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Sample records for flow constraining elements

  1. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and making same

    DOEpatents

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

    1995-07-04

    A laminated metal composite of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers is described which is formed using flow constraining elements, preferably in the shape of rings, individually placed around each of the low flow stress layers while pressure is applied to the stack to bond the layers of the composite together, to thereby restrain the flow of the low flow stress layers from the stack during the bonding. The laminated metal composite of the invention is made by the steps of forming a stack of alternate layers of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers with each layer of low flow stress material surrounded by an individual flow constraining element, such as a ring, and then applying pressure to the top and bottom surfaces of the resulting stack to bond the dissimilar layers together, for example, by compression rolling the stack. In a preferred embodiment, the individual flow constraining elements surrounding the layers of low flow stress material are formed of a material which may either be the same material as the material comprising the high flow stress layers, or have similar flow stress characteristics to the material comprising the high flow stress layers. Additional sacrificial layers may be added to the top and bottom of the stack to avoid damage to the stack during the bonding step; and these additional layers may then be removed after the bonding step. 5 figs.

  2. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and making same

    DOEpatents

    Syn, Chol K.; Lesuer, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    A laminated metal composite of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers is described which is formed using flow constraining elements, preferably in the shape of rings, individually placed around each of the low flow stress layers while pressure is applied to the stack to bond the layers of the composite together, to thereby restrain the flow of the low flow stress layers from the stack during the bonding. The laminated metal composite of the invention is made by the steps of forming a stack of alternate layers of low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers with each layer of low flow stress material surrounded by an individual flow constraining element, such as a ring, and then applying pressure to the top and bottom surfaces of the resulting stack to bond the dissimilar layers together, for example, by compression rolling the stack. In a preferred embodiment, the individual flow constraining elements surrounding the layers of low flow stress material are formed of a material which may either be the same material as the material comprising the high flow stress layers, or have similar flow stress characteristics to the material comprising the high flow stress layers. Additional sacrificial layers may be added to the top and bottom of the stack to avoid damage to the stack during the bonding step; and these additional layers may then be removed after the bonding step.

  3. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a laminated metal composite, comprising alternating layers of low flow stress material and high flow stress material, and formed using flow constraining elements around each low flow stress layer; and a method of making same. A composite is a combination of at least two chemically distinct materials with a distinct interface separating the two materials. A metal matrix composite (MMC) is a composite material composed of a metal and a nonmetallic reinforcing agent such as silicon carbide (SiC) or graphite in continuous or discontinuous fiber, whisker, or discrete particulate form. A laminate is a material composed of several bonded layers. It is possible to have a laminate composed of multi-layers of a single type of material bonded to each other. However, such a laminate would not be considered to be a composite. The term {open_quotes}laminated metal composite{close_quotes} (LMC), as used herein, is intended to include a structural material composed of: (1) layers of metal or metal alloys interleaved with (2) a different metal, a metal alloy, or a metal matrix composite (MMC) containing strengthening agents.

  4. Constraining the amount of radiogenic elements in the interior of Mars from the HP3 heat flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grott, Matthias; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2014-05-01

    The InSight mission (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) to be launched in 2016 will carry a seismometer (SEIS) and heat flow probe (HP3) to the martian surface, and address questions related to the size, physical state, and composition of the core and mantle, the thickness of the crust, and the thermal state of the interior. The heat flow measured at the surface depends on the amount of heat producing elements (HPE) present in the interior and offers a measurable quantity that can help to constrain the planetary heat budget. If the Urey ratio - the ratio between internal heat production and surface heat loss - is known, the heat production rate in the interior can be determined. We run thermal evolution models of increasing complexity and compared the obtained present-day Urey ratio for a set of different models/parameters. To this end, we used the 2D-3D mantle convection code Gaia [1], as well as 1D parameterized models [2]. We varied the initial amount of HPE [3, 4,5,6], used various viscosity formulations (temperature-, temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity, viscosity jump in the mid mantle), varied the size of the core, and considered models with and without phase transitions in the mantle. Additionally, we tested the effects of different partitioning of HPE between mantle and a fixed crust, different initial conditions (temperatures and boundary layer thicknesses) and reference viscosities. Our simulations show that, for a one-plate planet like Mars, the Urey ratio is mainly sensitive to the efficiency of mantle cooling, i.e. the mantle viscosity, and to the mean half-life of long-lived radiogenic isotopes. Given that models of the thermo-chemical evolution of Mars generally indicate reference viscosities below 1021 Pa s [3, 7], the martian Urey ratio is likely only a function of the Thorium concentration in the planetary interior. Surface radiogenic abundances determined from gamma-ray spectroscopy [8] are best

  5. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  6. Probabilistic constrained load flow based on sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Karakatsanis, T.S.; Hatziargyriou, N.D. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents a method for network constrained setting of control variables based on probabilistic load flow analysis. The method determines operating constraint violations for a whole planning period together with the probability of each violation. An iterative algorithm is subsequently employed providing adjustments of the control variables based on sensitivity analysis of the constrained variables with respect to the control variables. The method is applied to the IEEE 14 busbar system and to a realistic model of the Hellenic Interconnected system indicating its suitability for short-term operational planning applications.

  7. Groundwater availability as constrained by hydrogeology and environmental flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Katelyn A.; Mayer, Alex S.; Reeves, Howard W.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from aquifers in hydraulic connection with nearby streams has the potential to cause adverse impacts by decreasing flows to levels below those necessary to maintain aquatic ecosystems. The recent passage of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact has brought attention to this issue in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the legislation requires the Great Lakes states to enact measures for limiting water withdrawals that can cause adverse ecosystem impacts. This study explores how both hydrogeologic and environmental flow limitations may constrain groundwater availability in the Great Lakes Basin. A methodology for calculating maximum allowable pumping rates is presented. Groundwater availability across the basin may be constrained by a combination of hydrogeologic yield and environmental flow limitations varying over both local and regional scales. The results are sensitive to factors such as pumping time, regional and local hydrogeology, streambed conductance, and streamflow depletion limits. Understanding how these restrictions constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions has important water resources policy and management implications.

  8. Constrained Large Eddy Simulation of Separated Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhenhua; Shi, Yipeng; Wang, Jianchun; Xiao, Zuoli; Yang, Yantao; Chen, Shiyi

    2011-11-01

    Constrained Large-eddy Simulation (CLES) has been recently proposed to simulate turbulent flows with massive separation. Different from traditional large eddy simulation (LES) and hybrid RANS/LES approaches, the CLES simulates the whole flow domain by large eddy simulation while enforcing a RANS Reynolds stress constraint on the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress models in the near-wall region. Algebraic eddy-viscosity models and one-equation Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) model have been used to constrain the Reynolds stress. The CLES approach is validated a posteriori through simulation of flow past a circular cylinder and periodic hill flow at high Reynolds numbers. The simulation results are compared with those from RANS, DES, DDES and other available hybrid RANS/LES methods. It is shown that the capability of the CLES method in predicting separated flows is comparable to that of DES. Detailed discussions are also presented about the effects of the RANS models as constraint in the near-wall layers. Our results demonstrate that the CLES method is a promising alternative towards engineering applications.

  9. SHARAD Constrains on Lava Flow Properties at Southeastern Utopia Planitia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The volcanic flows originated at the southwestern flanks of Elysium Mons extend over 1,000 km into Utopia Planitia and overlie the knobby and polygonally cracked Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF). These flows display rough and smooth lobate morphologies (RL and SL) morphologies and occur in conjunction with sinuous channels (SC). Russell and Head [2003] described these morphologies and hypothesized that RL correspond to debris flows that arose as lahars from the interaction between magma and ground water or ice. The mapping of Tanaka et al. [2003] identified these features similarly, attributing them to volcanoclastic flows formed from magma-volatile interactions. Crater counts by Werner et al. [2011] support surface ages between 1 and 2 Gyr for these flows. Analysis of the radargrams acquired throughout this area o show unambiguous subsurface reflectors that, individually, are relatively short and laterally intermittent. As a group, however, these reflectors are distributed sparsely over the flow field and correlate very well with the SL units. Delays to reflectors beneath the surface are generally in the order of < ~1 μs. In one locale with a high concentration of subsurface reflectors, centered at 117.61°E and 31.31°N, a sequence of smooth lobate flows overlie a smooth volcanic unit. The lobate flow in immediate contact with the smooth unit possesses subsurface reflections that correlate well with the flow edges, and where this flow is overlain by another lobate flow these reflections vanish. We interpret these reflections as a reflector that corresponds to the interface between the lobate flow and smooth unit. The average delay to this reflector is 0.68 - 0.71 μs along its length. The thickness of this lobate flow, estimated from MOLA elevation data, ranges between 35 and 40 m. The thickness estimate from MOLA and the delay to reflector from SHARAD together constrain the relative permittivity of the flow to between 6.5 and 9.5. These values are consistent

  10. AMG by element agglomeration and constrained energy minimization interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, T V; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-02-17

    This paper studies AMG (algebraic multigrid) methods that utilize energy minimization construction of the interpolation matrices locally, in the setting of element agglomeration AMG. The coarsening in element agglomeration AMG is done by agglomerating fine-grid elements, with coarse element matrices defined by a local Galerkin procedure applied to the matrix assembled from the individual fine-grid element matrices. This local Galerkin procedure involves only the coarse basis restricted to the agglomerated element. To construct the coarse basis, one exploits previously proposed constraint energy minimization procedures now applied to the local matrix. The constraints are that a given set of vectors should be interpolated exactly, not only globally, but also locally on every agglomerated element. The paper provides algorithmic details, as well as a convergence result based on a ''local-to-global'' energy bound of the resulting multiple-vector fitting AMG interpolation mappings. A particular implementation of the method is illustrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  11. Finite element analysis of constrained total Condylar Knee Prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-13

    Exactech, Inc., is a prosthetic joint manufacturer based in Gainesville, FL. The company set the goal of developing a highly effective prosthetic articulation, based on scientific principles, not trial and error. They developed an evolutionary design for a total knee arthroplasty system that promised improved performance. They performed static load tests in the laboratory with similar previous designs, but dynamic laboratory testing was both difficult to perform and prohibitively expensive for a small business to undertake. Laboratory testing also cannot measure stress levels in the interior of the prosthesis where failures are known to initiate. To fully optimize their designs for knee arthroplasty revisions, they needed range-of-motion stress/strain data at interior as well as exterior locations within the prosthesis. LLNL developed computer software (especially NIKE3D) specifically designed to perform stress/strain computations (finite element analysis) for complex geometries in large displacement/large deformation conditions. Additionally, LLNL had developed a high fidelity knee model for other analytical purposes. The analysis desired by Exactech could readily be performed using NIKE3D and a modified version of the high fidelity knee that contained the geometry of the condylar knee components. The LLNL high fidelity knee model was a finite element computer model which would not be transferred to Exactech during the course of this CRADA effort. The previously performed laboratory studies by Exactech were beneficial to LLNL in verifying the analytical capabilities of NIKE3D for human anatomical modeling. This, in turn, gave LLNL further entree to perform work-for-others in the prosthetics field. There were two purposes to the CRADA (1) To modify the LLNL High Fidelity Knee Model to accept the geometry of the Exactech Total Knee; and (2) To perform parametric studies of the possible design options in appropriate ranges of motion so that an optimum design could be

  12. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  13. Single-element modeling of multilayer constrained-layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.

    1995-05-01

    The use of multi-layer constrained layer damping treatments on plate-like structures provides broadband vibration damping over a wide temperature range. A difficulty with the design of such treatments is their modeling. The current state of the art requires a separate plate element for each constraining layer plus a solid element for each viscoelastic layer in the thickness direction. The number of degrees of freedom is large conflicting with the iterative approach necessitated by the frequency and temperature dependance of the material properties which dictates that a small model size must be maintained. The large model size also slows optimization. The goal of this research was to produce a true plate finite element model which uses only a few degrees of freedom per node. This model is obtained by using a variational asymptotical theory to correctly capture the layerwise jumps in the stress and strain fields. A model is developed for simply supported plates which can later be extended to a more general finite element. Results are compared with the exact elasticity solution of Pagano. They show an excellent match exists in the predicted stress and strain field. The model is also compared with RKU analysis for plates again demonstrating its accuracy. A future finite element model based on this theory would require only six extra degrees of freedom per node with only one element in the thickness direction, thus simplifying the modeling of constrained layer damping treatments.

  14. Triangular spectral elements for incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, C.; Vanrosendale, John

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the use of triangular elements in the spectral element method for direct simulation of incompressible flow. Triangles provide much greater geometric flexibility than quadrilateral elements and are better conditioned and more accurate when small angles arise. We employ a family of tensor product algorithms for triangles, allowing triangular elements to be handled with comparable arithmetic complexity to quadrilateral elements. The triangular discretizations are applied and validated on the Poisson equation. These discretizations are then applied to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a laminar channel flow solution is given. These new triangular spectral elements can be combined with standard quadrilateral elements, yielding a general and flexible high order method for complex geometries in two dimensions.

  15. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  16. Natural Elements Method for Free Surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbani, M.; Ouahsine, A.; Villon, P.

    2009-09-01

    The Natural Element Method (NEM) is used to simulate a 2D shallow water flow in presence of free surface and a varying bathymetry. This meshless method used a fully Lagrangian formulation and natural neighbors, which remain a very striking problem related the boundary conditions. The method was succefully used to simulate dam-break flows by solving the fully nonlinear Shallow Water Equations (SWE) and by using an implicit scheme under a transient flow and the Coriolis effect.

  17. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  18. Damage detection and model refinement using elemental stiffness perturbations with constrained connectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, S.W.

    1996-04-01

    A new optimal update method for the correlation of dynamic structural finite element models with modal data is presented. The method computes a minimum-rank solution for the perturbations of the elemental stiffness parameters while constraining the connectivity of the global stiffness matrix. The resulting model contains a more accurate representation of the dynamics of the test structure. The changes between the original model and the updated model can be interpreted as modeling errors or as changes in the structure resulting from damage. The motivation for the method is presented in the context of existing optimal matrix update procedures. The method is demonstrated numerically on a spring-mass system and is also applied to experimental data from the NASA Langley 8-bay truss damage detection experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed procedure may be useful for updating elemental stiffness parameters in the context of damage detection and model refinement.

  19. Thinning and flow of Tibetan crust constrained by seismic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nikolai M; Ritzwoller, Michael H; Molnar, Peter; Levin, Vadim

    2004-07-01

    Intermediate-period Rayleigh and Love waves propagating across Tibet indicate marked radial anisotropy within the middle-to-lower crust, consistent with a thinning of the middle crust by about 30%. The anisotropy is largest in the western part of the plateau, where moment tensors of earthquakes indicate active crustal thinning. The preferred orientation of mica crystals resulting from the crustal thinning can account for the observed anisotropy. The middle-to-lower crust of Tibet appears to have thinned more than the upper crust, consistent with deformation of a mechanically weak layer that flows as if confined to a channel. PMID:15247475

  20. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  1. State-constrained booster trajectory solutions via finite elements and shooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Seywald, Hans

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of a FEM formulation based on variational principles. A general formulation for handling internal boundary conditions and discontinuities in the state equations is presented, and the general formulation is modified for optimal control problems subject to state-variable inequality constraints. Solutions which only touch the state constraint and solutions which have a boundary arc of finite length are considered. Suitable shape and test functions are chosen for a FEM discretization. All element quadrature (equivalent to one-point Gaussian quadrature over each element) may be done in closed form. The final form of the algebraic equations is then derived. A simple state-constrained problem is solved. Then, for a practical application of the use of the FEM formulation, a launch vehicle subject to a dynamic pressure constraint (a first-order state inequality constraint) is solved. The results presented for the launch-vehicle trajectory have some interesting features, including a touch-point solution.

  2. Glacial-interglacial Changes in Ocean Carbon Chemistry constrained by Boron Isotopes, Trace Elements, and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean carbon storage and release is commonly invoked to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles, but records of the carbonate chemistry of the glacial ocean have, until recently, been scarce. Here we present new boron isotope (δ11B) and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera from a suite of 15 cores from the South Atlantic from depths ranging from 1500 to 4000 m. These records show distinct changes in the water column depth structure of these tracers between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and late Holocene. Comparison of these paired trace element and isotope ratios reveals new insights to the shared and individual controls on tracers including Li/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, Mg/Li and δ11B. We further examine these data using a recently developed tracer fields modelling approach (Lund et al. 2011). This has previously been applied to δ18O data to investigate changes in circulation at the LGM. Here we extend this method to non-conservative isotopic and trace elemental tracers, allowing us to constrain the roles of circulation, the biological pump of organic carbon and CaCO3, and carbonate compensation, in setting deep ocean carbon storage at the LGM. Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  3. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  4. Reynolds-constrained large-eddy simulation of compressible flow over a compression ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zuoli; Chen, Liang

    2015-11-01

    A novel large-eddy simulation (LES) method is introduced for numerical simulation of wall-bounded compressible turbulent flows. The subgrid-scale (SGS) model in this method is designed to be composed of two parts depending on the distance to the nearest wall. In the near-wall region, both the mean SGS stress and heat flux are constrained by external Reynolds stress and heat flux to ensure the total target quantities, while the fluctuating SGS stress and heat flux are closed in a traditional fashion but using residual model parameterizations. In the far-wall region, the conventional SGS model is directly employed with necessary smoothing operation in the neighborhood of the constrained-unconstrained interface, which might be different for the stress and heat flux depending on the flow configuration. Compressible flow over a compression ramp is numerically studied using the new LES technique. The results are compared with the available experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data, and those from traditional LES and detached-eddy simulation (DES). It turns out that the Reynolds-constrained large-eddy simulation (RCLES) method can predict the size of the separation bubble, mean flow profile, and friction force, etc. more accurately than traditional LES and DES techniques. Moreover, the RCLES method proves to be much less sensitive to the grid resolution than traditional LES method, and makes pure LES of flows of engineering interest feasible with moderate grids.

  5. Finite element solutions of free surface flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarda, P. R.; Marcus, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for using NASTRAN to determine the flow field about arbitrarily shaped bodies in the presence of a free surface. The fundamental unknown of the problem is the velocity potential which must satisfy Laplace's equation in the fluid region. Boundary conditions on the free surface may involve second order derivatives in space and time. In cases involving infinite domains either a tractable radiation condition is applied at a truncated boundary or a series expansion is used and matched to the local finite elements. Solutions are presented for harmonic, transient, and steady state problems and compared to either exact solutions or other numerical solutions.

  6. Alaska Crustal Deformation: Finite Element Modeling Constrained by Geologic and Very Long Baseline Interferometry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul; Saucier, Fraancois; Palmer, Randy; Langon, Marc

    1995-01-01

    We compute crustal motions in Alaska by calculating the finite element solution for an elastic spherical shell problem. The method we use allows the finite element mesh to include faults and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) baseline rates of change. Boundary conditions include Pacific-North American (PA-NA) plate motions. The solution is constrained by the oblique orientation of the Fairweather-Queen Charlotte strike-slip faults relative to the PA-NA relative motion direction and the oblique orientation from normal convergence of the eastern Aleutian trench fault systems, as well as strike-shp motion along the Denali and Totschunda fault systems. We explore the effects that a range of fault slip constraints and weighting of VLBI rates of change has on the solution. This allows us to test the motion on faults, such as the Denali fault, where there are conflicting reports on its present-day slip rate. We find a pattern of displacements which produce fault motions generally consistent with geologic observations. The motion of the continuum has the general pattern of radial movement of crust to the NE away from the Fairweather-Queen Charlotte fault systems in SE Alaska and Canada. This pattern of crustal motion is absorbed across the Mackenzie Mountains in NW Canada, with strike-slip motion constrained along the Denali and Tintina fault systems. In south central Alaska and the Alaska forearc oblique convergence at the eastern Aleutian trench and the strike-shp motion of the Denali fault system produce a counterclockwise pattern of motion which is partially absorbed along the Contact and related fault systems in southern Alaska and is partially extruded into the Bering Sea and into the forearc parallel the Aleutian trench from the Alaska Peninsula westward. Rates of motion and fault slip are small in western and northern Alaska, but the motions we compute are consistent with the senses of strike-slip motion inferred geologically along the Kaltag, Kobuk Trench

  7. Constraining the Depth of the Martian Magma Ocean during Core Formation using Element Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijbrans, Ineke; Tronche, Elodie; van Westrenen, Wim

    2010-05-01

    The depth of a planetary magma ocean places first order constraints on the thermal state of a young planet. For the Earth, the depth of the magma ocean is mostly constrained by the pressure-temperature conditions at which Fe-rich metal last equilibrated with the bulk silicate Earth (BSE). These equilibration conditions are thought to correspond to the conditions at the terrestrial magma ocean floor, as this is where the metal ponds before sinking to the core. This depth is estimated by combining the BSE contents of siderophile (iron-loving) elements with metal-silicate partition coefficients (D) at high temperatures and pressures [e.g. 1]. The extent and depth of a magma ocean on Mars are hotly debated. In the case of Mars, the sulphur content of the core is significantly higher than for Earth (10-16 wt% sulphur [2]). The presence of sulphur has been shown to have an effect on the metal-silicate partitioning of some siderophile elements [3], but the current data set is insufficient to be of use for direct application to Martian conditions. We have started an experimental programme to constrain siderophile element partition coefficients for Ni and Co between metal and silicate as a function of temperature, pressure and sulphur content in the metal-alloy. For the silicate composition we used a newly proposed bulk silicate Mars (BSM) [4]. We chose the above-mentioned siderophile elements because their BSM concentrations are reasonably known from studies of Martian meteorites. Our aim is to derive new constraints on the depth of the Martian magma ocean and the chemistry accompanying Martian core formation. Experimental methods: The starting material consisted of a 1:1 mixture of silicate glass + quench crystals in the FeO-CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (FCMAS) system with a composition based on [4], and metal consisting of FeS, Fe, Ni, Co, FeP3. Four different metal compositions were used with sulphur contents of 0, 5, 15 and 25wt% respectively. Experiments were made in an end

  8. Evaluation of Available Transfer Capability Using Transient Stability Constrained Line Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzoechi, Lazarus Okechukwu; Mahajan, Satish M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to evaluate transient stability constrained available transfer capability (ATC). A linear and fast line flow-based (LFB) method was adopted to optimize the ATC values. This enabled the direct determination of the system source-sink locations. This paper formulated different market transactions considering bilateral and multilateral impacts in the stability constrained ATC. The proposed method was demonstrated on the WECC 9-bus and IEEE 39-bus systems. The critical energy performance index (CEPI) enabled the direct identification of candidates for contingency screening based on ranking. This index helped to reduce the list of credible contingencies for ATC evaluation and, therefore, the computation time. The results of the proposed ATC method are consistent with the literature and can be deployed for fast assessment of the impact of transactions in an electric power system.

  9. Determination of poroelastic properties of cartilage using constrained optimization coupled with finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Mansour, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of determining biphasic material properties using a finite element model of stress relaxation coupled with two types of constrained optimization to match measured data was investigated. Comparison of these two approaches, a zero-order method and a gradient-based algorithm, validated the predicted material properties. Optimizations were started from multiple different initial guesses of material properties (design variables) to establish the robustness of the optimization. Overall, the optimal values are close to those found by Cohen et al., (1998), but these small differences produced a marked improvement in the fit to the measured stress relaxation. Despite the greater deviation in the optimized values obtained from the zero-order method, both optimization procedures produced material properties that gave equally good overall fits to the measured data. Furthermore, optimized values were all within the expected range of material properties. Modeling stress relaxation using the optimized material properties showed an excellent fit to the entire time history of the measured data. PMID:25460921

  10. Determination of poroelastic properties of cartilage using constrained optimization coupled with finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The feasibility of determining biphasic material properties using a finite element model of stress relaxation coupled with two types of constrained optimization to match measured data was investigated. Comparison of these two approaches, a zero-order method and a gradient-based algorithm, validated the predicted material properties. Optimizations were started from multiple different initial guesses of material properties (design variables) to establish the robustness of the optimization. Overall, the optimal values are close to those found by Cohen et al. (1998) but these small differences produced a marked improvement in the fit to the measured stress relaxation. Despite the greater deviation in the optimized values obtained from the zero-order method, both optimization procedures produced material properties that gave equally good overall fits to the measured data. Furthermore, optimized values were all within the expected range of material properties. Modeling stress relaxation using the optimized material properties showed an excellent fit to the entire time history of the measured data. PMID:25460921

  11. Security-constrained optimization. Added dimension in utility systems optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Degeneff, R.C.; Neugebauer, W. ); Saylor, C.H.; Corey, S.L.

    1988-10-01

    Compared to the tempered environment of the late 1960s and early 1970s, the 1980s have been, and will continue to be, a time of challenge for utilities. Today's utility executive most confront a spectrum of technical issues, ranging from wheeling and transmission line access to loop flow. There are other challenges to face. The traditional utility corporate structure is being reorganized, with utility staffs shrinking in size. And public scrutiny has become more intense as public bodies question the technical and environmental impact, as well as the financial and legal prudence of a utility's activities. Utilities are successfully meeting these challenges and becoming more productive, due, in part to their use of innovative computer programs and tools. One of these tools is an optimal power flow (OPF). The following describes a new dimension in the optimal power flow technology known as the security-constrained optimization (SCO) program.

  12. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes

  13. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  14. Constrained simulations of flow in haemodynamic devices: towards a computational assistance of magnetic resonance imaging measurements.

    PubMed

    Cenova, Iva; Kauzlarić, David; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G

    2011-06-28

    Cardiovascular diseases, mostly related to atherosclerosis, are the major cause of death in industrial countries. It is observed that blood flow dynamics play an important role in the aetiology of atherosclerosis. Especially, the blood velocity distribution is an important indicator for predisposition regions. Today magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) delivers, in addition to the morphology of the cardiovascular system, blood flow patterns. However, the spatial resolution of the data is slightly less than 1 mm and owing to severe restrictions in magnetic field gradient switching frequencies and intensities, this limit will be very hard to overcome. In this paper, constrained fluid dynamics is applied within the smoothed particle hydrodynamics formalism to enhance the MRI flow data. On the one hand, constraints based on the known volumetric flow rate are applied. They prove the plausibility of the order of magnitude of the measurements. On the other hand, the higher resolution of the simulation allows one to determine in detail the flow field between the coarse data points and thus to improve their spatial resolution. PMID:21576164

  15. Constraining Eruptive Conditions From Lava Flow Morphometry: A Case Study With Field Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Z. R.; Clarke, A.; Greeley, R.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanism is widely recognized as one of the primary factors affecting the surfaces of solid planets and satellites throughout the solar system. Basaltic lava is thought to be the most common composition based on observed features typical of basaltic eruptions found on Earth. Lava flows are one of the most easily recognizable landforms on planetary surfaces and their features may provide information about eruption dynamics, lava rheology, and potential hazards. More recently, researchers have taken a multi-faceted approach to combine remote sensing, field observations and quantitative modeling to constrain volcanic activity on Earth and other planets. Here we test a number of published models, including empirically derived relationships from Mt. Etna and Kilauea, models derived from laboratory experiments, and theoretical models previously applied to remote sensing of planetary surfaces, against well-documented eruptions from the literature and field observations. We find that the Graetz (Hulme and Felder, 1977, Phil.Trans., 285, 227 - 234) method for estimating effusion rates compares favorably with published eruption data, while, on the other hand, inverting lava flow length prediction models to estimate effusion rates leads to several orders of magnitude in error. The Graetz method also better constrains eruption duration. Simple radial spreading laws predict Hawaiian lava flow lengths quite well, as do using the thickness of the lava flow front and chilled crust. There was no observed difference between results from models thought to be exclusive to aa or pahoehoe flow fields. Interpreting historic conditions should therefore follow simple relationships to observable morphologies no matter the composition or surface texture. We have applied the most robust models to understand the eruptive conditions and lava rheology of the Batamote Mountains near Ajo, AZ, an eroded shield volcano in southern Arizona. We find effusion rates on the order of 100 - 200 cubic

  16. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN INTERNETWORK MAGNETIC ELEMENTS AND SUPERGRANULAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco Suarez, D.; Katsukawa, Y.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.

    2012-10-20

    The advection of internetwork magnetic elements by supergranular convective flows is investigated using high spatial resolution, high cadence, and high signal-to-noise ratio Na I D1 magnetograms obtained with the Hinode satellite. The observations show that magnetic elements appear everywhere across the quiet Sun surface. We calculate the proper motion of these magnetic elements with the aid of a feature tracking algorithm. The results indicate that magnetic elements appearing in the interior of supergranules tend to drift toward the supergranular boundaries with a non-constant velocity. The azimuthally averaged radial velocities of the magnetic elements and of the supergranular flow, calculated from a local correlation tracking technique applied to Dopplergrams, are very similar. This suggests that, in the long term, surface magnetic elements are advected by supergranular flows, although on short timescales their very chaotic motions are driven mostly by granular flows and other processes.

  17. Constraining the parameters of the EAP sea ice rheology from satellite observations and discrete element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamados, Michel; Heorton, Harry; Feltham, Daniel; Muir, Alan; Baker, Steven

    2016-04-01

    The new elastic-plastic anisotropic (EAP) rheology that explicitly accounts for the sub-continuum anisotropy of the sea ice cover has been implemented into the latest version of the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE. The EAP rheology is widely used in the climate modeling scientific community (i.e. CPOM stand alone, RASM high resolution regional ice-ocean model, MetOffice fully coupled model). Early results from sensitivity studies (Tsamados et al, 2013) have shown the potential for an improved representation of the observed main sea ice characteristics with a substantial change of the spatial distribution of ice thickness and ice drift relative to model runs with the reference visco-plastic (VP) rheology. The model contains one new prognostic variable, the local structure tensor, which quantifies the degree of anisotropy of the sea ice, and two parameters that set the time scale of the evolution of this tensor. Observations from high resolution satellite SAR imagery as well as numerical simulation results from a discrete element model (DEM, see Wilchinsky, 2010) have shown that these individual floes can organize under external wind and thermal forcing to form an emergent isotropic sea ice state (via thermodynamic healing, thermal cracking) or an anisotropic sea ice state (via Coulombic failure lines due to shear rupture). In this work we use for the first time in the context of sea ice research a mathematical metric, the Tensorial Minkowski functionals (Schroeder-Turk, 2010), to measure quantitatively the degree of anisotropy and alignment of the sea ice at different scales. We apply the methodology on the GlobICE Envisat satellite deformation product (www.globice.info), on a prototype modified version of GlobICE applied on Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery and on the DEM ice floe aggregates. By comparing these independent measurements of the sea ice anisotropy as well as its temporal evolution against the EAP model we are able to constrain the

  18. Using environmental tracers to constrain flow parameters in fractured rock aquifers; Clare Valley, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Peter G.; Simmons, Craig T.

    In fractured rock aquifers, apparent groundwater ages obtained with environmental tracers (e.g., 14C, CFC-12, and 3H) usually do not represent the hydraulic age of the water. Diffusion of solute between the fractures and matrix results in apparent ages that are greater than hydraulic ages, and that may be different for different tracers. We use approximate analytical solutions and numerical simulations of tracer transport through fractured porous media to illustrate the dependence of 14C and CFC-12 ages and 3H concentrations on fracture and matrix properties. In the Clare Valley, South Australia, environmental tracer data are interpreted in conjunction with hydraulic data to constrain flow parameters in a fractured shale aquifer. Hydraulic conductivity, matrix porosity, fracture spacing, and groundwater age are measured, and a value for matrix diffusion coefficient is assumed. Equations describing tracer distribution and hydraulic properties of the system are solved simultaneously, to yield estimates of fracture aperture, vertical water velocity, and aquifer recharge rate. In particular, the recharge rate is estimated to be approximately 100 mm yr-1. A sensitivity analysis showed that this value is most sensitive to the measured values of matrix porosity and groundwater age, and highly insensitive to the measured hydraulic conductivity and the assumed matrix diffusion coefficient. A major horizontal fracture at 37 m depth intercepts most of the vertical flow. The leakage rate to the deeper flow system is estimated to be less than 0.1 mm yr-1.

  19. Quantifying the constraining influence of gene flow on adaptive divergence in the lake-stream threespine stickleback system.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jean-Sébastien; Gow, Jennifer L; Taylor, Eric B; Hendry, Andrew P

    2007-08-01

    The constraining effect of gene flow on adaptive divergence is often inferred but rarely quantified. We illustrate ways of doing so using stream populations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that experience different levels of gene flow from a parapatric lake population. In the Misty Lake watershed (British Columbia, Canada), the inlet stream population is morphologically divergent from the lake population, and presumably experiences little gene flow from the lake. The outlet stream population, however, shows an intermediate phenotype and may experience more gene flow from the lake. We first used microsatellite data to demonstrate that gene flow from the lake is low into the inlet but high into the outlet, and that gene flow from the lake remains relatively constant with distance along the outlet. We next combined gene flow data with morphological and habitat data to quantify the effect of gene flow on morphological divergence. In one approach, we assumed that inlet stickleback manifest well-adapted phenotypic trait values not constrained by gene flow. We then calculated the deviation between the observed and expected phenotypes for a given habitat in the outlet. In a second approach, we parameterized a quantitative genetic model of adaptive divergence. Both approaches suggest a large impact of gene flow, constraining adaptation by 80-86% in the outlet (i.e., only 14-20% of the expected morphological divergence in the absence of gene flow was observed). Such approaches may be useful in other taxa to estimate how important gene flow is in constraining adaptive divergence in nature. PMID:17683442

  20. Turbomachinery flow calculation on unstructured grids using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschel, W.; Vornberger, A.

    An explicit finite-element scheme based on a two-step Taylor-Galerkin algorithm allows the solution of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids. Mesh generation methods for unstructured grids are described which lead to efficient flow calculations. Turbulent flow is calculated by using an algebraic turbulence model. To test the numerical accuracy, a laminar and turbulent flow over a flat plate and the supersonic flow in a corner has been calculated. For validation the method is applied to the simulation of the inviscid flow through a transonic turbine cascade and the viscous flow through a subsonic turbine cascade.

  1. A Finite Element Based Constrained Mixture Implementation for Arterial Growth, Remodeling, and Adaptation: Theory and Numerical Verification

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, A.; Humphrey, J. D.; Holzapfel, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    We implemented a constrained mixture model of arterial growth and remodeling (G&R) in a nonlinear finite element framework to facilitate numerical analyses of diverse cases of arterial adaptation and maladaptation, including disease progression, resulting in complex evolving geometries and compositions. This model enables hypothesis testing by predicting consequences of postulated characteristics of cell and matrix turnover, including evolving quantities and orientations of fibrillar constituents and non-homogenous degradation of elastin or loss of smooth muscle function. The non-linear finite element formulation is general within the context of arterial mechanics, but we restricted our present numerical verification to cylindrical geometries to allow comparisons to prior results for two special cases: uniform transmural changes in mass and differential G&R within a two-layered cylindrical model of the human aorta. The present finite element model recovers the results of these simplified semi-inverse analyses with good agreement. PMID:23713058

  2. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-08-31

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by either fluid or gas pressure against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  3. Mobile Monolith Polymer Elements For Flow Control In Microfluidic Systems

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2006-01-24

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  4. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2005-11-11

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  5. Some parametric flow analyses of a particle bed fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1993-05-01

    Parametric calculations are performed, using the SAFSIM computer program, to investigate the fluid mechanics and heat transfer performance of a particle bed fuel element. Both steady-state and transient calculations are included, addressing such issues as flow stability, reduced thrust operation, transpiration drag, coolant conductivity enhancement, flow maldistributions, decay heat removal, flow perturbations, and pulse cooling. The calculations demonstrate the dependence of the predicted results on the modeling assumptions and thus provide guidance as to where further experimental and computational investigations are needed. The calculations also demonstrate that both flow instability and flow maldistribution in the fuel element are important phenomena. Furthermore, results are encouraging that geometric design changes to the element can significantly reduce problems related to these phenomena, allowing improved performance over a wide range of element power densities and flow rates. Such design changes will help to maximize the operational efficiency of space propulsion reactors employing particle bed fuel element technology. Finally, the results demonstrate that SAFSIM is a valuable engineering tool for performing quick and inexpensive parametric simulations addressing complex flow problems.

  6. FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE IMMISCIBLE FLOW THROUGH SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equation...

  7. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  8. CVB: the Constrained Vapor Bubble Capillary Experiment on the International Space Station MARANGONI FLOW REGION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Kundan, Akshay; Plawsky, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) is a wickless, grooved heat pipe and we report on a full- scale fluids experiment flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The CVB system consists of a relatively simple setup a quartz cuvette with sharp corners partially filled with either pentane or an ideal mixture of pentane and isohexane as the working fluids. Along with temperature and pressure measurements, the two-dimensional thickness profile of the menisci formed at the corners of the quartz cuvette was determined using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM). Even with the large, millimeter dimensions of the CVB, interfacial forces dominate in these exceedingly small Bond Number systems. The experiments were carried out at various power inputs. Although conceptually simple, the transport processes were found to be very complex with many different regions. At the heated end of the CVB, due to a high temperature gradient, we observed Marangoni flow at some power inputs. This region from the heated end to the central drop region is defined as a Marangoni dominated region. We present a simple analysis based on interfacial phenomena using only measurements from the ISS experiments that lead to a predictive equation for the thickness of the film near the heated end of the CVB. The average pressure gradient for flow in the film is assumed due to the measured capillary pressure at the two ends of the liquid film and that the pressure stress gradient due to cohesion self adjusts to a constant value over a distance L. The boundary conditions are the no slip condition at the wall interface and an interfacial shear stress at the liquid- vapor interface due to the Marangoni stress, which is due to the high temperature gradient. Although the heated end is extremely complex, since it includes three- dimensional variations in radiation, conduction, evaporation, condensation, fluid flow and interfacial forces, we find that using the above simplifying assumptions, a simple successful

  9. Constrained pressure residual multiscale (CPR-MS) method for fully implicit simulation of multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusini, Matteo; Lukyanov, Alexander A.; Natvig, Jostein; Hajibeygi, Hadi

    2015-10-01

    We develop the first multiscale method for fully implicit (FIM) simulations of multiphase flow in porous media, namely CPR-MS method. Built on the FIM Jacobian matrix, the pressure system is obtained by employing a Constrained Pressure Residual (CPR) operator. Multiscale Finite Element (MSFE) and Finite Volume (MSFV) methods are then formulated algebraically to obtain efficient and accurate solutions of this pressure equation. The multiscale prediction stage (first-stage) is coupled with a corrector stage (second-stage) employed on the full system residual. The converged solution is enhanced through outer GMRES iterations preconditioned by these first and second stage operators. While the second-stage FIM stage is solved using a classical iterative solver, the multiscale stage is investigated in full detail. Several choices for fine-scale pre- and post-smoothing along with different choices of coarse-scale solvers are considered for a range of heterogeneous three-dimensional cases with capillarity and three-phase systems. The CPR-MS method is the first of its kind, and extends the applicability of the so-far developed multiscale methods (both MSFE and MSFV) to displacements with strong coupling terms.

  10. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  11. LAMINAR FLOW ELEMENT: ITS USE AS A FLOW STANDARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A standard device to measure flows accurately and precisely was required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish an air pollution field auditing system capable of generating pollutant concentrations in the parts per million and parts per billion range. he e...

  12. Axisymmetric Flow Properties for Magnetic Elements of Differing Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rightmire-Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Aspects of the structure and dynamics of the flows in the Sun's surface shear layer remain uncertain and yet are critically important for understanding the observed magnetic behavior. In our previous studies of the axisymmetric transport of magnetic elements we found systematic changes in both the differential rotation and the meridional flow over the course of Solar Cycle 23. Here we examine how those flows depend upon the strength (and presumably anchoring depth) of the magnetic elements. Line of sight magnetograms obtained by the HMI instrument aboard SDO over the course of Carrington Rotation 2097 were mapped to heliographic coordinates and averaged over 12 minutes to remove the 5-min oscillations. Data masks were constructed based on the field strength of each mapped pixel to isolate magnetic elements of differing field strength. We used Local Correlation Tracking of the unmasked data (separated in time by 1- to 8-hours) to determine the longitudinal and latitudinal motions of the magnetic elements. We then calculated average flow velocities as functions of latitude and longitude from the central meridian for approx 600 image pairs over the 27-day rotation. Variations with longitude indicate and characterize systematic errors in the flow measurements associated with changes in the signal from disk center to limb. Removing these systematic errors reveals changes in the axisymmetric flow properties that reflect changes in flow properties with depth in the surface shear layer.

  13. Adaptive Evolutionary Programming Incorporating Neural Network for Transient Stability Constrained Optimal Power Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangpatiphan, Kritsana; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    This paper presents an adaptive evolutionary programming incorporating neural network for solving transient stability constrained optimal power flow (TSCOPF). The proposed AEP method is an evolutionary programming (EP)-based algorithm, which adjusts its population size automatically during an optimization process. The artificial neural network, which classifies the AEP individual based on its stability degrees, is embedded into the search template to reduce the computational load caused by transient stability constraints. The fuel cost minimization is selected as the objective function of TSCOPF. The proposed method is tested on the IEEE 30-bus system with two types of the fuel cost functions, i.e. the conventional quadratic function and the quadratic function superimposed by sine component to model the cost curves without and with valve-point loading effect respectively. The numerical examples show that AEP is more effective than conventional EP in terms of computational speed, and when the neural network is incorporated into AEP, it can significantly reduce the computational time of TSCOPF. A study of the architecture of the neural network is also conducted and discussed. In addition, the effectiveness of the proposed method for solving TSCOPF with the consideration of multiple contingencies is manifested.

  14. Seismic anisotropy beneath South China Sea: using SKS splitting to constrain mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, M.; Le, K.; Yang, T.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of South China Sea is under debate and several hypotheses have been proposed: (1) The collision of India plate and Eurasia plate; (2) the backward movement of the Pacific subduction plate; (3) mantle upwelling; and (4) combinations of above hypotheses. All these causal mechanisms emphasize the contributions of deep structures to the evolution of South China Sea. In this study we use earthquake data recorded by seismic stations surrounding South China Sea to constrain mantle flow beneath. To fill the vacancy of seismic data in Viet Nam, we deployed 4 seismic stations (VT01-VT04) in a roughly north - south orientation in Viet Nam in Nov. 2009. We combine the VT dataset with the AD and MY datasets from IRIS and select 81 events for SKS splitting analysis. Measurements were made at 11 stations using Wolfe and Silver (1998)'s multi-event stacking procedure. Our observed splitting directions in Vietnam are generally consistent with those of Bai et. al. (2009) . In northern Vietnam, the splitting times are around 1 sec and the fast directions are NWW-SEE, parallel to the absolute plate motion as well as the motion of the Earth surface, implying the crust and the mantle are coupled in this region and is moving as a result of the collision of India and China. While in southern Vietnam and Malaya, the fast directions are NE-SW, almost perpendicular to the absolute plate motion as well as the surface motion of Eurasia plate. However, the observed NE-SW is parallel to the subduction direction of the Australian plate, which might be caused by the mantle flow along NE-SW induced by the subduction.

  15. The isotope composition of selenium in chondrites constrains the depletion mechanism of volatile elements in solar system materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollstaedt, Hauke; Mezger, Klaus; Leya, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    Solar nebula processes led to a depletion of volatile elements in different chondrite groups when compared to the bulk chemical composition of the solar system deduced from the Sun's photosphere. For moderately-volatile elements, this depletion primarily correlates with the element condensation temperature and is possibly caused by incomplete condensation from a hot solar nebula, evaporative loss from the precursor dust, and/or inherited from the interstellar medium. Element concentrations and interelement ratios of volatile elements do not provide a clear picture about responsible mechanisms. Here, the abundance and stable isotope composition of the moderately- to highly-volatile element Se are investigated in carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites to constrain the mechanism responsible for the depletion of volatile elements in planetary bodies of the inner solar system and to define a δ 82 / 78 Se value for the bulk solar system. The δ 82 / 78 Se of the studied chondrite falls are identical within their measurement uncertainties with a mean of - 0.20 ± 0.26 ‰ (2 s.d., n = 14, relative to NIST SRM 3149) despite Se abundance depletions of up to a factor of 2.5 with respect to the CI group. The absence of resolvable Se isotope fractionation rules out a kinetic Rayleigh-type incomplete condensation of Se from the hot solar nebula or partial kinetic evaporative loss on the precursor material and/or the parent bodies. The Se depletion, if acquired during partial condensation or evaporative loss, therefore must have occurred under near equilibrium conditions to prevent measurable isotope fractionation. Alternatively, the depletion and cooling of the nebula could have occurred simultaneously due to the continuous removal of gas and fine particles by the solar wind accompanied by the quantitative condensation of elements from the pre-depleted gas. In this scenario the condensation of elements does not require equilibrium conditions to avoid isotope

  16. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  17. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  18. Multi-Objective Differential Evolution for Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow in Deregulated Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roselyn, J. Preetha; Devaraj, D.; Dash, Subhransu Sekhar

    2013-11-01

    Voltage stability is an important issue in the planning and operation of deregulated power systems. The voltage stability problems is a most challenging one for the system operators in deregulated power systems because of the intense use of transmission line capabilities and poor regulation in market environment. This article addresses the congestion management problem avoiding offline transmission capacity limits related to voltage stability by considering Voltage Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (VSCOPF) problem in deregulated environment. This article presents the application of Multi Objective Differential Evolution (MODE) algorithm to solve the VSCOPF problem in new competitive power systems. The maximum of L-index of the load buses is taken as the indicator of voltage stability and is incorporated in the Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The proposed method in hybrid power market which also gives solutions to voltage stability problems by considering the generation rescheduling cost and load shedding cost which relieves the congestion problem in deregulated environment. The buses for load shedding are selected based on the minimum eigen value of Jacobian with respect to the load shed. In the proposed approach, real power settings of generators in base case and contingency cases, generator bus voltage magnitudes, real and reactive power demands of selected load buses using sensitivity analysis are taken as the control variables and are represented as the combination of floating point numbers and integers. DE/randSF/1/bin strategy scheme of differential evolution with self-tuned parameter which employs binomial crossover and difference vector based mutation is used for the VSCOPF problem. A fuzzy based mechanism is employed to get the best compromise solution from the pareto front to aid the decision maker. The proposed VSCOPF planning model is implemented on IEEE 30-bus system, IEEE 57 bus practical system and IEEE 118 bus system. The pareto optimal

  19. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  20. Investigating Alpine fissure rutilated quartz to constrain timing and conditions of post-metamorphic hydrothermal fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulaker, D. Z.; Schmitt, A. K.; Zack, T.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2013-12-01

    Rutilated quartz, aka Venus' hair, is finely-acicular rutile intergrown with host quartz generated by fluid-mediated co-crystallization. It is commonly found in hydrothermal veins, including the renown cleft mineral locations of the Swiss Alps. Previous studies of Alpine cleft mineralizations used rare hydrothermal monazite [1] and titanite [2] to constrain vein formation to ~13.5-15.2 Ma, postdating peak metamorphism by ~2-4 Ma. Temperature (T) estimates of 150-450°C are based on fluid inclusions and bulk quartz-mineral oxygen isotope exchange equilibria, and formation pressures (P) are 0.5-2.5 kbar (for a geothermal gradient of 30°C/km) [2]. The potential of rutilated quartz as a thermochronometer, however, has not been harnessed previously. Here, we present the first results of age and P-T determinations for rutilated quartz from six locations in the Swiss Alps (San Gottardo; Feldbach, Binntal; Pi Aul, Vals; Faido, Leventina; Elm, Steinbach; Binntal). Samples were cut and mounted in epoxy discs to expose rutile (0.03 to 1 mm in diameter) and its host quartz which was also imaged in cathodoluminescence (CL). CL images for half of the samples' host quartz exhibited strong sector zoning, while others reveal only weak CL zonation. Isotopic and trace element analyses were carried out by SIMS using a CAMECA ims1270 for U-Pb, O-isotopes, and Ti-in-quartz, and a LA-ICP-MS system (213 nm New Wave laser coupled to an Agilent 7500a) for Zr-in-rutile. U-Pb rutile ages average 15.5×2.0 Ma (2σ). T estimates are 352-575°C (rutile-quartz oxygen isotopes in touching domains), 470-530°C (Zr-in-rutile assuming P = 0.5 and equilibrium with host-rock zircon), and 251-391°C (Ti-in-quartz at assumed P = 0.5 kbar and aTiO2 = 1). CL zones are isotopically unzoned. Rutile-quartz oxygen isotopes are pressure insensitive, whereas Zr-in-rutile and Ti-in-quartz are minimum temperatures. These results demonstrate that rutilated quartz can constrain timing and conditions of post

  1. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-06-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  2. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  3. Finite element analysis of periodic transonic flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.

    1978-01-01

    Flow about an oscillating thin airfoil in a transonic stream was considered. It was assumed that the flow field can be decomposed into a mean flow plus a periodic perturbation. On the surface of the airfoil the usual Neumman conditions are imposed. Two computer programs were written, both using linear basis functions over triangles for the finite element space. The first program uses a banded Gaussian elimination solver to solve the matrix problem, while the second uses an iterative technique, namely SOR. The only results obtained are for an oscillating flat plate.

  4. Experimental Impedance of Single Liner Elements with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follet, J. I.; Betts, J. F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to generate a high quality database, from which the effects of a mean bias flow on the acoustic impedance of lumped-element single-degree-of-freedom liners was determined. Acoustic impedance measurements were made using the standard two-microphone method in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube. Each liner consisted of a perforated sheet with a constant-area cavity. Liner resistance was shown to increase and to become less frequency and sound pressure level dependent as the bias flow was increased. The resistance was also consistently lower for a negative bias flow (suction) than for a positive bias flow (blowing) of equal magnitude. The slope of the liner reactance decreased with increased flow.

  5. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily M.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  6. A finite element formulation for supersonic flows around complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of small perturbation potential supersonic flow around complex configurations is considered. This problem requires the solution of an integral equation relating the values of the potential on the surface of the body to the values of the normal derivative, which is known from the small perturbation boundary conditions. The surface of the body is divided into small (hyperboloidal quadrilateral) surface elements which are described in terms of the Cartesian components of the four corner points. The values of the potential (and its normal derivative) within each element are assumed to be constant and equal to its value at the centroid of the element. This yields a set of linear algebraic equations whose coefficients are given by source and doublet integrals over the surface elements. Closed form evaluations of the integrals are presented.

  7. Finite element method application for turbulent and transitional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sváček, Petr

    2016-03-01

    This paper is interested in numerical simulations of the interaction of the fluid flow with an airfoil. Particularly, the problem of the turbulent flow around the airfoil with elastic support is considered. The main attention is paid to the numerical approximation of the flow problem using the finite element approximations. The laminar - turbulence transition of the flow on the surface airfoil is considered. The chois of the transition model is discussed. The transition model based on the two equation k-ω turbulence model is used. The structure motion is described with the aid of two degrees of freedom. The motion of the computational domain is treated with the aid of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. Numerical results are shown.

  8. A boundary element method for steady incompressible thermoviscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A boundary element formulation is presented for moderate Reynolds number, steady, incompressible, thermoviscous flows. The governing integral equations are written exclusively in terms of velocities and temperatures, thus eliminating the need for the computation of any gradients. Furthermore, with the introduction of reference velocities and temperatures, volume modeling can often be confined to only a small portion of the problem domain, typically near obstacles or walls. The numerical implementation includes higher order elements, adaptive integration and multiregion capability. Both the integral formulation and implementation are discussed in detail. Several examples illustrate the high level of accuracy that is obtainable with the current method.

  9. Finite element methodology for integrated flow-thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Vemaganti, G. R.

    1988-01-01

    Papers entitled, An Adaptive Finite Element Procedure for Compressible Flows and Strong Viscous-Inviscid Interactions, and An Adaptive Remeshing Method for Finite Element Thermal Analysis, were presented at the June 27 to 29, 1988, meeting of the AIAA Thermophysics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, San Antonio, Texas. The papers describe research work supported under NASA/Langley Research Grant NsG-1321, and are submitted in fulfillment of the progress report requirement on the grant for the period ending February 29, 1988.

  10. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  11. Thermodynamically constrained averaging theory approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems: 4. Species transport fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Cass T.; Gray, William G.

    2008-03-01

    This work is the fourth in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. The general TCAT framework and the mathematical foundation presented in previous works are built upon by formulating macroscale models for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, and the balance of entropy for a species in a phase volume, interface, and common curve. In addition, classical irreversible thermodynamic relations for species in entities are averaged from the microscale to the macroscale. Finally, we comment on alternative approaches that can be used to connect species and entity conservation equations to a constrained system entropy inequality, which is a key component of the TCAT approach. The formulations detailed in this work can be built upon to develop models for species transport and reactions in a variety of multiphase systems.

  12. Geotherms and Thermal Parameters from the Curie Depth Constrained Solutions of the One-Dimensional Steady-State Heat-Flow Equation: A New Method and Its Applicability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravat, D.; Morgan, P.; Salem, A.; Lowry, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a new method of constraining geotherms deep in the crust. Steady-state geotherms are most commonly derived by solving the heat flow differential equation with surface boundary conditions, and do not explicitly involve temperature constraints at depth. In a new method, we incorporate the magnetic Curie depth, derived from the spectral analysis of magnetic anomaly data, as an a posteriori condition into the solution of 1-D heat-flow equation to anchor geotherms at the Curie depth. The Curie depth is derived carefully from the Defractal Spectral Method where the fractal parameter of the field is also derived. The Curie depth constraint allows determination of an additional parameter: the ratio of radiogenic heat production (A) to thermal conductivity (K). When K is observed or can be estimated from geologic knowledge, A can be calculated. Furthermore, it is possible to renormalize the derived A to the value where radiogenic elements exponentially decrease with depth (the value of A at the surface denoted as As). The renormalization permits comparison of surface observed and computed values of As which we use to validate the method. We crosschecked observed values of As and K against the ratio As/K derived from the method in New Hampshire and across the border of Wyoming and Colorado. Excluding high heat-flow locations in these regions as anomalous, the difference between the observed and computed As in all these cases is less than 6-7%. There are also regions where both the derived parameters (As and K) are not within the acceptable range for the given reduced heat flow; these are generally the regions of complex active tectonics or anomalously high or low heat-flow values where the steady-state assumption is not valid. In the mid-oceanic ridge scenario of the Red Sea, the Curie depth corresponds to the Moho and reasonable values of K yield low values of A consistent with the expectation from mafic oceanic crust. There are many areas of the world

  13. Finite element simulation of temperature dependent free surface flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelman, M. S.; Sani, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The method of Engelman and Sani (1984) for a finite-element simulation of incompressible surface flows with a free and/or moving fluid interface, such as encountered in crystal growth and coating and polymer technology, is extended to temperature-dependent flows, including the effect of temperature-dependent surface tension. The basic algorithm of Saito and Scriven (1981) and Ruschak (1980) has been generalized and implemented in a robust and versatile finite-element code that can be employed with relative ease for the simulation of free-surface problems in complex geometries. As a result, the costly dependence on the Newton-Raphson algorithm has been eliminated by replacing it with a quasi-Newton iterative method, which nearly retains the superior convergence properties of the Newton-Raphson method.

  14. Finite element solution theory for three-dimensional boundary flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element algorithm is derived for the numerical solution of a three-dimensional flow field described by a system of initial-valued, elliptic boundary value partial differential equations. The familiar three-dimensional boundary layer equations belong to this description when diffusional processes in only one coordinate direction are important. The finite element algorithm transforms the original description into large order systems of ordinary differential equations written for the dependent variables discretized at node points of an arbitrarily irregular computational lattice. The generalized elliptic boundary conditions is piecewise valid for each dependent variable on boundaries that need not explicitly coincide with coordinate surfaces. Solutions for sample problems in laminar and turbulent boundary flows illustrate favorable solution accuracy, convergence, and versatility.

  15. Flow formed by spanwise gaps between roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E.; Lin, S. H.; Islam, O.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the three mean velocity components and the three Reynolds shear stresses were made in the region downstream of gaps between wall-mounted roughness elements of square cross section and high aspect ratio in a thick turbulent boundary layer. The effect of small and large gaps was studied in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 3600, based on obstacle height and free-stream velocity. The small gap produces retardation of the gap flow as with a two-dimensional roughness element, but a definite interaction between gap and wake flows is observed. The interaction is more intense for the large gap than for the small. Both gaps generate a secondary crossflow which moves fluid away from the centerline in the wall region and toward the centerline in the outer (y greater than 1.5H) region.

  16. Mixed Element Type Unstructured Grid Generation for Viscous Flow Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, David L.; Gaither, J. Adam

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is presented for efficient generation of high-quality unstructured grids suitable for CFD simulation of high Reynolds number viscous flow fields. Layers of anisotropic elements are generated by advancing along prescribed normals from solid boundaries. The points are generated such that either pentahedral or tetrahedral elements with an implied connectivity can be be directly recovered. As points are generated they are temporarily attached to a volume triangulation of the boundary points. This triangulation allows efficient local search algorithms to be used when checking merging layers, The existing advancing-front/local-reconnection procedure is used to generate isotropic elements outside of the anisotropic region. Results are presented for a variety of applications. The results demonstrate that high-quality anisotropic unstructured grids can be efficiently and consistently generated for complex configurations.

  17. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  18. Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.S.

    2009-03-20

    A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

  19. Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. S.

    2009-03-01

    A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

  20. A dual reciprocal boundary element formulation for viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafe, Olu

    1993-01-01

    The advantages inherent in the boundary element method (BEM) for potential flows are exploited to solve viscous flow problems. The trick is the introduction of a so-called dual reciprocal technique in which the convective terms are represented by a global function whose unknown coefficients are determined by collocation. The approach, which is necessarily iterative, converts the governing partial differential equations into integral equations via the distribution of fictitious sources or dipoles of unknown strength on the boundary. These integral equations consist of two parts. The first is a boundary integral term, whose kernel is the unknown strength of the fictitious sources and the fundamental solution of a convection-free flow problem. The second part is a domain integral term whose kernel is the convective portion of the governing PDEs. The domain integration can be transformed to the boundary by using the dual reciprocal (DR) concept. The resulting formulation is a pure boundary integral computational process.

  1. Aerothermal modeling program, phase 2. Element B: Flow interaction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Murthy, S. N. B.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1986-10-01

    The design process was improved and the efficiency, life, and maintenance costs of the turbine engine hot section was enhanced. Recently, there has been much emphasis on the need for improved numerical codes for the design of efficient combustors. For the development of improved computational codes, there is a need for an experimentally obtained data base to be used at test cases for the accuracy of the computations. The purpose of Element-B is to establish a benchmark quality velocity and scalar measurements of the flow interaction of circular jets with swirling flow typical of that in the dome region of annular combustor. In addition to the detailed experimental effort, extensive computations of the swirling flows are to be compared with the measurements for the purpose of assessing the accuracy of current and advanced turbulence and scalar transport models.

  2. Parameters of flow in cyclonic elements of separator battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevskiy, Mihail; Zyatikov, Pavel; Roslyak, Alecsander; Shishmina, Ludmila

    2014-08-01

    Peculiarities of separation processes in cyclone battery separators have been considered on liquid and solid disperse phases. The difference in efficiency between individual and battery liquid separators is slight .Concentration of disperse liquid phase in refined gases is 0.1-0.3 kg/kg. In operating on dry gases with abundance of dust the separation condition changes due to peculiarities of disperse phase behavior from solid particles .Flow parameter assessments in cyclones by different correlation of flow areas at the input and output have been conducted. Differences of flow parameters in conical and cylindrical cyclones have been explored. The analysis and causes of unsatisfied work of industrial battery separator with cyclone elements have been carried out.

  3. Dynamic coupling of bulk chemistry, trace elements and mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.; Heck, H. V.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully dynamical models that not only track the evolution of chemical heterogeneities through the mantle, but also incorporate the effect of chemical heterogeneities on the dynamics of mantle convection are now emerging. Since in general analytical solutions to these complex problems are lacking, careful testing and investigations of the effect and usefulness of these models is needed. We extend our existing numerical mantle convection code that can track fluid flow in 3D spherical geometry and tracks both bulk chemical components (basal fraction) and different trace elements. The chemical components fractionate upon melting when and where the solidus is crossed. Now, the chemical information will effect the flow of the fluid in the following ways: The bulk composition will link to density and the (radioactive) trace element abundance to heat production. Results will be reported of the effect of different density structures; either starting with a primordial dense layer at the base of the mantle, having all density variation originate from melting (basalt production), or a combination between these two end-member scenarios. In particular we will focus on the connection between large scale bulk chemical structures in the (deep) mantle and the evolution of the distribution of noble gasses (He and Ar). The distribution of noble gasses depend upon 1) assumptions on the initial distributions in the mantle, 2) the mantle flow, 3) radioactive production and, 4) outgassing to the atmosphere upon melting close to the surface.

  4. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  5. Constraining mantle flow with seismic and geodynamic data: A joint approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Nathan A.; Forte, Alessandro M.; Grand, Stephen P.

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the style of convective flow occurring in the mantle is essential to understand the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's interior as well as the forces driving plate tectonics. Models of mantle convection based on three-dimensional (3-D) seismic tomographic reconstructions have the potential to provide the most direct constraints on mantle flow. Seismic imaging of deep Earth structure has made great advances in recent years; however, it has not been possible to reach a consensus on the nature of convection in the mantle. Models of mantle flow based on tomography results have yielded variable conclusions largely because of the inherent non-uniqueness and differing degrees of resolution of seismic tomography models as well as the difficulty in determining flow directly from seismic images. Here we address this difficulty by simultaneously inverting global seismic and convection-related data sets. The seismic data consist of globally distributed shear body wave travel times including multi-bounce S-waves, shallow-turning triplicated phases, as well as core reflections and phases traversing the core (SKS and SKKS). Convection-related data sets include global free air gravity, tectonic plate divergence, and excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. In addition, the convection-related constraint on dynamic surface topography is estimated on the basis of a recent global model of crustal heterogeneity. These convection-related observables are related to mantle density anomalies through instantaneous mantle flow calculations and linked to the seismic data via optimized density-velocity scaling relationships. Simultaneous inversion allows us to test various mantle flow hypotheses directly against the combined seismic and convection data sets, rather than considering flow predictions based solely on a seismically derived 3-D mantle model. In this study, we test four different mantle flow hypotheses, including whole-mantle flow and models with

  6. Convective Enhancement of Icing Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2015-01-01

    To improve existing ice accretion simulation codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. To build on existing research on this topic, this study used the Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. Using the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with 3 surfaces, each with a different representation of ice roughness: 1) a control surface with no ice roughness, 2) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 10x, and 3) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 25x. Temperature data from the tests were recorded using an infrared camera and thermocouples imbedded in the test plate. From the temperature data, a convective heat transfer coefficient map was created for each case. Additional testing was also performed to validate the VIST's flow quality. These tests included five-hole probe and hot-wire probe velocity traces to provide flow visualization and to study boundary layer formation on the various test surfaces. The knowledge gained during the experiments will help improve ice accretion codes by providing heat transfer coefficient validation data and by providing flow visualization data helping understand current and future experiments performed in the VIST.

  7. Constrained optimisation in granular network flows: Games with a loaded dice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qun; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2013-06-01

    Flows in real world networks are rarely the outcome of unconditional random allocations as, say, the roll of a dice. Think, for example, of force transmission through a contact network in a quasistatically deforming granular material. Forces `flow' through this network in a highly conditional manner. How much force is transmitted between two contacting particles is always conditional not only on all the other forces acting between the particles in question but also on those acting on the other particles in the system. Broadly, we are interested in the nature and extent to which flows through a contact network favour certain pathways over others, and how the mechanisms that govern such biased flows for a given imposed loading history determine the future evolution of the contact network. Our first step is to solve a selection of fundamental combinatorial optimisation problems on the contact network from the perspective of force transmission. Here we report on solutions to the Maximum Flow Minimum Cost Problem for a weighted contact network where the weights assigned to the links of the contact network are varied according to their contact types. We found that those pathways through which the maximum flow of force is transmitted, in the direction of the maximum principal stress, at minimum cost - pass through the great majority of the force chains. Although the majority of the contacts in these pathways are elastic, the plastic contacts bear an undue influence on the minimum cost.

  8. A Method for the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.; Whitesides, John L.; Campbell, Richard L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    A fully automated iterative design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Drag reductions have been realized using the design method over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and airfoil thicknesses. The thrusts of the method are its ability to calculate a target N-Factor distribution that forces the flow to undergo transition at the desired location; the target-pressure-N-Factor relationship that is used to reduce the N-Factors in order to prolong transition; and its ability to design airfoils to meet lift, pitching moment, thickness and leading-edge radius constraints while also being able to meet the natural laminar flow constraint. The method uses several existing CFD codes and can design a new airfoil in only a few days using a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  9. An Approach to the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.

    1997-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integral turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the laminar flow toward the desired amount. An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  10. An approach to the constrained design of natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford Earl

    1995-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integml turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the larninar flow toward the desired amounl An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  11. Headwater sediment dynamics in a debris flow catchment constrained by high-resolution topographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loye, Alexandre; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Theule, Joshua Isaac; Liébault, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Debris flows have been recognized to be linked to the amounts of material temporarily stored in torrent channels. Hence, sediment supply and storage changes from low-order channels of the Manival catchment, a small tributary valley with an active torrent system located exclusively in sedimentary rocks of the Chartreuse Massif (French Alps), were surveyed periodically for 16 months using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to study the coupling between sediment dynamics and torrent responses in terms of debris flow events, which occurred twice during the monitoring period. Sediment transfer in the main torrent was monitored with cross-section surveys. Sediment budgets were generated seasonally using sequential TLS data differencing and morphological extrapolations. Debris production depends strongly on rockfall occurring during the winter-early spring season, following a power law distribution for volumes of rockfall events above 0.1 m3, while hillslope sediment reworking dominates debris recharge in spring and autumn, which shows effective hillslope-channel coupling. The occurrence of both debris flow events that occurred during the monitoring was linked to recharge from previous debris pulses coming from the hillside and from bedload transfer. Headwater debris sources display an ambiguous behaviour in sediment transfer: low geomorphic activity occurred in the production zone, despite rainstorms inducing debris flows in the torrent; still, a general reactivation of sediment transport in headwater channels was observed in autumn without new debris supply, suggesting that the stored debris was not exhausted. The seasonal cycle of sediment yield seems to depend not only on debris supply and runoff (flow capacity) but also on geomorphic conditions that destabilize remnant debris stocks. This study shows that monitoring the changes within a torrent's in-channel storage and its debris supply can improve knowledge on recharge thresholds leading to debris flow.

  12. Boundary Element Microhydrodynamics: Stagnation of flow in protein cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, Sergio; Hahn, David

    2007-03-01

    A very precise boundary element solution of the exact Stokes flow surface integral equation has been implemented in our Fortan 90 program BEST. In our previous work (Aragon & Hahn, Biophys. J. 2006, 91: 1591-1603; J. Chem. Theory and Comput. 2006, 2: 1416-1428) we obtained very precise values of the tensorial transport properties (translation, rotation, and intrinsic viscosity) for a large set of proteins with a uniform water hydration thickness of 0.11 nm. In this work, we utilize the surface stress distribution thus obtained to evaluate the flow field as a function of distance away from the hydrodynamic surface for a variety of surface features in a dimpled sphere (test case) and for the proteins myoglobin, lysozyme, and human serum albumin. We demonstrate that solvent in small to large pockets on the hydrodynamic surface moves with the protein with distances up to 2 nm for deep pockets regardless of the direction of motion of the protein. On the other hand, the fluid flow pattern on protruding portions of the hydrodynamic surface decays much more rapidly with distance from the surface. The implications of these results with respect to the amount of water of associated with the surface and the rate of transport to active enzymatic sites in stirred solutions is discussed.

  13. Using Surface Observations to Constrain the Direction and Magnitude of Mantle Flow Beneath Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, W. E.; Silver, P. G.

    2001-12-01

    While the motions of the surface tectonic plates are well determined, the accompanying horizontal mantle flow is not. Observations of surface deformation (GPS velocities and Quaternary fault slip rates) and upper mantle seismic anisotropy are combined for the first time, to provide a direct estimate of this flow field. We apply our investigation to western North America where seismic tomography shows a relatively thin lithosphere. Here the likely source of shear wave anisotropy results from a deformation fabric associated with the differential horizontal motion between the base of the lithosphere and the underlying mantle. For a vertically propagating shear wave recorded at a single station, and for mantle strains of order unity, the fast polarization direction, φ , of a split shear wave will be parallel to the direction of progressive simple shear, defined by this differential motion between lithosphere and underlying mantle. If the motion of the overlying lithospehre is known both within and across a plate boundary zone, such as western North America, then the direction and magnitude of mantle flow beneath the plate boundary zone can be uniquely determined with three or more observations of fast polarization directions. Within the Pacific-North American Plate boundary zone in western North America we find that the mantle velocity is 5.0+/-1.5 cm/yr and directed E-NE in a hotspot frame, nearly opposite to the direction of North American plate motion (WSW). The flow is only weakly coupled to the motion of the surface plates, producing a weak drag force. This flow field is most likely due to mantle density heterogeneity associated with the sinking of the old Farallon slab beneath North America. The last few decades have seen the development of two basically incompatible views of the plate-mantle system. The tectonophysical view assumes effective decoupling between the plate and a stationary mantle by a well developed asthenosphere. The plates are essentially 'self

  14. Constraining Paleo-Hydrologic Flow Fields from Iron Oxide Cementation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Chan, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Fine-grained sandstone in Mesozoic sedimentary red beds of the Colorado Plateau (southwestern United States) contain iron oxides cements (e.g., hematite and goethite) that display spectacular pattern formation, including evenly spaced nodule formation and banding with nested scales spanning about two to three orders of magnitude (Fig. 1). These nodules are commonly referred to as concretions, which are cemented mineral masses. The size of concretions typically ranges from millimeters to centimeters, while the spacing of bands ranges from millimeters to sub-meters. Spatial transition of one pattern to another or one pattern superimposed on another is also observed. Such patterns may embed important information about paleo-environments of sediment diagenesis, especially regarding the fluid migration and geochemical conditions involved. Field evidence indicates that the formation of iron oxide bands in sandstone seems closely related to groundwater flows. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. Using a linear stability analysis, we demonstrate that the pattern transition from nodules to bands results from symmetry breaking triggered by groundwater advection. Nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands tend to form in the presence of persistent water flows. The banding is formed perpendicularly to the flow direction, and the flow rate is expected to be proportional to the square of banding spacing. Therefore, careful mapping of cementation patterns and banding spacing over rock outcrops will allow us to reconstruct a detail map of water flow field for a sandstone aquifer. Concretion nodules formed in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone have been proposed as a terrestrial analogue to hematite spherules detected by the rover Opportunity at the Meridiani Planum site on the

  15. Finite element flow analysis; Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan, July 26-29, 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, T.

    Among the topics discussed are the application of FEM to nonlinear free surface flow, Navier-Stokes shallow water wave equations, incompressible viscous flows and weather prediction, the mathematical analysis and characteristics of FEM, penalty function FEM, convective, viscous, and high Reynolds number FEM analyses, the solution of time-dependent, three-dimensional and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, turbulent boundary layer flow, FEM modeling of environmental problems over complex terrain, and FEM's application to thermal convection problems and to the flow of polymeric materials in injection molding processes. Also covered are FEMs for compressible flows, including boundary layer flows and transonic flows, hybrid element approaches for wave hydrodynamic loadings, FEM acoustic field analyses, and FEM treatment of free surface flow, shallow water flow, seepage flow, and sediment transport. Boundary element methods and FEM computational technique topics are also discussed. For individual items see A84-25834 to A84-25896

  16. SIMULATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL FLOW WITH CONSTRAINED TRANSPORT AND ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT: ALGORITHMS AND TESTS OF THE AstroBEAR CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Varniere, Peggy; Mitran, Sorin; Jones, Thomas W.

    2009-06-15

    A description is given of the algorithms implemented in the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh-refinement code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The code provides several high-resolution shock-capturing schemes which are constructed to maintain conserved quantities of the flow in a finite-volume sense. Divergence-free magnetic field topologies are maintained to machine precision by collating the components of the magnetic field on a cell-interface staggered grid and utilizing the constrained transport approach for integrating the induction equations. The maintenance of magnetic field topologies on adaptive grids is achieved using prolongation and restriction operators which preserve the divergence and curl of the magnetic field across collocated grids of different resolutions. The robustness and correctness of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical solution of various tests with analytical solutions or previously published numerical solutions obtained by other codes.

  17. Thermodynamically constrained averaging theory approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems: 9. Transition region models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, A. S.; Rybak, I.; Helmig, R.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.

    2012-06-01

    This work is the ninth in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. A fundamental approach is developed to model the transition region between a two-fluid-phase porous medium system and a single-fluid-phase system, including species transport. A general model formulation is developed along with an entropy inequality to guide the specification of closure relations. The general model formulation and entropy inequality are then used to specify a closed system. The transition region model developed in this work is a generalization and extension of coupling conditions commonly used in sharp interface models. The theoretical framework has multiple areas of potential applicability including terrestrial-atmospheric contact zones, surface water-sediment interface zones, and industrial drying processes.

  18. Constraining the high-density nuclear symmetry energy with the transverse-momentum-dependent elliptic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjia; Guo, Chenchen; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Hongfei; Leifels, Y.; Trautmann, W.

    2014-04-01

    Within the newly updated version of the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model, the transverse-velocity dependence of the elliptic flow of free nucleons from Au197+Au197 collisions at the incident energy 400 MeV/nucleon is studied within different windows of the normalized c.m. rapidity y0. It is found that the elliptic flow difference v2n-v2p and ratio v2n/v2p of neutrons versus protons are sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy, especially the ratio v2n/v2p at small transverse velocity in the intermediate rapidity intervals 0.4<|y0|<0.6. By comparing either transverse-momentum-dependent or integrated FOPI/LAND elliptic flow data of nucleons and hydrogen isotopes with calculations using various Skyrme interactions, all exhibiting similar values of isoscalar incompressibility but very different density dependences of the symmetry energy, a moderately soft to linear symmetry energy is extracted, in good agreement with previous UrQMD or Tübingen QMD model calculations but contrast with results obtained with π-/π+ yield ratios in the literature.

  19. Improving Fiber Alignment in HARDI by Combining Contextual PDE Flow with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Portegies, J. M.; Fick, R. H. J.; Sanguinetti, G. R.; Meesters, S. P. L.; Girard, G.; Duits, R.

    2015-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the quality of tractography results computed from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data. Both methods are based on the same PDE framework, defined in the coupled space of positions and orientations, associated with a stochastic process describing the enhancement of elongated structures while preserving crossing structures. In the first method we use the enhancement PDE for contextual regularization of a fiber orientation distribution (FOD) that is obtained on individual voxels from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data via constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Thereby we improve the FOD as input for subsequent tractography. Secondly, we introduce the fiber to bundle coherence (FBC), a measure for quantification of fiber alignment. The FBC is computed from a tractography result using the same PDE framework and provides a criterion for removing the spurious fibers. We validate the proposed combination of CSD and enhancement on phantom data and on human data, acquired with different scanning protocols. On the phantom data we find that PDE enhancements improve both local metrics and global metrics of tractography results, compared to CSD without enhancements. On the human data we show that the enhancements allow for a better reconstruction of crossing fiber bundles and they reduce the variability of the tractography output with respect to the acquisition parameters. Finally, we show that both the enhancement of the FODs and the use of the FBC measure on the tractography improve the stability with respect to different stochastic realizations of probabilistic tractography. This is shown in a clinical application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery planning. PMID:26465600

  20. Improving Fiber Alignment in HARDI by Combining Contextual PDE Flow with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Portegies, J M; Fick, R H J; Sanguinetti, G R; Meesters, S P L; Girard, G; Duits, R

    2015-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the quality of tractography results computed from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) data. Both methods are based on the same PDE framework, defined in the coupled space of positions and orientations, associated with a stochastic process describing the enhancement of elongated structures while preserving crossing structures. In the first method we use the enhancement PDE for contextual regularization of a fiber orientation distribution (FOD) that is obtained on individual voxels from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data via constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Thereby we improve the FOD as input for subsequent tractography. Secondly, we introduce the fiber to bundle coherence (FBC), a measure for quantification of fiber alignment. The FBC is computed from a tractography result using the same PDE framework and provides a criterion for removing the spurious fibers. We validate the proposed combination of CSD and enhancement on phantom data and on human data, acquired with different scanning protocols. On the phantom data we find that PDE enhancements improve both local metrics and global metrics of tractography results, compared to CSD without enhancements. On the human data we show that the enhancements allow for a better reconstruction of crossing fiber bundles and they reduce the variability of the tractography output with respect to the acquisition parameters. Finally, we show that both the enhancement of the FODs and the use of the FBC measure on the tractography improve the stability with respect to different stochastic realizations of probabilistic tractography. This is shown in a clinical application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery planning. PMID:26465600

  1. Magnetic Depth Estimates and Their Potential for Constraining Crustal Composition and Heat Flow in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C. A.; Ravat, D.

    2004-12-01

    Crustal composition, temperature, and heat flow, key parameters in ice sheet and tectonic models, are difficult to measure in largely ice-covered Antarctica. Aeromagnetic data have been used on other continents to determine depths to the bottom of magnetic sources from which heat flow has been calculated. However, these depths can also reflect compositional variations, and the consistency of results from various depth determination methods has not been tested. Present spectral magnetic depth determination methods require 1) large window sizes (roughly 10 times the depth to the bottom of the magnetic layer), 2) statistical random or fractal behavior of sources, and 3) datasets free of intermediate to long-wavelength problems stemming from datum shifts or warping of surveys. Depths to both the top (Spector and Grant, 1970, as revised by Fedi et al., 1998) and bottom (Bhattachharyya and Leu, 1975; Shuey et al., 1977; Connard et al., 1983; Okubo et al., 1985; and Blakely, 1988) of magnetic units were calculated. Cross-checking the results by modeling the spectral slopes and locations of peaks ensures reasonable results. Consistency of results from the different methods leads to confidence in the derived estimates. Application of these methods helps determine depths to the top and bottom of magnetic units from several regions in east and west Antarctica using single surveys flown in short periods. Assuming the spectra are obtained from sufficiently large window sizes, comparison of the aeromagnetically-determined layer thicknesses and positions from those computed with other data yield information on crustal composition, and possibly, depth to the Curie isotherm and in turn, heat flow. For example, preliminary results show that a primary magnetic layer thins from ~15-20 km in inferred Precambrian crystalline shield beneath the polar plateau to ~7 km in reworked and juvenile crust of the central Transantarctic Mountains. If the 7 km depth represents the Curie isotherm

  2. Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Marta

    2014-01-31

    In November 2012, Oregon State University initiated the project entitled: Application of Crunch-Flow routines to constrain present and past carbon fluxes at gas-hydrate bearing sites. Within this project we developed Crunch-Flow based modeling modules that include important biogeochemical processes that need to be considered in gas hydrate environments. Our modules were applied to quantify carbon cycling in present and past systems, using data collected during several DOE-supported drilling expeditions, which include the Cascadia margin in US, Ulleung Basin in South Korea, and several sites drilled offshore India on the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. Specifically, we completed modeling efforts that: 1) Reproduce the compositional and isotopic profiles observed at the eight drilled sites in the Ulleung Basin that constrain and contrast the carbon cycling pathways at chimney (high methane flux) and non-chimney sites (low methane, advective systems); 2) Simulate the Ba record in the sediments to quantify the past dynamics of methane flux in the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin; and 3) Provide quantitative estimates of the thickness of individual mass transport deposits (MTDs), time elapsed after the MTD event, rate of sulfate reduction in the MTD, and time required to reach a new steady state at several sites drilled in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) Basin off India. In addition we developed a hybrid model scheme by coupling a home-made MATLAB code with CrunchFlow to address the methane transport and chloride enrichment at the Ulleung Basins chimney sites, and contributed the modeling component to a study focusing on pore-scale controls on gas hydrate distribution in sediments from the Andaman Sea. These efforts resulted in two manuscripts currently under review, and contributed the modeling component of another pare, also under review. Lessons learned from these efforts are the basis of a mini-workshop to be held at Oregon State University (Feb 2014) to instruct

  3. Thermodynamically constrained averaging theory approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems: 3. Single-fluid-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2006-11-01

    This work is the third in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach to modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. Building upon the general TCAT framework and the mathematical foundation presented in previous works in this series, we demonstrate the TCAT approach for the case of single-fluid-phase flow. The formulated model is based upon conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy and a general entropy inequality constraint, which is developed to guide model closure. A specific example of a closed model is derived under limiting assumptions using a linearization approach and these results are compared and contrasted with the traditional single-phase-flow model. Potential extensions to this work are discussed. Specific advancements in this work beyond previous averaging theory approaches to single-phase flow include use of macroscale thermodynamics that is averaged from the microscale, the use of derived equilibrium conditions to guide a flux-force pair approach to simplification, use of a general Lagrange multiplier approach to connect conservation equation constraints to the entropy inequality, and a focus on producing complete, closed models that are solvable.

  4. Production of Local Acoustic Radiation Force to Constrain Direction of Microcapsules in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohji Masuda,; Nobuyuki Watarai,; Ryusuke Nakamoto,; Yusuke Muramatsu,

    2010-07-01

    We have ever reported our attempt to control the direction of microcapsules in flow by acoustic radiation force. However, the diameter of capsules was too large to be applied in vivo. Furthermore, the acoustic radiation force affected only the focal area because focused ultrasound was used. Thus, we have improved our experiment by using microcapsules as small as blood cells and introducing a plane wave of ultrasound. We prepared an artificial blood vessel including a Y-form bifurcation established in two observation areas. Then, we newly defined the induction index to evaluate the difference in capsule density in two downstream paths. As a result, the optimum angle of ultrasound emission to induct to the desired path was derived. The induction index increased in proportion to the central frequency of ultrasound, which is affected by the aggregation of capsules to receive more acoustic radiation force.

  5. A cubic triangular element with local continuity - An application in potential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, E.-R.

    1981-08-01

    A triangular element is developed using a complete third-degree polynomial as the interpolation function. The nodal variables include the function and its first-order derivatives. A local continuity condition, which implements the conservation of the normal gradients of the interpolation function along the three boundaries of the element, is provided as a remedy for the nonconformity of the first-order derivatives in conventional elements with zeroth order continuity. The element is applied to potential flow problems. Numerical results for the flow over a cylinder and the flow through a draft tube elbow of a hydraulic turbine confirm the validity and the accuracy of this new cubic element. A comparison of this element with a triangular element with zeroth order continuity is made by checking their differences from an analytical solution for the flow over the cylinder. This element appears to be more accurate than the element with zeroth order continuity.

  6. The Anisotropic Structure of South China Sea: Using OBS Data to Constrain Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xue, M.; Yang, T.; Liu, C.; Hua, Q.; Xia, S.; Huang, H.; Le, B. M.; Huo, D.; Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic mechanism of the formation of South China Sea (SCS) has been debated for decades. The anisotropic structure can provide useful insight into the complex evolution of SCS by indicating its mantle flow direction and strength. In this study, we employ shear wave splitting methods on two half-year seismic data collected from 10 and 6 passive source Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) respectively. These OBSs were deployed along both sides of the extinct ridge in the central basin of SCS by Tongji University in 2012 and 2013 respectively, which were then successfully recovered in 2013 and 2015 respectively. Through processing and inspecting the global and regional earthquakes (with local events being processing) of the 2012 dataset, measurements are made for 2 global events and 24 regional events at 5 OBSs using the tangential energy minimization, the smallest eigenvalue minimization, as well as the correlation methods. We also implement cluster analysis on the splitting results obtained for different time windows as well as filtered at different frequency bands. For teleseismic core phases like SKS and PKS, we find the fast polarization direction beneath the central basin is approximately NE-SW, nearly parallel to the extinct ridge in the central basin of SCS. Whereas for regional events, the splitting analysis on S, PS and ScS phases shows much more complicated fast directions as the ray path varies for different phases. The fast directions observed can be divided into three groups: (1) for the events from the Eurasia plate, a gradual rotation of the fast polarization direction from NNE-SSW to NEE-SWW along the path from the inner Eurasia plate to the central SCS is observed, implying the mantle flow is controlled by the India-Eurasia collision; (2) for the events located at the junction of Pacific plate and Philippine plate, the dominant fast direction is NW-SE, almost perpendicular to Ryukyu Trench as well as sub-parallel to the absolute direction of

  7. Element flows associated with marine shore mine tailings deposits.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard

    2006-02-01

    From 1938 until 1975, flotation tailings from the Potrerillos--El Salvador mining district (porphyry copper deposits) were discharged into the El Salado valley and transported in suspension to the sea at Chaliaral Bay, Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Over 220 Mt of tailings, averaging 0.8 +/- 0.25 wt % of pyrite, were deposited into the bay, resulting in over a 1 kilometer seaward displacement of the shoreline and an estimated 10-15 m thick tailings accumulation covering a approximately 4 km2 surface area. The Chaniaral case was classified by the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) in 1983 as one of the most serious cases of marine contamination in the Pacific area. Since 1975, the tailings have been exposed to oxidation, resulting in a 70-188 cm thick low-pH (2.6-4) oxidation zone at the top with liberation of divalent metal cations, such as Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ (up to 2265 mg/L, 18.1 mg/L, and 20.3 mg/ L, respectively). Evaporation-induced transport capillarity led to metal enrichment atthe tailings surface (e.g. up to 2.4% Cu) in the form of secondary chlorides and/or sulfates (dominated by eriochalcite [CuCl.H2O] and halite). These, mainly water-soluble, secondary minerals were exposed to eolian transport in the direction of the Village of Chañaral by the predominant W-SW winds. Two element-flow directions (toward the tailings surface, via capillarity, and toward the sea) and two element groups with different geochemical behaviors (cations such as Cu, Zn, Ni, and oxyanions such as As and Mo) could be distinguished. It can be postulated, that the sea is mainly affected by the following: As, Mo, Cu, and Zn contamination, which were liberated from the oxidation zone from the tailings and mobilized through the tidal cycle, and by Cu and Zn from the subsurface waters flowing in the El Salado valley (up to 19 mg/L and 12 mg/L Zn, respectively), transported as chloro complexes at neutral pH. PMID:16509314

  8. Constraining {sup 13}C amounts in AGB stars through isotopic analysis of trace elements in presolar SiC.

    SciTech Connect

    Barzyk, J. G.; Savina, M. R.; Davis, A. M.; Gallino, R.; Gyngard, F.; Amari, S.; Zinner, E.; Pelliln, M. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Clayton, R. N.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Chicago; Chicago Ctr Cosmochem.; Universita di Torino; Washington Univ.

    2007-07-01

    Analyses of the isotopic compositions of multiple elements (Mo, Zr, and Ba) in individual mainstream presolar SiC grains were done by resonant ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). While most heavy element compositions were consistent with model predictions for the slow neutron capture process (s-process) in low-mass (1.5-3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) asymptotic giant branch stars of solar metallicity when viewed on single-element three-isotope plots, grains with compositions deviating from model predictions were identified on multi-element plots. These grains have compositions that cannot result from any neutron capture process but can be explained by contamination in some elements with solar system material. Previous work in which only one heavy element per grain was examined has been unable to identify contaminated grains. The multi-element analyses of this study detected contaminated grains which were subsequently eliminated from consideration. The uncontaminated grains form a data set with a greatly reduced spread on the three-isotope plots of each element measured, corresponding to a smaller range of {sup 13}C pocket efficiencies in parent AGB stars. Furthermore, due to this reduced spread, the nature of the stellar starting material, previously interpreted as having solar isotopic composition, is uncertain. The constraint on {sup 13}C pocket efficiencies in parent stars of these grains may help uncover the mechanism responsible for formation of {sup 13}C, the primary neutron source for s-process nucleosynthesis in low-mass stars.

  9. Assessing SPO techniques to constrain magma flow: Examples from sills of the Karoo Igneous Province, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Lauren; Watkeys, Michael K.

    2015-08-01

    Shape ellipsoids that define the petrofabrics of plagioclase in Jurassic Karoo dolerite sills in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa are rigorously constrained using the long axis lengths of plagioclase crystals and ellipse incompatibility. This has been undertaken in order to determine the most effective technique to determine petrofabrics when using the SPO-2003 programme (Launeau and Robin, 2005). The technique of segmenting an image for analysis is scrutinised and as a process is found redundant. A grain size threshold is defined to assist with the varying grain sizes observed within and between sills. Where grains exceed the 0.2 mm size threshold, images should be acquired at a high magnification (i.e., 10 × magnification). Petrofabrics are determined using the foliation and the lineation of the ellipsoid as defined by the maximum and minimum principal axes (respectively) of the resultant ellipsoid. Samples with strongly prolate fabrics are isolated allowing further constraint on the petrofabric to be made. Once the efficacy of the petrofabric determination process has been determined, the resultant foliations (and lineations) then elucidate the most accurate petrofabric attainable. The most accurate petrofabrics will be determined by using the correct magnification when the images are obtained and to run the analyses without segmenting the image. The fabrics of the upper and lower contacts of the Karoo dolerite sills are analysed in detail using these techniques and the fabrics are used as a proxy for magma flow.

  10. Constraining complex aquifer geometry with geophysics (2-D ERT and MRS measurements) for stochastic modelling of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Sekhar, M.; Descloitres, M.; Godderis, Y.; Ruiz, L.; Braun, J. J.

    2013-11-01

    Stochastic modelling is a useful way of simulating complex hard-rock aquifers as hydrological properties (permeability, porosity etc.) can be described using random variables with known statistics. However, very few studies have assessed the influence of topological uncertainty (i.e. the variability of thickness of conductive zones in the aquifer), probably because it is not easy to retrieve accurate statistics of the aquifer geometry, especially in hard rock context. In this paper, we assessed the potential of using geophysical surveys to describe the geometry of a hard rock-aquifer in a stochastic modelling framework. The study site was a small experimental watershed in South India, where the aquifer consisted of a clayey to loamy-sandy zone (regolith) underlain by a conductive fissured rock layer (protolith) and the unweathered gneiss (bedrock) at the bottom. The spatial variability of the thickness of the regolith and fissured layers was estimated by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles, which were performed along a few cross sections in the watershed. For stochastic analysis using Monte Carlo simulation, the generated random layer thickness was made conditional to the available data from the geophysics. In order to simulate steady state flow in the irregular domain with variable geometry, we used an isoparametric finite element method to discretize the flow equation over an unstructured grid with irregular hexahedral elements. The results indicated that the spatial variability of the layer thickness had a significant effect on reducing the simulated effective steady seepage flux and that using the conditional simulations reduced the uncertainty of the simulated seepage flux. As a conclusion, combining information on the aquifer geometry obtained from geophysical surveys with stochastic modelling is a promising methodology to improve the simulation of groundwater flow in complex hard-rock aquifers.

  11. Mixed fluid sources involved in diamond growth constrained by Sr-Nd-Pb-C-N isotopes and trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-BenDavid, Ofra; Pearson, D. Graham; Nowell, Geoff M.; Ottley, Chris; McNeill, John C. R.; Cartigny, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Sub-micrometer inclusions in diamonds carry high-density fluids (HDF) from which the host diamonds have precipitated. The chemistry of these fluids is our best opportunity of characterizing the diamond-forming environment. The trace element patterns of diamond fluids vary within a limited range and are similar to those of carbonatitic/kimberlitic melts that originate from beneath the lithospheric mantle. A convecting mantle origin for the fluid is also implied by C isotopic compositions and by a preliminary Sr isotopic study (Akagi, T., Masuda, A., 1988. Isotopic and elemental evidence for a relationship between kimberlite and Zaire cubic diamonds. Nature 336, 665-667.). Nevertheless, the major element chemistry of HDFs is very different from that of kimberlites and carbonatites, varying widely and being characterized by extreme K enrichment (up to ˜ 39 wt.% on a water and carbonate free basis) and high volatile contents. The broad spectrum of major element compositions in diamond-forming fluids has been related to fluid-rock interaction and to immiscibility processes. Elemental signatures can be easily modified by a variety of mantle processes whereas radiogenic isotopes give a clear fingerprint of the time-integrated evolution of the fluid source region. Here we present the results of the first multi radiogenic-isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb) and trace element study on fluid-rich diamonds, implemented using a newly developed off-line laser sampling technique. The data are combined with N and C isotope analysis of the diamond matrix to better understand the possible sources of fluid involved in the formation of these diamonds. Sr isotope ratios vary significantly within single diamonds. The highly varied but unsupported Sr isotope ratios cannot be explained by immiscibility processes or fluid-mineral elemental fractionations occurring at the time of diamond growth. Our results demonstrate the clear involvement of a mixed fluid, with one component originating from ancient

  12. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-04-28

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneousmore » systems by identifying the type of material in each element.« less

  13. A finite element method for the computation of transonic flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element method for the computation of the transonic flow with shocks past airfoils is presented using the artificial viscosity concept for the local supersonic regime. Generally, the classic element types do not meet the accuracy requirements of advanced numerical aerodynamics requiring special attention to the choice of an appropriate element. A series of computed pressure distributions exhibits the usefulness of the method.

  14. Sand Production Modeling Using Superquadric Discrete Elements and Coupling of Fluid Flow and Particle Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S. Perkins, E.D.

    1999-02-10

    Techniques for modeling oil well sand production have been developed using the formulations for superquadric discrete elements and Darcy fluid flow. Discrete element models are generated using the new technique of particle cloning. Discrete element sources and sinks allow simulation of sand production from the initial state through the transition to an equilibrium state where particles are created and removed at the same rate.

  15. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  16. Replacement of fluid-filter elements without interruption of flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotler, R. A.; Ward, J. B.

    1969-01-01

    Gatling-type filter assembly, preloaded with several filter elements enables filter replacement without breaking into the operative fluid system. When the filter element becomes contaminated, a unit inner subassembly is rotated 60 degrees to position a clean filter in the line.

  17. Cellular Structures in the Flow Over the Flap of a Two-Element Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yon, Steven A.; Katz, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Flow visualization information and time dependent pressure coefficients were recorded for the flow over a two-element wing. The investigation focused on the stall onset; particularly at a condition where the flow is attached on the main element but separated on the flap. At this condition, spanwise separation cells were visible in the flow over the flap, and time dependent pressure data was measured along the centerline of the separation cell. The flow visualizations indicated that the spanwise occurrence of the separation cells depends on the flap (and not wing) aspect ratio.

  18. Using chalcophile elements to constrain crustal contamination and xenolith-magma interaction in Cenozoic basalts of eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Gang; Huang, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Chen, Li-Hui; Xu, Xi-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Continental basalts have complicated petrogenetic processes, and their chemical compositions can be affected by multi-staged geological evolution. Compared to lithophile elements, chalcophile elements including Ni, platinum-group elements (PGEs) and Cu are sensitive to sulfide segregation and fractional crystallization during the evolution of mantle-derived magmas and can provide constraints on the genesis of continental basalts. Cenozoic intra-continental alkaline basalts in the Nanjing basaltic field, eastern China, include high-Ca and low-Ca varieties. All these basalts have poor PGE contents with Ir ranging from 0.016 ppb to 0.288 ppb and high Cu/Pd ratios from 0.7 × 105 to 4.7 × 105 (5.7 × 103 for DMM), indicating that they were derived from sulfide-saturated mantle sources with variable amounts of residual sulfide during melting or might undergo an early-sulfide segregation in the mantle. Relatively high Cu/Pd ratios along with high Pd concentrations for the high-Ca alkaline basalts indicate an additional removal of sulfide during magma ascent. Because these basalts have high, variable Pd/Ir ratios (2.8-16.8) with low Ce/Pb (9.9-19.7) ratios and εNd values (+ 3.6-+6.4), crustal contamination is proposed to be a potential process to induce the sulfide saturation and removal. Significantly increased Pd/Ir ratios for few high-Ca basalts can be explained by the fractionation of laurite or Ru-Os-Ir alloys with olivine or chromite. For low-Ca alkaline basalts, their PGE contents are well correlated with the MgO, Sc contents, incompatible element ratios (Lu/Hf, Na/Ti and Ca/Al) and Hf isotopes. Good correlations are also observed between Pd/Ir (or Rh/Ir) and Na/Ti (or Ca/Al) ratios. Variations of these elemental ratios and Hf isotopes is previously documented to be induced by the mixing of peridotite xenolith-released melts during ascent. Therefore, we suggest that such xenolith-magma interaction are also responsible for the variable PGE compositions of low

  19. Finite element analysis of aeroacoustic jet-flap flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    A computational analysis was performed on the steady, turbulent aerodynamic flowfields associated with a jet-blown flap. For regions devoid of flow separation, a parabolic approximation to the governing time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations was applied. Numerical results are presented for the symmetry plane flow of a slot-nozzle planar jet flap geometry, including prediction of flowfield evolution within the secondary mixing region immediately downstream of the trailing edge. Using a two equation turbulence kinetic energy closure model, rapid generation and decay of large spatial gradients in mean and correlated fluctuating velocity components within the immediate wake region were predicted. Modifications to the turbulent flow structure, as induced by porous surface treatment of the flap, were evaluated. The recirculating flow within a representative discrete slot in the surface was evaluated, using the two dimensional, time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Constrained Source Apportionment of Coarse Particulate Matter and Selected Trace Elements in Three Cities from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sturtz, Timothy M.; Adar, Sara D.; Gould, Timothy; Larson, Timothy V.

    2016-01-01

    PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles was used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Brake wear, tire wear, fertilized soil, and re-suspended soil were found to be important sources of copper, zinc, phosphorus, and silicon respectively across all three urban areas. PMID:27468256

  1. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  2. A spectral element method for the simulation of unsteady incompressible flows with heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karniadakis, George E.; Patera, Anthony T.

    1986-01-01

    The spectral element method is a high-order finite element technique for solution of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations. In the isoparametric spectral element discretization, the domain is broken up into general brick elements, and the dependent and independent variables represented as high-order tensor-product Lagrangian interpolants through Chebyshev collocation points. The nonlinear and convective terms in the governing equations are treated with explicit collocation, while the pressure and diffusive contributions are handled implicitly using variational projection operators. The method is applied to flow past a cylinder, flow in grooved channels, and natural convection in an enclosure.

  3. Experimental investigation of the flow near the ram element in the brush turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmirler, M.; Netřebská, H.

    2015-05-01

    The paper focuses on the investigating of the parameters of the fluid flow around the brush turbine ram element. The flow field was evaluated qualitatively by observing changes in density using a Schlieren method. It was also evaluated the influence of the element geometry on the total aerodynamic force of the element. The aerodynamic force was measured directly using a special aerodynamic balance. The aim of the project was to find the simplest element geometry with a maximum force effect and achieve an increase in overall efficiency and reduce the manufacturing costs.

  4. Persistent inflation at Aira caldera accompanying explosive activity at Sakurajima volcano: Constraining deformation source parameters from Finite Element inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Iguchi, Masato; Nakamichi, Haruhisa

    2015-04-01

    Aira caldera is located within Kagoshima Bay at the southern end of Kyushu, Japan. Sakurajima is an active post-caldera andesitic stratovolcano that sits on the caldera's southern rim. Despite frequent Vulcanian-type explosive activity, the area is experiencing continued uplift at a maximum rate of approximately 1.5 cm/yr with a footprint of 40 km, indicating that magma is being supplied faster than it is erupted. This is of particular concern as the amplitude of deformation is approaching the level inferred prior to the 1914 VEI 4 eruption. Using GPS data from 1996 - 2007 we explore causes for the uplift. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we use an inverse Finite Element method accounting for three-dimensional material heterogeneity (inferred from seismic tomography) and the surrounding topography of the region. The same inversions are also carried out using Finite Element models that incorporate simplified homogeneous or one-dimensional subsurface material properties, with and without topography. Results from the comparison of the six different models show statistically significant differences in the inferred deformation sources. This indicates that both subsurface heterogeneity and surface topography are essential in geodetic modelling to extract the most realistic deformation source parameters. The current best-fit source sits within a seismic low-velocity zone in the north-east of the caldera at a depth of approximately 14 km with a volume increase of 1.2 x 108 m3. The source location underlies a region of active underwater fumaroles within the Wakamiko crater and differs significantly from previous analytical modelling results. Seismic data further highlights areas of high seismic attenuation as well as large aseismic zones, both of which could allude to inelastic behaviour and a significant heat source at depth. To integrate these observations, subsequent forward Finite Element models will quantify the importance of rheology and

  5. Finite element analysis and computer graphics visualization of flow around pitching and plunging airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.

    1973-01-01

    A general computational method for analyzing unsteady flow around pitching and plunging airfoils was developed. The finite element method was applied in developing an efficient numerical procedure for the solution of equations describing the flow around airfoils. The numerical results were employed in conjunction with computer graphics techniques to produce visualization of the flow. The investigation involved mathematical model studies of flow in two phases: (1) analysis of a potential flow formulation and (2) analysis of an incompressible, unsteady, viscous flow from Navier-Stokes equations.

  6. Effect of River Training Project on Hydrodynamics Flow Circumstances by 2D Finite Element Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, B.; Li, D. F.; Hu, H. J.; Zhang, H. W.; Lou, L. H.; Chen, M.; Lv, Z. Y.

    Based on the verified two dimensional(2D) finite element model for river flow simulation, the effect of estuary training levees on the water flow and sediment movement in the Yellow River estuary is analyzed. For disclosing the effect of setting the two training levees on the flow and sediment motion, the calculation and analysis for the two projects, (one is no levees, the other is setting up two no levees) are given. The results show that when setting up two training levees, water flow is bound by levees and the water flows become more concentrated. As a result, velocity increases in the main channel, sediment carrying capacity of water flow increases correspondingly.

  7. Elements of an improved model of debris‐flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth‐averaged model of debris‐flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore‐fluid pressure. Non‐hydrostatic pore‐fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state‐dependent property that links the depth‐averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore‐pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate‐dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate‐independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore‐pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states.

  8. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows for Aerothermodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) Finite Element Simulation. It covers the background, governing equations, weak formulation, shock capturing, inviscid flux discretization, time discretization, linearization, and implicit solution strategies. It also reviews some applications such as Type IV Shock Interaction, Forward-Facing Cavity and AEDC Sharp Double Cone.

  9. Applications of the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and the Solution Element to Unsteady Chemically Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    2001-01-01

    This document reports the conclusion and findings of our research activities for this grant. The goal of the project is the development and application of the method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element, or the CE/SE method, to simulate chemically reacting flows. The product of this project will be a high-fidelity, time-accurate flow solver analyzing unsteady flow fields advanced propulsion concepts, including the low-emission turbojet engine combustion and flow fields of the Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE). Based on the documents and computer software of the CE/SE method that we have received from the CE/SE working group at NASA Lewis, we have focused our research effort on addressing outstanding technical issues related to the extension of the CE/SE method for unsteady, chemically reactive flows. In particular, we have made progresses in the following three aspects: (1) Derivation of the governing equations for reacting flows; (2) Numerical treatments of stiff source terms; and (3) Detailed simulations of ZND detonation waves.

  10. The least-squares finite element method for low-mach-number compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1994-01-01

    The present paper reports the development of the Least-Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM) for simulating compressible viscous flows at low Mach numbers in which the incompressible flows pose as an extreme. Conventional approach requires special treatments for low-speed flows calculations: finite difference and finite volume methods are based on the use of the staggered grid or the preconditioning technique; and, finite element methods rely on the mixed method and the operator-splitting method. In this paper, however, we show that such difficulty does not exist for the LSFEM and no special treatment is needed. The LSFEM always leads to a symmetric, positive-definite matrix through which the compressible flow equations can be effectively solved. Two numerical examples are included to demonstrate the method: first, driven cavity flows at various Reynolds numbers; and, buoyancy-driven flows with significant density variation. Both examples are calculated by using full compressible flow equations.

  11. Thermodynamically constrained averaging theory approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems: 5. Single-fluid-phase transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2009-05-01

    This work is the fifth in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. The general TCAT framework and the mathematical foundation presented in previous works are used to develop models that describe species transport and single-fluid-phase flow through a porous medium system in varying physical regimes. Classical irreversible thermodynamics formulations for species in fluids, solids, and interfaces are developed. Two different approaches are presented, one that makes use of a momentum equation for each entity along with constitutive relations for species diffusion and dispersion, and a second approach that makes use of a momentum equation for each species in an entity. The alternative models are developed by relying upon different approaches to constrain an entropy inequality using mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The resultant constrained entropy inequality is simplified and used to guide the development of closed models. Specific instances of dilute and non-dilute systems are examined and compared to alternative formulation approaches.

  12. Prediction of overall and blade-element performance for axial-flow pump configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Okiishi, T. H.; Miller, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A method and a digital computer program for prediction of the distributions of fluid velocity and properties in axial flow pump configurations are described and evaluated. The method uses the blade-element flow model and an iterative numerical solution of the radial equilbrium and continuity conditions. Correlated experimental results are used to generate alternative methods for estimating blade-element turning and loss characteristics. Detailed descriptions of the computer program are included, with example input and typical computed results.

  13. Enhanced finite element scheme for vibrational and flow induced sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, M.; Triebenbacher, S.; Wohlmuth, B.; Zörnre, S.

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents Finite Element (FE) methods for classical vibroacoustics as well as computational aeroacoustics. Therewith, we can handle different grid sizes in different regions and ensure a correct coupling at the interfaces by applying the Mortar FE method. Furthermore, we can fully take into account free radiation by a new Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, which is stable even for long term computations. The applicability of our developed numerical methods will be demonstrated by simulation results of the human phonation.

  14. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q2-Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two-equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied; the turbulence energy dissipation rate ([var epsilon]), the turbulence frequency ([omega]) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the K - [tau] transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow.

  15. Stress interaction at the Lazufre volcanic region, as constrained by InSAR, seismic tomography and boundary element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul; Spica, Zack; Legrand, Denis

    2016-04-01

    The Azufre-Lastarria volcanic complex in the central Andes has been recognized as a major region of magma intrusion. Both deep and shallow inflating reservoirs inferred through InSAR time series inversions, are the main sources of a multi-scale deformation accompanied by pronounced fumarolic activity. The possible interactions between these reservoirs, as well as the path of propagating fluids and the development of their pathways, however, have not been investigated. Results from recent seismic noise tomography in the area show localized zones of shear wave velocity anomalies, with a low shear wave velocity region at 1 km depth and another one at 4 km depth beneath Lastarria. Although the inferred shallow zone is in a good agreement with the location of the shallow deformation source, the deep zone does not correspond to any deformation source in the area. Here, using the boundary element method (BEM), we have performed an in-depth continuum mechanical investigation of the available ascending and descending InSAR data. We modelled the deep source, taking into account the effect of topography and complex source geometry on the inversion. After calculating the stress field induced by this source, we apply Paul's criterion (a variation on Mohr-Coulomb failure) to recognize locations that are liable for failure. We show that the locations of tensile and shear failure almost perfectly coincide with the shallow and deep anomalies as identified by shear wave velocity, respectively. Based on the stress-change models we conjecture that the deep reservoir controls the development of shallower hydrothermal fluids; a hypothesis that can be tested and applied to other volcanoes.

  16. Singularity computations. [finite element methods for elastoplastic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Direct descriptions of the structure of a singularity would describe the radial and angular distributions of the field quantities as explicitly as practicable along with some measure of the intensity of the singularity. This paper discusses such an approach based on recent development of numerical methods for elastoplastic flow. Attention is restricted to problems where one variable or set of variables is finite at the origin of the singularity but a second set is not.

  17. Elements of an improved model of debris-flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth-averaged model of debris-flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore-fluid pressure. Non-hydrostatic pore-fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state-dependent property that links the depth-averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore-pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate-dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate-independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore-pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Elemental transport coefficients in viscous plasma flows near local thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Alessio; Kustova, Elena V

    2009-05-01

    We propose a convenient formulation of elemental transport coefficients in chemically reacting and plasma flows locally approaching thermodynamic equilibrium. A set of transport coefficients for elemental diffusion velocities, heat flux, and electric current is introduced. These coefficients relate the transport fluxes with the electric field and with the spatial gradients of elemental fractions, pressure, and temperature. The proposed formalism based on chemical elements and fully symmetric with the classical transport theory based on chemical species, is particularly suitable to model mixing and demixing phenomena due to diffusion of chemical elements. The aim of this work is threefold: to define a simple and rigorous framework suitable for numerical implementation, to allow order of magnitude estimations and qualitative predictions of elemental transport phenomena, and to gain a deeper insight into the physics of chemically reacting flows near local equilibrium. PMID:19518564

  19. Mean and turbulent flow development through an array of rotating elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    The adjustment of an incoming boundary layer profile as it impacts and interacts with an array of elements has received significant attention in the context of terrestrial and aquatic canopies and more recently in the context of horizontal axis wind farms. The distance required for the mean flow profile to stabilize, the energy transport through the array, and the structure of the turbulence within the array are directly dependent upon such factors as the element height, density, rigidity/flexibility, frontal area distribution, element homogeneity, and underlying topography. In the present study, the mean and turbulent development of the flow through an array of rotating elements was examined experimentally. Element rotation has been shown to drastically alter wake dynamics of single and paired elements, but the possible extension of such rotation-driven dynamics had not previously been examined on larger groups of elements. Practically, such an array of rotating elements may provide insight into the flow dynamics of an array of vertical axis wind turbines. 2D particle image velocimetry was used along the length of the array in order to examine the effects of an increasing ratio of cylinder rotation speed to streamwise freestream velocity on flow development and structure. Work supported by a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship & Stanford Graduate Fellowship to A.E.C, by funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF2645, and by funding from the EFML.

  20. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  1. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  2. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element method with a Galerkin solution (FEMGS) technique is formulated for the solution of nonlinear problems in high-pressure compressible seal flow analyses. An example of a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow having nonlinearities, due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia, is used for illustrating the application of the technique.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF : ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODELING OF GROUND-WATER FLOW AND HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several advances in the analytic element method have been made to enhance its performance and facilitate three-dimensional ground-water flow modeling in a regional aquifer setting. First, a new public domain modular code (ModAEM) has been developed for modeling ground-water flow ...

  4. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  5. Spectral Element Method for the Simulation of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    This work uses a discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element method (DGSEM) to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations [1{3]. The inviscid ux is computed using the approximate Riemann solver of Roe [4]. The viscous fluxes are computed using the second form of Bassi and Rebay (BR2) [5] in a manner consistent with the spectral-element approximation. The method of lines with the classical 4th-order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for time integration. Results for polynomial orders up to p = 15 (16th order) are presented. The code is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The computations presented in this work are performed using the Sandy Bridge nodes of the NASA Pleiades supercomputer at NASA Ames Research Center. Each Sandy Bridge node consists of 2 eight-core Intel Xeon E5-2670 processors with a clock speed of 2.6Ghz and 2GB per core memory. On a Sandy Bridge node the Tau Benchmark [6] runs in a time of 7.6s.

  6. Application of a finite element algorithm for high speed viscous flows using structured and unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vemaganti, Gururaja R.; Wieting, Allan R.

    1990-01-01

    A higher-order streamline upwinding Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is employed for high speed viscous flow analysis using structured and unstructured meshes. For a Mach 8.03 shock interference problem, successive mesh adaptation was performed using an adaptive remeshing method. Results from the finite element algorithm compare well with both experimental data and results from an upwind cell-centered method. Finite element results for a Mach 14.1 flow over a 24 degree compression corner compare well with experimental data and two other numerical algorithms for both structured and unstructured meshes.

  7. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    High pressure gas sealing involves not only balancing the viscous force with the pressure gradient force but also accounting for fluid inertia--especially for choked flow. The conventional finite element method which uses a Rayleigh-Ritz solution technique is not convenient for nonlinear problems. For these problems, a finite element method with a Galerkin solution technique (FEMGST) was formulated. One example, a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow formulation has nonlinearities due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia. Solutions agree with classical results in the limiting cases. The development of the choked flow velocity profile is shown.

  8. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  9. A global spectral element model for poisson equations and advective flow over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Huan; Wang, Faming; Zeng, Zhong; Qiu, Zhouhua; Yin, Linmao; Li, Liang

    2016-03-01

    A global spherical Fourier-Legendre spectral element method is proposed to solve Poisson equations and advective flow over a sphere. In the meridional direction, Legendre polynomials are used and the region is divided into several elements. In order to avoid coordinate singularities at the north and south poles in the meridional direction, Legendre-Gauss-Radau points are chosen at the elements involving the two poles. Fourier polynomials are applied in the zonal direction for its periodicity, with only one element. Then, the partial differential equations are solved on the longitude-latitude meshes without coordinate transformation between spherical and Cartesian coordinates. For verification of the proposed method, a few Poisson equations and advective flows are tested. Firstly, the method is found to be valid for test cases with smooth solution. The results of the Poisson equations demonstrate that the present method exhibits high accuracy and exponential convergence. Highprecision solutions are also obtained with near negligible numerical diffusion during the time evolution for advective flow with smooth shape. Secondly, the results of advective flow with non-smooth shape and deformational flow are also shown to be reasonable and effective. As a result, the present method is proved to be capable of solving flow through different types of elements, and thereby a desirable method with reliability and high accuracy for solving partial differential equations over a sphere.

  10. Response of hot element flush wall gauges in oscillating laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, T. A.; Cook, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The time dependent response characteristics of flush-mounted hot element gauges used as instruments to measure wall shear stress in unsteady periodic air flows were investigated. The study was initiated because anomalous results were obtained from the gauges in oscillating turbulent flows for the phase relation of the wall shear stress variation, indicating possible gauge response problems. Flat plate laminar oscillating turbulent flows characterized by a mean free stream velocity with a superposed sinusoidal variation were performed. Laminar rather than turbulent flows were studied, because a numerical solution for the phase angle between the free stream velocity and the wall shear stress variation that is known to be correct can be obtained. The focus is on comparing the phase angle indicated by the hot element gauges with corresponding numerical prediction for the phase angle, since agreement would indicate that the hot element gauges faithfully follow the true wall shear stress variation.

  11. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  12. Lunar surface heat flow mapping from radioactive elements measured by Lunar Prospector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Li, Xiongyao; Li, Qingxia; Lang, Liang; Zheng, Yongchun

    2014-06-01

    An accurate estimate of global surface heat flow is important because it provides strong constraints on interior thermal model and understanding of the thermal state and geologic evolution of the Moon. In this paper, a distribution map of lunar surface heat flow is derived from calibrated Lunar Prospector gamma-ray spectrometer data (K, U and Th abundances). It shows that surface heat flow varies regionally from about 10.6 mW/m2 to 66.1 mW/m2, which is in the same order of magnitude as previous results. In the calculation, lunar surface heat flow includes the heat flow from the non-uniform distribution of radioactive elements K, U and Th and that from secular cooling of the Moon. The calculation of heat flow from radioactive elements is based on the assumption that the radioactive decay of K, U and Th on the Moon is the same as that on the Earth. The heat flow from secular cooling of the Moon is assumed to be equal to the global average radioactive heat flow. Firstly we construct a relationship between radioactive elements K, U and Th and lunar surface heat flow. The key parameter of the characteristic length scale in the relationship is determined by measured surface heat flow and Th abundances at Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites. Then the distribution of lunar surface heat flow is derived by combining other parameters such as lunar crustal thickness measured by Clementine and lunar crustal density. In addition, correlation analysis of the three radioactive elements is carried out due to the higher resolution of Th abundance and for ease of calculation.

  13. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  14. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  15. Modified finite-element model for application to terrain-induced mesoscale flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Leone, J.M. Jr.; Gresho, P.M.

    1982-11-01

    Terrain-induced mesoscale flows are localized atmospheric motions generated primarily by surface inhomogeneities such as differential heating and irregular terrain. Well-known examples of such flows are sea-and-land breeze circulations, mountain-valley flows, urban heat island circulations and mountain lee waves. A numerical model capable of capturing the details of these frequently complicated flow patterns must often contain a realistic and rather accurate representation of the relevant terrain. Over the last decade, mesoscale models have been developed in which various approaches were used to incorporate variable terrain. In this study, a somewhat unique approach, based on a modified finite element procedure, was used to solve the nonhydrostatic planetary boundary layer equations. The nonhydrostatic and finite element features of the model are particularly advantageous for modeling flows over complex topography. The numerical aspects of the model, the parameterizations currently used, and a few preliminary results are presented.

  16. The effect of slot height and difference in gas densities for coaxial jets on jet mixing in constrained swirled flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, N. E.

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were conducted about the effect of height of annular slot on efficiency of film cooling in a tube flow. Nonisothermal nature of flows was modelled by mixing of jets with different densities: air with argon or with helium: the concentration of foreign gas on wall was measured. The influence of nearwall jet swirling and of proportions of densities of gas flows as key factors for laminarization of mixing was considered.

  17. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  18. Supercomputer implementation of finite element algorithms for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of compressible flow phenomena using the finite element method is of recent origin and considerable interest. Two shock capturing finite element formulations for high speed compressible flows are described. A Taylor-Galerkin formulation uses a Taylor series expansion in time coupled with a Galerkin weighted residual statement. The Taylor-Galerkin algorithms use explicit artificial dissipation, and the performance of three dissipation models are compared. A Petrov-Galerkin algorithm has as its basis the concepts of streamline upwinding. Vectorization strategies are developed to implement the finite element formulations on the NASA Langley VPS-32. The vectorization scheme results in finite element programs that use vectors of length of the order of the number of nodes or elements. The use of the vectorization procedure speeds up processing rates by over two orders of magnitude. The Taylor-Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin algorithms are evaluated for 2D inviscid flows on criteria such as solution accuracy, shock resolution, computational speed and storage requirements. The convergence rates for both algorithms are enhanced by local time-stepping schemes. Extension of the vectorization procedure for predicting 2D viscous and 3D inviscid flows are demonstrated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the applicability of the finite element procedures for realistic problems that require hundreds of thousands of nodes.

  19. A finite element computational method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1987-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables are interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions, and the pressure is interpolated using linear shape functions which are defined on a triangular element for the two-dimensional case and on a tetrahedral element for the three-dimensional case. The triangular element and the tetrahedral element are contained inside the complete bi- and tri-quadratic elements for velocity variables for two and three dimensional cases, respectively, so that the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow of Reynolds numbers 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorably with the finite difference computational results and/or experimental data available. It was found that the present method can capture the delicate pressure driven recirculation zones, that the method did not yield any spurious pressure modes, and that the method requires fewer grid points than the finite difference methods to obtain comparable computational results.

  20. Using GRACE total water storage data to constrain the dynamics of surface flow in the Community Land Model in the Amazon and Orinoco basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Linage, C.; Lo, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    The surface water component is a major contributor to total water storage in the Amazon and Orinoco basins in South America. Global models that do not account for surface water routing often show poor agreement with the GRACE total water storage observations. In this study, we aim at constraining the spatial variations in surface flow simulated by the routing scheme of the CLM3.5. Two tests are performed corresponding to different choices for the surface-flow velocity value: a homogeneous-velocity model and a two-velocity model (with an upstream velocity that is larger than the downstream velocity in each river channel). The comparison with the GRACE observations is based on selected modes of a Principal Component Analysis of both data sets in order to take into account the spatio-temporal modes of the total water storage.

  1. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  2. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T. J.; Karr, Gerald R.

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  3. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  4. Internal flow measurements of the SSME fuel preburner injector element using real time neutron radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, John T.; Elam, Sandy; Koblish, Ted; Lee, Phil; Mcauliffe, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Due to observations of unsteady flow in the Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel preburner injector element, several flow studies have been performed. Real time neutron radiography tests were recently completed. This technique provided real time images of MiL-c-7024 and Freon-22 flow through an aluminum liquid oxygen post model at three back pressures (0, 150, and 545 psig) and pressure drops up to 1000 psid. Separated flow appeared only while operating at back pressures of 0 and 150 psig. The behavior of separated flow was similar to that observed for water in a 3x acrylic model of the LOX post. On the average, separated flow appeared to reattach near the exit of the post when the ratio of pressure drop to supply pressure was about 0.75.

  5. Finite element analysis of transonic flows in cascades: Importance of computational grids in improving accuracy and convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecer, A.; Akay, H. U.

    1981-01-01

    The finite element method is applied for the solution of transonic potential flows through a cascade of airfoils. Convergence characteristics of the solution scheme are discussed. Accuracy of the numerical solutions is investigated for various flow regions in the transonic flow configuration. The design of an efficient finite element computational grid is discussed for improving accuracy and convergence.

  6. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.

    1995-02-15

    The equations of motion describing turbulent flows (in both the low and high Reynolds-number regimes) are well established. However, present day computers cannot meet the enormous computational requirement for numerically solving the governing equations for common engineering flows in the high Reynolds number turbulent regime. The characteristics that make turbulent, high Reynolds number flows difficult to simulate is the extreme range of time and space scales of motion. Most current engineering calculations are performed using semi-empirical equations, developed in terms of the flow mean (average) properties. These turbulence{open_quote} models{close_quote} (semi-empirical/analytical approximations) do not explicitly account for the eddy structures and thus, the temporal and spatial flow fluctuations are not resolved. In these averaging approaches, it is necessary to approximate all the turbulent structures using semi-empirical relations, and as a result, the turbulence models must be tailored for specific flow conditions and geometries with parameters obtained (usually) from physical experiments. The motivation for this research is the development of a finite element turbulence modeling approach which will ultimately be used to predict the wind flow around buildings. Accurate turbulence models of building flow are needed to predict the dispersion of airborne pollutants. The building flow turbulence models used today are not capable of predicting the three-dimensional separating and reattaching flows without the manipulation of many empirical parameters. These empirical parameters must be set by experimental data and they may vary unpredictably with building geometry, building orientation, and upstream flow conditions.

  7. Computational Analysis of Enhanced Magnetic Bioseparation in Microfluidic Systems with Flow-Invasive Magnetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Khashan, S. A.; Alazzam, A.; Furlani, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic design is proposed for realizing greatly enhanced separation of magnetically-labeled bioparticles using integrated soft-magnetic elements. The elements are fixed and intersect the carrier fluid (flow-invasive) with their length transverse to the flow. They are magnetized using a bias field to produce a particle capture force. Multiple stair-step elements are used to provide efficient capture throughout the entire flow channel. This is in contrast to conventional systems wherein the elements are integrated into the walls of the channel, which restricts efficient capture to limited regions of the channel due to the short range nature of the magnetic force. This severely limits the channel size and hence throughput. Flow-invasive elements overcome this limitation and enable microfluidic bioseparation systems with superior scalability. This enhanced functionality is quantified for the first time using a computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer. PMID:24931437

  8. Computational Modeling for the Flow Over a Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Liu, Feng-Jun

    1999-01-01

    The flow over a multi-element airfoil is computed using two two-equation turbulence models. The computations are performed using the INS2D) Navier-Stokes code for two angles of attack. Overset grids are used for the three-element airfoil. The computed results are compared with experimental data for the surface pressure, skin friction coefficient, and velocity magnitude. The computed surface quantities generally agree well with the measurement. The computed results reveal the possible existence of a mixing-layer-like region of flow next to the suction surface of the slat for both angles of attack.

  9. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Robert James

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q-2Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied: the turbulence energy dissipation rate (epsilon), the turbulence frequency (omega) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the k-tau transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow. Attempts to extend the formulation beyond the flat channel were not successful due to oscillatory

  10. A FORTRAN computer code for calculating flows in multiple-blade-element cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution technique has been developed for solving the multiple-blade-element, surface-of-revolution, blade-to-blade flow problem in turbomachinery. The calculation solves approximate flow equations which include the effects of compressibility, radius change, blade-row rotation, and variable stream sheet thickness. An integral equation solution (i.e., panel method) is used to solve the equations. A description of the computer code and computer code input is given in this report.

  11. Terrestrial Laser Scanning of Lava Flows to Constrain Fracture Models in Geothermal Reservoirs; a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massiot, C.; Garcia-Sélles, D.; Nicol, A., , Prof; Mcnamara, D. D.; Townend, J.; Archibald, G.; Siratovich, P. A.; Villeneuve, M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal reservoirs hosted in volcanic rocks, like the Rotokawa Geothermal Field in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, typically contain fracture networks that control fluid flow. Realistic discrete fracture network (DFN) models have the potential to improve geothermal resource management. However, the spatial distribution and geometries of fracture networks are often poorly understood due to limited data and complex deformation histories including lava emplacement, subsequent burial and faulting.To understand better the distribution of fractures formed during lava emplacement, we study andesitic flow exposures from Mt Ruapehu, at the southern end of the TVZ. Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) acquisition on three 50-200 m2 outcrops provided large 3D point clouds of the shape of the outcrop. Delineation of thousands of individual fractures has been semi-automated using local geometrical constraints and a shape detection algorithm detecting planar and curved surfaces. Fracture orientation, length, area, linear (P10) and areal (P20) densities from the TLS data provide input parameters for the DFN models. Fracture detection is validated using high-resolution panoramic photographs (GigaPan) and manual scanline measurements. Cooling joints are highly connected via sub-horizontal joints that are aligned with vesicular layers. UCS tests show a mechanical anisotropy between vertical and horizontal samples. Most of the cooling joints terminate within or at the brecciated margins of individual flows which contrast mechanically with the massive flow interior. Thus, highly connected and curved fractures are mostly confined to lava flows.This study provides a framework for developing DFNs for geothermal reservoirs hosted in andesitic flows based on empirical observations of intrinsic fracturing and mechanical anisotropies of the host lithology. Fractures in individual lava flows may be interconnected in the reservoir by a combination of cooling joints, subsequent

  12. Comparing magnetic and magmatic fabrics to constrain the magma flow record in La Gloria pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payacán, Italo; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Gelman, Sarah E.; Bachmann, Olivier; Parada, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    This contribution illustrates a case study of a pluton (La Gloria pluton; LGP) where magnetic and magmatic fabrics are locally decoupled. We compare the magmatic fabric with the available magnetic fabric data to explore their abilities and elucidate the magma flow record of LGP. Results indicate that magnetic (controlled by multi-domain magnetite) and magmatic fabrics are generally consistent throughout LGP. Foliations define an axisymmetric pattern that gradually changes from vertical near lateral margins to less steep in the pluton interior, whereas lineations are subhorizontal following the elongation direction of the pluton. However, samples at the pluton center show marked differences between both fabrics: magnetic fabrics indicate subhorizontal magnetic lineations and foliations, and magmatic fabrics indicate subvertical lineations and foliations. Both magnetic and magmatic fabrics are interpreted to record strain caused by magma flow during thermal convection and lateral magma propagation at the transition between low and high crystallinity stages. We suggest that fabrics acquisition and consistency were determined by shear conditions (pure/simple shear rates ratio) and the orientation of the magma flow direction with respect to a rigid boundary (critical crystalline region) of the pluton. Magmatic fabric differs at the center of the pluton because pure shear is dominant and ascendant flows are orthogonal to the horizontal rigid boundary. LGP represents a whole-scale partly molten magma reservoir, where both thermal convection and lateral propagation of the magma are recorded simultaneously. This study highlights the importance of characterizing both fabrics to properly interpret magma flow recorded in plutons.

  13. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    The incompressible, viscous, turbulent flow over single and multi-element airfoils is numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution algorithm employs the method of pseudo compressibility and utilizes an upwind differencing scheme for the convective fluxes, and an implicit line-relaxation scheme. The motivation for this work includes interest in studying high-lift take-off and landing configurations of various aircraft. In particular, accurate computation of lift and drag at various angles of attack up to stall is desired. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil; an accurate prediction of stall is obtained. The approach used for multi-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared; a patched system of grids, and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time on a CRAY YMP per element in the airfoil configuration.

  14. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over single and multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. L.; Kwak, Dochan

    1992-01-01

    Incompressible viscous turbulent flows over single- and multiple-element airfoils are numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution algorithm uses the method of pseudocompressibility with an upwind-differencing scheme for the convective fluxes and an implicit line-relaxation scheme to study high-lift take-off and landing configurations and to compute lift and drag at various angles of attack up to stall. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil. The approach used for multiple-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared: a patched system of grids and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface-pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time on a CRAY YMP per element in the airfoil configuration.

  15. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Kwak, Dochan

    1992-01-01

    The incompressible, viscous, turbulent flow over single and multi-element airfoils is numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The computer code uses the method of pseudo-compressibility with an upwind-differencing scheme for the convective fluxes and an implicit line-relaxation solution algorithm. The motivation for this work includes interest in studying the high-lift take-off and landing configurations of various aircraft. In particular, accurate computation of lift and drag at various angles of attack, up to stall, is desired. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil; an accurate prediction of stall is obtained. The approach used for multi-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared: a patched system of grids, and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time (on a CRAY YMP) per element in the airfoil configuration.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Flow Over a Savonius Wind Turbine Using a Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Sriharsha; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2009-11-01

    A parallel spectral element code, SpecSolve, is developed with the objective of modeling flows in complex geometries. This code supports both structured and unstructured meshes and allows exact representation of boundary surfaces which are particularly useful for modeling turbo machinery flows. In this talk we present the results from 2D Navier-Stokes simulations of flow over a Savonius turbine. The simulation uses a rotating mesh in regions surrounding the blade and a stationary mesh away from the rotor. Results of a 2D Optimization study involving overlap ratio and the number of blades are also presented. These results are compared with experimental data.

  17. Multiphase flow through porous media: an adaptive control volume finite element formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Tollit, B.; Gorman, G.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate modeling of multiphase flow in porous media is of great importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We have developed a numerical scheme which employs an implicit pressure explicit saturation (IMPES) algorithm for the temporal discretization of the governing equations. The saturation equation is spatially discretized using a node centered control volume method on an unstructured finite element mesh. The face values are determined through an upwind scheme. The pressure equation is spatially discretized using a continuous control volume finite element method (CV-FEM) to achieve consistency with the discrete saturation equation. The numerical simulation is implemented in Fluidity, an open source and general purpose fluid simulator capable of solving a number of different governing equations for fluid flow and accompanying field equations on arbitrary unstructured meshes. The model is verified against the Buckley-Leverett problem where a quasi-analytical solution is available. We discuss the accuracy and the order of convergence of the scheme. We demonstrate the scheme for modeling multiphase flow in a synthetic heterogeneous porous medium along with the use of anisotropic mesh adaptivity to control local solution errors and increase computational efficiency. The adaptive method is also used to simulate two-phase flow in heap leaching, an industrial mining process, where the flow of the leaching solution is gravitationally dominated. Finally we describe the extension of the developed numerical scheme for simulation of flow in multiscale fractured porous media and its capability to model the multiscale characterization of flow in full scale.

  18. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  3. A Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin Finite Element Scheme for Non-Ionized Hypersonic Flows in Thermochemical Nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.; Bova, Stephen W.; Bond, Ryan B.

    2011-01-01

    Presentation topics include background and motivation; physical modeling including governing equations and thermochemistry; finite element formulation; results of inviscid thermal nonequilibrium chemically reacting flow and viscous thermal equilibrium chemical reacting flow; and near-term effort.

  4. Constraining Vadose Zone Flow Model Parameterisation Using Gamma Ray Borehole Logs And Zero-offset Cross-hole Radar Profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Binley, A. M.; Winship, P.

    The identification of unsaturated flow parameters is traditionally based on core re- trieval and laboratory testing. This approach is notoriously affected by severe draw- backs, such as the likely disturbance to samples and a mismatch between the scale of interest (m) and the sample scale (cm). In this study, we endorse a different approach, which relies upon borehole geophysical (natural gamma) logs for structural/geological information and cross-hole geophysical (radar) data for the measurement of the hy- drological response to natural loads (effective rainfall). This approach is applied to the results of an extensive monitoring programme at the Eggborough experimental site in Yorkshire, UK. The gamma ray logs are utilised in a geostatistical framework to gen- erate, in a stochastic fashion, simplified lithology scenarios. Each lithology is charac- terised by a set of unsaturated flow parameters using the van Genuchten model. Each lithological scenario is used for 1D vertical unsaturated flow simulations of rainfall recharge at a few locations. Cross-hole zero-offset radar surveys at several locations are used to provide time-varying vertical profiles of water content. For each simu- lation, a goodness-of-fit index between predicted and measured moisture content is computed, and is used to rank the likelihood of that parameter set. Both lithology and flow parameters are generated via a nested Monte Carlo approach. As a result, the likely ranges of unsaturated hydraulic parameters are estimated.

  5. A numerical investigation of the finite element method in compressible primitive variable Navier-Stokes flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive numerical investigation of the basic capabilities of the finite element method (FEM) for numerical solution of compressible flow problems governed by the two-dimensional and axis-symmetric Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables are presented. The strong and weak points of the method as a tool for computational fluid dynamics are considered. The relation of the linear element finite element method to finite difference methods (FDM) is explored. The calculation of free shear layer and separated flows over aircraft boattail afterbodies with plume simulators indicate the strongest assets of the method are its capabilities for reliable and accurate calculation employing variable grids which readily approximate complex geometry and capably adapt to the presence of diverse regions of large solution gradients without the necessity of domain transformation.

  6. Gen Purpose 1-D Finite Element Network Fluid Flow Heat Transfer System Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-08-02

    SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow Simulator) is a FORTRAN computer program to simulate the integrated performance of systems involving fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and reactor dynamics. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the engineering simulation of almost any system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to versatility, speed and robustness are primary SAFSIM development goals. SAFSIM contains three basic physics modules: (1) a one-dimensional finite element fluid mechanicsmore » module with multiple flow network capability; (2) a one-dimensional finite element structure heat transfer module with multiple convection and radiation exchange capability; and (3) a point reactor dynamics module with reactivity feedback and decay heat capability. SAFSIM can be used for compressible and incompressible, single-phase, multicomponent flow systems.« less

  7. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-Flow Compressors. VII - Blade-Element Flow in Annular Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Jackson, Robert J.; Lieblein, Seymour

    1955-01-01

    Annular blade-element data obtained primarily from single-stage compressor installations are correlated over a range of inlet Mach numbers and cascade geometry. The correlation curves are presented in such a manner that they are related directly to the low-speed two-dimensional-cascade data of part VI of this series. Thus, the data serve as both an extension and a verification of the two-dimensional-cascade data. In addition, the correlation results are applied to compressor design.

  8. Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin networks constrain myosin II function in driving retrograde actin flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Pollard, Thomas D; Forscher, Paul

    2012-06-25

    The Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments to generate networks at the leading edge of motile cells. Nonmuscle myosin II produces contractile forces involved in driving actin network translocation. We inhibited the Arp2/3 complex and/or myosin II with small molecules to investigate their respective functions in neuronal growth cone actin dynamics. Inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex with CK666 reduced barbed end actin assembly site density at the leading edge, disrupted actin veils, and resulted in veil retraction. Strikingly, retrograde actin flow rates increased with Arp2/3 complex inhibition; however, when myosin II activity was blocked, Arp2/3 complex inhibition now resulted in slowing of retrograde actin flow and veils no longer retracted. Retrograde flow rate increases induced by Arp2/3 complex inhibition were independent of Rho kinase activity. These results provide evidence that, although the Arp2/3 complex and myosin II are spatially segregated, actin networks assembled by the Arp2/3 complex can restrict myosin II-dependent contractility with consequent effects on growth cone motility. PMID:22711700

  9. Visualization and finite element analysis of pulsatile flow in models of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Matsuzawa, T; Homma, T

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile flows in glass models simulating fusiform and lateral saccular aneurysms were investigated by a flow visualization method. When resting fluid starts to flow, the initial fluid motion is practically irrotational. After a short period of time, the flow began to separate from the proximal wall of the aneurysm. Then the separation bubble or vortex grew rapidly in size and filled the whole area of the aneurysm circumferentially. During this period of time, the center of the vortex moved from the proximal end to the distal point of the aneurysm. The transient reversal flow, for instance, which may occur at the end of the ejection period, passed between the wall of the aneurysm and the centrally located vortex. When the rate and pulsatile frequency of flow were high, the vortex broke down into highly disturbed flow (or turbulence) at the distal portion of the aneurysm. The same effect was observed when the length of the aneurysm was increased. A reduction in pulsatile amplitude made the flow pattern close to that in steady flow. A finite element analysis was made to obtain velocity and pressure fields in pulsatile flow through a tube with an axisymmetric expansion. Calculations were performed with the pulsatile flows used in the visualization experiment in order to study the effects of change in the pulsatile wave form by keeping the time-mean Reynolds number and Womersley's parameter unchanged. Calculated instantaneous patterns of velocity field and stream lines agreed well with the experimental results. The appearance and disappearance of the vortex in the dilated portion and its development resulted in complex distributions of pressure and shear fields. Locally minimum and maximum values of wall shear stress occurred at points just upstream and downstream of the distal end of the expansion when the flow rate reached its peak. PMID:2605323

  10. Chance-constrained overland flow modeling for improving conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations based on scaling representation of sub-daily rainfall variability.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Yuefei; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zhong; Chen, Qiuwen

    2015-08-15

    Lack of hydrologic process representation at the short time-scale would lead to inadequate simulations in distributed hydrological modeling. Especially for complex mountainous watersheds, surface runoff simulations are significantly affected by the overland flow generation, which is closely related to the rainfall characteristics at a sub-time step. In this paper, the sub-daily variability of rainfall intensity was considered using a probability distribution, and a chance-constrained overland flow modeling approach was proposed to capture the generation of overland flow within conceptual distributed hydrologic simulations. The integrated modeling procedures were further demonstrated through a watershed of China Three Gorges Reservoir area, leading to an improved SLURP-TGR hydrologic model based on SLURP. Combined with rainfall thresholds determined to distinguish various magnitudes of daily rainfall totals, three levels of significance were simultaneously employed to examine the hydrologic-response simulation. Results showed that SLURP-TGR could enhance the model performance, and the deviation of runoff simulations was effectively controlled. However, rainfall thresholds were so crucial for reflecting the scaling effect of rainfall intensity that optimal levels of significance and rainfall threshold were 0.05 and 10 mm, respectively. As for the Xiangxi River watershed, the main runoff contribution came from interflow of the fast store. Although slight differences of overland flow simulations between SLURP and SLURP-TGR were derived, SLURP-TGR was found to help improve the simulation of peak flows, and would improve the overall modeling efficiency through adjusting runoff component simulations. Consequently, the developed modeling approach favors efficient representation of hydrological processes and would be expected to have a potential for wide applications. PMID:25889540

  11. Simulation of two-phase flow through porous media using the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    A finite-element model of two-phase flow of air and water movement through porous media was developed. The formulation for radial flow used axisymmetric linear triangular elements. Due to the radial nature of the problem, a two-dimensional formulation was used to represent three-dimensional space. Governing equations were based on Darcy's equation and continuity. Air was treated as a compressible fluid by using the Ideal Gas Law. A gravity-driven saturated-flow problem was modeled and the predicted flow rate exactly matched the analytical solution. Comparisons of analytical and experimental results of one-phase radial and vertical flow were made in which capillary pressure distributions were almost exactly matched by the two-phase model (TPM). The effect of air compression on infiltration was simulated. It was concluded that the TPM modeled air compression and its inhibiting effect on infiltration even though air counter flow through the surface boundary was not permitted. The difficulty in describing the boundary conditions for air at a boundary where infiltration occurred was examined. The effect of erroneous input data for the soil moisture characteristic curve and the relative permeability curve was examined.

  12. A finite-element analysis for steady and oscillatory supersonic flows around complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.; Chen, L. T.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of small perturbation potential supersonic flow around complex configurations is considered. This problem requires the solution of an integral equation relating the values of the potential on the surface of the body to the values of the normal derivative, which is known from the small perturbation boundary conditions. The surface of the body is divided into small (hyperboloidal quadrilateral) surface elements, sigma sub i, which are described in terms of the Cartesian components of the four corner points. The values of the potential (and its normal derivative) within each element is assumed to be constant and equal to its value at the centroid of the element, and this yields a set of linear algebraic equations. The coefficients of the equation are given by source and doublet integrals over the surface elements, sigma sub i. The results obtained using the above formulation are compared with existing analytical and experimental results.

  13. Discontinuous finite volume element discretization for coupled flow-transport problems arising in models of sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, Raimund; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    The sedimentation-consolidation and flow processes of a mixture of small particles dispersed in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers can be described by a nonlinear transport equation for the solids concentration coupled with the Stokes problem written in terms of the mixture flow velocity and the pressure field. Here both the viscosity and the forcing term depend on the local solids concentration. A semi-discrete discontinuous finite volume element (DFVE) scheme is proposed for this model. The numerical method is constructed on a baseline finite element family of linear discontinuous elements for the approximation of velocity components and concentration field, whereas the pressure is approximated by piecewise constant elements. The unique solvability of both the nonlinear continuous problem and the semi-discrete DFVE scheme is discussed, and optimal convergence estimates in several spatial norms are derived. Properties of the model and the predicted space accuracy of the proposed formulation are illustrated by detailed numerical examples, including flows under gravity with changing direction, a secondary settling tank in an axisymmetric setting, and batch sedimentation in a tilted cylindrical vessel.

  14. FEMWATER: a finite-element model of water flow through saturated-unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Ward, D.S.

    1980-10-01

    Upon examining the Water Movement Through Saturated-Unsaturated Porous Media: A Finite-Element Galerkin Model, it was felt that the model should be modified and expanded. The modification is made in calculating the flow field in a manner consistent with the finite element approach, in evaluating the moisture-content increasing rate within the region of interest, and in numerically computing the nonlinear terms. With these modifications, the flow field is continuous everywhere in the flow regime, including element boundaries and nodal points, and the mass loss through boundaries is much reduced. Expansion is made to include four additional numerical schemes which would be more appropriate for many situations. Also, to save computer storage, all arrays pertaining to the boundary condition information are compressed to smaller dimension, and to ease the treatment of different problems, all arrays are variably dimensioned in all subroutines. This report is intended to document these efforts. In addition, in the derivation of finite-element equations, matrix component representation is used, which is believed more readable than the matrix representation in its entirety. Two identical sample problems are simulated to show the difference between the original and revised models.

  15. Constraining recharge and groundwater flow processes in hard-rock aquifers in temperate maritime climate using stable isotope signatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatova, Katarina; Ofterdinger, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Recharge estimates and in understanding flow process in hard rock aquifers pose significant challenges. These arise from structural complexities of the hardrock aquifers and are further complicated by variability of the superficial cover. A comparative study of three metamorphic catchments situated in the North of Ireland is presented in this study, each with contrasting geology, glaciation history and consequently superficial cover. The presented study focusses on two main strains. Firstly, due to lack of existing records, stable water isotopes in precipitation (δ18O and δ2H) were monitored at the research sites and their temporal and spatial variability was examined. Secondly, flow processes and dynamics of groundwater recharge based on continuous records of stable isotopes in groundwater, collected along catchment transects from various depths, and its variability in relation to the acquired precipitation signal were studied. Each precipitation station exhibited distinct isotopic signatures, where weather effect and proximity to coastline are the main controlling factors governing the isotope signatures. Moreover, in each of the stations the isotopic signature varied seasonally and thus stable isotopes proved a useful tool for assessing the dynamics of groundwater recharge. The analysis of isotope signatures in precipitation and groundwater from various depths within the hard rock aquifers allowed to evaluate the timescale of recharge, with rapid responses varying from few days up to several months. In general, the recharge appeared continuous over the hydrological year within wetter catchments with higher annual precipitation amounts purging the hardrock aquifers throughout the year. However, within comparatively dryer catchments recharge has a more seasonal character, predominantly taking place during the winter half of the year. Spatially, the recharge is highly localised within the elevated catchment areas, where superficial deposits are scarce and the

  16. Three-dimensional linear stability analysis of incompressible viscous flows using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yan; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    1999-09-01

    The linear stability of incompressible flows is investigated on the basis of the finite element method. The two-dimensional base flows computed numerically over a range of Reynolds numbers are perturbed with three-dimensional disturbances. The three-dimensionality in the flow associated with the secondary instability is identified precisely. First, by using linear stability theory and normal mode analysis, the partial differential equations governing the evolution of perturbation are derived from the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with slight compressibility. In terms of the mixed finite element discretization, in which six-node quadratic Lagrange triangular elements with quadratic interpolation for velocities (P2) and three-node linear Lagrange triangular elements for pressure (P1) are employed, a non-singular generalized eigenproblem is formulated from these equations, whose solution gives the dispersion relation between complex growth rate and wave number. Then, the stabilities of two cases, i.e. the lid-driven cavity flow and flow past a circular cylinder, are examined. These studies determine accurately stability curves to identify the critical Reynolds number and the critical wavelength of the neutral mode by means of the Krylov subspace method and discuss the mechanism of instability. For the cavity flow, the estimated critical results are Rec=920.277+/-0.010 for the Reynolds number and kc=7.40+/-0.02 for the wave number. These results are in good agreement with the observation of Aidun et al. and are more accurate than those by the finite difference method. This instability in the cavity is associated with absolute instability [Huerre and Monkewitz, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., 22, 473-537 (1990)]. The Taylor-Göertler-like vortices in the cavity are verified by means of the reconstruction of three-dimensional flows. As for the flow past a circular cylinder, the primary instability result shows that the flow has only two-dimensional characteristics at the

  17. Calculation by the finite element method of 3-D turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, J. F.

    1992-02-01

    In order to solve industrial flow problems in complex geometries, a finite element code, N3S, was developed. It allows the computation of a wide variety of 2-D or 3-D unsteady incompressible flows, by solving the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations together with a k-epsilon turbulence model. Some recent developments of this code concern turbomachinery flows, where one has to take into account periodic boundary conditions, as well as Coriolis and centrifugal forces. The numerical treatment is based on a fractional step method: at each time step, an advection step is solved successively by means of a characteristic method; a diffusion step for the scalar terms; and finally, a Generalized Stokes Problem by using a preconditioned Uzawa algorithm. The space discretization uses a standard Galerkin finite element method with a mixed formulation for the velocity and pressure. An application is presented of this code to the flow inside a centrifugal pump which was extensively tested on several air and water test rigs, and for which many quasi-3-D or Euler calculations were reported. The present N3S calculation is made on a finite element mesh comprising about 28000 tetrahedrons and 43000 nodes.

  18. A spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Lee, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; City Univ. of New York

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for solving nearly incompressible flows. Decoupling the collision step from the streaming step offers numerical stability at high Reynolds numbers. In the streaming step, we employ high-order spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin discretizations using a tensor product basis of one-dimensional Lagrange interpolation polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids. Our scheme is cost-effective with a fully diagonal mass matrix, advancing time integration with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We present a consistent treatment for imposing boundary conditions with a numerical flux in the discontinuous Galerkin approach. We show convergence studies for Couette flows and demonstrate two benchmark cases with lid-driven cavity flows for Re = 400-5000 and flows around an impulsively started cylinder for Re = 550-9500. Computational results are compared with those of other theoretical and computational work that used a multigrid method, a vortex method, and a spectral element model.

  19. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of instabilities in parallel flow with spherical roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deanna, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a direct numerical simulation of laminar flow over a flat surface with spherical roughness elements using a spectral-element method are given. The numerical simulation approximates roughness as a cellular pattern of identical spheres protruding from a smooth wall. Periodic boundary conditions on the domain's horizontal faces simulate an infinite array of roughness elements extending in the streamwise and spanwise directions, which implies the parallel-flow assumption, and results in a closed domain. A body force, designed to yield the horizontal Blasius velocity in the absence of roughness, sustains the flow. Instabilities above a critical Reynolds number reveal negligible oscillations in the recirculation regions behind each sphere and in the free stream, high-amplitude oscillations in the layer directly above the spheres, and a mean profile with an inflection point near the sphere's crest. The inflection point yields an unstable layer above the roughness (where U''(y) is less than 0) and a stable region within the roughness (where U''(y) is greater than 0). Evidently, the instability begins when the low-momentum or wake region behind an element, being the region most affected by disturbances (purely numerical in this case), goes unstable and moves. In compressible flow with periodic boundaries, this motion sends disturbances to all regions of the domain. In the unstable layer just above the inflection point, the disturbances grow while being carried downstream with a propagation speed equal to the local mean velocity; they do not grow amid the low energy region near the roughness patch. The most amplified disturbance eventually arrives at the next roughness element downstream, perturbing its wake and inducing a global response at a frequency governed by the streamwise spacing between spheres and the mean velocity of the most amplified layer.

  1. A two element laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  2. Experimental investigation of the modification of the flow field, past instream vegetation elements, for distinct bedsurface roughness.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Yagci, Oral; Kitsikoudis, Vasileios; Koursari, Eftychia

    2015-04-01

    The presence of vegetation in rivers and estuaries has important implications for the modification of the flow field and sediment transport. In-stream vegetation has the potential to regulate the morphology and ecological health of a surface water body, and as such it finds a wide range of applications. Even though a number of controls influencing the local flow field past aquatic vegetation elements or patches of instream vegetation have been identified (such as shape, areal density, size and flexibility), conclusive evidence is lacking, particularly on how sediment transport processes are affected. Here, an experimental study is designed to identify how the flow field past different types of elements simulating in-stream emergent vegetation is modified. Two sets of experiments are conducted, each with a distinct value of high and low hydraulic roughness for the bed surface. In both experiments a rigid cylindrical element, a patch of rigid tubes and a plant shaped element (Cupressus Macrocarpa), simulating instream emergent vegetation are utilized. The flow field is measured at various locations downstream the element and average and turbulent flow statistics are obtained at near bed, mid-flow depth and near the water surface regions. It is found that different structural aspects of the elements, particularly the geometry, can significantly affect the flow field downstream the elements. Specifically, the average flow profiles are practically restored to near ambient flow conditions at about 5 diameters downstream the rigid element, while this happens at longer distances for the other elements. The flow structures shed past the elements are also very distinct, as confirmed via appropriately designed fluorescent dye flow visualizations. Potential ecosystem feedbacks and implications for formation of geospatial patterns are also discussed.

  3. Hydrothermal fluid flow models of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy constrained by InSAR surface deformation time series observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Lanari, R.; Manzo, M.; Sansosti, E.; Tizzani, P.; Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, located along the Bay of Naples, has a long history of significant vertical deformation, with the most recent large uplift (>1.5m) occurring in 1983-1984. Each episode of uplift has been followed by a period of subsidence that decreases in rate with time and may be punctuated by brief episodes of lesser uplift. The large amplitude of the major uplifts that occur without volcanic activity, and the subsequent subsidence has been argued as evidence for hydrothermal amplification of any magmatic source. The later subsidence and its temporal decay have been argued as due to diffusion of the pressurized caldera fill material into the less porous surrounding country rock. We present satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) time series analysis of ERS and Envisat data from the European Space Agency, based on exploiting the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) approach [Berardino et al., 2002]; this allows us to generate maps of relative surface deformation though time, beginning in 1992 through 2007, that are relevant to both ascending and descending satellite orbits. The general temporal behavior is one of subsidence punctuated by several lesser uplift episodes. The spatial pattern of deformation can be modeled through simple inflation/deflation sources in an elastic halfspace. Given the evidence to suggest that fluids may play a significant role in the temporal deformation of Campi Flegrei, rather than a purely magmatic or magma chamber-based interpretation, we model the temporal and spatial evolution of surface deformation as a hydrothermal fluid flow process. We use the TOUGH2-BIOT2 set of numerical codes [Preuss et al., 1999; Hsieh, 1996], which couple multi-phase (liquid-gas) and multi-component (H2O-CO2) fluid flow in a porous or fractured media with plane strain deformation and fluid flow in a linearly elastic porous medium. We explore parameters related to the depth and temporal history of fluid injection, fluid

  4. An a-posteriori finite element error estimator for adaptive grid computation of viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng

    2000-10-01

    In this thesis, an a-posteriori error estimator is presented and employed for solving viscous incompressible flow problems. In an effort to detect local flow features, such as vortices and separation, and to resolve flow details precisely, a velocity angle error estimator e theta which is based on the spatial derivative of velocity direction fields is designed and constructed. The a-posteriori error estimator corresponds to the antisymmetric part of the deformation-rate-tensor, and it is sensitive to the second derivative of the velocity angle field. Rationality discussions reveal that the velocity angle error estimator is a curvature error estimator, and its value reflects the accuracy of streamline curves. It is also found that the velocity angle error estimator contains the nonlinear convective term of the Navier-Stokes equations, and it identifies and computes the direction difference when the convective acceleration direction and the flow velocity direction have a disparity. Through benchmarking computed variables with the analytic solution of Kovasznay flow or the finest grid of cavity flow, it is demonstrated that the velocity angle error estimator has a better performance than the strain error estimator. The benchmarking work also shows that the computed profile obtained by using etheta can achieve the best matching outcome with the true theta field, and that it is asymptotic to the true theta variation field, with a promise of fewer unknowns. Unstructured grids are adapted by employing local cell division as well as unrefinement of transition cells. Using element class and node class can efficiently construct a hierarchical data structure which provides cell and node inter-reference at each adaptive level. Employing element pointers and node pointers can dynamically maintain the connection of adjacent elements and adjacent nodes, and thus avoids time-consuming search processes. The adaptive scheme is applied to viscous incompressible flow at different

  5. NACHOS 2: A finite element computer program for incompressible flow problems. Part 1: Theoretical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartling, D. K.

    1987-04-01

    The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, NACHOS 2, is presented in detail. The NACHOS 2 code is designed for the two-dimensional analysis of viscous incompressible fluid flows, including the effects of heat transfer and/or other transport processes. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulations and the associated numerical methods used in the NACHOS 2 code are also outlined. Instructions for use of the program are documented in SAND-86-1817; examples of problems analyzed by the code are provided in SAND-86-1818.

  6. Energy flow prediction in built-up structures through a hybrid finite element/wave and finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Collet, M.; Ichchou, M.; Li, L.; Bareille, O.; Dimitrijevic, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid and accurate numerical tool for the energy flow evaluation in a periodic substructure from the near-field to the far-field domain. Here we suppose that the near-field part contains a point source characterized by the injected power in the structure. The near-field part is then modeled by Finite Element Method (FEM) while the periodic structure and the far-field part are regarded as waveguides and modeled by an enhanced Wave and Finite Element Method (WFEM). Enhancements are made on the eigenvalue scheme, the condensation of the unit cell and the consideration of a reduced wave basis. Efforts are made to adapt substructures modeled by different strategies in a multi-scale manner such that the final matrices dimensions of the built-up structure are largely reduced. The method is then validated numerically and theoretically. An application is presented, where a structural dynamical system coupled with periodic resistive piezoelectric shunts is discussed.

  7. Laminar flow of viscoelastic fluids in rectangular ducts with heat transfer: A finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjaelae, S.

    1998-02-01

    A numerical study on the laminar flow and heat transfer behavior of viscoelastic fluids in rectangular ducts is conducted using the finite element approach. A Criminale-Ericksen-Fibley relation is applied to describe the viscoelastic character of the fluid, and a hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed flow with the H1 thermal boundary condition is considered. The finite element procedure employed yields essentially mesh-independent predictions with a fairly moderate computational effort. Computed results are presented and discussed in terms of the secondary flow field, the temperature field, the friction factor and the Nusselt number. In particular it is shown that the presence of a secondary flow markedly alters the temperature field and results in a substantial heat transfer enhancement with all duct aspect ratios considered. The significant heat transfer enhancement as a consequence of fluid elasticity, with virtually no pressure drop increase, is an interesting phenomenon that certainly has application potential in various industrial processes involving fluid flow and heat transfer.

  8. A mixed finite element scheme for viscoelastic flows with XPP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Li, Xikui

    2008-12-01

    A mixed finite element formulation for viscoelastic flows is derived in this paper, in which the FIC (finite incremental calculus) pressure stabilization process and the DEVSS (discrete elastic viscous stress splitting) method using the Crank-Nicolson-based split are introduced within a general framework of the iterative version of the fractional step algorithm. The SU (streamline-upwind) method is particularly chosen to tackle the convective terms in constitutive equations of viscoelastic flows. Thanks to the proposed scheme the finite elements with equal low-order interpolation approximations for stress-velocity-pressure variables can be successfully used even for viscoelastic flows with high Weissenberg numbers. The XPP(extended Pom-Pom) constitutive model for describing viscoelastic behaviors is particularly integrated into the proposed scheme. The numerical results for the 4:1 sudden contraction flow problem demonstrate prominent stability, accuracy and convergence rate of the proposed scheme in both pressure and stress distributions over the flow domain within a wide range of theWeissenberg number, particularly the capability in reproducing the results, which can be used to explain the "die swell" phenomenon observed in the polymer injection molding process.

  9. Geological applications of automatic grid generation tools for finite elements applied to porous flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, C.W.; Trease, H.E.; Cherry, T.A.

    1996-04-01

    The construction of grids that accurately reflect geologic structure and stratigraphy for computational flow and transport models poses a formidable task. Even with a complete understanding of stratigraphy, material properties, boundary and initial conditions, the task of incorporating data into a numerical model can be difficult and time consuming. Furthermore, most tools available for representing complex geologic surfaces and volumes are not designed for producing optimal grids for flow and transport computation. We have developed a modeling tool, GEOMESH, for automating finite element grid generation that maintains the geometric integrity of geologic structure and stratigraphy. The method produces an optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grid that can be used for flow and transport computations. The process of developing a flow and transport model can be divided into three parts: (1) Developing accurate conceptual models inclusive of geologic interpretation, material characterization and construction of a stratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic framework model, (2) Building and initializing computational frameworks; grid generation, boundary and initial conditions, (3) Computational physics models of flow and transport. Process (1) and (3) have received considerable attention whereas (2) has not. This work concentrates on grid generation and its connections to geologic characterization and process modeling. Applications of GEOMESH illustrate grid generation for two dimensional cross sections, three dimensional regional models, and adaptive grid refinement in three dimensions. Examples of grid representation of wells and tunnels with GEOMESH can be found in Cherry et al. The resulting grid can be utilized by unstructured finite element or integrated finite difference models.

  10. A Regularized Galerkin Boundary Element Method (RGBEM) for Simulating Potential Flow About Zero Thickness Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    GHARAKHANI,ADRIN; WOLFE,WALTER P.

    1999-10-01

    The prediction of potential flow about zero thickness membranes by the boundary element method constitutes an integral component of the Lagrangian vortex-boundary element simulation of flow about parachutes. To this end, the vortex loop (or the panel) method has been used, for some time now, in the aerospace industry with relative success [1, 2]. Vortex loops (with constant circulation) are equivalent to boundary elements with piecewise constant variation of the potential jump. In this case, extending the analysis in [3], the near field potential velocity evaluations can be shown to be {Omicron}(1). The accurate evaluation of the potential velocity field very near the parachute surface is particularly critical to the overall accuracy and stability of the vortex-boundary element simulations. As we will demonstrate in Section 3, the boundary integral singularities, which arise due to the application of low order boundary elements, may lead to severely spiked potential velocities at vortex element centers that are near the boundary. The spikes in turn cause the erratic motion of the vortex elements, and the eventual loss of smoothness of the vorticity field and possible numerical blow up. In light of the arguments above, the application of boundary elements with (at least) a linear variation of the potential jump--or, equivalently, piecewise constant vortex sheets--would appear to be more appropriate for vortex-boundary element simulations. For this case, two strategies are possible for obtaining the potential flow field. The first option is to solve the integral equations for the (unknown) strengths of the surface vortex sheets. As we will discuss in Section 2.1, the challenge in this case is to devise a consistent system of equations that imposes the solenoidality of the locally 2-D vortex sheets. The second approach is to solve for the unknown potential jump distribution. In this case, for commonly used C{sup o} shape functions, the boundary integral is singular at

  11. Discrete element method for emergency flow of pedestrian in S-type corridor.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyeongwon; Park, Junyoung

    2014-10-01

    Pedestrian flow in curved corridor should be modeled before design because this type of corridor can be most dangerous part during emergency evacuation. In this study, this flow is analyzed by Discrete Element Method with psychological effects. As the turning slope of corridor increases, the evacuation time is linearly increases. However, in the view of crashed death accident, the case with 90 degree turning slope can be dangerous because there are 3 dangerous points. To solve this matter, the pedestrian gathering together in curved part should be dispersed. PMID:25942811

  12. On current aspects of finite element computational fluid mechanics for turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A set of nonlinear partial differential equations suitable for the description of a class of turbulent three-dimensional flow fields in select geometries is identified. On the basis of the concept of enforcing a penalty constraint to ensure accurate accounting of ordering effects, a finite element numerical solution algorithm is established for the equation set and the theoretical aspects of accuracy, convergence and stability are identified and quantized. Hypermatrix constructions are used to formulate the reduction of the computational aspects of the theory to practice. The robustness of the algorithm, and the computer program embodiment, have been verified for pertinent flow configurations.

  13. Cut-element based immersed boundary method for moving geometries in compressible liquid flows with cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örley, Felix; Pasquariello, Vito; Hickel, Stefan; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-02-01

    The conservative immersed interface method for representing complex immersed solid boundaries or phase interfaces on Cartesian grids is improved and extended to allow for the simulation of weakly compressible fluid flows through moving geometries. We demonstrate that an approximation of moving interfaces by a level-set field results in unphysical oscillations in the vicinity of sharp corners when dealing with weakly compressible fluids such as water. By introducing an exact reconstruction of the cut-cell properties directly based on a surface triangulation of the immersed boundary, we are able to recover the correct flow evolution free of numerical artifacts. The new method is based on cut-elements. It provides sub-cell resolution of the geometry and handles flows through narrow closing or opening gaps in a straightforward manner. We validate our method with canonical flows around oscillating cylinders. We demonstrate that the method allows for an accurate prediction of flows around moving obstacles in weakly compressible liquid flows with cavitation effects. In particular, we show that the cavitating flow through a closing fuel injector control valve, which is an example for a complex application with interaction of stationary and moving parts, can be predicted by the method.

  14. A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables were interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions and the pressure was interpolated using linear shape functions. For the two dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a triangular element which is contained inside the complete biquadratic element for velocity variables; and for the three dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a tetrahedral element which is again contained inside the complete tri-quadratic element. Thus the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow for Reynolds number of 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorable with those of the finite difference methods as well as experimental data available. A finite elememt computer program for incompressible, laminar flows is presented.

  15. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 8. Interface and Common Curve Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-01-01

    This work is the eighth in a series that develops the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) that allows for a systematic increase in the scale at which multiphase transport phenomena is modeled in porous medium systems. In these systems, the explicit locations of interfaces between phases and common curves, where three or more interfaces meet, are not considered at scales above the microscale. Rather, the densities of these quantities arise as areas per volume or length per volume. Modeling of the dynamics of these measures is an important challenge for robust models of flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems, as the extent of these regions can have important implications for mass, momentum, and energy transport between and among phases, and formulation of a capillary pressure relation with minimal hysteresis. These densities do not exist at the microscale, where the interfaces and common curves correspond to particular locations. Therefore, it is necessary for a well-developed macroscale theory to provide evolution equations that describe the dynamics of interface and common curve densities. Here we point out the challenges and pitfalls in producing such evolution equations, develop a set of such equations based on averaging theorems, and identify the terms that require particular attention in experimental and computational efforts to parameterize the equations. We use the evolution equations developed to specify a closed two-fluid-phase flow model. PMID:21197134

  16. Weak Galerkin finite element methods for Darcy flow: Anisotropy and heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Liu, Jiangguo; Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2014-10-11

    This paper presents a family of weak Galerkin finite element methods (WGFEMs) for Darcy flow computation. The WGFEMs are new numerical methods that rely on the novel concept of discrete weak gradients. The WGFEMs solve for pressure unknowns both in element interiors and on the mesh skeleton. The numerical velocity is then obtained from the discrete weak gradient of the numerical pressure. The new methods are quite different than many existing numerical methods in that they are locally conservative by design, the resulting discrete linear systems are symmetric and positive-definite, and there is no need for tuning problem-dependent penalty factors. We test the WGFEMs on benchmark problems to demonstrate the strong potential of these new methods in handling strong anisotropy and heterogeneity in Darcy flow.

  17. Flow transition with 2-D roughness elements in a 3-D channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhining; Liu, Chaoquin; Mccormick, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    We develop a new numerical approach to study the spatially evolving instability of the streamwise dominant flow in the presence of roughness elements. The difficulty in handling the flow over the boundary surface with general geometry is removed by using a new conservative form of the governing equations and an analytical mapping. The numerical scheme uses second-order backward Euler in time, fourth-order central differences in all three spatial directions, and boundary-fitted staggered grids. A three-dimensional channel with multiple two-dimensional-type roughness elements is employed as the test case. Fourier analysis is used to decompose different Fourier modes of the disturbance. The results show that surface roughness leads to transition at lower Reynolds number than for smooth channels.

  18. An overlapping Schwarz method for spectral element simulation of three-dimensional incompressible flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.F.; Miller, N.I.; Tufo, H.M.

    1998-10-29

    As the sound speed is infinite for incompressible flows, computation of the pressure constitutes the stiffest component in the time advancement of unsteady simulations. For complex geometries, efficient solution is dependent upon the availability of fast solvers for sparse linear systems. In this paper we develop a Schwarz preconditioner for the spectral element method using overlapping subdomains for the pressure. These local subdomain problems are derived from tensor products of one-dimensional finite element discretizations and admit use of fast diagonalization methods based upon matrix-matrix products. In addition, we use a coarse grid projection operator whose solution is computed via a fast parallel direct solver. The combination of overlapping Schwarz preconditioning and fast coarse grid solver provides as much as a fourfold reduction in simulation time over previously employed methods based upon deflation for parallel solution of multi-million grid point flow problems.

  19. Spectral element simulation of precession driven flows in the outer cores of spheroidal planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vormann, Jan; Hansen, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    A common feature of the planets in the solar system is the precession of the rotation axes, driven by the gravitational influence of another body (e.g. the Earth's moon). In a precessing body, the rotation axis itself is rotating around another axis, describing a cone during one precession period. Similar to the coriolis and centrifugal force appearing from the transformation to a rotating system, the addition of precession adds another term to the Navier-Stokes equation, the so called Poincaré force. The main geophysical motivation in studying precession driven flows comes from their ability to act as magnetohydrodynamic dynamos in planets and moons. Precession may either act as the only driving force or operate together with other forces such as thermochemical convection. One of the challenges in direct numerical simulations of such flows lies in the spheroidal shape of the fluid volume, which should not be neglected since it contributes an additional forcing trough pressure torques. Codes developed for the simulation of flows in spheres mostly use efficient global spectral algorithms that converge fast, but lack geometric flexibility, while local methods are usable in more complex shapes, but often lack high accuracy. We therefore adapted the spectral element code Nek5000, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, to the problem. The spectral element method is capable of solving for the flow in arbitrary geometries while still offering spectral convergence. We present first results for the simulation of a purely hydrodynamic, precession-driven flow in a spheroid with no-slip boundaries and an inner core. The driving by the Poincaré force is in a range where theoretical work predicts multiple solutions for a laminar flow. Our simulations indicate a transition to turbulent flows for Ekman numbers of 10-6 and lower.

  20. Computation of the transient flow in zoned anisotropic porous media by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, E.; Grilli, S.

    Results on the application of the BEM to transient two-dimensional flows in zoned anisotropic porous media are presented, including the iterative calculation of the free surface seepage position. The classical BEM equations are discretized by linear, quadratic, or cubic elements, employing special singular numerical quadrature rules. The method is improved by the incorporation of a subregion division. The present technique is shown to be very accurate and to avoid previously encountered oscillation problems.

  1. A p-version finite element method for steady incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterscheidt, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A new p-version finite element formulation for steady, incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer problems is presented. The steady-state residual equations are obtained by considering a limiting case of the least-squares formulation for the transient problem. The method circumvents the Babuska-Brezzi condition, permitting the use of equal-order interpolation for velocity and pressure, without requiring the use of arbitrary parameters. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and generality of the method.

  2. 75 FR 42330 - Elemental Mercury Used in Flow Meters, Natural Gas Manometers, and Pyrometers; Significant New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ...EPA is promulgating a significant new use rule (SNUR) under section 5(a)(2) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for elemental mercury (CAS No. 7439-97-6) for use in flow meters, natural gas manometers, and pyrometers, except for use in these articles when they are in service as of September 11, 2009. This action will require persons who intend to manufacture (including import) or......

  3. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanschat, G.; Rivière, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv( Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders.

  4. Using outcrop observations, 3D discrete feature network (DFN) fluid-flow simulations, and subsurface data to constrain the impact of normal faults and opening mode fractures on fluid flow in an active asphalt mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. E.; Aydin, A.; Durlofsky, L.; Karimi-Fard, M.; Brownlow, D. T.

    2008-12-01

    An active quarry near Uvalde, TX which mines asphaltic limestone from the Anacacho Formation offers an ideal setting to study fluid-flow in fractured and faulted carbonate rocks. Semi-3D exposures of normal faults and fractures in addition to visual evidence of asphalt concentrations in the quarry help constrain relationships between geologic structures and the flow and transport of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a subsurface dataset which includes thin sections and measured asphalt concentration from the surrounding region provides a basis to estimate asphalt concentrations and constrain the depositional architecture of both the previously mined portions of the quarry and the un-mined surrounding rock volume. We characterized a series of normal faults and opening mode fractures at the quarry and documented a correlation between the intensity and distribution of these structures with increased concentrations of asphalt. The three-dimensional depositional architecture of the Anacacho Formation was characterized using the subsurface thin sections. Then outcrop exposures of faults, fractured beds, and stratigraphic contacts were mapped and their three-dimensional positions were recorded with differential gps devices. These two datasets were assimilated and a quarry-scale, geologically realistic, three-dimensional Discrete Feature Network (DFN) which represents the geometries and material properties of the matrix, normal faults, and fractures within the quarry was constructed. We then performed two-point flux, control-volume finite- difference fluid-flow simulations with the DFN to investigate the 3D flow and transport of fluids. The results were compared and contrasted with available asphalt concentration estimates from the mine and the aforementioned data from the surrounding drill cores.

  5. MP Salsa: a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 1--theoretical development

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Moffat, H.K.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar, low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow, heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solver coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion- reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMKIN, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element data base suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec solver library.

  6. Finite Element Solution of Unsteady Mixed Convection Flow of Micropolar Fluid over a Porous Shrinking Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Diksha; Singh, Bani

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to analyze the effect of unsteadiness on the mixed convection boundary layer flow of micropolar fluid over a permeable shrinking sheet in the presence of viscous dissipation. At the sheet a variable distribution of suction is assumed. The unsteadiness in the flow and temperature fields is caused by the time dependence of the shrinking velocity and surface temperature. With the aid of similarity transformations, the governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically, using variational finite element method. The influence of important physical parameters, namely, suction parameter, unsteadiness parameter, buoyancy parameter and Eckert number on the velocity, microrotation, and temperature functions is investigated and analyzed with the help of their graphical representations. Additionally skin friction and the rate of heat transfer have also been computed. Under special conditions, an exact solution for the flow velocity is compared with the numerical results obtained by finite element method. An excellent agreement is observed for the two sets of solutions. Furthermore, to verify the convergence of numerical results, calculations are conducted with increasing number of elements. PMID:24672310

  7. Finite element solution of unsteady mixed convection flow of micropolar fluid over a porous shrinking sheet.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Diksha; Kumar, Lokendra; Singh, Bani

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to analyze the effect of unsteadiness on the mixed convection boundary layer flow of micropolar fluid over a permeable shrinking sheet in the presence of viscous dissipation. At the sheet a variable distribution of suction is assumed. The unsteadiness in the flow and temperature fields is caused by the time dependence of the shrinking velocity and surface temperature. With the aid of similarity transformations, the governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically, using variational finite element method. The influence of important physical parameters, namely, suction parameter, unsteadiness parameter, buoyancy parameter and Eckert number on the velocity, microrotation, and temperature functions is investigated and analyzed with the help of their graphical representations. Additionally skin friction and the rate of heat transfer have also been computed. Under special conditions, an exact solution for the flow velocity is compared with the numerical results obtained by finite element method. An excellent agreement is observed for the two sets of solutions. Furthermore, to verify the convergence of numerical results, calculations are conducted with increasing number of elements. PMID:24672310

  8. Large-scale computation of incompressible viscous flow by least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to large-scale/three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system which can be solved effectively by simple iterative methods. The first-order velocity-Bernoulli function-vorticity formulation for incompressible viscous flows is also tested. For three-dimensional cases, an additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of the vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The simple substitution of the Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. To show the validity of this scheme for large-scale computation, we give numerical results for 2D driven cavity problem at Re = 10000 with 408 x 400 bilinear elements. The flow in a 3D cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 50 x 50 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Goertler-like vortices are observed for Re = 1,000.

  9. Introducing variable-step topography (VST) coordinates within dynamically constrained nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS). Part 2: VST performance on orthodox obstacle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, Gregory J.; Smith, Eric A.

    2014-06-01

    In this second part of a two-part sequence of papers, the performance metrics and quantitative advantages of a new VST surface coordinate system, implemented within a dynamically constrained, nonhydrostatic, cloud mesoscale atmospheric model, are evaluated in conjunction with seven orthodox obstacle flow problems. [The first part presented a full formulation of the VST model, prefaced by a description of the framework of the newly re-tooled nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS) operating within integral constraints based on the conservation of the foremost quantities of mass, energy and circulation.] The intent behind VST is to create a vertical surface coordinate system boundary underpinning a nonhydrostatic atmosphere capable of reliable simulations of flows over both smooth and steep terrain without sacrificing dynamical integrity over either type of surface. Model simulation results are analyzed for six classical fluid dynamics problems involving flows relative to obstacles with known analytical or laboratory-simulated solutions, as well as for a seventh noteworthy mountain wave breaking problem that has well-studied numerical solutions. For cases when topography becomes excessively severe or poorly resolved numerically, atmospheric models using transform (terrain-following) coordinates produce noteworthy errors rendering a stable integration only if the topography is smoothed. For cases when topography is slowly varying (smooth or subtle), models using discrete-step coordinates also produce noteworthy errors relative to known solutions. Alternatively, the VST model demonstrates that both limitations of the two conventional approaches, for the entire range of slope severities, can be overcome. This means that VST is ideally suited for a scalable, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model, safeguarded with physically realistic dynamical constraints.

  10. Simulation of flow in the microcirculation using a hybrid Lattice-Boltzman and Finite Element algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Mancera, Andres; Gonzalez Cardenas, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Flow in the microcirculation is highly dependent on the mechanical properties of the cells suspended in the plasma. Red blood cells have to deform in order to pass through the smaller sections in the microcirculation. Certain deceases change the mechanical properties of red blood cells affecting its ability to deform and the rheological behaviour of blood. We developed a hybrid algorithm based on the Lattice-Boltzmann and Finite Element methods to simulate blood flow in small capillaries. Plasma was modeled as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells' membrane as a hyperelastic solid. The fluid-structure interaction was handled using the immersed boundary method. We simulated the flow of plasma with suspended red blood cells through cylindrical capillaries and measured the pressure drop as a function of the membrane's rigidity. We also simulated the flow through capillaries with a restriction and identify critical properties for which the suspended particles are unable to flow. The algorithm output was verified by reproducing certain common features of flow int he microcirculation such as the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect.

  11. Application of parallel time-implicit discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to hypersonic nonequilibrium flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Ankush

    Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods are high-order accurate, compact-stencil methods, proven to possess favorable properties for highly efficient parallel systems, complex geometries and unstructured meshes. Coding effort is significantly reduced for compact-stencil DG methods in comparison to main stream finite difference and finite volume methods. This work successfully introduces DG methods to thermal ablation and non-equilibrium hypersonic flows. In the state-of-the-art hypersonic flow codes, surface heating predictions are very sensitive to mesh resolution in the shock. A minor misalignment can cause major changes in the heating predictions. This is due to the lack of high-order accuracy in current streamline methods and numerical errors associated with the shock capturing approach. Shock capturing methods like slope limiter or artificial viscosity, being empirical have errors in the shock region. This work employs r-p adaptivity to accurately capture the shock with p = 0 elements (first order accuracy). Smooth flow regions are captured using p greater than 0. This method is stable. Implicit methods are developed for solution advancement with high CFL numbers. Error in the shock is reduced by redistributing the elements (outside of the shock) to within the shock (r adaptivity). Inviscid and viscous hypersonic flow problems, with same accuracy as in h-p adaptivity method, are simulated with one-third elements. This methodology requires no a priori knowledge of the shock's location, and is suitable for detached shock problems. r-p adaptivity method has allowed for successful prediction of surface heating rate for hypersonic flow over cylinder. Additionally, good comparisons are made, for non-equilibrium hypersonic flows, to the published results. This tool is also used to determine the effect of micro-second pulsed sinusoidal Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators on the surface heating reduction for hypersonic flow over cylinder. A significant

  12. Computational flow simulation of liquid oxygen in a SSME preburner injector element LOX post

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    Liquid oxygen (LOX) is simulated as an incompressible flow through a Space Shuttle main engine fuel preburner injector element LOX post for the full range of operating conditions. Axial profiles of axial velocity and static pressure are presented. For each operating condition analyzed, the minimum pressure downstream of the orifice is compared to the vapor pressure to determine if cavitation could occur. Flow visualization is provided by velocity vectors and stream function contours. The results indicate that the minimum pressure is too high for cavitation to occur. To establish confidence in the CFD analysis, the simulation is repeated with water flow through a superscaled LOX post and compared with experimental results. The agreement between calculated and experimental results is very good.

  13. Preprocessor and postprocessor computer programs for a radial-flow finite-element model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pucci, A.A., Jr.; Pope, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Preprocessing and postprocessing computer programs that enhance the utility of the U.S. Geological Survey radial-flow model have been developed. The preprocessor program: (1) generates a triangular finite element mesh from minimal data input, (2) produces graphical displays and tabulations of data for the mesh , and (3) prepares an input data file to use with the radial-flow model. The postprocessor program is a version of the radial-flow model, which was modified to (1) produce graphical output for simulation and field results, (2) generate a statistic for comparing the simulation results with observed data, and (3) allow hydrologic properties to vary in the simulated region. Examples of the use of the processor programs for a hypothetical aquifer test are presented. Instructions for the data files, format instructions, and a listing of the preprocessor and postprocessor source codes are given in the appendixes. (Author 's abstract)

  14. DNS of Flows over Periodic Hills using a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo T.; Murman, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent compressible flows is performed using a higher-order space-time discontinuous-Galerkin finite-element method. The numerical scheme is validated by performing DNS of the evolution of the Taylor-Green vortex and turbulent flow in a channel. The higher-order method is shown to provide increased accuracy relative to low-order methods at a given number of degrees of freedom. The turbulent flow over a periodic array of hills in a channel is simulated at Reynolds number 10,595 using an 8th-order scheme in space and a 4th-order scheme in time. These results are validated against previous large eddy simulation (LES) results. A preliminary analysis provides insight into how these detailed simulations can be used to improve Reynoldsaveraged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling

  15. Finite Element Analysis of Magnetic Damping Effects on G-Jitter Induced Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Bo; Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, Henry C., III

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports some interim results on numerical modeling and analyses of magnetic damping of g-jitter driven fluid flow in microgravity. A finite element model is developed to represent the fluid flow, thermal and solute transport phenomena in a 2-D cavity under g-jitter conditions with and without an applied magnetic field. The numerical model is checked by comparing with analytical solutions obtained for a simple parallel plate channel flow driven by g-jitter in a transverse magnetic field. The model is then applied to study the effect of steady state g-jitter induced oscillation and on the solute redistribution in the liquid that bears direct relevance to the Bridgman-Stockbarger single crystal growth processes. A selection of computed results is presented and the results indicate that an applied magnetic field can effectively damp the velocity caused by g-jitter and help to reduce the time variation of solute redistribution.

  16. Finite element methods of analysis for 3D inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime

    1990-01-01

    The applicants have developed a finite element based approach for the solution of three-dimensional compressible flows. The procedure enables flow solutions to be obtained on tetrahedral discretizations of computational domains of complex form. A further development was the incorporation of a solution adaptive mesh strategy in which the adaptivity is achieved by complete remeshing of the solution domain. During the previous year, the applicants were working with the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center with an implementation of the basic meshing and solution procedure. The objective of the work to be performed over this twelve month period was the transfer of the adaptive mesh technology and also the undertaking of basic research into alternative flow algorithms for the Euler equations on unstructured meshes.

  17. International Conference on Finite Elements in Flow Problems, 7th, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989, Selected Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-10-01

    Topics presented include the finite element analysis of confined turbulent swirling flows, compressible viscous flow calculations using compatible finite element approximations, the equilibrium and stability of Tokamaks, and a coupled finite element solution of biharmonic problems for vector potentials. Also presented are the Godunov-mixed methods for immiscible displacement, the iterative adaptive implicit-explicit methods for flow problems, finite element methods for one-dimensional combustion problems, and a technique for analyzing finite element methods for viscous incompressible flow.

  18. An extended pressure finite element space for two-phase incompressible flows with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, Sven; Reusken, Arnold

    2007-05-01

    We consider a standard model for incompressible two-phase flows in which a localized force at the interface describes the effect of surface tension. If a level set (or VOF) method is applied then the interface, which is implicitly given by the zero level of the level set function, is in general not aligned with the triangulation that is used in the discretization of the flow problem. This non-alignment causes severe difficulties w.r.t. the discretization of the localized surface tension force and the discretization of the flow variables. In cases with large surface tension forces the pressure has a large jump across the interface. In standard finite element spaces, due to the non-alignment, the functions are continuous across the interface and thus not appropriate for the approximation of the discontinuous pressure. In many simulations these effects cause large oscillations of the velocity close to the interface, so-called spurious velocities. In this paper, for a simplified model problem, we give an analysis that explains why known (standard) methods for discretization of the localized force term and for discretization of the pressure variable often yield large spurious velocities. In the paper [S. Groß, A. Reusken, Finite element discretization error analysis of a surface tension force in two-phase incompressible flows, Preprint 262, IGPM, RWTH Aachen, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (accepted for publication)], we introduce a new and accurate method for approximation of the surface tension force. In the present paper, we use the extended finite element space (XFEM), presented in [N. Moes, J. Dolbow, T. Belytschko, A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 46 (1999) 131-150; T. Belytschko, N. Moes, S. Usui, C. Parimi, Arbitrary discontinuities in finite elements, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 50 (2001) 993-1013], for the discretization of the pressure. We show that the size of spurious velocities is reduced substantially, provided we

  19. Constraining the dynamical behavior of the western US lithosphere through computational modeling: Evidence that lower crustal flow plays a significant role in load accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seunarine, L.; Lowry, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    and temperature so that compositional and thermal mass contributions are nearly negligible. These results suggest that load accommodation produces less Moho deflection than would be expected for a crème brulee style of deformation and that stresses are accommodated, at least in part, by significant flow in the lower crust. Based on these results, we design a new series of models to better constrain the nature of this channel flow in the lower crust in terms of its average properties across the Western US, including channel dimensions and viscosity structure.

  20. Investigation of the Performance of an Axial-Flow-Pump Stage Designed by the Blade-Element Theory: Blade-Element Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, James E.; Soltis, Richard F.; Montgomery, John C.

    1961-01-01

    An axial-flow-pump stage was designed by utilizing blade-element methods in conjunction with axial-flow-compressor blade-element theory. This report presents the blade-element data of the pump stage in both the noncavitating and cavitating conditions. The noncavitating blade- element performance is compared with design rules. The results indicated that some modification of the compressor design equations for computing minimum-loss incidence and deviation angles may be necessary for application to an axial-flow-pump design. Minimum values of observed rotor loss were slightly lower than anticipated from compressor results. At the design flow coefficient the rotor-blade elements were not operating at the reference incidence angles, and the experimental efficiency was lower than the design value. The observed head rise was very close to the design. An attempt was made to estimate the potential of this rotor by using the minimum measured values of loss coefficient and observed energy input at the design flow. Performance of the pump at a suction specific speed of approximately 13,000 (cavitation number k approximately equals 0.12) showed only a slight dropoff in performance in the cavitation inception region from the noncavitating results. The observed performance at a suction specific speed of approximately 16,000 (k approximately equals 0.09) is also presented for comparison.

  1. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three-dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the heat transfer and collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Simulations were completed for free stream velocities ranging from 85-135 meters per second, and free stream total pressure of 44.8 and 93.1 kilopascals (6.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch absolute). In addition, the effect of angle of attack and yaw were investigated by including 5 degree deviations from straight for one of the flow conditions. All but one of the cases simulated a probe in isolation (i.e. in a very large domain without any support strut). One case is included which represents a probe mounted on a support strut within a finite sized wind tunnel. Collection efficiencies were generated, using the LEWICE3D code, for four spherical particle sizes, 100, 50, 20, and 5 micron in diameter. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 20% occurred, for all cases, as the flow entered the shroud of the probe. The reduction in velocity within the shroud is not indicative of any error in the probe measurement accuracy. Heat transfer results are presented which agree quite well with a correlation for the circular cross section heated elements. Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than the previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the reduced flow within the protective shroud. As particle size increases differences between the two

  2. Optimization of a dual capture element magnetic separator for the purification of high velocity water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belounis, Abdallah; Mehasni, Rabia; Ouili, Mehdi; Feliachi, Mouloud; El-Hadi Latreche, Mohamed

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a magnetic separator based on the use of a cascade arrangement of two identical capture elements has been optimized and verified. Such a separator is intended for the separation of fine particles of iron from flowing water at high velocity. The optimization has concerned the search for the excitation current and the distance between the capture elements that permit the extraction of the particles from a water flow in a circular channel at an average velocity ufav = 1.05 m/s. For such optimization we have minimized the objective function that is the distance between the capture position of a particle initially situated at a specific position and the central point of the last capture element of the arrangement. To perform the minimization, we have applied the Tabu search method. To validate the obtained results experimental verification based on the control of the evolution of the captured particle buildup and the quantifying of the separated volume of particles was achieved. Contribution to the topical issue "Numelec 2015 - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  3. The assignment of velocity profiles in finite element simulations of pulsatile flow in arteries.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, A; Boschetti, F; Inzoli, F

    1997-05-01

    In this paper we present a new method for the assignment of pulsatile velocity profiles as input boundary conditions in finite element models of arteries. The method is based on the implementation of the analytical solution for developed pulsatile flow in a rigid straight tube. The analytical solution provides the fluid dynamics of the region upstream from the fluid domain to be investigated by means of the finite element approach. In standard fluid dynamics finite element applications, the inlet developed velocity profiles are achieved assuming velocity boundary conditions to be easily implementable-such as flat or parabolic velocity profiles-applied to a straight tube of appropriate length. The tube is attached to the inflow section of the original fluid domain so that the flow can develop fully. The comparison between the analytical solution and the traditional numerical approach indicates that the analytical solution has some advantages over the numerical one. Moreover, the results suggest that subroutine employment allows a consistent reduction in solving time especially for complex fluid dynamic model, and significantly decreases the storage and memory requirements for computations. PMID:9215485

  4. Effect of surface morphology on drag and roughness sublayer in flows over regular roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Marco; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    The effects of systematically varied roughness morphology on bulk drag and on the spatial structure of turbulent boundary layers are examined by performing a series of wind tunnel experiments. In this study, rough surfaces consisting of regularly and uniformly distributed LEGO™ bricks are employed. Twelve different patterns are adopted in order to methodically examine the individual effects of frontal solidity (λF, frontal area of the roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area) and plan solidity (λP, plan area of roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area), on both the bulk drag and the turbulence structure. A floating element friction balance based on Krogstad & Efros (2010) was designed and manufactured to measure the drag generated by the different surfaces. In parallel, high resolution planar and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was applied to investigate the flow features. This talk will focus on the effects of each solidity parameter on the bulk drag and attempt to relate the observed trends to the flow structures in the roughness sublayer. Currently at City University London.

  5. Detached Eddy Simulations of Incompressible Turbulent Flows Using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Laskowski, G M

    2001-08-01

    An explicit Galerkin finite-element formulation of the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) 1 - equation turbulent transport model was implemented into the incompressible flow module of a parallel, multi-domain, Galerkin finite-element, multi-physics code, using both a RANS formulation and a DES formulation. DES is a new technique for simulating/modeling turbulence using a hybrid RANSkES formulation. The turbulent viscosity is constructed from an intermediate viscosity obtained from the transport equation which is spatially discretized using Q1 elements and integrated in time via forward Euler time integration. Three simulations of plane channel flow on a RANS-type grid, using different turbulence models, were conducted in order to validate the implementation of the SA model: SA-RANS, SA-DES and Smagorinksy (without wall correction). Very good agreement was observed between the SA-RANS results and theory, namely the Log Law of the Wall (LLW), especially in the viscous sublayer region and, to a lesser extent, in the log-layer region. The results obtained using the SA-DES model did not agree as well with the LLW, and it is believed that this poor agreement can be attributed to using a DES model on a RANS grid, namely using an incorrect length-scale. It was observed that near the wall, the SA-DES model acted as an RANS model, and away from the wall it acted as an LES model.

  6. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    The subject of this work is the adaptive finite element simulation of problems arising in flow and transport applications on parallel computers. Of particular interest are new contributions to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in this parallel high-performance context, including novel work on data structures, treatment of constraints in a parallel setting, generality and extensibility via object-oriented programming, and the design/implementation of a flexible software framework. This technology and software capability then enables more robust, reliable treatment of multiscale--multiphysics problems and specific studies of fine scale interaction such as those in biological chemotaxis (Chapter 4) and high-speed shock physics for compressible flows (Chapter 5). The work begins by presenting an overview of key concepts and data structures employed in AMR simulations. Of particular interest is how these concepts are applied in the physics-independent software framework which is developed here and is the basis for all the numerical simulations performed in this work. This open-source software framework has been adopted by a number of researchers in the U.S. and abroad for use in a wide range of applications. The dynamic nature of adaptive simulations pose particular issues for efficient implementation on distributed-memory parallel architectures. Communication cost, computational load balance, and memory requirements must all be considered when developing adaptive software for this class of machines. Specific extensions to the adaptive data structures to enable implementation on parallel computers is therefore considered in detail. The libMesh framework for performing adaptive finite element simulations on parallel computers is developed to provide a concrete implementation of the above ideas. This physics-independent framework is applied to two distinct flow and transport applications classes in the subsequent application studies to illustrate the flexibility of the

  7. Pump-and-treat optimization using analytic element method flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. Shawn; Rabideau, Alan J.; Craig, James R.

    2006-05-01

    Plume containment using pump-and-treat (PAT) technology continues to be a popular remediation technique for sites with extensive groundwater contamination. As such, optimization of PAT systems, where cost is minimized subject to various remediation constraints, is the focus of an important and growing body of research. While previous pump-and-treat optimization (PATO) studies have used discretized (finite element or finite difference) flow models, the present study examines the use of analytic element method (AEM) flow models. In a series of numerical experiments, two PATO problems adapted from the literature are optimized using a multi-algorithmic optimization software package coupled with an AEM flow model. The experiments apply several different optimization algorithms and explore the use of various pump-and-treat cost and constraint formulations. The results demonstrate that AEM models can be used to optimize the number, locations and pumping rates of wells in a pump-and-treat containment system. Furthermore, the results illustrate that a total outflux constraint placed along the plume boundary can be used to enforce plume containment. Such constraints are shown to be efficient and reliable alternatives to conventional particle tracking and gradient control techniques. Finally, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique is identified as an effective algorithm for solving pump-and-treat optimization problems. A parallel version of the PSO algorithm is shown to have linear speedup, suggesting that the algorithm is suitable for application to problems that are computationally demanding and involve large numbers of wells.

  8. Interstitial fluid flow in the osteon with spatial gradients of mechanical properties: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Rémond, Agnès; Naïli, Salah; Lemaire, Thibault

    2008-12-01

    Bone remodelling is the process that maintains bone structure and strength through adaptation of bone tissue mechanical properties to applied loads. Bone can be modelled as a porous deformable material whose pores are filled with cells, organic material and interstitial fluid. Fluid flow is believed to play a role in the mechanotransduction of signals for bone remodelling. In this work, an osteon, the elementary unit of cortical bone, is idealized as a hollow cylinder made of a deformable porous matrix saturated with an interstitial fluid. We use Biot's poroelasticity theory to model the mechanical behaviour of bone tissue taking into account transverse isotropic mechanical properties. A finite element poroelastic model is developed in the COMSOL Multiphysics software. Elasticity equations and Darcy's law are implemented in this software; they are coupled through the introduction of an interaction term to obtain poroelasticity equations. Using numerical simulations, the investigation of the effect of spatial gradients of permeability or Poisson's ratio is performed. Results are discussed for their implication on fluid flow in osteons: (i) a permeability gradient affects more the fluid pressure than the velocity profile; (ii) focusing on the fluid flow, the key element of loading is the strain rate; (iii) a Poisson's ratio gradient affects both fluid pressure and fluid velocity. The influence of textural and mechanical properties of bone on mechanotransduction signals for bone remodelling is also discussed. PMID:17990014

  9. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Collection efficiencies were generated for three spherical particle sizes, 100, 20, and 5 micron in diameter, using the codes LEWICE3D and LEWICE2D. The free stream Mach number was 0.27, representing a velocity of approximately 86 ms. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 15-20 occurred as the flow entered the shroud of the probe.Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the effect of the protective shroud.

  10. Power flow as a complement to statistical energy analysis and finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Present methods of analysis of the structural response and the structure-borne transmission of vibrational energy use either finite element (FE) techniques or statistical energy analysis (SEA) methods. The FE methods are a very useful tool at low frequencies where the number of resonances involved in the analysis is rather small. On the other hand SEA methods can predict with acceptable accuracy the response and energy transmission between coupled structures at relatively high frequencies where the structural modal density is high and a statistical approach is the appropriate solution. In the mid-frequency range, a relatively large number of resonances exist which make finite element method too costly. On the other hand SEA methods can only predict an average level form. In this mid-frequency range a possible alternative is to use power flow techniques, where the input and flow of vibrational energy to excited and coupled structural components can be expressed in terms of input and transfer mobilities. This power flow technique can be extended from low to high frequencies and this can be integrated with established FE models at low frequencies and SEA models at high frequencies to form a verification of the method. This method of structural analysis using power flo and mobility methods, and its integration with SEA and FE analysis is applied to the case of two thin beams joined together at right angles.