclusions The results of Study 2 indicate that with proper parameters of treatment, ultrasound biofeedback can be a highly effective intervention for children with persistent rhotic errors. In addition, qualitative comparison of Studies 1 and 2 suggests that treatment for the North American English rhotic should include opportunities to explore different tongue shapes, to find the most facilitative variant for each individual speaker. PMID:25088034

  20. Biofeedback-Based Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Tinnitus: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weise, Cornelia; Heinecke, Kristin; Rief, Winfried

    2008-01-01

    Many tinnitus sufferers believe that their tinnitus has an organic basis and thus seek medical rather than psychological treatments. Tinnitus has been found to be associated with negative appraisal, dysfunctional attention shift, and heightened psychophysiological arousal, so cognitive-behavioral interventions and biofeedback are commonly…

  1. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus whenever bruxism occurs. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of research into biofeedback for bruxism; to assess the efficacy and acceptability of biofeedback therapy in management of awake bruxism and, separately, sleep bruxism in adults; and to compare findings between the two variants. Methods A systematic review of published literature examining biofeedback as an intervention directed at controlling primary bruxism in adults. We will search electronic databases and the grey literature using a predefined search strategy to identify randomised and non-randomised studies, technical reports and patents. Searches will not be restricted by language or date and will be expanded through contact with authors and experts, and by following up reference lists and citations. Two authors, working independently, will conduct screening of search results, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment and a third will resolve any disagreements. The primary outcomes of acceptability and effectiveness will be assessed using only randomised studies, segregated by bruxism subtype. A meta-analysis of these data will be conducted only if pre-defined conditions for quality and heterogeneity are met, otherwise the data will be summarized in narrative form. Data from non-randomised studies will be used to augment a narrative synthesis of the state of technical developments and any safety-related issues. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006880

  2. [Pelvic floor muscle training and pelvic floor disorders in women].

    PubMed

    Thubert, T; Bakker, E; Fritel, X

    2015-05-01

    Our goal is to provide an update on the results of pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of urinary incontinence and genital prolapse symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle training allows a reduction of urinary incontinence symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle contractions supervised by a healthcare professional allow cure in half cases of stress urinary incontinence. Viewing this contraction through biofeedback improves outcomes, but this effect could also be due by a more intensive and prolonged program with the physiotherapist. The place of electrostimulation remains unclear. The results obtained with vaginal cones are similar to pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback or electrostimulation. It is not known whether pelvic floor muscle training has an effect after one year. In case of stress urinary incontinence, supervised pelvic floor muscle training avoids surgery in half of the cases at 1-year follow-up. Pelvic floor muscle training is the first-line treatment of post-partum urinary incontinence. Its preventive effect is uncertain. Pelvic floor muscle training may reduce the symptoms associated with genital prolapse. In conclusion, pelvic floor rehabilitation supervised by a physiotherapist is an effective short-term treatment to reduce the symptoms of urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:25921509

  3. Is EEG Biofeedback Efficacious as a Treatment for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder? A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wear, Trevin Douglas

    This literature review examined 16 treatment studies which employed electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback to treat children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). An introductory section reviews hallmarks of ADHD, its historical background, current diagnostic criteria, etiology, single treatment or symptom focused treatment,…

  4. Comparison of the Efficacy of Electromyographic Biofeedback, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, and Conservative Medical Interventions in the Treatment of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flor, Herta; Birbaumer, Niels

    1993-01-01

    Patients who suffered from chronic back pain or temporomandibular pain were randomly assigned to either electromyographic biofeedback, cognitive behavioral therapy, or conservative medical treatment groups. Biofeedback showed the most improvement at posttreatment and the only lasting significant effect. Analysis of attrition showed a significant…

  5. EEG Biofeedback as a Treatment for Substance Use Disorders: Review, Rating of Efficacy, and Recommendations for Further Research

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Rex L.; Trudeau, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback has been employed in substance use disorder (SUD) over the last three decades. The SUD is a complex series of disorders with frequent comorbidities and EEG abnormalities of several types. EEG biofeedback has been employed in conjunction with other therapies and may be useful in enhancing certain outcomes of therapy. Based on published clinical studies and employing efficacy criteria adapted by the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research, alpha theta training—either alone for alcoholism or in combination with beta training for stimulant and mixed substance abuse and combined with residential treatment programs, is probably efficacious. Considerations of further research design taking these factors into account are discussed and descriptions of contemporary research are given. PMID:18214670

  6. Surgical treatment of orbital floor fractures.

    PubMed

    Rankow, R M; Mignogna, F V

    1975-01-01

    Ninety patients with orbital floor fractures were treated by the Otolaryngology Service of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Of these 90 patients, 58 were classified as coexisting and 32 as isolated. All fractures with clinical symptoms and demonstrable x-ray evidence should be explored. Despite negative findings by routine techniques, laminography may confirm fractures in all clinically suspicious cases. In this series, 100% of the patients explored had definitive fractures. A direct infraorbital approach adequately exposes the floor of the orbit. An effective and cosmetic subtarsal incision was utilized. Implants were employed when the floor could not be anatomically reapproximated or the periorbita was destroyed. PMID:1119982

  7. Effectiveness of Alpha Biofeedback Therapy: Negative Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Charles G.; Herder, Joseph

    1980-01-01

    Assessed the utility of alpha biofeedback training in the treatment of patients (N=66). Biofeedback and placebo biofeedback groups were given alpha or mock-alpha training sessions. Improvement on 54 variables was compared to that of no-treatment controls. Only a chance number of significant changes appeared among the groups. (Author)

  8. Biofeedback Treatment of Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion and Respiratory Distress in an Adolescent Girl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnes, Emily; Allen, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    In this investigation, we evaluated the effectiveness of surface electromyography (EMG) biofeedback to treat paradoxical vocal fold motion in a 16-year-old girl. EMG biofeedback training occurred once per week over the course of 10 weeks. In a changing criterion design, muscle tension showed systematic changes that corresponded with changes in the…

  9. [Progressive relaxation and EMG biofeedback in the treatment of chronic headache in children. Results of an explorative study.].

    PubMed

    Kröner-Herwig, B; Plump, U; Pothmann, R

    1992-06-01

    A group study on the comparative efficacy of EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation is presented. Sixteen children aged between 8 and 14 years with chronic tension headache and combined headache participated in the study. Six sessions of relaxation training and 12 (shorter) biofeedback sessions were held with each child. Both treatments had excellent results, which were apparent directly after training. All but one child benefited to a clinically significant extent from the treatment, with a reduction of more than 50% in headache frequency. Other variables indicate further positive effects of treatment (e.g., medication consumption, absence from school). After 6 months of follow-up the children treated by relaxation had achieved event further reductions in headache activity. Suggestions for further improvement in the clinical and economic efficiency of treatment formats are presented, and perspectives for future research are discussed. PMID:18415618

  10. Controlled evaluation of thermal biofeedback in treatment of elevated blood pressure in unmedicated mild hypertension.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, E B; Eisele, G; Vollmer, A; Payne, A; Gordon, M; Cornish, P; Gilmore, L

    1996-06-01

    In the first of two studies, 42 unmedicated mild hypertensives completed either 16 sessions of thermal biofeedback (TBF) training for hand (7 sessions) and foot (9 sessions) warming or 8 weeks of monitoring BPs at home. There was a trend (p < .10) for more of those treated (57.1%) to have DBPs lower than 90 mm Hg than for those only monitoring BPs at home (33%). Analyses of clinic BP values from random zero sphygmomanometer measurements, from 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and from home BP measurements made by the patient showed no advantage for treatment versus BP monitoring. Sixteen of the 21 patients in BP monitoring were later treated. Analyses of treatment effects across all treated subjects by gender revealed a significant (p = .02) decrease in DBP for treated female subjects (n = 13) but not for males (n = 24). In the second study the 22 initial treatment successes, that is, those whose DBP was below 90 mm Hg at posttreatment (59.4% of those who completed treatment), were randomized to an intensive follow-up (monthly visits for 6 months, then visits every two months) emphasizing regular home practice with an electronic TBF device or regular follow-up (visits every 3 months). Twelve of the 22 were still normotensive at 12 months. There were no differences at any point during the follow-up between the two conditions in success rate or BPs despite a numerical advantage in reported frequency of home practice by those in the intensive follow-up condition. PMID:8805965

  11. Specific effects and biofeedback versus biofeedback-assisted self-regulation training.

    PubMed

    Shellenberger, R; Green, J

    1987-09-01

    In any field, clear and logical conceptualizations are the basis of accurate models----correct research design----correct results----correct conclusions----advancement in the field. Faulty conceptualizations----faulty models----faulty research design----faulty results----faulty conclusions----confusion. In analyzing the conceptualizations of "biofeedback" as expressed by John Furedy (1987) in, "Specific versus Placebo Effects in Biofeedback Training: A Critical Lay Perspective," we focus on two issues: Does biofeedback have a treatment effect? Is biofeedback necessary for the training effect? In discussing issue (1) we describe the multiple meanings of "biofeedback" and raise the fundamental question: Is biofeedback a treatment? We argue that faulty conceptualizations of clinical biofeedback (1) assume that the treatment in clinical biofeedback is "biofeedback" with specific effects, (2) assume that the scientific basis of biofeedback is dependent upon demonstrations of these specific effects through double-blind design that distinguish "specific" from "placebo effects," and (3) trivialize clinical research by attempting to determine the usefulness of biofeedback information--usefulness that is already understood logically by professionals and consumers and demonstrated by clinical studies in the laboratory and in the clinic. We further argue that accurate conceptualizations of clinical biofeedback (1) identify self-regulation skills as the treatment with specific effects of physiological change and symptom reduction, and (2) describe the use of information from biofeedback instruments as scientific verification of self-regulation skills. Finally, the scientific basis of clinical biofeedback is based on (1) evidence from experimental and clinical control studies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of self-regulation skills for symptom alleviation, and (2) the use of biofeedback instruments to verify the acquisition of self-regulatory skills, thus fulfilling

  12. Autogenic Training and Hand Temperature Biofeedback in the Treatment of Migraine: A Preliminary Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup, B.; And Others

    The possibility of alleviating migraine headaches by autogenic relaxation training, with or without hand temperature biofeedback, was assessed. The study examined five independent groups in a bi-directional control group design. Volunteer migraine sufferers served as subjects, each participating for 12 weeks. The first four weeks of the study were…

  13. Biofeedback Training as Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danskin, David G.; Walters, E. Dale

    1975-01-01

    Encourages professionals in helping relationships to explore and experience biofeedback training for voluntary self-regulation. A sample biofeedback training program is described. Observations of participants in biofeedback programs are presented. (Author/BW)

  14. Biofeedback and Relaxation Training for Chronic Headache: A Controlled Comparison of Booster Treatment and Regular Contacts for Long-Term Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrasik, Frank; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of booster treatments and regular contact for enhancing maintenance in headache patients previously treated by biofeedback and relaxation. Diary records and patient interviews showed no major differences between the conditions, suggesting that regular contact may be an efficient procedure for maintaining treatment gains.…

  15. The effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahadi, Tannaz; Madjlesi, Faezeh; Mahjoubi, Bahar; Mirzaei, Rezvan; Forogh, Bijan; Daliri, Seyedeh Somayeh; Derakhshandeh, Seyed Majid; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Raissi, G. Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Rome II and III diagnostic criteria for dyssynergic defecation recommended the exclusion of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study determined the effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without IBS. Materials and Methods: This study was a nonrandomized, single blinded, semi experimental study. Dyssynergic defecation patients with and without IBS were asked to undergo biofeedback therapy 8 sessions. The defecation dynamics and balloon expulsion time were evaluated before, at the end and 1 month after the biofeedback therapy. IBS symptoms were graded using a 4-point Likert scale. Mann–Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon test and Friedman test were applied to analyze data using SPSS software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: After the biofeedback therapy, the IBS symptoms have been decreased significantly (the median of 2 before and 1 after therapy, P < 0.01). The biofeedback therapy significantly decreased the anismus index in IBS group by the mean of 0.75 ± 0.31, 0.28 ± 0.07 and 0.28 ± 0.06 in three phases, respectively. Similar results were found in non-IBS patients (the mean of 0.74 ± 0.32, 0.28 ± 0.08, 0.27 ± 0.08 in three phases, respectively). The symptoms of constipation (sensation of incomplete evacuation, difficult and painful defecation), defecation facilitative manual maneuver frequency, pelvic floor muscles resting amplitude and strain amplitude decreased and squeezing amplitude improved significantly after biofeedback therapy in both groups with and without IBS (P < 0.001). There were not significant differences between patients with and without IBS (P > 0.05) with respect to outcome. No complication was observed in treatment groups. Conclusion: Dyssynergic constipation patients with and without IBS will likely benefit from biofeedback therapy. PMID:25538778

  16. Floor of mouth cancer: patient selection and treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.E.; Lee, F.; Smith, P.G.; Ogura, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    Retrospective review of 126 primarily treated floor of mouth (FOM) cancers was done to study patient selection and to search for more optimum treatment strategies. Small surface lesions were treated by local excision (LE); small lesions invading FOM without lymph nodes were treated by radiation alone (RA), while larger lesions and those with palpable nodes were treated by preoperative irradiation and surgery (R + S). Ultimate control of the FOM cancer and nodes was achieved for 100% of the LE, 71% of the RA, and 75% of the R + S patients. The majority of primary tumor and nodal recurrences developed by 15 months and 35% of the failures were salvaged by additional treatment. Change in treatment strategies are suggested for surface lesions because of a poor rate of initial tumor control (43%), for patients treated by RA because of a high rate of complications (41%), and for patients without palpable lymph nodes who can be successfully treated by elective neck irradiation.

  17. Biofeedback Therapy: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Bryan

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the major therapeutic claims of biofeedback training and the respective methodologies used, are outlined, along with some of the research difficulties that are encountered in biofeedback training. (Author)

  18. [Types of biofeedback].

    PubMed

    Kubik, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The author presented 9 types of biofeedback witch are usefull in medical practice. He explained neurophysiological circuits involved in this process. He presented technical basis of the different types of biofeedback and pathological fields of its supplementation. PMID:27349053

  19. Biofeedback: Its Uses in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    This paper begins by defining biofeedback and describing some of the major biofeedback machines. An historical perspective is provided of research literature on the relationship of biofeedback and learning. Biofeedback and relaxation are discussed and research is cited for the use of biofeedback techniques in relaxation training with children. Two…

  20. Biofeedback for psychiatric disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Poppy L A; David, Anthony S

    2014-06-01

    Biofeedback potentially provides non-invasive, effective psychophysiological interventions for psychiatric disorders. The encompassing purpose of this review was to establish how biofeedback interventions have been used to treat select psychiatric disorders [anxiety, autistic spectrum disorders, depression, dissociation, eating disorders, schizophrenia and psychoses] to date and provide a useful reference for consultation by clinicians and researchers planning to administer a biofeedback treatment. A systematic search of EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and WOK databases and hand searches in Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, and Journal of Neurotherapy, identified 227 articles; 63 of which are included within this review. Electroencephalographic neurofeedback constituted the most investigated modality (31.7%). Anxiety disorders were the most commonly treated (68.3%). Multi-modal biofeedback appeared most effective in significantly ameliorating symptoms, suggesting that targeting more than one physiological modality for bio-regulation increases therapeutic efficacy. Overall, 80.9% of articles reported some level of clinical amelioration related to biofeedback exposure, 65.0% to a statistically significant (p < .05) level of symptom reduction based on reported standardized clinical parameters. Although the heterogeneity of the included studies warrants caution before explicit efficacy statements can be made. Further development of standardized controlled methodological protocols tailored for specific disorders and guidelines to generate comprehensive reports may contribute towards establishing the value of biofeedback interventions within mainstream psychiatry. PMID:24806535

  1. Brain–computer interface game applications for combined neurofeedback and biofeedback treatment for children on the autism spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Elisabeth V. C.; Suttie, Neil; Sivanathan, Aparajithan; Lim, Theodore; Louchart, Sandy; Pineda, Jaime A.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show deficits in social and communicative skills, including imitation, empathy, and shared attention, as well as restricted interests and repetitive patterns of behaviors. Evidence for and against the idea that dysfunctions in the mirror neuron system are involved in imitation and could be one underlying cause for ASD is discussed in this review. Neurofeedback interventions have reduced symptoms in children with ASD by self-regulation of brain rhythms. However, cortical deficiencies are not the only cause of these symptoms. Peripheral physiological activity, such as the heart rate and its variability, is closely linked to neurophysiological signals and associated with social engagement. Therefore, a combined approach targeting the interplay between brain, body, and behavior could be more effective. Brain–computer interface applications for combined neurofeedback and biofeedback treatment for children with ASD are currently nonexistent. To facilitate their use, we have designed an innovative game that includes social interactions and provides neural- and body-based feedback that corresponds directly to the underlying significance of the trained signals as well as to the behavior that is reinforced. PMID:25071545

  2. The Effectiveness of Biofeedback and Home Relaxation Training on Reduction of Borderline Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesko, Wayne A.; Summerfield, Liane M.

    1988-01-01

    Relaxation and biofeedback have been established as being effective in reducing high blood pressure over both the short and long term. A study found that biofeedback, progressive relaxation, and biofeedback/relaxation combined were all effective treatments for borderline hypertension. (JD)

  3. Biofeedback in Counselor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabbs, Michael A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examines the many benefits that may result when biofeedback experiences are included in a counselor-education program. Protocol is enumerated for the implementation of biofeedback in counselor education. Objectives and procedures for each of the three stages are presented for the reader's evaluation. (Author)

  4. Biofeedback as Intrapersonal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jandt, Fred E.; Beaver, Claude D.

    Any physiological process which can be monitored in some way may provide biofeedback, which can range from galvanic skin resistance to electroencephalograph (EEG) alpha feedback. Biofeedback techniques have several implications and applications for research in both intrapersonal and interpersonal communication. Both EEG alpha and electromyograph…

  5. Medical & Surgical Management of Pelvic Floor Disorders Affecting Defecation

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Ron; Cromwell, John; Rao, Satish S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders that affect stool evacuation include structural (example: rectocele) and functional disorders (example: dyssynergic defecation). Meticulous history, digital rectal examination, and physiological tests such as anorectal manometry, colonic transit study, balloon expulsion and imaging studies such as anal ultrasound, defecography, and static and dynamic MRI can facilitate an objective diagnosis and optimal treatment. Management consists of education and counseling regarding bowel function, diet, laxatives, most importantly behavioral and biofeedback therapies, and lastly surgery. Randomized clinical trials have established that biofeedback therapy is effective in treating dyssynergic defecation. Because dyssynergic defecation may co-exist with conditions such as solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS), and rectocele, before considering surgery, biofeedback therapy should be tried and an accurate assessment of the entire pelvis and its function should be performed. Several surgical approaches have been advocated for the treatment of pelvic floor disorders including open, laparoscopic and trans-abdominal approach, stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR), and robotic colon and rectal resections. However, there is lack of well controlled randomized studies and efficacy of these surgical procedures remains to be established. PMID:22907620

  6. Use of Biofeedback/Relaxation Procedures with Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.; Russell, Harold L.

    The report covers a series of investigations on the effects of biofeedback/muscle relaxation training on the academic achievement of learning disabled (LD) students. In the first study, 32 LD elementary school students made gains in all measures except arithmetic following electromyograph biofeedback/relaxation treatment. Implementation of the…

  7. Pelvic floor muscle training and adjunctive therapies for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Patricia B; Grimmer, Karen A; Deenadayalan, Yamini

    2006-01-01

    Background Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a prevalent and costly condition which may be treated surgically or by physical therapy. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the literature and present the best available evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) performed alone and together with adjunctive therapies (eg biofeedback, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones) for the treatment of female SUI. Methods All major electronic sources of relevant information were systematically searched to identify peer-reviewed English language abstracts or papers published between 1995 and 2005. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and other study designs eg non-randomised trials, cohort studies, case series, were considered for this review in order to source all the available evidence relevant to clinical practice. Studies of adult women with a urodynamic or clinical diagnosis of SUI were eligible for inclusion. Excluded were studies of women who were pregnant, immediately post-partum or with a diagnosis of mixed or urge incontinence. Studies with a PFMT protocol alone and in combination with adjunctive physical therapies were considered. Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of each study, its level of evidence and the methodological quality. Due to the heterogeneity of study designs, the results are presented in narrative format. Results Twenty four studies, including 17 RCTs and seven non-RCTs, met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the studies varied but lower quality scores did not necessarily indicate studies from lower levels of evidence. This review found consistent evidence from a number of high quality RCTs that PFMT alone and in combination with adjunctive therapies is effective treatment for women with SUI with rates of 'cure' and 'cure/improvement' up to 73% and 97% respectively. The contribution of adjunctive therapies is unclear and there is limited evidence about treatment

  8. BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING AND TENSION-TYPE HEADACHE.

    PubMed

    Šecić, Ana; Cvjeticanin, Timon; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2016-03-01

    Biofeedback is a training method, which connects physiological and psychological processes in a person for the purposes of improving his/her physical, emotional, mental and spiritual health. In biofeedback treatment, an active role of the patient is stressed for him/her to be able to actively control the physiological and emotional processes. The aim of biofeedback is to improve the conscious control of the individual's involuntary physiological activity. Research has shown that biofeedback, either applied alone or in combination with other behavioral therapies (techniques), is an effective treatment for various medical and psychological disorders, from headache and hypertension to temporomandibular and attention deficit disorders. More than 90% of adults experience headache once a year, which makes headache one of the most common symptoms and diagnoses in medicine. Tension-type headaches occur in at least 40% of the population and their impact on the health insurance costs and diminished productivity is significant. Studies have shown that clinical biofeedback training is effective in treating headaches. Moreover, the authors stress the need for additional research and further development of methodology for this kind of research. PMID:27333731

  9. Biofeedback: A Classroom Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Faith

    1975-01-01

    Describes the use of biofeedback machines in biology classes which provide students with an awareness of their own brain waves and as a device to demonstrate the fact that the body responds readily to the mind. (BR)

  10. Neurofeedback and biofeedback with 37 migraineurs: a clinical outcome study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional peripheral biofeedback has grade A evidence for effectively treating migraines. Two newer forms of neurobiofeedback, EEG biofeedback and hemoencephalography biofeedback were combined with thermal handwarming biofeedback to treat 37 migraineurs in a clinical outpatient setting. Methods 37 migraine patients underwent an average of 40 neurofeedback sessions combined with thermal biofeedback in an outpatient biofeedback clinic. All patients were on at least one type of medication for migraine; preventive, abortive or rescue. Patients kept daily headache diaries a minimum of two weeks prior to treatment and throughout treatment showing symptom frequency, severity, duration and medications used. Treatments were conducted an average of three times weekly over an average span of 6 months. Headache diaries were examined after treatment and a formal interview was conducted. After an average of 14.5 months following treatment, a formal interview was conducted in order to ascertain duration of treatment effects. Results Of the 37 migraine patients treated, 26 patients or 70% experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of their headaches which was sustained on average 14.5 months after treatments were discontinued. Conclusions All combined neuro and biofeedback interventions were effective in reducing the frequency of migraines with clients using medication resulting in a more favorable outcome (70% experiencing at least a 50% reduction in headaches) than just medications alone (50% experience a 50% reduction) and that the effect size of our study involving three different types of biofeedback for migraine (1.09) was more robust than effect size of combined studies on thermal biofeedback alone for migraine (.5). These non-invasive interventions may show promise for treating treatment-refractory migraine and for preventing the progression from episodic to chronic migraine. PMID:20205867

  11. Incontinence Treatment: Biofeedback

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of ...

  12. Biofeedback in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palladino, Joseph J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Discusses how biofeedback is being incorporated into the psychology curricula of undergraduate liberal arts colleges. Two hundred colleges were surveyed. Included is a discussion of biofeedback instrumentation and descriptions of a course, a field experience, and a workshop. Also examinded is a biofeedback innovation in a research-treatment…

  13. The efficacy of surface electromyographic biofeedback assisted stretching for the treatment of chronic low back pain: a case-series.

    PubMed

    Moore, Aimee; Mannion, Jamie; Moran, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with low back pain (LBP) commonly present with an impaired flexion-relaxation (FR) response, characterised as continued lumbar muscle activation at maximal voluntary flexion. The aim of the present investigation was to explore the effectiveness of a surface electromyographic assisted stretching (SEMGAS) programme in improving FR. Nine volunteers with chronic LBP and an impaired FR took part in weekly biofeedback SEMGAS sessions and performed a home-based stretching programme, for 5 weeks. FR, Oswestry Disability Index, Numeric Pain Rating Scale and Sit and Reach were recorded pre and post-intervention as well as at a 4-6-week follow-up. Of the nine participants included, three improved FR to statistically significant levels. These three participants also achieved a clinically important change in pain intensity scores. The results suggest that SEMGAS may provide benefits to some individuals with chronic LBP and impaired FR, although larger scale investigation of SEMGAS alone is indicated. PMID:25603739

  14. A Pilot Study of Brief Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback to Reduce Craving in Young Adult Men Receiving Inpatient Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eddie, D.; Kim, C.; Lehrer, P.; Deneke, E.; Bates, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the implementation feasibility, and efficacy for reducing alcohol and drug craving, of a brief, 3-session heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV BFB) intervention added to a traditional 28-day substance abuse disorder (SUD) inpatient treatment program. Forty-eight young adult men received either treatment as usual (TAU) plus three sessions of HRV BFB training over three weeks, or TAU only. Participants receiving HRV BFB training were instructed to practice daily using a handheld HRV BFB device. HRV BFB training was well tolerated by participants and supported by treatment staff. Men receiving TAU + HRV BFB demonstrated a greater, medium effect size reduction in alcohol and drug craving compared to those receiving TAU only, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. In addition, an interaction effect was observed in analyses that accounted for baseline craving levels, wherein heart rate variability (HRV) levels at treatment entry were predictive of changes in craving in the TAU group only. Low baseline levels of HRV were associated with increases in craving, whereas higher baseline HRV levels were associated with greater decreases in craving from start to end of treatment. In the TAU + HRV BFB group, however, there was no such association. That is, HRV BFB appeared to dissociate individual differences in baseline HRV levels from changes in craving. Given that alcohol and drug craving often precipitates relapse, HRV BFB merits further study as an adjunct treatment to ameliorate craving experienced by persons with substance use disorders. PMID:25179673

  15. [Biofeedback Therapy and Sweat].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Biofeedback training is a technique through which one can learn to control usually uncontrollable inner body functions, such as brain waves, heart rate or electrodermal activity (EDA). These 'hidden' biological signals are measured from a participant and fed back during the training, e.g., through visual and auditory changes on a computer screen. With practice, the participant learns to control this feedback, and ultimately to control their bodily responses without needing the feedback. In this article, the application of EDA biofeedback will be introduced as a therapy for specific neurological conditions. PMID:27503820

  16. EMG Biofeedback and Exercise for Treatment of Cervical and Shoulder Pain in Individuals with a Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in the cervical and shoulder region is a common secondary problem after spinal cord injury (SCI), reported by 30% to 70% of individuals. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training, in addition to a standard exercise program, on reducing shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. Methods: Fifteen individuals with SCI, C6 or lower, who were manual wheelchair users with shoulder pain were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions. The Exercise group (n = 7) received instruction on a standard home-based exercise program. The EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group (n = 8) received identical exercise instruction plus EMG biofeedback training to improve muscle balance and muscle relaxation during wheelchair propulsion. Shoulder pain was assessed by the Wheelchair Users Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI) at baseline, at posttest 10 weeks after the start of intervention, and at follow-up 16 weeks after posttest. Results: The number of participants per group allowed only within-group comparisons; however, the findings indicated a beneficial effect from EMG biofeedback training. Shoulder pain, as measured by WUSPI, decreased 64% from baseline to posttest for the EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group (P = .02). Shoulder pain for the Exercise group decreased a nonsignificant 27%. At follow-up, both groups showed continued improvement, yet the benefit of EMG biofeedback training was still discernible. The EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group had an 82% reduction in shoulder pain from baseline to follow-up (P = .004), while the Exercise group showed a 63% reduction (P = .03) over the same time period. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that EMG biofeedback has value when added to an exercise intervention to reduce shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. These findings indicate that EMG biofeedback may be valuable in remediating

  17. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN646). Floor plan for water treatment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-646). Floor plan for water treatment room on west facade, tank and filter locations in basement along service tunnel and in coupling station. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-17 ANP/GE-6-646-P-2. April 1957. INEEL Index code no. 037-0645/0646-51-693-107387 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Redesign and treatment planning orbital floor reconstruction using computer analysis anatomical landmarks.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Govsa, Figen; Kazak, Zuhal; Erdogmus, Senem; Celik, Servet

    2016-08-01

    Orbital floor fractures are one of the most commonly encountered maxillofacial fractures due to their weak anatomical structure. Restoration of the orbital floor following a traumatic injury or a tumor surgery is often difficult due to inadequate visibility and lack of knowledge on its anatomical details. The aim of this study is to investigate the locations of the inferior orbital fissure (IOF), infraorbital groove (G), and infraorbital foramen (Fo) and their relationship with the orbital floor using a software. Measurements from the inferior orbital rim (IOR) using the Fo, the IOF, G, and the optic canal (OC) were calculated in 268 orbits as reference points. The surgical landmarks from the G and the OC, the G and the IOF, the G and the intersection point were measured as 31.6 ± 6, 12.9 ± 4, and 12 ± 5 mm, respectively. The mean distances between the G and the IOR, the Fo and the IOF, and the Fo and the OC were found as 8.3 ± 2.1, 28.7 ± 3.5, and 53.6 ± 5.9 mm, respectively. The mean angles were calculated as OC-IOF-G 68.1° ± 16.4°; intersection-G-IOF as 61.4° ± 15.8°; IOF-OC-G as 19° ± 5.5°; OC-G-intersection as 31.5° ± 11.9°, G-intersection-OC as 129.5°, IOF-intersection-G as 50.5°. Furthermore, variable bony changes on the orbital floor which may lead to the differences at intersection point of the G and Fo were determined. In 28 specimens (20.9 %), unilateral accessory Fo (AcFo) was present. In 27 specimens, AcFo was situated supermaedially (96.4 %) on the main aperture. In one specimen, two intraorbital canals and Fo emerged from different points and coursed into different apertures. The measured mean distances of the AcFo-IOR and the AcFo-Fo were as 7 ± 2 and 7.3 ± 3.2 mm, respectively. The primary principle in the oculoplastic treatment of orbital floor reconstructions must be repositioning the herniated orbital aperture by maintaining the infraorbital artery and the nerve in the orbital floor. The IOF and

  19. A pilot study of heart rate variability biofeedback therapy in the treatment of perinatal depression on a specialized perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Beckham, A Jenna; Greene, Tammy B; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) therapy may be useful in treating the prominent anxiety features of perinatal depression. We investigated the use of this non-pharmacologic therapy among women hospitalized with severe perinatal depression. Three questionnaires, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale, and Linear Analog Self Assessment, were administered to 15 women in a specialized inpatient perinatal psychiatry unit. Participants were also contacted by telephone after discharge to assess continued use of HRVB techniques. The use of HRVB was associated with an improvement in all three scales. The greatest improvement (-13.867, p < 0.001 and -11.533, p < 0.001) was among STAI scores. A majority (81.9 %, n = 9) of women surveyed by telephone also reported continued frequent use at least once per week, and over half (54.6 %, n = 6) described the use of HRVB techniques as very or extremely beneficial. The use of HRVB was associated with statistically significant improvement on all instrument scores, the greatest of which was STAI scores, and most women reported frequent continued use of HRVB techniques after discharge. These results suggest that HRVB may be particularly beneficial in the treatment of the prominent anxiety features of perinatal depression, both in inpatient and outpatient settings. PMID:23179141

  20. Stress Management by Biofeedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In the 1980's, Dr. Patrick Doyle served on a project to train U.S. astronauts at Johnson Space Center in biofeedback techniques to control anxiety and hypertension. Traditional biofeedback concepts were found to be too mundane, repetitive and boring, so Doyle developed Bio-Games with more interesting and involved formats. The first product, Bio-Ball, is an interactive, multimedia baseball video game that is played by relaxing in order to hit the ball. Gradually the player is able to relax at will, and with practice is able to apply the skills to real-life situations. Doyle has since gone on to create a number of biofeedback games marketed by Creative MultiMedia Inc. including Bio-Golf, Clutch City, and Pachyderm. Stress-busting screen savers are also being marketed under the Buddies series. In addition to being used in the corporate world, Bio-Games have been recognized by the Starbright Foundation which focuses on improving the total hospital environments of critically injured and chronically-ill children.

  1. Reduced heart rate variability in chronic severe traumatic brain injury: Association with impaired emotional and social functioning, and potential for treatment using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Francis, Heather M; Fisher, Alana; Rushby, Jacqueline A; McDonald, Skye

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) may provide an index of capacity for social functioning and may be remediated by HRV biofeedback. Given reductions in HRV are found following traumatic brain injury (TBI), the present study aimed to determine whether lower HRV in TBI is associated with social function, and whether HRV biofeedback might be a useful remediation technique in this population. Resting state HRV and measures of social and emotional processing were collected in 30 individuals with severe TBI (3-34 years post-injury) and 30 controls. This was followed by a single session of HRV biofeedback. HRV was positively associated with social cognition and empathy, and negatively associated with alexithymia for the TBI group. Both TBI and control groups showed significantly increased HRV on both time-domain (i.e., SDNN, rMSSD) and frequency-domain measures (LF, HF, LF:HF ratio) during biofeedback compared to baseline. These results suggest that decreased HRV is linked to social and emotional function following severe TBI, and may be a novel target for therapy using HRV biofeedback techniques. PMID:25627984

  2. Biofeedback: The Beat Goes On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kater, Donna; Spires, Jeanette

    1975-01-01

    This article reviews some of the research applications of biofeedback techniques and suggests how these may be of use in counseling. The goals toward which biofeedback can be used are increased self-awareness, integration of the individual, and the freedom to make choices regarding states of consciousness. (SJL)

  3. Alcoholism, Alpha Production, and Biofeedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Frances W.; Holmes, David S.

    1976-01-01

    Electroencephalograms of 20 alcoholics and 20 nonalcoholics were obtained. Data indicated that alcoholics produced less alpha than nonalcoholics. In one training condition subjects were given accurate biofeedback, whereas in the other condition subjects were given random (noncontingent) feedback. Accurate biofeedback did not result in greater…

  4. The benefit of heart rate variability biofeedback and relaxation training in reducing trait anxiety†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Kim, Jung K; Wachholtz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Previous research studies have indicated that biofeedback treatment and relaxation techniques are effective in reducing psychological and physical symptoms (Hammond, 2005; Manzoni, G. M., Pagnini, F., Castelnuovo, G., & Molinari, E., 2008). However, dearth of studies has compared heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback treatment and relaxation training to reduce trait anxiety. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of HRV biofeedback treatment and relaxation training in reducing trait anxiety compared to control group without any treatment using students in a science and engineering university of South Korea. For the present study, a total of 15 graduate students with moderate level of trait anxiety were recruited for 4 individual sessions every two weeks. They were randomly assigned into three groups: biofeedback treatment (n = 5), relaxation training (n = 5), and no treatment control group (n = 5). Our results revealed significant difference in change score of trait anxiety between the HRV biofeedback treatment and the no treatment control group. However, no significant difference was found between the relaxation training group and the no treatment control group. In addition, there was no significant difference between the HRV biofeedback treatment and the relaxation training. Results of the present study indicate that there is potential benefit in utilizing HRV biofeedback treatment for stress management programs and/or anxiety reduction treatment PMID:27099546

  5. Transurethral Radiofrequency Collagen Denaturation for Treatment of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Review of the Literature and Clinical Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lukban, James Chivian

    2012-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition in women with a significant negative effect on quality of life. Intervention includes behavioral modification, intravaginal devices, pelvic floor muscle exercises, biofeedback, functional electrical stimulation, and surgical procedures. We will review a new in-office procedure for the treatment of SUI that may serve as a viable nonsurgical option. PMID:22007230

  6. Predicting Differential Response to EMG Biofeedback and Relaxation Training: The Role of Cognitive Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, James D.

    1984-01-01

    Analyzed treatment outcome data for 102 headache patients who had been assigned randomly to receive either EMG biofeedback (N=70) or relaxation training (N=32). Analysis demonstrated that relaxation training was significantly more effective than biofeedback and that mixed headache patients improved significantly less than either migraine or…

  7. Recent developments in biofeedback for neuromotor rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Wolf, Steven L; He, Jiping

    2006-01-01

    The original use of biofeedback to train single muscle activity in static positions or movement unrelated to function did not correlate well to motor function improvements in patients with central nervous system injuries. The concept of task-oriented repetitive training suggests that biofeedback therapy should be delivered during functionally related dynamic movement to optimize motor function improvement. Current, advanced technologies facilitate the design of novel biofeedback systems that possess diverse parameters, advanced cue display, and sophisticated control systems for use in task-oriented biofeedback. In light of these advancements, this article: (1) reviews early biofeedback studies and their conclusions; (2) presents recent developments in biofeedback technologies and their applications to task-oriented biofeedback interventions; and (3) discusses considerations regarding the therapeutic system design and the clinical application of task-oriented biofeedback therapy. This review should provide a framework to further broaden the application of task-oriented biofeedback therapy in neuromotor rehabilitation. PMID:16790060

  8. Differential Effects of Hypnosis, Biofeedback Training, and Trophotropic Responses on Anxiety, Ego Strength, and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, John D.

    1980-01-01

    College students were randomly assigned to one of four groups: hypnotic treatment, biofeedback treatment, trophotropic treatment, and control. Results indicated hypnosis was more effective in lowering anxiety levels. With regard to increasing ego strength, both the hypnotic and biofeedback training groups proved to be significant. Presented at the…

  9. ANMS-ESNM Position Paper and Consensus Guidelines On Biofeedback Therapy for Anorectal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Satish S.C.; Benninga, Marc A; Bharucha, Adil E; Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Whitehead, William E

    2015-01-01

    Anorectal disorders such as dyssynergic defecation, fecal incontinence, levator ani syndrome and solitary rectal ulcer syndrome are common, and affect both the adult and pediatric populations. Although they are treated with several treatment approaches, over the last two decades, biofeedback therapy using visual and verbal feedback techniques has emerged as an useful option. Because it is safe, it is commonly recommended. However, the clinical efficacy of biofeedback therapy in adults and children is not clearly known, and there is a lack of critical appraisal of the techniques used and the outcomes of biofeedback therapy for these disorders. The American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society and the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility convened a task force to examine the indications, study performance characteristics, methodologies used and the efficacy of biofeedback therapy, and to provide evidence-based recommendations. Based on the strength of evidence, biofeedback therapy is recommended for the short term and long term treatment of constipation with dyssynergic defecation (Level I, Grade A), and for the treatment of fecal incontinence (Level II, Grade B). Biofeedback therapy may be useful in the short-term treatment of Levator Ani Syndrome with dyssynergic defecation (Level II, Grade B), and solitary rectal ulcer syndrome with dyssynergic defecation (Level III, Grade C), but the evidence is fair. Evidence does not support the use of biofeedback for the treatment of childhood constipation (Level 1, Grade D). PMID:25828100

  10. Visual Recovery after Primary Retinal Detachment Surgery: Biofeedback Rehabilitative Strategy.

    PubMed

    Vingolo, Enzo M; Fragiotta, Serena; Domanico, Daniela; Limoli, Paolo G; Nebbioso, Marcella; Spadea, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate possible speeding up recovery time after retinal detachment (RD) surgery using biofeedback strategy. Methods. A total of 52 eyes were selected. After surgery, patients were divided into two groups: group A, including patients submitted to biofeedback with MP-1 strategy; group B, patients who received common care strategy. Biofeedback strategy was started 15 days after the suspension of cycloplegic eye drops in buckling procedure or after silicone oil removal in the vitrectomized eyes. Controls were scheduled at baseline and 6, 12, and 18 weeks. Results. At baseline, there was no significant difference in BCVA between groups (P = 0.4230). At the end of biofeedback treatment (WK 6) BCVA of group A was significantly better (P < 0.001) than group B and BCVA was still better in group A than group B at WK 12 (P = 0.028) and at WK 18 (P = 0.041). Conclusions. Visual recovery after RD surgery is still unclear, and it does not depend on entity of the RD. Our data demonstrate that in biofeedback group there was a significant recovery in visual performances that still remains evident after 3 months from the baseline. PMID:26998353

  11. Visual Recovery after Primary Retinal Detachment Surgery: Biofeedback Rehabilitative Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Vingolo, Enzo M.; Fragiotta, Serena; Domanico, Daniela; Limoli, Paolo G.; Nebbioso, Marcella; Spadea, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate possible speeding up recovery time after retinal detachment (RD) surgery using biofeedback strategy. Methods. A total of 52 eyes were selected. After surgery, patients were divided into two groups: group A, including patients submitted to biofeedback with MP-1 strategy; group B, patients who received common care strategy. Biofeedback strategy was started 15 days after the suspension of cycloplegic eye drops in buckling procedure or after silicone oil removal in the vitrectomized eyes. Controls were scheduled at baseline and 6, 12, and 18 weeks. Results. At baseline, there was no significant difference in BCVA between groups (P = 0.4230). At the end of biofeedback treatment (WK 6) BCVA of group A was significantly better (P < 0.001) than group B and BCVA was still better in group A than group B at WK 12 (P = 0.028) and at WK 18 (P = 0.041). Conclusions. Visual recovery after RD surgery is still unclear, and it does not depend on entity of the RD. Our data demonstrate that in biofeedback group there was a significant recovery in visual performances that still remains evident after 3 months from the baseline. PMID:26998353

  12. Game-based biofeedback for paediatric anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Knox, M; Lentini, J; Cummings, Ts; McGrady, A; Whearty, K; Sancrant, L

    2011-09-01

    Twenty-four children and adolescents aged 9-17 who were referred for treatment for anxiety were assigned to either a game-based biofeedback group or a waiting list comparison group. The eight-session biofeedback intervention included psychoeducation, identification of triggers and signs of anxiety, and in vivo practice. The intervention used computer-based gaming technology to teach and practise relaxation. Analyses using ANCOVA revealed significant differences in post-test scores of anxiety and depression measures between the two groups. The intervention group reduced anxiety and depression scores on standardised tests. Findings suggest that biofeedback-assisted relaxation training can be useful in decreasing anxiety and depressive symptoms in anxious youths. PMID:22942901

  13. The effects of biofeedback in diabetes and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Angele

    2010-07-01

    The metabolic syndrome is likely to develop in patients in whom genetic predisposition, chronic stress, negative emotion, and unhealthy lifestyle habits converge. In light of the psychophysiologic aspect of most of these factors, biofeedback, relaxation, and other psychophysiologic interventions have been studied and used in patients with elements of the metabolic syndrome, particularly diabetes and hypertension. This article reviews the rationale and evidence for biofeedback for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension, which has been shown to effectively lower blood glucose and blood pressure in numerous studies. Patients with prehypertension may be a particularly appropriate target population for biofeedback for blood pressure reduction. Further research is needed to guide identification of the best candidates for psychophysiologic intervention for these conditions, although patient readiness for change is a clear prerequisite. PMID:20622080

  14. Game-based biofeedback for paediatric anxiety and depression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-four children and adolescents aged 9–17 who were referred for treatment for anxiety were assigned to either a game-based biofeedback group or a waiting list comparison group. The eight-session biofeedback intervention included psychoeducation, identification of triggers and signs of anxiety, and in vivo practice. The intervention used computer-based gaming technology to teach and practise relaxation. Analyses using ANCOVA revealed significant differences in post-test scores of anxiety and depression measures between the two groups. The intervention group reduced anxiety and depression scores on standardised tests. Findings suggest that biofeedback-assisted relaxation training can be useful in decreasing anxiety and depressive symptoms in anxious youths. PMID:22942901

  15. Skin Temperature Biofeedback in Children and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Steve; Loughry-Machado, Glenna

    1981-01-01

    Skin temperature biofeedback performance was studied in 38 6- to 10-year-old children and 38 of their parents across two sessions of audio biofeedback segments in which participants alternately attempted hand-warming and hand-cooling. Children were superior to adults in controlling skin temperature in the presence of biofeedback. (Author/DB)

  16. Cassel Psych Center Computerized Biofeedback Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Cassel Psych Center, a computerized biofeedback clinic, where the "well" patient is a major concern, and where biofeedback instruments are used with computers to form a Computerized-Biofeedback Clinical Support System. The Center's activities are designed to parallel the services of the pathologist in a medical setting. (PAS)

  17. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  18. Application of Biofeedback/Relaxation Training to Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.

    A series of investigations was conducted to determine the effects of biofeedback training on 20 learning disabled elementary boys, 16 educable retarded boys, and 5 "non-diagnosed" elementary children with learning problems. Treatment of each group consisted of getting the children settled into the room and listening to a pre-recorded audio tape…

  19. An Evaluation of a Visual Biofeedback Intervention in Dyslexic Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddle, Elizabeth; Jackson, Georgina; Jackson, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A prototype of a biofeedback system designed to treat dyslexia by improving heart-rate variability was evaluated in a single blind study of dyslexic adults. Treatment consisted of four 15 minute exposures to a visual display synchronized with either the participant's own cardiac cycle (intervention condition), or of a synthesized cardiac cycle…

  20. Biofeedback and dance performance: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Joshua; Sajid, Imran; Parkinson, Lesley A; Gruzelier, John H

    2005-03-01

    Alpha-theta neurofeedback has been shown to produce professionally significant performance improvements in music students. The present study aimed to extend this work to a different performing art and compare alpha-theta neurofeedback with another form of biofeedback: heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback. Twenty-four ballroom and Latin dancers were randomly allocated to three groups, one receiving neurofeedback, one HRV biofeedback and one no intervention. Dance was assessed before and after training. Performance improvements were found in the biofeedback groups but not in the control group. Neurofeedback and HRV biofeedback benefited performance in different ways. A replication with larger sample sizes is required. PMID:15889586

  1. Biofeedback for Better Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Biofeedtrac, Inc.'s Accommotrac Vision Trainer, invented by Dr. Joseph Trachtman, is based on vision research performed by Ames Research Center and a special optometer developed for the Ames program by Stanford Research Institute. In the United States, about 150 million people are myopes (nearsighted), who tend to overfocus when they look at distant objects causing blurry distant vision, or hyperopes (farsighted), whose vision blurs when they look at close objects because they tend to underfocus. The Accommotrac system is an optical/electronic system used by a doctor as an aid in teaching a patient how to contract and relax the ciliary body, the focusing muscle. The key is biofeedback, wherein the patient learns to control a bodily process or function he is not normally aware of. Trachtman claims a 90 percent success rate for correcting, improving or stopping focusing problems. The Vision Trainer has also proved effective in treating other eye problems such as eye oscillation, cross eyes, and lazy eye and in professional sports to improve athletes' peripheral vision and reaction time.

  2. Real-time estimation of aerodynamic features for ambulatory voice biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Llico, Andrés F.; Zañartu, Matías; González, Agustín J.; Wodicka, George R.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The development of ambulatory voice monitoring devices has the potential to improve the diagnosis and treatment of voice disorders. In this proof-of-concept study, real-time biofeedback is incorporated into a smartphone-based platform that records and processes neck surface acceleration. The focus is on utilizing aerodynamic measures of vocal function as a basis for biofeedback. This is done using regressed Z-scores to compare recorded values to normative estimates based on sound pressure level and fundamental frequency. Initial results from the analysis of different voice qualities suggest that accelerometer-based estimates of aerodynamic parameters can be used for real-time ambulatory biofeedback. PMID:26233054

  3. Treatment decision-making and information-seeking preferences in women with pelvic floor disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raker, Christina A.; Myers, Deborah L.; Clark, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis The Autonomy Preference Index (API) and Control Preferences Scale (CPS) measure information-seeking and decision-making preferences. Our objective was to validate these scales in women with pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) and identify variables associated with decision-making preferences. Methods Women seeking care for PFDs completed the API and the CPS. Psychometric properties were determined. Multivariable analyses were used to identify correlates of information-seeking and decision-making preferences. Results One hundred ten women were recruited. Both scales demonstrated good psychometric properties (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.5 to 0.7; Cronbach’s alpha = 0.8 for the API, and r=−0.3 between the API and CPS). Based on scores, women had strong preferences to be well informed, but were more neutral in their decision-making preferences. In multivariable analyses, higher education levels were associated with a stronger desire for seeking medical information. Conclusions Women seeking care for PFDs vary in their preferences for participating in treatment decisions. PMID:20424822

  4. [MANAGEMENT OF VAGINAL CONES IN THE TREATMENT OF PELVIC FLOOR REHABILITATION].

    PubMed

    Onandia Garate, Maialen; Luces Lago, Ana María; Mosquera Pan, Lucía; Tizón Bouza, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The pelvic floor (PF) is a sheet of muscles and other tissues that support the pelvic organs in their physiological positions. Throughout women's lives, these structures can become weak or be injured by events such as pregnancy, childbirth, surgery, overweight or constipation. PF dysfunction includes a group of disorders causing urinary incontinence, as well as genital prolapse or pelvic pain, and can significantly deteriorate women's quality of life. Vaginal cones (VC) represent a non-pharmacological, economical, safe and non-invasive method for the treatment of PF dysfunction; they allow the patient to increase the physiological consciousness of the musculature of the PF while promoting an increase in the muscle tone. The midwife, as a professional intimately connected with women's health care, works with the multidisciplinary team which treats pelvic dysfunctions; therefore, they need to provide updated information about the different methods for improving perineal function, including VC, and providing advice on their use and management, and establishing individualized exercise programs and tracking information for each case. The available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of the VC is limited and there may be other methods to treat PF dysfunctions. PMID:26448995

  5. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Lünenburger, Lars; Colombo, Gery; Riener, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. Methods To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. Results The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Conclusion Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback values to the patients and

  6. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: Can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    SciTech Connect

    Stam, Marcel R. . E-mail: m.stam@rther.umcn.nl; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. Results: A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 Sd = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. Conclusions: This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  7. Successful Treatment of Silent Sinus Syndrome With Combined Endoscopic Sinus Surgery and Blepharoplasty Without Orbital Floor Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hyung

    2016-09-01

    Silent sinus syndrome (SSS) is a rare clinical syndrome associated with characteristic spontaneous and gradual downward bowing of the orbital floor caused by impaired sinus ventilation. The author experienced a rare case of SSS in a 35-year-old woman patient. She was referred for evaluation of a spontaneous orbital asymmetry with right enophthalmos and hypoglobus. She underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery to open obstructed maxillary sinus ostium and aesthetic eyelid surgery to enhance the appearance of her orbital asymmetry. These surgical treatments brought about the effect of making her eyes look more symmetric, refreshed, and alert. Here, the author reports a good treatment result of SSS without orbital floor reconstruction along with review of literatures. PMID:27536921

  8. [Significance of conservative treatment for faecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schwandner, O

    2012-08-01

    Based on a variety of aetiological factors and combined disorders in faecal incontinence, a conservative treatment option as the primary treatment can be recommended. Conservative treatment includes medical therapy influencing stool consistency and stool passage, pelvic floor exercises and biofeedback as well as local treatment options. However, defining the role of conservative treatment concepts related to success or failure remains a challenging task. The lack of evidence derived from studies is related to a variety of reasons including inclusion criteria, patient selection, treatment standardisation, and the principal difficulty to objectively define functional success. PMID:22933004

  9. Mydriasis during Orbital Floor Fracture Reconstruction: A Novel Diagnostic and Treatment Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Matthew S.; Al-Mousa, Radwan; Sundar, Gangadhara; Lim, Thiam Chye

    2010-01-01

    Orbital floor fractures are the most commonly encountered traumatic fractures in the facial skeleton. Mydriasis that is detected during orbital floor fracture reconstruction may cause significant distress to surgeons, as it may be associated with sinister events such as visual loss. It is not an uncommon problem; previous studies have shown the incidence of mydriasis to be 2.1%. The combination of careful preoperative evaluation and planning, as well as specific intraoperative investigations when mydriasis is encountered, can be immensely valuable in allaying surgeons' anxiety during orbital floor fracture reconstruction. In this review article, the authors discuss the common causes of mydriasis and present a novel systematic approach to its diagnostic evaluation devised by our unit that has been successfully implemented since 2008. PMID:22132259

  10. The use of a respiratory rate biofeedback device to reduce dental anxiety: an exploratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Morarend, Quinn A; Spector, Michael L; Dawson, Deborah V; Clark, Steven H; Holmes, David C

    2011-06-01

    Anxiety experienced by individuals visiting the dental office to receive treatment is common. Evidence has shown biofeedback to be a useful modality of treatment for numerous maladies associated with anxiety. The purpose of the current pilot study was to investigate the use of a novel biofeedback device (RESPeRATE™) to reduce patients' pre-operative general anxiety levels and consequently reduce the pain associated with dental injections. Eighty-one subjects participated in this study, forty in the experimental group and forty-one in the control group. Subjects in the experimental group used the biofeedback technique, while those in the control group were not exposed to any biofeedback. All subjects filled out a pre-injection anxiety survey, then received an inferior alveolar injection of local anesthetic. Post-injection, both groups were given an anxiety survey and asked to respond to four questions regarding the injection experience using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). With the use of the respiratory rate biofeedback device, there was a significant reduction of negative feelings regarding the overall injection experience, as measured by a VAS. Our findings demonstrate that this novel biofeedback technique may be helpful in the amelioration of dental anxiety, and may help produce a more pleasant overall experience for the patient. PMID:21365307

  11. Long-term effects of electrodermal biofeedback training on seizure control in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoko; Trimble, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We report data from two patients, followed over 3 years after electrodermal biofeedback treatment. Patients were trained three times each week for four weeks to increase their sympathetic arousal using electrodermal biofeedback. This treatment was directed at enabling the patients to change their psychophysiological state as a countermeasure to prevent seizures. Both patients voluntarily kept a record of seizure frequency over the year preceding the treatment and continued to record their seizures for up to 3 years after the termination of biofeedback treatment. Both patients showed a marked reduction in seizure frequency (54.9% and 59.8%) during the month of biofeedback treatment. This improvement was maintained over the subsequent years. We highlight the therapeutic potential of biofeedback interventions that enable patients to volitionally control their state of physiological arousal in the management of drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:24238895

  12. Biofeedback Training and Therapeutic Gains: Clinical Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, John L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses several indirect benefits of clinical biofeedback training and their role in the therapeutic process. Suggests these secondary benefits may give biofeedback a distinctive advantage over other therapeutic interventions. Argues that these benefits are as important to the client's long-term emotional and physical health as is symptom…

  13. Biofeedback and Communication: Perspectives and Definitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohm, C.E.; Goyer, R.S.

    This paper discusses the term "biofeedback" in its historical context and relates it to behavioral research in speech communication. The paper presents an operational model of the communication process, suggesting that biofeedback techniques might be used within the scope of the model to monitor, study, and ultimately modify an individual's normal…

  14. A prospective randomized study to compare pelvic floor rehabilitation and dapoxetine for treatment of lifelong premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Pastore, A L; Palleschi, G; Leto, A; Pacini, L; Iori, F; Leonardo, C; Carbone, A

    2012-08-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common male sexual disorder. We compared pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation to on-demand treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor dapoxetine in 40 men with lifelong PE (baseline intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) ≤1 min). Subjects were randomized into the following two treatment groups: (1) PFM rehabilitation or (2) 30 or 60 mg of on-demand dapoxetine. Total treatment time for both groups was 12 weeks, at the end of which, IELT mean values were calculated to compare the effectiveness of the two different therapeutic approaches. At the end of treatment, 11 of the 19 patients (57%) treated with rehabilitation were able to control the ejaculation reflex, with a mean IELT of 126.6 sec (range: 123.6-152.4 sec). In the dapoxetine group, after 12 weeks of therapy, 5 of 8 (62.5%) patients in the 30 mg subgroup and five of seven (72%) in the 60 mg subgroup had an IELT >180 sec (mean: 178.2 and 202.8 sec, respectively). The results obtained in the group treated with pelvic floor rehabilitation are promising, and this treatment represents an important cost reduction if compared to dapoxetine on-demand treatment. The present study confirms the data that are previously available in the literature on the efficacy and safety of the new inhibitor of serotonin reuptake, dapoxetine, as well as proposes and evaluates a new type of physical treatment that may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of PE. PMID:22320846

  15. Breathing biofeedback as an adjunct to exposure in cognitive behavioral therapy hastens the reduction of PTSD symptoms: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rosaura Polak, A; Witteveen, Anke B; Denys, Damiaan; Olff, Miranda

    2015-03-01

    Although trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) with exposure is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), not all patients recover. Addition of breathing biofeedback to exposure in TF-CBT is suggested as a promising complementary technique to improve recovery of PTSD symptoms. Patients (n = 8) with chronic PTSD were randomized to regular TF-CBT or TF-CBT with complementary breathing biofeedback to exposure. PTSD symptoms were measured before, during and after TF-CBT with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. The results show that breathing biofeedback is feasible and can easily be complemented to TF-CBT. Although PTSD symptoms significantly decreased from pre to post treatment in both conditions, there was a clear trend towards a significantly faster (p = .051) symptom reduction in biofeedback compared to regular TF-CBT. The most important limitation was the small sample size. The hastened clinical improvement in the biofeedback condition supports the idea that breathing biofeedback may be an effective complementary component to exposure in PTSD patients. The mechanism of action of breathing biofeedback may relate to competing working memory resources decreasing vividness and emotionality, similar to eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. Future research is needed to examine this. PMID:25750106

  16. Prospective randomized comparison of oxybutynin, functional electrostimulation, and pelvic floor training for treatment of detrusor overactivity in women.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Raquel M; Castro, Rodrigo A; Sousa, Gabriela C; Sartori, Marair G F; Baracat, Edmund C; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of oxybutynin, functional electrostimulation (FES), and pelvic floor training (PFT) for treatment of women with detrusor overactivity. Sixty-four subjects were randomized to oxybutynin (n=22), FES (n=21), or PFT (n=21). Women were evaluated before and after completion of 12 weeks of treatment by subjective response, voiding diary, and urodynamic test. There was subjective symptomatic improvement in 77% of the women treated with oxybutynin, 52% with FES, and 76% with PFT. Urgency resolved in 64% of women treated with oxybutynin, 52% with FES, and in 57% with PFT. Urodynamic evaluation was normal in 36% treated with oxybutynin, 57% with FES, and 52% with PFT. Maximum detrusor involuntary contraction pressure decreased in all groups (p<0.05). All treatments were equally effective. Subjective reduction of urge-incontinence episodes was associated with symptomatic improvement. PMID:18330483

  17. Single-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training, Electrical Stimulation, Vaginal Cones, and No Active Treatment in the Management of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rodrigo A.; Arruda, Raquel M.; Zanetti, Miriam R. D.; Santos, Patricia D.; Sartori, Marair G. F.; Girão, Manoel J. B. C.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the effectiveness of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. PATIENTS AND METHODS One hundred eighteen subjects were randomly selected to recieve pelvic floor exercises (n=31), ES (n=30), vaginal cones (n=27), or no treatment (untreated control) (n=30). Women were evaluated before and after completion of six months of treatment by the pad test, quality of life questionnaire (I-QOL), urodynamic test, voiding diary, and subjective response. RESULTS In the objective evaluation, we observed a statistically significant reduction in the pad test (p=0.003), in the number of stress urinary episodes (p<0.001), and a significant improvement in the quality of life (p<0.001) in subjects who used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones compared to the control group. No significant difference was found between groups in the urodynamic parameters. In the subjective evaluation, 58%, 55%, and 54% of women who had used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones, respectively, reported being satisfied after treatment. In the control group, only 21% patients were satisfied with the treatment. CONCLUSION Based on this study, pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones are equally effective treatments and are far superior to no treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. PMID:18719756

  18. Enhancing generalisation in biofeedback intervention using the challenge point framework: A case study

    PubMed Central

    HITCHCOCK, ELAINE R.; BYUN, TARA McALLISTER

    2014-01-01

    Biofeedback intervention can help children achieve correct production of a treatment-resistant error sound, but generalisation is often limited. This case study suggests that generalisation can be enhanced when biofeedback intervention is structured in accordance with a “challenge point” framework for speech-motor learning. The participant was an 11-year-old with residual /r/ misarticulation who had previously attained correct /r/ production through a structured course of ultrasound biofeedback treatment but did not generalise these gains beyond the word level. Treatment difficulty was adjusted in an adaptive manner following predetermined criteria for advancing, maintaining, or moving back a level in a multidimensional hierarchy of functional task complexity. The participant achieved and maintained virtually 100% accuracy in producing /r/ at both word and sentence levels. These preliminary results support the efficacy of a semi-structured implementation of the challenge point framework as a means of achieving generalisation and maintenance of treatment gains. PMID:25216375

  19. Pelvic floor muscle training for urgency urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Greer, Joy A; Smith, Ariana L; Arya, Lily A

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of existing physiotherapy modalities for the treatment of urge urinary incontinence (UUI). A systematic review was performed for primary studies of physiotherapy techniques for UUI published in English between 1996 and August 2010 in major electronic databases. Only randomized clinical trials that reported outcomes separately for women with UUI were included. Outcomes assessed were reduction in UUI, urinary frequency, and nocturia. Data from 13 full-text trials including the modalities of pelvic floor muscles exercises with or without biofeedback, vaginal electrical stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and vaginal cones were analyzed. The methodologic quality of these trials was fair. Significant improvement in UUI was reported for all physiotherapy techniques except vaginal cone therapy. There are insufficient data to determine if pelvic physiotherapy improves urinary frequency or nocturia. Evidence suggests that physiotherapy techniques may be beneficial for the treatment of UUI. PMID:22246576

  20. Third Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, First Floor Plan, Ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Third Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, First Floor Plan, Ground Floor Plan, West Bunkhouse - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  1. Biofeedback in medicine: who, when, why and how?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Biofeedback is a mind–body technique in which individuals learn how to modify their physiology for the purpose of improving physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. Much like physical therapy, biofeedback training requires active participation on the part of patients and often regular practice between training sessions. Clinical biofeedback may be used to manage disease symptoms as well as to improve overall health and wellness through stress management training. Research has shown that biofeedback interventions are efficacious in treating a variety of medical conditions, and many Americans are turning to biofeedback and other less traditional therapies for their routine healthcare. Clinical biofeedback training is growing increasingly popular in the USA, as many people are seeking out relatively new approaches to healthcare. This article provides an overview of clinical biofeedback training, outlines two models of training, details research which has established how effective biofeedback is in patients with a given disease, and describes who should be referred for biofeedback training. PMID:22477926

  2. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05), and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017), indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017). The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits. PMID:26694399

  3. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05), and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017), indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017). The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits. PMID:26694399

  4. SU-E-J-29: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Tumor Motion Consistency for Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Makhija, K; Keall, P; Greer, P; Arm, J; Hunter, P; Kim, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the breathing-guidance system: audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. This will minimize respiratory-induced tumor motion variations across cancer imaging and radiotherapy procedues. This is the first study to investigate the impact of respiratory guidance on tumor motion. Methods: Tumor motion consistency was investigated with five lung cancer patients (age: 55 to 64), who underwent a training session to get familiarized with AV biofeedback, followed by two MRI sessions across different dates (pre and mid treatment). During the training session in a CT room, two patient specific breathing patterns were obtained before (Breathing-Pattern-1) and after (Breathing-Pattern-2) training with AV biofeedback. In each MRI session, four MRI scans were performed to obtain 2D coronal and sagittal image datasets in free breathing (FB), and with AV biofeedback utilizing Breathing-Pattern-2. Image pixel values of 2D images after the normalization of 2D images per dataset and Gaussian filter per image were used to extract tumor motion using image pixel values. The tumor motion consistency of the superior-inferior (SI) direction was evaluated in terms of an average tumor motion range and period. Results: Audiovisual biofeedback improved tumor motion consistency by 60% (p value = 0.019) from 1.0±0.6 mm (FB) to 0.4±0.4 mm (AV) in SI motion range, and by 86% (p value < 0.001) from 0.7±0.6 s (FB) to 0.1±0.2 s (AV) in period. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves both breathing pattern and tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential for facilitating reproducible tumor motion towards achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  5. Surgical vs. non-surgical treatment in women with pelvic floor dysfunction: Patient-centered goals at one year

    PubMed Central

    Hullfish, Kathie L.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Gurka, Matthew J.; Steers, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective In women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), we assessed the degree to which treatment (surgical vs. non-surgical) was associated with achievement of patient-centered goals, satisfaction with care, and quality of life. Study design Prospective cohort. Between September 2003 and December 2004 we recruited women during their first referral visit for PFD treatment at our outpatient Urogynecology Clinic. At the first visit, women enumerated up to five personal treatment goals, and “anchored” each goal by anticipating best and worst possible outcomes. At 12 month follow-up, women were asked to indicate their level of goal attainment (−2, worst outcome; +2, best outcome). At baseline and follow-up, women completed short forms of the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) (range 0–100, high scores indicating greater impact or distress). Patients indicated level of treatment satisfaction on a 4 level ordinal scale. Results Of the 127 study participants with complete data, 46 (36.2 %) were managed surgically and 81 (63.8%) non surgically. There were no major demographic differences between the two groups in terms of age, race, weight, prior PFD surgery, and vaginal parity. The surgical group was more likely to have received baseline diagnosis of pelvic organ prolapse (80 % vs 60 %, p = 0.0259), and be post-menopausal (89 % vs 72 %, p = 0.0261). There were no significant differences in the distribution of goal type (symptom relief, activity, self image, general health) by treatment status (p = 0.1074). Using logistic regression to adjust for age and baseline diagnosis, surgically managed patients at one year were significantly more likely to report complete primary goal attainment (odds ratio (OR) = 4.42; p = 0.0154) and complete treatment satisfaction (OR = 6.12; p = 0.0109). For all participants, one-year IIQ-7 and UDI-6 scores were significantly correlated with primary goal attainment scores. Conclusions In

  6. Biofeedback Training in the Rehabilitation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Claudell S.

    1979-01-01

    The article describes how a 60-hour training program helped 32 blind persons use biofeedback techniques to improve blood flow to arms, hands, legs, and feet (especially important for diabetics), and to reduce anxiety through relaxation. (Author)

  7. Evaluation of the Acoustic Measurement Capability of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel Open Test Section with Acoustically Absorbent Ceiling and Floor Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The single source location used for helicopter model studies was utilized in a study to determine the distances and directions upstream of the model accurate at which measurements of the direct acoustic field could be obtained. The method used was to measure the decrease of sound pressure levels with distance from a noise source and thereby determine the Hall radius as a function of frequency and direction. Test arrangements and procedures are described. Graphs show the normalized sound pressure level versus distance curves for the glass fiber floor treatment and for the foam floor treatment.

  8. Investigating the Use of Traditional and Spectral Biofeedback Approaches to Intervention for /r/ Misarticulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byun, Tara McAllister; Hitchcock, Elaine R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Misarticulation of /r/ is among the most challenging developmental speech errors to remediate. Case studies suggest that visual biofeedback treatment can establish perceptually accurate /r/ in clients who have not responded to traditional treatments. This investigation studied the response of children with persistent /r/ misarticulation…

  9. Using music as a signal for biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Ilias; Seinfeld, Sofia; Arroyo-Palacios, Jorge; Slater, Mel; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2014-07-01

    Studies on the potential benefits of conveying biofeedback stimulus using a musical signal have appeared in recent years with the intent of harnessing the strong effects that music listening may have on subjects. While results are encouraging, the fundamental question has yet to be addressed, of how combined music and biofeedback compares to the already established use of either of these elements separately. This experiment, involving young adults (N = 24), compared the effectiveness at modulating participants' states of physiological arousal of each of the following conditions: A) listening to pre-recorded music, B) sonification biofeedback of the heart rate, and C) an algorithmically modulated musical feedback signal conveying the subject's heart rate. Our hypothesis was that each of the conditions (A), (B) and (C) would differ from the other two in the extent to which it enables participants to increase and decrease their state of physiological arousal, with (C) being more effective than (B), and both more than (A). Several physiological measures and qualitative responses were recorded and analyzed. Results show that using musical biofeedback allowed participants to modulate their state of physiological arousal at least equally well as sonification biofeedback, and much better than just listening to music, as reflected in their heart rate measurements, controlling for respiration-rate. Our findings indicate that the known effects of music in modulating arousal can therefore be beneficially harnessed when designing a biofeedback protocol. PMID:23623954

  10. Efficacy of Biofeedback Therapy before and after Sphincteroplasty for Fecal Incontinence because of Obstetric Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghahramani, Leila; Mohammadipour, Mastoureh; Roshanravan, Reza; Hajihosseini, Fahimeh; Bananzadeh, Alimohammad; Izadpanah, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a challenging condition in that it exerts various psychosocial impacts on daily life. Different treatment modalities have been suggested for fecal incontinence. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy in combination with surgery in the management of fecal incontinence. The present randomized controlled trial was performed on 27 women with a complaint of fecal incontinence because of delivery trauma. The patients underwent sphincteroplasty and levatorplasty via the same method by 2 colorectal surgeons. In Group I, biofeedback therapy was performed 3 months before and 6 months after the surgery; in Group II, biofeedback therapy was applied only 6 months after the surgery; and in Group III, only surgical management was performed. The results revealed a significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative Wexner scores of incontinence in all the 3 groups. Additionally, the difference between the preoperative and postoperative scores was significant only in Group I and Group III, but not in Group II. The reduction in the Wexner score was significantly less in Group III. However, no significant difference was observed between the 3 groups concerning the mean difference of preoperative and postoperative manometry. The present study revealed no significant role for biofeedback therapy alone in the improvement of manometric evaluation. However, the Wexner score, which is an indicator of patient satisfaction, increased with biofeedback therapy following sphincteroplasty. In general, surgical treatment is now reserved for selected patients with fecal incontinence and has recently been developed with biofeedback therapy. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201206039936N1 PMID:26989283

  11. Internet-based treatment of stress urinary incontinence: a randomised controlled study with focus on pelvic floor muscle training

    PubMed Central

    Sjöström, Malin; Umefjord, Göran; Stenlund, Hans; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    What’s known on the subject? and What does the study add? Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) affects 10–35% of women, and it is sometimes very distressful. Pelvic floor exercises are the first line of treatment, but access barriers or embarrassment may prevent women from seeking help. There is a need for new, simple, and effective ways to deliver treatment. Management of SUI without face-to-face contact is possible, and Internet-based treatment is a new, promising treatment alternative. Objective To compare two treatment programmes for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) without face-to-face contact: one Internet-based and one sent by post. Patients and Methods Randomised, controlled trial conducted in Sweden 2009–2011. Computer-generated block-randomisation, allocation by independent administrator. No ‘blinding’. The study included 250 community-dwelling women aged 18–70 years, with SUI ≥1 time/week. Consecutive online recruitment. The women had 3 months of either; (i) An Internet-based treatment programme (124 women), including e-mail support and cognitive behavioural therapy assignments or (ii) A treatment programme sent by post (126). Both programmes focused mainly on pelvic floor muscle training. Primary outcomes: symptom-score (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, ICIQ-UI SF) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life, ICIQ-LUTSQoL). Secondary outcomes: (i) Patient Global Impression of Improvement, (ii) Incontinence aids, (iii) Patient satisfaction, (iv) Health-specific QoL (EQ5D-Visual Analogue Scale), and (v) Incontinence episode frequency. Follow-up after 4 months via self-assessed postal questionnaires. Results In all, 12% (30 women) were lost to follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis showed highly significant improvements (P < 0.001) with large effect sizes (>0.8) with both interventions, but there were no significant differences between groups in primary outcomes

  12. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress, Anxiety, and Depression among Graduate Students in Public Health Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Ratanasiripong, Nop; Hanklang, Suda; Chumchai, Pornlert

    2015-01-01

    Globally, graduate students have been found to have high prevalence of mental health problems. With increasing severity of mental health problems on university campuses and limited resources for mental health treatment, alternative interventions are needed. This study investigated the use of biofeedback training to help reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. A sample of 60 graduate students in public health nursing was randomly assigned to either the biofeedback intervention or the control group. Results indicated that biofeedback intervention was effective in significantly reducing the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression over the 4-week period, while the control group had increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression over the same timeframe. As future leaders in the public health nursing arena, the more psychologically healthy the graduate students in public health nursing are, the better the public health nursing professionals they will be as they go forth to serve the community after graduation. PMID:25954515

  13. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress, Anxiety, and Depression among Graduate Students in Public Health Nursing.

    PubMed

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Ratanasiripong, Nop; Hanklang, Suda; Chumchai, Pornlert

    2015-01-01

    Globally, graduate students have been found to have high prevalence of mental health problems. With increasing severity of mental health problems on university campuses and limited resources for mental health treatment, alternative interventions are needed. This study investigated the use of biofeedback training to help reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. A sample of 60 graduate students in public health nursing was randomly assigned to either the biofeedback intervention or the control group. Results indicated that biofeedback intervention was effective in significantly reducing the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression over the 4-week period, while the control group had increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression over the same timeframe. As future leaders in the public health nursing arena, the more psychologically healthy the graduate students in public health nursing are, the better the public health nursing professionals they will be as they go forth to serve the community after graduation. PMID:25954515

  14. Audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy: Impact of audio instruction and audio-visual biofeedback on respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    George, Rohini; Chung, Theodore D.; Vedam, Sastry S.; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Mohan, Radhe; Weiss, Elisabeth; Keall, Paul J. . E-mail: pjkeall@vcu.edu

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Respiratory gating is a commercially available technology for reducing the deleterious effects of motion during imaging and treatment. The efficacy of gating is dependent on the reproducibility within and between respiratory cycles during imaging and treatment. The aim of this study was to determine whether audio-visual biofeedback can improve respiratory reproducibility by decreasing residual motion and therefore increasing the accuracy of gated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 331 respiratory traces were collected from 24 lung cancer patients. The protocol consisted of five breathing training sessions spaced about a week apart. Within each session the patients initially breathed without any instruction (free breathing), with audio instructions and with audio-visual biofeedback. Residual motion was quantified by the standard deviation of the respiratory signal within the gating window. Results: Audio-visual biofeedback significantly reduced residual motion compared with free breathing and audio instruction. Displacement-based gating has lower residual motion than phase-based gating. Little reduction in residual motion was found for duty cycles less than 30%; for duty cycles above 50% there was a sharp increase in residual motion. Conclusions: The efficiency and reproducibility of gating can be improved by: incorporating audio-visual biofeedback, using a 30-50% duty cycle, gating during exhalation, and using displacement-based gating.

  15. Priorities for treatment research from different professional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, William E; Wald, Arnold; Norton, Nancy J

    2004-01-01

    The consensus conference "Advancing the Treatment of Fecal and Urinary Incontinence Through Research" had as one of its goals the development of a comprehensive list of research priorities. Experts from all disciplines that treat incontinence-gastroenterology, pediatric gastroenterology, urology, urogynecology, colorectal surgery, geriatrics, neurology, nursing, and psychology-and patient advocates were asked to identify their highest priorities for treatment-related research. Meeting participants were shown the aggregated list and invited to propose additional priorities. Treatments for fecal incontinence (biofeedback, sphincteroplasty, antidiarrheal and laxative medications, and sacral nerve stimulation) require validation by randomized, controlled trials. For urinary incontinence, the greatest need is to compare pharmacological, behavioral, and surgical treatments. Trials assessing combined treatments (e.g., biofeedback plus surgery vs. surgery alone or biofeedback alone) are also needed. New drugs are needed that target anal canal resting pressure in fecal incontinence and hypersensitivity to distention in urge urinary incontinence. It may be possible to substantially reduce the incidence of incontinence through modification of obstetric practices (e.g., avoiding episiotomies or offering elective cesarean delivery to high-risk patients), providing pelvic floor exercises before childbirth, and educating patients to avoid straining during defecation. For the elderly, practical behavioral and pharmacological treatments are needed that can postpone or avoid institutionalization. Social science research may identify ways to counteract the social stigma of fecal incontinence and assist physicians in providing patients with more comprehensive and understandable information on the risks associated with different treatment options. PMID:14978659

  16. Audiovisual biofeedback improves motion prediction accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of motion prediction, utilized to overcome the system latency of motion management radiotherapy systems, is hampered by irregularities present in the patients’ respiratory pattern. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been shown to reduce respiratory irregularities. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that AV biofeedback improves the accuracy of motion prediction. Methods: An AV biofeedback system combined with real-time respiratory data acquisition and MR images were implemented in this project. One-dimensional respiratory data from (1) the abdominal wall (30 Hz) and (2) the thoracic diaphragm (5 Hz) were obtained from 15 healthy human subjects across 30 studies. The subjects were required to breathe with and without the guidance of AV biofeedback during each study. The obtained respiratory signals were then implemented in a kernel density estimation prediction algorithm. For each of the 30 studies, five different prediction times ranging from 50 to 1400 ms were tested (150 predictions performed). Prediction error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE); the RMSE was calculated from the difference between the real and predicted respiratory data. The statistical significance of the prediction results was determined by the Student's t-test. Results: Prediction accuracy was considerably improved by the implementation of AV biofeedback. Of the 150 respiratory predictions performed, prediction accuracy was improved 69% (103/150) of the time for abdominal wall data, and 78% (117/150) of the time for diaphragm data. The average reduction in RMSE due to AV biofeedback over unguided respiration was 26% (p < 0.001) and 29% (p < 0.001) for abdominal wall and diaphragm respiratory motion, respectively. Conclusions: This study was the first to demonstrate that the reduction of respiratory irregularities due to the implementation of AV biofeedback improves prediction accuracy. This would result in increased efficiency of motion

  17. EMG Biofeedback Training Versus Systematic Desensitization for Test Anxiety Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, John L.; Cabianca, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Biofeedback training to reduce test anxiety among university students was investigated. Biofeedback training with systematic desensitization was compared to an automated systematic desensitization program not using EMG feedback. Biofeedback training is a useful technique for reducing test anxiety, but not necessarily more effective than systematic…

  18. Blindness, Diabetes, and Amputation: Alleviation of Depression and Pain through Thermal Biofeedback Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, W. E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 39-year-old man who was blind, diabetic, and had a double amputation with chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease was treated with thermal biofeedback to reduce his depression through increased self-control, to minimize pain, and to facilitate healing of a pregangrenous hand. On treatment discharge, his mental and physical states…

  19. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy versus Temporal Pulse Amplitude Biofeedback Training for Recurrent Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul R.; Forsyth, Michael R.; Reece, John

    2007-01-01

    Sixty-four headache sufferers were allocated randomly to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), temporal pulse amplitude (TPA) biofeedback training, or waiting-list control. Fifty-one participants (14M/37F) completed the study, 30 with migraine and 21 with tension-type headache. Treatment consisted of 8, 1-hour sessions. CBT was highly effective,…

  20. Evaluation of a Biofeedback Intervention in College Students Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westlake, Garret

    2013-01-01

    This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (n = 10) and in a typical college population (n = 37). The use of EDA allowed for trends to emerge from the data and provided a foundation for future…

  1. The Association Between Distances Traveled for Care and Treatment Choices for Pelvic Floor Disorders in a Rural Southwestern Population

    PubMed Central

    Dunivan, Gena C.; Fairchild, Pamela S.; Cichowski, Sara B.; Rogers, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine if distance traveled for care influenced patient choice for conservative vs. surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and/or stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Retrospective chart review of all new patients seen in the Urogynecology clinic at the University of New Mexico Hospital (UNMH) from January 2007 through September 2011. Data collected included medical history, Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POPQ) examination, and validated quality of life questionnaires. Results 1384 women were identified with POP and/or SUI. Women traveled an average of 50 miles to receive care at UNMH. After multivariable analysis, greater distance traveled was associated with increased likelihood of choosing surgery, OR 1.45 [1.18-1.76]. More advanced disease as measured by higher stage of prolapse, OR 3.43 [2.30-5.11], and positive leak with empty supine cough test, OR 1.94 [1.45-2.59] were also associated with choosing surgical management. Conclusions Women who travel further for care and women with more advanced pelvic organ prolapse and/or stress urinary incontinence are more likely to choose surgical management for pelvic floor disorders. PMID:26925308

  2. A smartphone based cardiac coherence biofeedback system.

    PubMed

    De Jonckheere, J; Ibarissene, I; Flocteil, M; Logier, R

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac coherence biofeedback training consist on slowing one's breathing to 0.1 Hz in order to simulate the baroreflex sensitivity and increase the respiratory sinus arrhythmia efficiency. Several studies have shown that these breathing exercises can constitute an efficient therapy in many clinical contexts like cardiovascular diseases, asthma, fibromyalgia or post-traumatic stress. Such a non-intrusive therapeutic solution needs to be performed on an 8 to 10 weeks period. Even if some heart rate variability based solutions exist, they presented some mobility constrain rendering these cardiac / respiratory control technologies more difficult to perform on a daily used. In this paper, we present a new simplified smartphone based solution allowing people to process efficient cardiac coherence biofeedback exercises. Based on photo-plethysmographic imaging through the smartphone camera, this sensor-less technology allows controlling cardiac coherence biofeedback exercises through a simplified heart rate variability algorithm. PMID:25571063

  3. [Biofeedback in psychomotor training. Electrophysiological bases].

    PubMed

    Bazanova, O M; Mernaia, E M; Shtark, M B

    2008-05-01

    Comparison of influence of usual musical practice and the same trainings but using biofeedback on electrophysiological and psychological markers of optimal psychomotor functioning in 39 students-musicians revealed that the obvious musical practice caused psychomotor pressure in most students (with initially low individual alpha peak frequency), whereas similar practice combined with an individualized session of alpha-EEG/EMG biofeedback was accompanied by increase of alpha-activity in all examinees and a decrease (reduction) of integrated EMG that indicated reaching of optimal psychomotor functioning. It appears that the psychomotor learning ability depends on the baseline individual alpha-activity. Individual alpha peak frequency was associated with fluency and efficiency of psychomotor performance, individual alpha band width--with plasticity and creativity, individual amount of alpha suppression in response to opening eyes--with the level of selfactualization. These alpha activity EEG indices correlated with efficiency of the biofeedback training. PMID:18669359

  4. Biofeedback in psychomotor training. Electrophysiological basis.

    PubMed

    Bazanova, O M; Mernaya, E M; Shtark, M B

    2009-06-01

    The influences of individual musical practice and the same practice supplemented with biofeedback using electrophysiological markers for optimum music-performing activity were studied in 39 music students. Traditional technical practice produced increases in integral EMG power and decreases in alpha activity in most of the students with initially low maximum alpha activity peak frequencies. Similar practice but combined with individual sessions of alpha-EEG/EMG biofeedback were accompanied by increases in the frequency, bandwidth, and activation responses of EEG alpha rhythms in all subjects, along with decreases in EEG integral power. The efficacy of training with biofeedback and the ability to experience psychomotor learning depended on the initial individual characteristics of EEG alpha activity. PMID:19430974

  5. Floors: Selection and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Bernard

    Flooring for institutional, commercial, and industrial use is described with regard to its selection, care, and maintenance. The following flooring and subflooring material categories are discussed--(1) resilient floor coverings, (2) carpeting, (3) masonry floors, (4) wood floors, and (5) "formed-in-place floors". The properties, problems,…

  6. Intervention for Lateral /s/ Using Electropalatography (EPG) Biofeedback and an Intensive Motor Learning Approach: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuliffe, Megan J.; Cornwell, Petrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Visual biofeedback using electropalatography (EPG) has been beneficial in the treatment of some cases of lateral /s/ misarticulation. While EPG intervention is motorically based, studies have not commonly employed a motor learning approach to treatment. Furthermore, treatment success is measured primarily by change to EPG tongue-palate…

  7. SU-E-J-235: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves the Correlation Between Internal and External Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Ludbrook, J; Paganelli, C; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: External respiratory surrogates are often used to predict internal lung tumor motion for beam gating but the assumption of correlation between external and internal surrogates is not always verified resulting in amplitude mismatch and time shift. To test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves the correlation between internal and external respiratory motion, in order to improve the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatments for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: In nine lung cancer patients, 2D coronal and sagittal cine-MR images were acquired across two MRI sessions (pre- and mid-treatment) with (1) free breathing (FB) and (2) AV biofeedback. External anterior-posterior (AP) respiratory motions of (a) chest and (b) abdomen were simultaneously acquired with physiological measurement unit (PMU, 3T Skyra, Siemens Healthcare Erlangen, Germany) and real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian, Palo Alto, USA), respectively. Internal superior-inferior (SI) respiratory motions of (c) lung tumor (i.e. centroid of auto-segmented lung tumor) and (d) diaphragm (i.e. upper liver dome) were measured from individual cine-MR images across 32 dataset. The four respiratory motions were then synchronized with the cine-MR image acquisition time. Correlation coefficients were calculated in the time variation of two nominated respiratory motions: (1) chest-abdomen, (2) abdomen-diaphragm and (3) diaphragm-lung tumor. The three combinations were compared between FB and AV biofeedback. Results: Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved chest-abdomen correlation by 17% (p=0.005) from 0.75±0.23 to 0.90±0.05 and abdomen-diaphragm correlation by 4% (p=0.058) from 0.91±0.11 to 0.95±0.05. Compared to FB, AV biofeedback improved diaphragm-lung tumor correlation by 12% (p=0.023) from 0.65±0.21 to 0.74±0.16. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that AV biofeedback significantly improved the correlation of internal and external respiratory motion, thus

  8. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22258946 . Dumoulin C, Hay-Smith J. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091581 . Herderschee R, Hay-Smith EJC, Herbison GP, Roovers JP, Heineman MJ. Feedback ...

  9. The Response of Hyperkinesis to EMG Biofeedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haight, Maryellen J.; And Others

    A study was conducted involving eight hyperkinetic males (11-15 years old) to determine if Ss receiving electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training would show a reduction in frontalis muscle tension, hyperactivity, and lability, and increases in self-esteem and visual and auditory attention span. Individual 45- and 30-minute relaxation exercises…

  10. 21 CFR 882.5050 - Biofeedback device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Biofeedback device. 882.5050 Section 882.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... the status of one or more of a patient's physiological parameters (e.g., brain alpha wave...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5050 - Biofeedback device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Biofeedback device. 882.5050 Section 882.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... the status of one or more of a patient's physiological parameters (e.g., brain alpha wave...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5050 - Biofeedback device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Biofeedback device. 882.5050 Section 882.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... the status of one or more of a patient's physiological parameters (e.g., brain alpha wave...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5050 - Biofeedback device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biofeedback device. 882.5050 Section 882.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... the status of one or more of a patient's physiological parameters (e.g., brain alpha wave...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5050 - Biofeedback device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Biofeedback device. 882.5050 Section 882.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... the status of one or more of a patient's physiological parameters (e.g., brain alpha wave...

  15. Business model design for a wearable biofeedback system.

    PubMed

    Hidefjäll, Patrik; Titkova, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Wearable sensor technologies used to track daily activities have become successful in the consumer market. In order for wearable sensor technology to offer added value in the more challenging areas of stress-rehab care and occupational health stress-related biofeedback parameters need to be monitored and more elaborate business models are needed. To identify probable success factors for a wearable biofeedback system (Affective Health) in the two mentioned market segments in a Swedish setting, we conducted literature studies and interviews with relevant representatives. Data were collected and used first to describe the two market segments and then to define likely feasible business model designs, according to the Business Model Canvas framework. Needs of stakeholders were identified as inputs to business model design. Value propositions, a key building block of a business model, were defined for each segment. The value proposition for occupational health was defined as "A tool that can both identify employees at risk of stress-related disorders and reinforce healthy sustainable behavior" and for healthcare as: "Providing therapists with objective data about the patient's emotional state and motivating patients to better engage in the treatment process". PMID:25980872

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Dyssynergic Defecation.

    PubMed

    Rao, Satish S C; Patcharatrakul, Tanisa

    2016-07-30

    Dyssynergic defecation is common and affects up to one half of patients with chronic constipation. This acquired behavioral problem is due to the inability to coordinate the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles to evacuate stools. A detailed history, prospective stool diaries, and a careful digital rectal examination will not only identify the nature of bowel dysfunction, but also raise the index of suspicion for this evacuation disorder. Anorectal physiology tests and balloon expulsion test are essential for a diagnosis. Newer techniques such as high-resolution manometry and magnetic resonance defecography can provide mechanistic insights. Recently, randomized controlled trials have shown that biofeedback therapy is more effective than laxatives and other modalities, both in the short term and long term, without side effects. Also, symptom improvements correlated with changes in underlying pathophysiology. Biofeedback therapy has been recommended as the first-line of treatment for dyssynergic defecation. Here, we provide an overview of the burden of illness and pathophysiology of dyssynergic defecation, and how to diagnose and treat this condition with biofeedback therapy. PMID:27270989

  17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Dyssynergic Defecation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Satish S C; Patcharatrakul, Tanisa

    2016-01-01

    Dyssynergic defecation is common and affects up to one half of patients with chronic constipation. This acquired behavioral problem is due to the inability to coordinate the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles to evacuate stools. A detailed history, prospective stool diaries, and a careful digital rectal examination will not only identify the nature of bowel dysfunction, but also raise the index of suspicion for this evacuation disorder. Anorectal physiology tests and balloon expulsion test are essential for a diagnosis. Newer techniques such as high-resolution manometry and magnetic resonance defecography can provide mechanistic insights. Recently, randomized controlled trials have shown that biofeedback therapy is more effective than laxatives and other modalities, both in the short term and long term, without side effects. Also, symptom improvements correlated with changes in underlying pathophysiology. Biofeedback therapy has been recommended as the first-line of treatment for dyssynergic defecation. Here, we provide an overview of the burden of illness and pathophysiology of dyssynergic defecation, and how to diagnose and treat this condition with biofeedback therapy. PMID:27270989

  18. Efficacy of traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: interventions of QEEG-guided biofeedback, computers, strategies, and medications.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Kirtley E; Carmody, Dennis P

    2008-06-01

    The onset of cognitive rehabilitation brought with it a hope for an effective treatment for the traumatic brain injured subject. This paper reviews the empirical reports of changes in cognitive functioning after treatment and compares the relative effectiveness of several treatments including computer interventions, cognitive strategies, EEG biofeedback, and medications. The cognitive functions that are reviewed include auditory memory, attention and problem solving. The significance of the change in cognitive function is assessed in two ways that include effect size and longevity of effect. These analyses complement the previously published meta-reviews by adding these two criteria and include reports of EEG biofeedback, which is shown to be an effective intervention for auditory memory. PMID:18551365

  19. Breaking the cycle: cognitive behavioral therapy and biofeedback training in a case of cyclic vomiting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slutsker, Barak; Konichezky, Andres; Gothelf, Doron

    2010-12-01

    The present article presents a case of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) along with heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback training for the treatment of a medication unresponsive 13-year-old boy with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). CVS is characterized by recurring stereotypic episodes of vomiting, interspersed with asymptomatic periods. Triggers for vomiting include anticipatory anxiety related to school examinations, family conflicts, and birthday parties as well as infectious diseases, and certain foods. Current treatment design addressed two pivotal etiological factors: autonomic dysregulation and anticipatory anxiety. Treatment outcome suggests that vomiting episodes may be successfully prevented by aiding the patient to identify and manage precipitant psychological stressors, to regulate HRV patterns, and gain a renewed sense of bodily control and self-efficacy. Further research is suggested using a controlled study with pre- and post-behavioral and stress measures to evaluate the effectiveness of CBT and biofeedback training compared to pharmacotherapy and placebo. PMID:21154016

  20. Treatment of anxiety and stress with biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Dunster, Christine

    2012-09-01

    "Kate" is a thin, attractive 50-year-old perimenopausal woman who considers herself "basically healthy" but feels she needs help with stress management in her life. She is educated, married, and the mother of 4 children ranging in age from 11 to 22 years. In addition to managing her household, she has a full-time job as an administrative assistant and also works a part-time job from home. She states she needs to do this so the family can "get back on our feet" as her husband was unemployed for a number of months and they currently have 2 children in college. In addition, they relocated a year ago to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for her husband's job and now have a higher mortgage payment. "Family" is Kate's top priority, but she does not receive much assistance from her husband on the home front and feels "there is not enough time in a day." PMID:24278835

  1. Treatment of Anxiety and Stress With Biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    “Kate” is a thin, attractive 50-year-old perimenopausal woman who considers herself “basically healthy” but feels she needs help with stress management in her life. She is educated, married, and the mother of 4 children ranging in age from 11 to 22 years. In addition to managing her household, she has a full-time job as an administrative assistant and also works a part-time job from home. She states she needs to do this so the family can “get back on our feet” as her husband was unemployed for a number of months and they currently have 2 children in college. In addition, they relocated a year ago to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for her husband's job and now have a higher mortgage payment. “Family” is Kate's top priority, but she does not receive much assistance from her husband on the home front and feels “there is not enough time in a day.” PMID:24278835

  2. Thoracic ROM measurement system with visual bio-feedback: system design and biofeedback evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takeshi; Kawamura, Kazuya; Fujitani, Junko; Koike, Tomokazu; Fujimoto, Masashi; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    Patients with diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) need to improve their thorax mobility. Thoracic ROM is one of the simplest and most useful indexes to evaluate the respiratory function. In this paper, we have proposed the prototype of a simple thoracic ROM measurement system with real-time visual bio-feedback in the chest expansion test. In this system, the thoracic ROM is measured using a wire-type linear encoder whose wire is wrapped around the thorax. In this paper, firstly, the repeatability and reliability of measured thoracic ROM was confirmed as a first report of the developed prototype. Secondly, we analyzed the effect of the bio-feedback system on the respiratory function. The result of the experiment showed that it was easier to maintain a large and stable thoracic ROM during deep breathing by using the real-time visual biofeedback system of the thoracic ROM. PMID:22254548

  3. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. PMID:25108498

  4. [Conservative treatment in male urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Anding, R

    2014-03-01

    Prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of urinary incontinence are well studied in women; however, studies on male urinary incontinence focus on incontinence following surgery of the bladder or prostate, predominantly incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Aging men suffer from incontinence, most frequently urge incontinence (overactive bladder, OAB), nearly as often as women do.The domain of conservative therapy of urinary stress incontinence in men is pelvic floor training. It remains unclear whether biofeedback procedures, electrostimulation therapy, or magnetic stimulation therapy can enhance pelvic floor training. There are data suggesting that an off-label therapy with Duloxetin®, a selective serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI), improves urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy. Antimuscarinic agents in combination with bladder training have been proven as safe and effective treatment in men with OAB. Data, however, suggest that men with OAB are far less frequently treated than women. PMID:24585116

  5. The Effects of EEG Biofeedback Training on Hyperactive and/or Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassel, Steve

    The literature review presents an explanation of biofeedback and a critical evaluation of the research pertaining to electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback training for the hyperactive and/or learning disabled child. Three hypotheses are examined: whether EEG biofeedback training is efficacious; whether EEG biofeedback training is more…

  6. Long-Term Psychosomatic Effects of Biofeedback vs. Relaxation Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowlis, David P.; Borzone, Ximena C.

    Differences were compared in the short-term and long-term responses of subjects with headache, insomnia, or hypertension to biofeedback training, relaxation, or a combination of both. Headache sufferers, insomniacs, and hypertensives were randomly assigned in equal numbers to biofeedback, relaxation training or a record-keeping control. Over 2…

  7. A Cognitively Oriented Psychologist Looks at Bio-feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Richard S.

    1975-01-01

    It is advocated that bio-feedback research be approached within the larger context of emotion and adaption and oriented to the wide variety of mediators that affect the reaction pattern, rather than be treated as a special or unique kind of process limited to the bio-feedback laboratory. (EH)

  8. The Impact of Biofeedback Techniques in University Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasfield, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    The author describes the use of several biofeedback instruments. He discusses the attraction of biofeedback procedures for university counseling centers--focus on self-control of behavior, client preferance, large variety of potential applications and consequent extension of services. Informed consent issues and implications for counselor training…

  9. The Reliability of Single Subject Statistics for Biofeedback Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremner, Frederick J.; And Others

    To test the usefulness of single subject statistical designs for biofeedback, three experiments were conducted comparing biofeedback to meditation, and to a compound stimulus recognition task. In a statistical sense, this experimental design is best described as one experiment with two replications. The apparatus for each of the three experiments…

  10. An Introduction to Applications of Biofeedback Training in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danskin, David G.; Lowenstein, Timothy J.

    Biofeedback is the use of sensitive detectors (instruments) with visual and auditory displays to reveal to an individual minute changes in his internal physiological functions. Biofeedback training with such instruments results in the ability to voluntarily regulate physiological functions formerly believed involuntary. These physiological…

  11. Real-time fMRI biofeedback targeting the orbitofrontal cortex for contamination anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Michelle; Stoica, Teodora; Saksa, John; Scheinost, Dustin; Qiu, Maolin; Bhawnani, Jitendra; Pittenger, Christopher; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, Todd

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for training subjects to control activity in a region of their orbitofrontal cortex associated with contamination anxiety using biofeedback of real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) data. Increased activity of this region is seen in relationship with contamination anxiety both in control subjects and in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a relatively common and often debilitating psychiatric disorder involving contamination anxiety. Although many brain regions have been implicated in OCD, abnormality in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is one of the most consistent findings. Furthermore, hyperactivity in the OFC has been found to correlate with OCD symptom severity and decreases in hyperactivity in this region have been reported to correlate with decreased symptom severity. Therefore, the ability to control this brain area may translate into clinical improvements in obsessive-compulsive symptoms including contamination anxiety. Biofeedback of rt-fMRI data is a new technique in which the temporal pattern of activity in a specific region (or associated with a specific distributed pattern of brain activity) in a subject's brain is provided as a feedback signal to the subject. Recent reports indicate that people are able to develop control over the activity of specific brain areas when provided with rt-fMRI biofeedback. In particular, several studies using this technique to target brain areas involved in emotion processing have reported success in training subjects to control these regions. In several cases, rt-fMRI biofeedback training has been reported to induce cognitive, emotional, or clinical changes in subjects. Here we illustrate this technique as applied to the treatment of contamination anxiety in healthy subjects. This biofeedback intervention will be a valuable basic research tool: it allows researchers to perturb brain function, measure the resulting changes in brain dynamics and relate those to

  12. A biofeedback intervention to control impulsiveness in a severely personality disordered forensic patient.

    PubMed

    Howard, Rick; Schellhorn, Klaus; Lumsden, John

    2013-05-01

    Impulsiveness in personality disordered forensic patients is associated with poor treatment completion and high risk of re-offending. A biofeedback training protocol, previously found to reduce impulsiveness and improve attention in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, was used in an initial attempt to reduce impulsiveness in a severely personality disordered man with borderline, antisocial and histrionic features. Electrocortical, behavioural and self-report measures of impulsiveness were taken before and immediately following 6 weeks of biofeedback training and at 3 months follow-up. The patient successfully engaged with the intervention. His self-reports of reduced impulsiveness and improved attention were corroborated by behavioural and electrocortical measures that indicated reduced impulsiveness and better focused attention. Results suggest this intervention might prove useful in improving behavioural and emotional self-regulation in severely personality disordered patients. PMID:24343943

  13. Conservative Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence In Women: A 10-Year (2004-2013) Scoping Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Louise; Andersen, Elizabeth; Reekie, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a serious threat to the well-being of women world-wide. In this scoping review of the literature, we examined the most prominent research foci between the years 2004 and 2013. In this article, conservative treat-ment is operationalized as any non-surgical or non-pharmacological treatment modalities that could be carried out by specially trained nurses, physiotherapists, or physicians to treat stress urinary incontinence in women. The two most frequently described or systematically investigated treatment options identified in our review were 1) strengthening pelvic floor muscles with pelvic floor muscle training, including biofeedback and weighted vaginal cones; and 2) the use of intravaginal support devices, such as incontinence pessaries. Other treatment modalities were also explored in the literature review, such as intraurethral devices, behavioral and lifestyle interventions, products, and alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and acupressure. However, the focus of this article is on the two most frequently described options. PMID:26402992

  14. Effects of Instructions and Biofeedback on EEG-Alpha Production and the Effects of EEG-Alpha Biofeedback Training for Controlling Arousal in a Subsequent Stressful Situation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, David S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Results indicate that the instructions (and related information concerning alpha) rather than the biofeedback are critical in alpha biofeedback training and that this training does not appear to have utility for controlling arousal under stress. (Author)

  15. Smartphone Applications Utilizing Biofeedback Can Aid Stress Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Alison; Kelly, Mark; Robertson, Ian H.; Robertson, Deirdre A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stress is one of the leading global causes of disease and premature mortality. Despite this, interventions aimed at reducing stress have low adherence rates. The proliferation of mobile phone devices along with gaming-style applications allows for a unique opportunity to broaden the reach and appeal of stress-reduction interventions in modern society. We assessed the effectiveness of two smartphone applications games combined with biofeedback in reducing stress. Methods: We compared a control game to gaming-style smartphone applications combined with a skin conductance biofeedback device (the Pip). Fifty participants aged between 18 and 35 completed the Trier Social Stress Test. They were then randomly assigned to the intervention (biofeedback game) or control group (a non-biofeedback game) for thirty minutes. Perceived stress, heart rate and mood were measured before and after participants had played the games. Results: A mixed factorial ANOVA showed a significant interaction between time and game type in predicting perceived stress [F(1,48) = 14.19, p < 0.001]. Participants in the biofeedback intervention had significantly reduced stress compared to the control group. There was also a significant interaction between time and game in predicting heart rate [F(1,48) = 6.41, p < 0.05]. Participants in the biofeedback intervention showed significant reductions in heart rate compared to the control group. Discussion: This illustrates the potential for gaming-style smartphone applications combined with biofeedback as stress reduction interventions. PMID:27378963

  16. Surface Electromyographic (SEMG) Biofeedback for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback is a process in which biological information is measured and fed back to a patient and clinician for the purpose of gaining increased awareness and control over physiological domains. Surface electromyography (SEMG), a measure of muscle activity, allows both a patient and clinician to have direct and immediate access to muscle functioning that is not possible with manual palpation or visual observation. SEMG biofeedback can be used to help "down-train" elevated muscle activity or to "up-train" weak, inhibited, or paretic muscles. This article presents a historical and clinical overview of SEMG and its use in chronic low back pain assessment and biofeedback training. PMID:27417615

  17. Biofeedback monitoring-devices for astronauts in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotondo, G.; Pancheri, P.; Monesi, F.; Grantaliano, G.; DePascalis, V.

    After a reconsideration of the state-of-the-art in biofeedback research the implementation of biofeedback systems is envisioned as a countermeasure of stress for the psychoprophylaxis of the astronaut. A one-session experiment performed on two groups of subjects to assess the interference from EMG-feedback on the performance in a simultaneous psychomotor trial with a view to expanding biofeedback application is described. The results show that the experimental group performed in the same way as the control without feedback, but with less CNS activation. Some general conclusions are drawn from the advances in technology.

  18. Surface Electromyographic (SEMG) Biofeedback for Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Neblett, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback is a process in which biological information is measured and fed back to a patient and clinician for the purpose of gaining increased awareness and control over physiological domains. Surface electromyography (SEMG), a measure of muscle activity, allows both a patient and clinician to have direct and immediate access to muscle functioning that is not possible with manual palpation or visual observation. SEMG biofeedback can be used to help “down-train” elevated muscle activity or to “up-train” weak, inhibited, or paretic muscles. This article presents a historical and clinical overview of SEMG and its use in chronic low back pain assessment and biofeedback training. PMID:27417615

  19. Improving postural control through integration of sensory inputs and visual biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Fuller, K; Huber, L

    1995-01-01

    Postural control is an essential component to be considered in the rehabilitation of stroke survivors. This article attempts to provide the clinician with terminology and frameworks for classification in order to provide a more focused intervention. There is a comparison of some of the available assessments of impairment and disability. Treatment emphasizing the specific use of visual biofeedback to improve postural control is described. Control of the sensory environment during treatment to challenge a patient's ability to integrate available sensory information to perform balance activities is described. A case study incorporating treatment ideas is included. PMID:27619900

  20. Cleaning up Floor Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Richard; McLean, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how educational-facility maintenance departments can cut costs in floor cleaning through careful evaluation of floor equipment and products. Tips for choosing carpet detergents are highlighted. (GR)

  1. Efficacy of EMG- and EEG-Biofeedback in Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis and a Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Glombiewski, Julia Anna; Bernardy, Kathrin; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Biofeedback (BFB) is an established intervention in the rehabilitation of headache and other pain disorders. Little is known about this treatment option for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of the present review is to integrate and critically evaluate the evidence regarding the efficacy of biofeedback for FMS. Methods. We conducted a literature search using Pubmed, clinicaltrials.gov (National Institute of Health), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, and manual searches. The effect size estimates were calculated using a random-effects model. Results. The literature search produced 123 unique citations. One hundred sixteen records were excluded. The meta-analysis included seven studies (321 patients) on EEG-Biofeedback and EMG-Biofeedback. In comparison to control groups, biofeedback (BFB) significantly reduced pain intensity with a large effect size (g = 0.79; 95% CI: 0.22–1.36). Subgroup analyses revealed that only EMG-BFB and not EEG-BFB significantly reduced pain intensity in comparison to control groups (g = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.11–1.62). BFB did not reduce sleep problems, depression, fatigue, or health-related quality of life in comparison to a control group. Discussion. The interpretation of the results is limited because of a lack of studies on the long-term effects of EMG-BFB in FMS. Further research should focus on the long-term efficacy of BFB in fibromyalgia and on the identification of predictors of treatment response. PMID:24082911

  2. Efficacy of biofeedback therapy via a mini wireless device on sleep bruxism contrasted with occlusal splint: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, WeiPing; Yang, Jie; Zhang, FeiMin; Yin, XinMin; Wei, XiaoLong; Wang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The putative causes of bruxism are multifactorial and there are no definite measures for bruxism management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy on sleep bruxism, compared with occlusal splint. Twenty-four volunteers with sleep bruxism were divided into two groups: the GTB group that were treated with biofeedback therapy (n  = 12) and the GTO group that were treated with occlusal splint (n  = 12). A mini pressure sensor integrated with a monitoring circuit by use of a maxillary biofeedback splint was fabricated. To foster the relaxation of the masticatory muscles and the nervous system, the wireless device received signals from bruxism events and vibrations alerted the bruxer when the threshold was exceeded. Total episodes and average duration of bruxism events during 8 hours of sleep were analyzed with the monitoring program (TRMY1.0). After 6 and 12 weeks, the episodes (P  =  0.001) and duration (P < 0.05) in the GTB group declined dramatically. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the GTO group after the treatment (P > 0.05). Furthermore, the episodes had significant differences between the GTB group and the GTO group after the same period of treatment (P  =  0.000). The results suggest that biofeedback therapy may be an effective and convenient measure for mild bruxers, when compared with occlusal splint therapy. The mini wireless biofeedback method may be of value for the diagnosis and management of bruxism in the future. PMID:25859272

  3. Randomised controlled trial of brief intervention with biofeedback and hypnotherapy in patients with refractory irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dobbin, A; Dobbin, J; Ross, S C; Graham, C; Ford, M J

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder associated with profoundly impaired quality of life and emotional distress. The management of refractory IBS symptoms remains challenging and non-pharmacological therapeutic approaches have been shown to be effective. We compared brief interventions with biofeedback and hypnotherapy in women referred by their GP with refractory IBS symptoms. Patients were randomised to one of two treatment groups, biofeedback or hypnotherapy, delivered as three one-hour sessions over 12 weeks. Symptom assessments were undertaken using validated, self-administered questionnaires. Two of the 128 consecutive IBS patients suitable for the study declined to consider nonpharmacological therapy and 29 patients did not attend beyond the first session. Of the 97 patients randomised into the study, 21 failed to attend the therapy session; 15 of 76 patients who attended for therapy dropped out before week 12 post-therapy. The mean (SD) change in IBS symptom severity score 12 weeks post-treatment in the biofeedback group was -116.8 (99.3) and in the hypnotherapy group -58.0 (101.1), a statistically significant difference between groups (difference=-58.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference [-111.6, -6.1], p=0.029). In 61 patients with refractory IBS, biofeedback and hypnotherapy were equally effective at improving IBS symptom severity scores, total non-gastrointestinal symptom scores and anxiety and depression ratings during 24 weeks follow-up. Biofeedback may prove to be the more cost-effective option as it requires less expertise. PMID:23516685

  4. Efficacy of biofeedback therapy via a mini wireless device on sleep bruxism contrasted with occlusal splint: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gu, WeiPing; Yang, Jie; Zhang, FeiMin; Yin, XinMin; Wei, XiaoLong; Wang, Chen

    2015-04-01

    The putative causes of bruxism are multifactorial and there are no definite measures for bruxism management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy on sleep bruxism, compared with occlusal splint. Twenty-four volunteers with sleep bruxism were divided into two groups: the GTB group that were treated with biofeedback therapy (n  = 12) and the GTO group that were treated with occlusal splint (n  = 12). A mini pressure sensor integrated with a monitoring circuit by use of a maxillary biofeedback splint was fabricated. To foster the relaxation of the masticatory muscles and the nervous system, the wireless device received signals from bruxism events and vibrations alerted the bruxer when the threshold was exceeded. Total episodes and average duration of bruxism events during 8 hours of sleep were analyzed with the monitoring program (TRMY1.0). After 6 and 12 weeks, the episodes (P  =  0.001) and duration (P < 0.05) in the GTB group declined dramatically. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the GTO group after the treatment (P > 0.05). Furthermore, the episodes had significant differences between the GTB group and the GTO group after the same period of treatment (P  =  0.000). The results suggest that biofeedback therapy may be an effective and convenient measure for mild bruxers, when compared with occlusal splint therapy. The mini wireless biofeedback method may be of value for the diagnosis and management of bruxism in the future. PMID:25859272

  5. FIRST FLOOR FRONT ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR FRONT ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED-- NOTE PRESENCE OF SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS (THE LATTER FLOOR WAS REMOVED MANY YEARS AGO), See also PA-1436 B-12 - Kid-Physick House, 325 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Flooring for Schools: Unsightly Walkways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Many mattress manufacturers recommend that consumers rotate their mattresses at least twice a year to help prevent soft spots from developing and increase the product's life span. It's unfortunate that the same kind of treatment can't be applied to flooring for schools, such as carpeting, especially in hallways. Being able to flip or turn a carpet…

  7. Biofeedback and Electrodermal Self-Regulation in Psychopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Earl P.; Schwartz, Gary E.

    1976-01-01

    Data replicate and extend research on differences in physiological patterning between psychopaths and control subjects and provide new information on patterning with instructions and learned specificity with biofeedback. (Author/RK)

  8. Effect of biofeedback on the detection of deception.

    PubMed

    Timm, H W

    1987-05-01

    This study examined the effect of audio electrodermal biofeedback training on the detection of deception. The subjects consisted of 68 volunteers enrolled in selected undergraduate college courses. Each subject was required to commit a mock murder, after which a polygraph examiner administered a series of five consecutive "lie detector" tests to ascertain the facts involved in his/her murder. Before testing, subjects were randomly assigned to either a biofeedback condition or to a control group. The detection efficiency associated with the subject's respiration responses was significantly enhanced by simultaneous auditory biofeedback given during the polygraph testing; however, the feedback's effect upon the detection rates associated with the electrodermal measures that it was reflecting was neither statistically significant nor in the same direction. The results support the premise that audio biofeedback might be useful in enhancing respiration's detection efficiency during polygraph testing. PMID:3598524

  9. Resonant breathing biofeedback training for stress reduction among manufacturing operators.

    PubMed

    Sutarto, Auditya Purwandini; Wahab, Muhammad Nubli Abdul; Zin, Nora Mat

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of resonant breathing biofeedback training for reducing stress among manufacturing operators. Resonant breathing biofeedback works by teaching people to recognize their involuntary heart rate variability and to control patterns of this physiological response. Thirty-six female operators from an electronic manufacturing factory were randomly assigned as the experimental group (n = 19) and the control group (n = 17). The participants of the intervention received 5 weekly sessions of biofeedback training. Physiological stress profiles and self-perceived depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS) were assessed at pre- and post-intervention. Results indicated that depression, anxiety, and stress significantly decreased after the training in the experimental group; they were supported by a significant increase in physiological measures. Overall, these results support the potential application of resonant biofeedback training to reduce negative emotional symptoms among industrial workers. PMID:23294659

  10. Investigating the impact of audio instruction and audio-visual biofeedback for lung cancer radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Rohini

    Lung cancer accounts for 13% of all cancers in the Unites States and is the leading cause of deaths among both men and women. The five-year survival for lung cancer patients is approximately 15%.(ACS facts & figures) Respiratory motion decreases accuracy of thoracic radiotherapy during imaging and delivery. To account for respiration, generally margins are added during radiation treatment planning, which may cause a substantial dose delivery to normal tissues and increase the normal tissue toxicity. To alleviate the above-mentioned effects of respiratory motion, several motion management techniques are available which can reduce the doses to normal tissues, thereby reducing treatment toxicity and allowing dose escalation to the tumor. This may increase the survival probability of patients who have lung cancer and are receiving radiation therapy. However the accuracy of these motion management techniques are inhibited by respiration irregularity. The rationale of this thesis was to study the improvement in regularity of respiratory motion by breathing coaching for lung cancer patients using audio instructions and audio-visual biofeedback. A total of 331 patient respiratory motion traces, each four minutes in length, were collected from 24 lung cancer patients enrolled in an IRB-approved breathing-training protocol. It was determined that audio-visual biofeedback significantly improved the regularity of respiratory motion compared to free breathing and audio instruction, thus improving the accuracy of respiratory gated radiotherapy. It was also observed that duty cycles below 30% showed insignificant reduction in residual motion while above 50% there was a sharp increase in residual motion. The reproducibility of exhale based gating was higher than that of inhale base gating. Modeling the respiratory cycles it was found that cosine and cosine 4 models had the best correlation with individual respiratory cycles. The overall respiratory motion probability distribution

  11. Length Tension Function of Puborectalis Muscle: Implications for the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Floor Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Sheean, Geoff; Padda, Bikram S; Rajasekaran, Mahadevan R

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims External anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PRM) play important role in anal continence function. Based on length-tension measurement, we recently reported that the human EAS muscle operates at short sarcomere length under physiological conditions. Goal of our study was to determine if PRM also operates at the short sarcomere length. Methods Length-tension relationship of the PRM muscle was studied in vivo in 10 healthy nullipara women. Length was altered by vaginal distension using custom-designed probes of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 mm diameters as well as by distending a polyethylene bag with different volumes of water. Probes were equipped with a reverse perfuse sleeve sensor to measure vaginal pressure (surrogate of PRM tension). PRM electromyogram (EMG) was recorded using wire electrodes. Three-dimensional ultra-sound images were obtained to determine effect of vaginal distension on PRM length. Results Ultrasound images demonstrate distension volume dependent increase in PRM length. Rest and squeeze pressures of vaginal bag increased with the increase in bag volume. Similarly, the change in vaginal pressure, which represents the PRM contraction increased with the increase in the probe size. Increase in probe size was not associated with an increase in EMG activity (a marker of neural drive) of the PRM. Conclusions Probe size dependent increase in PRM contraction pressure, in the presence of constant EMG (neural input) proves that the human PRM operates at short sarcomere length. Surgically adjusting the PRM length may represent a novel strategy to improve treat anal continence and possibly other pelvic floor disorders. PMID:25273124

  12. Space Motion Sickness and Stress Training Simulator using Electrophysiological Biofeedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudeau, C.; Golding, J. F.; Thevot, F.; Lucas, Y.; Bobola, P.; Thouvenot, J.

    2005-06-01

    An important problem in manned spaceflight is the nausea that typically appears during the first 3 days and then disappears after 5 days. Methods of detecting changes in electrophysiological signals are being studied in order to reduce susceptibility to space motion sickness through biofeedback training, and for the early detection of nausea during EVA. A simulator would allow subjects to control their body functions and to use biofeedback to control space motion sickness and stress.

  13. In vivo EMG biofeedback in violin and viola pedagogy.

    PubMed

    LeVine, W R; Irvine, J K

    1984-06-01

    In vivo EMG biofeedback was found to be an effective pedagogical tool for removing unwanted left-hand tension in nine violin and viola players. Improvement occurred rapidly and persisted throughout a 5-month follow-up period. Further studies will be necessary to assess the effect of biofeedback independent of placebo effects. The brevity of the method and the magnitude of improvement warrant further investigation. PMID:6509108

  14. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress. PMID:25461224

  15. Magnifying the Scale of Visual Biofeedback Improves Posture.

    PubMed

    Jehu, Deborah A; Thibault, Jérémie; Lajoie, Yves

    2016-06-01

    Biofeedback has been shown to minimize body sway during quiet standing. However, limited research has reported the optimal sensitivity parameters of visual biofeedback related to the center of pressure (COP) sway. Accordingly, 19 young adults (6 males; 13 females; aged 21.3 ± 2.5) stood with feet together and performed three visual biofeedback intensities [unmodified biofeedback (UMBF), BF magnified by 5 (BF5), BF magnified by 10 (BF10)], along with control trials with no biofeedback (NBF). The participants were instructed to stand as still as possible while minimizing the movements of the visual target. The findings revealed that UMBF produced significantly greater COP displacement in both the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral directions, as well as greater standard deviation of the COP in the AP direction (p < 0.05). Additionally, NBF showed significantly greater 95 % area ellipse than the UMBF, BF5, and BF10 intensities (p < 0.001). Therefore, the most sensitive COP scales generated the least amount of postural sway. However, there were no significant differences on any of the COP measures between BF5 and BF10. This research provides insight with respect to the proper scale on which biofeedback should be given in order to improve postural control (i.e., BF5 or BF10). PMID:26678916

  16. Scapular kinematic is altered after electromyography biofeedback training.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Jun G; Gunderson, Samantha R; Kane-Ronning, Kai; Suprak, David N

    2016-06-14

    Electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training affords patients a better sense of the different muscle activation patterns involved in the movement of the shoulder girdle. It is important to address scapular kinematics with labourers who have daily routines involving large amounts of lifting at shoulder level or higher. This population is at a heightened risk of developing subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of scapular stabilization exercises with EMG biofeedback training on scapular kinematics. Twenty-three healthy subjects volunteered for the study. Electrodes were placed on the upper and lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and lumbar paraspinals to measure EMG activity. Subjects underwent scapular kinematic testing, which consisted of humeral elevation in the scapular plane, before and after biofeedback training. The latter consisted of 10 repetitions of the I, W, T, and Y scapular stabilization exercises. Subjects were told to actively reduce the muscle activation shown on the screen for the upper trapezius during the exercises. The scapular external rotation had a statistically significant difference at all humeral elevation angles (p<0.004) after biofeedback was administered. After the exercises, the scapula was in a more externally rotated orientation with a mean difference of 6.5°. There were no significant differences found with scapular upward rotation, or posterior tilt at all humeral elevation angles following biofeedback. Scapular kinematics are altered by EMG biofeedback training utilizing scapular stabilization exercises. However, only scapular external rotation was affected by the exercises. PMID:27161990

  17. Structural heat treatments against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): effect of flour depth, life stage and floor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high temperatures (50-60°C) and two levels of sanitation (~0.5 and 43 g of flour), on mortality of eggs, young larvae, old larvae, pupae, and adults of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, were evaluated during heat treatment of a pilot flour mill at Kansas State University. The ...

  18. Effects of Instructions, Biofeedback, and Cognitive Activities on Heart Rate Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Thomas W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    In a factorial experiment, 90 male and 90 female subjects were given (a) either instructions to increase heart rate (HR), decrease HR, or no instructions to change their HR; (b) either true biofeedback, false biofeedback, or no biofeedback; and (c) either instructions concerning cognitions to help them change HR or no instructions concerning…

  19. Biofeedback: A Survey Regarding Current Clinical Use and Content in Occupational Therapy Educational Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Theodore I., II

    1992-01-01

    Responses from 301 of 418 physical dysfunction clinics and 91 of 136 occupational therapy college programs found that 47 percent of clinics use biofeedback; 63 percent of professional-level and 13 percent of technical-level programs teach biofeedback; 73 percent of clinicians learned biofeedback on job; and 95 percent of clinics use…

  20. On the Horizon. Biofeedback and Self-Management of Stress in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Edward W.; Walton, Wilbur T.

    1979-01-01

    The use of biofeedback in the self management of stress in school children is discussed. Educational research on biofeedback suggests that biofeedback training can help children to learn relaxation skills, reduce school-related anxiety, and gain a measure of self-discipline and confidence. (PHR)

  1. IBS Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... or bring on symptoms Stress management, gut-directed hypnosis, biofeedback, relaxation, or pain management techniques Consulting with ... Complimentary or Alternative Treatments Selecting a CAM Practitioner Hypnosis for IBS Yoga Medications Laxatives Anticholinergic/Antispasmodic Agents ...

  2. The effect of heart rate variability biofeedback on performance psychology of basketball players.

    PubMed

    Paul, Maman; Garg, Kanupriya

    2012-06-01

    Coping with pressure and anxiety is an ineluctable demand of sports performance. Heart rate variability (HRV) Biofeedback (BFB) shall be used as a tool for self regulating physiological responses resulting in improved psycho physiological interactions. For further analysis, the present study has been designed to examine the relationship between anxiety and performance and also effectiveness of biofeedback protocol to create stress-eliciting situation in basketball players. Thirty basketball players of university level and above (both male and female) aged 18-28 years, who scored a minimum of 20 in state trait anxiety inventory, were randomly divided into three equal groups- Experimental (Biofeedback) group, Placebo group and Control (No Treatment) group. The BFB group received HRV BFB training for 10 consecutive days for 20 min that included breathing at individual's resonant frequency through a pacing stimulus; Placebo group was shown motivational video clips for 10 consecutive days for 10 min, whereas No Treatment Control group was not given any intervention. Two way repeated measure ANOVA was applied to analyze the differences within and between the groups. Anxiety, coping self-efficacy, heart rate variability, respiration rate, and performance (dribbling, passing and shooting) at session 1, 10 and 1 month follow up were statistically significant in each group along with interaction of group and time (p < 0.001). Also, all the measures showed statistically significant inter group difference (p < 0.05). The findings are harmonious with existing data on HRV BFB as a strategy for dealing with anxiety. The Placebo group showed improvement in self efficacy and performance post training. The Control group showed no change in any variable except performance. The results of the study support the idea that HRV BFB lowers the anxiety and thus there seems to be a potential association between HRV BFB and performance optimization. PMID:22402913

  3. Floors: Care and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post Office Dept., Washington, DC.

    Guidelines, methods and policies regarding the care and maintenance of post office building floors are overviewed in this handbook. Procedures outlined are concerned with maintaining a required level of appearance without wasting manpower. Flooring types and characteristics and the particular cleaning requirements of each type are given along with…

  4. School Flooring Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, John

    2012-01-01

    With all of the hype that green building is receiving throughout the school facility-management industry, it's easy to overlook some elements that may not be right in front of a building manager's nose. It is helpful to examine the role floor covering plays in a green building project. Flooring is one of the most significant and important systems…

  5. Maximizing Hard Floor Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steger, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Explains the maintenance options available for hardwood flooring that can help ensure long life cycles and provide inviting spaces. Developing a maintenance system, knowing the type of traffic that the floor must endure, using entrance matting, and adhering to manufacturers guidelines are discussed. Daily, monthly or quarterly, and long-term…

  6. FIRST FLOOR REAR ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR REAR ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED-- NOTE PRESENCE OF SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS AT LEFT. See also PA-1436 B-6 - Kid-Physick House, 325 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. FIRST FLOOR REAR ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR REAR ROOM. SECOND FLOOR HAS BEEN REMOVED-- NOTE PRESENCE OF SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS AT LEFT. See also PA-1436 B-13 - Kid-Physick House, 325 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and pelvic floor spasm: can we diagnose and treat?

    PubMed

    Westesson, Karin E; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    National Institutes of Health category III prostatitis, also known as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, is a common condition with significant impact on quality of life. This clinically defined syndrome has a multifactorial etiology and seems to respond best to multimodal therapy. At least half of these patients have pelvic floor spasm. There are several approaches to therapy including biofeedback, acupuncture, and myofascial release physical therapy. However, the only multicenter study of pelvic floor physical therapy for pelvic floor spasm in men failed to show an advantage over conventional Western massage. We have proposed a clinical phenotyping system called UPOINT to classify patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain and subsequently direct appropriate therapy. Here, we review the current approach to category III prostatitis and describe how clinical phenotyping with UPOINT may improve therapy outcomes. PMID:20490725

  9. Visual Feedback in Treatment of Residual Phonological Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruscello, Dennis M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of visual biofeedback in the treatment of individuals who have residual phonological errors is discussed. Biofeedback is conceptualized as a cognitive treatment that requires the client's analysis of visual information and then use of that information in developing correct productions of residual phonological errors. Results suggest the…

  10. The effect of biofeedback training on patients with functional constipation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Meihong; Lin, Zheng; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Hongjie; Wang, Meihfeng

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this prospective quasi-experimental study was to explore the influence of biofeedback training on patients with functional constipation (FC). Changes in clinical symptoms, psychological status, quality of life, and autonomic nervous function in 21 FC patients before and after biofeedback training were investigated. The psychological status and quality of life were evaluated with the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), and a Chinese version of the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Autonomic nervous function was assessed on the basis of heart rate variability recorded with a HANS-1000 autonomic nervous biofeedback apparatus. After a complete course of training (10 sessions), clinical symptoms were greatly improved (p < .01), and the SAS and SDS scores were markedly decreased. There was a significant difference in the SAS and SDS scores before and after biofeedback (p < .01). The scores of general health perceptions, physical functioning, emotional role functioning, bodily pain, and vitality were increased significantly (p < .05), especially the scores of general health perceptions and emotional role functioning (p < .01), which indicated that quality of life in FC patients was significantly improved. No marked improvement of autonomic nervous function was found. Although a slight improvement in autonomic nervous activity was found, there was no significant statistical findings (p > .05). We conclude that biofeedback training can improve clinical symptoms, psychological status, and quality of life in FC patients, but further research is needed to determine whether biofeedback training can improve the autonomic nervous function in FC patients. PMID:22472667

  11. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor. ... Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are recommended for: Women ... Men with urinary stress incontinence after prostate surgery ...

  12. A mathematical model for incorporating biofeedback into human postural control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biofeedback of body motion can serve as a balance aid and rehabilitation tool. To date, mathematical models considering the integration of biofeedback into postural control have represented this integration as a sensory addition and limited their application to a single degree-of-freedom representation of the body. This study has two objectives: 1) to develop a scalable method for incorporating biofeedback into postural control that is independent of the model’s degrees of freedom, how it handles sensory integration, and the modeling of its postural controller; and 2) to validate this new model using multidirectional perturbation experimental results. Methods Biofeedback was modeled as an additional torque to the postural controller torque. For validation, this biofeedback modeling approach was applied to a vibrotactile biofeedback device and incorporated into a two-link multibody model with full-state-feedback control that represents the dynamics of bipedal stance. Average response trajectories of body sway and center of pressure (COP) to multidirectional surface perturbations of subjects with vestibular deficits were used for model parameterization and validation in multiple perturbation directions and for multiple display resolutions. The quality of fit was quantified using average error and cross-correlation values. Results The mean of the average errors across all tactor configurations and perturbations was 0.24° for body sway and 0.39 cm for COP. The mean of the cross-correlation value was 0.97 for both body sway and COP. Conclusions The biofeedback model developed in this study is capable of capturing experimental response trajectory shapes with low average errors and high cross-correlation values in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions for all perturbation directions and spatial resolution display configurations considered. The results validate that biofeedback can be modeled as an additional torque to the postural

  13. Total pelvic floor ultrasound for pelvic floor defaecatory dysfunction: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Alison J; Solanki, Deepa; Schizas, Alexis M P; Williams, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic floor ultrasound is used for the dynamic assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and allows multicompartmental anatomical and functional assessment. Pelvic floor dysfunction includes defaecatory, urinary and sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and pain. It is common, increasingly recognized and associated with increasing age and multiparity. Other options for assessment include defaecation proctography and defaecation MRI. Total pelvic floor ultrasound is a cheap, safe, imaging tool, which may be performed as a first-line investigation in outpatients. It allows dynamic assessment of the entire pelvic floor, essential for treatment planning for females who often have multiple diagnoses where treatment should address all aspects of dysfunction to yield optimal results. Transvaginal scanning using a rotating single crystal probe provides sagittal views of bladder neck support anteriorly. Posterior transvaginal ultrasound may reveal rectocoele, enterocoele or intussusception whilst bearing down. The vaginal probe is also used to acquire a 360° cross-sectional image to allow anatomical visualization of the pelvic floor and provides information regarding levator plate integrity and pelvic organ alignment. Dynamic transperineal ultrasound using a conventional curved array probe provides a global view of the anterior, middle and posterior compartments and may show cystocoele, enterocoele, sigmoidocoele or rectocoele. This pictorial review provides an atlas of normal and pathological images required for global pelvic floor assessment in females presenting with defaecatory dysfunction. Total pelvic floor ultrasound may be used with complementary endoanal ultrasound to assess the sphincter complex, but this is beyond the scope of this review. PMID:26388109

  14. 5. STAIR FROM SECOND FLOOR TO THIRD FLOOR, FROM NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. STAIR FROM SECOND FLOOR TO THIRD FLOOR, FROM NORTHWEST. Note extreme thin construction of support and outline of well ellipse on floor. Stair to first floor has been removed - Saltus-Habersham House, 802 Bay Street, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  15. Use of audio biofeedback to reduce tibial impact accelerations during running.

    PubMed

    Wood, Claire M; Kipp, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    Visual biofeedback of tibial peak positive acceleration (PPA) during running has been used successfully as a method of gait retraining to reduce PPAs. Audio biofeedback generated from PPA may present a novel, portable alternative. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using PPA-generated audio biofeedback to reduce PPAs while running. Nine runners were fitted with a wireless accelerometer on their left tibia. PPAs were recorded and a custom LabVIEW program was used to emit a single beep once the PPA reached a preset threshold. The numerical difference between this threshold and peak PPA during running was scaled to the pitch of the beep, such that a foot strike with greater PPA would result in a beep with higher pitch. Subjects were then instructed to (1) run without any beeps, and/or (2) keep the pitch of the beep as low as possible. Subjects participated in a single testing session that included a five minute warm-up and two rounds of biofeedback, which consisted of five minutes of running with biofeedback followed by five minutes of running without biofeedback. Subjects were able to significantly reduce PPAs during exposure to audio biofeedback. In addition, two rounds of biofeedback were sufficient for subjects to retain a reduction in PPAs without biofeedback. PPA-generated audio biofeedback therefore appears to be a feasible method of gait retraining to reduce PPAs in runners. PMID:24679712

  16. Biofeedback and Counseling for Stress and Anxiety among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Sverduk, Kevin; Prince, Judy; Hayashino, Diane

    2012-01-01

    With the rise in stress and anxiety among college students, there is a need for more comprehensive and effective counseling options for counselors in college counseling centers. This study investigated the impact of using biofeedback and brief counseling in treating stress and anxiety in an ethnically diverse college student population. Results…

  17. Efficacy of Alpha Biofeedback Training in Elevating Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that alpha brain wave biofeedback training elevates mood was tested. Three groups of eight naive subjects each were formed: Group 1 underwent training, Group 2 kept the alpha feedback signal off, and Group 3 named titles of tunes. The hypothesis was not supported. (Author)

  18. Effects of electromyographic biofeedback on quadriceps strength: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lepley, Adam S; Gribble, Phillip A; Pietrosimone, Brian G

    2012-03-01

    Quadriceps strength is a vital component to lower extremity function and is often the focus in resistance training interventions and injury rehabilitation. Electromyographic biofeedback (EMGBF) is frequently used to supplement strength gains; however, the true effect remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to determine the magnitude of the treatment effect for EMGBF on quadriceps strength compared with that of placebo and traditional exercise interventions in both healthy and pathological populations. Web of Science and ProQuest databases were searched, and bibliographies of relevant articles were crossreferenced. Six articles measuring isometric quadriceps strength in response to EMGBF training were included and methodologically assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Standardized effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from preintervention and postintervention measures for EMGBF, placebo, and exercise-only interventions. Separate comparisons were made between studies assessing different intervention length (<4 and ≥4 weeks) and patient populations (pathological and healthy). Articles included received an average PEDro score of 6.5 ± 0.84. Homogeneous EMGBF effect sizes were found in all 6 studies (d = 0.01-5.56), with 4 studies reporting CI that crossed 0. A heterogeneous collection of effect sizes was found for exercise alone (d = -0.12 to 1.18) and placebo (d = -0.2 to 1.38), with 4 and 1 studies having a CI that crossed 0, respectively. The greatest EMGBF effects were found in pathological populations (d = 0.01-5.56), with the strongest effect found in the subjects with knee osteoarthritis (d = 5.56, CI = 4.26-6.68). As a group, effects were the strongest for EMGBF compared with that of placebo and exercise-only interventions, yet definitive evidence that EMGBF is beneficial for increasing quadriceps strength could not be concluded because of the 4 studies demonstrating a wide CI. PMID

  19. Physical therapy for female pelvic floor disorders.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, A P

    1994-08-01

    Non-surgical, non-pharmacological treatment for female pelvic floor dysfunction is represented by rehabilitation in urogynecology. Since Kegel, in 1948, who proposed the concept of functional restoration of the perineal muscles, no specific term has actually been established. Owing to the number of specialists involved in the management of female pelvic floor disorders (such as gynecologists, urologists, coloproctologists, and neurologists) and the different types of health care providers concerned (such as physicians, physical therapists, nurses, and midwives), it is difficult to make the proper choice between 'physical therapy for pelvic floor', 'pelvic floor rehabilitation', 'pelvic muscle re-education', and 'pelvic floor training'. Because muscle re-education is under the control of physical therapists, we have chosen the term of physical therapy for female pelvic floor disorders. Muscle re-education has an important role in the primary treatment of lower urinary tract dysfunction. A multidisciplinary collaboration may be of particular interest, and a thorough evaluation is useful for a proper selection of patients. PMID:7742496

  20. Biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corral, Juan E; Kataria, Rahul; Vickers, Dawn; Koutouby, Raghad; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome. Research exploring the prevalence, cause and treatment options for constipation is limited and lacks objective measurements such as anorectal manometry. We report a case of a 16-year-old lady with Prader-Willi syndrome presenting with rectal pain and constipation for 2 years despite multiple medications and weekly enemas. She also noted passive fecal incontinence that required frequent manual disimpactions. Anorectal manometry revealed an abnormal relaxation of the puborectalis and external sphincter muscles on push maneuvers suggesting dyssynergic defecation and rectal hypersensitivity. Contraction and relaxation of her pelvic muscles were recorded with electromyography. Relaxation of the puborectalis muscle improved significantly after three biofeedback sessions. Patient was successfully tapered off laxatives and has been maintained on linaclotide only. Dyssynergic defecation may be a common finding in Prader-Willi syndrome. In selected cases we recommend anorectal manometry to identify neuromuscular dysfunction and subsequent biofeedback therapy depending on the degree of mental retardation to minimize overuse of laxatives. PMID:26423048

  1. Biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Kataria, Rahul; Vickers, Dawn; Koutouby, Raghad; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome. Research exploring the prevalence, cause and treatment options for constipation is limited and lacks objective measurements such as anorectal manometry. We report a case of a 16-year-old lady with Prader-Willi syndrome presenting with rectal pain and constipation for 2 years despite multiple medications and weekly enemas. She also noted passive fecal incontinence that required frequent manual disimpactions. Anorectal manometry revealed an abnormal relaxation of the puborectalis and external sphincter muscles on push maneuvers suggesting dyssynergic defecation and rectal hypersensitivity. Contraction and relaxation of her pelvic muscles were recorded with electromyography. Relaxation of the puborectalis muscle improved significantly after three biofeedback sessions. Patient was successfully tapered off laxatives and has been maintained on linaclotide only. Dyssynergic defecation may be a common finding in Prader-Willi syndrome. In selected cases we recommend anorectal manometry to identify neuromuscular dysfunction and subsequent biofeedback therapy depending on the degree of mental retardation to minimize overuse of laxatives. PMID:26423048

  2. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  3. Suitability of Smartphone Inertial Sensors for Real-Time Biofeedback Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Anton; Tomažič, Sašo; Umek, Anton

    2016-01-01

    This article studies the suitability of smartphones with built-in inertial sensors for biofeedback applications. Biofeedback systems use various sensors to measure body functions and parameters. These sensor data are analyzed, and the results are communicated back to the user, who then tries to act on the feedback signals. Smartphone inertial sensors can be used to capture body movements in biomechanical biofeedback systems. These sensors exhibit various inaccuracies that induce significant angular and positional errors. We studied deterministic and random errors of smartphone accelerometers and gyroscopes, primarily focusing on their biases. Based on extensive measurements, we determined accelerometer and gyroscope noise models and bias variation ranges. Then, we compiled a table of predicted positional and angular errors under various biofeedback system operation conditions. We suggest several bias compensation options that are suitable for various examples of use in real-time biofeedback applications. Measurements within the developed experimental biofeedback application show that under certain conditions, even uncompensated sensors can be used for real-time biofeedback. For general use, especially for more demanding biofeedback applications, sensor biases should be compensated. We are convinced that real-time biofeedback systems based on smartphone inertial sensors are applicable to many similar examples in sports, healthcare, and other areas. PMID:26927125

  4. Suitability of Smartphone Inertial Sensors for Real-Time Biofeedback Applications.

    PubMed

    Kos, Anton; Tomažič, Sašo; Umek, Anton

    2016-01-01

    This article studies the suitability of smartphones with built-in inertial sensors for biofeedback applications. Biofeedback systems use various sensors to measure body functions and parameters. These sensor data are analyzed, and the results are communicated back to the user, who then tries to act on the feedback signals. Smartphone inertial sensors can be used to capture body movements in biomechanical biofeedback systems. These sensors exhibit various inaccuracies that induce significant angular and positional errors. We studied deterministic and random errors of smartphone accelerometers and gyroscopes, primarily focusing on their biases. Based on extensive measurements, we determined accelerometer and gyroscope noise models and bias variation ranges. Then, we compiled a table of predicted positional and angular errors under various biofeedback system operation conditions. We suggest several bias compensation options that are suitable for various examples of use in real-time biofeedback applications. Measurements within the developed experimental biofeedback application show that under certain conditions, even uncompensated sensors can be used for real-time biofeedback. For general use, especially for more demanding biofeedback applications, sensor biases should be compensated. We are convinced that real-time biofeedback systems based on smartphone inertial sensors are applicable to many similar examples in sports, healthcare, and other areas. PMID:26927125

  5. Heart rate variability biofeedback intervention for reduction of psychological stress during the early postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Naoko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Kodama, Hideya

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback intervention for reduction of psychological stress in women in the early postpartum period. On postpartum day 4, 55 healthy subjects received a brief explanation about HRV biofeedback using a portable device. Among them, 25 mothers who agreed to implement HRV biofeedback at home were grouped as the biofeedback group, and other 30 mothers were grouped as the control group. At 1 month postpartum, there was a significant decrease in total Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score (P < 0.001) in the biofeedback group; this change was brought about mainly by decreases in items related to anxiety or difficulty sleeping. There was also a significant increase in standard deviation of the normal heartbeat interval (P < 0.01) of the resting HRV measures in the biofeedback group after adjusting for potential covariates. In conclusion, postpartum women who implemented HRV biofeedback after delivery were relatively free from anxiety and complained less of difficulties sleeping at 1 month postpartum. Although the positive effects of HRV biofeedback may be partly attributable to intervention effects, due to its clinical outcome, HRV biofeedback appears to be recommendable for many postpartum women as a feasible health-promoting measure after childbirth. PMID:25239433

  6. Internet-based treatment of stress urinary incontinence: 1- and 2-year results of a randomized controlled trial with a focus on pelvic floor muscle training

    PubMed Central

    Sjöström, Malin; Umefjord, Göran; Stenlund, Hans; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the long-term effects of two non-face-to-face treatment programmes for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) based on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Subjects and Methods The present study was a randomized controlled trial with online recruitment of 250 community-dwelling women aged 18–70 years with SUI ≥ one time/week. Diagnosis was based on validated self-assessed questionnaires, 2-day bladder diary and telephone interview with a urotherapist. Consecutive computer-generated block randomization was carried out with allocation by an independent administrator to 3 months of treatment with either an internet-based treatment programme (n = 124) or a programme sent by post (n = 126). Both interventions focused mainly on PFMT. The internet group received continuous e-mail support from a urotherapist, whereas the postal group trained on their own. Follow-up was performed after 1 and 2 years via self-assessed postal questionnaires. The primary outcomes were symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]). Secondary outcomes were the Patient Global Impression of Improvement, health-specific quality of life (EQ-visual analogue scale [EQ-VAS]), use of incontinence aids, and satisfaction with treatment. There was no face-to-face contact with the participants at any time. Analysis was based on intention-to-treat. Results We lost 32.4% (81/250) of participants to follow-up after 1 year and 38.0% (95/250) after 2 years. With both interventions, we observed highly significant (P < 0.001) improvements with large effect sizes (>0.8) for symptoms and condition-specific quality of life (QoL) after 1 and 2 years, respectively. No significant differences were found between the groups. The mean (sd) changes in symptom score were 3.7 (3.3) for the internet group and 3.2 (3.4) for the postal group (P = 0

  7. Conservative Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Rafael Mendes; Magnani, Pedro Sergio; Haddad, Jorge Milhem; Castro, Rodrigo de Aquino; Brito, Luiz Gustavo Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that studied the conservative management of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). There were 1058 results after the initial searches, from which 37 studies were eligible according to previously determined inclusion criteria. For the primary outcomes, pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) was more efficacious than no treatment in improving incontinence-specific quality of life (QoL) scales (SMD = -1.24SDs; CI 95% = -1.77 to -0.71SDs). However, its effect on pad tests was imprecise. Combining biofeedback with PFMT had an uncertain effect on QoL (MD = -4.4 points; CI 95% = -16.69 to 7.89 points), but better results on the pad test, although with elevated heterogeneity (MD = 0.9g; 95%CI = 0.71 to 1,10g); group PFMT was not less efficacious than individual treatment, and home PFMT was not consistently worse than supervised PFMT. Both intravaginal and superficial electrical stimulation (IES and SES) were better than no treatment for QoL and pad test. Vaginal cones had mixed results. The association of IES with PFMT may improve the efficacy of the latter for QoL and pad test, but the results of individual studies were not consistent. Thus, there is evidence of the use of PFMT on the treatment of SUI, with and without biofeedback. PMID:26883864

  8. Pelvic Floor Disorders Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... to develop and perform research studies related to women with pelvic floor disorders. In this way, studies can be done more quickly than if the medical centers were working alone. Doctors, nurses, other health care workers, and support staff all play important roles.The ...

  9. Detail view of floor mosaic in first floor lobby ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of floor mosaic in first floor lobby - St. Elizabeths Hospital, Hitchcock Hall, 2700 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, Southeast, 588-604 Redwood Street, Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. First floor lobby, showing stairs to ground floor Fitzsimons ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First floor lobby, showing stairs to ground floor - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Main Hospital Building, Charlie Kelly Boulevard, North side, at intersection of Sharon A. Lane Drive, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Stairwell from first floor to ground floor Fitzsimons General ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Stairwell from first floor to ground floor - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Main Hospital Building, Charlie Kelly Boulevard, North side, at intersection of Sharon A. Lane Drive, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Railing detail, stairs from first floor to ground floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Railing detail, stairs from first floor to ground floor - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Main Hospital Building, Charlie Kelly Boulevard, North side, at intersection of Sharon A. Lane Drive, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Two and Three Bedroom Units: First Floor Plan, Second Floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Two and Three Bedroom Units: First Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, South Elevation (As Built), North Elevation (As Built), East Elevation (As Built), East Elevation (Existing), North Elevation (Existing) - Aluminum City Terrace, East Hill Drive, New Kensington, Westmoreland County, PA

  14. 16. SANDSORTING BUILDING, FIRST FLOOR, MEZZANINE ON LEFT (BELOW FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. SAND-SORTING BUILDING, FIRST FLOOR, MEZZANINE ON LEFT (BELOW FLOOR ARE CONCRETE AND STORAGE BINS), LOOKING NORTH - Mill "C" Complex, Sand-Sorting Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  15. STIRLING'S QUARTERS SMALL BARN: FIRST FLOOR PLAN; SECOND FLOOR PLAN; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STIRLING'S QUARTERS SMALL BARN: FIRST FLOOR PLAN; SECOND FLOOR PLAN; SOUTH ELEVATION; EAST ELEVATION; NORTH ELEVATION; WEST ELEVATION. - Stirling's Quarters, 555 Yellow Springs Road, Tredyffrin Township, Valley Forge, Chester County, PA

  16. Association between the Functionality of Pelvic Floor Muscles and Sexual Satisfaction in Young Women.

    PubMed

    Darski, Caroline; Barbosa, Lia Janaina Ferla; Paiva, Luciana Laureano; Vieira, Adriane

    2016-04-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to associate the results obtained while assessing the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) functionality with the score of sexual satisfaction of young adult women. Methods This is an observational and cross-sectional study. The inclusion criteria were women aged between 20 and 40 years who have had sexual intercourse, nulliparous, BMI lower than 25 kg/m(2), and absence of pelvic floor dysfunction. The evaluation consisted of both the medical history and assessment of the PFM functionality using the Perina pressure biofeedback and Oxford Scale. We measured sexual satisfaction using the Female Sexual Quotient questionnaire and used the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to verify the normality of the data. We analyzed non-parametric variables using the Spearman correlation test. The significance level was 5%. Results A total of 80 women with a median age of 26 years and median BMI of 21.64 kg/m(2) participated in this study. We divided the subjects into two groups, best and worse PFM functionality, according to median Perina pressure biofeedback and Oxford scale. We found no difference between the groups when comparing the sexual satisfaction scores. There was only a slight significant correlation between the Contraction Voluntary Average obtained using the pressure biofeedback and the primary domain (r = 0.27; p = 0.01). Conclusion This study found a slight correlation between PFM functionality and the functionality of the primary domain of the Female Sexual Quotient questionnaire. Therefore, it is not possible to state whether there is an association between the PFM functionality and female sexual satisfaction in young adults. PMID:27088707

  17. CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) AND KEEPERS OF THE CAST HOUSE FLOOR, S.L. KIMBROUGH AND DAVID HOLMES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Blast Furnace No. 8, North of Valley Road, West of Ensley-Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  18. 49. TOP FLOOR OF 1852 WING LOOKING EAST. FLOOR COVERING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. TOP FLOOR OF 1852 WING LOOKING EAST. FLOOR COVERING INDICATES ANGLE OF INTERSECTION BETWEEN THIS AND THE EARLIER WING. NOTE ALSO CHANGE IN ORIENTATION OF COLUMNS AND HANGING LIGHT FIXTURE. BRIGHT AREA AT CEILING IN MIDDLE DISTANCE INDICATES SKYLIGHT. THIS FLOOR ADDED CA. 1880. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  19. Interior, view of third floor room, with original flooring, camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, view of third floor room, with original flooring, camera facing northwest, this was typical of the rooms on the third floor before the rehabilitation by the Navy in the 1950s and 1960s - Naval Training Station, Senior Officers' Quarters District, Quarters No. 4, Naval Station Treasure Island, 4 Whiting Way, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. Assessment of biofeedback rehabilitation in post-stroke patients combining fMRI and gait analysis: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability to walk independently is a primary goal for rehabilitation after stroke. Gait analysis provides a great amount of valuable information, while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers a powerful approach to define networks involved in motor control. The present study reports a new methodology based on both fMRI and gait analysis outcomes in order to investigate the ability of fMRI to reflect the phases of motor learning before/after electromyographic biofeedback treatment: the preliminary fMRI results of a post stroke subject’s brain activation, during passive and active ankle dorsal/plantarflexion, before and after biofeedback (BFB) rehabilitation are reported and their correlation with gait analysis data investigated. Methods A control subject and a post-stroke patient with chronic hemiparesis were studied. Functional magnetic resonance images were acquired during a block-design protocol on both subjects while performing passive and active ankle dorsal/plantarflexion. fMRI and gait analysis were assessed on the patient before and after electromyographic biofeedback rehabilitation treatment during gait activities. Lower limb three-dimensional kinematics, kinetics and surface electromyography were evaluated. Correlation between fMRI and gait analysis categorical variables was assessed: agreement/disagreement was assigned to each variable if the value was in/outside the normative range (gait analysis), or for presence of normal/diffuse/no activation of motor area (fMRI). Results Altered fMRI activity was found on the post-stroke patient before biofeedback rehabilitation with respect to the control one. Meanwhile the patient showed a diffuse, but more limited brain activation after treatment (less voxels). The post-stroke gait data showed a trend towards the normal range: speed, stride length, ankle power, and ankle positive work increased. Preliminary correlation analysis revealed that consistent changes were observed both for the

  1. Clinical evaluation of a new biofeedback standing balance training device.

    PubMed

    Lee, M Y; Wong, M K; Tang, F T

    1996-01-01

    For patients with neurological damage of the central nervous system, such as that due to cerebrovascular accident (CVA), standing balance training is a critical therapeutic procedure to be undertaken before walking and self-care training. The identification and characterization of neurological disorder in postural steadiness will enhance our understanding of the postural control system, and help to identify patients at risk of falls in the CVA population. This paper discusses the design and clinical evaluation of a new biofeedback training device for static (postural steadiness) performance of the standing balance system. The device includes a height adjustable standing table, an instrumented force sensing platform, an on-line weight bearing audio/visual biofeedback system, a postural correction mirror, and a belt suspension system for the upper extremities. A quantitative evaluation protocol of bilateral asymmetries in weight distribution and postural sway to characterize standing balance with the force sensing platform is discussed. Finally, the clinical evaluation results of sixty patients with hemiplegia from acute stroke for a period of four weeks are discussed. With this economic standing training device, the static standing steadiness can be trained effectively through weight bearing biofeedback and a postural correction mirror in the clinical and home caring environments. PMID:8836924

  2. Validation of a Biofeedback System for Wheelchair Propulsion Training

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liyun; Kwarciak, Andrew M.; Rodriguez, Russell; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Richter, W. Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design and validation of the OptiPush Biofeedback System, a commercially available, instrumented wheel system that records handrim biomechanics and provides stroke-by-stroke biofeedback and targeting for 11 propulsion variables. Testing of the system revealed accurate measurement of wheel angle (0.02% error), wheel speed (0.06% error), and handrim loads. The maximum errors in static force and torque measurements were 3.80% and 2.05%, respectively. Measured forces were also found to be highly linear (0.985 < slope < 1.011) and highly correlated to the reference forces (r2 > .998). Dynamic measurements of planar forces (Fx and Fy) and axle torque also had low error (−0.96 N to 0.83 N for force and 0.10 Nm to 0.14 Nm for torque) and were highly correlated (r > .986) with expected force and torque values. Overall, the OptiPush Biofeedback System provides accurate measurement of wheel dynamics and handrim biomechanics and may be a useful tool for improving manual wheelchair propulsion. PMID:22110977

  3. An Exploratory Investigation of the Effect on a Biofeedback Technique with Hyperactive, Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Larry L.; Hershey, Myrliss

    Studied was the effectiveness of biofeedback techniques in reducing the hyperactive behavior of five hyperactive and four nonhyperactive children (all in elementary level learning disability classes). After 10 15-minute biofeedback training sessions over an 8-week period, Ss learned to raise their finger temperatures an average of 12.92 degrees…

  4. Using a False Biofeedback Methodology to Explore Relationships between Learners' Affect, Metacognition, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, Amber Chauncey; Azevedo, Roger; D'Mello, Sidney K.

    2013-01-01

    We used a false-biofeedback methodology to manipulate physiological arousal in order to induce affective states that would influence learners' metacognitive judgments and learning performance. False-biofeedback is a method used to induce physiological arousal (and resultant affective states) by presenting learners with audio stimuli of false heart…

  5. Microcomputer-Based Systems Providing Biofeedback of Voice and Speech Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volin, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The article explains the role of feedback and biofeedback in speech therapy; identifies speech parameters that can be modeled by current systems (e.g., pitch, intensity, voice quality, and articulatory accuracy); and describes selected microcomputer-based speech production biofeedback systems that are available. An appendix provides sources. (DB)

  6. EMG Biofeedback Training of Type A and Type B Behavior Pattern Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Daniel W.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the relative efficacy of EMG biofeedback training to reduce tension levels in students (N=55) characterized by the presence or absence of coronary-prone behavior pattern (Type A or Type B). Results showed biofeedback students attained and maintained greater relaxation during training than did controls, regardless of A/B status. (WAS)

  7. Effects of Progressive Relaxation versus Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation with College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, John D.; Czerlinsky, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Examined use of biofeedback, relaxation training, or both in a college relaxation class with an enrollment of 33 students. Results indicated students receiving relaxation training plus biofeedback improved significantly more on psychological variables than did students receiving only relaxation training. (Author/ABL)

  8. Biofeedback and Relaxation Therapy for Chronic Temporomandibular Joint Pain: Predicting Successful Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funch, Donna P.; Gale, Elliot N.

    1984-01-01

    Randomly assigned 57 patients with chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain to receive either relaxation or biofeedback therapy. Successful patients in the relaxation condition tended to be younger and had experienced TMJ pain for a shorter period of time than the successful biofeedback patients. (BH)

  9. The Effects of Biofeedback and Relaxation Training on Memory Tasks among Hyperactive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omizo, Michael M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study examined the effects of biofeedback and relaxation training on memory tasks among 48 hyperactive boys (9-11 years old). Relaxation training in combination with biofeedback was useful in helping the boys achieve better muscle relaxation and perform better on a paired-associate memory task than did a control group. (Author/CB)

  10. Integrating Course Work With Field Work Placements in Undergraduate Clinical Biofeedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motiff, James P.

    The three major aspects of the clinical biofeedback experience for undergraduates at Hope College, Holland, Michigan are presented in terms of the academic program, the actual clinical experience, and the procedures for becoming certified as a "biofeedback assistant." The academic program is detailed, including the requirements for psychology…

  11. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Relaxation--Thermal Biofeedback Training with Propranolol Hydrochloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Evaluated the ability of propranolol hydrochloride to enhance results achieved with relaxation-biofeedback training. Results suggest that concomitant propranolol therapy (CPT) significantly enhanced the effectiveness of relaxation-biofeedback training. CPT also yielded larger reductions in analgesic use and greater improvements in quality-of-life…

  12. Critique: Can Children with AD/HD Learn Relaxation and Breathing Techniques through Biofeedback Video Games?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Craig; Conlon, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a critique on K. Amon and A. Campbell's "Can children with AD/HD learn relaxation and breathing techniques through biofeedback video games?". Amon and Campbell reported a successful trial of a commercially available biofeedback program, "The Wild Divine", in reducing symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)…

  13. Nonantimuscarinic treatment for overactive bladder: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Cedric K; Meriwether, Kate; El-Nashar, Sherif; Grimes, Cara L; Chen, Chi Chiung Grace; Orejuela, Francisco; Antosh, Danielle; Gleason, Jon; Kim-Fine, Shunaha; Wheeler, Thomas; McFadden, Brook; Balk, Ethan M; Murphy, Miles

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy and safety of nonantimuscarinic treatments for overactive bladder. Medline, Cochrane, and other databases (inception to April 2, 2014) were used. We included any study design in which there were 2 arms and an n > 100, if at least 1 of the arms was a nonantimuscarinic therapy or any comparative trial, regardless of number, if at least 2 arms were nonantimuscarinic therapies for overactive bladder. Eleven reviewers double-screened citations and extracted eligible studies for study: population, intervention, outcome, effects on outcome categories, and quality. The body of evidence for categories of interventions were summarized and assessed for strength. Ninety-nine comparative studies met inclusion criteria. Interventions effective to improve subjective overactive bladder symptoms include exercise with heat and steam generating sheets (1 study), diaphragmatic (1 study), deep abdominal (1 study), and pelvic floor muscle training exercises (2 studies). Pelvic floor exercises are more effective in subjective and objective outcomes with biofeedback or verbal feedback. Weight loss with diet and exercise, caffeine reduction, 25-50% reduction in fluid intake, and pelvic floor muscle exercises with verbal instruction and or biofeedback were all efficacious. Botulinum toxin A improves urge incontinence episodes, urgency, frequency, quality of life, nocturia, and urodynamic testing parameters. Acupuncture improves quality of life and urodynamic testing parameters. Extracorporeal magnetic stimulation improves urodynamic parameters. Mirabegron improves daily incontinence episodes, nocturia, number of daily voids, and urine volume per void, whereas solabegron improves daily incontinence episodes. Short-term posterior tibial nerve stimulation is more efficacious than pelvic floor muscle training exercises and behavioral therapy for improving: urgency, urinary incontinence episodes, daily voids, volume per void, and overall

  14. Effect of visual biofeedback to acquire supraglottic swallow in healthy individuals: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Imada, Miho; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Ishiguro, Yuriko; Kato, Miho; Inamoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Shibata, Seiko; Saitoh, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback therapy in acquiring supraglottic swallow (SGS) in a randomized-controlled trial with healthy individuals. Eighteen individuals (mean age, 26 years) who could not close or keep closed the vocal folds before and during the swallow in SGS were allocated randomly to either a visual biofeedback group (eight individuals) or a nonbiofeedback group (10 individuals). A videoendoscope was inserted intranasally and an SGS exercise, using 4 ml of green-colored water, was performed 30 times per day up to 5 days. When the participant failed to perform SGS, the result was provided only to the participants in the visual biofeedback group. The median length of time until acquiring SGS was 1.5 days in the visual biofeedback group and 3.5 days in the nonbiofeedback group (P=0.040). We concluded that visual biofeedback effectively enabled participants to acquire SGS earlier. PMID:26795716

  15. Modular Flooring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thate, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The modular flooring system (MFS) was developed to provide a portable, modular, durable carpeting solution for NASA fs Robotics Alliance Project fs (RAP) outreach efforts. It was also designed to improve and replace a modular flooring system that was too heavy for safe use and transportation. The MFS was developed for use as the flooring for various robotics competitions that RAP utilizes to meet its mission goals. One of these competitions, the FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC), currently uses two massive rolls of broadloom carpet for the foundation of the arena in which the robots are contained during the competition. The area of the arena is approximately 30 by 72 ft (approximately 9 by 22 m). This carpet is very cumbersome and requires large-capacity vehicles, and handling equipment and personnel to transport and deploy. The broadloom carpet sustains severe abuse from the robots during a regular three-day competition, and as a result, the carpet is not used again for competition. Similarly, broadloom carpets used for trade shows at convention centers around the world are typically discarded after only one use. This innovation provides a green solution to this wasteful practice. Each of the flooring modules in the previous system weighed 44 lb (.20 kg). The improvements in the overall design of the system reduce the weight of each module by approximately 22 lb (.10 kg) (50 %), and utilize an improved "module-to-module" connection method that is superior to the previous system. The MFS comprises 4-by-4-ft (.1.2-by- 1.2-m) carpet module assemblies that utilize commercially available carpet tiles that are bonded to a lightweight substrate. The substrate surface opposite from the carpeted surface has a module-to-module connecting interface that allows for the modules to be connected, one to the other, as the modules are constructed. This connection is hidden underneath the modules, creating a smooth, co-planar flooring surface. The modules are stacked and strapped

  16. 9. LOOKING FROM FLOOR 1 UP THROUGH OPENING TO FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. LOOKING FROM FLOOR 1 UP THROUGH OPENING TO FLOOR 2; OPENING IN THE FLOOR IS TO ALLOW THE RUNNER STONES TO BE FLIPPED OVER FOR SHARPENING; AT THE FIRST FLOOR ARE THE POSTS SUPPORTING THE BRIDGEBEAMS ON WHICH THE BRIDGE TREES PIVOT; THE CENTER POST RISES ABOVE THE STONES TO RECEIVE THE FOOT BEARING OF THE UPRIGHT SHAFT; ALSO SEEN ARE THE STONE SPINDLWS, UNDER SIDES OF THE BED STONES, STONE NUT AND GREAT SPUR WHEEL. - Pantigo Windmill, James Lane, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  17. 19. 1925 Main Factory building, interior, view of second floor's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 1925 Main Factory building, interior, view of second floor's permutit room, view looking east showing water treatment tanks - North Star Woolen Mill, 109 Portland Avenue South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  18. 8. Second floor front apartment showing ornately painted pressed metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Second floor front apartment showing ornately painted pressed metal ceiling, as well as modern partitions and wall treatments. View looking north. - Franklin Grocery Company Building, 1 South Main Street, Franklin, Merrimack County, NH

  19. 22. THIRD FLOOR, 202 EAST FOURTH STREET LOOKING SOUTHEAST, PARTITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. THIRD FLOOR, 202 EAST FOURTH STREET LOOKING SOUTHEAST, PARTITION SCAR MARKED BY CONTRASTING WALLPAPER TREATMENTS - Phillips-Thompson Building, 200-206 East Fourth Street, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  20. Floor of Juventae Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 30 May 2002) Juventae Chasma is an enormous box canyon (250 km X 100 km) which opens to the north and forms the outflow channel Maja Vallis. Most Martian outflow channels such as Maja, Kasei, and Ares Valles begin at point sources such as box canyons and chaotic terrain and then flow unconfined into a basin region. This image captures a portion of the western floor of Juventae Chasma and shows a wide variety of landforms. Conical hills, mesas, buttes and plateaus of layered material dominate this scene and seem to be 'swimming' in vast sand sheets. The conical hills have a spur and gully topography associated with them while the flat topped buttes and mesas do not. This may be indicative of different materials that compose each of these landforms or it could be that the flat-topped layer has been completely eroded off of the conical hills thereby exposing a different rock type. Both the conical hills and flat-topped buttes and mesas have extensive scree slopes (heaps of eroded rock and debris). Ripples, which are inferred to be dunes, can also be seen amongst the hills. No impact craters can be seen in this image, indicating that the erosion and transport of material down the canyon wall and across the floor is occurring at a relatively rapid rate, so that any craters that form are rapidly buried or eroded.

  1. Effects of innovative virtual reality game and EMG biofeedback on neuromotor control in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Sim, Yon Ju; You, Joshua H; Kim, Cheol J

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor control dysfunction or dyskinesia is a hallmark of neuromuscular impairment in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and is often implicated in reaching and grasping deficiencies due to a neuromuscular imbalance between the triceps and biceps. To mitigate such muscle imbalances, an innovative electromyography (EMG)-virtual reality (VR) biofeedback system were designed to provide accurate information about muscle activation and motivation. However, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not yet been determined in children with CP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a combined EMG biofeedback and VR (EMG-VR biofeedback) intervention system to improve muscle imbalance between triceps and biceps during reaching movements in children with spastic CP. Raw EMG signals were recorded at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz, band-pass filtered between 20-450 Hz, and notch-filtered at 60 Hz during elbow flexion and extension movements. EMG data were then processed using MyoResearch Master Edition 1.08 XP software. All participants underwent both interventions consisting of the EMG-VR biofeedback combination and EMG biofeedback alone. EMG analysis resulted in improved muscle activation in the underactive triceps while decreasing overactive or hypertonic biceps in the EMG-VR biofeedback compared with EMG biofeedback. The muscle imbalance ratio between the triceps and biceps was consistently improved. The present study is the first clinical trial to provide evidence for the additive benefits of VR intervention for enhancing the upper limb function of children with spastic CP. PMID:25227075

  2. Effects of practicing tandem gait with and without vibrotactile biofeedback in subjects with unilateral vestibular loss

    PubMed Central

    Dozza, Marco; Wall, Conrad; Peterka, Robert J.; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay B.

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with unilateral vestibular loss exhibit motor control impairments as shown by body and limb deviation during gait. Biofeedback devices have been shown to improve stance postural control, especially when sensory information is limited by environmental conditions or pathologies such as unilateral vestibular loss. However, the extent to which biofeedback could improve motor performance or learning while practicing a dynamic task such as narrow gait is still unknown. In this cross-over design study, 9 unilateral vestibular loss subjects practiced narrow gait with and without wearing a trunk-tilt, biofeedback device in 2 practice sessions. The biofeedback device informed the subjects of their medial-lateral angular tilt and tilt velocity during gait via vibration of the trunk. From motion analysis and tilt data, the performance of the subjects practicing tandem gait were compared over time with and without biofeedback. By practicing tandem gait, subjects reduced their trunk-tilt, center of mass displacement, medial-lateral feet distance, and frequency of stepping error. In both groups, use of tactile biofeedback consistently increased postural stability during tandem gait, beyond the effects of practice alone. However, one single session of practice with biofeedback did not result in conclusive short-term after-effects consistent with short-term retention of motor performance without this additional biofeedback. Results from this study support the hypothesis that tactile biofeedback acts similar to natural sensory feedback to improve dynamic motor performance but does not facilitate a recalibration of motor performance to improve function after short-term use. PMID:18525145

  3. PhysioSoft--an approach in applying computer technology in biofeedback procedures.

    PubMed

    Havelka, Mladen; Havelka, Juraj; Delimar, Marko

    2009-09-01

    The paper presents description of original biofeedback computer program called PhysioSoft. It has been designed on the basis of the experience in development of biofeedback techniques of interdisciplinary team of experts of the Department of Health Psychology of the University of Applied Health Studies, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, and "Mens Sana", Private Biofeedback Practice in Zagreb. The interest in the possibility of producing direct and voluntary effects on autonomic body functions has gradually proportionately increased with the dynamics of abandoning the Cartesian model of body-mind relationship. The psychosomatic approach and studies carried out in the 50-ies of the 20th century, together with the research about conditioned and operant learning, have proved close inter-dependence between the physical and mental, and also the possibility of training the individual to consciously act on his autonomic physiological functions. The new knowledge has resulted in the development of biofeedback techniques around the 70-ies of the previous century and has been the base of many studies indicating the significance of biofeedback techniques in clinical practice concerned with many symptoms of health disorders. The digitalization of biofeedback instruments and development of user friendly computer software enable the use of biofeedback at individual level as an efficient procedure of a patient's active approach to self care of his own health. As the new user friendly computer software enables extensive accessibility of biofeedback instruments, the authors have designed the PhysioSoft computer program as a contribution to the development and broad use of biofeedback. PMID:19860110

  4. 4. STAIR, FROM SECOND FLOOR TO THIRD FLOOR, FROM NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. STAIR, FROM SECOND FLOOR TO THIRD FLOOR, FROM NORTHEAST. Plan of stair is elliptical, the inside well measuring 54' on major axis and 14' on minor axis. ALSO NOTE HIGH REEDED WAINSCOT - Saltus-Habersham House, 802 Bay Street, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  5. 18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH BLOCKS AND PULLEYS OVERHEAD LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  6. 13. Bottom floor, tower interior showing concrete floor and cast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Bottom floor, tower interior showing concrete floor and cast iron bases for oil butts (oil butts removed when lighthouse lamp was converted to electric power.) - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  7. Floor Plans: Section "AA", Section "BB"; Floor Framing Plans: Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans: Section "A-A", Section "B-B"; Floor Framing Plans: Section "A-A", Section "B-B" - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  8. 18. MAIN FLOOR HOLDING TANKS Main floor, looking at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. MAIN FLOOR - HOLDING TANKS Main floor, looking at holding tanks against the west wall, from which sluice gates are seen protruding. Right foreground-wooden holding tanks. Note narrow wooden flumes through which fish were sluiced into holding and brining tanks. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  9. Floor-plan radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, David G.; Ueberschaer, Ronald M.

    2000-07-01

    Urban-warfare specialists, law-enforcement officers, counter-drug agents, and counter-terrorism experts encounter operational situations where they must assault a target building and capture or rescue its occupants. To minimize potential casualties, the assault team needs a picture of the building's interior and a copy of its floor plan. With this need in mind, we constructed a scale model of a single- story house and imaged its interior using synthetic-aperture techniques. The interior and exterior walls nearest the radar set were imaged with good fidelity, but the distal ones appear poorly defined and surrounded by ghosts and artifacts. The latter defects are traceable to beam attenuation, wavefront distortion, multiple scattering, traveling waves, resonance phenomena, and other effects not accounted for in the traditional (noninteracting, isotropic point scatterer) model for radar imaging.

  10. Short communication: Flooring preferences of dairy cows at calving.

    PubMed

    Campler, M; Munksgaard, L; Jensen, M B; Weary, D M; von Keyserlingk, M A G

    2014-02-01

    The present study investigated the flooring preference during the 30 h before parturition in Holstein dairy cows housed individually in a maternity pen. Seventeen multiparous cows were moved, on average, 2 d before expected calving date into an individual maternity pen with 3 different flooring surfaces: 10 cm of sand, pebble-top rubber mats, or concrete flooring, each covered with 15 cm of straw. Calving location, lying time, and total time and number of lying bouts on each of the floor types were recorded during 2 periods: precalving (24 to 29 h before calving) and at calving (0 to 5h before calving). Ten cows calved on sand, 6 on concrete, and 1 on the rubber mat. Lying bouts increased during the hours closest to calving, regardless of flooring. The number of lying bouts did not differ between flooring types precalving but cows had more lying bouts on sand and concrete compared with rubber at calving. Cows spent more time lying down on sand and concrete compared with rubber precalving, but lying times did not differ between treatments at calving. Cows that calved on sand spent more time lying on sand at calving compared with the other 2 flooring types. Cows that calved on concrete did not show a flooring preference at calving. These results indicate that rubber mats are the least preferred by dairy cows in the maternity pens, even when covered with a deep layer of straw. PMID:24359828

  11. Blood pressure tracking systems and their application to biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Lee, R M; Caldwell, J R; Lee, J A

    1977-12-01

    Two automatic electronic systems for tracking diastolic or systolic blood pressure (BP) and their use in biofeedback experiments are described. Both systems are based on the use of an arm cuff and the recording of Korotkoff sounds with a microphone. An electronic control system receives input from the microphone and provides output to several solenoid valves that control compressed airflow to the cuff. For one of the tracking systems we devised, the cuff is alternately inflated for 45 sec and deflated for 45 sec. During inflation, small increments and decrements in cuff pressure, based on the occurrence of Korotkoff sounds, are used to track BP. The other tracking system is slower but provides more continuous measurements: The cuff is alternately inflated to approximately the BP level for 5 sec and then deflated for 5 sec. During each inflation, the number of Korotkoff sounds is recorded by the system and according to this number, the amount of inflation on the next trial is automatically adjusted so that the cuff pressure follows BP. Both systems have been used successfully in biofeedback applications. PMID:612355

  12. Novel association of rectal evacuation disorder and rumination syndrome: Diagnosis, comorbidities, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Iturrino, Johanna; Shin, Andrea; Vazquez-Roque, Maria; Katzka, David A; Snuggerud, Jill R; Seime, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with disorders of gastrointestinal function may undergo unnecessary treatment if misdiagnosed as motility disorders. Objective To report on clinical features, medical, surgical, and psychiatric comorbidities, and prior treatments of a patient cohort diagnosed concurrently with nonpsychogenic rumination syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction (also termed rectal evacuation disorder). Methods From a consecutive series (1994–2013) of 438 outpatients with rectal evacuation disorders in the practice of a single gastroenterologist at a tertiary care centre, 57 adolescents or adults were diagnosed with concomitant rumination syndrome. All underwent formal psychological assessment or completed validated questionnaires. Results All 57 patients (95% female) fulfilled Rome III criteria for rumination syndrome; rectal evacuation disorder was confirmed by testing of anal sphincter pressures and rectal balloon evacuation. Prior to diagnosis, most patients underwent multiple medical and surgical treatments (gastrostomy, gastric fundoplication, other gastric surgery, ileostomy, colectomy) for their symptoms. Psychological comorbidity was identified in 93% of patients. Patients were managed predominantly with psychological and behavioural approaches: diaphragmatic breathing for rumination and biofeedback retraining for pelvic floor dysfunction. Conclusions Awareness of concomitant rectal evacuation disorder and rumination syndrome and prompt identification of psychological comorbidity are keys to instituting behavioural and psychological methods to avoid unnecessary treatment. PMID:24724013

  13. Use of EMG Biofeedback Procedures with Learning Disabled Children in a Clinical and an Educational Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.; Russell, Harold L.

    1985-01-01

    In two studies, 16 learning disabled elementary-aged boys receiving electromyographs for biofeedback muscle relaxation training showed significant improvement over controls on a variety of measures, including reading, spelling, verbal IQ, eye-hand coordination, and handwriting. (CL)

  14. Generalization of lowered EMG levels during musical performance following biofeedback training.

    PubMed

    Morasky, R L; Reynolds, C; Sowell, L E

    1983-06-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training offers a means by which musicians can control excess muscle tension during performance. Music instructors generally agree that unnecessary muscle tension not only leads to physical problems but also can interfere with performance quality. It is important, however, that the reduced EMG levels resulting from biofeedback training generalize to situations in which feedback is not available, and that the reduction in muscle tension not result in decreased performance quality. Eight intermediate to advanced clarinet players participated in four EMG biofeedback training sessions during which short-term and extended generalization of lowered EMG levels was assessed along with trill and scale speed scores. Significant reductions in EMG levels associated with biofeedback training generalized to short-term and extended situations, while trill and scale performances remained at or above pretest levels. PMID:6639976

  15. A Wearable Respiratory Biofeedback System Based on Generalized Body Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guan-Zheng; Huang, Bang-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Wearable medical devices have enabled unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs and emerging biofeedback services in a pervasive manner. This article describes a wearable respiratory biofeedback system based on a generalized body sensor network (BSN) platform. The compact BSN platform was tailored for the strong requirements of overall system optimizations. A waist-worn biofeedback device was designed using the BSN. Extensive bench tests have shown that the generalized BSN worked as intended. In-situ experiments with 22 subjects indicated that the biofeedback device was discreet, easy to wear, and capable of offering wearable respiratory trainings. Pilot studies on wearable training patterns and resultant heart rate variability suggested that paced respirations at abdominal level and with identical inhaling/exhaling ratio were more appropriate for decreasing sympathetic arousal and increasing parasympathetic activities. PMID:21545293

  16. Efficacy of Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation Combined with Biofeedback Therapy in Patients with Functional Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Bing Yan; Ma, Hong Mei; Zang, Xiao Ying; Wang, Si Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Nan; Zhang, Xi Peng; Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A large number of studies have shown that function constipation (FC) has an extremely high incidence of mental and psychological disorders. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) was applied to the treatment of psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression. We explored the effects of CES combined with biofeedback therapy (BFT) on the psychological state, clinical symptoms, and anorectal function in patients with FC. Methods A total of 74 patients with FC were randomly divided into 2 groups. The control group received BFT. CES combined with BFT was carried out in the experiment group. All patients were assessed using the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), and Wexner constipation score at baseline and the end of each course. Anorectal manometry and balloon expulsion tests were performed before and after treatment. Results After treatment, the participants in the experiment group had significantly lower score SAS, SDS, and Wexner constipation scores than the control group (all P < 0.05). The number of successful expulsion in the experiment group was larger than the control group (P = 0.016). Conclusions CES combined with BFT was effective in improving the psychological status of anxiety, depression, and bowel symptoms in patients with FC. PMID:26932836

  17. A psychoengineering paradigm for the neurocognitive mechanisms of biofeedback and neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Gaume, A; Vialatte, A; Mora-Sánchez, A; Ramdani, C; Vialatte, F B

    2016-09-01

    We believe that the missing keystone to design effective and efficient biofeedback and neurofeedback protocols is a comprehensive model of the mechanisms of feedback learning. In this manuscript we review the learning models in behavioral, developmental and cognitive psychology, and derive a synthetic model of the psychological perspective on biofeedback. We afterwards review the neural correlates of feedback learning mechanisms, and present a general neuroscience model of biofeedback. We subsequently show how biomedical engineering principles can be applied to design efficient feedback protocols. We finally present an integrative psychoengineering model of the feedback learning processes, and provide new guidelines for the efficient design of biofeedback and neurofeedback protocols. We identify five key properties, (1) perceptibility=can the subject perceive the biosignal?, (2) autonomy=can the subject regulate by himself?, (3) mastery=degree of control over the biosignal, (4) motivation=rewards system of the biofeedback, and (5) learnability=possibility of learning. We conclude with guidelines for the investigation and promotion of these properties in biofeedback protocols. PMID:27339691

  18. Waterproof Raised Floor Makes Utility Lines Accessible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Floor for laboratories, hospitals and factories waterproof yet allows access to subfloor utilities. Elevated access floor system designed for installations with multitude of diverse utility systems routed under and up through floor and requirement of separation of potentially conflicting utility services. Floor covered by continuous sheet of heat resealable vinyl. Floor system cut open when changes are made in utility lines and ducts. After modifications, floor covering resealed to protect subfloor utilities from spills and leaks.

  19. Making A Precisely Level Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.; Walker, William H.; Cather, Jim; Burch, John B.; Clark, Keith M.; Johnston, Dwight; Henderson, David E.

    1989-01-01

    Floor-pouring procedure yields large surface level, smooth, and hard. Floor made of self-leveling, slow-curing epoxy with added black pigment. Epoxy poured to thickness no greater than 0.33 in. (0.84 cm) on concrete base. Base floor seasoned, reasonably smooth and level, and at least 4 in. (10cm) thick. Base rests on thermal barrier of gravel or cinders and contains no steel plates, dividers, or bridges to minimize thermal distortion. Metal retaining wall surrounds base.

  20. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Emmons, J. Bruce; Blessing, Leonard J.

    2004-02-03

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  1. 21. VIEW OF THE FIRST FLOOR PLAN. THE FIRST FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW OF THE FIRST FLOOR PLAN. THE FIRST FLOOR WAS USED FOR DEPLETED AND ENRICHED URANIUM FABRICATION. THE ORIGINAL DRAWING HAS BEEN ARCHIVED ON MICROFILM. THE DRAWING WAS REPRODUCED AT THE BEST QUALITY POSSIBLE. LETTERS AND NUMBERS IN THE CIRCLES INDICATE FOOTER AND/OR COLUMN LOCATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 23. VIEW OF THE FIRST FLOOR PLAN. THE FIRST FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW OF THE FIRST FLOOR PLAN. THE FIRST FLOOR HOUSED ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES, THE CENTRAL COMPUTING, UTILITY SYSTEMS, ANALYTICAL LABORATORIES, AND MAINTENANCE SHOPS. THE ORIGINAL DRAWING HAS BEEN ARCHIVED ON MICROFILM. THE DRAWING WAS REPRODUCED AT THE BEST QUALITY POSSIBLE. LETTERS AND NUMBERS IN THE CIRCLES INDICATE FOOTER AND/OR COLUMN LOCATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  3. 22. VIEW OF THE SECOND FLOOR PLAN. THE SECOND FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW OF THE SECOND FLOOR PLAN. THE SECOND FLOOR CONTAINS THE AIR PLENUM ND SOME OFFICE SPACE. THE ORIGINAL DRAWING HAS BEEN ARCHIVED ON MICROFILM. THE DRAWING WAS REPRODUCED AT THE BEST QUALITY POSSIBLE. LETTERS AND NUMBERS IN THE CIRCLES INDICATE FOOTER AND/OR COLUMN LOCATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Effects of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback on EEG Alpha Asymmetry and Anxiety Symptoms in Male Athletes: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Dziembowska, Inga; Izdebski, Paweł; Rasmus, Anna; Brudny, Janina; Grzelczak, Marta; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BFB) has been shown as useful tool to manage stress in various populations. The present study was designed to investigate whether the biofeedback-based stress management tool consisting of rhythmic breathing, actively self-generated positive emotions and a portable biofeedback device induce changes in athletes' HRV, EEG patterns, and self-reported anxiety and self-esteem. The study involved 41 healthy male athletes, aged 16-21 (mean 18.34 ± 1.36) years. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: biofeedback and control. Athletes in the biofeedback group received HRV biofeedback training, athletes in the control group didn't receive any intervention. During the randomized controlled trial (days 0-21), the mean anxiety score declined significantly for the intervention group (change-4 p < 0.001) but not for the control group (p = 0.817). In addition, as compared to the control, athletes in biofeedback group showed substantial and statistically significant improvement in heart rate variability indices and changes in power spectra of both theta and alpha brain waves, and alpha asymmetry. These changes suggest better self-control in the central nervous system and better flexibility of the autonomic nervous system in the group that received biofeedback training. A HRV biofeedback-based stress management tool may be beneficial for stress reduction for young male athletes. PMID:26459346

  5. [PELVIC FLOOR RECONSTRUCTION AFTER PELVIC EVISCERATION USING GRACILIS MUSCULOCUTANEOUS FLAP].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, V N; Bakirov, A A; Kabirov, I R; Izmajlov, A A; Kutlijarov, L M; Safiullin, R L; Urmancev, M F; Sultanov, I M; Abdrahimov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Evisceration of the pelvic organs (EPO) is a fairly uncommon surgical treatment that removes all organs from a patient's pelvic cavity. We use gracilis musculocutaneous flap to repair pelvic floor after EPO. Over the period from November 2013 to December 2014 we carried out EPO with reconstructive repair of the pelvic floor with gracilis musculocutaneous flap in 10 patients with locally advanced pelvic tumors. We describe the surgical procedure and surgical outcomes in these patients. Mean age of the patients was 55 years. Mean duration of EPO with the pelvic floor repair was 285 min., mean blood loss--595 mL and the average length of hospital stay--19 days. Gracilis musculocutaneous flap has a sufficient arterial supply and mobility for pelvic floor reconstruction. Necrosis of flap's distal edge occurred in one of the 10 clinical cases, while the remaining flaps were fully preserved. Complete healing of wounds with no signs of weakening of the pelvic floor muscles was observed in all cases. Pelvic floor reconstruction is an essential procedure in order to reduce complications associated with the evisceration of the pelvic organs. The Gracilis musculocutaneous flap is the logical alternative to repair pelvic floor defect. It does not contribute to complications like functional deficiency of the lower limbs, complications of stoma formation or weakening of the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:26390558

  6. The Mozart effect in biofeedback visual rehabilitation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Serena; Librando, Aloisa; Esposito, Mariacristina; Vingolo, Enzo M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of acoustic biofeedback by means of Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major K. 448 to maintain and/or restore visual performance in a patient with macular pucker and glaucoma. Methods A 74-year-old patient with open angle glaucoma in both eyes and macular pucker in the right eye (RE) underwent visual rehabilitation with acoustic biofeedback by means of the MAIA™ Vision Training Module (Centervue, Padova, Italy) 10 minutes each eye once a week for 5 weeks. The patient was asked to move his eyes according to a sound which changed into Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos when the patient locked the fixation target. Results Best-corrected visual acuity improved in his right eye (RE) and was stable in the left eye (LE). Fixation stability improved in both eyes, and retinal sensitivity decreased in the RE and improved in the LE. The characteristic of the macular pucker did not change during the training as demonstrated with optical coherence tomography. The patient was very satisfied with the training, as demonstrated by a 25-item questionnaire (National Eye Institute – Visual Functioning Questionnaire, NEI-VFQ-25). The patient’s reading speed and the character size which he was able to read improved in his RE. Conclusion Music could enhance synaptic plasticity and affect neural learning and fixation training by means of MAIA vision training. Therefore it can improve visual performance in patients with macular pucker, postpone the surgical time, and assure a better quality of life for the patient. PMID:21966199

  7. A flexible platform for biofeedback-driven control and personalization of electrical nerve stimulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew P; Qing, Kurt Y; Otto, Kevin J; Worth, Robert M; John, Simon W M; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2015-05-01

    Electrical vagus nerve stimulation is a treatment alternative for many epileptic and depressed patients whose symptoms are not well managed with pharmaceutical therapy. However, the fixed stimulus, open loop dosing mechanism limits its efficacy and precludes major advances in the quality of therapy. A real-time, responsive form of vagus nerve stimulation is needed to control nerve activation according to therapeutic need. This personalized approach to therapy will improve efficacy and reduce the number and severity of side effects. We present autonomous neural control, a responsive, biofeedback-driven approach that uses the degree of measured nerve activation to control stimulus delivery. We demonstrate autonomous neural control in rats, showing that it rapidly learns how to most efficiently activate any desired proportion of vagal A, B, and/or C fibers over time. This system will maximize efficacy by minimizing patient response variability and by minimizing therapeutic failures resulting from longitudinal decreases in nerve activation with increasing durations of treatment. The value of autonomous neural control equally applies to other applications of electrical nerve stimulation. PMID:25167554

  8. Susceptibility of Tribolium castaneum life stages exposed to elevated temperatures during heat treatments of a pilot flour mill: influence of sanitation, temperatures attained among mills floors, and costs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of sanitation on responses of life stages of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), was investigated in a pilot flour mill subjected to three, 24 hour heat treatments using forced-air gas heaters. Two sanitation levels, dusting of wheat flour an...

  9. Channel Floor Yardangs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    The yardangs in this image are forming in channel floor deposits. The channel itself is funneling the wind to cause the erosion.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 4.5, Longitude 229.7 East (133.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  10. Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content ASCRS Patients Educational Resources Diseases and Conditions Patient Education Library Patient Success Stories Treatments and Screening Resources Find a Surgeon Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Registries Helpful Links Physicians ...

  11. Tangential Floor in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marti, Leyla

    2012-01-01

    This article examines floor management in two classroom sessions: a task-oriented computer lesson and a literature lesson. Recordings made in the computer lesson show the organization of floor when a task is given to students. Temporary or "incipient" side floors (Jones and Thornborrow, 2004) emerge beside the main floor. In the literature lesson,…

  12. Alternative medicine in atrial fibrillation treatment—Yoga, acupuncture, biofeedback and more

    PubMed Central

    Kanmanthareddy, Arun; Reddy, Madhu; Ponnaganti, Gopi; Sanjani, Hari Priya; Koripalli, Sandeep; Adabala, Nivedita; Buddam, Avanija; Janga, Pramod; Lakkireddy, Thanmay; Bommana, Sudharani; Vallakati, Ajay; Atkins, Donita

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has seen a significant improvement in the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) with the development of newer medications and improvement in catheter ablation techniques. Recurrence of AF remains a significant problem in these patients and medications offer limited supportive role. Complementary and alternative treatment strategies therefore remain a viable option for these AF patients. Several studies have shown improvement in AF symptoms with yoga therapy, acupuncture and biofeedback. There are also several herbal medicine and supplements such as omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidant vitamins, barberry, motherwort, cinchona, Shensongyangxin, hawthorn, Kella and Wenxin Keli that have been evaluated as potential therapeutic options in AF. These studies are however limited by small sample sizes with mixed results. Besides the pharmacological action, metabolism, interactions with other medications and the adverse effects of the herbal medications and supplements remain poorly understood. In spite of the above limitations, complementary therapies remain a promising option in the management of AF and further studies are necessary to validate their safety and efficacy. PMID:25713735

  13. Exploring the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program in reducing anxiety in college students.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Gregg; Keffer, Steven; Abrahamson, Craig; Horst, S Jeanne

    2011-06-01

    Given the pervasiveness of stress and anxiety in our culture it is important to develop and implement interventions that can be easily utilized by large numbers of people that are readily available, inexpensive and have minimal side effects. Two studies explored the effectiveness of a computer-based heart rate variability biofeedback program on reducing anxiety and negative mood in college students. A pilot project (n = 9) of highly anxious students revealed sizable decreases in anxiety and negative mood following utilizing the program for 4 weeks. A second study (n = 35) employing an immediate versus delayed treatment design replicated the results, although the magnitude of the impact was not quite as strong. Despite observing decreases in anxiety, the expected changes in psychophysiological coherence were not observed. PMID:21533678

  14. Biofeedback vs. Video Games: Effects on Impulsivity, Locus of Control and Self-Concept with Incarcerated Juveniles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kappes, Bruno M.; Thompson, Dan L.

    1985-01-01

    Juvenile residents (N=12) were assigned to biofeedback or video game conditions to examine their effects on self-regulation skills. Results indicated no significant differences between biofeedback and video game training. However, pre- and post-differences for both groups combined demonstrated significant gains in self-regulation. (Author/BL)

  15. The Effects of Relaxation and Biofeedback Training on Dimensions of Self Concept (DOSC) among Hyperactive Male Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omiza, Michael M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of relaxation training and biofeedback on five factors of self-concept among hyperactive male elementary school students are investigated: levels of aspiration; anxiety; academic interest and satisfaction; leadership and initiative; and identification v alienation. Findings suggest that relaxation training/biofeedback warrant inclusion…

  16. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress and Anxiety among Nursing Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Ratanasiripong, Nop; Kathalae, Duangrat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It has been well documented that nursing students across the world experience stress and anxiety throughout their education and training. The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to investigate the impact of biofeedback intervention program on nursing students' levels of stress and anxiety during their first clinical training. Methods. Participants consisted of 60 second-year baccalaureate nursing students. The 30 participants in the biofeedback group received training on how to use the biofeedback device to assist in stress and anxiety management for 5 weeks while the 30 in the control group did not receive any training. Findings. Results indicated that the biofeedback group was able to maintain the stress level while the control group had a significant increase in the stress level over the 5-week period of clinical training. Additionally, the biofeedback group had a significant reduction in anxiety, while the control group had a moderate increase in anxiety. Conclusions. The better the nursing students can manage their stress and anxiety, the more successful they can be in their clinical training. Ultimately, the more psychologically healthy the nursing students are, the more likely they will flourish and graduate to become productive and contributing members of the nursing profession. PMID:22811932

  17. Benefits of multi-session balance and gait training with multi-modal biofeedback in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shannon B; Horslen, Brian C; Davis, Justin R; Allum, John H J; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-06-01

    Real-time balance-relevant biofeedback from a wearable sensor can improve balance in many patient populations, however, it is unknown if balance training with biofeedback has lasting benefits for healthy older adults once training is completed and biofeedback removed. This study was designed to determine if multi-session balance training with and without biofeedback leads to changes in balance performance in healthy older adults; and if changes persist after training. 36 participants (age 60-88) were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups trained on seven stance and gait tasks for 2 consecutive weeks (3×/week) while trunk angular sway and task duration were monitored. One group received real-time multi-modal biofeedback of trunk sway and a control group trained without biofeedback. Training effects were assessed at the last training session, with biofeedback available to the feedback group. Post-training effects (without biofeedback) were assessed immediately after, 1-week, and 1-month post-training. Both groups demonstrated training effects; participants swayed less when standing on foam with eyes closed (EC), maintained tandem-stance EC longer, and completed 8 tandem-steps EC faster and with less sway at the last training session. Changes in sway and duration, indicative of faster walking, were also observed after training for other gait tasks. While changes in walking speed persisted post-training, few other post-training effects were observed. These data suggest there is little added benefit to balance training with biofeedback, beyond training without, in healthy older adults. However, transient use of wearable balance biofeedback systems as balance aides remains beneficial for challenging balance situations and some clinical populations. PMID:27264396

  18. The use of biofeedback in clinical virtual reality: the INTREPID project.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Claudia; Gorini, Alessandra; Vigna, Cinzia; Algeri, Davide; Pallavicini, Federica; Riva, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by a constant and unspecific anxiety that interferes with daily-life activities. Its high prevalence in general population and the severe limitations it causes, point out the necessity to find new efficient strategies to treat it. Together with the cognitive-behavioral treatments, relaxation represents a useful approach for the treatment of GAD, but it has the limitation that it is hard to be learned. The INTREPID project is aimed to implement a new instrument to treat anxiety-related disorders and to test its clinical efficacy in reducing anxiety-related symptoms. The innovation of this approach is the combination of virtual reality and biofeedback, so that the first one is directly modified by the output of the second one. In this way, the patient is made aware of his or her reactions through the modification of some features of the VR environment in real time. Using mental exercises the patient learns to control these physiological parameters and using the feedback provided by the virtual environment is able to gauge his or her success. The supplemental use of portable devices, such as PDA or smart-phones, allows the patient to perform at home, individually and autonomously, the same exercises experienced in therapist's office. The goal is to anchor the learned protocol in a real life context, so enhancing the patients' ability to deal with their symptoms. The expected result is a better and faster learning of relaxation techniques, and thus an increased effectiveness of the treatment if compared with traditional clinical protocols. PMID:19915521

  19. Combined use of autogenic therapy and biofeedback in training effective control of heart rate by humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were performed on 24 men and women (aged 20-27 yr) in three equal groups who were taught to control their own heart rates by autogenic training and biofeedback under dark and sound-isolated conditions. Group I was parasympathetic dominant, group II was sympathetic dominant, and group III consisted of parasympathetic-dominant subjects and controls who received only biofeedback of their own heart rates. The results corroborate three hypotheses: (1) subjects with para-sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles perform in a way that is both qualitatively and quantitatively different from subjects with sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles; (2) tests of interindividual variability yield data relevant to individual performance in visceral learning tasks; and (3) the combined use of autogenic training, biofeedback, and verbal feedback is suitable for conditioning large stable autonomic responses in humans.

  20. Efficacy of Biofeedback and Cognitive-behavioural Therapy in Psoriatic PatientsA Single-blind, Randomized and Controlled Study with Added Narrow-band Ultraviolet B Therapy.

    PubMed

    Piaserico, Stefano; Marinello, Elena; Dessi, Andrea; Linder, Michael Dennis; Coccarielli, Debora; Peserico, Andrea

    2016-08-23

    Increasing data suggests that there is a connection between stress and the appearance of psoriasis symptoms. We therefore performed a clinical trial enrolling 40 participants who were randomly allocated to either an 8-week cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) (treatment group) plus narrow-band UVB phototherapy or to an 8-week course of only narrow-band UVB phototherapy (control group). We evaluated the clinical severity of psoriasis (PASI), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12, Skindex-29 and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at baseline and by the end of the study. Sixty-five percent of patients in the treatment group achieved PASI75 compared with 15% of standard UVB patients (p = 0.007). GHQ-12 cases were reduced from 45% to 10% in the treatment group and from 30% to 20% in the control group (p = 0.05). The Skindex-29 emotional domain showed a significant improvement in the CBT/biofeedback group compared with control patients (-2.8 points, p = 0.04). This study shows that an adjunctive 8-week intervention with CBT combined with biofeedback increases the beneficial effect of UVB therapy in the overall management of psoriasis, reduces the clinical severity of psoriasis, improving quality of life and decreases the number of minor psychiatric disorders. PMID:27283367

  1. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  2. Heart Rate Variability and the Efficacy of Biofeedback in Heroin Users with Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Mei; Ko, Jiun-Min; Fan, Sheng-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low heart rate variability (HRV) has been confirmed in heroin users, but the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback in heroin users remain unknown. This study examined (1) correlations between depression and HRV indices; (2) group differences in HRV indices among a heroin-user group, a group with major depressive disorder but no heroin use, and healthy controls; and (3) the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiratory rates within the heroin group. Methods All participants completed a depression questionnaire and underwent electrocardiogram measurements, and group differences in baseline HRV indices were examined. The heroin group underwent electrocardiogram and respiration rate measurements at baseline, during a depressive condition, and during a happiness condition, before and after which they took part in the heart-rate-variability–biofeedback program. The effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiration rates were examined. Results There was a negative correlation between depression and high frequency of HRV, and a positive correlation between depression and low frequency to high frequency ratio of HRV. The heroin group had a lower overall and high frequency of HRV, and a higher low frequency/high frequency ratio than healthy controls. The heart-rate-variability–biofeedback intervention increased HRV indices and decreased respiratory rates from pre-intervention to post-intervention. Conclusion Reduced parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activations were found in heroin users. Heart-rate-variability–biofeedback was an effective non-pharmacological intervention to restore autonomic balance. PMID:27121428

  3. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback on cardiovascular responses and autonomic sympathovagal modulation following stressor tasks in prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Sun, P; Wang, S; Lin, G; Wang, T

    2016-02-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is implicated in prehypertension, and previous studies have suggested that therapies that improve modulation of sympathovagal balance, such as biofeedback and slow abdominal breathing, are effective in patients with prehypertension at rest. However, considering that psychophysiological stressors may be associated with greater cardiovascular risk in prehypertensives, it is important to investigate whether heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) results in equivalent effects on autonomic cardiovascular responses control during stressful conditions in prehypertensives. A total of 32 college students with prehypertension were enrolled and randomly assigned to HRV-BF (n=12), slow abdominal breathing (SAB, n=10) or no treatment (control, n=10) groups. Then, a training experiment consisting of 15 sessions was employed to compare the effect of each intervention on the following cardiovascular response indicators before and after intervention: heart rate (HR); heart rate variability (HRV) components; blood volume pulse amplitude (BVPamp); galvanic skin response; respiration rate (RSP); and blood pressure. In addition, the cold pressor test and the mental arithmetic challenge test were also performed over two successive days before and after the invention as well as after 3 months of follow-up. A significant decrease in HR and RSP and a significant increase in BVPamp were observed after the HRV-BF intervention (P<0.001). For the HRV analysis, HRV-BF significantly reduced the ratio of low-frequency power to high-frequency power (the LF/HF ratio, P<0.001) and increased the normalized high-frequency power (HFnm) (P<0.001) during the stress tests, and an added benefit over SAB by improving HRV was also observed. In the 3-month follow-up study, similar effects on RSP, BVPamp, LF/HF and HFnm were observed in the HRV-BF group compared with the SAB group. HRV-BF training contributes to the beneficial effect of reducing the stress-related cardiovascular

  4. Ploughing the deep sea floor.

    PubMed

    Puig, Pere; Canals, Miquel; Company, Joan B; Martín, Jacobo; Amblas, David; Lastras, Galderic; Palanques, Albert

    2012-09-13

    Bottom trawling is a non-selective commercial fishing technique whereby heavy nets and gear are pulled along the sea floor. The direct impact of this technique on fish populations and benthic communities has received much attention, but trawling can also modify the physical properties of seafloor sediments, water–sediment chemical exchanges and sediment fluxes. Most of the studies addressing the physical disturbances of trawl gear on the seabed have been undertaken in coastal and shelf environments, however, where the capacity of trawling to modify the seafloor morphology coexists with high-energy natural processes driving sediment erosion, transport and deposition. Here we show that on upper continental slopes, the reworking of the deep sea floor by trawling gradually modifies the shape of the submarine landscape over large spatial scales. We found that trawling-induced sediment displacement and removal from fishing grounds causes the morphology of the deep sea floor to become smoother over time, reducing its original complexity as shown by high-resolution seafloor relief maps. Our results suggest that in recent decades, following the industrialization of fishing fleets, bottom trawling has become an important driver of deep seascape evolution. Given the global dimension of this type of fishery, we anticipate that the morphology of the upper continental slope in many parts of the world’s oceans could be altered by intensive bottom trawling, producing comparable effects on the deep sea floor to those generated by agricultural ploughing on land. PMID:22951970

  5. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  6. Design issues for floor control protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommel, Hans-Peter; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, Jose J.

    1995-03-01

    Floor control allows users of networked multimedia applications to remotely share resources like cursors, data views, video and audio channels, or entire applications without access conflicts. Floors are mutually exclusive permissions, granted dynamically to collaborating users, mitigating race conditions and guaranteeing fair and deadlock- free resource access. Although floor control is an early concept within computer-supported cooperative work, no framework exists and current floor control mechanisms are often limited to simple objects. While small-scale collaboration can be facilitated by social conventions, the importance of floors becomes evident for large-scale application sharing and teleconferencing orchestration. In this paper, the concept of a scalable session protocol is enhanced with floor control. Characteristics of collaborative environments are discussed, and session and floor control are discerned. The system's and user's requirements perspectives are discussed, including distributed storage policies, packet structure and user-interface design for floor presentation, manipulation, and triggering conditions for floor migration. Interaction stages between users, and scenarios of participant withdrawal, late joins, and establishment of subgroups are elicited with respect to floor generation, bookkeeping, and passing. An API is proposed to standardize and integrate floor control among shared applications. Finally, a concise classification for existing systems with a notion of floor control is introduced.

  7. 49 CFR 38.59 - Floor surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Floor surfaces. 38.59 Section 38.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Rapid Rail Vehicles and Systems § 38.59 Floor surfaces. Floor...

  8. 14 CFR 25.793 - Floor surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Floor surfaces. 25.793 Section 25.793 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Floor surfaces. The floor surface of all areas which are likely to become wet in service must have...

  9. 14 CFR 25.793 - Floor surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Floor surfaces. 25.793 Section 25.793 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Floor surfaces. The floor surface of all areas which are likely to become wet in service must have...

  10. 36 CFR 1192.59 - Floor surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Floor surfaces. 1192.59 Section 1192.59 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE... Rail Vehicles and Systems § 1192.59 Floor surfaces. Floor surfaces on aisles, places for standees,...

  11. 49 CFR 38.59 - Floor surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Floor surfaces. 38.59 Section 38.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Rapid Rail Vehicles and Systems § 38.59 Floor surfaces. Floor...

  12. 36 CFR 1192.59 - Floor surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Floor surfaces. 1192.59 Section 1192.59 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE... Rail Vehicles and Systems § 1192.59 Floor surfaces. Floor surfaces on aisles, places for standees,...

  13. Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction in Women: A Review.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Alison; Menees, Stacy

    2016-06-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction and fecal incontinence is a common and debilitating condition in women, particularly as women age, and often goes under-reported to health care providers. It is important for providers to ask patients about possible symptoms. An algorithm for evaluation and treatment is presented. Current and future therapies are described and discussed. PMID:27261895

  14. Floor furnace burns to children.

    PubMed

    Berger, L R; Kalishman, S

    1983-01-01

    Three children with grid-like second-degree burns of their extremities from contact with floor furnace registers prompted an examination of this thermal hazard. Average temperature of the gratings was 294 degrees F (146 degrees C), with a range of 180 degrees to 375 degrees F (82.2 degrees to 191 degrees C). All of the furnaces tested were positioned at the entrance to bedrooms and had so little clearance that it was impossible to walk around them without contact with their surface. Infants and toddlers are at particular risk: 1 or 2 seconds of exposure would be expected to produce a serious burn. Suggestions for preventing burns from floor furnaces include turning them off when young children are at home; installing barrier gates to prevent children from coming in contact with the registers; and developing a surface coating or replacement grate with less hazardous thermal properties. PMID:6848984

  15. Evaluation of Novel EMG Biofeedback for Postural Correction During Computer Use.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Brecca M; Maluf, Katrina S; Davidson, Bradley S

    2016-06-01

    Postural correction is an effective rehabilitation technique used to treat chronic neck and shoulder pain, and is aimed toward reducing the load on the surrounding muscles by adopting a neutral posture. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of real-time high-density surface EMG (HDsEMG) biofeedback for postural correction during typing. Twenty healthy participants performed a typing task with two forms of postural feedback: (1) verbal postural coaching and (2) verbal postural coaching plus HDsEMG biofeedback. The interface used activity from two HDsEMG arrays placed over the trapezius designed to shift trapezius muscle activity inferiorly. The center of gravity across both arrays was used to quantify the spatial distribution of trapezius activity. Planar angles taken from upper extremity reflective markers quantified cervicoscapular posture. During the biofeedback condition, trapezius muscle activity was located 12.74 ± 3.73 mm more inferior, the scapula was 2.58 ± 1.18° more adducted and 0.23 ± 0.24° more depressed in comparison to verbal postural coaching alone. The results demonstrate the short-term effectiveness of a real-time HDsEMG biofeedback intervention to achieve postural correction, and may be more effective at creating an inferior shift in trapezius muscle activity in comparison to verbal postural coaching alone. PMID:26718205

  16. [Design of an artificial sphincter system with bio-feedback function based on MSP430].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-kan; Yan, De-tian

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we advance a new treating method for rectectomy postoperative anus incontinence, which is called "artificial sphincter system with biofeedback-function". The system simulates the function of human's sphincter and has entered into a stage of simulation experiments on animals. PMID:16494055

  17. Can Children with AD/HD Learn Relaxation and Breathing Techniques through Biofeedback Video Games?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amon, Krestina L.; Campbell, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated "The Journey to Wild Divine" as a biofeedback management tool teaching breathing and relaxation skills to children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD). The children played the game by manipulating their heart rate using breathing techniques taught in the game, measured through three finger sensors. Parents…

  18. Implementation of Biofeedback Techniques To Reduce Stress Involving Communication Skills with Elementary School Hearing Impaired Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litus, Tonyia J.

    Two sixth-grade, hearing-impaired students were studied to determine the effectiveness of stress management techniques using biofeedback instruments to monitor their nervous and cardiovascular systems. The male student had behavior problems, exhibiting explosive behavior without warning. The female student experienced excessive audible inhalations…

  19. Stress Management and Anxiety Reduction Through EMG Biofeedback/Relaxation Training upon Junior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Darrel

    The effectiveness of electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback/relaxation training on the stress management and anxiety levels of 18 eighth-grade students was tested. Chapter I serves as an introduction and presents information on the need for the study, hypotheses, limitations, and definition of terms. Chapter II contains a review of related…

  20. Biofeedback for Developing Self-Control of Tension and Stress in One's Hierarchy of Psychological States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell

    1985-01-01

    Describes six stage hierarchial patterns in the development of self-control through biofeedback. The stages include Skeletal and Striated Muscle Tension; Visceral Involvement-Anxiety Neuroses; Chronic Physiological Dysfunctioning; Decision Making Competency; Twilight Learning-Permissive Concentration; and Autogenic Feedback Training. (BL)

  1. Stress Testing Recovery EMG for Evaluation of Biofeedback and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Wesley E.; DeGood, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess biofeedback (BF) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and placebo-control training by means of a post-training transfer test. The subjects for the research were 30 women. Initial tests consisted of measuring the electromyographic response of the frontalis muscle of the forehead to stress. After…

  2. The Future of Biofeedback Training in the Field of Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    The use of biofeedback training with special education students is reviewed. Relaxation training to lower anxiety levels of hyperactive children, academic skill remediation, neuromuscular training with cerebral palsied and physically handicapped children, and central nervous system functioning with epileptics are among research topics cited. (CL)

  3. The Future of Biofeedback Training in the Field of Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Wilbur T.

    Biofeedback training (a process of feeding back to an organism information pertaining to its physiological functions using signals transmitted through sensory receptors) stands as one method to better educate and treat handicapped children. Recent research establishes that it is possible to influence automatic processes (such as breathing)…

  4. Biofeedback Auditory Alpha EEG Training and Its Effect upon Anxiety and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, Marianne B.

    The major purpose of this exploratory study was to determine if electroencephalographic (EEG) auditory biofeedback training combined with Open Focus relaxation therapy would increase alpha-brain-wave production in highly anxious freshman university students who were also deficient in reading skills. The subjects for the study were 15 volunteer…

  5. Direct Manipulation of Physiological Arousal in Induced Anxiety Therapy-Biofeedback Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappington, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    Induced Anxiety is a brief psychotherapy procedure that teaches individuals to cope with negative effect by using relaxation techniques. This research investigated the role of physiological arousal in the affect induction phase of Induced Anxiety therapy by using biofeedback to facilitate arousal. Twenty-one college students suffering from…

  6. Change Mechanisms in EMG Biofeedback Training: Cognitive Changes Underlying Improvements in Tension Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Subjects (N=43) suffering from tension headache were assigned to one of four electromyograph (EMG) biofeedback conditions and were led to believe they were achieving high or moderate success in decreasing EMG activity. Regardless of actual EMG changes, subjects receiving high-success feedback showed greater improvement for headaches than…

  7. Analysis of different image-based biofeedback models for improving cycling performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibbo, D.; Conforto, S.; Bernabucci, I.; Carli, M.; Schmid, M.; D'Alessio, T.

    2012-03-01

    Sport practice can take advantage from the quantitative assessment of task execution, which is strictly connected to the implementation of optimized training procedures. To this aim, it is interesting to explore the effectiveness of biofeedback training techniques. This implies a complete chain for information extraction containing instrumented devices, processing algorithms and graphical user interfaces (GUIs) to extract valuable information (i.e. kinematics, dynamics, and electrophysiology) to be presented in real-time to the athlete. In cycling, performance indexes displayed in a simple and perceivable way can help the cyclist optimize the pedaling. To this purpose, in this study four different GUIs have been designed and used in order to understand if and how a graphical biofeedback can influence the cycling performance. In particular, information related to the mechanical efficiency of pedaling is represented in each of the designed interfaces and then displayed to the user. This index is real-time calculated on the basis of the force signals exerted on the pedals during cycling. Instrumented pedals for bikes, already designed and implemented in our laboratory, have been used to measure those force components. A group of subjects underwent an experimental protocol and pedaled with (the interfaces have been used in a randomized order) and without graphical biofeedback. Preliminary results show how the effective perception of the biofeedback influences the motor performance.

  8. The Potential Effects of a Biofeedback Writing Exercise on Radial Artery Blood Flow and Neck Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Krullaards, Rob L.; Pel, Johan J. M.; Snijders, Chris J.; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that sustained contraction of the deep neck muscles may reduce axial cervical range of motion (CROM) and radial artery blood flow velocity (vrad.art.mean). No studies have reported both phenomena in relation to acute hand, shoulder or neck trauma. Procedures: The CROM and vrad.art.mean were measured in 20 police officers prior to and immediately after a 2-hours drive on a motorcycle and immediately after a 1-minute writing exercise using biofeedback. The CROM was measured using separate inclinometers and the vrad.art.mean was measured in both arms just proximal to the wrist using echo-Doppler. Findings: During the study, one officer had a motorcycle accident resulting in acute symptoms of neck trauma. His vrad.art.mean was acutely reduced by 73% (right arm) and 45% (left arm). Writing with biofeedback increased his vrad.art.mean by 150% (right arm) and 80% (left arm). In the remaining 19 officers, the CROM to the right was significantly increased after the 2-hours driving task (p<0.05; paired subject t-test). Writing with biofeedback increased their CROM in both directions and vrad.art.mean in both arms (p<001). Conclusions: A 2-hours drive showed modest physical changes in the upper extremities. Biofeedback in writing tasks might relate to the influence of relaxation and diverting attention for neck mobility and arterial blood flow improvement. PMID:23675136

  9. Effects of Biofeedback on Distress in a University Counseling Center: Preliminary Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipper-Smith, Adriana; Tift, Jay H.; Frye, Joan F.

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback (BF) and its mechanisms of change were examined alongside self-regulation and mind-body approaches in the context of counseling centers. The advance in psychopathology within this context and its intersections with neurophysiological, psychological, and social variables were highlighted. Although BF is commonly provided to students,…

  10. Post partum pelvic floor changes.

    PubMed

    Fonti, Ylenia; Giordano, Rosalba; Cacciatore, Alessandra; Romano, Mattea; La Rosa, Beatrice

    2009-10-01

    Pelvic-perineal dysfunctions, are the most common diseases in women after pregnancy. Urinary incontinence and genital prolapsy, often associated, are the most important consequences of childbirth and are determined by specific alterations in the structure of neurological and musculo-fascial pelvic support.Causation is difficult to prove because symptom occur remote from delivery.Furthermore it is unclear whether changes are secondary to the method of childbirth or to the pregnancy itself.This controversy fuels the debate about whether or not women should be offered the choice of elective caesarean delivery to avoid the development of subsequent pelvic floor disfunction.But it has been demonstrated that pregnancy itself, by means of mechanical changes of pelvic statics and changes in hormones, can be a significant risk factor for these diseases. Especially is the first child to be decisive for the stability of the pelvic floor.During pregnancy, the progressive increase in volume of the uterus subject perineal structures to a major overload. During delivery, the parties present and passes through the urogenital hiatus leading to growing pressure on the tissues causing the stretching of the pelvic floor with possible muscle damage, connective tissue and / or nervous.In this article we aim to describe genitourinary post partum changes with particular attention to the impact of pregnancy or childbirth on these changes. PMID:22439048

  11. Pelvic floor ultrasonography: an update.

    PubMed

    Shek, K L; Dietz, H-P

    2013-02-01

    Female pelvic floor dysfunction encompasses a number of highly prevalent clinical conditions such as female pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and fecal incontinence, and sexual dysfunction. The etiology and pathophysiology of those conditions are, however, not well understood. Recent technological advances have seen a surge in the use of imaging, both in research and clinical practice. Among the techniques available such as sonography, X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound is superior for pelvic floor imaging, especially in the form of perineal or translabial imaging. The technique is safe with no radiation, simple, cheap, easily accessible and provides high spatial and temporal resolutions. Translabial or perineal ultrasound is useful in determining residual urinary volume, detrusor wall thickness, bladder neck mobility and in assessing pelvic organ prolapse as well as levator function and anatomy. It is at least equivalent to other imaging techniques in diagnosing, such diverse conditions as urethral diverticula, rectal intussusception and avulsion of the puborectalis muscle. Ultrasound is the only imaging method capable of visualizing modern slings and mesh implants and may help selecting patients for implant surgery. Delivery-related levator injury seems to be the most important etiological factor for pelvic organ prolapse and recurrence after prolapse surgery, and it is most conveniently diagnosed by pelvic floor ultrasound. This review gives an overview of the methodology. Its main current uses in clinical assessment and research will also be discussed. PMID:23412016

  12. Pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence postpartum.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bethany; Woodward, Sue

    The offering of pelvic floor muscle exercises to all women during their first pregnancy is recommended by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Pelvic floor muscles suffer significant trauma throughout pregnancy and childbirth, which may sometimes lead to urinary incontinence postpartum. However, it is uncertain how effective pelvic floor muscle exercises are in treating this incontinence. Several trials have been analysed to try to understand this question. Issues such as when the exercises were undertaken, how often they were performed and in what circumstances they were carried out, have all been considered. While it is still uncertain whether they are effective in reducing urinary incontinence postpartum, as they are non-invasive and fairly simple to carry out, they are still the first-line management for urinary incontinence postpartum with other treatments being considered if this is ineffective. PMID:26067791

  13. Role of physical countermaneuvers in the management of orthostatic hypotension: efficacy and biofeedback augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouvette, C. M.; McPhee, B. R.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Low, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of various physical countermaneuvers in reducing orthostatic hypotension and its associated symptoms and to assess the efficacy of biofeedback training in enhancing the effectiveness of physical countermaneuvers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In nine study subjects with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, four training sessions on physical countermaneuvers were performed after tilt-up, three with visual feedback on the effect of physical countermaneuvers on blood pressure and other cardiovascular variables. Blood pressure change and orthostatic symptoms during tilt-up were determined, as were the changes in total peripheral resistance, stroke index, and heart rate. RESULTS: The five female and four male patients had a mean age of 53 years and a mean duration of symptoms of 4.2 years. On an orthostatic symptom scale of 0 to 10, these patients had a mean symptom score of 7.3. The increment in systolic blood pressure was better for some maneuvers (such as leg crossing and a combination) than others (such as neck flexion and abdominal contraction). Three patterns of responses to biofeedback were found. Simple maneuvers such as squatting did not improve with training; visual feedback was needed for maneuvers such as thigh contraction, and performance declined without biofeedback; the third pattern, seen in maneuvers such as leg crossing, showed continued improvement with training, even without biofeedback. A survey at 3 to 4 months after training revealed continued use of physical maneuvers (3.8 +/- 3.1 per day), increased standing time with each episode of presyncopal symptoms (8.3 +/- 5.8 minutes), and continued global symptomatic improvement. Total peripheral resistance, but not heart rate or stroke index, showed significant regression with blood pressure improvement. CONCLUSION: Physical countermaneuvers are efficacious in reducing orthostatic hypotension, can be augmented by use of biofeedback, and may significantly improve the

  14. Psychological Treatment of Benign Headache Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Edward B.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a selective summarization and critique of research on the psychological treatment of headache, with the primary focus on research appearing since 1980. Examines research on relaxation training, biofeedback, cognitive, and cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches. Includes suggestions for future research directions and methodological…

  15. Impact of incorporating visual biofeedback in 4D MRI.

    PubMed

    To, David T; Kim, Joshua P; Price, Ryan G; Chetty, Indrin J; Glide-Hurst, Carri K

    2016-01-01

    Precise radiation therapy (RT) for abdominal lesions is complicated by respiratory motion and suboptimal soft tissue contrast in 4D CT. 4D MRI offers improved con-trast although long scan times and irregular breathing patterns can be limiting. To address this, visual biofeedback (VBF) was introduced into 4D MRI. Ten volunteers were consented to an IRB-approved protocol. Prospective respiratory-triggered, T2-weighted, coronal 4D MRIs were acquired on an open 1.0T MR-SIM. VBF was integrated using an MR-compatible interactive breath-hold control system. Subjects visually monitored their breathing patterns to stay within predetermined tolerances. 4D MRIs were acquired with and without VBF for 2- and 8-phase acquisitions. Normalized respiratory waveforms were evaluated for scan time, duty cycle (programmed/acquisition time), breathing period, and breathing regularity (end-inhale coefficient of variation, EI-COV). Three reviewers performed image quality assessment to compare artifacts with and without VBF. Respiration-induced liver motion was calculated via centroid difference analysis of end-exhale (EE) and EI liver contours. Incorporating VBF reduced 2-phase acquisition time (4.7 ± 1.0 and 5.4 ± 1.5 min with and without VBF, respectively) while reducing EI-COV by 43.8% ± 16.6%. For 8-phase acquisitions, VBF reduced acquisition time by 1.9 ± 1.6 min and EI-COVs by 38.8% ± 25.7% despite breathing rate remaining similar (11.1 ± 3.8 breaths/min with vs. 10.5 ± 2.9 without). Using VBF yielded higher duty cycles than unguided free breathing (34.4% ± 5.8% vs. 28.1% ± 6.6%, respectively). Image grading showed that out of 40 paired evaluations, 20 cases had equivalent and 17 had improved image quality scores with VBF, particularly for mid-exhale and EI. Increased liver excursion was observed with VBF, where superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right EE-EI displacements were 14.1± 5.8, 4.9 ± 2.1, and 1.5 ± 1.0 mm, respectively, with VBF compared to 11.9

  16. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath

  17. Increasing hand efficiency at cold temperatures by training hand vasodilation with a classical conditioning-biofeedback overlap design.

    PubMed

    Hayduk, A W

    1980-09-01

    The prolonged exposure of hands to cold environments leads to substantial cold pain and severe deterioration of manual dexterity, finger dexterity, hand strength, and tactile sensitivity. This study taught volunteers to warm their hands at -14 degrees Celsius and measured the hand efficiency effects. The subjects were six male and female nonsmoking volunteers. All research was conducted in a cold chamber during the warm summer months to eliminate seasonal factors. A combined multiple-baseline/ABA single-subject design with multiple replications was used. Each subject's hand performance was obtained for both hands in warm and in cold conditions. One hand was trained and both hands were retested in the cold. The second hand was trained and both hands were retested in the cold. Finally, the subject inhibited warming while in the cold (treatment removal) and both hands were tested again. The treatment itself used biofeedback instrumentation to extend and enlarge previously classically conditioned vasodilative episodes. The procedure was found to be effective for bringing about temperature changes in the cold. Large treatment effects were found on all hand efficiency measures. The results suggest wide implications for the workplace, for theory, and for future research. PMID:7448240

  18. Scaling on a limestone flooring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Quiroga, P. M.; Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    2012-04-01

    Natural stone can be use on nearly every surface, inside and outside buildings, but decay is more commonly reported from the ones exposed to outdoor aggressively conditions. This study instead, is an example of limestone weathering of uncertain origin in the interior of a residential building. The stone, used as flooring, started to exhibit loss of material in the form of scaling. These damages were observed before the building, localized in the South of Spain (Málaga), was inhabited. Moreover, according to the company the limestone satisfies the following European standards UNE-EN 1341: 2002, UNE-EN 1343: 2003; UNE-EN 12058: 2004 for floorings. Under these circumstances the main objective of this study was to assess the causes of this phenomenon. For this reason the composition of the mortar was determined and the stone was characterized from a mineralogical and petrological point of view. The last material, which is a fossiliferous limestone from Egypt with natural fissure lines, is mainly composed of calcite, being quartz, kaolinite and apatite minor phases. Moreover, under different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques (FTIR, micro-Raman, SEM-EDX, etc) samples of the weathered, taken directly from the buildings, and unweathered limestone tiles were examined and a new mineralogical phase, trona, was identified at scaled areas which are connected with the natural veins of the stone. In fact, through BSE-mapping the presence of sodium has been detected in these veins. This soluble sodium carbonate would was dissolved in the natural waters from which limestone was precipitated and would migrate with the ascendant capilar humidity and crystallized near the surface of the stone starting the scaling phenomenon which in historic masonry could be very damaging. Therefore, the weathering of the limestone would be related with the hygroscopic behaviour of this salt, but not with the constructive methods used. This makes the limestone unable to be used on restoration

  19. A Novel Method of Orbital Floor Reconstruction Using Virtual Planning, 3-Dimensional Printing, and Autologous Bone.

    PubMed

    Vehmeijer, Maarten; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Liberton, Niels; Wolff, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the orbital floor are often a result of traffic accidents or interpersonal violence. To date, numerous materials and methods have been used to reconstruct the orbital floor. However, simple and cost-effective 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies for the treatment of orbital floor fractures are still sought. This study describes a simple, precise, cost-effective method of treating orbital fractures using 3D printing technologies in combination with autologous bone. Enophthalmos and diplopia developed in a 64-year-old female patient with an orbital floor fracture. A virtual 3D model of the fracture site was generated from computed tomography images of the patient. The fracture was virtually closed using spline interpolation. Furthermore, a virtual individualized mold of the defect site was created, which was manufactured using an inkjet printer. The tangible mold was subsequently used during surgery to sculpture an individualized autologous orbital floor implant. Virtual reconstruction of the orbital floor and the resulting mold enhanced the overall accuracy and efficiency of the surgical procedure. The sculptured autologous orbital floor implant showed an excellent fit in vivo. The combination of virtual planning and 3D printing offers an accurate and cost-effective treatment method for orbital floor fractures. PMID:27137437

  20. The effect of voice ambulatory biofeedback on the daily performance and retention of a modified vocal motor behavior in participants with normal voices

    PubMed Central

    Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ambulatory biofeedback has potential to improve carryover of newly-established vocal motor behaviors into daily life outside of the clinic and warrants systematic research that is lacking in the literature. This proof-of-concept study was designed to establish an empirical basis for future work in this area by formally assessing whether ambulatory biofeedback reduces daily vocal intensity (performance) and the extent to which this change remains after biofeedback removal (retention). Method Six participants with normal voices wore the KayPENTAX Ambulatory Phonation Monitor for three baseline days followed by four days with biofeedback provided on odd days. Results Compared to baseline days, participants exhibited a statistically significant decrease in mean vocal intensity (4.4 dB) and an increase in compliance (16.8 percentage points) when biofeedback was provided above a participant-specific intensity threshold. After biofeedback removal, mean vocal intensity and compliance reverted back to baseline levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that although current ambulatory biofeedback approaches have potential to modify a vocal motor behavior, the modified behavior may not be retained after biofeedback removal. Future work calls for the testing of more innovative ambulatory biofeedback approaches based on motor control and learning theories to improve retention of a desired vocal motor behavior. PMID:25765862

  1. Pelvic floor ultrasound: a review.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Hans Peter

    2010-04-01

    Imaging currently plays a limited role in the investigation of pelvic floor disorders. It is obvious that magnetic resonance imaging has limitations in urogynecology and female urology at present due to cost and access limitations and due to the fact that it is generally a static, not a dynamic, method. However, none of those limitations apply to sonography, a diagnostic method that is very much part of general practice in obstetrics and gynecology. Translabial or transperineal ultrasound is helpful in determining residual urine; detrusor wall thickness; bladder neck mobility; urethral integrity; anterior, central, and posterior compartment prolapse; and levator anatomy and function. It is at least equivalent to other imaging methods in visualizing such diverse conditions as urethral diverticula, rectal intussusception, mesh dislodgment, and avulsion of the puborectalis muscle. Ultrasound is the only imaging method able to visualize modern mesh slings and implants and may predict who actually needs such implants. Delivery-related levator trauma is the most important known etiologic factor for pelvic organ prolapse and not difficult to diagnose on 3-/4-dimensional and even on 2-dimensional pelvic floor ultrasound. It is likely that this will be an important driver behind the universal use of this technology. This review gives an overview of the method and its main current uses in clinical assessment and research. PMID:20350640

  2. Biofeedback for training balance and mobility tasks in older populations: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Context An effective application of biofeedback for interventions in older adults with balance and mobility disorders may be compromised due to co-morbidity. Objective To evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of biofeedback-based training of balance and/or mobility in older adults. Data Sources PubMed (1950-2009), EMBASE (1988-2009), Web of Science (1945-2009), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (1960-2009), CINAHL (1982-2009) and PsycINFO (1840-2009). The search strategy was composed of terms referring to biofeedback, balance or mobility, and older adults. Additional studies were identified by scanning reference lists. Study Selection For evaluating effectiveness, 2 reviewers independently screened papers and included controlled studies in older adults (i.e. mean age equal to or greater than 60 years) if they applied biofeedback during repeated practice sessions, and if they used at least one objective outcome measure of a balance or mobility task. Data Extraction Rating of study quality, with use of the Physiotherapy Evidence Database rating scale (PEDro scale), was performed independently by the 2 reviewers. Indications for (non)effectiveness were identified if 2 or more similar studies reported a (non)significant effect for the same type of outcome. Effect sizes were calculated. Results and Conclusions Although most available studies did not systematically evaluate feasibility aspects, reports of high participation rates, low drop-out rates, absence of adverse events and positive training experiences suggest that biofeedback methods can be applied in older adults. Effectiveness was evaluated based on 21 studies, mostly of moderate quality. An indication for effectiveness of visual feedback-based training of balance in (frail) older adults was identified for postural sway, weight-shifting and reaction time in standing, and for the Berg Balance Scale. Indications for added effectiveness of applying biofeedback during training of balance, gait, or

  3. Effects of Self-Hypnosis Training and Emg Biofeedback Relaxation Training on Chronic Pain in Persons with Spinal-Cord Injury1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M.; Hanley, Marisol A.; Raichle, Katherine A.; Molton, Ivan R.; Engel, Joyce M.; Osborne, Travis L.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Cardenas, Diana D.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-seven adults with spinal-cord injury and chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of self-hypnosis (HYP) or EMG biofeedback relaxation (BIO) training for pain management. Participants in both treatment conditions reported sub-stantial, but similar, decreases in pain intensity from before to after the treatment sessions. However, participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, reported statistically significant decreases in daily average pain pre- to posttreatment. These pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain reported by the HYP participants were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, also reported significant pre- to posttreatment increases in perceived control over pain, but this change was not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. PMID:19459087

  4. Effects of self-hypnosis training and EMG biofeedback relaxation training on chronic pain in persons with spinal-cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M; Hanley, Marisol A; Raichle, Katherine A; Molton, Ivan R; Engel, Joyce M; Osborne, Travis L; Stoelb, Brenda L; Cardenas, Diana D; Patterson, David R

    2009-07-01

    Thirty-seven adults with spinal-cord injury and chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of self-hypnosis (HYP) or EMG biofeedback relaxation (BIO) training for pain management. Participants in both treatment conditions reported substantial, but similar, decreases in pain intensity from before to after the treatment sessions. However, participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, reported statistically significant decreases in daily average pain pre- to posttreatment. These pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain reported by the HYP participants were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, also reported significant pre- to posttreatment increases in perceived control over pain, but this change was not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. PMID:19459087

  5. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training: Underutilization in the USA.

    PubMed

    Lamin, Eliza; Parrillo, Lisa M; Newman, Diane K; Smith, Ariana L

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are highly prevalent in women of all ages and can greatly impair quality of life. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is a viable treatment option for several pelvic floor conditions including urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. PFMT is a program of therapy initiated by an experienced clinician (e.g., women's health or urology nurse practitioner (NP), physical therapist (PT)) that involves exercises for women with stress urinary incontinence (UI) and exercises combined with behavioral or conservative treatments (lifestyle changes, bladder training with urge suppression) for women with urgency or mixed UI. These exercise programs are more comprehensive than simple Kegel exercises. Despite evidence-based research indicating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness for treatment of urinary incontinence, PFMT is not commonly used as a first-line treatment in clinical practice in the USA (Abrams et al., 2012). This article will review PFMT for the treatment of UI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and theorize how this conservative therapy can be utilized more effectively in the USA. PMID:26757904

  6. Crash Tests of Protective Airplane Floors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1986-01-01

    Energy-absorbing floors reduce structural buckling and impact forces on occupants. 56-page report discusses crash tests of energy-absorbing aircraft floors. Describes test facility and procedures; airplanes, structural modifications, and seats; crash dynamics; floor and seat behavior; and responses of anthropometric dummies seated in airplanes. Also presents plots of accelerations, photographs and diagrams of test facility, and photographs and drawings of airplanes before, during, and after testing.

  7. The floor plate: multiple cells, multiple signals.

    PubMed

    Placzek, Marysia; Briscoe, James

    2005-03-01

    One of the key organizers in the CNS is the floor plate - a group of cells that is responsible for instructing neural cells to acquire distinctive fates, and that has an important role in establishing the elaborate neuronal networks that underlie the function of the brain and spinal cord. In recent years, considerable controversy has arisen over the mechanism by which floor plate cells form. Here, we describe recent evidence that indicates that discrete populations of floor plate cells, with characteristic molecular properties, form in different regions of the neuraxis, and we discuss data that imply that the mode of floor plate induction varies along the anteroposterior axis. PMID:15738958

  8. Side Elevation; 1/4 Plans of Floor Framing, Floor Planking, Roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Side Elevation; 1/4 Plans of Floor Framing, Floor Planking, Roof Framing and Roof; Longitudinal Section, Cross Section, End Elevation - Eames Covered Bridge, Spanning Henderson Creek, Oquawka, Henderson County, IL

  9. 17. 4th floor roof, view south, 4th and 5th floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 4th floor roof, view south, 4th and 5th floor setback to left and atrium structure to right - Sheffield Farms Milk Plant, 1075 Webster Avenue (southwest corner of 166th Street), Bronx, Bronx County, NY

  10. Eastern Floor of Holden Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 15 April 2002) The Science Today's THEMIS image covers territory on the eastern floor of Holden Crater, which is located in region of the southern hemisphere called Noachis Terra. Holden Crater is 154 km in diameter and named after American Astronomer Edward Holden (1846-1914). This image shows a mottled surface with channels, hills, ridges and impact craters. The largest crater seen in this image is 5 km in diameter. This crater has gullies and what appears to be horizontal layers in its walls. The Story With its beautiful symmetry and gullies radially streaming down to the floor, the dominant crater in this image is an impressive focal point. Yet, it is really just a small crater within a much larger one named Holden Crater. Take a look at the context image to the right to see just how much bigger Holden Crater is. Then come back to the image strip that shows the mottled surface of Holden Crater's eastern floor in greater detail, and count how many hills, ridges, channels, and small impact craters can be seen. No perfectly smooth terrain abounds there, that's for sure. The textured terrain of Holden Crater has been particularly intriguing ever since the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft found evidence of sedimentary rock layers there that might have formed in lakes or shallow seas in Mars' ancient past. This finding suggests that Mars may have been more like Earth long ago, with water on its surface. Holden Crater might even have held a lake long ago. No one knows for sure, but it's an exciting possibility. Why? If water was once on the surface of Mars long enough to form sedimentary materials, maybe it was there long enough for microbial life to have developed too. (Life as we know it just isn't possible without the long-term presence of liquid water.) The question of life on the red planet is certainly tantalizing, but scientists will need to engage in a huge amount of further investigation to begin to know the answer. That

  11. Controlling the emotional heart: heart rate biofeedback improves cardiac control during emotional reactions.

    PubMed

    Peira, Nathalie; Fredrikson, Mats; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    When regulating negative emotional reactions, one goal is to reduce physiological reactions. However, not all regulation strategies succeed in doing that. We tested whether heart rate biofeedback helped participants reduce physiological reactions in response to negative and neutral pictures. When viewing neutral pictures, participants could regulate their heart rate whether the heart rate feedback was real or not. In contrast, when viewing negative pictures, participants could regulate heart rate only when feedback was real. Ratings of task success paralleled heart rate. Participants' general level of anxiety, emotion awareness, or cognitive emotion regulation strategies did not influence the results. Our findings show that accurate online heart rate biofeedback provides an efficient way to down-regulate autonomic physiological reactions when encountering negative stimuli. PMID:24373886

  12. iBalance-ABF: a smartphone-based audio-biofeedback balance system.

    PubMed

    Franco, C; Fleury, A; Gumery, P Y; Diot, B; Demongeot, J; Vuillerme, N

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an implementation of a Kalman filter, using inertial sensors of a smartphone, to estimate 3-D angulation of the trunk. The developed system monitors the trunk angular evolution during bipedal stance and helps the user to improve balance through a configurable and integrated auditory-biofeedback (ABF) loop. A proof-of-concept study was performed to assess the effectiveness of this so-called iBalance-ABF--smartphone-based audio-biofeedback system--in improving balance during bipedal standing. Results showed that young healthy individuals were able to efficiently use ABF on sagittal trunk tilt to improve their balance in the medial-lateral direction. These findings suggest that the iBalance-ABF system as a telerehabilitation system could represent a suitable solution for ambient assisted living technologies. PMID:23047859

  13. Neutrino floor at ultralow threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-05-01

    By lowering their energy threshold, direct dark matter searches can reach the neutrino floor with experimental technology that is now in development. The 7Be flux can be detected with ˜10 eV nuclear recoil energy threshold and 50 kg/yr exposure. The p e p flux can be detected with ˜3 ton/yr exposure, and the first detection of the CNO flux is possible with similar exposure. The p p flux can be detected with threshold of ˜eV and only ˜ kg /yr exposure. These can be the first pure neutral current measurements of the low-energy solar neutrino flux. Measuring this flux is important for low mass dark matter searches and for understanding the solar interior.

  14. Successful application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy to orbital floor trapdoor fracture in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yasunori; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Although surgical treatment of orbital floor fractures can be performed by many different approaches, the application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for this condition has rarely been described in the literature. We report on a case of a 7-year-old boy with a trapdoor orbital floor fracture successfully treated with the application of EMMM. The patient suffered trauma to the right orbit floor and the inferior rectus was entrapped at the orbital floor. Initially, surgical repair via endoscopic endonasal approach was attempted. However, we were unable to adequately access the orbital floor through the maxillary ostium. Therefore, an alternative route of access to the orbital floor was established by EMMM. With sufficient visualization and operating space, the involved orbital content was completely released from the entrapment site and reduced into the orbit. To facilitate wound healing, the orbital floor was supported with a water-inflated urethral balloon catheter for 8 days. At follow-up 8 months later, there was no gaze restriction or complications associated with the EMMM. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of EMMM in endoscopic endonasal repair of orbital floor fracture, particularly for cases with a narrow nasal cavity such as in pediatric patients. PMID:26926254

  15. 16. THIRD FLOOR BLDG. 28A, DETAIL CUTOUT IN FLOOR FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. THIRD FLOOR BLDG. 28A, DETAIL CUTOUT IN FLOOR FOR WOOD BLOCK FLOORING LOOKING EAST. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  16. Pilot study employing heart rate variability biofeedback training to decrease anxiety in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Scolnick, Barbara; Mostofsky, David I; Keane, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback, a technique which encourages slow meditative breathing, was offered to 25 in-patients with various eating disorder diagnoses-anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. We found that this modality had no serious side effects, and was subjectively useful to most participants. An enhanced ability to generate highly coherent HRV patterns in patients with recent onset anorexia nervosa was observed. PMID:24917934

  17. Is a cognitive-behavioural biofeedback intervention useful to reduce injury risk in junior football players?

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Arne; Ivarsson, Andreas; Johnson, Urban

    2012-01-01

    Athletes participating in sport are exposed to a relatively high injury risk. Previous research has suggested that it could be possible to reduce sports injuries through psychological skills training. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which a cognitive behavioural biofeedback intervention could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of players in Swedish elite football high schools. Participants from four elite football high schools (16-19 years old) were divided into one experiment (n = 13) and one control group (n = 14). Participants were asked to complete three questionnaires to assess anxiety level (Sport Anxiety Scale), history of stressors (Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes) and coping skills (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory - 28) in a baseline measure. Mann-Whitney U-tests showed no significant differences in pre-intervention scores based on the questionnaires. The experimental group participated in a nine-week intervention period consisting of seven sessions, including: somatic relaxation, thought stopping, emotions/problem focused coping, goal setting, biofeedback training as well as keeping a critical incident diary. A Mann-Whitney U test showed no significant difference between the control and experimental group U (n1 = 13, n2 = 14) = 51.00, p = 0.054. However, considering the small sample, the statistical power (0.05 for present study), to detect effects was low. The results of the study are discussed from a psychological perspective and proposals for future research are given. Key pointsCognitive-behavioral training together with biofeedback training seems to be an effective strategy to decrease the occurrence of injuries.More intervention studies should be conducted applying existing biofeedback methodology, especially in the injury preventive area.Future research should develop a bio-psychological injury model aimed at predicting injury occurrence which describes the physiological stress responses and how they

  18. Is a Cognitive-Behavioural Biofeedback Intervention Useful to Reduce Injury Risk in Junior Football Players?

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsson, Arne; Ivarsson, Andreas; Johnson, Urban

    2012-01-01

    Athletes participating in sport are exposed to a relatively high injury risk. Previous research has suggested that it could be possible to reduce sports injuries through psychological skills training. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which a cognitive behavioural biofeedback intervention could reduce the number of sports injuries in a sample of players in Swedish elite football high schools. Participants from four elite football high schools (16-19 years old) were divided into one experiment (n = 13) and one control group (n = 14). Participants were asked to complete three questionnaires to assess anxiety level (Sport Anxiety Scale), history of stressors (Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes) and coping skills (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory - 28) in a baseline measure. Mann-Whitney U-tests showed no significant differences in pre-intervention scores based on the questionnaires. The experimental group participated in a nine-week intervention period consisting of seven sessions, including: somatic relaxation, thought stopping, emotions/problem focused coping, goal setting, biofeedback training as well as keeping a critical incident diary. A Mann-Whitney U test showed no significant difference between the control and experimental group U (n1 = 13, n2 = 14) = 51.00, p = 0.054. However, considering the small sample, the statistical power (0.05 for present study), to detect effects was low. The results of the study are discussed from a psychological perspective and proposals for future research are given. Key pointsCognitive-behavioral training together with biofeedback training seems to be an effective strategy to decrease the occurrence of injuries.More intervention studies should be conducted applying existing biofeedback methodology, especially in the injury preventive area.Future research should develop a bio-psychological injury model aimed at predicting injury occurrence which describes the physiological stress responses and how they

  19. Effects of double air-cushion biofeedback exercises in a patient with sacroiliac joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We developed a double air-cushion biofeedback device to be used for sacroiliac (SI) joint exercises and investigated the effects of exercising using the device in a patient with SI joint pain. [Subject] A 40-year-old man, who complained of pain in the left posterior iliac crest area and SI joints over a 6-month period participated. [Methods] After a 4-week exercise program using the double air-cushion biofeedback device, the subject was assessed using the Gaenslen, Patrick, posterior shear (POSH), and resisted abduction (REAB) tests. [Results] After performing exercise designed to strengthen subdivisions of the gluteus medius, the subject had no pain in the Gaenslen, Patrick, POSH, or REAB tests of the SI joint. The visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain on palpation of the left posterior iliac crest area decreased to 4/10 from an initial score of 7/10. [Conclusion] Exercises with the double air-cushion biofeedback device improved hip asymmetry, SI joint mobility, and muscle strength. PMID:26696747

  20. Motor units in incomplete spinal cord injury: electrical activity, contractile properties and the effects of biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Stein, R B; Brucker, B S; Ayyar, D R

    1990-10-01

    The electrical and contractile properties of hand muscles in a selected population of quadriplegic subjects were studied intensively before and after EMG biofeedback. Spontaneously active motor units and units that could only be slowly and weakly activated were observed in these subjects, in addition to units that were voluntarily activated normally. This suggests a considerable overlap of surviving motor neurons to a single muscle that are below, near or above the level of a lesion. Despite the common occurrence of polyphasic potentials and other signs of neuromuscular reinnervation, the average twitch tension of single motor units in hand muscles of quadriplegic subjects was not significantly different from that in control subjects. Nor did it increase after biofeedback training that typically increased the peak surface EMG by a factor of 2-5 times. The percentage of spontaneously active units was also constant. The surface EMG may be increased during biofeedback by using higher firing rates in motor units that can already be activated, rather than by recruiting previously unavailable motor units. PMID:2266370

  1. Microperimetric Biofeedback Training Improved Visual Acuity after Successful Macular Hole Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ueda-Consolvo, Tomoko; Otsuka, Mitsuya; Hayashi, Yumiko; Ishida, Masaaki; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of setting a preferred retinal locus relocation target (PRT) and performing Macular Integrity Assessment (MAIA) biofeedback training in patients showing insufficient recovery of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) despite successful closure of an idiopathic macular hole (MH). Methods. Retrospective interventional case series. Nine eyes of 9 consecutive patients with the decimal BCVA of less than 0.6 at more than 3 months after successful MH surgery were included. A PRT was chosen based on MAIA microperimetry and the patients underwent MAIA biofeedback training. BCVA, reading speed, fixation stability, and 63% bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) were evaluated before and after the training. Statistical analysis was carried out using paired Student's t-test. Results. PRT was chosen on the nasal side of the closed MH fovea in 8 patients. After the MAIA training, BCVA improved in all patients. The mean logMAR value of BCVA significantly improved from 0.33 to 0.12 (p = 0.007). Reading speed improved in all patients (p = 0.29), fixation stability improved in 5 patients (p = 0.70), and 63% BCEA improved in 7 patients (p = 0.21), although these improvements were not statistically significant. Conclusion. MAIA biofeedback training improved visual acuity in patients with insufficient recovery of BCVA after successful MH surgery. PMID:26783452

  2. Effects of biofeedback-assisted attention training in a college population.

    PubMed

    Valdés, M R

    1985-12-01

    A program of stress management employing open-focus attention-training workshops was developed at Baruch College to bring the benefits of stress reduction to students. The purpose of the research reported here was to evaluate the results of the open-focus attention-training technique. Open-focus technique without biofeedback training was used for two semesters. Biofeedback training was incorporated in the third semester. In the first study, changes in grade point average (GPA), stress-related symptoms, and physiological measures were examined. The experimental subjects' stress data for this study was reported previously (Valdés, 1985). In the second study, changes in the same variables for experimental and control subjects were evaluated. Students in the control group showed decreased GPA, while those who participated in open-focus training showed a trend toward improved GPA. Stress-related symptoms associated with anxiety and management of emotional problems showed significant posttraining improvement, as did physiological measures in all of the biofeedback modalities in which the experimental subjects were specifically trained. The results support the hypothesis that the workshops were successful in reducing stress levels, and suggest that further controlled research be conducted to verify these findings, and to identify the most effective components of the training procedure. PMID:3837671

  3. Visual Biofeedback Balance Training Using Wii Fit after Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barcala, Luciana; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Colella, Fernanda; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Salgado, Afonso Shiguemi Inoue; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of balance training with visual biofeedback on balance, body symmetry, and function among individuals with hemiplegia following a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The present study was performed using a randomized controlled clinical trial with a blinded evaluator. The subjects were twenty adults with hemiplegia following a stroke. The experimental group performed balance training with visual biofeedback using Wii Fit® together with conventional physical therapy. The control group underwent conventional physical therapy alone. The intervention lasted five weeks, with two sessions per week. Body symmetry (baropodometry), static balance (stabilometry), functional balance (Berg Balance Scale), functional mobility (Timed Up and Go test), and independence in activities of daily living (Functional Independence Measure) were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] No statistically significant differences were found between the experimental and control groups. In the intragroup analysis, both groups demonstrated a significant improvement in all variables studied. [Conclusion] The physical therapy program combined with balance training involving visual biofeedback (Wii Fit®) led to an improvement in body symmetry, balance, and function among stroke victims. However, the improvement was similar to that achieved with conventional physical therapy alone. PMID:24259909

  4. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  5. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  6. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  7. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  8. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  9. Floor Time: Rethinking Play in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kordt-Thomas, Chad; Lee, Ilene M.

    2006-01-01

    Floor time is a play-based, one-to-one approach to helping children develop relationships, language, and thinking. Developed by child psychiatrist Stanley Greenspan, floor time is helpful not only for children with special needs but also for children who are developing typically. It can be used by teachers, caregivers, and families in brief…

  10. Learning4Life on the Exhibit Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The exhibit floor is a wealth of knowledge. One can read, view, and listen to information presented in many formats. Somewhere on the exhibit floor there are experts on every topic, ready and waiting for one's questions. But like any research topic, frequently a structured search is required to find the best answers. This article discusses how to…

  11. Behavioral Assessment and Treatment of Pediatric Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrasik, Frank; Schwartz, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    Headaches are quite common in children and adolescents, and they appear to persist into adulthood in a sizable number of individuals. Assessment approaches (interview, pain diaries, and general and specific questionnaires) and behavioral treatment interventions (contingency management, relaxation, biofeedback, and cognitive behavior therapy) are…

  12. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport.

    PubMed

    Bø, Kari

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine" and is a common problem in the female population with prevalence rates varying between 10% and 55% in 15- to 64-year-old women. The most frequent form of urinary incontinence in women is stress urinary incontinence, defined as "involuntary leakage on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing". The aim of this article is to systematically review the literature on urinary incontinence and participation in sport and fitness activities with a special emphasis on prevalence and treatment in female elite athletes. Stress urinary incontinence is a barrier to women's participation in sport and fitness activities and, therefore, it may be a threat to women's health, self-esteem and well-being. The prevalence during sports among young, nulliparous elite athletes varies between 0% (golf) and 80% (trampolinists). The highest prevalence is found in sports involving high impact activities such as gymnastics, track and field, and some ball games. A 'stiff' and strong pelvic floor positioned at an optimal level inside the pelvis may be a crucial factor in counteracting the increases in abdominal pressure occurring during high-impact activities. There are no randomised controlled trials or reports on the effect of any treatment for stress urinary incontinence in female elite athletes. However, strength training of the pelvic floor muscles has been shown to be effective in treating stress urinary incontinence in parous females in the general population. In randomised controlled trials, reported cure rates, defined as <2g of leakage on pad tests, varied between 44% and 69%. Pelvic floor muscle training has no serious adverse effects and has been recommended as first-line treatment in the general population. Use of preventive devices such as vaginal tampons or pessaries can prevent leakage during high impact physical activity. The pelvic floor muscles need to be much stronger in elite athletes

  13. Ultrasonic Inspection Of The LTAB Floor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G

    2001-07-31

    The National Ignition Facility's (NIF) floor is damaged by transporter operations. Two basic operations, rotating the wheels in place and traversing the floor numerous times can cause failure in the grout layer. The floor is composed of top wear surface (Stonhard) and an osmotic grout layer on top of concrete, Fig. 1. An ultrasonic technique was implemented to assess the condition of the floor as part of a study to determine the damage mechanisms. The study considered damage scenarios and ways to avoid the damage. A possible solution is to install thin steel plates where the transporter traverses on the floor. These tests were conducted with a fully loaded transporter that applies up to 1300 psi loads to the floor. A contact ultrasonic technique evaluated the condition of the grout layer in NIF's floor. Figure 1 displays the configuration of the ultrasonic transducer on the floor. We inspected the floor after wheel rotation damage and after wheel traversal damage. Figure 2a and 2b are photographs of the portable ultrasonic system and data acquisition. We acquired ultrasonic signals in a known pristine area and a damaged area to calibrate the inspection. Figure 3 is a plot of the typical ultrasonic response from an undamaged area (black) overlapped with a signal (red) from a damaged area. The damage area data was acquired at a location next to a hole in the floor that was caused by the transporter. Five megahertz pulses are propagated from the transducer and through a Plexiglas buffer rod into the floor. The ultrasonic pulse reflects from each discontinuity in the floor. The ultrasonic signal reflects from the top surface, the Stonhard-to-grout interface, and the grout to concrete interface. We expect to see reflections from each of these interfaces in an undamaged floor. If the grout layer pulverizes then the high frequency signal cannot traverse the layer and the grout to concrete interface signal will decrease or vanish. The more damage to the grout the more the

  14. 41. Ground level photograph of two floors of skeleton complete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Ground level photograph of two floors of skeleton complete with 3rd and 4th floors being started,upper floors of county bldg visible - Chicago City Hall, 121 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. Typical Newel Post, First Floor Newel Post, Typical Baluster, Typical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Newel Post, First Floor Newel Post, Typical Baluster, Typical Nosing, First Floor Stringer Profile, Second Floor Stringer Profile - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Treasurer's Quarters, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  16. Analysis of Potential Concerete Floor Decontamination Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Ebadian

    1997-08-06

    During the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities to be conducted at the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), contaminated concrete waste will be generated from the D&D of approximately 200 buildings and other structures [1]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns the Fernald site. The site is a contractor-operated federal facility that produced high-purity uranium metal products for the DOE and its predecessor agency, the Atomic Energy Commission, from 1952 to 1989. Thorium being ores were also processed at FEMP, but on a smaller scale. Production activities ceased in 1989, and the production mission of the facility ended formally in 1991. FEMP was included on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List in 1989. The current mission of the site is environmental restoration according to the requirements specified by CERCLA [1]. Decontamination and decommissioning activities require the treatment of concrete floors to segregate technetium-99 contaminated concrete from the remainder of the concrete. Many proven commercial stiace removal technologies are available. These processes vary in aggressiveness, stiety requirements, waste generation, capital requirements, and operating and maintenance costs.

  17. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  18. Generation of airborne listeria from floor drains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes can colonize floor drains in poultry processing and further processing facilities remaining even after cleaning and disinfection. Therefore, during wash down, workers exercise caution to prevent escape and transfer of drain microflora to food contact surfaces. The objective ...

  19. Impact evaluation of composite floor sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boitnott, Richard L.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy floor sections representative of aircraft fuselage construction were statically and dynamically tested to evaluate their response to crash loadings. These floor sections were fabricated using a frame-stringer design typical of present aluminum aircraft without features to enhance crashworthiness. The floor sections were tested as part of a systematic research program developed to study the impact response of composite components of increasing complexity. The ultimate goal of the research program is to develop crashworthy design features for future composite aircraft. Initially, individual frames of six-foot diameter were tested both statically and dynamically. The frames were then used to construct built-up floor sections for dynamic tests at impact velocities of approximately 20 feet/sec to simulate survivable crash velocities. In addition, static tests were conducted to gain a better understanding of the failure mechanisms seen in the dynamic tests.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Dynamic Pelvic Floor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the pelvic floor, ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  1. Performance evaluation of floor thermal storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Shinkai, Koichiro; Kasuya, Atsushi; Kato, Masahiro

    2000-07-01

    Environmental issues were seriously addressed when a new building was designed with district heating and cooling for the Osaka gas company. As a result, the building was officially recognized as Environmentally Conscious Building No. 1 by the Construction Ministry. In order to reduce cost by peak shaving, adoption of a floor thermal storage system was planned. This paper describes results regarding the peak shaving by floor thermal storage system in designing the air-conditioning system.

  2. Analysis and Modeling of the Galvanic Skin Response Spontaneous Component in the context of Intelligent Biofeedback Systems Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unakafov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an approach to galvanic skin response (GSR) spontaneous component analysis and modeling. In the study a classification of biofeedback training methods is given, importance of intelligent methods development is shown. The INTENS method, which is perspective for intellectualization, is presented. An important problem of biofeedback training method intellectualization - estimation of the GSR spontaneous component - is solved in the main part of the work. Its main characteristics are described; results of GSR spontaneous component modeling are shown. Results of small research of an optimum material for GSR probes are presented.

  3. Effect of rubber flooring on group-housed sows' gait and claw and skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Bos, E-J; van Riet, M M J; Maes, D; Millet, S; Ampe, B; Janssens, G P J; Tuyttens, F A M

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the influence of floor type on sow welfare in terms of lameness, claw lesions, and skin lesions. In a 2 × 3 factorial design, we have investigated the effect of rubber coverings on concrete floors and the effect of 3 levels of dietary zinc supplementation on locomotion and claw and skin lesions in group-housed sows. Six groups of 21 ± 4 hybrid sows were monitored during 3 successive reproductive cycles. The sows were group housed from d 28 after insemination (d 0) until 1 wk before expected farrowing date (d 108) in pens with either exposed concrete floors or concrete floors covered with rubber in part of the lying area and the fully slatted area. During each reproductive cycle, locomotion and skin lesions were assessed 4 times (d 28, 50, 108, and 140) and claw lesions were assessed twice (d 50 and 140). Results are given as least squares means ± SE. Locomotion and claw scores were given in millimeters, on analog scales of 150 and 160 mm, respectively. Here, we report on the effect of floor type, which did not interact with dietary zinc concentration ( > 0.10 for all variables). At move to group (d 28) and mid gestation (d 50), no differences between floor treatments were seen in locomotion ( > 0.10). At the end of gestation (d 108), sows housed on rubber flooring scored 9.9 ± 4.1 mm better on gait ( < 0.001). Regarding claw disorders, both parameters "heel overgrowth and erosion" (difference of 4.6 ± 1.8 mm; = 0.01) and "heel-sole crack" (difference of 3.1 ± 1.5 mm; = 0.04) scores were better for sows on rubber flooring at mid gestation (d 50). However, sows on rubber flooring scored worse for "vertical cracks in the wall horn" (difference of 3.4 ± 1.7 mm; = 0.04). At the end of lactation (d 140), both "white line" (difference of 2.9 ± 1 mm; = 0.02) and "claw length" (difference of 4.7 ± 1.4 mm; < 0.001) had better scores on rubber flooring. No differences for skin lesions were observed between floor treatments. The improved scores

  4. ETRA, TRA642. ON BASEMENT FLOOR. IBEAM COLUMNS SUPPORTING CONSOLE FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETRA, TRA-642. ON BASEMENT FLOOR. I-BEAM COLUMNS SUPPORTING CONSOLE FLOOR HAVE BEEN SURROUNDED BY CONCRETE IN RECTANGULAR PILLARS. BASEMENT FLOOR IS BEING PREPARED FOR PLACEMENT OF CONCRETE. ABOVE CEILING IS CONSOLE FLOOR, IN WHICH CUT-OUT HAS PRESERVED SPACE FOR REACTOR AND ITS SHIELDING. CIRCULAR FORM IN REACTOR AREA IS CONCRETE FORMING. NOTE VERTICAL CONDUIT AT INTERVALS AROUND REACTOR PITS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-1237. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 4/17/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Neural activity based biofeedback therapy for Autism spectrum disorder through wearable wireless textile EEG monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahi, Ahna; Rai, Pratyush; Oh, Sechang; Ramasamy, Mouli; Harbaugh, Robert E.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    Mu waves, also known as mu rhythms, comb or wicket rhythms are synchronized patterns of electrical activity involving large numbers of neurons, in the part of the brain that controls voluntary functions. Controlling, manipulating, or gaining greater awareness of these functions can be done through the process of Biofeedback. Biofeedback is a process that enables an individual to learn how to change voluntary movements for purposes of improving health and performance through the means of instruments such as EEG which rapidly and accurately 'feedback' information to the user. Biofeedback is used for therapeutic purpose for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) by focusing on Mu waves for detecting anomalies in brain wave patterns of mirror neurons. Conventional EEG measurement systems use gel based gold cup electrodes, attached to the scalp with adhesive. It is obtrusive and wires sticking out of the electrodes to signal acquisition system make them impractical for use in sensitive subjects like infants and children with ASD. To remedy this, sensors can be incorporated with skull cap and baseball cap that are commonly used for infants and children. Feasibility of Textile based Sensor system has been investigated here. Textile based multi-electrode EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system with embedded electronics for data acquisition and wireless transmission has been seamlessly integrated into fabric of these items for continuous detection of Mu waves. Textile electrodes were placed on positions C3, CZ, C4 according to 10-20 international system and their capability to detect Mu waves was tested. The system is ergonomic and can potentially be used for early diagnosis in infants and planning therapy for ASD patients.

  6. The role of local estrogen therapy in the management of pelvic floor disorders.

    PubMed

    Tzur, T; Yohai, D; Weintraub, A Y

    2016-04-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are common and bothersome problems that include a variety of conditions. These conditions greatly affect the performance of daily activities and social function such as work, traveling, physical exercise, sleep and sexual function. Aging is a well-known factor affecting the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract anatomy and function. It is clear that the pelvic organs and their surrounding muscular and connective tissue support are estrogen-responsive. Treatment of pelvic floor disorders requires significant health-care resources and their impact is likely to increase in the near future. This literature review aims to provide an overview of both research and clinical aspects of the pathophysiology of urogenital estrogen deficiency and the role of local estrogen therapy as part of the management strategy of different pelvic floor disorders. The safety and risk concerns regarding the use of local estrogen therapy are addressed as well. PMID:26830033

  7. Stable Isotope Probing of Peat and Forest Floor Amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quideau, Sylvie; Béasse, Mark

    2013-04-01

    In Alberta, Canada, land reclamation efforts utilize peat as an organic amendment to help reclaim decommissioned oil sands mine sites to upland boreal forests. This study investigates the rhizosphere microbial communities of two pioneer species, aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), a species not known for strong associations with the soil microbial community, and alder (Alnus crispa Ait.), a species well known for mutualism with actinomycetes. Specifically, the objective was to determine how different organic amendments (peat versus forest floor) influenced the rhizosphere microbial communities and how this could be linked to plant growth. Seedlings were grown for 20 weeks in forest floor material, peat, and a combination of both. They were pulse labelled with 13CO2 (g) and subsequently harvested for plant growth measurements. While analysis of plant growth attributes did not indicate any effect of the organic amendment on aspen growth, alder reported significantly less growth in peat treatments. The rhizosphere soils were extracted for compound-specific analysis of δ13C in microbial phospholipid fatty acids. Stable isotope probing showed greater carbon flow between trees and their rhizosphere communities when seedlings were grown in forest floor material.

  8. 76 FR 7098 - Dealer Floor Plan Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Parts 120 and 121 Dealer Floor Plan Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Dealer Floor Plan Pilot Program to make available 7(a) loan guaranties for lines of credit that provide floor plan financing. This new Dealer Floor Plan Pilot Program was created in the Small Business...

  9. 2. VIEW OF LOWER MILL FLOOR FOUNDATION, SHOWING, LEFT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF LOWER MILL FLOOR FOUNDATION, SHOWING, LEFT TO RIGHT, EDGE OF MILLING FLOOR, TABLE FLOOR, VANNING FLOOR, LOADING LEVEL, TAILINGS POND IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. VIEW IS LOOKING FROM THE NORTHWEST - Mountain King Gold Mine & Mill, 4.3 Air miles Northwest of Copperopolis, Copperopolis, Calaveras County, CA

  10. [Haematoma of the floor of the mouth associated to acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Pelaz, Alejandro; Bayón, Jeremías; Gallego, Lorena; Junquera, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an 80-year-old man who developed a haematoma in the floor of the mouth after receiving alteplase in the treatment of an acute myocardial infarction. Both the treatment received and appropriate preventive measures to avoid such haematomas are described. PMID:21163462

  11. 23. FIFTH FLOOR BLDG. 28B, DETAIL WOOD BLOCK FLOORING LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. FIFTH FLOOR BLDG. 28B, DETAIL WOOD BLOCK FLOORING LOOKING WEST. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  12. 24. FIFTH FLOOR BLDG. 28B, DETAIL WOOD BLOCK FLOORING LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. FIFTH FLOOR BLDG. 28B, DETAIL WOOD BLOCK FLOORING LOOKING NORTH. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  13. ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING, TRA648. FLOOR PLANS FOR FIRST FLOOR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING, TRA-648. FLOOR PLANS FOR FIRST FLOOR AND BASEMENT. SECTIONS. KAISER ETR-5528-MTR-648-A-2, 12/1955. INL INDEX NO. 532-0648-00-486-101402, REV. 6. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. 17 CFR 1.62 - Contract market requirement for floor broker and floor trader registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for future delivery or commodity option on or subject to the rules of that contract market. (2) Each... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Contract market requirement....62 Contract market requirement for floor broker and floor trader registration. (a)(1) Each...

  15. 17 CFR 1.62 - Contract market requirement for floor broker and floor trader registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for future delivery or commodity option on or subject to the rules of that contract market. (2) Each... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contract market requirement....62 Contract market requirement for floor broker and floor trader registration. (a)(1) Each...

  16. 17 CFR 1.62 - Contract market requirement for floor broker and floor trader registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for future delivery or commodity option on or subject to the rules of that contract market. (2) Each... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Contract market requirement....62 Contract market requirement for floor broker and floor trader registration. (a)(1) Each...

  17. ETR, TRA642. FLOOR PLAN UNDER BALCONY ON CONSOLE FLOOR. MOTORGENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. FLOOR PLAN UNDER BALCONY ON CONSOLE FLOOR. MOTOR-GENERATOR SETS AND OTHER ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY ETR-D-1781, 7/1960. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-706-020384, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. The cleaning of ward floors and the bacteriological study of floor-cleaning machines

    PubMed Central

    Bate, J. G.

    1961-01-01

    Current trends in ward flooring materials and cleaning methods are considered from the point of view of the hospital bacteriologist. Methods employed in an investigation into the bacteriological safety of a number of floor-cleaning machines are described, and some considerations governing the choice of vacuum cleaners for ward use are discussed. Images PMID:13687726

  19. Abrasions and lameness in piglets born in different farrowing systems with different types of floor

    PubMed Central

    Zoric, Mate; Nilsson, Ebba; Mattsson, Sigbrit; Lundeheim, Nils; Wallgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    Background The quality of the floor is essential to the welfare of piglets as abrasions often are recorded in newborn piglets, and such lesions may lead to lameness. Apart from animal suffering, lameness contributes to losses in form of dead piglets, decreased growth, and increased use of antibiotics and manual labour. Methods In a herd with three different farrowing systems, 37 litters (390 piglets) were studied until the age of 3 weeks with respect to presence of skin wounds and abrasions. Lameness was registered until the age of 7 weeks. Eight lame piglets were sacrificed before medical treatment and subjected to necropsy including histopathological and microbiological examinations. Isolates of streptococci, staphylococci and E. coli were tested with respect to antimicrobial resistance. Mastitis was observed in ten sows. Results The most severe abrasions at carpus and soles were seen in the system with a new solid concrete floor with a slatted floor over the dunging area. The lowest magnitude was observed in the deep litter system with peat. Sole bruising was more common in the systems with concrete floor compared to the deep litter system with peat, and the differce in prevalence was significant at all examination days. The lesions decreased with time and about 75% of the treatments for lameness were performed during the first three weeks of life. The overall prevalence of lameness was highest in the system with new solid concrete floor with a slatted floor over the dunging area (9.4%) followed by the old solid concrete floor (7.5%). A lower (p < 0.05) prevalence was seen in the deep litters system with peat (3.3%). No significant relationship between mastitis and abrasions or lameness in the offspring was observed. Conclusion There were large differences in the prevalence of abrasions and lameness between the floor types. The deep litter system with peat provided a soft and good floor for piglets. The overall prevalence of lameness was only diagnosed in every

  20. Application of Relaxation/Biofeedback Training in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of electromyographic (EMG) feedback/relaxation training on the achievement, cognitive and motor test results, and observed behavior change of learning disabled, mentally retarded, control, and nondiagnosed children manifesting learning problems (all elementary age). Treatment consisted of 10-minute…

  1. Curved Lobate Scarp on Crater Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A broadly curved lobate scarp (running from left to right in the large crater to the right of center in this image) is restricted to the floor of a crater 85 kilometers in diameter. The rim of this crater and the rims of those north of it have been disrupted by the process which caused the hilly and lineated terrain. This process has not affected the smooth plains on their floors, indicating that the floor materials post date the formation of the craters. In this case, the scarp on the crater floor may be a flow front formed during emplacement of the floor material.

    This image (FDS 27379) was acquired during the spacecraft's first encounter with Mercury.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  2. Comparison of Abdominal Muscle Activity in Relation to Knee Angles during Abdominal Drawing-in Exercises Using Pressure Biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Cheol; Lee, Su-Kyoung; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The leg angles that are the most effective for abdominal muscle activation were investigated by performing abdominal drawing-in exercises at different leg angles with a biofeedback pressure unit. [Methods] Subjects were asked to adopt a supine position, and the tip of the biofeedback pressure unit was placed under the posterior superior iliac spine. Then, the pressure was adjusted to 40 mmHg while referring to the pressure gauge connected to the biofeedback pressure unit. Subjects were instructed to increase the pressure by 10 mmHg using the drawing-in technique upon the oral instruction, “Start,” and to maintain the drawn-in state. The time during which the pressure was maintained within an error range of ±1–2mmHg was measured in seconds. [Result] During the abdominal drawing-in exercises, the activity of the rectus abdominis, the internal and external obliques, and the transverse abdominis increased as the knee joint flexion angle increased from 45° to 120°. [Conclusion] When trunk stabilization exercises are performed at the same pressure to reduce damage after the acute phase of low back pain, trunk muscle strength can be efficiently increased by increasing the knee joint angle gradually, while performing abdominal drawing-in exercises with a biofeedback pressure unit. PMID:24259770

  3. The Comparative Study of the Occupational Stress among Jobs and Bio-Feedback Training Effects in Iran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamarzarin, Hamid

    The effectiveness of biofeedback and relaxation training in reducing occupational stress was examined in a study of 50 individuals employed in various occupations in Iran. The study sample consisted of 15 workers (5 females, 10 males); 15 managers (5 females, 10 males); 9 guardians (3 females, 6 males); 5 dentists (2 females, 3 males); and 6…

  4. Balance Improvement Effects of Biofeedback Systems with State-of-the-Art Wearable Sensors: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Lam, Wing Kai; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Falls and fall-induced injuries are major global public health problems. Balance and gait disorders have been the second leading cause of falls. Inertial motion sensors and force sensors have been widely used to monitor both static and dynamic balance performance. Based on the detected performance, instant visual, auditory, electrotactile and vibrotactile biofeedback could be provided to augment the somatosensory input and enhance balance control. This review aims to synthesize the research examining the effect of biofeedback systems, with wearable inertial motion sensors and force sensors, on balance performance. Randomized and non-randomized clinical trials were included in this review. All studies were evaluated based on the methodological quality. Sample characteristics, device design and study characteristics were summarized. Most previous studies suggested that biofeedback devices were effective in enhancing static and dynamic balance in healthy young and older adults, and patients with balance and gait disorders. Attention should be paid to the choice of appropriate types of sensors and biofeedback for different intended purposes. Maximizing the computing capacity of the micro-processer, while minimizing the size of the electronic components, appears to be the future direction of optimizing the devices. Wearable balance-improving devices have their potential of serving as balance aids in daily life, which can be used indoors and outdoors. PMID:27023558

  5. Using Computer Assisted Biofeedback to Help Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to Gain Self-Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Judy; Johnson, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of computer-assisted biofeedback on the electromyographic activity of three students (grades four and six) with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results indicated increased relaxation abilities and, in the case of the one student also observed in the classroom, increased on-task behavior after the biofeedback…

  6. Balance Improvement Effects of Biofeedback Systems with State-of-the-Art Wearable Sensors: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Lam, Wing Kai; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Falls and fall-induced injuries are major global public health problems. Balance and gait disorders have been the second leading cause of falls. Inertial motion sensors and force sensors have been widely used to monitor both static and dynamic balance performance. Based on the detected performance, instant visual, auditory, electrotactile and vibrotactile biofeedback could be provided to augment the somatosensory input and enhance balance control. This review aims to synthesize the research examining the effect of biofeedback systems, with wearable inertial motion sensors and force sensors, on balance performance. Randomized and non-randomized clinical trials were included in this review. All studies were evaluated based on the methodological quality. Sample characteristics, device design and study characteristics were summarized. Most previous studies suggested that biofeedback devices were effective in enhancing static and dynamic balance in healthy young and older adults, and patients with balance and gait disorders. Attention should be paid to the choice of appropriate types of sensors and biofeedback for different intended purposes. Maximizing the computing capacity of the micro-processer, while minimizing the size of the electronic components, appears to be the future direction of optimizing the devices. Wearable balance-improving devices have their potential of serving as balance aids in daily life, which can be used indoors and outdoors. PMID:27023558

  7. The Effect of Extra-Curricular Mental Training with Biofeedback on Short Running Performance of Adolescent Physical Education Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Eli, Michael; Blumenstein, Boris

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between mental training with biofeedback and performance was investigated. An adapted version of the Wingate five-step approach was used as a mental preparation technique for enhancing the short-running performance among 16-18-year-old adolescent physical education pupils. Participants (n = 79) were randomly…

  8. The effect of a single session of short duration heart rate variability biofeedback on EEG: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Prinsloo, Gabriell E; Rauch, H G Laurie; Karpul, David; Derman, Wayne E

    2013-03-01

    This pilot study examines the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on measures of electroencephalogram (EEG) during and immediately after biofeedback. Eighteen healthy males exposed to work-related stress, were randomised into an HRV biofeedback (BIO) or a comparative group (COM). EEG was recorded during the intervention and during rest periods before and after the intervention. Power spectral density in theta, alpha and beta frequency bands and theta/beta ratios were calculated. During the intervention, the BIO group had higher relative theta power [Fz and Pz (p < 0.01), Cz (p < 0.05)], lower fronto-central relative beta power (p < 0.05), and higher theta/beta [Fz and Cz (p < 0.01), Pz (p < 0.05)] than the COM group. The groups showed different responses after the intervention with increased posterior theta/beta (p < 0.05) in the BIO group and altered posterior relative theta (p < 0.05), central relative beta (p = 0.06) and central-posterior theta/beta (p < 0.01) in the post-intervention rest period. The findings of this study suggest that a single session of HRV biofeedback after a single training session was associated with changes in EEG suggestive of increased internal attention and relaxation both during and after the intervention. However, the comparative intervention was associated with changes suggestive of increased mental effort and possible anxiety during and after the intervention. PMID:23129056

  9. During Training and Posttraining Effects of Live and Taped Extended Progressive Relaxation, Self-Relaxation, and Electromyogram Biofeedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiman, Irving; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Compared live and taped progressive relaxation (LR, TR), self-relaxation (SR), and electromyogram biofeedback (BF) on measures of autonomic and somatic arousal and subjective tension. LR was superior to RE on reductions in physiological arousal; SR and BR were equivalent except for the superiority of SR on reductions in autonomic arousal.…

  10. The Effects of Relaxation Instructions and EMG Biofeedback of Test Anxiety, General Anxiety, and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Michael; Saslow, Carol

    1980-01-01

    Brief relaxation instruction alone and instructions plus electromyographic (EMG) feedback produced significant decreases in general and test-specific anxiety. EMG feedback added little to the effectiveness of relaxation instructions and practice. Relaxation instruction without EMG biofeedback shifted subjects toward a more internal locus of…

  11. SU-E-J-158: Audiovisual Biofeedback Reduces Image Artefacts in 4DCT: A Digital Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S; Kipritidis, J; Lee, D; Keall, P; Bernatowicz, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Irregular breathing motion has a deleterious impact on 4DCT image quality. The breathing guidance system: audiovisual biofeedback (AVB) is designed to improve breathing regularity, however, its impact on 4DCT image quality has yet to be quantified. The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of AVB on thoracic 4DCT image quality by utilizing the digital eXtended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) phantom driven by lung tumor motion patterns. Methods: 2D tumor motion obtained from 4 lung cancer patients under two breathing conditions (i) without breathing guidance (free breathing), and (ii) with guidance (AVB). There were two breathing sessions, yielding 8 tumor motion traces. This tumor motion was synchronized with the XCAT phantom to simulate 4DCT acquisitions under two acquisition modes: (1) cine mode, and (2) prospective respiratory-gated mode. Motion regularity was quantified by the root mean square error (RMSE) of displacement. The number of artefacts was visually assessed for each 4DCT and summed up for each breathing condition. Inter-session anatomic reproducibility was quantified by the mean absolute difference (MAD) between the Session 1 4DCT and Session 2 4DCT. Results: AVB improved tumor motion regularity by 30%. In cine mode, the number of artefacts was reduced from 61 in free breathing to 40 with AVB, in addition to AVB reducing the MAD by 34%. In gated mode, the number of artefacts was reduced from 63 in free breathing to 51 with AVB, in addition to AVB reducing the MAD by 23%. Conclusion: This was the first study to compare the impact of breathing guidance on 4DCT image quality compared to free breathing, with AVB reducing the amount of artefacts present in 4DCT images in addition to improving inter-session anatomic reproducibility. Results thus far suggest that breathing guidance interventions could have implications for improving radiotherapy treatment planning and interfraction reproducibility.

  12. Use of a portable biofeedback device to improve insomnia in a combat zone, a case report.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Spira, James L

    2009-12-01

    Insomnia is a common problem in situations of stress. Some forms of stress, however, may contraindicate the use of traditional, pharmacological interventions. Working in a combat zone is such a situation. Alternative means of improving sleep are clearly needed for Service Members. We report a case involving a medical provider who was serving in a military, emergency-services facility in Iraq, and who presented with anxiety, depressed mood, and insomnia. Symptoms were sub-threshold for major depressive disorder or acute stress disorder. Mood and anxiety symptoms responded to traditional therapy techniques, but problems with insomnia remained. The patient was given a portable biofeedback device that employs an infrared sensor photoplethysmograph to measure heart rate variability (HRV) from peripheral finger pulse. One week later, sleep was significantly improved. Symptom improvement lasted to at least 6 weeks while in theater. One year later, a check-in with the patient revealed that after returning home, he had been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD symptoms had resolved after 6 months of psychopharmacology and cognitive behavioral therapy. These results indicate that biofeedback may be a useful means of improving sleep in a combat zone, but that such improvements may not necessarily prevent the development of more serious symptoms later. No clear causality can be inferred from a single case, and further study is needed to determine if this finding have wider applicability. PMID:19655243

  13. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bögels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5 weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints. PMID:26111942

  14. A knitted garment using intarsia technique for Heart Rate Variability biofeedback: Evaluation of initial prototype.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, F; Ji, G; Lu, K; Rödby, K; Seoane, F

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback is a method based on paced breathing at specific rate called resonance frequency by giving online feedbacks from user respiration and its effect on HRV. Since the HRV is also influence by different factors like stress and emotions, stress related to an unfamiliar measurement device, cables and skin electrodes may cover the underling effect of such kind of intervention. Wearable systems are usually considered as intuitive solutions which are more familiar to the end-user and can help to improve usability and hence reducing the stress. In this work, a prototype of a knitted garment using intarsia technique is developed and evaluated. Results show the satisfactory level of quality for Electrocardiogram and thoracic electrical bioimpedance i.e. for respiration monitoring as a part of HRV biofeedback system. Using intarsia technique and conductive yarn for making the connection instead of cables will reduce the complexity of fabrication in textile production and hence reduce the final costs in a final commercial product. Further development of garment and Android application is ongoing and usability and efficiency of final prototype will be evaluated in detail. PMID:26736953

  15. Improvement/rehabilitation of memory functioning with neurotherapy/QEEG biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Thornton, K

    2000-12-01

    This article presents a new approach to the remediation of memory deficits by studying the electrophysiological functioning involved in memory and applying biofeedback techniques. A Quantitative EEG (QEEG) activation database was obtained with 59 right-handed subjects during two auditory memory tasks (prose passages and word lists). Memory performance was correlated with the QEEG variables. Clinical cases were administered the same QEEG activation study to determine their deviations from the values that predicted success for the reference group. EEG biofeedback interventions were designed to increase the value (to normal levels) of the specific electrophysiological variable that was related to successful memory function and deviant in the subject. Case examples are presented that indicate the successful use of this intervention style in normal subjects and in subjects with brain injury; improvement cannot be fully explained by spontaneous recovery, given the time postinjury. Five cases (two normal, two subjects with brain injury, and one subject who had stereotactic surgery of the hippocampus for seizure control) are presented. Improvements ranged from 68% to 181% in the group of patients with brain injury, as a result of the interventions. PMID:11056409

  16. The effects of frontal EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation upon hyperactivity and its behavioral concomitants.

    PubMed

    Braud, L W

    1978-03-01

    Hyperactive children (N = 15) and nonhyperactive children (N = 15) were compared. Hyperactive children were found to possess significantly higher (p less than .002) muscular tension levels and, in addition, presented more behavioral problems and had lower test scores. Both electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback and progressive relaxation exercises were successful in the significant reduction of muscular tension, hyperactivity, distractability, irritability, impulsivity, explosiveness, aggressivity, and emotionality in hyperactive children. The greatest improvement was seen in the area of "emotionality-aggression" (irritability, explosiveness, impulsivity, low frustration tolerance, aggresion). No differences were seen in the EMG improvement of drug and nondrug hyperactive children; both made progress under these self-control techniques. However, nondrug children made greater improvements in the behavioral area. Both EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation resulted in improvements on the test scores of hyperactive subjects (Bender-Gestalt, Visual Sequential Memory, Digit Span, Coding). The therapy would appear to be improved by the inclusion of mental relaxation, concentration, meditation, and mind-blanking exercises for mental control. PMID:667193

  17. Does Mckuer's Law Hold for Heart Rate Control via Biofeedback Display?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courter, B. J.; Jex, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    Some persons can control their pulse rate with the aid of a biofeedback display. If the biofeedback display is modified to show the error between a command pulse-rate and the measured rate, a compensatory (error correcting) heart rate tracking control loop can be created. The dynamic response characteristics of this control loop when subjected to step and quasi-random disturbances were measured. The control loop includes a beat-to-beat cardiotachmeter differenced with a forcing function from a quasi-random input generator; the resulting error pulse-rate is displayed as feedback. The subject acts to null the displayed pulse-rate error, thereby closing a compensatory control loop. McRuer's Law should hold for this case. A few subjects already skilled in voluntary pulse-rate control were tested for heart-rate control response. Control-law properties are derived, such as: crossover frequency, stability margins, and closed-loop bandwidth. These are evaluated for a range of forcing functions and for step as well as random disturbances.

  18. Balance control enhancement using sub-sensory stimulation and visual-auditory biofeedback strategies for amputee subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Yih; Lin, Chih-Feng; Soon, Kok-Soon

    2007-12-01

    Sub-sensory electrical or mechanical stimulation can enhance the sensitivity of the human somatosensory system to improve the balance control capabilities of elderly. In addition, clinical studies suggest that visual-auditory biofeedback can improve sensory compensation for the elderly. This study hypothesizes that the static balance and gait performance of single leg quiet standing and treadmill walking could be improved for providing proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation using sub-sensory stimulation and visual-auditory biofeedback in amputee subjects. To test this, a computerized foot pressure biofeedback sensory compensation system using sub-threshold low-level electrical stimulation combined with visual-auditory biofeedback was developed. Seven unilateral trans-tibial amputees who wore prostheses over 2 years were recruited. The subjects performed multiple single leg quiet standing trials with sub-sensory electrical stimulation applied at the quadriceps muscle during half of the trials. Static balance performance was characterized by using a Zebris motion analysis system to measure the sway distance and duration of the centre of mass on the second sacral (S2) of the subjects. In addition, multiple treadmill ambulatory trials with or without visual-auditory biofeedback was performed. Dynamic gait performance was characterized with a Zebris instrumented insole to measure the temporal responses of foot pressure sensors. Experimental results showed an improvement in three balance performance indices (Holding Time Index, HTI, Maximum Sway Distance Index, MSDI, and Average Sway Distance Index, ASDI) during single leg quiet standing by applying sub-sensory stimulation. The improvement ratio of these balance performance indices across subjects for single leg quiet standing tests resulted in 132.34% in HTI, 44.61% in MSDI, and 61.45% in ASDI. With visual-auditory biofeedback as a cue for heel contact and toe push-off condition during treadmill ambulation, the

  19. Pelvic floor muscle exercises in genuine urinary stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Cammu, H; Van Nylen, M

    1997-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises, in the treatment of genuine stress incontinence, have been used successfully since 1948. One may expect a significant improvement (warranting no further therapy), or cure rate of about 50%. These exercises have a long-lasting effect. Poorly motivated women should be discouraged to follow exercise sessions. An active co-operation between urogynecologist, physiotherapist and the patient is important in order to avoid undertreated and dissatisfied women. The option to be operated upon must be easily available. PMID:9557995

  20. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Taian M; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  1. A Context-Aware Application to Increase Elderly Users Compliance with Physical Rehabilitation Exercises at Home via Animatronic Biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Gamecho, Borja; Silva, Hugo; Guerreiro, José; Gardeazabal, Luis; Abascal, Julio

    2015-11-01

    Biofeedback from physical rehabilitation exercises has proved to lead to faster recovery, better outcomes, and increased patient motivation. In addition, it allows the physical rehabilitation processes carried out at the clinic to be complemented with exercises performed at home. However, currently existing approaches rely mostly on audio and visual reinforcement cues, usually presented to the user on a computer screen or a mobile phone interface. Some users, such as elderly people, can experience difficulties to use and understand these interfaces, leading to non-compliance with the rehabilitation exercises. To overcome this barrier, latest biosignal technologies can be used to enhance the efficacy of the biofeedback, decreasing the complexity of the user interface. In this paper we propose and validate a context-aware framework for the use of animatronic biofeedback, as a way of potentially increasing the compliance of elderly users with physical rehabilitation exercises performed at home. In the scope of our work, animatronic biofeedback entails the use of pre-programmed actions on a robot that are triggered in response to certain changes detected in the users biomechanical or electrophysiological signals. We use electromyographic and accelerometer signals, collected in real time, to monitor the performance of the user while executing the exercises, and a mobile robot to provide animatronic reinforcement cues associated with their correct or incorrect execution. A context-aware application running on a smartphone aggregates the sensor data and controls the animatronic feedback. The acceptability of the animatronic biofeedback has been tested on a set of volunteer elderly users, and results suggest that the participants found the animatronic feedback engaging and of added value. PMID:26319272

  2. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Taian M.; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  3. [Biofeedback therapy for chronic prostatitis: Application and consideration].

    PubMed

    Chen, Si-da; Li, Jing; Li, Shen-qing; Qian, Li-huan; He, Yuan; Liu, Bu-ping

    2016-01-01

    Studies of biological feedback (BF) for the treatment of chronic prostatitis (CP) are occasionally reported have exhibited some related problems. This article presents an evaluation of the published literature on the BF treatment of CP at home and abroad in the aspects of instrument, method, application, effect, function, and mechanism. UROSTYMTM and MyoTrac are often employed and their operating paths are basically the same. NIH prostate symptom scores, urinary function, pain, sexual function, immune function, prostate fluid, and other indicators are generally used for the analysis of the effects of BF alone or in combination with other therapies on CP and its related symptoms. Either BF alone or BF combined with other therapies can promote urination, reduce pain, improve the quality of life, attenuate inflammation, improve sexual function, adjust immunity, and lessen physical and chemical stimulation. However, the relevant literature is of low quantity and quality, the reported studies are not standardized, and exploration of the action mechanisms is neglected. PMID:26931028

  4. Creeping Reification: Functional Versus Symptomatic Treatment in the Diagnosis "Minimal Brain Dysfunction"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilsheimer, George von

    1973-01-01

    The term minimal brain damage is evaluated in the light of several experiments on about 200 adolescents: no treatment in a democratic children's community; the effect of psychic energizers; electrosleep; biofeedback training for alpha wave desynchronization; deconditioning of phobias; and nutritional/medical treatment. (Author)

  5. Tannin extracts abate ammonia emissions from simulated dairy barn floors.

    PubMed

    Powell, J M; Aguerre, M J; Wattiaux, M A

    2011-01-01

    Feeding more tannin and less crude protein (CP) to dairy cows may have synergistic impacts on reducing NH emissions from dairy barns. Three trials using lab-scale ventilated chambers with concrete floors were conducted to determine the impacts on NH emission of tannin and CP feeding, tannin feeding on urease activity in feces, and tannin application directly to the barn floor. For Trial 1, mixtures of feces and urine from lactating Holstein dairy cows () fed four levels (g kg) of dietary tannin extract [a mixture from red quebracho () and chestnut () trees]: 0 tannin (0T), 4.5 (low tannin [LT]), 9.0 (medium tannin [MT]), and 18.0 (high tannin [HT]); each fed at two levels (g kg) of dietary CP: 155 low CP (LCP) and 168 high CP (HCP) were applied to chambers. For Trial 2, urea solution was added to feces obtained from cows fed 0T, MT, and HT at HCP. For Trial 3, tannin amounts equivalent to those fed at 0T, MT, and HT were applied directly to feces-urine mixtures from 0T-HCP. For all trials, NH emissions were measured 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h after treatment application. For Trial 1, reductions in NH emission due to tannin feeding were greatest when fed at LCP: The LCP-LT and LCP-HT treatments emitted 30.6% less NH than LCP-0T, and the HCP-LT and HCP-HT treatments emitted 16.3% less NH than HCP-0T. For Trial 2, feeding tannin decreased urease activity in feces, resulting in an 11.5% reduction in cumulative NH loss. For Trial 3, the application of tannin directly to simulated barn floors also apparently decreased urease activity, resulting in an average reduction in cumulative NH emissions of 19.0%. Larger-scale trails are required to ascertain the effectiveness of tannin extracts in abating NH loss from dairy barn floors. PMID:21546676

  6. A&M. TAN607 floor plans. Shows three floor levels of pool, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607 floor plans. Shows three floor levels of pool, hot shop, and warm shop. Includes view of pool vestibule, personnel labyrinth, location of floor rails, and room numbers of office areas, labs, instrument rooms, and stairways. This drawing was re-drawn to show as-built features in 1993. Ralph M. Parsons 902-3-ANP-607-A 96. Date of original: December 1952. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-00-693-106748 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Nontraumatic orbital floor fracture after nose blowing.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Ranjit S; Shah, Akash D

    2016-03-01

    A 40-year-old woman with no history of trauma or prior surgery presented to the emergency department with headache and left eye pain after nose blowing. Noncontrast maxillofacial computed tomography examination revealed an orbital floor fracture that ultimately required surgical repair. There are nontraumatic causes of orbital blowout fractures, and imaging should be obtained irrespective of trauma history. PMID:26973725

  8. 49 CFR 393.84 - Floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION... fumes, exhaust gases, or fire. Floors shall not be permeated with oil or other substances likely...

  9. 49 CFR 393.84 - Floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION... fumes, exhaust gases, or fire. Floors shall not be permeated with oil or other substances likely...

  10. 49 CFR 393.84 - Floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION... fumes, exhaust gases, or fire. Floors shall not be permeated with oil or other substances likely...

  11. 49 CFR 393.84 - Floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION... fumes, exhaust gases, or fire. Floors shall not be permeated with oil or other substances likely...

  12. 49 CFR 393.84 - Floors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION... fumes, exhaust gases, or fire. Floors shall not be permeated with oil or other substances likely...

  13. Building Trades. Block III. Floor Framing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This document contains three units of a course on floor framing to be used as part of a building trades program. Each unit consists, first, of an informational lesson, with complete lesson plan for the teacher's use. Included in each lesson plan are the lesson aim; lists of teaching aids, materials, references, and prerequisites for students;…

  14. Nontraumatic orbital floor fracture after nose blowing

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Ranjit S.; Shah, Akash D.

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman with no history of trauma or prior surgery presented to the emergency department with headache and left eye pain after nose blowing. Noncontrast maxillofacial computed tomography examination revealed an orbital floor fracture that ultimately required surgical repair. There are nontraumatic causes of orbital blowout fractures, and imaging should be obtained irrespective of trauma history. PMID:26973725

  15. Seeing Results in Flooring for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Operations staffs at education facilities of all sizes are tasked with selecting a hard floor cleaning program that is cost-effective, efficient and highly productive. With an increased focus on the sustainability of an environment, facility managers also must select a program that meets sustainability goals while maintaining a healthful, safe…

  16. Do I have an alluvial valley floor

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, G.G.

    1980-12-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 establishes specific restrictions for coal mining on or adjacent to alluvial valley floors. Alluvial valley floors are lands in the Western United States where water availability for flood irrigation or subirrigation provides enhanced agricultural productivity on stream-laid deposits located in valley bottoms. Alluvial valley floors may consist of developed land or undeveloped rangeland. Developed land, if of sufficient size to be important to a farming operation, cannot be mined whereas undeveloped rangeland can be mined provided certain performance standards are met. Developed land is important to farming when the percentage loss of production by removal of the alluvial valley floor from a farm(s) total production exceeds the equation P = 3 + 0.0014X, where P is the maximum percentage loss of productivity considered to be a negligible impact to a Wyoming farming operation and X is the number of animal units of total farm production above 100. A threshold level of 10 percent is placed on P, above which such a loss is considered to be a significant loss to any size farming operation.

  17. Sea Floor off San Diego, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gibbons, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Ocean-floor image generated from multibeam-bathymetry data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; California State University, Monterey Bay; and Fugro Pelagos. To learn more, visit http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/2007/2959/.

  18. Geodetic measurements at sea floor spreading centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiess, F. N.

    1978-01-01

    A network of 8 or more precision transponder units mounted on the sea floor and interrogated periodically from an instrument package towed near bottom through the area to provide the necessary spatial averaging could provide a practical system for observing the pattern of buildup of strain at intermediate and fast spreading centers.

  19. Performance Support on the Shop Floor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasvi, Jyrki J. J.; Vartiainen, Matti

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of performance support on the shop floor highlights four support systems for assembly lines that incorporate personal computer workstations in local area networks and use multimedia documents. Considers new customer-focused production paradigms; organizational learning; knowledge development; and electronic performance support systems…

  20. Lead exposures from varnished floor refinishing.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Joseph; Havlena, Jeff; Jacobs, David E; Dixon, Sherry; Ikens, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the presence of lead in varnish and factors predicting lead exposure from floor refinishing and inexpensive dust suppression control methods. Lead in varnish, settled dust, and air were measured using XRF, laboratory analysis of scrape and wipe samples, and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7300, respectively, during refinishing (n = 35 homes). Data were analyzed using step-wise logistic regression. Compared with federal standards, no lead in varnish samples exceeded 1.0 mg/cm(2), but 52% exceeded 5000 ppm and 70% of settled dust samples after refinishing exceeded 40 μg/ft(2). Refinishing pre-1930 dwellings or stairs predicted high lead dust on floors. Laboratory analysis of lead in varnish was significantly correlated with airborne lead (r = 0.23, p = 0.014). Adding dust collection bags into drum sanders and HEPA vacuums to edgers and buffers reduced mean floor lead dust by 8293 μg Pb/ft(2) (p<0.05) on floors and reduced most airborne lead exposures to less than 50 μg/m(3). Refinishing varnished surfaces in older housing produces high but controllable lead exposures. PMID:22494405

  1. Personalizing pelvic floor reconstructive surgery in aging women.

    PubMed

    Mannella, Paolo; Giannini, Andrea; Russo, Eleonora; Naldini, Gabriele; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-09-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction is a growingly frequent condition in aging individuals. Urinary or rectal incontinence, constipation, pelvic organ prolapse, pelvic pain or sexual dysfunction are common problems in this age range. Such conditions carry a severe impact on quality of life, but also limit individual independence in daily activities, favor social isolation and carry health risks. Diagnosis and treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction in aging women is tricky, since multiple interfering conditions affecting muscle tone and nerve function are common in these individuals. Diabetes mellitus, sarcopenia, use of drugs that affect cognition or impact bowel or urinary function are just a few examples. These conditions need to be thoroughly taken into account during pre-operative work up for their potential impact on the success of surgery and vice versa. Functional reconstruction aimed at treating symptoms rather than anatomic defects is key to success. The recent advancements in surgical treatment of urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse allow for more options to achieve the best surgery in each patient. PMID:26142653

  2. Effects of different floor types and levels of washing of waterers on broiler performance and bacteria count of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Andrews, L D; Stamps, L K; Moore, R W; Newberry, L A

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the present experiment was to determine the effect of different flooring materials and washing of waterers on broiler performance. The floor treatments were 1) black, plastic-coated expanded metal, relatively rigid (B); 2) white plastic, semi-rigid, with rectangular openings (WR); 3) white plastic, semi-rigid, with square openings (WS); and 4) 3 cm of rice hull litter (C). One hanging waterer was placed in each pen. Wash treatments were 1) trough and bell washed every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (AW); 2) wash trough only on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (TW); and 3) the waterers were never washed after the 2nd wk (NW). Broilers reared on C has significantly lower BW than those broilers on B floors. Broilers reared on the B and WS floors had significantly higher breast blister scores and percentage of birds with blisters than broilers reared on C floors. Broilers reared on C had lower enlarged feather follicle scores than those reared on all raised floors and a lower percentage of enlarged feather follicles than those broilers reared on WS or WR floors. Broilers reared on WS+TW had significantly better feed conversion than WS+AW, B+TW, and B+AW treatments. Broilers reared on WR+TW treatment were significantly higher in breast blister score than broilers reared on WR+AW, C+TW, and C+AW treatments. Broilers reared on C+TW and C+AW treatments were significantly lower in breast blister score except for broilers reared on C+NW, WR+AW, and WS+AW treatments. Broilers reared on C+NW treatment were significantly lower in enlarged feather follicle score than those broilers reared on B+TW, WR+AW, and WS+NW treatments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8346148

  3. Local Oestrogen for Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M. A.; Kleijn, M. H.; Langendam, M.; Limpens, J.; Heineman, M. J.; Roovers, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The decline in available oestrogen after menopause is a possible etiological factor in pelvic floor disorders like vaginal atrophy (VA), urinary incontinence (UI), overactive bladder (OAB) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). This systematic review will examine the evidence for local oestrogen therapy in the treatment of these pelvic floor disorders. Evidence Acquisition We performed a systematic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the non-MEDLINE subset of PubMed from inception to May 2014. We searched for local oestrogens and VA (I), UI/OAB (II) and POP (III). Part I was combined with broad methodological filters for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and secondary evidence. For part I and II two reviewers independently selected RCTs evaluating the effect of topical oestrogens on symptoms and signs of VA and UI/OAB. In part III all studies of topical oestrogen therapy in the treatment of POP were selected. Data extraction and the assessment of risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was undertaken independently by two reviewers. Evidence Synthesis The included studies varied in ways of topical application, types of oestrogen, dosage and treatment durations. Objective and subjective outcomes were assessed by a variety of measures. Overall, subjective and urodynamic outcomes, vaginal maturation and vaginal pH changed in favor of vaginal oestrogens compared to placebo. No obvious differences between different application methods were revealed. Low doses already seemed to have a beneficial effect. Studies evaluating the effect of topical oestrogen in women with POP are scarce and mainly assessed symptoms and signs associated with VA instead of POP symptoms. Conclusion Topical oestrogen administration is effective for the treatment of VA and seems to decrease complaints of OAB and UI. The potential for local oestrogens in the prevention as well as treatment of POP needs further research. PMID:26383760

  4. FLOOR PLAN OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601), FIRST FLOOR SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLOOR PLAN OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601), FIRST FLOOR SHOWING SAMPLE CORRIDORS AND EIGHTEEN CELLS AND ADJOINING REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627) SHOWING REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITIES LAB, DECONTAMINATION ROOM, AND MULTICURIE CELL ROOM. TO LEFT ARE LABORATORY BUILDING (CPP-602) AND MAINTENANCE BUILDING (CPP-630). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-706-051979. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER CPP-E-1979. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. FLOOR PLAN OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601), SECOND FLOOR SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLOOR PLAN OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601), SECOND FLOOR SHOWING PROCESS MAKEUP AREA AND EIGHTEEN CELLS AND ADJOINING REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627) SHOWING COLD LAB, DECONTAMINATION ROOM, MULTICURIE CELL ROOM, AND OFFICES. TO LEFT ARE LABORATORY BUILDING (CPP-602) AND MAINTENANCE BUILDING (CPP-630). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-706-051980. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER CPP-E-1980. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. [The effectiveness of gait rehabilitation in the patients following endoprosthetic hip replacement by means of the biofeedback-based hardware videoreconstruction of the walking stereotype].

    PubMed

    Koneva, E S

    2015-01-01

    The number of surgical interventions performed for total arthroplasty of the lower extremities (TALE) grows steadily which accounts for the increasingly greater number of patients in need of high-quality and efficient rehabilitation therapy during the post-operative period. In connection with this, the evaluation and implementation of the novel rehabilitation techniques for the management of the patients after TALE is a highly topical problem. We have studied the influence of the method of the biofeedback-based hardware videoreconstruction of the walking stereotype (BOSVRH) in the patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty during the early postoperative period. The study included three groups of patients. Those of group I (n = 65) were chosen for the training on a treadmill with BOSVRH. In group II (n = 50), the restoration of the walking stereotype was a component of exercise therapy without the use of special hardware techniques. The patients of group III (n = 40) were healthy subjects with no clinical signs of arthrosis in the medical history who served as controls. The analysis of the test results in the end of the training course for the restoration of the walking stereotype in the patients of groups I and II in comparison with the "standard" values in the patients of control group III has demonstrated a more efficient restoration of the waling stereotype in the patients of group I than in those of group II. In the former group, the analysis of the results of dynamic observation of the features of the constituent step elements revealed the improvement of their structural characteristics, the normalization of the symmetry of the load distribution between the lower extremities during walking, and the restoration of the amortization function of the operated limb. In addition, the patients of group I showed a markedly increased level of motivation and satisfaction with the treatment. The control X-ray examination of the implanted joints during the long term

  7. Brain stimulation used as biofeedback training for recovery of motor functions deteriorated by stroke.

    PubMed

    Calomeni, Mauricio Rocha; Rocha, José Antonio Martins da Silva; Silva, Alair Pedro Ribeiro da; Ribeiro, Luiz Henrique Brandão; Marques, Luciene; Siza, Maria Auxiliadora Freire; Silva, Vernon Furtado da

    2013-03-01

    According to World Health Organization, approximately 15 million people are affected by cerebrovascular accident in the world. We study the effect of brain stimulation plus an imaging procedure used as biofeedback training for recovery of motor functions impaired by CVA. Four individuals aged between 33 and 72 years were included in the study, of both genders, with hemiparesis on the left arm due to the CVA. They had their brain activity monitored by EEG. Functional tasks were evaluated according to an observational model proposed by the international classification of functioning and by runtime. The training was composed of 12 sessions of 30 minutes of stimulation by light and sound, as well as imaging procedures. Results revealed that improvements in the performance of the task, with regard to both the runtime and the functional quality of movements, are more related to the increase of effectiveness of neuronal function. PMID:23563715

  8. Mobile biofeedback of heart rate variability in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Druschky, Katrin; Druschky, Achim

    2015-09-01

    Biofeedback of heart rate variability (HRV) was applied to patients with diabetic polyneuropathy using a new mobile device allowing regularly scheduled self-measurements without the need of visits to a special autonomic laboratory. Prolonged generation of data over an eight-week period facilitated more precise investigation of cardiac autonomic function and assessment of positive and negative trends of HRV parameters over time. Statistical regression analyses revealed significant trends in 11 of 17 patients, while no significant differences were observed when comparing autonomic screening by short-term HRV and respiratory sinus arrhythmia at baseline and after the 8 weeks training period. Four patients showed positive trends of HRV parameters despite the expected progression of cardiac autonomic dysfunction over time. Patient compliance was above 50% in all but two patients. The results of this preliminary study indicate a good practicality of the handheld device and suggest a potential positive effect on cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24438496

  9. Virtual Exertions: a user interface combining visual information, kinesthetics and biofeedback for virtual object manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Ponto, Kevin; Kimmel, Ryan; Kohlmann, Joe; Bartholomew, Aaron; Radwin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Virtual Reality environments have the ability to present users with rich visual representations of simulated environments. However, means to interact with these types of illusions are generally unnatural in the sense that they do not match the methods humans use to grasp and move objects in the physical world. We demonstrate a system that enables users to interact with virtual objects with natural body movements by combining visual information, kinesthetics and biofeedback from electromyograms (EMG). Our method allows virtual objects to be grasped, moved and dropped through muscle exertion classification based on physical world masses. We show that users can consistently reproduce these calibrated exertions, allowing them to interface with objects in a novel way. PMID:25285327

  10. Real-time estimation and biofeedback of single-neuron firing rates using local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Thomas M.; Nazarpour, Kianoush; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The long-term stability and low-frequency composition of local field potentials (LFPs) offer important advantages for robust and efficient neuroprostheses. However, cortical LFPs recorded by multi-electrode arrays are often assumed to contain only redundant information arising from the activity of large neuronal populations. Here we show that multichannel LFPs in monkey motor cortex each contain a slightly different mixture of distinctive slow potentials that accompany neuronal firing. As a result, the firing rates of individual neurons can be estimated with surprising accuracy. We implemented this method in a real-time biofeedback brain–machine interface, and found that monkeys could learn to modulate the activity of arbitrary neurons using feedback derived solely from LFPs. These findings provide a principled method for monitoring individual neurons without long-term recording of action potentials. PMID:25394574

  11. Heart rate regulation during cycle-ergometer exercise via bio-feedback.

    PubMed

    Argha, Ahmadreza; Su, Steven W; Hung Nguyen; Celler, Branko G

    2015-08-01

    This paper explains our developed control system which regulates the heart rate (HR) to track a desired trajectory. The controller is indeed a non-conventional non-model-based proportional, integral and derivative (PID) controller. The controller commands are interpreted as biofeedback auditory commands. These commands can be heard and implemented by the exercising subject as a part of the control-loop. However, transmitting a feedback signal while the pedals are not in the appropriate position to efficiently exert force may lead to a cognitive disengagement of the user from the feedback controller. This note explains a novel form of control system regarding as "actuator-based event-driven control system", designed specifically for the purpose of this project. We conclude that the developed event-driven controller makes it possible to precisely regulate HR to a predetermined HR profile. PMID:26737328

  12. 8. DETAIL: GENERATOR FLOOR DIABLO POWERHOUSE SHOWING BUTTERFLY VALVE CONTROL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL: GENERATOR FLOOR DIABLO POWERHOUSE SHOWING BUTTERFLY VALVE CONTROL, MOSAIC TILE FLOOR, AS SEEN FROM VISITORS GALLERY, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 6.1 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  13. CAR MACHINE SHOP, SECOND FLOOR, PAINT SPRAY ROOM EXTERIOR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAR MACHINE SHOP, SECOND FLOOR, PAINT SPRAY ROOM EXTERIOR AND ATTIC FLOOR SUPPORT COLUMNS AND BEAMS, LOOKING WEST. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Car Machine Shop, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  14. 50. Ground floor, looking northwest at former location of ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Ground floor, looking northwest at former location of ground floor (bottom) level of milk room - Sheffield Farms Milk Plant, 1075 Webster Avenue (southwest corner of 166th Street), Bronx, Bronx County, NY

  15. 3. MILK BARN, INTERIOR VIEW OF GROUND FLOOR, LOOKING 132 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. MILK BARN, INTERIOR VIEW OF GROUND FLOOR, LOOKING 132 DEGREES SOUTHEAST, SHOWING RAISED FLOOR OF CENTRAL AISLE. - Hudson-Cippa-Wolf Ranch, Milk Barn, Sorento Road, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  16. 20. View of second floor to the Cherry Hill lettuce ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of second floor to the Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking at floor area - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  17. 27 CFR 46.233 - Payment of floor stocks tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 Filing Requirements § 46.233 Payment of floor stocks tax....

  18. 27 CFR 46.233 - Payment of floor stocks tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 Filing Requirements § 46.233 Payment of floor stocks tax....

  19. 27 CFR 46.231 - Floor stocks tax return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette....28T09, 2009 Floor Stocks Tax Return—Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, is available...

  20. 27 CFR 46.231 - Floor stocks tax return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette....28T09, 2009 Floor Stocks Tax Return—Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, is available...

  1. 27 CFR 46.233 - Payment of floor stocks tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 Filing Requirements § 46.233 Payment of floor stocks tax....

  2. 27 CFR 46.231 - Floor stocks tax return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette....28T09, 2009 Floor Stocks Tax Return—Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, is available...

  3. 27 CFR 46.233 - Payment of floor stocks tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 Filing Requirements § 46.233 Payment of floor stocks tax....

  4. 27 CFR 46.231 - Floor stocks tax return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette....28T09, 2009 Floor Stocks Tax Return—Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, is available...

  5. 27 CFR 46.231 - Floor stocks tax return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette....28T09, 2009 Floor Stocks Tax Return—Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes, is available...

  6. Refrigeration Plant, North Elevation, Second Floor Plan, East Elevation, Ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Refrigeration Plant, North Elevation, Second Floor Plan, East Elevation, Ground Floor Plan, Section A-A - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  7. 27. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, SOUTH ENTRANCE, SOUTH LOBBY, DETAIL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, SOUTH ENTRANCE, SOUTH LOBBY, DETAIL OF BRONZE SEAL IN FLOOR (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE SECOND FLOOR STAIR HALL. NOTE THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE SECOND FLOOR STAIR HALL. NOTE THE TONGUE-AND-GROOVE WOOD FLOORING AND THE WINDOW ABOVE THE STAIR LANDING. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type D, 111 Beard Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  9. 79. DETAIL, MOSAIC FLOOR IN HALL 355 AT ENTRANCE TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. DETAIL, MOSAIC FLOOR IN HALL 355 AT ENTRANCE TO REGENTS' ROOM, THIRD FLOOR - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT SOUTHWEST CORNER ROOM WITH STAIRWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT SOUTHWEST CORNER ROOM WITH STAIRWAY TO SECOND FLOOR - Penn School Historic District, Benezet House, 1 mile South of Frogmore, Route 37, St Helena Island, Frogmore, Beaufort County, SC

  11. 5. EAST SECTION OF BUILDING, FIRST FLOOR, WEST ROOM. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST SECTION OF BUILDING, FIRST FLOOR, WEST ROOM. NOTE OVEN AT LEFT. All construction original except wood flooring, plumbing and electricity. - Ralph Izard House, Kitchen Building, 110 Broad Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  12. View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of double floor boards with mortises cross beams, showing spikes and flooring nails (Lower board layer exposed) - Silas C. Read Sawmill, Outlet of Maxwell Lake near North Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  13. 32. Coffee bean sluiceway on ground floor showing chute bringing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Coffee bean sluiceway on ground floor showing chute bringing beans from first floor hopper. HAER PR, 6-MAGU, 1B-17 - Hacienda Buena Vista, PR Route 10 (Ponce to Arecibo), Magueyes, Ponce Municipio, PR

  14. 18. 1925 Main Factory building, interior, second floor, view looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. 1925 Main Factory building, interior, second floor, view looking northeast at opening in the floor for dropping warp rolls - North Star Woolen Mill, 109 Portland Avenue South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  15. 12. TRIPLE WINDOW, FIRST FLOOR, SOUTH SIDE. Typical for all ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. TRIPLE WINDOW, FIRST FLOOR, SOUTH SIDE. Typical for all triple windows on first and second floors. Note single swing jib door - John Joyner Smith House, 400 Wilmington Street, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  16. 15. SECOND FLOOR, SOUTHWEST ROOM (HALL CHAMBER), SOUTH WALL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. SECOND FLOOR, SOUTHWEST ROOM (HALL CHAMBER), SOUTH WALL WITH STAIRCASE TO ATTIC AND STAIRWELL FROM FIRST FLOOR - John Richardson House, 15 Race Street, Richardson Park, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  17. 33. Third floor, looking north, elevator and central stair to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Third floor, looking north, elevator and central stair to the right (original ice manufacturing floor) - Sheffield Farms Milk Plant, 1075 Webster Avenue (southwest corner of 166th Street), Bronx, Bronx County, NY

  18. 11. BUILDING 1: FIRST FLOOR (Center Section), WEST AND NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BUILDING 1: FIRST FLOOR (Center Section), WEST AND NORTH WALLS, SHOWING TWO TIERS OF COLUMNS WITH SECOND FLOOR REMOVED - Boston Beer Company, 225-249 West Second Street, South Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  19. 5. Light tower, stairs to second floor, looking northeast from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Light tower, stairs to second floor, looking northeast from first floor - Little River Light Station, East end of Little River Island, at mouth of Little River & entrance to Cutler Harbor, Cutler, Washington County, ME

  20. Detail of first floor of loading dock showing composition tile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of first floor of loading dock showing composition tile over wood floor/basement ceiling - Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, Railroad Terminal Post Office & Express Building, Fifth & I Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. 8. DETAIL OF EAST FRONT, SHOWING FIRST FLOOR STOREFRONT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF EAST FRONT, SHOWING FIRST FLOOR STOREFRONT AND SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS. VIEW TO WEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Dubuque Seed Company Warehouse, 169-171 Iowa Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  2. Novel esophageal speech therapy method in total laryngectomized patients: biofeedback by intraesophageal impedance.

    PubMed

    Şahin, M; Ogut, M F; Vardar, R; Kirazli, T; Engin, E Z; Bor, S

    2016-01-01

    The loss of the best communication port after total laryngectomy surgery makes speech rehabilitation an important goal. Our aim was to improve the quality of esophageal speech (ES) using online esophageal multichannel intra-luminal impedance (MII) as a new biofeedback method. Twenty-six total laryngectomized patients were included. Before ES therapy, an esophageal motility test was carried out. MII catheters were placed in all subjects who were then randomized into two groups. Group 1 included 13 cases, who were retrained according to the classical method. Group 2 included 13 cases, who were retrained according to the simplified animation of air movements within the esophagus and upper stomach resulting from the modifications of intra-esophageal air kinetics gained by MII. The level of speech proficiency was evaluated relative to pretraining levels using perceptual scales in the third and sixth months. Acoustic voice was analyzed. The number of syllables read per minute and the intelligibility of monosyllabic and dissyllabic words were calculated. In this study, MII was used for the first time in alaryngeal speech rehabilitation as a biofeedback method; an overall sufficient speech level was achieved by 68.4% at the end of therapy, whereas attendance was 90%. A statistically significant improvement was found in both groups in terms of ES level compared with the pretraining period although there was no significant difference between groups. Although we did not observe the expected difference between groups suggested by our hypothesis, MII may be used as an objective tool to show patients how to swallow and regurgitate air during training, and may thus expedite ES therapy both for the speech therapist and the patient in the future. PMID:25515163

  3. Effects of an auditory biofeedback device on plantar pressure in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Luke; Feger, Mark A; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan; Park, Joseph; Hertel, Jay

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle instability (CAI) patients have been shown to have increased lateral column plantar pressure throughout the stance phase of gait. To date, traditional CAI rehabilitation programs have been unable to alter gait. We developed an auditory biofeedback device that can be worn in shoes that elicits an audible cue when an excessive amount of pressure is applied to a sensor. This study determined whether using this device can decrease lateral plantar pressure in participants with CAI and alter surface electromyography (sEMG) amplitudes (anterior tibialis, peroneus longus, medial gastrocnemius, and gluteus medius). Ten CAI patients completed baseline treadmill walking while in-shoe plantar pressures and sEMG were measured (baseline condition). Next, the device was placed into the shoe and set to a threshold that would elicit an audible cue during each step of the participant's normal gait. Then, participants were instructed to walk in a manner that would not trigger the audible cue, while plantar pressure and sEMG measures were recorded (auditory feedback (AUD FB) condition). Compared to baseline, there was a statistically significant reduction in peak pressure in the lateral midfoot-forefoot and central forefoot during the AUD FB condition. In addition, there were increases in peroneus longus and medial gastrocnemius sEMG amplitudes 200ms post-initial contact during the AUD FB condition. The use of this auditory biofeedback device resulted in decreased plantar pressure in the lateral column of the foot during treadmill walking in CAI patients and may have been caused by the increase in sEMG activation of the peroneus longus. PMID:27004629

  4. Improving Managers' Psychophysical Well-Being: Effectiveness of Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Munafò, Marianna; Patron, Elisabetta; Palomba, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    High work stress has been consistently associated with disturbed autonomic balance, specifically, lowered vagal cardiac control and increased sympathetic activity, which may lead to increased cardiovascular risk. Stress management procedures have been proposed to reduce autonomic dysfunctions related to work stress in different categories of workers exposed to heightened work demands, while a limited number of studies addressed this issue in managers. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) biofeedback (BF) intervention on psychological and physiological outcomes, in managers with high-level work responsibilities. Thirty-one managers leading outstanding private or public companies were randomly assigned to either a RSA-BF training (RSA-BF; N = 16) or a control group (N = 15). The RSA-BF training consisted of five weekly 45 min sessions, designed to increase RSA, whereas controls had to provide a daily stress diary once a week. After the training, managers in both groups reported reduced heart rate at rest, lower anxiety levels and improvement in health-related quality of life. More importantly, managers in the RSA-BF group showed increased vagal control (as indexed by increased RSA), decreased sympathetic arousal (as indexed by reduced skin conductance and systolic blood pressure) and lower emotional interferences, compared to managers in the control group. Results from this study showed that RSA-BF training was effective in improving cardiac autonomic balance at rest. Moreover, findings from this study underline the effectiveness of biofeedback in reducing psychophysiological negative outcomes associated with stress in managers. PMID:26446978

  5. Biofeedback-based training for stress management in daily hassles: an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Kotozaki, Yuka; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Shinada, Takamitsu; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Kei; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ogino, Takeshi; Kiguchi, Masashi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Background The day-to-day causes of stress are called daily hassles. Daily hassles are correlated with ill health. Biofeedback (BF) is one of the tools used for acquiring stress-coping skills. However, the anatomical correlates of the effects of BF with long training periods remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate this. Methods Participants were assigned randomly to two groups: the intervention group and the control group. Participants in the intervention group performed a biofeedback training (BFT) task (a combination task for heart rate and cerebral blood flow control) every day, for about 5 min once a day. The study outcomes included MRI, psychological tests (e.g., Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and Brief Job Stress Questionnaire), and a stress marker (salivary cortisol levels) before (day 0) and after (day 28) the intervention. Results We observed significant improvements in the psychological test scores and salivary cortisol levels in the intervention group compared to the control group. Furthermore, voxel-based morphometric analysis revealed that compared to the control group, the intervention group had significantly increased regional gray matter (GM) volume in the right lateral orbitofrontal cortex, which is an anatomical cluster that includes mainly the left hippocampus, and the left subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. The GM regions are associated with the stress response, and, in general, these regions seem to be the most sensitive to the detrimental effects of stress. Conclusions Our findings suggest that our BFT is effective against the GM structures vulnerable to stress. PMID:25161823

  6. An anomalous case of an indirect orbital floor fracture.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, Matteo; Poglio, Giuseppe; Grivetto, Fabrizio; Benech, Arnaldo

    2014-09-01

    Fractures of the orbital floor are common in facial trauma. Those that comprise only the orbital floor are called indirect fractures or pure internal orbital floor fractures. We present the case of an indirect fracture of the orbital floor after direct trauma to the back of the head caused by a bicycle accident. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that this mechanism for such a fracture has been reported. PMID:24742591

  7. 75 FR 70061 - Dealer Floor Plan Pilot Program Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Dealer Floor Plan Pilot Program Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION... agenda for a meeting regarding the Dealer Floor Plan Pilot Program established in the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010. The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The Dealer Floor Plan Pilot...

  8. 27 CFR 46.195 - Floor stocks requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Floor stocks requirements... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 General § 46.195 Floor stocks requirements. (a) Take inventory....

  9. 27 CFR 46.195 - Floor stocks requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Floor stocks requirements... CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES Floor Stocks Tax on Certain Tobacco Products, Cigarette Papers, and Cigarette Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 General § 46.195 Floor stocks requirements. (a) Take inventory....

  10. 36 CFR 1192.79 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 1192.79 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles... accommodated shall be slip-resistant. (b) All thresholds and step edges shall have a band of color(s) running... floor, either light-on-dark or dark-on-light....

  11. 36 CFR 1192.79 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 1192.79 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles... accommodated shall be slip-resistant. (b) All thresholds and step edges shall have a band of color(s) running... floor, either light-on-dark or dark-on-light....

  12. 36 CFR 1192.79 - Floors, steps and thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 1192.79 Floors, steps and thresholds. (a) Floor surfaces on aisles... accommodated shall be slip-resistant. (b) All thresholds and step edges shall have a band of color(s) running... floor, either light-on-dark or dark-on-light....

  13. What Do You Really Know About Floor Finishes & Strippers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    An independent testing laboratory reveals the results of comparative studies done on vinyl flooring and the question of to wax or not to wax'' and which waxes work best with what flooring; and provides six evaluation tips on floor strippers. (EA)

  14. 13. INTERIOR VIEW, FIRST FLOOR SHOWING THE ELEVATORS FEEDING GRAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR VIEW, FIRST FLOOR SHOWING THE ELEVATORS FEEDING GRAIN FROM THE SECOND FLOOR TO THE GRINDING STONES, WITH GRAIN ELEVATORS IN BACKGROUND (NOTE OUTLINE ON THE FLOOR WHERE ROLLER MILLS WERE ORIGINALLY PLACED) - Schech's Mill, Beaver Creek State Park, La Crescent, Houston County, MN

  15. 17. Same floor as hot water vats looking towards the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Same floor as hot water vats looking towards the front of the building. These have to do with grain from upper floor judging from ceiling to floor progression. Note nice iron work. - Tivoli-Union Brewery, 1320-1348 Tenth Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  16. VINEYARD FLOOR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES AFFECT SOIL PROPERTIES & MICROBIOLOGY, WATER RELATIONS, AND CROP NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term comparison of various vineyard floor management practices (weed control and cover crops) indicates that weed control treatments had no impact on soil microbial biomass, but had a significant interactive effect with the rye cover crop on mycorrhizal colonization of grapevine roots, presum...

  17. [Development of an Analgesia Therapy System for Delivery Based on Bio-feedback Transcuataneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation].

    PubMed

    Deng Songbo; Lu Yaosheng; Fang, Kun; Qin, Ruyi; Lin, Zhan

    2015-06-01

    Transcuataneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) analgesia as a non-drug method has received people's more and more attention recently. Considering problems of existing products, such as unstable performance and unsatisfied effectiveness, we developed a new analgesia therapy system for delivery based on bio-feedback TENS in our laboratory. We proposed a new idea for stimulation signal design, that is, we modulated a middle frequency signal by a traditional low frequency TENS wave in the new system. We designed different prescription waves for pain relief during a uterine contraction or massage between contractions. In the end, a bio-feedback TENS method was proposed, in which the waveforms of stimulation signals were selected and their parameters were modified automatically based on feedback from uterine pressure, etc. It was proved through quality tests and clinical trials that the system had good performance and satisfied analgesia effectiveness. PMID:26485994

  18. Pelvic floor hypertonic disorders: identification and management.

    PubMed

    Butrick, Charles W

    2009-09-01

    Patients with hypertonic pelvic floor disorders can present with pelvic pain or dysfunction. Each of the various syndromes will be discussed including elimination disorders, bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), vulvodynia, vaginismus, and chronic pelvic pain. The symptoms and objective findings on physical examination and various diagnostic studies will be reviewed. Therapeutic options including physical therapy, pharmacologic management, and trigger point injections, as well as botulinum toxin injections will be reviewed in detail. PMID:19932423

  19. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  20. Factory floor injury in a Lagos sawmill.

    PubMed

    Bode, C O; Giwa, S O; Oke, D A

    2001-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed injuries sustained in 36 consecutive accidents in a wood-processing factory and managed at a private hospital over a 2-year period in Lagos. The commonest injuries were lacerations by revolving saws, followed by crush injuries from entrapment by machines and from falling logs and planks. The upper limbs were involved in 24 (66%) of these accidents cases. Of 137 workers on the factory floor, the highest injury rate (64%) occurred among machine operators. While 80.6% of these injuries were simple ones treated by suturing and dressing, 7 (19.4%) were life-threatening enough to warrant hospitalisation and major surgery, with 6 sustaining a mean permanent disability of 7.1 +/- 6%. Although factory-floor injuries constituted only 6.5% of 553 hospital attendance recorded within the period from the company, they were responsible for 44.2% of total medical expenditure by the company within the same period. Non-use of protective gears and disregard for safety procedures were noted in most of the accidents. The in-house first-aid program was adjudged as life-saving in the few major cases managed. We concluded that while many factory-floor injuries in wood-processing factories may be minor hand injuries, provision and strict observance of safety protocols as well as an active first-aid program are invaluable to minimise morbidity, cost and loss of productive man-hours in wood processing factories. PMID:11885883

  1. Floor of Lake Tahoe, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gibbons, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Lake-floor depths shown by color, from light tan (shallowest) to blue (deepest). Arrows on map (C) show orientations of perspective views. A, view toward McKinney Bay over blocks tumbled onto the lake floor by a massive landslide 10s to 100s of thousands of years ago; dark triangular block near center is approximately 1.5 km (0.9 mi) across and 120 m (390 ft) high. B, view toward South Lake Tahoe and Emerald Bay (on right) over sediment waves as much as 10 m (30 ft) high, created by sediment flowing down the south margin of the lake. Slopes appear twice as steep as they are. Lake-floor imagery from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) multibeam bathymetric data and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers bathymetric lidar data. Land imagery generated by overlaying USGS digital orthophoto quadrangles (DOQs) on USGS digital elevation models (DEMs). All data available at http://tahoe.usgs.gov/.

  2. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  3. Laparoscopic surgery for rectal prolapse and pelvic floor disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rickert, Alexander; Kienle, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are different dysfunctions of gynaecological, urinary or anorectal organs, which can present as incontinence, outlet-obstruction and organ prolapse or as a combination of these symptoms. Pelvic floor disorders affect a substantial amount of people, predominantly women. Transabdominal procedures play a major role in the treatment of these disorders. With the development of new techniques established open procedures are now increasingly performed laparoscopically. Operation techniques consist of various rectopexies with suture, staples or meshes eventually combined with sigmoid resection. The different approaches need to be measured by their operative and functional outcome and their recurrence rates. Although these operations are performed frequently a comparison and evaluation of the different methods is difficult, as most of the used outcome measures in the available studies have not been standardised and data from randomised studies comparing these outcome measures directly are lacking. Therefore evidence based guidelines do not exist. Currently the laparoscopic approach with ventral mesh rectopexy or resection rectopexy is the two most commonly used techniques. Observational and retrospective studies show good functional results, a low rate of complications and a low recurrence rate. As high quality evidence is missing, an individualized approach is recommend for every patient considering age, individual health status and the underlying morphological and functional disorders. PMID:26380050

  4. [Nursing care in the initial phases of pelvic floor prolapse].

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    Uterine prolapse consists of a falling or sliding of the uterus from its normal position in the pelvic cavity inside the vagina and is one of the most frequent alterations secondary to pelvic floor dysfunction in gynecology consultations. Although patients are reluctant to talk about this sensitive issue, they complain of feeling a lump in their genitals, urinary incontinence, and problems in their sexual relations. In fact, uterine prolapse is not a disease but an alteration of the elements suspending and containing the uterus, which are almost always injured by pregnancy and childbirth. Other causes in addition to trauma of the endopelvic fascia (mainly cardinal and uterosacral ligaments) are injuries or relaxations of the pelvic floor (the muscles lifting the anus and the fascia that covers the bladder, vagina and rectum). Causes of uterine prolapse without obstetric antecedents are usually those that involve an increase in abdominal pressure and respiratory diseases causing severe coughing. The incidence of uterine prolapse is highest in multiparous women, with prolonged deliveries, a long second stage involving marked straining, in forceps deliveries and in women with perineal tears. Nursing care is essential, both in the prevention and the detection of prolapse, so that women can express their needs without fear and are aware of the need for appropriate treatment in the incipient stages of prolapse. PMID:19080886

  5. Effects of Weight-Bearing Biofeedback Training on Functional Movement Patterns Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Cory L.; Bade, Michael J.; Davidson, Bradley S.; Dayton, Michael R.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. OBJECTIVES Examine the effects of weight-bearing (WB) biofeedback training on WB symmetry and functional joint moments following unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). BACKGROUND Individuals post unilateral TKA place more weight on the non-surgical limb compared to the surgical limb during function. It is unknown if targeted intervention can improve surgical limb use and resolve altered movement patterns. METHODS Twenty-six patients were randomized to 2 groups: RELOAD or CONTROL. The RELOAD group had standard of care rehabilitation augmented with WB biofeedback training and the CONTROL group had dose-matched standard of care. Lower limb weight-bearing ratios (WBRs) were measured preoperatively and 6 and 26 weeks after TKA during a Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSST) and walking. Secondary outcomes were FTSST time, walking speed, and lower limb joint moments during the FTSST and walking. RESULTS No between-group differences were found in WBR. FTSST time improved in the RELOAD group compared to the CONTROL group at 6 (P=.021) and 26 weeks (P=.021) and there was a tendency for improved walking speed in the RELOAD group at 26 weeks (P=.068). There were no between-group differences in knee extension moment during the FTSST. Surgical-limb knee extension moments during walking increased from baseline to 26 weeks in the RELOAD group and decreased in the CONTROL group (P=.008). CONCLUSION WB biofeedback training had no effect on functional WB symmetry or knee extension moments during the FTSST. However, the biofeedback training resulted in increases of knee extension moments during gait and improved FTSST times. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapy, level 2b. PMID:26207975

  6. A Commentary on Real-Time Biofeedback to Augment Neuromuscular Training for ACL Injury Prevention in Adolescent Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Adam W.; Kushner, Adam M.; Groene, John; Williams, Christopher; Riley, Michael A.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury and the associated long-term sequelae, such as immediate reductions in physical inactivity, increased adiposity and increased risk of osteoarthritis throughout adulthood, are a major health concern for adolescent athletes. Current interventions for injury prevention may have limited effectiveness, are susceptible to issues of compliance and have not achieved the widespread acceptance necessary to promote full adoption. Neuromuscular training (NMT) is a well-established training intervention introduced to affect change in modifiable biomechanical risk factors to reduce the risk of injury in these athletes. Despite moderate success, neuromuscular training is still limited by its reliance on subjective feedback and after the fact (i.e., offline) objective feedback techniques. The purpose of this commentary is to discuss technological tools that could be used to enhance and objectify targeted biofeedback interventions to complement NMT. Electromyography, force plates, motion sensors, and camera-based motion capture systems are innovative tools that may have realistic feasibility for integration as biofeedback into NMT programs to improve training outcomes. Improved functional deficit identification and corrective analysis may further improve and optimize athletic performance, and decrease the risk of sports-related injury during sport performance. Key points Specific, targeted interventions that isolate injury risk factors and can help correct modifiable neuromuscular deficits are essential. Current training interventions for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention have only demonstrated limited effectiveness and have not achieved the widespread acceptance necessary to promote full adoption to reduce ACL injury rates. The paper provides an overview of innovative strategies and technological tools that could be used to enhance and objectify targeted biofeedback interventions to complement neuromuscular training (NMT

  7. Poly(trimethylene carbonate) and biphasic calcium phosphate composites for orbital floor reconstruction: a feasibility study in sheep.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, A C; Yuan, H; Passanisi, G; van der Meer, J W; de Bruijn, J D; van Kooten, T G; Grijpma, D W; Bos, R R M

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of orbital floor fractures, bone is ideally regenerated. The materials currently used for orbital floor reconstruction do not lead to the regeneration of bone. Our objective was to render polymeric materials based on poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) osteoinductive, and to evaluate their suitability for use in orbital floor reconstruction. For this purpose, osteoinductive biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) particles were introduced into a polymeric PTMC matrix. Composite sheets containing 50 wt% BCP particles were prepared. Also laminates with poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) were prepared by compression moulding PDLLA films onto the composite sheets. After sterilisation by gamma irradiation, the sheets were used to reconstruct surgically-created orbital floor defects in sheep. The bone inducing potential of the different implants was assessed upon intramuscular implantation. The performance of the implants in orbital floor reconstruction was assessed by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Histological evaluation revealed that in the orbital and intramuscular implantations of BCP containing specimens, bone formation could be seen after 3 and 9 months. Analysis of the CBCT scans showed that the composite PTMC sheets and the laminated composite sheets performed well in orbital floor reconstruction. It is concluded that PTMC/BCP composites and PTMC/BCP composites laminated with PDLLA have osteoinductive properties and seem suitable for use in orbital floor reconstruction. PMID:24488822

  8. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation for patients with lifelong premature ejaculation: a novel therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Palleschi, Giovanni; Fuschi, Andrea; Maggioni, Cristina; Rago, Rocco; Zucchi, Alessandro; Costantini, Elisabetta; Carbone, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Premature ejaculation is the most common male sexual disorder. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible therapeutic role of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation in patients affected by lifelong premature ejaculation. Methods: We treated 40 men with lifelong premature ejaculation, reporting, a baseline intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) ≤ 1 min, with 12-week pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation. Results: At the end of the rehabilitation, mean IELTs were calculated to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy. At the end of the treatment, 33 (82.5%) of the 40 patients gained control of their ejaculatory reflex, with a mean IELT of 146.2 s (range: 123.6–152.4 s). A total of 13 out of 33 (39%) patients were evaluated at 6 months follow up, and they maintained a significant IELT (112.6 s) compared with their initial IELT (mean 39.8 s). Conclusions: The results obtained in our subjects treated with pelvic floor rehabilitation are promising. This therapy represents an important cost reduction compared with the standard treatment (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Based on the present data, we propose pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation as a new, viable therapeutic option for the treatment of premature ejaculation. PMID:24883105

  9. Restless behavior increases over time, but not with compressibility of the flooring surface, during forced standing at the feed bunk.

    PubMed

    Krebs, N; Berry, S L; Tucker, C B

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the use of rubber flooring in freestall barns has increased, but little is known about which design features of these surfaces are important for cattle. In 2 experiments, we evaluated how the type and compressibility of the flooring surface in front of the feed bunk influenced the behavioral response to 4 h of forced standing after morning milking. Two flooring types were compared: rubber and concrete. Rubber was tested at 3 levels of compressibility: 2, 4, and 35 times as compressible as concrete. Four hours of forced standing was evaluated because it mimicked conditions that can occur on dairies, particularly when waiting for artificial insemination or veterinary treatment. The effects of cow weight and hoof surface area, gait score, and hoof health on the response to treatment were evaluated. Restless behavior, as measured by number of steps, almost doubled over the 4h of forced standing, regardless of flooring material. Cows lay down, on average, within 5 min after access to the lying area was provided. These results indicate that the 4 h of forced standing was uncomfortable. No differences in restless behavior were observed in association with the type or compressibility of the flooring surface in front of the feed bunk. Cow size, hoof health, or gait score did not consistently explain the response to the flooring treatments or stepping rate, although these populations of animals were generally healthy. It is unclear if comfort did not differ between the flooring options tested during 4 h of forced standing or if alterative methodology, such as measuring more subtle shifts in weight, is required to assess design features of rubber flooring. PMID:21183021

  10. 112. Stage level floor structure. Generial view from downstage left, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. Stage level floor structure. Generial view from downstage left, facing northeast, showing structural supports for the stage floor after some of the flooring was removed. Openings in the stage floor could be made by rolling eight movable sections to the side and down under the fixed floor (see sheet 4 of 9, notes 1A and 1B). Once opened, another floor section of the same size as the opening could be raised to stage level by a hydraulic ram (type D1). The movable section in the foreground is in the retracted position, with its top surface below the flange of the beam supporting the fixed floor. Compare it to the height of the un-retracted section to the left (see sheet 6 of 9, notes 2A and 2B). - Auditorium Building, 430 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  11. Comprehensive approach for the conservation of the mosaic floor of the saints Cosmas and Damian church of Jerash Greco-Roman City.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrisat, Bilal; Hamarneh, Catrina; Majeed Mjalli, Abdul

    The mosaic floor of Cosmas and Damian church was unearthed by the Yale University expedition in 1928 - 1929 and since then the mosaic floor has been exposed to the different agents of deterioration. In this paper a comprehensive approach of six phases is suggested to minimize the deterioration: documentation, deterioration diagnostics, treatment, conservation and management. Understanding the physical properties of the tesserae using petrographic technique was found to be useful for the understanding and conservation of the mosaic floors' materials. The use of diluted ammonia based solvent is proved to be the best workable treatment to remove the microorganism and to hinder the diffusion of the colonization of lichens on the mosaic floors in Jerash. With modification to suit local parameters, the comprehensive approach might be applied for mosaic floor with different context.

  12. MTRETR MAINTENANCE SHOP, TRA653. FLOOR PLAN FOR FIRST FLOOR: MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR-ETR MAINTENANCE SHOP, TRA-653. FLOOR PLAN FOR FIRST FLOOR: MACHINE SHOP, ELECTRICAL AND INSTRUMENT SHOP, TOOL CRIB, ELECTRONIC SHOP, LOCKER ROOM, SPECIAL TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED ROOM, AND OFFICES. "NEW" ON DRAWING REFERS TO REVISION OF 11/1956 DRAWING ON WHICH AREAS WERE DESIGNATED AS "FUTURE." HUMMEL HUMMEL & JONES 810-MTR-ETR-653-A-7, 5/1957. INL INDEX NO. 532-0653-00-381-101839, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. A&M. TAN607 floor plan for first floor. Shows stepped door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607 floor plan for first floor. Shows stepped door plug design from hot shop into special services cubicle, cubicle windows, and other details. This drawing was re-drawn to show as-built conditions in 1985. Ralph M. Parsons 902-3-ANP-607-A 99. Date of original: January 1955. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-00-693-106751 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit is an effective method for maintaining neck mobility and muscular endurance in college students with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Yeon

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of deep cervical flexor training on maintaining forward head posture, muscular endurance, and cervical mobility. It also examined the effectiveness of deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty college students were recruited and randomly assigned to groups that underwent either deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit (experimental group, n=10) or conventional deep cervical flexor training (control group, n=10). The craniovertebral angle of each subject was measured with a lateral-view picture. Neck mobility was assessed using a cervical range of motion device and muscular endurance was measured using a pressure biofeedback unit. Both groups performed conventional deep cervical flexor exercises three times a week for six weeks. The experimental group underwent a pressure biofeedback unit training was 5 to10 minutes/day, thrice a week. [Results] Cervical range of motion in the experimental group increased significantly between the end of training and the end of the four week detraining period, compared to that in control group. [Conclusion] Deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit is a useful method for maintaining neck mobility and muscular endurance in people with forward head posture. PMID:26644676

  15. Buffing, burnishing, and stripping of vinyl asbestos floor tile

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, B.A.; Edwards, A.; Clark, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate airborne asbestos concentrations during the three principal types of preventative maintenance (low-speed spray-buffing, ultra high-speed burnishing, and wet-stripping) used on asbestos-containing floor tiles. These were done under pre-existing and prepared levels of floor care maintenance. Airborne asbestos concentrations were measured before and during each floor care procedure to determine the magnitude of the increase in airborne asbestos levels during each procedure. Airborne total fiber concentrations were also measured for comparison with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration`s (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 0.1 f/cm{sup 3}. Low-speed spray-buffing and wet-stripping were evaluated on pre-existing floor conditions and three levels of prepared floor care conditions (poor, medium, and good). Ultra high-speed burnishing and wet-stripping were evaluated on two levels of prepared floor care conditions (poor and good). Floor care conditions were defined in consultation with the Chemical Specialty Manufacturers Association and other representatives of floor-care chemical manufacturers. Controlled studies were conducted in an unoccupied building at the decommissioned Chanute Air Force Base in Rantoul, Illinois, with the cooperation of the U.S. Air Force. The building offered approximately 8600 ft{sup 2} of open floor space tiled with 9-inch by 9-inch resilient floor tile containing approximately 5% chrysotile asbestos.

  16. Deflection of Resilient Materials for Reduction of Floor Impact Sound

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong-Mun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many residents living in apartment buildings in Korea have been bothered by noise coming from the houses above. In order to reduce noise pollution, communities are increasingly imposing bylaws, including the limitation of floor impact sound, minimum thickness of floors, and floor soundproofing solutions. This research effort focused specifically on the deflection of resilient materials in the floor sound insulation systems of apartment houses. The experimental program involved conducting twenty-seven material tests and ten sound insulation floating concrete floor specimens. Two main parameters were considered in the experimental investigation: the seven types of resilient materials and the location of the loading point. The structural behavior of sound insulation floor floating was predicted using the Winkler method. The experimental and analytical results indicated that the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor significantly increased with increasing the tangent modulus of resilient material. The deflection of the floating concrete floor loaded at the side of the specimen was much greater than that of the floating concrete floor loaded at the center of the specimen. The Winkler model considering the effect of modulus of resilient materials was able to accurately predict the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor. PMID:25574491

  17. Deflection of resilient materials for reduction of floor impact sound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong-Mun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many residents living in apartment buildings in Korea have been bothered by noise coming from the houses above. In order to reduce noise pollution, communities are increasingly imposing bylaws, including the limitation of floor impact sound, minimum thickness of floors, and floor soundproofing solutions. This research effort focused specifically on the deflection of resilient materials in the floor sound insulation systems of apartment houses. The experimental program involved conducting twenty-seven material tests and ten sound insulation floating concrete floor specimens. Two main parameters were considered in the experimental investigation: the seven types of resilient materials and the location of the loading point. The structural behavior of sound insulation floor floating was predicted using the Winkler method. The experimental and analytical results indicated that the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor significantly increased with increasing the tangent modulus of resilient material. The deflection of the floating concrete floor loaded at the side of the specimen was much greater than that of the floating concrete floor loaded at the center of the specimen. The Winkler model considering the effect of modulus of resilient materials was able to accurately predict the cracking strength of the floating concrete floor. PMID:25574491

  18. Venus - Multi-Floor Irregular Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan image shows an irregular crater of approximately 14- kilometer (8.7-mile) mean diameter. The crater is actually a cluster of four separate craters that are in rim contact. The noncircular rims and multiple, hummocky floors are probably the result of the breakup and dispersion of an incoming meteoroid during passage through the dense Venusian atmosphere. After breaking up, the meteoroid fragments impacted nearly simultaneously, creating the crater cluster. The area shown is 40 kilometers (25 miles) in width and 76 kilometers (47 miles) in length, it is centered at -21.4 degrees latitude, 335.2 degrees longitude in the northern Lavinia Region of Venus.

  19. Physical activity and the pelvic floor.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are common, with 1 in 4 US women reporting moderate to severe symptoms of urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, or fecal incontinence. Given the high societal burden of these disorders, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial. Physical activity is one such potentially modifiable risk factor; the large number of girls and women participating in sport and strenuous training regimens increases the need to understand associated risks and benefits of these exposures. The aim of this review was to summarize studies reporting the association between physical activity and pelvic floor disorders. Most studies are cross-sectional and most include small numbers of participants. The primary findings of this review include that urinary incontinence during exercise is common and is more prevalent in women during high-impact sports. Mild to moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking, decreases both the odds of having and the risk of developing urinary incontinence. In older women, mild to moderate activity also decreases the odds of having fecal incontinence; however, young women participating in high-intensity activity are more likely to report anal incontinence than less active women. Scant data suggest that in middle-aged women, lifetime physical activity increases the odds of stress urinary incontinence slightly and does not increase the odds of pelvic organ prolapse. Women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are more likely to report a history of heavy work than controls; however, women recruited from the community with pelvic organ prolapse on examination report similar lifetime levels of strenuous activity as women without this examination finding. Data are insufficient to determine whether strenuous activity while young predisposes to pelvic floor disorders later in life. The existing literature suggests that most physical activity does not harm the pelvic floor and does provide numerous health benefits for

  20. New trends in visual rehabilitation with MP-1 microperimeter biofeedback: optic neural dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Verboschi, Francesca; Domanico, Daniela; Nebbioso, Marcella; Corradetti, Giulia; Scalinci, Sergio Zaccaria; Vingolo, Enzo Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of visual rehabilitation with MP-1 microperimeter biofeedback in advanced optic neural dysfunction due to glaucoma, and to precisely characterize fixation stability and location in affected patients. Ten patients (18 eyes) with advanced glaucoma were submitted to a rehabilitation protocol that consisted of: a 25-item questionnaire (National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Que stionnaire); measurement of visual acuity; a reading speed test; microperimetry with fixation study, retinal sensitivity and the bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA). The rehabilitation program consisted of 10 training sessions of 10 minutes per eye performed over a period of one week and was repeated at four months, eight months, and one year. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student’s t-test and Spearman correlation; p values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. In 13 eyes fixation changed from unstable to relatively unstable while its location changed from predominantly eccentric to predominantly central. In five eyes, fixation changed from relatively unstable to stable with a change of location from poor central fixation to predominantly central fixation. Mean retinal sensitivity changed from 7.43±8.28 dB to 8.33±9.04 dB (p<0.05); the mean best corrected visual acuity was 0.98±0.66 logMAR at the baseline assessment, and 0.75±0.6 logMAR at the end of rehabilitation (p>0.05); reading speed improved from a mean value of 31.4±4.3 words/minute to 55.6±3.2 words/minute at the end of the training (p<0.05). The BCEA changed from 0.94±0.39 deg2 to 0.86±0.46 deg2 (p=0.76). Rehabilitation with MP-1 biofeedback in patients with advanced glaucoma is a useful means of improving these patients’ fixation stability, reading speed and quality of life. PMID:24598397