Science.gov

Sample records for flow cytofluorometric analysis

  1. Flow cytofluorometric monitoring of leukocyte apoptosis in experimental cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsmanova, Ekaterina Y.; Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Livanova, Ludmila F.; Kobkova, Irina M.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.; Shchukovskaya, Tatyana N.; Smirnova, Nina I.; Kutyrev, Vladimir V.

    2003-10-01

    Flow cytofluorometric DNA analysis was applied to determine of the relative contents of proliferative (more then 2C DNA per cell) and apoptotic (less then 2C DNA per cell) leukocytes in blood of adult rabbits, challenged with 10,000 times the 50 % effective dose of Vibrio cholerae virulent strain by the RITARD technique. It has been shown that irreversible increase the percentage of cells carrying DNA in the degradation stage brings to disbalance between the genetically controlled cell proliferation and apoptosis that leads to animal death from the cholera infection. Such fatal changes were not observed in challenging of immunized animals that were not died. Thus received data show that the flow cytofluorometric measurements may be used for detection of transgressions in homeostasis during acute infection diseases, for outlet prognosis of the cholera infection.

  2. Flow cytofluorometric assay of human whole blood leukocyte DNA degradation in response to Yersinia pestis and Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Golovko, Elena M.; Malyukova, Tatyana A.; Lyapin, Mikhail N.; Kostyukova, Tatyana A.; Yezhov, Igor N.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.

    2001-05-01

    Human leukocytes containing less than 2C DNA per cell (damaged or dead cells) were detected and quantified by flow cytometry and DNA-specific staining with ethidium bromide and mithramycin in whole blood infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Addition of live S. aureus to the blood (100 microbe cells per one leukocyte) resulted in rapid degradation of leukocyte DNA within 3 to 6 hours of incubation at 37 degree(s)C. However, only about 50 percent cells were damaged and the leukocytes with the intact genetic apparatus could be found in the blood for a period up to 24 hours. The leukocyte injury was preceded by an increase of DNA per cell content (as compared to the normal one) that was likely to be connected with the active phagocytosis of S. aureus by granulocytes (2C DNA of diploid phagocytes plus the all bacterial DNA absorbed). In response to the same dose of actively growing (at 37 degree(s)C) virulent Y. pestis cells, no increase in DNA content per cell could be observed in the human blood leukocytes. The process of the leukocyte DNA degradation started after a 6-hour incubation, and between 18 to 24 hours of incubation about 90 percent leukocytes (phagocytes and lymphocytes) lost their specific DNA fluorescence. These results demonstrated a high potential of flow cytometry in comparative analysis in vitro of the leukocyte DNA degradation process in human blood in response to bacteria with various pathogenic properties. They agree with the modern idea of an apoptotic mechanism of immunosuppression in plague.

  3. Cytofluorometric identification of plasmin-sensitive factor XIIIa binding to platelets.

    PubMed

    Kreager, J A; Devine, D V; Greenberg, C S

    1988-08-30

    We have investigated the binding of blood coagulation factor XIIIa to thrombin-stimulated platelets using cytofluorometric analysis. Washed thrombin-stimulated platelets bound exogenously added factor XIIIa in a calcium-dependent reaction. The expression of endogenous platelet factor XIII was also detected on the surface of thrombin-stimulated platelets. When fluorescence analysis was performed based on particle size, factor XIIIa bound to the surface of greater than 95% of particles which contained more than one platelet, but only 50% of single platelets. The binding of factor XIIIa to thrombin-stimulated platelets was inhibited by plasmin. Plasmin also inhibited thrombin-dependent expression of the factor XIIIa binding site on platelets. Experiments in which thrombin-stimulated platelets were incubated with factor XIIIa in the presence of 125I-dimethylcasein or 3H-putrescine demonstrated that platelets bear both glutamyl and lysyl substrates for factor XIIIa. Thrombin increased the expression of factor XIIIa substrates by platelets. Plasmin inhibited both the expression of factor XIIIa substrates and degraded them. The binding of factor XIIIa to thrombin-stimulated platelets and the availability of factor XIIIa substrates on the platelet surface could provide a mechanism by which factor XIIIa stabilizes the hemostatic plug by promoting crosslinking reactions between platelet membrane proteins and adhesive glycoproteins. In contrast, plasmin inhibition of factor XIIIa binding and crosslinking could disrupt hemostasis. PMID:2903577

  4. Effects of irradiation, glucocorticoid and FK506 on cell-surface antigen expression by rat thymocytes: a three-colour flow cytofluorometric analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, M; Konishi, M; Takai, K; Naito, K; Fujikura, Y; Fukumoto, T

    1994-01-01

    The expression of T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) alpha beta was investigated in rat CD4- CD8- thymocytes during thymic reconstitution after the exposure of animals to irradiation or glucocorticoid. The effect of the immunosuppressant FK506 on the expression of TCR alpha beta in rat CD4- CD8- thymocytes was also examined. The percentage of CD4- CD8- thymocytes constituted 2.6% of total thymocytes and that of CD4- CD8- TCR alpha beta high cells constituted 12.6% of CD4- CD8- thymocytes in normal adult Lewis rats. The percentage of CD4- CD8- TCR alpha beta high cells increased during thymic reconstitution after irradiation, and maximally constituted 28.6% of CD4- CD8- thymocytes on day 7. Similar results were obtained during thymic reconstitution after glucocorticoid treatment. In contrast, continuous treatment with FK506 for 7 days markedly decreased not only the percentages of CD4+ CD8- TCR alpha beta high and CD4- CD8+ TCR alpha beta high thymocytes, but also that of CD4- CD8- TCR alpha beta high thymocytes. These results indicate that rat CD4- CD8- thymocytes contain a subpopulation of mature (TCR alpha beta high) cells. The possible implications of the existence of this subpopulation with regard to thymocyte differentiation and maturation are discussed. PMID:7530693

  5. HPFTP flow diverter analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spadley, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A computational fluid flow analysis on the flow diverter system under consideration for the Space Shuttle main engine high pressure fuel turbopump (SSME HPFTP) is proposed. A three dimensional viscous flow environment is computed to optimize the geometric configuration and location of the flow diverter system. The analysis consists of a fully turbulent cold flow calculation by Navier-Stokes equations and a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The equations are numerically by a finite difference/element procedure. The results will provide the steady and unsteady pressure field and thermal environment required to assess the usefulness of the flow diverter system in deflecting the cold flow away from the hot turbine components. A geometry optimization study determines the best diverter shape and location to avoid larger thermal gradients on the rotor/stator components.

  6. Laminar Flow Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, David F.

    1992-10-01

    The major thrust of this book is to present a technique of analysis that aids the formulation, understanding, and solution of problems of viscous flow. The intent is to avoid providing a "canned" program to solve a problem, offering instead a way to recognize the underlying physical, mathematical, and modeling concepts inherent in the solutions. The reader must first choose a mathematical model and derive governing equations based on realistic assumptions, or become aware of the limitations and assumptions associated with existing models. An appropriate solution technique is then selected. The solution technique may be either analytical or numerical. Computer-aided analysis algorithms supplement the classical analyses. The book begins by deriving the Navier-Stokes equation for a viscous compressible variable property fluid. The second chapter considers exact solutions of the incompressible hydrodynamic boundary layer equations solved with and without mass transfer at the wall. Forced convection, free convection, and the compressible laminar boundary layer are discussed in the remaining chapters. The text unifies the various topics by tracing a logical progression from simple to complex governing differential equations and boundary conditions. Numerical, parametric, and directed analysis problems are included at the end of each chapter.

  7. Flow Analysis: A Novel Approach For Classification.

    PubMed

    Vakh, Christina; Falkova, Marina; Timofeeva, Irina; Moskvin, Alexey; Moskvin, Leonid; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a novel approach for classification of flow analysis methods according to the conditions under which the mass transfer processes and chemical reactions take place in the flow mode: dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods. The first group includes continuous flow analysis, flow injection analysis, all injection analysis, sequential injection analysis, sequential injection chromatography, cross injection analysis, multi-commutated flow analysis, multi-syringe flow injection analysis, multi-pumping flow systems, loop flow analysis, and simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis. The second group includes segmented flow analysis, zone fluidics, flow batch analysis, sequential injection analysis with a mixing chamber, stepwise injection analysis, and multi-commutated stepwise injection analysis. The offered classification allows systematizing a large number of flow analysis methods. Recent developments and applications of dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods are presented. PMID:26364745

  8. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  9. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  10. Flow analysis system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Wayne S. (Inventor); Barck, Bruce N. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A non-invasive flow analysis system and method wherein a sensor, such as an acoustic sensor, is coupled to a conduit for transmitting a signal which varies depending on the characteristics of the flow in the conduit. The signal is amplified and there is a filter, responsive to the sensor signal, and tuned to pass a narrow band of frequencies proximate the resonant frequency of the sensor. A demodulator generates an amplitude envelope of the filtered signal and a number of flow indicator quantities are calculated based on variations in amplitude of the amplitude envelope. A neural network, or its equivalent, is then used to determine the flow rate of the flow in the conduit based on the flow indicator quantities.

  11. NASA flow fields analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the present research are to improve design capabilities for low thrust rocket engines through understanding the detailed mixing and combustion processes in a representative combustor. Of particular interest is a small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thruster which is considered as a coordinated part of an on-going experimental program at NASA LERC. Detailed computational modeling involves the solution of both the two- and three-dimensional Navier Stokes equations, coupled with chemical reactions and the species diffusion equations. Computations of interest include both steady state and time-accurate flowfields and are obtained by means of LU approximate factorization in time and flux split upwinding differencing in space. The emphasis in the research is focused on using numerical analysis to understand detailed combustor flowfields, including the shear layer dynamics created between fuel film cooling and the core gas in the vicinity on the nearby combustor wall; the integrity and effectiveness of the coolant film; and three-dimensional fuel and oxidizer jet injection/mixing/combustion characteristics in the primary combustor along with their joint impacts on global engine performance.

  12. Buck Creek River Flow Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanapala, Yasas; George, Elizabeth; Ritter, John

    2009-04-01

    Buck Creek flowing through Springfield Ohio has a number of low-head dams currently in place that cause safety issues and sometimes make it impossible for recreational boaters to pass through. The safety issues include the back eddies created by the dams that are known as drowning machines and the hydraulic jumps. In this study we are modeling the flow of Buck Creek using topographical and flow data provided by the Geology Department of Wittenberg University. The flow is analyzed using Hydraulic Engineering Center - River Analysis System software (HEC-RAS). As the first step a model of the river near Snyder Park has been created with the current structure in place for validation purposes. Afterwards the low-head dam is replaced with four drop structures with V-notch overflow gates. The river bed is altered to reflect plunge pools after each drop structure. This analysis will provide insight to how the flow is going to behave after the changes are made. In addition a sediment transport analysis is also being conducted to provide information about the stability of these structures.

  13. Flow Analysis Tool White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boscia, Nichole K.

    2012-01-01

    Faster networks are continually being built to accommodate larger data transfers. While it is intuitive to think that implementing faster networks will result in higher throughput rates, this is often not the case. There are many elements involved in data transfer, many of which are beyond the scope of the network itself. Although networks may get bigger and support faster technologies, the presence of other legacy components, such as older application software or kernel parameters, can often cause bottlenecks. Engineers must be able to identify when data flows are reaching a bottleneck that is not imposed by the network and then troubleshoot it using the tools available to them. The current best practice is to collect as much information as possible on the network traffic flows so that analysis is quick and easy. Unfortunately, no single method of collecting this information can sufficiently capture the whole endto- end picture. This becomes even more of a hurdle when large, multi-user systems are involved. In order to capture all the necessary information, multiple data sources are required. This paper presents a method for developing a flow analysis tool to effectively collect network flow data from multiple sources and provide that information to engineers in a clear, concise way for analysis. The purpose of this method is to collect enough information to quickly (and automatically) identify poorly performing flows along with the cause of the problem. The method involves the development of a set of database tables that can be populated with flow data from multiple sources, along with an easyto- use, web-based front-end interface to help network engineers access, organize, analyze, and manage all the information.

  14. Hot Flow Anomaly Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2010-12-01

    Hot Flow Anomaly observed on Interball-Tail on 03.14.1996 is investigated. The normal to the interplanetary current sheet interacting with bow shock was determined in assumption of tangential discontinuity. Calculated motional electric field was directed towards current sheet. The bow shock before HFA arrival to the spacecraft was quasi-perpendicular, and was quasi-parallel after HFA passage. Respectively, of the shocks, bracketing HFA, were quasi-perpendicular before HFA passage and quasi-parallel after it. With averaged velocity of plasma within the body of HFA and duration of HFA observation we determined its size in normal to the current sheet direction as ~ 2.5 RE. HFA consists of two regions separated by thin layer with different plasma characteristics. Convection of plasma within HFA, as observed along spacecraft trajectory by subtracting averaged velocity from observed velocities, show that plasma in each of two regions is moving from separating layer. It indicates that separating layer is the site of energy deposition from interaction of the solar wind with ions reflected from the shock. This is confirmed by analysis of ion velocity distributions in this layer.

  15. Analysis of katabatic flow using infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzielanek, M.; Cermak, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel high-resolution IR method which is developed, tested and used for the analysis of katabatic flow. Modern thermal imaging systems allow for the recording of infrared picture sequences and thus the monitoring and analysis of dynamic processes. In order to identify, visualize and analyze dynamic air flow using infrared imaging, a highly reactive 'projection' surface is needed along the air flow. Here, a design for these types of analysis is proposed and evaluated. Air flow situations with strong air temperature gradients and fluctuations, such as katabatic flow, are particularly suitable for this new method. The method is applied here to analyze nocturnal cold air flows on gentle slopes. In combination with traditional methods the vertical and temporal dynamics of cold air flow are analyzed. Several assumptions on cold air flow dynamics can be confirmed explicitly for the first time. By observing the cold air flow in terms of frequency, size and period of the cold air fluctuations, drops are identified and organized in a newly derived classification system of cold air flow phases. In addition, new flow characteristics are detected, like sharp cold air caps and turbulence inside the drops. Vertical temperature gradients inside cold air drops and their temporal evolution are presented in high resolution Hovmöller-type diagrams and sequenced time lapse infrared videos.

  16. Content analysis in information flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusho, Alexander A.; Grusho, Nick A.; Timonina, Elena E.

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with architecture of content recognition system. To analyze the problem the stochastic model of content recognition in information flows was built. We proved that under certain conditions it is possible to solve correctly a part of the problem with probability 1, viewing a finite section of the information flow. That means that good architecture consists of two steps. The first step determines correctly certain subsets of contents, while the second step may demand much more time for true decision.

  17. Recurrent flow analysis in spatiotemporally chaotic 2-dimensional Kolmogorov flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Dan; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by recent success in the dynamical systems approach to transitional flow, we study the efficiency and effectiveness of extracting simple invariant sets (recurrent flows) directly from chaotic/turbulent flows and the potential of these sets for providing predictions of certain statistics of the flow. Two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow (the 2D Navier-Stokes equations with a sinusoidal body force) is studied both over a square [0, 2π]2 torus and a rectangular torus extended in the forcing direction. In the former case, an order of magnitude more recurrent flows are found than previously [G. J. Chandler and R. R. Kerswell, "Invariant recurrent solutions embedded in a turbulent two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow," J. Fluid Mech. 722, 554-595 (2013)] and shown to give improved predictions for the dissipation and energy pdfs of the chaos via periodic orbit theory. Analysis of the recurrent flows shows that the energy is largely trapped in the smallest wavenumbers through a combination of the inverse cascade process and a feature of the advective nonlinearity in 2D. Over the extended torus at low forcing amplitudes, some extracted states mimic the statistics of the spatially localised chaos present surprisingly well recalling the findings of Kawahara and Kida ["Periodic motion embedded in plane Couette turbulence: Regeneration cycle and burst," J. Fluid Mech. 449, 291 (2001)] in low-Reynolds-number plane Couette flow. At higher forcing amplitudes, however, success is limited highlighting the increased dimensionality of the chaos and the need for larger data sets. Algorithmic developments to improve the extraction procedure are discussed.

  18. Recurrent flow analysis in spatiotemporally chaotic 2-dimensional Kolmogorov flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Dan Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-04-15

    Motivated by recent success in the dynamical systems approach to transitional flow, we study the efficiency and effectiveness of extracting simple invariant sets (recurrent flows) directly from chaotic/turbulent flows and the potential of these sets for providing predictions of certain statistics of the flow. Two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow (the 2D Navier-Stokes equations with a sinusoidal body force) is studied both over a square [0, 2π]{sup 2} torus and a rectangular torus extended in the forcing direction. In the former case, an order of magnitude more recurrent flows are found than previously [G. J. Chandler and R. R. Kerswell, “Invariant recurrent solutions embedded in a turbulent two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 722, 554–595 (2013)] and shown to give improved predictions for the dissipation and energy pdfs of the chaos via periodic orbit theory. Analysis of the recurrent flows shows that the energy is largely trapped in the smallest wavenumbers through a combination of the inverse cascade process and a feature of the advective nonlinearity in 2D. Over the extended torus at low forcing amplitudes, some extracted states mimic the statistics of the spatially localised chaos present surprisingly well recalling the findings of Kawahara and Kida [“Periodic motion embedded in plane Couette turbulence: Regeneration cycle and burst,” J. Fluid Mech. 449, 291 (2001)] in low-Reynolds-number plane Couette flow. At higher forcing amplitudes, however, success is limited highlighting the increased dimensionality of the chaos and the need for larger data sets. Algorithmic developments to improve the extraction procedure are discussed.

  19. Analysis of lipid flow on minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Fatemeh; Christenson, Joel; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-03-01

    Interaction between the bilayer shape and surface flow is important for capturing the flow of lipids in many biological membranes. Recent microscopy evidence has shown that minimal surfaces (planes, catenoids, and helicoids) occur often in cellular membranes. In this study, we explore lipid flow in these geometries using a `stream function' formulation for viscoelastic lipid bilayers. Using this formulation, we derive two-dimensional lipid flow equations for the commonly occurring minimal surfaces in lipid bilayers. We show that for three minimal surfaces (planes, catenoids, and helicoids), the surface flow equations satisfy Stokes flow equations. In helicoids and catenoids, we show that the tangential velocity field is a Killing vector field. Thus, our analysis provides fundamental insight into the flow patterns of lipids on intracellular organelle membranes that are characterized by fixed shapes reminiscent of minimal surfaces.

  20. Analysis of stratified flow mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, S. L.; Lyczkowski, R. W.

    1985-06-01

    The Creare 1/5-scale Phase II experiments which model fluid and thermal mixing of relatively cold high pressure injection (PHI) water into a cold leg of a full-scale pressurized water reactor (PWR) having loop flow are analyzed and found that they cannot achieve complete similarity with respect to characteristic Reynolds and Froude numbers and developing hydrodynamic entry length. Several analyses show that these experiments fall into two distinct regimes of mixing: momentum controlled and gravity controlled (stratification).

  1. Analysis of stratified flow mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, S.L.; Lyckowski, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    The Creare one-fifth-scale Phase II experiments which model fluid and thermal mixing of relatively cold high-pressure injection water into a cold leg of a full-scale pressurized water reactor having loop flow, are analyzed. It is found that they cannot achieve complete similarity with respect to characteristic Reynolds and Froude numbers and developing hydrodynamic entry length. Several analyses show that these experiments fall into two distinct regimes of mixing: momentum and gravity controlled (stratification).

  2. Impeller flow field measurement and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, J. R.; Fleeter, S.

    1991-01-01

    A series of experiments are performed to investigate and quantify the three-dimensional mean flow field in centrifugal compressor flow passages and to evaluate contemporary internal flow models. The experiments include the acquisition and analysis of LDV data in the impeller passages of a low-speed moderate-scale research mixed-flow centrifugal compressor operating at its design point. Predictions from a viscous internal flow model are then correlated with these data. The LDV data show the traditional jet-wake structure observed in many centrifugal compressors, with the wake observed along the shroud 70 percent of the length from the pressure to suction surface. The viscous model predicts the major flow phenomena. However, the correlations of the viscous predictions with the LDV data were poor.

  3. Flow analysis of nozzle installations with strong airplane flow interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to calculate the flow fields resulting from the viscous-inviscid interactions that occur when a strong jet exhaust and aircraft flow field coupling exists. The approach used in the current procedure is to divide the interaction region into zones which are either predominantly viscous or inviscid. The flow in the inviscid zone, which surrounds most of the aircraft, is calculated using an existing linearized potential flow code. The viscous flow zone, which encompasses the jet plume, is modeled using a parabolized Navier-Stokes code. The key feature of the present procedure is the coupling of the zonal solutions such that sufficient information is transferred between the zones to preserve the effects of the interactions. The zonal boundaries overlap with the boundary conditions being the information link between zones. An iteraction scheme iterates the coupled analysis until convergence has been obtained. The procedure has been successfully used for several test cases for which the computed results are presented.

  4. Dimensional analysis of natural debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gordon; Ouyang, Chaojun

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows occur when masses of poorly sorted sediment, agitated and saturated with water, surge down slopes in response to gravitational attraction. They are of great concern because they often cause catastrophic disasters due to the long run-out distance and large impact forc-es. Different from rock avalanches and sediment-laden water floods, both solid and fluid phases affected by multiple parameters can influence the motion of debris flows and govern their rheological properties. A dimensional analysis for a systematic study of the governing parameters is presented in this manuscript. Multiple dimensionless numbers with clear physical meanings are critically reviewed. Field data on natural debris flows are available here based on the fifty years' observation and measurement in the Jiangjia Gully, which is located in the Dongchuan City, Yunnan Province of China. The applications of field data with the dimensional analysis for studying natural debris flows are demonstrated. Specific values of dimensionless numbers (e.g., modified Savage Number, Reynolds number, Friction number) for classifying flowing regimes of natural debris flows on the large scales are obtained. Compared to previous physical model tests conducted mostly on small scales, this study shows that the contact friction between particles dominates in natural debris flows. In addition, the solid inertial stress due to particle collisions and the pore fluid viscous shear stress play key roles in governing the dynamic properties of debris flows and the total normal stress acting on the slope surfaces. The channel width as a confinement to the flows can affect the solids discharge per unit width significantly. Furthermore, a dimensionless number related to pore fluid pressure dissipation is found for distinguishing surge flows and continuous flows in field satisfactorily. It indicates that for surge debris flows, the high pore fluid pressures generated in granular body dissipate quite slowly and may

  5. Analysis of stratified flow mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, S.L.; Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Creare 1/5-scale Phase II experiments which model fluid and thermal mixing of relatively cold high pressure injection (HPI) water into a cold leg of a full-scale pressurized water reactor (PWR) having loop flow are analyzed and found that they cannot achieve complete similarity with respect to characteristic Reynolds and Froude numbers and developing hydrodynamic entry length. Several analyses show that these experiments fall into two distinct regimes of mixing: momentum controlled and gravity controlled (stratification). 18 refs., 9 figs.

  6. LFSTAT - Low-Flow Analysis in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor

    2013-04-01

    The calculation of characteristic stream flow during dry conditions is a basic requirement for many problems in hydrology, ecohydrology and water resources management. As opposed to floods, a number of different indices are used to characterise low flows and streamflow droughts. Although these indices and methods of calculation have been well documented in the WMO Manual on Low-flow Estimation and Prediction [1], a comprehensive software was missing which enables a fast and standardized calculation of low flow statistics. We present the new software package lfstat to fill in this obvious gap. Our software package is based on the statistical open source software R, and expands it to analyse daily stream flow data records focusing on low-flows. As command-line based programs are not everyone's preference, we also offer a plug-in for the R-Commander, an easy to use graphical user interface (GUI) provided for R which is based on tcl/tk. The functionality of lfstat includes estimation methods for low-flow indices, extreme value statistics, deficit characteristics, and additional graphical methods to control the computation of complex indices and to illustrate the data. Beside the basic low flow indices, the baseflow index and recession constants can be computed. For extreme value statistics, state-of-the-art methods for L-moment based local and regional frequency analysis (RFA) are available. The tools for deficit characteristics include various pooling and threshold selection methods to support the calculation of drought duration and deficit indices. The most common graphics for low flow analysis are available, and the plots can be modified according to the user preferences. Graphics include hydrographs for different periods, flexible streamflow deficit plots, baseflow visualisation, recession diagnostic, flow duration curves as well as double mass curves, and many more. From a technical point of view, the package uses a S3-class called lfobj (low-flow objects). This

  7. SRMAFTE facility checkout model flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Equipment (SRMAFTE) facility was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the internal propellant, insulation, and nozzle configurations of solid propellant rocket motor designs. This makes the characterization of the facility internal flow field very important in assuring that no facility induced flow field features exist which would corrupt the model related measurements. In order to verify the design and operation of the facility, a three-dimensional computational flow field analysis was performed on the facility checkout model setup. The checkout model measurement data, one-dimensional and three-dimensional estimates were compared, and the design and proper operation of the facility was verified. The proper operation of the metering nozzles, adapter chamber transition, model nozzle, and diffuser were verified. The one-dimensional and three-dimensional flow field estimates along with the available measurement data are compared.

  8. Advanced stability analysis for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY stability analysis code to the full eighth order compressible stability equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the stability of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the stability of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.

  9. POD analysis of turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Alexander J.; Hellström, Leo; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2015-11-01

    Proper Orthogonal Decomposition was introduced into the analysis of turbulent flow by Lumley (1967, 1981). Turbulent flows pose particular challenges for POD analysis because the energy is distributed over a wide range of scales. It has recently been found, however, that POD can be a powerful experimental tool for identifying the largest scales, especially the Large Scale Motions (LSMs) and Very Large Scale Motions (VLSMs) in turbulent pipe flow. It has also been useful, for example, to identify the large-scale motions that dominate the unsteady behavior of the flow downstream of a right-angled bend. Here, we summarize some of these experimental results, and discuss their implications for the understanding of turbulence structure. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0174 and ERC Grant No. 277472.

  10. Recent advances in flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Trojanowicz, Marek; Kołacińska, Kamila

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic development of methodologies of analytical flow injection measurements during four decades since their invention has reinforced the solid position of flow analysis in the arsenal of techniques and instrumentation of contemporary chemical analysis. With the number of published scientific papers exceeding 20 000, and advanced instrumentation available for environmental, food, and pharmaceutical analysis, flow analysis is well established as an extremely vital field of modern flow chemistry, which is developed simultaneously with methods of chemical synthesis carried out under flow conditions. This review work is based on almost 300 original papers published mostly in the last decade, with special emphasis put on presenting novel achievements from the most recent 2-3 years in order to indicate current development trends of this methodology. Besides the evolution of the design of whole measuring systems, and including especially new applications of various detections methods, several aspects of implications of progress in nanotechnology, and miniaturization of measuring systems for application in different field of modern chemical analysis are also discussed. PMID:26906258

  11. LV software for supersonic flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) maintains a leadership position in research into advanced aerospace propulsion systems. For the next generation of aircraft, engine designs continue to involve complex, high-speed flows. Performing the detailed flow diagnostics to properly evaluate these designs requires advanced instrumentation to probe these highly turbulent flows. The hostile flow environment often requires nonintrusive measurement techniques such as the laser velocimeter (LV). Since the LV is a proven instrument for nonintrusive flow measurement, it can provide quantitative velocity data with minimal interference to the flow. Based on anticipated flow conditions, laser velocimeter systems were procured from TSI, Inc. The initial system utilized counter processor technology, but later procurements this past year include a more advanced, correlator-based processor, which significantly improves the overall LV performance. To meet the needs of advanced research into propulsion, this instrument must be integrated into an existing VAX/VMS computer system for data acquisition, processing, and presentation. The work done under this grant before this period concentrated on developing the software required to setup and acquire data from the TSI MI-990 multichannel interface, and the RMR 1989 rotating machinery resolver. With the basis established for controlling the operation of the LV system, software development this past year shifted in emphasis from instrumentation control and data acquisition to data analysis and presentation. The progress of the program is reported.

  12. A clinical flow cytometry data analysis assistant

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C. ); Stewart, C.C. ); Duque, R.E. ); Braylan, R.C. . Coll. of Medicine)

    1990-01-01

    A rule-based expert system is being developed to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data for patients with leukemias or lymphomas. The cells are stained with fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies and the cell fluorescence is measured with a flow cytometer. Cluster analysis is used to isolate subpopulations in the data on which the clinical decisions are made. Symbolic facts for the expert system are instantiated using these numerical data and the knowledge of the clinicians and experts in flow cytometry. The first prototype used a decision tree and rigid rules. Is successfully classified only nine of eleven leukemia cases. A second prototype incorporating certainty factors into the rules is now being developed that should remove the need for a rigid decision tree. 9 refs.

  13. Equilibria with incompressible flows from symmetry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiroukidis, Ap E-mail: gthroum@cc.uoi.gr; Throumoulopoulos, G. N. E-mail: gthroum@cc.uoi.gr

    2015-08-15

    We identify and study new nonlinear axisymmetric equilibria with incompressible flow of arbitrary direction satisfying a generalized Grad Shafranov equation by extending the symmetry analysis presented by Cicogna and Pegoraro [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022520 (2015)]. In particular, we construct a typical tokamak D-shaped equilibrium with peaked toroidal current density, monotonically varying safety factor, and sheared electric field.

  14. Automated Protein Assay Using Flow Injection Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Carrie A. C.; Oates, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    1998-08-01

    The technique of flow injection analysis (FIA) is a common instrumental method used in detecting a variety of chemical and biological agents. This paper describes an undergraduate laboratory that uses FIA to perform a bicinchoninic acid (BCA) colorimetric assay for quantitating protein samples. The method requires less than 2 min per sample injection and gives a response over a broad range of protein concentrations. This method can be used in instrumental analysis labs to illustrate the principles and use of FIA, or as a means for introducing students to common methods employed in the analysis of biological agents.

  15. Flow analysis with cumulants: Direct calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bilandzic, Ante; Snellings, Raimond; Voloshin, Sergei

    2011-04-15

    Anisotropic flow measurements in heavy-ion collisions provide important information on the properties of hot and dense matter. These measurements are based on analysis of azimuthal correlations and might be biased by contributions from correlations that are not related to the initial geometry, so-called nonflow. To improve anisotropic flow measurements, advanced methods based on multiparticle correlations (cumulants) have been developed to suppress nonflow contribution. These multiparticle correlations can be calculated by looping over all possible multiplets, however, this quickly becomes prohibitively CPU intensive. Therefore, the most used technique for cumulant calculations is based on generating functions. This method involves approximations, and has its own biases, which complicates the interpretation of the results. In this paper we present a new exact method for direct calculations of multiparticle cumulants using moments of the flow vectors.

  16. Flow sorting of microorganisms for molecular analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, G; Fuchs, B; Spring, S; Beisker, W; Amann, R

    1997-01-01

    Not only classical cultivation-based methods but also the new molecular approaches may result in incomplete and selective information on the natural diversity of microbial communities. Flow sorting of microorganisms from environmental samples allows the deliberate selection of cell populations of interest from highly diverse systems for molecular analysis. Several cellular parameters that can be measured by flow cytometry are useful as sort criteria. Here, we report sorting of bacteria from activated sludge, lake water, and lake sediment according to differences in light scattering, DNA content, and/or affiliation to certain phylogenetic groups as assessed by fluorescein-labeled, rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. Microscopy of the sorted cells showed that populations of originally low abundance could be strongly enriched by flow sorting (up to 280-fold), depending on the original abundance of the cells of interest and the type of sample sorted. The purity of the cells of interest could be further increased by repeated sorting, but this increase was limited by cell aggregation in the case of activated-sludge samples. It was possible to amplify almost full-length 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragments from sorted microbial cells by PCR, even after fixation with paraformaldehyde and in situ hybridization. Dot blot hybridization and sequencing demonstrated that most of the amplified rDNA originated from those cells that had been selected for by flow sorting. Comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences revealed previously unknown species of magnetotactic or activated-sludge bacteria. PMID:9361408

  17. Infrastructure Analysis Tools: A Focus on Cash Flow Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Penev, M.

    2012-09-01

    NREL has developed and maintains a variety of infrastructure analysis models for the U.S. Department of Energy. Business case analysis has recently been added to this tool set. This presentation focuses on cash flow analysis. Cash flows depend upon infrastructure costs, optimized spatially and temporally, and assumptions about financing and revenue. NREL has incorporated detailed metrics on financing and incentives into the models. Next steps in modeling include continuing to collect feedback on regional/local infrastructure development activities and 'roadmap' dynamics, and incorporating consumer preference assumptions on infrastructure to provide direct feedback between vehicles and station rollout.

  18. Dual throat thruster cold flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgreen, R. B.; Nickerson, G. R.; Obrien, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    The concept was evaluated with cold flow (nitrogen gas) testing and through analysis for application as a tripropellant engine for single-stage-to-orbit type missions. Three modes of operation were tested and analyzed: (1) Mode 1 Series Burn, (2) Mode 1 Parallel Burn, and (3) Mode 2. Primary emphasis was placed on the Mode 2 plume attachment aerodynamics and performance. The conclusions from the test data analysis are as follows: (1) the concept is aerodynamically feasible, (2) the performance loss is as low as 0.5 percent, (3) the loss is minimized by an optimum nozzle spacing corresponding to an AF-ATS ratio of about 1.5 or an Le/Rtp ratio of 3.0 for the dual throat hardware tested, requiring only 4% bleed flow, (4) the Mode 1 and Mode 2 geometry requirements are compatible and pose no significant design problems.

  19. Residual ozone determination by flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Straka, M.R.; Pacey, G.E.; Gordon, G.

    1984-09-01

    It has been proposed that ozone be used to replace free chlorine for the disinfection of drinking water and waste water. For the use of ozone in this capacity, it would be necessary to have a fast accurate and precise method to analyze for the presence of residuals. An automated method for ozone determination based on the indigo reagent method is presented. This method is based on the advantages of flow injection analysis (FIA) techniques. 19 references, 3 tables, 2 figures.

  20. Recent Electrochemical and Optical Sensors in Flow-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chailapakul, Orawon; Ngamukot, Passapol; Yoosamran, Alongkorn; Siangproh, Weena; Wangfuengkanagul, Nattakarn

    2006-01-01

    Some recent analytical sensors based on electrochemical and optical detection coupled with different flow techniques have been chosen in this overview. A brief description of fundamental concepts and applications of each flow technique, such as flow injection analysis (FIA), sequential injection analysis (SIA), all injection analysis (AIA), batch injection analysis (BIA), multicommutated FIA (MCFIA), multisyringe FIA (MSFIA), and multipumped FIA (MPFIA) were reviewed.

  1. Dynamic feature analysis in bidirectional pedestrian flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xia, Yang; Winnie, Daamen; Serge, Paul Hoogendoorn; Hai-Rong, Dong; Xiu-Ming, Yao

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of dynamic features of pedestrian flows is one of the most exciting topics in pedestrian dynamics. This paper focuses on the effect of homogeneity and heterogeneity in three parameters of the social force model, namely desired velocity, reaction time, and body size, on the moving dynamics of bidirectional pedestrian flows in the corridors. The speed and its deviation in free flows are investigated. Simulation results show that the homogeneous higher desired speed which is less than a critical threshold, shorter reaction time or smaller body size results in higher speed of flows. The free dynamics is more sensitive to the heterogeneity in desired speed than that in reaction time or in body size. In particular, an inner lane formation is observed in normal lanes. Furthermore, the breakdown probability and the start time of breakdown are focused on. This study reveals that the sizes of homogeneous desired speed, reaction time or body size play more important roles in affecting the breakdown than the heterogeneities in these three parameters do. Project supported jointly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61233001) and the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2013JBZ007).

  2. Numerical analysis of flows in reciprocating engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, H.; Kojima, M.

    1986-07-01

    A numerical method of the analysis for three-dimensional turbulent flow in cylinders of reciprocating engines with arbitrary geometry is described. A scheme of the finite volume/finite element methods is used, employing a large number of small elements of arbitrary shapes to form a cylinder. The fluid dynamic equations are expressed in integral form for each element, taking into account the deformation of the element shape according to the piston movements, and are solved in the physical space using rectangular coordinates. The conventional k-epsilon two-equation model is employed to describe the flow turbulence. Example calculations are presented for simple pancake-type combustion chambers having an annular intake port at either center or asymmetric position of the cylinder head. The suction inflow direction is also changed in several ways. The results show a good simulation of overall fluid movements within the engine cylinder.

  3. Radioisotope method of compound flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryka, Leszek; Zych, Marcin; Hanus, Robert; Sobota, Jerzy; Vlasak, Pavel; Malczewska, Beata

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents gamma radiation application to analysis of a multicomponent or multiphase flow. Such information as a selected component content in the mixture transported through pipe is crucial in many industrial or laboratory installations. Properly selected sealed radioactive source and collimators, deliver the photon beam, penetrating cross section of the flow. Detectors mounted at opposite to the source side of the pipe, allow recording of digital signals representing composition of the stream. In the present development of electronics, detectors and computer software, a significant progress in know-how of this field may be observed. The paper describes application of this method to optimization and control of hydrotransport of solid particles and propose monitoring facilitating prevent of a pipe clogging or dangerous oscillations.

  4. LV software support for supersonic flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The software for configuring a Laser Velocimeter (LV) counter processor system was developed using structured design. The LV system includes up to three counter processors and a rotary encoder. The software for configuring and testing the LV system was developed, tested, and included in an overall software package for data acquisition, analysis, and reduction. Error handling routines respond to both operator and instrument errors which often arise in the course of measuring complex, high-speed flows. The use of networking capabilities greatly facilitates the software development process by allowing software development and testing from a remote site. In addition, high-speed transfers allow graphics files or commands to provide viewing of the data from a remote site. Further advances in data analysis require corresponding advances in procedures for statistical and time series analysis of nonuniformly sampled data.

  5. Cross Flow Parameter Calculation for Aerodynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, David, Jr. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for determining a cross flow angle for a feature on a structure. A processor unit receives location information identifying a location of the feature on the structure, determines an angle of the feature, identifies flow information for the location, determines a flow angle using the flow information, and determines the cross flow angle for the feature using the flow angle and the angle of the feature. The flow information describes a flow of fluid across the structure. The flow angle comprises an angle of the flow of fluid across the structure for the location of the feature.

  6. Flow simulation and analysis of high-power flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, E.; Albertus, P.; Cho, K. T.; Weber, A. Z.; Kojic, A.

    2015-12-01

    The cost of a flow battery system can be reduced by increasing its power density and thereby reducing its stack area. If per-pass utilizations are held constant, higher battery power densities can only be achieved using higher flow rates. Here, a 3D computational fluid dynamics model of a flow battery flow field and electrode is used to analyze the implications of increasing flow rates to high power density operating conditions. Interdigitated and serpentine designs, and cell sizes ranging from 10 cm2 to 400 cm2, are simulated. The results quantify the dependence of pressure loss on cell size and design, demonstrating that the details of the passages that distribute flow between individual channels and the inlet and outlet have a major impact on pressure losses in larger cells. Additionally, in-cell flow behavior is analyzed as a function of cell size and design. Flow structures are interrogated to show how and where electrode parameters influence pressure drops, and how regions where transport is slow are correlated with the presence of experimentally observed cell degradation.

  7. Coupled ensemble flow line advection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; Yuan, Xiaoru; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Xiaomin

    2013-12-01

    Ensemble run simulations are becoming increasingly widespread. In this work, we couple particle advection with pathline analysis to visualize and reveal the differences among the flow fields of ensemble runs. Our method first constructs a variation field using a Lagrangian-based distance metric. The variation field characterizes the variation between vector fields of the ensemble runs, by extracting and visualizing the variation of pathlines within ensemble. Parallelism in a MapReduce style is leveraged to handle data processing and computing at scale. Using our prototype system, we demonstrate how scientists can effectively explore and investigate differences within ensemble simulations. PMID:24051840

  8. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method developed for the classification of quasi-stationary events into a few planetary flow regimes and for the examination of transitions between these regimes is described. The method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and then to a 500-mbar data set for Northern Hemisphere (NH), for which cluster analysis was carried out in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters were found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, while transient clusters were found in the band-pass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band, three pairs of clusters determined EOFs 1, 2, and 3, respectively; they exhibited well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American pattern, and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data exhibited strong bimodality.

  9. Bulk-Flow Analysis, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.

    1993-01-01

    The bulk-flow analysis results for this contract are incorporated in the following publications: 'Fluid-Structure Interaction Forces at Pump-Impeller Shroud Surfaces for Axial Vibration Analysis'; 'Centrifugal Acceleration Modes for Incompressible Fluid in the Leakage Annulus Between a Shrouded Pump Impeller and Its Housing'; 'Influence of Impeller Shroud Forces on Pump Rotordynamics'; 'Pressure Oscillation in the Leakage Annulus Between a Shrouded Impeller and Its Housing Due to Impeller-Discharge-Pressure Disturbances'; and 'Compressibility Effects on Rotor Forces in the Leakage Path Between a Shrouded Pump Impeller and Its Housing'. These publications are summarized and included in this final report. Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD) results developed by Dr. Erian Baskharone are reported separately.

  10. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Hyun, S.

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  11. Unsaturated Zone Flow Patterns and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers

    2001-10-17

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents the development of an expected-case model for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport that will be described in terms of the representativeness of models of the natural system. The expected-case model will provide an evaluation of the effectiveness of the natural barriers, assess the impact of conservatism in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), and support the development of further models and analyses for public confidence building. The present models used in ''Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation'' (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) 2000 [1532461]) underestimate the natural-barrier performance because of conservative assumptions and parameters and do not adequately address uncertainty and alternative models. The development of an expected case model for the UZ natural barrier addresses issues regarding flow-pattern analysis and modeling that had previously been treated conservatively. This is in line with the Repository Safety Strategy (RSS) philosophy of treating conservatively those aspects of the UZ flow and transport system that are not important for achieving regulatory dose (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153246], Section 1.1.1). The development of an expected case model for the UZ also provides defense-in-depth in areas requiring further analysis of uncertainty and alternative models. In general, the value of the conservative case is to provide a more easily defensible TSPA for behavior of UZ flow and transport processes at Yucca Mountain. This AMR has been prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (Bechtel SAIC Company (BSC) 2001 [155051], Section 1.3 - Work Package 4301213UMG). The work scope is to examine the data and current models of flow and transport in the Yucca Mountain UZ to identify models and analyses where conservatism may be reduced and

  12. PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF AXIAL FLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of axial-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as symmetrical, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat model, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and

  13. Computer program for compressible flow network analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilton, M. E.; Murtaugh, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Program solves problem of an arbitrarily connected one dimensional compressible flow network with pumping in the channels and momentum balancing at flow junctions. Program includes pressure drop calculations for impingement flow and flow through pin fin arrangements, as currently found in many air cooled turbine bucket and vane cooling configurations.

  14. Data-Flow Based Model Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saad, Christian; Bauer, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    The concept of (meta) modeling combines an intuitive way of formalizing the structure of an application domain with a high expressiveness that makes it suitable for a wide variety of use cases and has therefore become an integral part of many areas in computer science. While the definition of modeling languages through the use of meta models, e.g. in Unified Modeling Language (UML), is a well-understood process, their validation and the extraction of behavioral information is still a challenge. In this paper we present a novel approach for dynamic model analysis along with several fields of application. Examining the propagation of information along the edges and nodes of the model graph allows to extend and simplify the definition of semantic constraints in comparison to the capabilities offered by e.g. the Object Constraint Language. Performing a flow-based analysis also enables the simulation of dynamic behavior, thus providing an "abstract interpretation"-like analysis method for the modeling domain.

  15. Space Station resource node flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kania, Lee; Kumar, Ganesh; Mcconnaughey, Paul

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the flow field within the Space Station Freedom resource node with operational intermodule ventilation and temperature/humidity control ventilation systems has been conducted. The INS3D code, an incompressible, steady-state Navier-Stokes solver has been used to assess the design of the ventilation system via quantification of the level of fluid mixing and identification of 'dead air' regions and short-circuit ventilation. Numerical results indicate significant short-circuit ventilation in the forward and midsections of the node and insufficient fluid mixing is found to exist in the aft node section. These results as well as results from a solution grid dependence study are presented.

  16. Methodologies and techniques for analysis of network flow data

    SciTech Connect

    Bobyshev, A.; Grigoriev, M.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Network flow data gathered at the border routers and core switches is used at Fermilab for statistical analysis of traffic patterns, passive network monitoring, and estimation of network performance characteristics. Flow data is also a critical tool in the investigation of computer security incidents. Development and enhancement of flow based tools is an on-going effort. This paper describes the most recent developments in flow analysis at Fermilab.

  17. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  18. Numerical Analysis of Granular Flows in a Silo Bed on Flow Regime Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingtuan; Gui, Nan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2015-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a gravity-driven dense granular flow in a granular bed with a contracted drainage orifice are studied by using discrete element method and quantitative analysis. Three values of discharging rates, ranging from fast to slow dense flows, are investigated. Time variations and derivatives of mean forces and velocities, as well as their respective correlations, are analyzed to quantitatively depict the characteristics of granular flow as well as flow regime categorization. The auto-correlation functions, as well as their Fourier spectrums, are utilized to characterize the differences between the mechanisms of slow and fast granular flows. Finally, it is suggested that the flow regimes of slow and fast flows can be characterized by the kinetic and kinematic flow properties of particles. PMID:25793996

  19. Numerical analysis of granular flows in a silo bed on flow regime characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingtuan; Gui, Nan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2015-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a gravity-driven dense granular flow in a granular bed with a contracted drainage orifice are studied by using discrete element method and quantitative analysis. Three values of discharging rates, ranging from fast to slow dense flows, are investigated. Time variations and derivatives of mean forces and velocities, as well as their respective correlations, are analyzed to quantitatively depict the characteristics of granular flow as well as flow regime categorization. The auto-correlation functions, as well as their Fourier spectrums, are utilized to characterize the differences between the mechanisms of slow and fast granular flows. Finally, it is suggested that the flow regimes of slow and fast flows can be characterized by the kinetic and kinematic flow properties of particles. PMID:25793996

  20. Woody debris flow behavior from experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Allen; Medina, Vicente; Morloti, Emanuele; Renaud, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    A consequence of debris flow in streams are well known, the collapse of the stream flooding all over the land. The high momentum flux of those flows can devastate houses, drag and crushes cars, etc. The presence of woody debris into the flow rise the flow depth and increment the collapse of the streams, bridges and structures. The present preliminary study offer a qualitative comparison between a debris flow and a woody debris flow with similar flow characteristics. To obtain this a series of experiments were performed in the Morph-dynamic Laboratory of the Hydraulic, Marine and Environmental Department. A high slope flume of 9 meters length, 40 cm width and 60 cm high was used. Up to 5 experiments were running in the flume. Initially the material was placed dry in the bed conforming a 20 cm depth of granular material changing the way of water wave entrance. Always water wave was introduced as a step function with different step size and different flow duration in order to introduce the same volume of water, just enough to saturate all the material in the channel. The flow was filmed with a handycam in order to see the general flow characteristics and with a high speed camera, just in a section, to visualize the flow velocities. Several woody pieces were placed along the channel to simulate the presence of wood and tress in the stream. Each tree was constructed in such a way that each one have a root made by rocks simulating a real root and different mass distribution. The comparison with experiments without wood was clever to understand the influence of woods in the debris flow. The woody debris flow alone creates natural dams along the stream without presence of inciters obstacles along the reach.

  1. Analysis of Pulsed Flow Modification Alternatives, Lower Missouri River, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    The graphical, tabular, and statistical data presented in this report resulted from analysis of alternative flow regime designs considered by a group of Missouri River managers, stakeholders, and scientists during the summer of 2005. This plenary group was charged with designing a flow regime with increased spring flow pulses to support reproduction and survival of the endangered pallid sturgeon. Environmental flow components extracted from the reference natural flow regime were used to design and assess performance of alternative flow regimes. The analysis is based on modeled flow releases from Gavins Point Dam (near Yankton, South Dakota) for nine design alternatives and two reference scenarios; the reference scenarios are the run-of-the-river and the water-control plan implemented in 2004. The alternative designs were developed by the plenary group with the goal of providing pulsed spring flows, while retaining traditional social and economic uses of the river.

  2. Gas flow analysis in melting furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, L.I.; Bui, R.T.; Charette, A.; Bourgeois, T.

    1998-12-01

    The flow structure inside round furnaces with various numbers of burners, burner arrangement, and exit conditions has been studied experimentally with the purpose of improving the flow conditions and the resulting heat transfer. Small-scale transparent models were built according to the laws of geometric and dynamic similarity. Various visualization and experimental techniques were applied. The flow pattern in the near-surface regions was visualized by the fluorescent minituft and popcorn techniques; the flow structure in the bulk was analyzed by smoke injection and laser sheet illumination. For the study of the transient effects, high-speed video photography was applied. The effects of the various flow patterns, like axisymmetric and rotational flow, on the magnitude and uniformity of the residence time, as well as on the formation of stagnation zones, were discussed. Conclusions were drawn and have since been applied for the improvement of furnace performance.

  3. Analysis of seawater flow through optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández López, Sheila; Carrera Ramírez, Jesús; Rodriguez Sinobar, Leonor; Benitez, Javier; Rossi, Riccardo; Laresse de Tetto, Antonia

    2015-04-01

    The relation between sea and coastal aquifer is very important to the human populations living in coastal areas. The interrelation involves the submarine ground water discharge of relatively fresh water to the sea and the intrusion of sea water into the aquifer, which impairs the quality of ground water. The main process in seawater intrusion is managed by fluid-density effects which control the displacement of saline water. The underlain salinity acts as the restoring force, while hydrodynamic dispersion and convection lead to a mixing and vertical displacement of the brine. Because of this, a good definition of this saltwater-freshwater interface is needed what is intimately joined to the study of the movements (velocity fields) of fresh and salt water. As it is well known, the flow of salt water studied in seawater intrusion in stationary state, is nearly null or very low. However, in the rest of cases, this flux can be very important, so it is necessary its study to a better comprehension of this process. One possible manner of carry out this analysis is through the data from optical fiber. So, to research the distribution and velocity of the fresh and saltwater in the aquifer, a fiber optic system (OF) has been installed in Argentona (Baix Maresme, Catalonia). The main objective is to obtain the distributed temperature measurements (OF-DTS) and made progress in the interpretation of the dynamic processes of water. For some applications, the optical fiber acts as a passive temperature sensor but in our case, the technique Heated Active Fiber Optic will be used. This is based on the thermal response of the ground as a heat emission source is introduced. The thermal properties of the soil, dependent variables of soil water content, will make a specific temperature distribution around the cable. From the analyzed data we will deduce the velocity field, the real objective of our problem. To simulate this phenomenon and the coupled transport and flow problem

  4. Parametric and experimental analysis using a power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    A structural power flow approach for the analysis of structure-borne transmission of vibrations is used to analyze the influence of structural parameters on transmitted power. The parametric analysis is also performed using the Statistical Energy Analysis approach and the results are compared with those obtained using the power flow approach. The advantages of structural power flow analysis are demonstrated by comparing the type of results that are obtained by the two analytical methods. Also, to demonstrate that the power flow results represent a direct physical parameter that can be measured on a typical structure, an experimental study of structural power flow is presented. This experimental study presents results for an L shaped beam for which an available solution was already obtained. Various methods to measure vibrational power flow are compared to study their advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Analysis and control of cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourta, A.; Vitale, E.

    2008-07-01

    A flow above a cavity leads to an unsteady separated flow. This configuration exhibits an intense aeroacoustic coupling, where very intense aerodynamic noise can be emitted. Moreover, a majority of tangential flow above a cavity has an oscillatory character, resulting from a strong coupling between the acoustic and the flow dynamics. In the present work, we are interested in characterizing the dynamics and the frequency distribution of a cavity flow. First, the dynamics of the cavity are analyzed and the frequency distribution is established, which is followed by a study of nonlinear interaction. An open loop control using a synthetic jet is then applied in order to reduce noise generation. Finally, by choosing suitable jet parameters a significant noise reduction is obtained.

  6. Natural laminar flow airfoil analysis and trade studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of an airfoil for a large commercial transport cruising at Mach 0.8 and the use of advanced computer techniques to perform the analysis are described. Incorporation of the airfoil into a natural laminar flow transport configuration is addressed and a comparison of fuel requirements and operating costs between the natural laminar flow transport and an equivalent turbulent flow transport is addressed.

  7. Stability analysis for laminar flow control, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benney, D. J.; Orszag, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The basic equations for the stability analysis of flow over three dimensional swept wings are developed and numerical methods for their solution are surveyed. The equations for nonlinear stability analysis of three dimensional disturbances in compressible, three dimensional, nonparallel flows are given. Efficient and accurate numerical methods for the solution of the equations of stability theory were surveyed and analyzed.

  8. Multiphase Flow Analysis in Hydra-TH

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, Mark A.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Francois, Marianne M.; Lowrie, Robert B.; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2012-06-20

    This talk presents an overview of the multiphase flow efforts with Hydra-TH. The presentation begins with a definition of the requirements and design principles for multiphase flow relevant to CASL-centric problems. A brief survey of existing codes and their solution algorithms is presented before turning the model formulation selected for Hydra-TH. The issues of hyperbolicity and wellposedness are outlined, and a three candidate solution algorithms are discussed. The development status of Hydra-TH for multiphase flow is then presented with a brief summary and discussion of future directions for this work.

  9. A linearized Euler analysis of unsteady transonic flows in turbomachinery

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.C.; Clark, W.S.; Lorence, C.B. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1994-07-01

    A computational method for efficiently predicting unsteady transonic flows in two- and three-dimensional cascades is presented. The unsteady flow is modeled using a linearized Euler analysis whereby the unsteady flow field is decomposed into a nonlinear mean flow plus a linear harmonically varying unsteady flow. The equations that govern the perturbation flow, the linearized Euler equations, are linear variable coefficient equations. For transonic flows containing shocks, shock capturing is used to model the shock impulse (the unsteady load due to the harmonic motion of the shock). A conservative Lax-Wendroff scheme is used to obtain a set of linearized finite volume equations that describe the harmonic small disturbance behavior of the flow. Conditions under which such a discretization will correctly predict the shock impulse are investigated. Computational results are presented that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the present method as well as the essential role of unsteady shock impulse loads on the flutter stability of fans.

  10. Multimodel Simulation of Water Flow: Uncertainty Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulations of soil water flow require measurements of soil hydraulic properties which are particularly difficult at the field scale. Laboratory measurements provide hydraulic properties at scales finer than the field scale, whereas pedotransfer functions (PTFs) integrate information on hydraulic pr...

  11. Analysis of three-dimensional viscous internal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghia, Kirti N.; Ghia, Urmila

    1985-12-01

    The objective of this study was to acquire improved understanding of viscous internal flows related to turbomachinery components by analyzing appropriate model flow problems. Significant effort was directed towards developing basic computational methods which were made available to interested researchers involved in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research and to users involved in the design of turbomachinery components. Several analyses were developed and included are: an analysis for the fully developed three-dimensional flow in curved ducts, a parabolized Navier-Strokes analysis for developing flow in curved ducts, an unsteady Navier-Strokes analysis for internal and external flows, adaptive grid generation for one and two dimensional viscous flows, analysis of the Neumann problem in generalized orthogonal coordinates, efficient semi-implicit solution techniques consisting of the alternating direction implicit multigrid and strongly implicit multigrid methods, the direct block Gaussian elimination (GBE) method for solution of the Poisson equation for the unsteady Navier-Stokes analysis of incompressible flows. For the flow inside a shear driven cavity, the asymptotic flow in curved ducts and clarity for interpretation of the available corresponding experimental results and have now become benchmark solutions for these problems.

  12. Automated analysis for fluid flow topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1989-01-01

    A new approach for visualizing vector data sets was developed by reducing the original vector field to a set of critical points and their connections, and was applied to fluid flow data sets. The critical point representation allows for considerable reduction in the data complexity. The representations are displayed as surfaces which are much simpler than the original data set, yet retain all the pertinent flow topology information. It is suggested that topological representations may be useful for database comparison.

  13. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  14. From continuous flow analysis to programmable Flow Injection techniques. A history and tutorial of emerging methodologies.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Jaromir Jarda

    2016-09-01

    Automation of reagent based assays, also known as Flow Analysis, is based on sample processing, in which a sample flows towards and through a detector for monitoring of its components. The Achilles heel of this methodology is that the majority of FA techniques use constant continuous forward flow to transport the sample - an approach which continually consumes reagents and generates chemical waste. Therefore the purpose of this report is to highlight recent developments of flow programming that not only save reagents, but also lead by means of advanced sample processing to selective and sensitive assays based on stop flow measurement. Flow programming combined with a novel approach to data harvesting yields a novel approach to single standard calibration, and avoids interference caused by refractive index. Finally, flow programming is useful for sample preparation, such as rapid, extensive sample dilution. The principles are illustrated by selected references to an available online tutorial http://www.flowinjectiontutorial,com/. PMID:27343609

  15. Three-dimensional analysis of partially open butterfly valve flows

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Kim, R.H.

    1996-09-01

    A numerical simulation of butterfly valve flows is a useful technique to investigate the physical phenomena of the flow field. A three-dimensional numerical analysis was carried out on incompressible fluid flows in a butterfly valve by using FLUENT, which solves difference equations. Characteristics of the butterfly valve flows at different valve disk angles with a uniform incoming velocity were investigated. Comparisons of FLUENT results with other results, i.e., experimental results, were made to determine the accuracy of the employed method. Results of the three-dimensional analysis may be useful in the valve design.

  16. Method of analysis for compressible flow through mixed-flow centrifugal impellers of arbitrary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrick, Joseph T; Ginsburg, Ambrose; Osborn, Walter M

    1952-01-01

    A method is presented for analysis of the compressible flow between the hub and the shroud of mixed-flow impellers of arbitrary design. Axial symmetry was assumed, but the forces in the meridional (hub to shroud) plane, which are derived from tangential pressure gradients, were taken into account. The method was applied to an experimental mixed-flow impeller. The analysis of the flow in the meridional plane of the impeller showed that the rotational forces, the blade curvature, and the hub-shroud profile can introduce severe velocity gradients along the hub and the shroud surfaces. Choked flow at the impeller inlet as determined by the analysis was verified by experimental results.

  17. Linear stability analysis of swirling turbulent flows with turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Juniper, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the growth of large scale coherent structures in turbulent flows by performing linear stability analysis around a mean flow. Turbulent flows are characterized by fine-scale stochastic perturbations. The momentum transfer caused by these perturbations affects the development of larger structures. Therefore, in a linear stability analysis, it is important to include the perturbations' influence. One way to do this is to include a turbulence model in the stability analysis. This is done in the literature by using eddy viscosity models (EVMs), which are first order turbulence models. We extend this approach by using second order turbulence models, in this case explicit algebraic Reynolds stress models (EARSMs). EARSMs are more versatile than EVMs, in that they can be applied to a wider range of flows, and could also be more accurate. We verify our EARSM-based analysis by applying it to a channel flow and then comparing the results with those from an EVM-based analysis. We then apply the EARSM-based stability analysis to swirling pipe flows and Taylor-Couette flows, which demonstrates the main benefit of EARSM-based analysis. This project is supported by EPSRC and Rolls-Royce through a Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship.

  18. Flow analysis of C. elegans swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Gagnon, David; Arratia, Paulo; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Improved understanding of microscopic swimming has the potential to impact numerous biomedical and industrial processes. A crucial means of analyzing these systems is through experimental observation of flow fields, from which it is important to be able to accurately deduce swimmer physics such as power consumption, drag forces, and efficiency. We examine the swimming of the nematode worm C. elegans, a model system for undulatory micro-propulsion. Using experimental data of swimmer geometry and kinematics, we employ the regularized stokeslet boundary element method to simulate the swimming of this worm outside the regime of slender-body theory. Simulated flow fields are then compared with experimentally extracted values confined to the swimmer beat plane, demonstrating good agreement. We finally address the question of how to estimate three-dimensional flow information from two-dimensional measurements.

  19. Kinetic analysis of ultrarelativistic flow with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2012-10-01

    The ultrarelativistic shock layer around the triangle prism is numerically analyzed using the relativistic Boltzmann equation to investigate the dissipation process under two types of ultrarelativistic limits: namely, the Lorentz contraction limit, in which the uniform flow velocity approximates to the speed of light, and the thermally relativistic limit, in which the temperature of the uniform flow approximates to infinity. The relativistic Boltzmann equation is numerically solved using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. We discuss dissipation process in the flow field by focusing on profiles of the dynamic pressure and heat flux along the stagnation streamline under the Lorentz contraction limit or the thermally relativistic limit. Our numerical results confirm that profiles of the dynamic pressure and heat flux along the stagnation streamline strongly depend on the Lorentz contraction and thermally relativistic effects under their ultrarelativistic limits, as predicted by Chapman-Enskog expansion on the basis of the generic Knudsen number.

  20. Through flow analysis of pumps and fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, A. N.

    1980-08-01

    Incompressible through flow calculations in axial, mixed and centrifugal flow pumps and fans are described. An iterative scheme is used. A simple blade to blade model is applied on the surfaces of revolution defined by the meridional streamlines. This defines the fluid properties and the mean stream surface (S2 surface) for the next meridional solution. A computer program is available allowing the method to be applied for design purposes. APL is used for input and output and FORTRAN IV for computation. A typical calculation requires 30 sec of Univac 1100 time.

  1. Heat transfer analysis for peripheral blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Hattori, Hideharu; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ichige, Yukiko; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2009-06-01

    Some disorders such as circulatory disease and metabolic abnormality cause many problems to peripheral blood flow condition. Therefore, frequent measurement of the blood flow condition is bound to contribute to precaution against those disorders and to control of conditions of the diseases. We propose a convenient means of blood flow volume measurement at peripheral part, such as fingertips. Principle of this measurement is based on heat transfer characteristics of peripheral part containing the blood flow. Transition response analysis of skin surface temperature has provided measurement model of the peripheral blood flow volume. We developed the blood flow measurement system based on that model and evaluated it by using artificial finger under various temperature conditions of ambience and internal fluid. The evaluation results indicated that proposed method could estimate the volume of the fluid regardless of temperature condition of them. Finally we applied our system to real finger testing and have obtained results correlated well with laser Doppler blood flow meter values.

  2. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Mixed Flow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chan M.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    1994-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a high-work Mixed Flow Turbine (MFT) is computed and compared with experimental data. A three dimensional (3-D) viscous analysis is applied to the single stage MFT geometry with a relatively long upstream transition duct. Predicted vane surface static pressures and circumferentially averaged spanwise quantities at stator and rotor exits agree favorably with data. Compared to the results of axisymmetric flow analysis from design intent, the 3-D computation agrees much better especially in the endwall regions where throughflow prediction fails to assess the loss mechanism properly. Potential sources of performance loss such as tip leakage and secondary flows are also properly captured by the analysis.

  3. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  4. Theoretical analysis on flow characteristics of melt gear pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R. J.; Wang, J. Q.; Kong, F. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between Geometric parameters and theoretical flow of melt gear pump is revealed, providing a theoretical basis to melt gear pump design. The paper has an analysis of meshing movement of melt gear pump on the condition of four different tooth numbers, stack movement law and flow ripple. The regulation of flow pulsation coefficient is researched by MATLAB software. The modulus formula of melt gear pump is proposed, consistent with actual situation.

  5. Statistical Distribution of Inflation on Lava Flows: Analysis of Flow Surfaces on Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazel, L. S.; Anderson, S. W.; Stofan, E. R.; Baloga, S.

    2003-01-01

    The surface morphology of a lava flow results from processes that take place during the emplacement of the flow. Certain types of features, such as tumuli, lava rises and lava rise pits, are indicators of flow inflation or endogenous growth of a lava flow. Tumuli in particular have been identified as possible indicators of tube location, indicating that their distribution on the surface of a lava flow is a junction of the internal pathways of lava present during flow emplacement. However, the distribution of tumuli on lava flows has not been examined in a statistically thorough manner. In order to more rigorously examine the distribution of tumuli on a lava flow, we examined a discrete flow lobe with numerous lava rises and tumuli on the 1969 - 1974 Mauna Ulu flow at Kilauea, Hawaii. The lobe is located in the distal portion of the flow below Holei Pali, which is characterized by hummocky pahoehoe flows emplaced from tubes. We chose this flow due to its discrete nature allowing complete mapping of surface morphologies, well-defined boundaries, well-constrained emplacement parameters, and known flow thicknesses. In addition, tube locations for this Mauna Ulu flow were mapped by Holcomb (1976) during flow emplacement. We also examine the distribution of tumuli on the distal portion of the hummocky Thrainsskjoldur flow field provided by Rossi and Gudmundsson (1996). Analysis of the Mauna Ulu and Thrainsskjoldur flow lobes and the availability of high-resolution MOC images motivated us to look for possible tumuli-dominated flow lobes on the surface of Mars. We identified a MOC image of a lava flow south of Elysium Mons with features morphologically similar to tumuli. The flow is characterized by raised elliptical to circular mounds, some with axial cracks, that are similar in size to the tumuli measured on Earth. One potential avenue of determining whether they are tumuli is to look at the spatial distribution to see if any patterns similar to those of tumuli

  6. A theoretical analysis of vertical flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of Vertical Flow Equilibrium (VFE) and of parallel flow conditions, in general, is often applied to the modeling of flow and displacement in natural porous media. However, the methodology for the development of the various models is rather intuitive, and no rigorous method is currently available. In this paper, we develop an asymptotic theory using as parameter the variable R{sub L} = (L/H){radical}(k{sub V})/(k{sub H}). It is rigorously shown that present models represent the leading order term of an asymptotic expansion with respect to 1/R{sub L}{sup 2}. Although this was numerically suspected, it is the first time that is is theoretically proved. Based on the general formulation, a series of models are subsequently obtained. In the absence of strong gravity effects, they generalize previous works by Zapata and Lake (1981), Yokoyama and Lake (1981) and Lake and Hirasaki (1981), on immiscible and miscible displacements. In the limit of gravity-segregated flow, we prove conditions for the fluids to be segregated and derive the Dupuit and Dietz (1953) approximations. Finally, we also discuss effects of capillarity and transverse dispersion.

  7. Quantitative transverse flow measurement using OCT speckle decorrelation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Huang, Yong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an inter-Ascan speckle decorrelation based method that can quantitatively assess blood flow normal to the direction of the OCT imaging beam. To validate this method, we performed a systematic study using both phantom and in vivo animal models. Results show that our speckle analysis method can accurately extract transverse flow speed with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:23455305

  8. Substance Flow Analysis of Mercury in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, L. M.; Wang, S.; Zhang, L.; Wang, F. Y.; Wu, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies, the emission of anthropogenic atmospheric Hg in China as well as single sector have been examined a lot. However, there might have been more Hg released as solid wastes rather than air. Hg stored in solid wastes may be released to air again when the solid wastes experience high temperature process or cause local pollution if the solid wastes are stacked casually for a long time. To trace the fate of Hg in China, this study developed the substance flow of Hg in 2010 covering all the sectors summarized in table 1. Below showed in Figure 1, the total Hg input is 2825t. The unintentional input of Hg, mined Hg, and recycled Hg account for 57%, 32% and 11% respectively. Figure 2 provides the detail information of substance flow of Hg. Byproducts from one sector may be used as raw materials of another, causing cross Hg flow between sectors. The Hg input of cement production is 303 t, of which 34% comes from coal and limestone, 33% comes from non-ferrous smelting, 23% comes from coal combustion, 7% comes from iron and steel production and 3% comes from mercury mining. Hg flowing to recycledHg production is 639 t, mainly from Hg contained in waste active carbon and mercuric chloride catalyst from VCM production and acid sludge from non-ferrous smelting. There are 20 t mercury flowing from spent mercury adding products to incineration. Figure1 and Figure 2 also show that 46% of the output Hg belongs to "Lagged release", which means this part of mercury might be released later. The "Lagged release" Hg includes 809 t Hg contained in stacked byproducts form coal combustion, non-ferrous smelting, iron and steel production, Al production, cement production and mercury mining, 161t Hg stored in the pipeline of VCM producing, 10 t Hg in fluorescent lamps that are in use and 314 t mercury stored in materials waiting to be handled with in recycled mercury plants. There is 112 t Hg stored in landfill and 129 t Hg exported abroad with the export of mercury adding

  9. Power flow analysis of two coupled plates with arbitrary characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    In the last progress report (Feb. 1988) some results were presented for a parametric analysis on the vibrational power flow between two coupled plate structures using the mobility power flow approach. The results reported then were for changes in the structural parameters of the two plates, but with the two plates identical in their structural characteristics. Herein, limitation is removed. The vibrational power input and output are evaluated for different values of the structural damping loss factor for the source and receiver plates. In performing this parametric analysis, the source plate characteristics are kept constant. The purpose of this parametric analysis is to determine the most critical parameters that influence the flow of vibrational power from the source plate to the receiver plate. In the case of the structural damping parametric analysis, the influence of changes in the source plate damping is also investigated. The results obtained from the mobility power flow approach are compared to results obtained using a statistical energy analysis (SEA) approach. The significance of the power flow results are discussed together with a discussion and a comparison between the SEA results and the mobility power flow results. Furthermore, the benefits derived from using the mobility power flow approach are examined.

  10. Covariant Lyapunov analysis of chaotic Kolmogorov flows.

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Masanobu; Kobayashi, Miki U; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio

    2012-01-01

    Hyperbolicity is an important concept in dynamical system theory; however, we know little about the hyperbolicity of concrete physical systems including fluid motions governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, we study numerically the hyperbolicity of the Navier-Stokes equation on a two-dimensional torus (Kolmogorov flows) using the method of covariant Lyapunov vectors developed by Ginelli et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 130601 (2007)]. We calculate the angle between the local stable and unstable manifolds along an orbit of chaotic solution to evaluate the hyperbolicity. We find that the attractor of chaotic Kolmogorov flows is hyperbolic at small Reynolds numbers, but that smaller angles between the local stable and unstable manifolds are observed at larger Reynolds numbers, and the attractor appears to be nonhyperbolic at a certain Reynolds numbers. Also, we observed some relations between these hyperbolic properties and physical properties such as time correlation of the vorticity and the energy dissipation rate. PMID:22400681

  11. Computational Analysis of Multi-Rotor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Lee, Henry C.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Interactional aerodynamics of multi-rotor flows has been studied for a quadcopter representing a generic quad tilt-rotor aircraft in hover. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effects of the separation distances between rotors, and also fuselage and wings on the performance and efficiency of multirotor systems. Three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a spatially 5th order accurate scheme, dual-time stepping, and the Detached Eddy Simulation turbulence model. The results show that the separation distances as well as the wings have significant effects on the vertical forces of quadroror systems in hover. Understanding interactions in multi-rotor flows would help improve the design of next generation multi-rotor drones.

  12. Analysis of Fluid Flow over a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, and computer program product for modeling heat radiated by a structure. The flow of a fluid over a surface of a model of the structure is simulated. The surface has a plurality of surface elements. Heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements in response to the fluid flowing over the surface of the model of the structure is identified. An effect of heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other is identified. A model of the heat radiated by the structure is created using the heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements and the effect of the heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other.

  13. Long-range correlation analysis of economic news flow intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, S. P.; Faizliev, A. R.; Balash, V. A.; Korobov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the paper is to examine the auto-correlation properties for time series of the news flow intensity using different methods, such as the fluctuation analysis, the detrended fluctuation analysis and the detrending moving average analysis. Empirical findings for news analytics data show the presence of long-range correlations for the time series of news intensity data.

  14. CFD analysis of coverplate receiver flow

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, O.; Zimmermann, H.; Kutz, J.

    1998-01-01

    The flow field in a preswirled cooling air supply to a turbine rotor has been investigated by means of CFD simulations. Coefficients for system efficiency are derived. The influences of various geometric parameters for different configurations have been correlated with the help of appropriate coefficients. For some of the most important geometric parameters of the coverplate receiver, design recommendations have been made. For the preswirl nozzles, the potential of efficiency improvement by contour design is highlighted.

  15. Immobilized Bioluminescent Reagents in Flow Injection Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Abdul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Bioluminescent reactions exhibits two important characteristics from an analytical viewpoint; they are selective and highly sensitive. Furthermore, bioluminescent emissions are easily measured with a simple flow-through detector based on a photomultiplier tube and the rapid and reproducible mixing of sample and expensive reagent is best achieved by a flow injection manifold. The two most important bioluminescent systems are the enzyme (luciferase)/substrate (luciferin) combinations extracted from fireflies (Photinus pyralis) and marine bacteria (Virio harveyi) which requires ATP and NAD(P)H respectively as cofactors. Reactions that generate or consume these cofactors can also be coupled to the bioluminescent reaction to provide assays for a wide range of clinically important species. A flow injection manifold for the study of bioluminescent reactions is described, as are procedures for the extraction, purification and immobilization of firefly and bacterial luciferase and oxidoreductase. Results are presented for the determination of ATP using firefly system and the determination of other enzymes and substrates participating in ATP-converting reactions e.g. creatine kinase, ATP-sulphurylase, pyruvate kinase, creatine phosphate, pyrophosphate and phophoenolypyruvate. Similarly results are presented for the determination of NAD(P)H, FMN, FMNH_2 and several dehydrogenases which produce NAD(P)H and their substrates, e.g. alcohol, L-lactate, L-malate, L-glutamate, Glucose-6-phosphate and primary bile acid.

  16. Nitrogen Flow Analysis in Huizhou, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhaoyin; Yin, Zegao; Koenig, Albert

    2008-03-01

    Eutrophication due to uncontrolled discharges of nitrogen and phosphorus has become a serious pollution problem in many Chinese rivers. This article analyzes the nitrogen flow in Huizhou City in the East River watershed in south China. The material accounting method was applied to investigate the nitrogen flows related to human activities, which consist of the natural and anthropogenic systems. In Huizhou City, the nonpoint source pollution was quantified by the export coefficient method and the domestic discharge was estimated as the product of per capita nitrogen contribution and population. This research was conducted based on statistical information and field data from 1998 in the Huizhou City. The results indicated that the major nitrogen flows in this area were river loads, fertilizer and feedstuff imports, atmospheric deposition, animal manure volatilization, and processes related to burning and other emissions. In 1998, about 40% of the nitrogen was retained in the system and could result in potential environmental problems. Nitrogen export was mainly by rivers, which account for about 57% of the total nitrogen exported. Comparisons made between the East River and the Danube and Yangtze Rivers show that the unit area nitrogen export was of the same magnitude and the per capita nitrogen export was comparable.

  17. Asymptotic and numerical analysis of electrohydrodynamic flows of dielectric liquid.

    PubMed

    Suh, Y K; Baek, K H; Cho, D S

    2013-08-01

    We perform an asymptotic analysis of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow of nonpolar liquid subjected to an external, nonuniform electric field. The domain of interest covers the bulk as well as the thin dissociation layers (DSLs) near the electrodes. Outer (i.e., bulk) equations for the ion transport in hierarchical order of perturbation parameters can be expressed in linear form, whereas the inner (i.e., DSL) equations take a nonlinear form. We derive a simple formula in terms of various parameters which can be used to estimate the relative importance of the DSL-driven flow compared with the bulk-driven flow. EHD flow over a pair of cylindrical electrodes is then solved asymptotically and numerically. It is found that in large geometric scale and high ion concentration the EHD flow is dominated by the bulk-charge-induced flow. As the scale and concentration are decreased, the DSL-driven slip velocity increases and the resultant flow tends to dominate the domain and finally leads to flow reversal. We also conduct a flow-visualization experiment to verify the analysis and attain good agreement between the two results with parameter tuning. We finally show, based on the comparison of experimental and numerical solutions, that the rate of free-ion generation (dissociation) should be less than the one predicted from the existing formula. PMID:24032920

  18. Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Cryogenic Liquid Turbulent Flow Fluid Film Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Computational programs developed for the thermal analysis of tilting and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings are described. The motion of a cryogenic liquid on the thin film annular region of a fluid film bearing is described by a set of mass and momentum conservation, and energy transport equations for the turbulent bulk-flow velocities and pressure, and accompanied by thermophysical state equations for evaluation of the fluid material properties. Zeroth-order equations describe the fluid flow field for a journal static equilibrium position, while first-order (linear) equations govern the fluid flow for small amplitude-journal center translational motions. Solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations provides the bearing flow rate, load capacity, drag torque and temperature rise. Solution to the first-order equations determines the rotordynamic force coefficients due to journal radial motions.

  19. A viscous flow analysis for the tip vortex generation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Briley, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A three dimensional, forward-marching, viscous flow analysis is applied to the tip vortex generation problem. The equations include a streamwise momentum equation, a streamwise vorticity equation, a continuity equation, and a secondary flow stream function equation. The numerical method used combines a consistently split linearized scheme for parabolic equations with a scalar iterative ADI scheme for elliptic equations. The analysis is used to identify the source of the tip vortex generation process, as well as to obtain detailed flow results for a rectangular planform wing immersed in a high Reynolds number free stream at 6 degree incidence.

  20. Analysis of supersonic combustion flow fields with embedded subsonic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P.

    1972-01-01

    The viscous characteristic analysis for supersonic chemically reacting flows was extended to include provisions for analyzing embedded subsonic regions. The numerical method developed to analyze this mixed subsonic-supersonic flow fields is described. The boundary conditions are discussed related to the supersonic-subsonic and subsonic-supersonic transition, as well as a heuristic description of several other numerical schemes for analyzing this problem. An analysis of shock waves generated either by pressure mismatch between the injected fluid and surrounding flow or by chemical heat release is also described.

  1. Parametric and experimental analysis using a power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Having defined and developed a structural power flow approach for the analysis of structure-borne transmission of structural vibrations, the technique is used to perform an analysis of the influence of structural parameters on the transmitted energy. As a base for comparison, the parametric analysis is first performed using a Statistical Energy Analysis approach and the results compared with those obtained using the power flow approach. The advantages of using structural power flow are thus demonstrated by comparing the type of results obtained by the two methods. Additionally, to demonstrate the advantages of using the power flow method and to show that the power flow results represent a direct physical parameter that can be measured on a typical structure, an experimental investigation of structural power flow is also presented. Results are presented for an L-shaped beam for which an analytical solution has already been obtained. Furthermore, the various methods available to measure vibrational power flow are compared to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  2. A linearized Euler analysis of unsteady flows in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1987-01-01

    A method for calculating unsteady flows in cascades is presented. The model, which is based on the linearized unsteady Euler equations, accounts for blade loading shock motion, wake motion, and blade geometry. The mean flow through the cascade is determined by solving the full nonlinear Euler equations. Assuming the unsteadiness in the flow is small, then the Euler equations are linearized about the mean flow to obtain a set of linear variable coefficient equations which describe the small amplitude, harmonic motion of the flow. These equations are discretized on a computational grid via a finite volume operator and solved directly subject to an appropriate set of linearized boundary conditions. The steady flow, which is calculated prior to the unsteady flow, is found via a Newton iteration procedure. An important feature of the analysis is the use of shock fitting to model steady and unsteady shocks. Use of the Euler equations with the unsteady Rankine-Hugoniot shock jump conditions correctly models the generation of steady and unsteady entropy and vorticity at shocks. In particular, the low frequency shock displacement is correctly predicted. Results of this method are presented for a variety of test cases. Predicted unsteady transonic flows in channels are compared to full nonlinear Euler solutions obtained using time-accurate, time-marching methods. The agreement between the two methods is excellent for small to moderate levels of flow unsteadiness. The method is also used to predict unsteady flows in cascades due to blade motion (flutter problem) and incoming disturbances (gust response problem).

  3. A linearized Euler analysis of unsteady flows in turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1987-06-01

    A method for calculating unsteady flows in cascades is presented. The model, which is based on the linearized unsteady Euler equations, accounts for blade loading shock motion, wake motion, and blade geometry. The mean flow through the cascade is determined by solving the full nonlinear Euler equations. Assuming the unsteadiness in the flow is small, then the Euler equations are linearized about the mean flow to obtain a set of linear variable coefficient equations which describe the small amplitude, harmonic motion of the flow. These equations are discretized on a computational grid via a finite volume operator and solved directly subject to an appropriate set of linearized boundary conditions. The steady flow, which is calculated prior to the unsteady flow, is found via a Newton iteration procedure. An important feature of the analysis is the use of shock fitting to model steady and unsteady shocks. Use of the Euler equations with the unsteady Rankine-Hugoniot shock jump conditions correctly models the generation of steady and unsteady entropy and vorticity at shocks. In particular, the low frequency shock displacement is correctly predicted. Results of this method are presented for a variety of test cases. Predicted unsteady transonic flows in channels are compared to full nonlinear Euler solutions obtained using time-accurate, time-marching methods. The agreement between the two methods is excellent for small to moderate levels of flow unsteadiness. The method is also used to predict unsteady flows in cascades due to blade motion (flutter problem) and incoming disturbances (gust response problem).

  4. Spherical harmonic analysis of steady photospheric flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented in which full disk Doppler velocity measurements are analyzed using spherical harmonic functions to determine the characteristics of the spectrum of spherical harmonic modes and the nature of steady photospheric flows. Synthetic data are constructed in order to test the technique. In spite of the mode mixing due to the lack of information about the motions on the backside of the sun, solar rotation and differential rotation can be accurately measured and monitored for secular changes, and meridional circulations with small amplitudes can be measured. Furthermore, limb shift measurements can be accurately obtained, and supergranules can be fully resolved and separated from giant cells by their spatial characteristics.

  5. Climate Informed Low Flow Frequency Analysis Using Nonstationary Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Guo, S.; Lian, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Stationarity is often assumed for frequency analysis of low flows in water resources management and planning. However, many studies have shown that flow characteristics, particularly the frequency spectrum of extreme hydrologic events,were modified by climate change and human activities and the conventional frequency analysis without considering the non-stationary characteristics may lead to costly design. The analysis presented in this paper was based on the more than 100 years of daily flow data from the Yichang gaging station 44 kilometers downstream of the Three Gorges Dam. The Mann-Kendall trend test under the scaling hypothesis showed that the annual low flows had significant monotonic trend, whereas an abrupt change point was identified in 1936 by the Pettitt test. The climate informed low flow frequency analysis and the divided and combined method are employed to account for the impacts from related climate variables and the nonstationarities in annual low flows. Without prior knowledge of the probability density function for the gaging station, six distribution functions including the Generalized Extreme Values (GEV), Pearson Type III, Gumbel, Gamma, Lognormal, and Weibull distributions have been tested to find the best fit, in which the local likelihood method is used to estimate the parameters. Analyses show that GEV had the best fit for the observed low flows. This study has also shown that the climate informed low flow frequency analysis is able to exploit the link between climate indices and low flows, which would account for the dynamic feature for reservoir management and provide more accurate and reliable designs for infrastructure and water supply.

  6. Stochastic uncertainty analysis for unconfined flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Gaisheng; Zhang, Dongxiao; Lu, Zhiming

    2006-01-01

    A new stochastic approach proposed by Zhang and Lu (2004), called the Karhunen-Loeve decomposition-based moment equation (KLME), has been extended to solving nonlinear, unconfined flow problems in randomly heterogeneous aquifers. This approach is on the basis of an innovative combination of Karhunen-Loeve decomposition, polynomial expansion, and perturbation methods. The random log-transformed hydraulic conductivity field (InKS) is first expanded into a series in terms of orthogonal Gaussian standard random variables with their coefficients obtained as the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the covariance function of InKS- Next, head h is decomposed as a perturbation expansion series ??A(m), where A(m) represents the mth-order head term with respect to the standard deviation of InKS. Then A(m) is further expanded into a polynomial series of m products of orthogonal Gaussian standard random variables whose coefficients Ai1,i2(m)...,im are deterministic and solved sequentially from low to high expansion orders using MODFLOW-2000. Finally, the statistics of head and flux are computed using simple algebraic operations on Ai1,i2(m)...,im. A series of numerical test results in 2-D and 3-D unconfined flow systems indicated that the KLME approach is effective in estimating the mean and (co)variance of both heads and fluxes and requires much less computational effort as compared to the traditional Monte Carlo simulation technique. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Potential Flow Analysis of Dynamic Ground Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feifel, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of some flight test data suggests the presence of a 'dynamic ground effect'. The lift of an aircraft approaching the ground depends on the rate of descent and is lower than the aircraft steady state lift at a same height above the ground. Such a lift deficiency under dynamic conditions could have a serious impact on the overall aircraft layout. For example, the increased pitch angle needed to compensate for the temporary loss in lift would reduce the tail strike margin or require an increase in landing gear length. Under HSR2 an effort is under way to clarify the dynamic ground effect issue using a multi-pronged approach. A dynamic ground effect test has been run in the NASA Langley 14x22 ft wind tunnel. Northup-Grumman is conducting time accurate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) Euler analyses on the National Aerodynamic Simulator facility. Boeing has been using linear potential flow methodology which are thought to provide much needed insight in, physics of this very complex problem. The present report summarizes the results of these potential flow studies.

  8. Critical assessment of automated flow cytometry data analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Finak, Greg; Hoos, Holger; Mosmann, Tim R; Brinkman, Ryan; Gottardo, Raphael; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Traditional methods for flow cytometry (FCM) data processing rely on subjective manual gating. Recently, several groups have developed computational methods for identifying cell populations in multidimensional FCM data. The Flow Cytometry: Critical Assessment of Population Identification Methods (FlowCAP) challenges were established to compare the performance of these methods on two tasks: (i) mammalian cell population identification, to determine whether automated algorithms can reproduce expert manual gating and (ii) sample classification, to determine whether analysis pipelines can identify characteristics that correlate with external variables (such as clinical outcome). This analysis presents the results of the first FlowCAP challenges. Several methods performed well as compared to manual gating or external variables using statistical performance measures, which suggests that automated methods have reached a sufficient level of maturity and accuracy for reliable use in FCM data analysis. PMID:23396282

  9. Navier-Stokes Flow Field Analysis of Compressible Flow in a Pressure Relief Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Wang, Ten-See; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat K.

    1993-01-01

    The present study was motivated to analyze the complex flow field involving gaseous oxygen (GOX) flow in a relief valve (RV). The 9391 RV, pictured in Figure 1, was combined with the pilot valve to regulate the actuation pressure of the main valve system. During a high-pressure flow test at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the valve system developed a resonance chatter, which destroyed most of the valve body. Figures 2-4 show the valve body before and after accident. It was understood that the subject RV has never been operated at 5500 psia. In order to fully understand the flow behavior in the RV, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is carried out to investigate the side load across the piston sleeve and the erosion patterns resulting from flow distribution around piston/nozzle interface.

  10. Navier-Stokes flow field analysis of compressible flow in a pressure relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Wang, Ten-See; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat K.

    1993-07-01

    The present study was motivated to analyze the complex flow field involving gaseous oxygen (GOX) flow in a relief valve (RV). The 9391 RV, pictured in Figure 1, was combined with the pilot valve to regulate the actuation pressure of the main valve system. During a high-pressure flow test at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the valve system developed a resonance chatter, which destroyed most of the valve body. Figures 2-4 show the valve body before and after accident. It was understood that the subject RV has never been operated at 5500 psia. In order to fully understand the flow behavior in the RV, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is carried out to investigate the side load across the piston sleeve and the erosion patterns resulting from flow distribution around piston/nozzle interface.

  11. Web-Based Analysis and Publication of Flow Cytometry Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Nikesh; Krutzik, Peter O.; Irish, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Cytobank is a web-based application for storage, analysis, and sharing of flow cytometry experiments. Researchers use a web browser to log in and use a wide range of tools developed for basic and advanced flow cytometry. In addition to providing access to standard cytometry tools from any computer, Cytobank creates a platform and community for developing new analysis and publication tools. Figure layouts created on Cytobank are designed to allow transparent access to the underlying experiment annotation and data processing steps. Since all flow cytometry files and analysis data are stored on a central server, experiments and figures can be viewed or edited by anyone with the proper permissions from any computer with Internet access. Once a primary researcher has performed the initial analysis of the data, collaborators can engage in experiment analysis and make their own figure layouts using the gated, compensated experiment files. Cytobank is available to the scientific community at www.cytobank.org PMID:20578106

  12. Bi-global Stability Analysis of Compressible Open Cavity Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiyang; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2015-11-01

    The effect of compressibility on stability characteristics of rectangular open cavity flows is numerically examined. In our earlier work with two-dimensional direct numerical simulation of open cavity flows, we found that increasing Mach number destabilizes the flow in the subsonic regime but stabilizes the flow in the transonic regime. To further examine the compressibility effect, linear bi-global stability analysis is performed over the same range of Mach numbers to investigate the influence of three-dimensional instabilities in flows over open cavities with length-to-depth ratios of 2 and 6. We identify dominant eigenmodes for varied Mach numbers and spanwise wavelengths with respect to two-dimensional stable and unstable steady states. Over a range of spanwise wavelengths, we reveal the growth/damp rates and frequencies of the dominant global modes. Based on the insights from the present analysis, we compare our findings from global stability analysis with our companion three-dimensional flow control experiments aimed at reducing pressure fluctuation caused by cavity flow unsteadiness. This work was supported by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant FA9550-13-1-0091).

  13. CFD modeling of turbulent duct flows for coolant channel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Chan, Daniel C.

    1993-07-01

    The design of modern liquid rocket engines requires the analysis of chamber coolant channels to maximize the heat transfer while minimizing the coolant flow. Coolant channels often do not remain at a constant cross section or at uniform curvature. New designs require higher aspect ratio coolant channels than previously used. To broaden the analysis capability and to complement standard analysis tools an investigation on the accuracy of CFD predictions for coolant channel flow has been initiated. Validation of CFD capabilities for coolant channel analysis will enhance the capabilities for optimizing design parameters without resorting to extensive experimental testing. The eventual goal is to use CFD to determine the flow fields of unique coolant channel designs and therefore determine critical heat transfer coefficients. In this presentation the accuracy of a particular CFD code is evaluated for turbulent flows. The first part of the presentation is a comparison of numerical results to existing cold flow data for square curved ducts (NASA CR-3367, 'Measurements of Laminar and Turbulent Flow in a Curved Duct with Thin Inlet Boundary Layers'). The results of this comparison show good agreement with the relatively coarse experimental data. The second part of the presentation compares two cases of higher aspect ratio channels (AR=2.5,10) to show changes in axial and secondary flow strength. These cases match experimental work presently in progress and will be used for future validation. The comparison shows increased secondary flow strength of the higher aspect ratio case due to the change in radius of curvature. The presentation includes a test case with a heated wall to demonstrate the program's capability. The presentation concludes with an outline of the procedure used to validate the CFD code for future design analysis.

  14. Power flow analysis of an L-shaped plate structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    In the analysis of the vibration response and structure-borne vibration transmission between elements of a complex structure, statistical energy analysis (SEA) or finite element analysis (FEA) are generally used. However, an alternative method is using vibrational power flow techniques which can be especially useful in the mid frequencies between the optimum frequency regimes for FEA and SEA. Power flow analysis has in general been used on one-dimensional beam-like structures or between structures with point joints. In this paper, the power flow technique is extended to two-dimensional plate like structures joined along a common edge without frequency or spatial averaging the results, such that the resonant response of the structure is determined. The power flow results are compared to results obtained using FEA at low frequencies and SEA at high frequencies. The agreement with FEA results is good but the power flow technique has an improved computational efficiency. Compared to the SEA results the power flow results show a closer representation of the actual response of the structure.

  15. Numerical analysis of 3-D potential flow in centrifugal turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daiguji, H.

    1983-09-01

    A numerical method is developed for analysing a three-dimensional steady incompressible potential flow through an impeller in centrifugal turbomachines. The method is the same as the previous method which was developed for the axial flow turbomachines, except for some treatments in the downstream region. In order to clarify the validity and limitation of the method, a comparison with the existing experimental data and numerical results is made for radial flow compressor impellers. The calculated blade surface pressure distributions almost coincide with the quasi-3-D calculation by Krimerman and Adler (1978), but are different partly from the quasi-3-D calculation using one meridional flow analysis. It is suggested from this comparison that the flow through an impeller with high efficiency near the design point can be predicted by this fully 3-D numerical method.

  16. Anharmonic analysis of arterial blood pressure and flow pulses.

    PubMed

    Voltairas, P A; Fotiadis, D I; Massalas, C V; Michalis, L K

    2005-07-01

    Fourier analysis is usually employed for the computation of blood flow in arteries. Although the orthogonality of Fourier eigenfunctions guarantees the accurate mathematical modeling of the blood pressure and flow waveforms, the physics behind this objective function is frequently missing. We propose a new method to account for the blood pressure and flow, single-cycle (systole-diastole) waveforms. It is based on the one dimensional hydrodynamic mass and momentum conservation equations for viscous flow. The similarity of the linear problem, under discussion, with related transmission line theory in electromagnetic wave propagation, permits expansion in anharmonic, non-separable eigenfunctions. In some cases one term in the expansion is adequate to fit the main peak of the observed waveforms. Analytical formulas are derived for the dependence of the pressure and flow main peaks on whole blood viscosity and distance from the heart, which interpret observations related to hypertension. PMID:15922753

  17. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  18. Development of a three-dimensional turbulent duct flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, P. R.; Levy, R.; Mcdonald, H.; Briley, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    A method for computing three-dimensional turbulent subsonic flow in curved ducts is described. An approximate set of governing equations is given for viscous flows which have a primary flow direction. The derivation is coordinate invariant, and the resulting equations are expressed in terms of tensors. General tube-like coordinates were developed for a general class of geometries applicable to many internal flow problems. The coordinates are then particularized to pipes having superelliptic cross sections whose shape can vary continuously between a circle and a near rectangle. The analysis is applied to a series of relevant aerodynamic problems including transition from nearly square to round pipes and flow through a pipe with an S-shaped bend.

  19. Meanline Analysis of Turbines with Choked Flow in the Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    The Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code (OTAC) is a new meanline/streamline turbomachinery modeling tool being developed at NASA GRC. During the development process, a limitation of the code was discovered in relation to the analysis of choked flow in axial turbines. This paper describes the relevant physics for choked flow as well as the changes made to OTAC to enable analysis in this flow regime.

  20. Precipitator inlet particulate distribution flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LaRose, J.A.; Averill, A.

    1994-12-31

    The B and W Rothemuhle precipitators located at PacifiCorp`s Wyodak Generating Station in Gillette, Wyoming have, for the past two years, been experiencing discharge wire breakage. The breakage is due to corrosion of the wires: however, the exact cause of the corrosion is unknown. One aspect thought to contribute to the problem is an unbalance of ash loading among the four precipitators. Plant operation has revealed that the ash loading to precipitator C appears to be the heaviest of the four casing, and also appears to have the most severe corrosion. Data from field measurements showed that the gas flows to the four precipitators are fairly uniform, within {+-}9% of the average. The ash loading data showed a large maldistribution among the precipitators. Precipitator C receives 60% more ash than the next heaviest loaded precipitator. A numerical model was created which showed the same results. The model was then utilized to determine design modifications to the existing flue and turning vanes to improve the ash loading distribution. The resulting design was predicted to improve the ash loading to all the precipitators, within {+-}10% of the average.

  1. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  2. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  3. Automated High-Dimensional Flow Cytometric Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyne, Saumyadipta; Hu, Xinli; Wang, Kui; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lin, Tsung-I.; Maier, Lisa; Baecher-Allan, Clare; McLachlan, Geoffrey; Tamayo, Pablo; Hafler, David; de Jager, Philip; Mesirov, Jill

    Flow cytometry is widely used for single cell interrogation of surface and intracellular protein expression by measuring fluorescence intensity of fluorophore-conjugated reagents. We focus on the recently developed procedure of Pyne et al. (2009, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 106, 8519-8524) for automated high- dimensional flow cytometric analysis called FLAME (FLow analysis with Automated Multivariate Estimation). It introduced novel finite mixture models of heavy-tailed and asymmetric distributions to identify and model cell populations in a flow cytometric sample. This approach robustly addresses the complexities of flow data without the need for transformation or projection to lower dimensions. It also addresses the critical task of matching cell populations across samples that enables downstream analysis. It thus facilitates application of flow cytometry to new biological and clinical problems. To facilitate pipelining with standard bioinformatic applications such as high-dimensional visualization, subject classification or outcome prediction, FLAME has been incorporated with the GenePattern package of the Broad Institute. Thereby analysis of flow data can be approached similarly as other genomic platforms. We also consider some new work that proposes a rigorous and robust solution to the registration problem by a multi-level approach that allows us to model and register cell populations simultaneously across a cohort of high-dimensional flow samples. This new approach is called JCM (Joint Clustering and Matching). It enables direct and rigorous comparisons across different time points or phenotypes in a complex biological study as well as for classification of new patient samples in a more clinical setting.

  4. POD analysis of PIV measurements in complex near wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Garni, A. M.; Bernal, L. P.

    2003-11-01

    Proper Orthogonal Decomposition analysis of PIV measurements is used to study the turbulent flow structure in the near wake of bluff bodies. Several body geometries are considered including two-dimensional cylindrical shapes, rounded-nose bluff bodies and typical road vehicle geometries. The main goal of the study is to determine the more energetic POD modes and associated unsteady flow, and the underlying near wake dynamics. We briefly review the results of POD analysis of PIV measurements in two-dimensional geometries. We show that in more complicated flow fields, different POD modes capture the turbulent energy in different regions of the wake. For example, in the flow over a pickup truck, modes 1 and 2 capture the turbulent structure in the underbody shear layer, while mode 4 captures the turbulent structure of the flow over the bed. This result has significant implications for flow control applications. The POD methodology is used to identify generic unsteady flow structures in the near wake. The dominant modes are an oscillation of the length of the recirculation region behind the body (breathing mode) and a lateral oscillation of the wake (flapping mode). In some cases a vortex shedding mode reminiscent of the Karman-Roshko structure in circular cylinders is also observed. Efforts to determine the dynamics of the experimentally measured POD modes are discussed.

  5. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: Stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Cambon, C.

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Ω0 ) and the additional “precessing” Coriolis force (with angular velocity -ɛΩ0 ), normal to it. A “weak” shear flow, with rate 2ɛ of the same order of the Poincaré “small” ratio ɛ , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler’s equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov’s [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré’s [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small ɛ . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet’s theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small ɛ , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger ɛ values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally, both flow cases

  6. Vibrational Power Flow Analysis of Rods and Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlever, James Christopher; Bernhard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to model vibrational power flow and predict the resulting energy density levels in uniform rods and beams is investigated. This method models the flow of vibrational power in a manner analogous to the flow of thermal power in a heat conduction problem. The classical displacement solutions for harmonically excited, hysteretically damped rods and beams are used to derive expressions for the vibrational power flow and energy density in the rod and beam. Under certain conditions, the power flow in these two structural elements will be shown to be proportional to the energy density gradient. Using the relationship between power flow and energy density, an energy balance on differential control volumes in the rod and beam leads to a Poisson's equation which models the energy density distribution in the rod and beam. Coupling the energy density and power flow solutions for rods and beams is also discussed. It is shown that the resonant behavior of finite structures complicates the coupling of solutions, especially when the excitations are single frequency inputs. Two coupling formulations are discussed, the first based on the receptance method, and the second on the travelling wave approach used in Statistical Energy Analysis. The receptance method is the more computationally intensive but is capable of analyzing single frequency excitation cases. The traveling wave approach gives a good approximation of the frequency average of energy density and power flow in coupled systems, and thus, is an efficient technique for use with broadband frequency excitation.

  7. CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF AUTOMATED FLOW CYTOMETRY DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Finak, Greg; Hoos, Holger; Mosmann, Tim R.; Gottardo, Raphael; Brinkman, Ryan; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods for flow cytometry (FCM) data processing rely on subjective manual gating. Recently, several groups have developed computational methods for identifying cell populations in multidimensional FCM data. The Flow Cytometry: Critical Assessment of Population Identification Methods (FlowCAP) challenges were established to compare the performance of these methods on two tasks – mammalian cell population identification to determine if automated algorithms can reproduce expert manual gating, and sample classification to determine if analysis pipelines can identify characteristics that correlate with external variables (e.g., clinical outcome). This analysis presents the results of the first of these challenges. Several methods performed well compared to manual gating or external variables using statistical performance measures, suggesting that automated methods have reached a sufficient level of maturity and accuracy for reliable use in FCM data analysis. PMID:23396282

  8. Automated high-dimensional flow cytometric data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Saumyadipta; Hu, Xinli; Wang, Kui; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lin, Tsung-I; Maier, Lisa M.; Baecher-Allan, Clare; McLachlan, Geoffrey J.; Tamayo, Pablo; Hafler, David A.; De Jager, Philip L.; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometric analysis allows rapid single cell interrogation of surface and intracellular determinants by measuring fluorescence intensity of fluorophore-conjugated reagents. The availability of new platforms, allowing detection of increasing numbers of cell surface markers, has challenged the traditional technique of identifying cell populations by manual gating and resulted in a growing need for the development of automated, high-dimensional analytical methods. We present a direct multivariate finite mixture modeling approach, using skew and heavy-tailed distributions, to address the complexities of flow cytometric analysis and to deal with high-dimensional cytometric data without the need for projection or transformation. We demonstrate its ability to detect rare populations, to model robustly in the presence of outliers and skew, and to perform the critical task of matching cell populations across samples that enables downstream analysis. This advance will facilitate the application of flow cytometry to new, complex biological and clinical problems. PMID:19443687

  9. Asymmetric tensor analysis for flow visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Eugene; Yeh, Harry; Lin, Zhongzang; Laramee, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    The gradient of a velocity vector field is an asymmetric tensor field which can provide critical insight that is difficult to infer from traditional trajectory-based vector field visualization techniques. We describe the structures in the eigenvalue and eigenvector fields of the gradient tensor and how these structures can be used to infer the behaviors of the velocity field. To illustrate the structures in asymmetric tensor fields, we introduce the notions of eigenvalue and eigenvector manifolds. These concepts afford a number of theoretical results that clarify the connections between symmetric and antisymmetric components in tensor fields. In addition, these manifolds naturally lead to partitions of tensor fields, which we use to design effective visualization strategies. Both eigenvalue manifold and eigenvector manifold are supported by a tensor reparameterization with physical meaning. This allows us to relate our tensor analysis to physical quantities such as rotation, angular deformation, and dilation, which provide physical interpretation of our tensor-driven vector field analysis in the context of fluid mechanics. To demonstrate the utility of our approach, we have applied our visualization techniques and interpretation to the study of the Sullivan Vortex as well as computational fluid dynamics simulation data. PMID:19008559

  10. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability in cyclonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Inigo, Juan; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Cyclonic separators are used in a variety of industries to efficiently separate mixtures of fluid and solid phases by means of centrifugal forces and gravity. In certain circumstances, the vortex core of cyclonic flows is known to precess due to the instability of the flow, which leads to performance reductions. We aim to characterize the unsteadiness using linear stability analysis of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in a global framework. The system of equations, including the turbulence model, is linearised to obtain an eigenvalue problem. Unstable modes corresponding to the dynamics of the large structures of the turbulent flow are extracted. The analysis shows that the most unstable mode is a helical motion which develops around the axis of the flow. This result is in good agreement with LES and experimental analysis, suggesting the validity of the approach. Finally, an adjoint-based sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the regions of the flow that, when altered, have most influence on the frequency and growth-rate of the unstable eigenvalues.

  11. Power flow analysis of two coupled plates with arbitrary characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The limitation of keeping two plates identical is removed and the vibrational power input and output are evaluated for different area ratios, plate thickness ratios, and for different values of the structural damping loss factor for the source plate (plate with excitation) and the receiver plate. In performing this parametric analysis, the source plate characteristics are kept constant. The purpose of this parametric analysis is to be able to determine the most critical parameters that influence the flow of vibrational power from the source plate to the receiver plate. In the case of the structural damping parametric analysis, the influence of changes in the source plate damping is also investigated. As was done previously, results obtained from the mobility power flow approach will be compared to results obtained using a statistical energy analysis (SEA) approach. The significance of the power flow results are discussed together with a discussion and a comparison between SEA results and the mobility power flow results. Furthermore, the benefits that can be derived from using the mobility power flow approach, are also examined.

  12. Stability investigations of airfoil flow by global analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morzynski, Marek; Thiele, Frank

    1992-01-01

    As the result of global, non-parallel flow stability analysis the single value of the disturbance growth-rate and respective frequency is obtained. This complex value characterizes the stability of the whole flow configuration and is not referred to any particular flow pattern. The global analysis assures that all the flow elements (wake, boundary and shear layer) are taken into account. The physical phenomena connected with the wake instability are properly reproduced by the global analysis. This enhances the investigations of instability of any 2-D flows, including ones in which the boundary layer instability effects are known to be of dominating importance. Assuming fully 2-D disturbance form, the global linear stability problem is formulated. The system of partial differential equations is solved for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The equations, written in the pure stream function formulation, are discretized via FDM using a curvilinear coordinate system. The complex eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors are evaluated by an iterative method. The investigations performed for various Reynolds numbers emphasize that the wake instability develops into the Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is shown to be connected with the first mode obtained from the non-parallel flow stability analysis. The higher modes are reflecting different physical phenomena as for example Tollmien-Schlichting waves, originating in the boundary layer and having the tendency to emerge as instabilities for the growing Reynolds number. The investigations are carried out for a circular cylinder, oblong ellipsis and airfoil. It is shown that the onset of the wake instability, the waves in the boundary layer, the shear layer instability are different solutions of the same eigenvalue problem, formulated using the non-parallel theory. The analysis offers large potential possibilities as the generalization of methods used till now for the stability analysis.

  13. Analysis of homogeneous turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A. D.; Hill, J. C.; Mahalingam, S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Full turbulence simulations at low Reynolds numbers were made for the single-step, irreversible, bimolecular reaction between non-premixed reactants in isochoric, decaying homogeneous turbulence. Various initial conditions for the scalar field were used in the simulations to control the initial scalar dissipation length scale, and simulations were also made for temperature-dependent reaction rates and for non-stoichiometric and unequal diffusivity conditions. Joint probability density functions (pdf's), conditional pdf's, and various statistical quantities appearing in the moment equations were computed. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates that compressive strain-rate correlates better than other dynamical quantities with local reaction rate, and the locations of peak reaction rates seem to be insensitive to the scalar field initial conditions.

  14. Analysis of the stochastic excitability in the flow chemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirtseva, Irina

    2015-11-30

    A dynamic model of the thermochemical process in the flow reactor is considered. We study an influence of the random disturbances on the stationary regime of this model. A phenomenon of noise-induced excitability is demonstrated. For the analysis of this phenomenon, a constructive technique based on the stochastic sensitivity functions and confidence domains is applied. It is shown how elaborated technique can be used for the probabilistic analysis of the generation of mixed-mode stochastic oscillations in the flow chemical reactor.

  15. Image Cross-Correlation Analysis of Time Varying Flows.

    PubMed

    Marquezin, Cassia A; Ceffa, Nicolò G; Cotelli, Franco; Collini, Maddalena; Sironi, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2016-07-19

    In vivo studies of blood circulation pathologies have great medical relevance and need methods for the characterization of time varying flows at high spatial and time resolution in small animal models. We test here the efficacy of the combination of image correlation techniques and single plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) in characterizing time varying flows in vitro and in vivo. As indicated by numerical simulations and by in vitro experiments on straight capillaries, the complex analytical form of the cross-correlation function for SPIM detection can be simplified, in conditions of interest for hemodynamics, to a superposition of Gaussian components, easily amenable to the analysis of variable flows. The possibility to select a wide field of view with a good spatial resolution along the collection optical axis and to compute the cross-correlation between regions of interest at varying distances on a single time stack of images allows one to single out periodic flow components from spurious peaks on the cross-correlation functions and to infer the duration of each flow component. We apply this cross-correlation analysis to the blood flow in Zebrafish embryos at 4 days after fertilization, measuring the average speed and the duration of the systolic and diastolic phases. PMID:27348197

  16. Solar Subsurface Flows derived with Ring-Diagram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, R.; Howe, R.; Gonzalez Hernandez, I.; Hill, F.; Haber, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Local helioseismology makes it possible to map the horizontal flows in the outer convection zone of the Sun. For the ring-diagram analysis, we start from full-disk Doppler velocity images of the Sun and track a region at about the surface rotation rate for a period of a day. Each tracked data cube of velocity is then Fourier transformed. The resulting 3-D power spectrum shows structures that correspond to the acoustic waves. These structures appear as rings in a 2-D plane at a given temporal frequency. Since acoustic waves are advected by subsurface flows, the velocity of these horizontal flows can be determined from the offset of the ring centers. Using ring-diagram analysis of Doppler images of the Sun obtained with the ground-based Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft (SOHO), we are studying, for example, the large-scale subsurface flows (E-W rotation and N-S meridional flow) and their variation with the solar cycle of magnetic activity. We are also studying subsurface flows associated with active regions on the Sun focusing on their evolution (emergence and decay). In addition, we have started to analyze data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft. We will present some recent results.

  17. River flow fluctuation analysis: Effect of watershed area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirpa, Feyera A.; Gebremichael, Mekonnen; Over, Thomas M.

    2010-12-01

    This study presents the results of a detailed river flow fluctuation analysis on daily records from 14 stations in the Flint River Basin in Georgia in the southeastern United States with special focus on the effect of watershed area on long memory of river flow fluctuations. The areas of the watersheds draining to the stations range from 23 to 19,606 km2. The climatic and seasonal trends are removed using the detrended fluctuation analysis technique. Results show that (1) river flow fluctuations have two distinct scaling regimes, and the scaling break is delayed for large watershed areas; (2) large watersheds have more persistent river flow fluctuations and stronger long memory (i.e., for lag times beyond the scale break) than small watersheds do; (3) the long memory of river flow fluctuations does not come from the long memory of precipitation; (4) a linear reservoir unit hydrograph transfer function approach does not capture correctly the basin processes that convert short-memory precipitation to long-memory streamflow; and (5) the degree of multifractality of river flow fluctuations decreases with increasing watershed area. The results clearly indicate that watershed area is an important factor in the long-memory studies of streamflow such as streamflow prediction.

  18. Evaluation of uncertainties due to hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis: Steady flow, transient flow, and thermal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine; Karasaki, Kenzi

    2002-12-11

    Starting with regional geographic, geologic, surface and subsurface hydrologic, and geophysical data for the Tono area in Gifu, Japan, we develop an effective continuum model to simulate subsurface flow and transport in a 4 km by 6 km by 3 km thick fractured granite rock mass overlain by sedimentary layers. Individual fractures are not modeled explicitly. Rather, continuum permeability and porosity distributions are assigned stochastically, based on well-test data and fracture density measurements. Lithologic layering and one major fault, the Tsukiyoshi Fault, are assigned deterministically. We conduct three different studies: (1) the so-called base case, in which the model simulates the steady-state groundwater flow through the site, and then stream trace analysis is used to calculate travel times to the model boundary from specified release points; (2) simulations of transient flow during long term pump tests (LTPT) using the base-case model; and (3) thermal studies in which coupled heat flow and fluid flow are modeled, to examine the effects of the geothermal gradient on groundwater flow. The base-case study indicates that the choice of open or closed lateral boundaries has a strong influence on the regional groundwater flow patterns produced by the models, but no field data exist that can be used to determine which boundary conditions are more realistic. The LTPT study cannot be used to distinguish between the alternative boundary conditions, because the pumping rate is too small to produce an analyzable pressure response at the model boundaries. In contrast, the thermal study shows that the temperature distributions produced by the open and closed models differ greatly. Comparison with borehole temperature data may be used to eliminate the closed model from further consideration.

  19. Flow Analysis of the Cleveland Clinic Centrifugal Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Golding, Leonard A. R.; Smith, William A.; Horvath, David; Medvedev, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    An implantable ventricular assist rotordynamic blood pump is being developed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in cooperation with the NASA Lewis Research Center. At the nominal design condition, the pump provides blood flow at the rate of 5 liters per minute at a pressure rise of 100 mm of mercury and a rotative speed of 3000 RPM. Bench testing of the centrifugal pump in a water/glycerin mixture has provided flow and pressure data at several rotative speeds. A one-dimensional empirical based pump flow analysis computer code developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used in the design process to simulate the flow in the primary centrifugal pump stage. The computer model was used to size key impeller and volute geometric parameters that influence pressure rise and flow. Input requirements to the computer model include a simple representation of the pump geometry. The model estimates the flow conditions at the design and at off-design operating conditions at the impeller leading and trailing edges and the volute inlet and exit. The output from the computer model is compared to flow and pressure data obtained from bench testing.

  20. Spherical harmonic analysis of earth's conductive heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, V. M.; Cardoso, R. R.; Ponte Neto, C. F.

    2008-04-01

    A reappraisal of the international heat flow database has been carried out and the corrected data set was employed in spherical harmonic analysis of the conductive component of global heat flow. Procedures used prior to harmonic analysis include analysis of the heat flow data and determination of representative mean values for a set of discretized area elements of the surface of the earth. Estimated heat flow values were assigned to area elements for which experimental data are not available. However, no corrections were made to account for the hypothetical effects of regional-scale convection heat transfer in areas of oceanic crust. New sets of coefficients for 12° spherical harmonic expansion were calculated on the basis of the revised and homogenized data set. Maps derived on the basis of these coefficients reveal several new features in the global heat flow distribution. The magnitudes of heat flow anomalies of the ocean ridge segments are found to have mean values of less than 150 mW/m2. Also, the mean global heat flow values for the raw and binned data are found to fall in the range of 56-67 mW/m2, down by nearly 25% compared to the previous estimate of 1993, but similar to earlier assessments based on raw data alone. To improve the spatial resolution of the heat flow anomalies, the spherical harmonic expansions have been extended to higher degrees. Maps derived using coefficients for 36° harmonic expansion have allowed identification of new features in regional heat flow fields of several oceanic and continental segments. For example, lateral extensions of heat flow anomalies of active spreading centers have been outlined with better resolution than was possible in earlier studies. Also, the characteristics of heat flow variations in oceanic crust away from ridge systems are found to be typical of conductive cooling of the lithosphere, there being little need to invoke the hypothesis of unconfined hydrothermal circulation on regional scales. Calculations

  1. Lagrangian analysis of fluid transport in empirical vortex ring flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Dabiri, John O.; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we apply dynamical systems analyses and computational tools to fluid transport in empirically measured vortex ring flows. Measurements of quasisteadily propagating vortex rings generated by a mechanical piston-cylinder apparatus reveal lobe dynamics during entrainment and detrainment that are consistent with previous theoretical and numerical studies. In addition, the vortex ring wake of a free-swimming Aurelia aurita jellyfish is measured and analyzed in the framework of dynamical systems to elucidate similar lobe dynamics in a naturally occurring biological flow. For the mechanically generated rings, a comparison of the net entrainment rate based on the present methods with a previous Eulerian analysis shows good correspondence. However, the current Lagrangian framework is more effective than previous analyses in capturing the transport geometry, especially when the flow becomes more unsteady, as in the case of the free-swimming jellyfish. Extensions of these results to more complex flow geometries is suggested.

  2. FLDA: Latent Dirichlet Allocation Based Unsteady Flow Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Lai, Chufan; Guo, Hanqi; Shen, Enya; Yuan, Xiaoru; Li, Sikun

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel feature extraction approach called FLDA for unsteady flow fields based on Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) model. Analogous to topic modeling in text analysis, in our approach, pathlines and features in a given flow field are defined as documents and words respectively. Flow topics are then extracted based on Latent Dirichlet allocation. Different from other feature extraction methods, our approach clusters pathlines with probabilistic assignment, and aggregates features to meaningful topics at the same time. We build a prototype system to support exploration of unsteady flow field with our proposed LDA-based method. Interactive techniques are also developed to explore the extracted topics and to gain insight from the data. We conduct case studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed approach. PMID:26356968

  3. Finite element analysis of aeroacoustic jet-flap flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    A computational analysis was performed on the steady, turbulent aerodynamic flowfields associated with a jet-blown flap. For regions devoid of flow separation, a parabolic approximation to the governing time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations was applied. Numerical results are presented for the symmetry plane flow of a slot-nozzle planar jet flap geometry, including prediction of flowfield evolution within the secondary mixing region immediately downstream of the trailing edge. Using a two equation turbulence kinetic energy closure model, rapid generation and decay of large spatial gradients in mean and correlated fluctuating velocity components within the immediate wake region were predicted. Modifications to the turbulent flow structure, as induced by porous surface treatment of the flap, were evaluated. The recirculating flow within a representative discrete slot in the surface was evaluated, using the two dimensional, time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

  4. Production flow analysis: a tool for designing a lean hospital.

    PubMed

    Karvonen, Sauli; Korvenranta, Heikki; Paatela, Mikael; Seppälä, Timo

    2007-01-01

    Production flow analysis (PFA) was used in the planning process for a new acute care hospital. The PFA demonstrated that functional organisation--for example, with centralised medical imaging-- generates a lot of back and forth patient transfers between functional units. This to-and-fro patient flow increases lead times of care processes and also exposes the patients to unnecessary complications. PFA produced an ideal patient flow model and layout model for the acute care hospital. Thus, PFA revealed information for use in proximity ranking of different units of the hospital; the planning team then decided which units should be placed next to each other. Medical imaging should be essentially ubiquitous, to achieve simple, high-velocity patient flow. Thus, a modern decentralized layout model for medical imaging was planned. Furthermore, PFA enables optimizing transfer routes for patients and also, e.g., lift capacity in the hospital. PMID:17621771

  5. Flow Analysis of X-34 Main Propulsion System Feedlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Garcia, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The X-34 Main Propulsion System (MPS) configuration includes the liquid oxygen (LOX) and rocket propellant #1 (RP-1) feedlines. The flow analyses of these feedlines were performed and documented in previous studies. These analyses predicted a relatively low inlet distortion and nearly even flow split at the engine interface. The new design for these MPS feedlines has been recommended recently. The new configuration includes a tighter radius in the RP-1 feedline and a neck-down section between the gimbals. Conversely, the LOX feedline is very similar to the previous design. There were concerns that this new RP-1 configuration might generate a greater flow distortion at the engine interface than the original design. To resolve this issue, a Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to determine the flow Field in the new RP-1 feedlines.

  6. Fluid flow systems analysis to save energy

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, P.S.

    1999-07-01

    Industrial processes use rotating equipment (e.g.; pump, fan, blower, centrifugal compressor, positive displacement compressor) and pipe (or duct) to move fluid from point A to B, with many processes using electric motors as the prime mover. Most of the systems in the industry are over-designed to meet a peak load demand which might occur over a small fraction of the time or to satisfy a higher pressure demanded by a much smaller user in the same process. The system over-design will result in a selection of larger but inefficient rotating equipment and electric motor system. A careful life cycle cost and economic evaluation must be undertaken to ensure that the process audit, reengineering and equipment selections are not impacting the industrial process goals, but result in a least optimal cost over the life of the project. The paper will define, discuss, and present various process systems in chemical, hydrocarbon and pulp and paper industries. It will discuss the interactive impact of the changes in the mechanical system configuration and the changes in the process variables to better redesign the system and reduce the cost of operation. it will also present a check list of energy conservation measures (ECM) or opportunities. Such ECMs will be related to hydraulics, system components, process modifications, and system efficiency. Two or three case studies will be presented focusing on various conservation measures that improve electrical operating efficiency of a distillation column system. An incremental cost and payback analysis will be presented to assist the investment in process optimization and energy savings' measures.

  7. A critical review on photochemical conversions in flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Diogo L; Kamogawa, Marcos Y; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2015-10-01

    Photochemical conversions are cost-effective and environmental friendly processes that require mild experimental conditions and avoid generation of highly acidic wastes. Treated samples are then compatible with most of the analytical techniques. These characteristics become more relevant when the photoconversions are accomplished to flow analysis, thus allowing exploitation of incomplete reactions, the effective use of the photogenerated unstable radicals and in-line sample treatment. Decreasing of reagent consumption and waste generation, sample processing in a closed environment, and improvement of efficiency of the photochemical processes are other inherent advantages. These aspects are critically reviewed in this article, which emphasizes applications to fractionation and speciation analysis, photo-induced luminescence, miniaturization, and in-line waste treatment. Design of flow-through photochemical cells, use of auxiliary reagents in homogeneous and heterogeneous media, and configurations of flow manifolds are also discussed. PMID:26481985

  8. A multicommutated tester of bioreactors for flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Pokrzywnicka, Marta; Kamiński, Jacek; Michalec, Michał; Koncki, Robert; Tymecki, Łukasz

    2016-11-01

    Enzymes are often used in the modern analytical procedures allowing selective recognition and conversion of target analytes into easily detected products. In flow analysis systems, enzymes are predominantly applied in the immobilized forms as flow-through bioreactors. In this research the multicommutated flow analysis (MCFA) system for evaluation and comparison of analytical parameters of bioreactors has been developed. The MCFA manifold allows simultaneous testing up to four bioreactors, but if necessary their number can be easily increased. The system allows comparison of several parameters of tested bioreactors including activity, repeatability, reproducibility, operational and storage stability. The performance of developed bioreactor tester is presented using urea-urease model system based on plastic open-tubular bioreactor with covalently immobilized enzyme. Product of enzymatic reaction is detected using two different chemical methods and by dedicated optoelectronic ammonium detectors. Moreover, the utility of developed MCFA manifold for evaluation of other enzyme bioreactors is demonstrated. PMID:27591609

  9. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Methodology Flow Charts

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    These images show the comprehensive methodology used for creation of a Play Fairway Analysis to explore the geothermal resource potential of the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico. The deterministic methodology was originated by the petroleum industry, but was custom-modified to function as a knowledge-based geothermal exploration tool. The stochastic PFA flow chart uses weights of evidence, and is data-driven.

  10. Determination of Reaction Stoichiometries by Flow Injection Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Angel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a method of flow injection analysis intended for calculation of complex-formation and redox reaction stoichiometries based on a closed-loop configuration. The technique is suitable for use in undergraduate laboratories. Information is provided for equipment, materials, procedures, and sample results. (JM)

  11. Flow Analysis on a Limited Volume Chilled Water System

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Lin

    2012-07-31

    LANL Currently has a limited volume chilled water system for use in a glove box, but the system needs to be updated. Before we start building our new system, a flow analysis is needed to ensure that there are no high flow rates, extreme pressures, or any other hazards involved in the system. In this project the piping system is extremely important to us because it directly affects the overall design of the entire system. The primary components necessary for the chilled water piping system are shown in the design. They include the pipes themselves (perhaps of more than one diameter), the various fitting used to connect the individual pipes to form the desired system, the flow rate control devices (valves), and the pumps that add energy to the fluid. Even the most simple pipe systems are actually quite complex when they are viewed in terms of rigorous analytical considerations. I used an 'exact' analysis and dimensional analysis considerations combined with experimental results for this project. When 'real-world' effects are important (such as viscous effects in pipe flows), it is often difficult or impossible to use only theoretical methods to obtain the desired results. A judicious combination of experimental data with theoretical considerations and dimensional analysis are needed in order to reduce risks to an acceptable level.

  12. Study of design and analysis methods for transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.

    1977-01-01

    An airfoil design program and a boundary layer analysis were developed. Boundary conditions were derived for ventilated transonic wind tunnels and performing transonic windtunnel wall calculations. A computational procedure for rotational transonic flow in engine inlet throats was formulated. Results and conclusions are summarized.

  13. A CLIPS expert system for clinical flow cytometry data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, G. C.; Duque, R. E.; Braylan, R. C.; Stewart, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed using CLIPS to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data from cancer patients. Cluster analysis is used to find subpopulations representing various cell types in multiple datasets each consisting of four to five measurements on each of 5000 cells. CLIPS facts are derived from results of the clustering. CLIPS rules are based on the expertise of Drs. Stewart, Duque, and Braylan. The rules incorporate certainty factors based on case histories.

  14. A Homemade Autosampler/Injector Commutator for Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, Eduardo Costa; de Souza, Leandro Ruela; de Magalhães, Cristiana Schmidt; Wisniewski, Célio

    2006-01-01

    An autosampler/injector commutator for flow injection analysis (FIA) was constructed with electronic components of used equipments. The apparatus is controlled by commercially available multifunctional interface (PCL711B) connected to a personal computer, and the software was written in Visual Basic language. The system was applied to water analysis and it presented satisfactory results. The low cost and simplicity are the principal characteristics of the autosampler/injector commutator. PMID:17671617

  15. Kinetic analysis of thermally relativistic flow with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2011-01-01

    Nonequilibrium flow of thermally relativistic matter with dissipation is considered in the framework of the relativistic kinetic theory. As an object of the analysis, the supersonic rarefied flow of thermally relativistic matter around the triangle prism is analyzed using the Anderson-Witting model. Obtained numerical results indicate that the flow field changes in accordance with the flow velocity and temperature of the uniform flow owing to both effects derived from the Lorentz contraction and thermally relativistic effects, even when the Mach number of the uniform flow is fixed. The profiles of the heat flux along the stagnation streamline can be approximated on the basis of the relativistic Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) law except for a strong nonequilibrium regime such as the middle of the shock wave and the vicinity of the wall, whereas the profile of the heat flux behind the triangle prism cannot be approximated on the basis of the relativistic NSF law owing to rarefied effects via the expansion behind the triangle prism. Additionally, the heat flux via the gradient of the static pressure is non-negligible owing to thermally relativistic effects. The profile of the dynamic pressure is different from that approximated on the basis of the NSF law, which is obtained by the Eckart decomposition. Finally, variations of convections of the mass and momentum owing to the effects derived from the Lorentz contraction and thermally relativistic effects are numerically confirmed.

  16. Two-Phase Mass Flow Measurement Using Noise Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Robert Pugmire; Keller, Joseph George; Stephens, A. G.; Blotter, J.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a low cost, non-intrusive, mass flow measurement sensor for two-phase flow conditions in geothermal applications. The emphasis of the work to date has been on a device that will monitor two-phase flow in the above-ground piping systems. The flashing brines have the potential for excessive scaling and corrosion of exposed surfaces, which can reduce the effectiveness of any measurement device. A major objective in the work has been the development of an instrument that is less susceptible to the scaling and corrosion effects. The focus of the project efforts has been on transducer noise analysis, a technology initiated at the INEEL. A transducer sensing a process condition will have, in addition to its usual signal, various noise components superimposed upon the primary signal that can be related to flow. Investigators have proposed that this technique be applied to steam and liquid water flow mixtures where the signal from an accelerometer mounted on an external pipe surface is evaluated to determine flow rate.

  17. Kinetic analysis of thermally relativistic flow with dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2011-01-15

    Nonequilibrium flow of thermally relativistic matter with dissipation is considered in the framework of the relativistic kinetic theory. As an object of the analysis, the supersonic rarefied flow of thermally relativistic matter around the triangle prism is analyzed using the Anderson-Witting model. Obtained numerical results indicate that the flow field changes in accordance with the flow velocity and temperature of the uniform flow owing to both effects derived from the Lorentz contraction and thermally relativistic effects, even when the Mach number of the uniform flow is fixed. The profiles of the heat flux along the stagnation streamline can be approximated on the basis of the relativistic Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) law except for a strong nonequilibrium regime such as the middle of the shock wave and the vicinity of the wall, whereas the profile of the heat flux behind the triangle prism cannot be approximated on the basis of the relativistic NSF law owing to rarefied effects via the expansion behind the triangle prism. Additionally, the heat flux via the gradient of the static pressure is non-negligible owing to thermally relativistic effects. The profile of the dynamic pressure is different from that approximated on the basis of the NSF law, which is obtained by the Eckart decomposition. Finally, variations of convections of the mass and momentum owing to the effects derived from the Lorentz contraction and thermally relativistic effects are numerically confirmed.

  18. Linear stability analysis of inclined two-layer stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negretti, M. Eletta; Socolofsky, Scott A.; Jirka, Gerhard H.

    2008-09-01

    Two-layer stratified flows are commonly observed in geophysical and environmental contexts. At the interface between the two layers, both velocity shear and buoyancy interplay, resulting in various modes of instability. Results from a temporal linear stability analysis of a two-layer stratified exchange flow under the action of a mean advection are presented, investigating the effect of a mild bottom slope on the stability of the interface. The spatial acceleration is directly included in the governing stability equations. The results demonstrate that increasing the bottom slope has a similar effect on the stability of the flow as does increasing the ratio R of the thickness of the velocity mixing layer δν to that of the density layer δρ as it causes the flow to be more unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The transition from Kelvin-Helmholtz modes to stable flow occurs at lower Richardson numbers and wavenumbers compared to the horizontal two-layer flow. Kelvin-Helmholtz modes are decreasingly amplified for 1

  19. Flow Analysis of a Gas Turbine Low- Pressure Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is coordinating a project to numerically simulate aerodynamic flow in the complete low-pressure subsystem (LPS) of a gas turbine engine. The numerical model solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow equations through all components within the low-pressure subsystem as well as the external flow around the engine nacelle. The Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Code (ADPAC), which is being developed jointly by Allison Engine Company and NASA, is the Navier-Stokes flow code being used for LPS simulation. The majority of the LPS project is being done under a NASA Lewis contract with Allison. Other contributors to the project are NYMA and the University of Toledo. For this project, the Energy Efficient Engine designed by GE Aircraft Engines is being modeled. This engine includes a low-pressure system and a high-pressure system. An inlet, a fan, a booster stage, a bypass duct, a lobed mixer, a low-pressure turbine, and a jet nozzle comprise the low-pressure subsystem within this engine. The tightly coupled flow analysis evaluates aerodynamic interactions between all components of the LPS. The high-pressure core engine of this engine is simulated with a one-dimensional thermodynamic cycle code in order to provide boundary conditions to the detailed LPS model. This core engine consists of a high-pressure compressor, a combustor, and a high-pressure turbine. The three-dimensional LPS flow model is coupled to the one-dimensional core engine model to provide a "hybrid" flow model of the complete gas turbine Energy Efficient Engine. The resulting hybrid engine model evaluates the detailed interaction between the LPS components at design and off-design engine operating conditions while considering the lumped-parameter performance of the core engine.

  20. Computational analysis of swirling flows in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Obdulio

    The vortex breakdown of a swirling jet flow entering a finite-length pipe is studied in this thesis. The theories of Rusak and co-authors which provide fundamental tools to predict the first occurrence of breakdown and simulate the flow behavior are applied. To demonstrate the ideas, the detailed experimental data of Novak and Sarpkaya (2000) are used, specifically, the upstream (inlet) axial and circumferential velocity profiles ahead of the breakdown (stagnation) point. The critical swirl ratios, o0 and o1, that respectively form the necessary and sufficient conditions for the occurrence of breakdown in a swirling jet flow, are computed from the ordinary differential equations of the problem. It is found that for the upstream velocity profiles o0 = 0.5607 and o 1 = 1.35196. The swirl level in the experiment of Novak and Sarpkaya (2000) was o = 1, and it shows that vortex breakdown may occur downstream of the inlet in the vortex flow field, as indeed is found in the experiments. Moreover, the experiments provide flow profiles along the whole pipe which are compared with simulation results based on Granata (2014) for a swirling flow in a pipe that has the same inlet conditions. An agreement is found between the simulated results and the experimental data all along the pipe from the upstream inlet state up to the breakdown point. Behind the breakdown point, no concise agreement is found which may be due to the high turbulence in the high-Re experimental flow or a result of non-full convergence of simulated results. The present theoretical analysis and simulations shed light on the breakdown process of swirling jet flows in pipes.

  1. Tailings dam-break flow - Analysis of sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleixo, Rui; Altinakar, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    A common solution to store mining debris is to build tailings dams near the mining site. These dams are usually built with local materials such as mining debris and are more vulnerable than concrete dams (Rico et al. 2008). of The tailings and the pond water generally contain heavy metals and various toxic chemicals used in ore extraction. Thus, the release of tailings due to a dam-break can have severe ecological consequences in the environment. A tailings dam-break has many similarities with a common dam-break flow. It is highly transient and can be severely descructive. However, a significant difference is that the released sediment-water mixture will behave as a non-Newtonian flow. Existing numerical models used to simulate dam-break flows do not represent correctly the non-Newtonian behavior of tailings under a dam-break flow and may lead to unrealistic and incorrect results. The need for experiments to extract both qualitative and quantitative information regarding these flows is therefore real and actual. The present paper explores an existing experimental data base presented in Aleixo et al. (2014a,b) to further characterize the sediment transport under conditions of a severe transient flow and to extract quantitative information regarding sediment flow rate, sediment velocity, sediment-sediment interactions a among others. Different features of the flow are also described and analyzed in detail. The analysis is made by means of imaging techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry that allow extracting not only the velocity field but the Lagrangian description of the sediments as well. An analysis of the results is presented and the limitations of the presented experimental approach are discussed. References Rico, M., Benito, G., Salgueiro, AR, Diez-Herrero, A. and Pereira, H.G. (2008) Reported tailings dam failures: A review of the European incidents in the worldwide context , Journal of Hazardous Materials, 152, 846

  2. First analysis of anisotropic flow with Lee-Yang zeros

    SciTech Connect

    Bastid, N.; Barret, V.; Crochet, P.; Dupieux, P.; Lopez, X.; Basrak, Z.; Caplar, R.; Delalija, M.; Gaspariae, I.; Korolija, M.

    2005-07-01

    We report on the first analysis of directed and elliptic flow with the new method of Lee-Yang zeros. Experimental data are presented for Ru+Ru reactions at 1.69A GeV measured with the FOPI detector at SIS/GSI. The results obtained with several methods, based on the event-plane reconstruction, on Lee-Yang zeros, and on multiparticle cumulants (up to fifth order) applied for the first time at SIS energies, are compared. They show conclusive evidence that azimuthal correlations between nucleons and composite particles at this energy are largely dominated by anisotropic flow.

  3. Large perturbation flow field analysis and simulation for supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varner, M. O.; Martindale, W. R.; Phares, W. J.; Kneile, K. R.; Adams, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis technique for simulation of supersonic mixed compression inlets with large flow field perturbations is presented. The approach is based upon a quasi-one-dimensional inviscid unsteady formulation which includes engineering models of unstart/restart, bleed, bypass, and geometry effects. Numerical solution of the governing time dependent equations of motion is accomplished through a shock capturing finite difference algorithm, of which five separate approaches are evaluated. Comparison with experimental supersonic wind tunnel data is presented to verify the present approach for a wide range of transient inlet flow conditions.

  4. Improved Flow Modeling in Transient Reactor Safety Analysis Computer Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Holowach, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Cheung, F.B.

    2002-07-01

    A method of accounting for fluid-to-fluid shear in between calculational cells over a wide range of flow conditions envisioned in reactor safety studies has been developed such that it may be easily implemented into a computer code such as COBRA-TF for more detailed subchannel analysis. At a given nodal height in the calculational model, equivalent hydraulic diameters are determined for each specific calculational cell using either laminar or turbulent velocity profiles. The velocity profile may be determined from a separate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis, experimental data, or existing semi-empirical relationships. The equivalent hydraulic diameter is then applied to the wall drag force calculation so as to determine the appropriate equivalent fluid-to-fluid shear caused by the wall for each cell based on the input velocity profile. This means of assigning the shear to a specific cell is independent of the actual wetted perimeter and flow area for the calculational cell. The use of this equivalent hydraulic diameter for each cell within a calculational subchannel results in a representative velocity profile which can further increase the accuracy and detail of heat transfer and fluid flow modeling within the subchannel when utilizing a thermal hydraulics systems analysis computer code such as COBRA-TF. Utilizing COBRA-TF with the flow modeling enhancement results in increased accuracy for a coarse-mesh model without the significantly greater computational and time requirements of a full-scale 3D (three-dimensional) transient CFD calculation. (authors)

  5. General flow field analysis methods for helicopter rotor aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Lam, C. Gordon; Bliss, Donald B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous work in the analysis of rotor flow fields for aeroacoustic applications involved the preliminary development of an efficient and accurate Lagrangian simulation of the unsteady vorticity field in the vicinity of helicopter main rotor that could analyze a limited class of rotor/wake interactions. The capabilities of this analysis have subsequently been considerably enhanced to allow it to serve as the foundation for a general analysis of the rotor/wake interaction noise. This paper presents the details of these enhancements, which focus on the expansion of the reconstruction approach developed previously to handle arbitrary vortex wake interactions within three-dimensional regions located near or within the rotor disk. Also, the development of nearfield velocity corrections appropriate for the analysis of such interactions is described, as is a preliminary study of methods for using the new high-resolution flow field analysis for noise predictions. The results show that by employing this novel flow field reconstruction technique it is possible to employ full-span free wake analyses with temporal and spatial resolution suitable for acoustic applications while reducing the computation time required by one to two orders of magnitude relative to traditional methods.

  6. Is the modal approach appropriate for analysis of energy flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavic, Goran

    2002-11-01

    Modal superposition is a most commonly used approach in a numerical analysis of vibration. However, the computation requirements of a typical analysis of energy flow limit the attractiveness of the modal approach because, as a rule, a very large number of modes have to be taken into account in order to produce realistic results. The reason for this particularity is that the energy analysis involves not only vibration displacements but also higher derivatives of these which are contributed by higher modes, the higher the derivative order. More careful analysis of structure-borne vibration shows that the modal truncation is not the only inconvenience where the modal approach is used. An equally important factor limiting its use is the representation of vibration dissipation by modal damping. The paper shows comparisons of computed energy flow in plates using modal and wave approaches. The differences between the two are noticeable, in particular where the vectorial functions of energy flow field, divergence and curl, are concerned. The wave approach to vibration analysis is shown to be more physically consistent than the modal approach.

  7. Computational Aeroacoustic Analysis of Slat Trailing-Edge Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Lockhard, David P.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Berkman, Mert E.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2000-01-01

    An acoustic analysis based on the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation was performed for a high-lift system. As input, the acoustic analysis used un- steady flow data obtained from a highly resolved, time-dependent, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculation. The analysis strongly suggests that vor- tex shedding from the trailing edge of the slat results in a high-amplitude, high-frequency acoustic signal, similar to that which was observed in a correspond- ing experimental study of the high-lift system.

  8. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  9. Detailed analysis of POD method applied on turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellnerova, Radka; Kukacka, Libor; Uruba, Vaclav; Jurcakova, Klara; Janour, Zbynek

    2012-04-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of a very turbulent flow inside a street canyon is performed. The energy contribution of each mode is obtained. Also, physical meaning of the POD result is clarified. Particular modes of POD are assigned to the particular flow events like a sweep event, a vortex behind a roof or a vortex at the bottom of a street. Test of POD sensitivity to the acquisition time of data records is done. Test with decreasing sample frequency is also executed. Further, interpolation of POD expansion coefficient is performed in order to test possible increase in sample frequency and get new information about the flow from the POD analysis. We tested a linear and a spline type of the interpolation and the linear one carried out a slightly better result.

  10. Bifurcation analysis of a speed gradient continuum traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Wen-Huan; Shi, Zhong-Ke; Liu, Da-Wei

    2015-11-01

    A bifurcation analysis approach is presented based on the macroscopic traffic flow model. This method can be used to describe and predict the nonlinear traffic phenomena on the highway from a system global stability perspective. Based on a recently proposed speed gradient continuum traffic flow model, the types and stabilities of the equilibrium solutions are discussed and the existence of Hopf bifurcation and saddle-node bifurcation is proved. Then various bifurcations such as Hopf bifurcation, saddle-node bifurcation, Limit Point bifurcation of cycles, Cusp bifurcation and Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation are found and the traffic flow behaviors at some of them are analyzed. When the Hopf bifurcation is selected as the starting point of density temporal evolution, it may help to explain the stop-and-go traffic phenomena.

  11. Kootenai River Instream Flow Analysis, 2004 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William J.; Geise, Doran; Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks Staff

    2004-10-01

    A modified Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) approach was used on the mainstem Kootenai River from Libby Dam downstream to Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The objective of this study was to quantify changes in habitat for the target fish species, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), as a function of discharge in the river. This study used physical data and habitat use information from previous studies in the 1990s. The present study adapted the one-dimensional physical data into a georeferenced data set for each study site. The hydraulic simulations were combined with habitat suitability criteria in a GIS analysis format to determine habitat area as a function of discharge. Results of the analysis showed that the quantity of suitable habitat is greater at lower discharges than higher discharges and that the more stable flow regime from 1993 through 2002 provided more stable habitat conditions when compared to the highly variable flow regime from 1983 through 1992. The daily and weekly variability under 1983-1992 conditions forces subadult bull trout to use less productive habitat during the night by repetitively wetting and drying stream channel margin area. Subadult bull trout exhibit a distinct difference between daytime and nighttime habitat use (Muhlfeld 2002). These fish utilize deeper main channel habitats during the day and move to shallow channel margin areas at night. The productivity of lower trophic levels is low within the consistently watered and dewatered marginal areas and thus these areas provide little foraging value to subadult bull trout that utilize those areas as flows increase. The more stable flow regime (for weekly or daily timesteps) from 1993-2002 should be more productive than flow regimes with high weekly or daily variability. The highly variable flows likely stress subadult bull trout and rainbow trout due to the additional movement required to find suitable habitat or through the utilization of

  12. Extended forward sensitivity analysis of one-dimensional isothermal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Zhao, H.

    2013-07-01

    Sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification is an important part of nuclear safety analysis. In this work, forward sensitivity analysis is used to compute solution sensitivities on 1-D fluid flow equations typical of those found in system level codes. Time step sensitivity analysis is included as a method for determining the accumulated error from time discretization. The ability to quantify numerical error arising from the time discretization is a unique and important feature of this method. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time step with other physical parameters, the simulation is allowed to run at optimized time steps without affecting the confidence of the physical parameter sensitivity results. The time step forward sensitivity analysis method can also replace the traditional time step convergence studies that are a key part of code verification with much less computational cost. One well-defined benchmark problem with manufactured solutions is utilized to verify the method; another test isothermal flow problem is used to demonstrate the extended forward sensitivity analysis process. Through these sample problems, the paper shows the feasibility and potential of using the forward sensitivity analysis method to quantify uncertainty in input parameters and time step size for a 1-D system-level thermal-hydraulic safety code. (authors)

  13. Analysis of three-dimensional viscous internal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghia, K. N.; Ghia, U.

    1983-08-01

    In the first research category, two different areas were studied: Analysis of laminar duct flows, and study of laminar and turbulent separated flows. These studies were aimed at acquiring a better understanding of isolated physical phenomena significant to turbomachinery applications via the use of appropriate model problems. The second research category is aimed at obtaining flow-dependent computational grids efficiently so that critical regions can be accurately modeled. The final research category includes the analysis of numerical methods, with the goal of improving the efficiency and accuracy of the various methods developed and implemented. Preliminary fine-grid marching solutions were obtained in the entrance region of the duct for eight different duct configurations. Streamwise separation was examined, using the model problem of laminar flow through a constricted asymmetric channel. True transient results were obtained for several flow configurations with extremely fine grids, so as to provide benchmark solutions which can permit assessment of other solutions obtained using approximate methods. Turbulence modeling was pursued, with the wall region being described by low-remodeling. Although the wall region can be modeled more accurately by this method, the fine grids required retard the convergence rate of the approximate factorization method used. Flow-dependent grids were generated for a 1-D nonlinear viscous Burgers' equation. For the first time, accurate results were computed using totally central-difference schemes for Re up to 10,000. Finally, in the last category, in the area of semi-implicit methods, a multi-grid method was developed to provide fine-grid solutions for the Neumann problem.

  14. Simplified protocol for flow cytometry analysis of fluorescently labeled exosomes and microvesicles using dedicated flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Pospichalova, Vendula; Svoboda, Jan; Dave, Zankruti; Kotrbova, Anna; Kaiser, Karol; Klemova, Dobromila; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Crha, Igor; Jandakova, Eva; Minar, Lubos; Weinberger, Vit; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method, which is widely used for high-throughput quantitative and qualitative analysis of cells. However, its straightforward applicability for extracellular vesicles (EVs) and mainly exosomes is hampered by several challenges, reflecting mostly the small size of these vesicles (exosomes: ~80–200 nm, microvesicles: ~200–1,000 nm), their polydispersity, and low refractive index. The current best and most widely used protocol for beads-free flow cytometry of exosomes uses ultracentrifugation (UC) coupled with floatation in sucrose gradient for their isolation, labeling with lipophilic dye PKH67 and antibodies, and an optimized version of commercial high-end cytometer for analysis. However, this approach requires an experienced flow cytometer operator capable of manual hardware adjustments and calibration of the cytometer. Here, we provide a novel and fast approach for quantification and characterization of both exosomes and microvesicles isolated from cell culture media as well as from more complex human samples (ascites of ovarian cancer patients) suitable for multiuser labs by using a flow cytometer especially designed for small particles, which can be used without adjustments prior to data acquisition. EVs can be fluorescently labeled with protein-(Carboxyfluoresceinsuccinimidyl ester, CFSE) and/or lipid- (FM) specific dyes, without the necessity of removing the unbound fluorescent dye by UC, which further facilitates and speeds up the characterization of microvesicles and exosomes using flow cytometry. In addition, double labeling with protein- and lipid-specific dyes enables separation of EVs from common contaminants of EV preparations, such as protein aggregates or micelles formed by unbound lipophilic styryl dyes, thus not leading to overestimation of EV numbers. Moreover, our protocol is compatible with antibody labeling using fluorescently conjugated primary antibodies. The presented methodology opens the possibility for

  15. AnalyzeHOLE - An Integrated Wellbore Flow Analysis Tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Conventional interpretation of flow logs assumes that hydraulic conductivity is directly proportional to flow change with depth. However, well construction can significantly alter the expected relation between changes in fluid velocity and hydraulic conductivity. Strong hydraulic conductivity contrasts between lithologic intervals can be masked in continuously screened wells. Alternating intervals of screen and blank casing also can greatly complicate the relation between flow and hydraulic properties. More permeable units are not necessarily associated with rapid fluid-velocity increases. Thin, highly permeable units can be misinterpreted as thick and less permeable intervals or not identified at all. These conditions compromise standard flow-log interpretation because vertical flow fields are induced near the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE, an integrated wellbore analysis tool for simulating flow and transport in wells and aquifer systems, provides a better alternative for simulating and evaluating complex well-aquifer system interaction. A pumping well and adjacent aquifer system are simulated with an axisymmetric, radial geometry in a two-dimensional MODFLOW model. Hydraulic conductivities are distributed by depth and estimated with PEST by minimizing squared differences between simulated and measured flows and drawdowns. Hydraulic conductivity can vary within a lithology but variance is limited with regularization. Transmissivity of the simulated system also can be constrained to estimates from single-well, pumping tests. Water-quality changes in the pumping well are simulated with simple mixing models between zones of differing water quality. These zones are differentiated by backtracking thousands of particles from the well screens with MODPATH. An Excel spreadsheet is used to interface the various components of AnalyzeHOLE by (1) creating model input files, (2) executing MODFLOW, MODPATH, PEST, and supporting FORTRAN routines, and (3) importing and graphically

  16. AnalyzeHOLE: An Integrated Wellbore Flow Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Keith J. Halford

    2009-10-01

    Conventional interpretation of flow logs assumes that hydraulic conductivity is directly proportional to flow change with depth. However, well construction can significantly alter the expected relation between changes in fluid velocity and hydraulic conductivity. Strong hydraulic conductivity contrasts between lithologic intervals can be masked in continuously screened wells. Alternating intervals of screen and blank casing also can greatly complicate the relation between flow and hydraulic properties. More permeable units are not necessarily associated with rapid fluid-velocity increases. Thin, highly permeable units can be misinterpreted as thick and less permeable intervals or not identified at all. These conditions compromise standard flow-log interpretation because vertical flow fields are induced near the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE, an integrated wellbore analysis tool for simulating flow and transport in wells and aquifer systems, provides a better alternative for simulating and evaluating complex well-aquifer system interaction. A pumping well and adjacent aquifer system are simulated with an axisymmetric, radial geometry in a two-dimensional MODFLOW model. Hydraulic conductivities are distributed by depth and estimated with PEST by minimizing squared differences between simulated and measured flows and drawdowns. Hydraulic conductivity can vary within a lithology but variance is limited with regularization. Transmissivity of the simulated system also can be constrained to estimates from single-well, pumping tests. Water-quality changes in the pumping well are simulated with simple mixing models between zones of differing water quality. These zones are differentiated by backtracking thousands of particles from the well screens with MODPATH. An Excel spreadsheet is used to interface the various components of AnalyzeHOLE by (1) creating model input files, (2) executing MODFLOW, MODPATH, PEST, and supporting FORTRAN routines, and (3) importing and graphically

  17. Analysis of Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Transonic Alternating Flow Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K.; Piatak, David J.; Rausch, Russ D.

    2012-01-01

    A transonic wind tunnel test of the Ares I-X Rigid Buffet Model (RBM) identified a Mach number regime where unusually large buffet loads are present. A subsequent investigation identified the cause of these loads to be an alternating flow phenomenon at the Crew Module-Service Module junction. The conical design of the Ares I-X Crew Module and the cylindrical design of the Service Module exposes the vehicle to unsteady pressure loads due to the sudden transition between a subsonic separated and a supersonic attached flow about the cone-cylinder junction as the local flow randomly fluctuates back and forth between the two flow states. These fluctuations produce a square-wave like pattern in the pressure time histories resulting in large amplitude, impulsive buffet loads. Subsequent testing of the Ares I RBM found much lower buffet loads since the evolved Ares I design includes an ogive fairing that covers the Crew Module-Service Module junction, thereby making the vehicle less susceptible to the onset of alternating flow. An analysis of the alternating flow separation and attachment phenomenon indicates that the phenomenon is most severe at low angles of attack and exacerbated by the presence of vehicle protuberances. A launch vehicle may experience either a single or, at most, a few impulsive loads since it is constantly accelerating during ascent rather than dwelling at constant flow conditions in a wind tunnel. A comparison of a windtunnel- test-data-derived impulsive load to flight-test-data-derived load indicates a significant over-prediction in the magnitude and duration of the buffet load. I. Introduction One

  18. Statistical analysis of magnetotail fast flows and related magnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühauff, Dennis; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2016-04-01

    This study presents an investigation on the occurrence of fast flows in the magnetotail using the complete available data set of the THEMIS spacecraft for the years 2007 to 2015. The fast flow events (times of enhanced ion velocity) are detected through the use of a velocity criterion, therefore making the resulting database as large as almost 16 000 events. First, basic statistical findings concerning velocity distributions, occurrence rates, group structures are presented. Second, Superposed Epoch Analysis is utilized to account for average profiles of selected plasma quantities. The data reveal representative time series in near and far tail of the Earth with typical timescales of the order of 1-2 min, corresponding to scale sizes of 3 RE. Last, related magnetic field disturbances are analyzed. It is found that the minimum variance direction is essentially confined to a plane almost perpendicular to the main flow direction while, at the same time, the maximum variance direction is aligned with flow and background field directions. The presentation of the database and first statistical findings will prove useful both as input for magneto-hydrodynamical simulations and theoretical considerations of fast flows.

  19. Solid rocket motor aft field joint flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, Jayant S.; Gibeling, Edward J.; Mcdonald, Henry

    1987-01-01

    An efficient Navier-Stokes analysis was successfully applied to simulate the complex flow field in the vicinity of a slot in a solid rocket motor with segment joints. The capability of the computer code to resolve the flow near solid surfaces without using a wall function assumption was demonstrated. In view of the complex nature of the flow field in the vicinity of the slot, this approach is considered essential. The results obtained from these calculations provide valuable design information, which would otherwise be extremely difficult to obtain. The results of the axisymmetric calculations indicate the presence of a region of reversed axial flow at the aft-edge of the slot and show the over-pressure in the slot to be only about 10 psi. The results of the asymmetric calculations indicate that a pressure asymmetry more than two diameters downstream of the slot has no noticeable effect on the flow field in the slot. They also indicate that the circumferential pressure differential caused in the slot due to failure of a 15 deg section of the castable inhibitor will be approximately 1 psi.

  20. Computational Analysis of the G-III Laminar Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Liao, Wei; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2011-01-01

    Under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project, flight experiments are planned with the primary objective of demonstrating the Discrete Roughness Elements (DRE) technology for passive laminar flow control at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. In this paper, we present a preliminary computational assessment of the Gulfstream-III (G-III) aircraft wing-glove designed to attain natural laminar flow for the leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg. Analysis for a flight Mach number of 0.75 shows that it should be possible to achieve natural laminar flow for twice the transition Reynolds number ever achieved at this sweep angle. However, the wing-glove needs to be redesigned to effectively demonstrate passive laminar flow control using DREs. As a by-product of the computational assessment, effect of surface curvature on stationary crossflow disturbances is found to be strongly stabilizing for the current design, and it is suggested that convex surface curvature could be used as a control parameter for natural laminar flow design, provided transition occurs via stationary crossflow disturbances.

  1. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cellsmore » in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.« less

  2. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lottes, Steven A.

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cells in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.

  3. Progress Toward Efficient Laminar Flow Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Campbell, Matthew L.; Streit, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A multi-fidelity system of computer codes for the analysis and design of vehicles having extensive areas of laminar flow is under development at the NASA Langley Research Center. The overall approach consists of the loose coupling of a flow solver, a transition prediction method and a design module using shell scripts, along with interface modules to prepare the input for each method. This approach allows the user to select the flow solver and transition prediction module, as well as run mode for each code, based on the fidelity most compatible with the problem and available resources. The design module can be any method that designs to a specified target pressure distribution. In addition to the interface modules, two new components have been developed: 1) an efficient, empirical transition prediction module (MATTC) that provides n-factor growth distributions without requiring boundary layer information; and 2) an automated target pressure generation code (ATPG) that develops a target pressure distribution that meets a variety of flow and geometry constraints. The ATPG code also includes empirical estimates of several drag components to allow the optimization of the target pressure distribution. The current system has been developed for the design of subsonic and transonic airfoils and wings, but may be extendable to other speed ranges and components. Several analysis and design examples are included to demonstrate the current capabilities of the system.

  4. Energy flow: image correspondence approximation for motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangliang; Li, Ruifeng; Fang, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    We propose a correspondence approximation approach between temporally adjacent frames for motion analysis. First, energy map is established to represent image spatial features on multiple scales using Gaussian convolution. On this basis, energy flow at each layer is estimated using Gauss-Seidel iteration according to the energy invariance constraint. More specifically, at the core of energy invariance constraint is "energy conservation law" assuming that the spatial energy distribution of an image does not change significantly with time. Finally, energy flow field at different layers is reconstructed by considering different smoothness degrees. Due to the multiresolution origin and energy-based implementation, our algorithm is able to quickly address correspondence searching issues in spite of background noise or illumination variation. We apply our correspondence approximation method to motion analysis, and experimental results demonstrate its applicability.

  5. Flow Injection as a Teaching Tool for Gravimetric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartini, Raquel P.; Zagatto, Elias A. G.; Oliveira, Cláudio C.

    2000-06-01

    A flow-injection system to carry out gravimetric analysis is presented. Students are faced with an instrumental approach for gravimetric procedures. Crucibles, muffle furnaces, and desiccators are not required. A flowing suspension is established by simultaneously injecting an aqueous sample and a precipitating reagent into two merging carrier streams. The precipitate is accumulated on a minifilter hanging under the plate of an analytical balance and is weighed inside the main stream. Since Archimedes' principle holds, a drying step is not needed. After measurement, the precipitate is dissolved and disposed of. As an application, the determination of phosphate based on precipitation with ammonium and magnesium ions in slightly alkaline medium is chosen. The proposed system is very stable and well suited for demonstration. When applied to analysis of fertilizer extracts with 0.10-1.00% w/v P, it yields precise results (RSD < 0.042) in agreement with an official spectrophotometric method.

  6. Analysis of transonic flow about lifting wing-body configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical solution was obtained for the perturbation velocity potential for transonic flow about lifting wing-body configurations with order-one span-length ratios and small reduced-span-length ratios and equivalent-thickness-length ratios. The analysis is performed with the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The angles of attack which are considered are small but are large enough to insure that the effects of lift in the region far from the configuration are either dominant or comparable with the effects of thickness. The modification to the equivalence rule which accounts for these lift effects is determined. An analysis of transonic flow about lifting wings with large aspect ratios is also presented.

  7. Dual Solutions for Nonlinear Flow Using Lie Group Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Awais, Muhammad; Hayat, Tasawar; Irum, Sania; Saleem, Salman

    2015-01-01

    `The aim of this analysis is to investigate the existence of the dual solutions for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a porous shrinking wall. We have employed the Lie group analysis for the simplification of the nonlinear differential system and computed the absolute invariants explicitly. An efficient numerical technique namely the shooting method has been employed for the constructions of solutions. Dual solutions are computed for velocity profile of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid flow. Plots reflecting the impact of dual solutions for the variations of Deborah number, Hartman number, wall mass transfer are presented and analyzed. Streamlines are also plotted for the wall mass transfer effects when suction and blowing situations are considered. PMID:26575996

  8. A numerical analysis of the unsteady flow past bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, M. S. U. K.; Modi, V. J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes in detail a relatively sophisticated numerical approach, using the Boundary Element Method in conjunction with the Discrete Vortex Model, to represent the complex unsteady flow field around a bluff body with separating shear layers. Important steps in the numerical analysis of this challenging problem are discussed and a performance evaluation algorithm established. Of considerable importance is the effect of computational parameters such as number of elements representing the geometry, time-step size, location of the nascent vortices, etc., on the accuracy of results and the associated cost. As an example, the method is applied to the analysis of the flow around a stationary Savonius rotor. A detailed parametric study provides fundamental information concerning the starting torque time histories, evolution of the wake, Strouhal number, etc. A comparison with the wind tunnel test data shows remarkable correlation suggesting considerable promise for the approach.

  9. Analysis of some acoustics-jet flow interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical problems in the interactions between the mean-shear flows and the acoustic field in the planar and circular jets are examined. These problems are basic in understanding the effects of coherent large structure on the generation and complications of sound in a sub-sonic jet. Three problems were investigated: (1) spatial (vs. temporal) normal mode analysis in a planar jets; (2) a slightly divergent, planar jet; and (3) acoustic waves in an axisymmetrical jet.

  10. Digital Analysis and Sorting of Fluorescence Lifetime by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jessica P.; Naivar, Mark A.; Freyer, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal processing capabilities of the Open Reconfigurable Cytometric Acquisition System (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS’ digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5–25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 µs, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142° to 1.6°. The lowest coefficients of variation (<1%) were found for 10-MHz modulated waveforms having pulse widths of 6 µs and simulated lifetimes of 4 ns. Direct comparison of the digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a radiofrequency modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to ~98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to simply and inexpensively

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Chaotic Flow around Two-Dimensional Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi; Nielsen, Eric; Diskin, Boris

    2015-11-01

    Computational methods for sensitivity analysis are invaluable tools for fluid dynamics research and engineering design. These methods are used in many applications, including aerodynamic shape optimization and adaptive grid refinement. However, traditional sensitivity analysis methods, including the adjoint method, break down when applied to long-time averaged quantities in chaotic fluid flow fields, such as high-fidelity turbulence simulations. This break down is due to the ``Butterfly Effect'' the high sensitivity of chaotic dynamical systems to the initial condition. A new sensitivity analysis method developed by the authors, Least Squares Shadowing (LSS), can compute useful and accurate gradients for quantities of interest in chaotic dynamical systems. LSS computes gradients using the ``shadow trajectory'', a phase space trajectory (or solution) for which perturbations to the flow field do not grow exponentially in time. To efficiently compute many gradients for one objective function, we use an adjoint version of LSS. This talk will briefly outline Least Squares Shadowing and demonstrate it on chaotic flow around a Two-Dimensional airfoil.

  12. Analysis of Oxygen, Anaesthesia Agent and Flows in Anaesthesia Machine

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rakesh; Gupta, Ramesh Chand

    2013-01-01

    The technical advancement in the anaesthesia workstations has made the peri-operative anaesthesia more safer. Apart from other monitoring options, respiratory gas analysis has become an integral part of the modern anaesthesia workstations. Monitoring devices, such as an oxygen analyser with an audible alarm, carbon dioxide analyser, a vapour analyser, whenever a volatile anaesthetic is delivered have also been recommended by various anaesthesia societies. This review article discusses various techniques for analysis of flow, volumes and concentration of various anaesthetic agents including oxygen, nitrous oxide and volatile anaesthetic agents. PMID:24249881

  13. Probabilistic constrained load flow based on sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Karakatsanis, T.S.; Hatziargyriou, N.D. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents a method for network constrained setting of control variables based on probabilistic load flow analysis. The method determines operating constraint violations for a whole planning period together with the probability of each violation. An iterative algorithm is subsequently employed providing adjustments of the control variables based on sensitivity analysis of the constrained variables with respect to the control variables. The method is applied to the IEEE 14 busbar system and to a realistic model of the Hellenic Interconnected system indicating its suitability for short-term operational planning applications.

  14. Analysis for flow of Jeffrey fluid with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Asad, Sadia; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-04-01

    An analysis of the boundary layer flow and heat transfer in a Jeffrey fluid containing nanoparticles is presented in this paper. Here, fluid motion is due to a stretchable cylinder. The thermal conductivity of the fluid is taken to be temperature-dependent. The partial differential equations of velocity, temperature, and concentration fields are transformed to a dimensionless system of ordinary differential equations. Nonlinear governing analysis is computed for the homotopy solutions. The behaviors of Brownian motion and thermophoresis diffusion of nanoparticles have been examined graphically. Numerical values of the local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed.

  15. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  16. Multi-scale analysis for environmental dispersion in wetland flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zi; Li, Z.; Chen, G. Q.

    2011-08-01

    Presented in this work is a multi-scale analysis for longitudinal evolution of contaminant concentration in a fully developed flow through a shallow wetland channel. An environmental dispersion model for the mean concentration is devised as an extension of Taylor's classical formulation by a multi-scale analysis. Corresponding environmental dispersivity is found identical to that determined by the method of concentration moments. For typical contaminant constituents of chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, total nitrogen and heavy metal, the evolution of contaminant cloud is illustrated with the critical length and duration of the contaminant cloud with constituent concentration beyond some given environmental standard level.

  17. A guide to human in vivo microcirculatory flow image analysis.

    PubMed

    Massey, Michael J; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2016-01-01

    Various noninvasive microscopic camera technologies have been used to visualize the sublingual microcirculation in patients. We describe a comprehensive approach to bedside in vivo sublingual microcirculation video image capture and analysis techniques in the human clinical setting. We present a user perspective and guide suitable for clinical researchers and developers interested in the capture and analysis of sublingual microcirculatory flow videos. We review basic differences in the cameras, optics, light sources, operation, and digital image capture. We describe common techniques for image acquisition and discuss aspects of video data management, including data transfer, metadata, and database design and utilization to facilitate the image analysis pipeline. We outline image analysis techniques and reporting including video preprocessing and image quality evaluation. Finally, we propose a framework for future directions in the field of microcirculatory flow videomicroscopy acquisition and analysis. Although automated scoring systems have not been sufficiently robust for widespread clinical or research use to date, we discuss promising innovations that are driving new development. PMID:26861691

  18. Analysis of transient storage subject to unsteady flow: Diel flow variation in an Antarctic stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Andrews, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Transport of dissolved material in streams and small rivers may be characterized using tracer-dilution methods and solute transport models. Recent studies have quantified stream/substream interactions using models of transient storage. These studies are based on tracer-dilution data obtained during periods of steady flow. We present a modeling framework for the analysis of transient storage in stream systems with unsteady flows. The framework couples a kinematic wave routing model with a solute transport model that includes transient storage. The routing model provides time-varying flows and cross-sectional areas that are used as input to the solute transport model. The modeling framework was used to quantify stream/substream interaction in Huey Creek, an Antarctic stream fed exclusively by glacial meltwater. Analysis of tracer-dilution data indicates that there was substantial interaction between the flowing surface water and the hyporheic (substream) zone. The ratio of storage zone area to stream cross-sectional area (A(s)/A) was >1 in all stream reaches, indicating that the substream area contributing to hyporheic exchange was large relative to stream cross-sectional area. The rate of exchange, as governed by the transient storage exchange coefficient (??), was rapid because of a high stream gradient and porous alluvial materials. Estimates of ?? generally exceed those determined for other small streams. The high degree of hyporheic exchange supports the hypothesis that weathering reactions within the hyporheos account for observed increases in solute concentration with stream length, as noted in other studies of Antarctic streams.

  19. Analysis and performance of subsonic ejectors for pulsatile flow applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, J.G.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    This study looks at the application of ejectors to four-stroke engines. The goal is to develop a system of exhaust gas emission control by premixing exhaust gas with fresh atmospheric air. The constraints on the system include relatively low pressure pulsatile flow of the primary gas, geometric constraints (small size), significant density differences between the two fluid streams and possible large back-pressure operating conditions. A model is applied to the ejector application to pulsatile flow based on a global control volume analysis. The model constrains the operating conditions based on conservation of mass, momentum and energy for incompressible flow conditions. The time dependent effects are modeled by including a representative inertia term in the momentum equation based on quasi-steady conditions. The results are used to illustrate the operating characteristics for a small four-stroke engine application. The sensitivity of operation to the operating and design parameters of the system are illustrated. In particular, the effects of the pulsatile flow on the operation are shown to increase the performance under certain operating conditions. The model simulation is compared to some data available in the literature.

  20. Computational heat transfer analysis for oscillatory channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kannapareddy, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    An accurate finite-difference scheme has been utilized to investigate oscillatory, laminar and incompressible flow between two-parallel-plates and in circular tubes. The two-parallel-plates simulate the regenerator of a free-piston Stirling engine (foil type regenerator) and the channel wall was included in the analysis (conjugate heat transfer problem). The circular tubes simulate the cooler and heater of the engine with an isothermal wall. The study conducted covered a wide range for the maximum Reynolds number (from 75 to 60,000), Valensi number (from 2.5 to 700), and relative amplitude of fluid displacement (0.714 and 1.34). The computational results indicate a complex nature of the heat flux distribution with time and axial location in the channel. At the channel mid-plane we observed two thermal cycles (out of phase with the flow) per each flow cycle. At this axial location the wall heat flux mean value, amplitude and phase shift with the flow are dependent upon the maximum Reynolds number, Valensi number and relative amplitude of fluid displacement. At other axial locations, the wall heat flux distribution is more complex.

  1. Dynamic analysis of global copper flows. Global stocks, postconsumer material flows, recycling indicators, and uncertainty evaluation.

    PubMed

    Glöser, Simon; Soulier, Marcel; Tercero Espinoza, Luis A

    2013-06-18

    We present a dynamic model of global copper stocks and flows which allows a detailed analysis of recycling efficiencies, copper stocks in use, and dissipated and landfilled copper. The model is based on historical mining and refined copper production data (1910-2010) enhanced by a unique data set of recent global semifinished goods production and copper end-use sectors provided by the copper industry. To enable the consistency of the simulated copper life cycle in terms of a closed mass balance, particularly the matching of recycled metal flows to reported historical annual production data, a method was developed to estimate the yearly global collection rates of end-of-life (postconsumer) scrap. Based on this method, we provide estimates of 8 different recycling indicators over time. The main indicator for the efficiency of global copper recycling from end-of-life (EoL) scrap--the EoL recycling rate--was estimated to be 45% on average, ± 5% (one standard deviation) due to uncertainty and variability over time in the period 2000-2010. As uncertainties of specific input data--mainly concerning assumptions on end-use lifetimes and their distribution--are high, a sensitivity analysis with regard to the effect of uncertainties in the input data on the calculated recycling indicators was performed. The sensitivity analysis included a stochastic (Monte Carlo) uncertainty evaluation with 10(5) simulation runs. PMID:23725041

  2. Flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of nanoparticles used in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zattoni, Andrea; Roda, Barbara; Borghi, Francesco; Marassi, Valentina; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Structured nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled size distribution and novel physicochemical features present fundamental advantages as drug delivery systems with respect to bulk drugs. NPs can transport and release drugs to target sites with high efficiency and limited side effects. Regulatory institutions such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Commission have pointed out that major limitations to the real application of current nanotechnology lie in the lack of homogeneous, pure and well-characterized NPs, also because of the lack of well-assessed, robust routine methods for their quality control and characterization. Many properties of NPs are size-dependent, thus the particle size distribution (PSD) plays a fundamental role in determining the NP properties. At present, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) are among the most used techniques to size characterize NPs. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is also applied to the size separation of complex NP samples. SEC selectivity is, however, quite limited for very large molar mass analytes such as NPs, and interactions with the stationary phase can alter NP morphology. Flow field-flow fractionation (F4) is increasingly used as a mature separation method to size sort and characterize NPs in native conditions. Moreover, the hyphenation with light scattering (LS) methods can enhance the accuracy of size analysis of complex samples. In this paper, the applications of F4-LS to NP analysis used as drug delivery systems for their size analysis, and the study of stability and drug release effects are reviewed. PMID:24012480

  3. Computational analysis of an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Matherne, Gaynell Paul; Lim, David Scott; Peeler, Ben B; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    Longer-term (>2 weeks) mechanical circulatory support will provide an improved quality of life for thousands of pediatric cardiac failure patients per year in the United States. These pediatric patients suffer from severe congenital or acquired heart disease complicated by congestive heart failure. There are currently very few mechanical circulatory support systems available in the United States as viable options for this population. For that reason, we have designed an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device (PVAD) with an impeller that is fully suspended by magnetic bearings. As a geometrically similar, smaller scaled version of our axial flow pump for the adult population, the PVAD has a design point of 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg to meet the full physiologic needs of pediatric patients. Conventional axial pump design equations and a nondimensional scaling technique were used to estimate the PVAD's initial dimensions, which allowed for the creation of computational models for performance analysis. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the axial flow PVAD, which measures approximately 65 mm in length by 35 mm in diameter, shows that the pump will produce 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg for 8000 rpm. Fluid forces (approximately 1 N) were also determined for the suspension and motor design, and scalar stress values remained below 350 Pa with maximum particle residence times of approximately 0.08 milliseconds in the pump. This initial design demonstrated acceptable performance, thereby encouraging prototype manufacturing for experimental validation. PMID:15384993

  4. Adaptive computational methods for SSME internal flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Adaptive finite element methods for the analysis of classes of problems in compressible and incompressible flow of interest in SSME (space shuttle main engine) analysis and design are described. The general objective of the adaptive methods is to improve and to quantify the quality of numerical solutions to the governing partial differential equations of fluid dynamics in two-dimensional cases. There are several different families of adaptive schemes that can be used to improve the quality of solutions in complex flow simulations. Among these are: (1) r-methods (node-redistribution or moving mesh methods) in which a fixed number of nodal points is allowed to migrate to points in the mesh where high error is detected; (2) h-methods, in which the mesh size h is automatically refined to reduce local error; and (3) p-methods, in which the local degree p of the finite element approximation is increased to reduce local error. Two of the three basic techniques have been studied in this project: an r-method for steady Euler equations in two dimensions and a p-method for transient, laminar, viscous incompressible flow. Numerical results are presented. A brief introduction to residual methods of a-posterior error estimation is also given and some pertinent conclusions of the study are listed.

  5. New Methods for Sensitivity Analysis in Chaotic, Turbulent Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi

    2012-11-01

    Computational methods for sensitivity analysis are invaluable tools for fluid mechanics research and engineering design. These methods are used in many applications, including aerodynamic shape optimization and adaptive grid refinement. However, traditional sensitivity analysis methods break down when applied to long-time averaged quantities in chaotic fluid flowfields, such as those obtained using high-fidelity turbulence simulations. Also, a number of dynamical properties of chaotic fluid flows, most notably the ``Butterfly Effect,'' make the formulation of new sensitivity analysis methods difficult. This talk will outline two chaotic sensitivity analysis methods. The first method, the Fokker-Planck adjoint method, forms a probability density function on the strange attractor associated with the system and uses its adjoint to find gradients. The second method, the Least Squares Sensitivity method, finds some ``shadow trajectory'' in phase space for which perturbations do not grow exponentially. This method is formulated as a quadratic programing problem with linear constraints. This talk is concluded with demonstrations of these new methods on some example problems, including the Lorenz attractor and flow around an airfoil at a high angle of attack.

  6. Multimodal Pressure-Flow Analysis: Application of Hilbert Huang Transform in Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Men-Tzung; Hu, Kun; Liu, Yanhui; Peng, C.-K.; Novak, Vera

    2008-12-01

    Quantification of nonlinear interactions between two nonstationary signals presents a computational challenge in different research fields, especially for assessments of physiological systems. Traditional approaches that are based on theories of stationary signals cannot resolve nonstationarity-related issues and, thus, cannot reliably assess nonlinear interactions in physiological systems. In this review we discuss a new technique called multimodal pressure flow (MMPF) method that utilizes Hilbert-Huang transformation to quantify interaction between nonstationary cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV) and blood pressure (BP) for the assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA). CA is an important mechanism responsible for controlling cerebral blood flow in responses to fluctuations in systemic BP within a few heart-beats. The MMPF analysis decomposes BP and BFV signals into multiple empirical modes adaptively so that the fluctuations caused by a specific physiologic process can be represented in a corresponding empirical mode. Using this technique, we showed that dynamic CA can be characterized by specific phase delays between the decomposed BP and BFV oscillations, and that the phase shifts are significantly reduced in hypertensive, diabetics and stroke subjects with impaired CA. Additionally, the new technique can reliably assess CA using both induced BP/BFV oscillations during clinical tests and spontaneous BP/BFV fluctuations during resting conditions.

  7. Loop flow analysis of dissolved reactive phosphorus in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Li, Quanlong; Yuan, Dongxing

    2014-06-01

    The current flow based method for the determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) suffers interference from salinity (e.g. index refractive difference) and the incidentally formed bubbles, which can be a problem for optical detection. Here we reported a simple and robust loop flow analysis (LFA) method for accurate measurement of DRP in different aqueous samples. The chemistry is based on the classic phosphomolybdenum blue (PMB) reaction and the PMB formed in a novel cross-shaped flow cell was detected at 700 nm using a miniature spectrophotometer. The effects of reagents on the kinetic formation of PMB were evaluated. The detection limit was 32 nM with an optical pathlength of 1cm and the relative standard deviations for repetitive determinations of 1, 2 and 8 µM phosphate solutions were 1.8% (n=113, without any stoppage during repeating analysis for >7h), 1.0% (n=49) and 0.39% (n=9), respectively. The analysis time was 4 min sample(-1). The effects of salinity and interfering ions (silicate and arsenate) were evaluated and showed no interference under the proposed protocol for DRP analysis. Using the LFA method, different aqueous samples with a salinity range of 0-34 were analyzed and the results showed excellent agreement with the reference method (slope 0.9982±0.0063, R(2)=0.9987, n=34). Recoveries for spiked samples varied from 95.4% to 103.7%. The proposed method showed insignificant interference from salinity, silicate and arsenate, higher reproducibility, easier operation and was free of the bubble problem. PMID:24725885

  8. Lagrangian analysis of contaminant dispersal in bounded turbulent shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, P.S.; Wallace, J.M.; Balint, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS) of passive scalar contaminant disperal in bounded shear flows have been carried out. Several modifications to the laboratory windtunnel have been carried out which will make possible laser sheet flow visualization along the whole length of the 8m test section. Backward particle paths needed to perform a Lagrangian analysis of scalar transport are in the process of being computed for each of the numerical data sets previously described. A light sheet system is being implemented which is capable of visualizing a 30cm X 30cm X 5cm portion of the wall layer in order to extract quantitative information about the structure of the scalar plumes.

  9. Flow injection analysis with amperometric detection of naltrexone in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Abedul, M T; Costa-García, A

    1997-09-01

    Flow injection analysis (FIA) with amperometric detection using a carbon paste electrode is applied to the determination of naltrexone. The sample solution was injected into the carrier stream of 0.1 M perchloric acid, being determined by oxidation at +1.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl/sat. KCl using a flow rate of 4 ml min-1. A relative standard deviation of 1.5% was calculated for a concentration level of 10(-5) M (n = 17) without carrying out a carbon paste electrode pretreatment. Calibration curves were found to be linear between 2 x 10(-8) and 10(-5) M (almost three orders of magnitude) and the method has a detection limit of 2 x 10(-8) M. A simple and reproducible procedure is proposed for the determination of naltrexone in pharmaceuticals. The results compared favourably with those obtained by an HPLC-UV method. PMID:9447547

  10. Detection of Abnormal Events via Optical Flow Feature Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Snoussi, Hichem

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed to detect abnormal events in video streams. The algorithm is based on the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor and the classification method. The details of the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor are illustrated for describing movement information of the global video frame or foreground frame. By combining one-class support vector machine and kernel principal component analysis methods, the abnormal events in the current frame can be detected after a learning period characterizing normal behaviors. The difference abnormal detection results are analyzed and explained. The proposed detection method is tested on benchmark datasets, then the experimental results show the effectiveness of the algorithm. PMID:25811227

  11. Analysis and control of supersonic vortex breakdown flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis and computation of steady, compressible, quasi-axisymmetric flow of an isolated, slender vortex are considered. The compressible, Navier-Stokes equations are reduced to a simpler set by using the slenderness and quasi-axisymmetry assumptions. The resulting set along with a compatibility equation are transformed from the diverging physical domain to a rectangular computational domain. Solving for a compatible set of initial profiles and specifying a compatible set of boundary conditions, the equations are solved using a type-differencing scheme. Vortex breakdown locations are detected by the failure of the scheme to converge. Computational examples include isolated vortex flows at different Mach numbers, external axial-pressure gradients and swirl ratios.

  12. Computational analysis of the SSME fuel preburner flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model which simulates the steady state operation of the SSME fuel preburner is developed. Specifically, the model will be used to quantify the flow factors which cause local hot spots in the fuel preburner in order to recommend experiments whereby the control of undesirable flow features can be demonstrated. The results of a two year effort to model the preburner are presented. In this effort, investigating the fuel preburner flowfield, the appropriate transport equations were numerically solved for both an axisymmetric and a three-dimensional configuration. Continuum's VAST (Variational Solution of the Transport equations) code, in conjunction with the CM-1000 Engineering Analysis Workstation and the NASA/Ames CYBER 205, was used to perform the required calculations. It is concluded that the preburner operational anomalies are not due to steady state phenomena and must, therefore, be related to transient operational procedures.

  13. Analysis of a cryolava flow-like feature on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Le, Corre L.; Le, Mouelic S.; Sotin, C.; Combe, J.-P.; Rodriguez, S.; Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Jaumann, R.; Soderblom, J.; Soderblom, L.A.; Clark, R.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the analysis of the highest spatial resolution hyperspectral images acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft during its prime mission. A bright area matches a flow-like feature coming out of a caldera-like feature observed in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data recorded by the Cassini radar experiment [Lopes et al., 2007. Cryovolcanic features on Titan's surface as revealed by the Cassini Titan Radar Mapper. Icarus 186, 395-412, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.09.006]. In this SAR image, the flow extends about 160 km east of the caldera. The contrast in brightness between the flow and the surroundings progressively vanishes, suggesting alteration or evolution of the composition of the cryolava during the lifetime of the eruptions. Dunes seem to cover part of this flow on its eastern end. We analyze the different terrains using the Spectral Mixing Analysis (SMA) approach of the Multiple-Endmember Linear Unmixing Model (MELSUM, Combe et al., 2008). The study area can be fully modeled by using only two types of terrains. Then, the VIMS spectra are compared with laboratory spectra of known materials in the relevant atmospheric windows (from 1 to 2.78 ??m). We considered simple molecules that could be produced during cryovolcanic events, including H2O, CO2 (using two different grain sizes), CH4 and NH3. We find that the mean spectrum of the cryoflow-like feature is not consistent with pure water ice. It can be best fitted by linear combinations of spectra of the candidate materials, showing that its composition is compatible with a mixture of H2O, CH4 and CO2.. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Numerical analysis of flow through oscillating cascade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1989-01-01

    The design of turbomachinery blades requires the prevention of flutter for all operating conditions. However, flow field predictions used for aeroelastic analysis are not well understood for all flow regimes. The present research focuses on numerical solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations using an ADI procedure to model two-dimensional, transonic flow through oscillating cascades. The model prescribes harmonic pitching motions for the blade sections for both zero and non-zero inter-blade phase angles. The code introduces the use of a deforming grid technique for convenient specification of the periodic boundary conditions. Approximate nonreflecting boundary conditions have been coded for the inlet and exit boundary conditions. Sample unsteady solutions have been performed for an oscillating cascade and compared to experimental data. Also, test cases were fun for a flat plate cascade to compare with an unsteady, small-perturbation, subsonic analysis. The predictions for oscillating cascades with non-zero inter-blade phase angles are in good agreement with experimental data and small-perturbation theory. The zero degree inter-blade phase angle cases, which were near a resonant condition, differ from the experiment and theory. Studies on reflecting versus non-reflecting inlet and exit boundary conditions show that the treatment of the boundary can have a significant effect on the first harmonic, unsteady pressure distributions for certain flow conditions. This code is expected to be used as a tool for reviewing simpler models that do not include the full nonlinear aerodynamics or as a final check for designs against flutter in turbomachinery.

  15. Theoretical analysis of magnetic field interactions with aortic blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kinouchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1996-04-01

    The flow of blood in the presence of a magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the major arteries of the central circulatory system. Under certain simplifying conditions, such as the assumption that the length of major arteries (e.g., the aorta) is infinite and that the vessel walls are not electrically conductive, the distribution of induced voltages and currents within these blood vessels can be calculated with reasonable precision. However, the propagation of magnetically induced voltages and currents from the aorta into neighboring tissue structures such as the sinuatrial node of the heart has not been previously determined by any experimental or theoretical technique. In the analysis presented in this paper, a solution of the complete Navier-Stokes equation was obtained by the finite element technique for blood flow through the ascending and descending aortic vessels in the presence of a uniform static magnetic field. Spatial distributions of the magnetically induced voltage and current were obtained for the aortic vessel and surrounding tissues under the assumption that the wall of the aorta is electrically conductive. Results are presented for the calculated values of magnetically induced voltages and current densities in the aorta and surrounding tissue structures, including the sinuatrial node, and for their field-strength dependence. In addition, an analysis is presented of magnetohydrodynamic interactions that lead to a small reduction of blood volume flow at high field levels above approximately 10 tesla (T). Quantitative results are presented on the offsetting effects of oppositely directed blood flows in the ascending and descending aortic segments, and a quantitative estimate is made of the effects of assuming an infinite vs. a finite length of the aortic vessel in calculating the magnetically induced voltage and current density distribution in tissue.

  16. Bootstrap position analysis for forecasting low flow frequency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tasker, Gary D.; Dunne, P.

    1997-01-01

    A method of random resampling of residuals from stochastic models is used to generate a large number of 12-month-long traces of natural monthly runoff to be used in a position analysis model for a water-supply storage and delivery system. Position analysis uses the traces to forecast the likelihood of specified outcomes such as reservoir levels falling below a specified level or streamflows falling below statutory passing flows conditioned on the current reservoir levels and streamflows. The advantages of this resampling scheme, called bootstrap position analysis, are that it does not rely on the unverifiable assumption of normality, fewer parameters need to be estimated directly from the data, and accounting for parameter uncertainty is easily done. For a given set of operating rules and water-use requirements for a system, water managers can use such a model as a decision-making tool to evaluate different operating rules. ?? ASCE,.

  17. Flow-cytometry-based DNA hybidization and polymorphism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Kommander, Kristina; White, P. S.; Nolan, John P.

    1998-05-01

    Functional analysis of the human genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well- suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. We are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. Our approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advantages of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  18. Energy-decomposition analysis for viscous free-surface flows.

    PubMed

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Bouscasse, Benjamin; Marrone, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    This work is dedicated to the energy decomposition analysis of a viscous free-surface flow. In the presence of a free surface, the viscous dissipation for a Newtonian liquid can be decomposed into two terms: an enstrophy component and a free-surface deformation component. The latter requires the evaluation of volume and surface integrals in the meshless framework. The analysis is based on the weakly compressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics formalism. The behavior of the energy terms is studied in standing wave problems by changing the viscosity and the wave amplitude. Finally, an analysis of a complex shallow water breaking wave case is provided. It is shown that in presence of intense breaking phenomena the two energy components are always comparable, whereas generally the free surface component is dominant on the viscous dissipation of gravity waves. PMID:26651775

  19. Navier-Stokes flow field analysis of compressible flow in a high pressure safety relief valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Wang, Ten-See; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the complex three-dimensional flowfield of an oxygen safety pressure relieve valve during an incident, with a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis. Specifically, the analysis will provide a flow pattern that would lead to the expansion of the eventual erosion pattern of the hardware, so as to combine it with other findings to piece together a most likely scenario for the investigation. The CFD model is a pressure based solver. An adaptive upwind difference scheme is employed for the spatial discretization, and a predictor, multiple corrector method is used for the velocity-pressure coupling. The computational result indicated vortices formation near the opening of the valve which matched the erosion pattern of the damaged hardware.

  20. Gravity flow of powder in a lunar environment. Part 2: Analysis of flow initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pariseau, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    A small displacement-small strain finite element technique utilizing the constant strain triangle and incremental constitutive equations for elasticplastic (media nonhardening and obeying a Coulomb yield condition) was applied to the analysis of gravity flow initiation. This was done in a V-shaped hopper containing a powder under lunar environmental conditions. Three methods of loading were examined. Of the three, the method of computing the initial state of stress in a filled hopper prior to drawdown, by adding material to the hopper layer by layer, was the best. Results of the analysis of a typical hopper problem show that the initial state of stress, the elastic moduli, and the strength parameters have an important influence on material response subsequent to the opening of the hopper outlet.

  1. Navier-Stokes flow field analysis of compressible flow in a high pressure safety relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Bruce; Wang, Ten-See; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the complex three-dimensional flowfield of an oxygen safety pressure relieve valve during an incident, with a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis. Specifically, the analysis will provide a flow pattern that would lead to the expansion of the eventual erosion pattern of the hardware, so as to combine it with other findings to piece together a most likely scenario for the investigation. The CFD model is a pressure based solver. An adaptive upwind difference scheme is employed for the spatial discretization, and a predictor, multiple corrector method is used for the velocity-pressure coupling. The computational result indicated vortices formation near the opening of the valve which matched the erosion pattern of the damaged hardware.

  2. Global Qualitative Flow-Path Modeling for Local State Determination in Simulation and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T. (Inventor); Fleming, Land D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    For qualitative modeling and analysis, a general qualitative abstraction of power transmission variables (flow and effort) for elements of flow paths includes information on resistance, net flow, permissible directions of flow, and qualitative potential is discussed. Each type of component model has flow-related variables and an associated internal flow map, connected into an overall flow network of the system. For storage devices, the implicit power transfer to the environment is represented by "virtual" circuits that include an environmental junction. A heterogeneous aggregation method simplifies the path structure. A method determines global flow-path changes during dynamic simulation and analysis, and identifies corresponding local flow state changes that are effects of global configuration changes. Flow-path determination is triggered by any change in a flow-related device variable in a simulation or analysis. Components (path elements) that may be affected are identified, and flow-related attributes favoring flow in the two possible directions are collected for each of them. Next, flow-related attributes are determined for each affected path element, based on possibly conflicting indications of flow direction. Spurious qualitative ambiguities are minimized by using relative magnitudes and permissible directions of flow, and by favoring flow sources over effort sources when comparing flow tendencies. The results are output to local flow states of affected components.

  3. Comparative analysis of volumetric flow meters used for mass flow estimation in multiphase and multidensity environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, Richard; Korman, Valentin; Wiley, John T.

    2006-05-01

    Accurate and reliable multiphase flow measurements are needed for liquid propulsion systems. Existing volumetric flow meters are adequate for flow measurements with well-characterized, clean liquids and gases. However, these technologies are inadequate for multiphase environments, such as cryogenic fluids. Although, properly calibrated turbine flow meters can provide highly accurate and repeatable data, problems are still prevalent with multiphase flows. Limitations are thus placed on the applicability of intrusive turbine flow meters.

  4. Performance analysis of program execution on data flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, S.F.; Oldehoeft, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    A Petri Net model and graph analysis technique is presented for program execution on data flow systems. The model encompasses static systems in which recurrent computations reuse the same copy of a program node and dynamic systems in which reuse of a node results in the creation of a new copy. Program execution time, assuming sufficient resources, is analysed by use of the theory of state machine decomposable petri nets and an approximation technique based on graph reduction. Numerical simulation results are presented for validation of the model for static systems. 14 references.

  5. Digital analysis and sorting of fluorescence lifetime by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jessica P; Naivar, Mark A; Freyer, James P

    2010-09-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal-processing capabilities of the open reconfigurable cytometric acquisition system (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency (RF)-modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS' digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5-25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 micros, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142 degrees to 1.6 degrees. The lowest coefficients of variation (<1%) were found for 10-MHz modulated waveforms having pulse widths of 6 micros and simulated lifetimes of 4 ns. Direct comparison of the digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells, and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a RF-modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to approximately 98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to

  6. An analysis method for two-dimensional transonic viscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavitz, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    A method for the approximate calculation of transonic flow over airfoils, including shock waves and viscous effects, is described. Numerical solutions are obtained by use of a computer program which is discussed in the appendix. The importance of including the boundary layer in the analysis is clearly demonstrated, as well as the need to improve on existing procedures near the trailing edge. Comparisons between calculations and experimental data are presented for both conventional and supercritical airfoils, emphasis being on the surface pressure distribution, and good agreement is indicated.

  7. Microscopic analysis of Hopper flow with ellipsoidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sida; Zhou, Zongyan; Zou, Ruiping; Pinson, David; Yu, Aibing

    2013-06-01

    Hoppers are widely used in process industries. With such widespread application, difficulties in achieving desired operational behaviors have led to extensive experimental and mathematical studies in the past decades. Particularly, the discrete element method has become one of the most important simulation tools for design and analysis. So far, most studies are on spherical particles for computational convenience. In this work, ellipsoidal particles are used as they can represent a large variation of particle shapes. Hopper flow with ellipsoidal particles is presented highlighting the effect of particle shape on the microscopic properties.

  8. One-dimensional analysis of choked-flow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Robert E; Cavicchi, Richard H

    1953-01-01

    Turbines for most applications requiring high work output per stage have one or more blade rows which are choked. This analysis indicated that the area ratios and equivalent blade speed are the controlling factors in the design and operation of such turbines. Six criteria are stated that will aid in establishing from test data of multistage turbines which blade rows are choked and which are not. The variation in internal flow conditions with operating conditions for a turbine equipped with an adjustable stator is determined for one application of stator adjustment.

  9. Finite element methodology for integrated flow-thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Vemaganti, G. R.

    1988-01-01

    Papers entitled, An Adaptive Finite Element Procedure for Compressible Flows and Strong Viscous-Inviscid Interactions, and An Adaptive Remeshing Method for Finite Element Thermal Analysis, were presented at the June 27 to 29, 1988, meeting of the AIAA Thermophysics, Plasma Dynamics and Lasers Conference, San Antonio, Texas. The papers describe research work supported under NASA/Langley Research Grant NsG-1321, and are submitted in fulfillment of the progress report requirement on the grant for the period ending February 29, 1988.

  10. Wing analysis using a transonic potential flow computational method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henne, P. A.; Hicks, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The ability of the method to compute wing transonic performance was determined by comparing computed results with both experimental data and results computed by other theoretical procedures. Both pressure distributions and aerodynamic forces were evaluated. Comparisons indicated that the method is a significant improvement in transonic wing analysis capability. In particular, the computational method generally calculated the correct development of three-dimensional pressure distributions from subcritical to transonic conditions. Complicated, multiple shocked flows observed experimentally were reproduced computationally. The ability to identify the effects of design modifications was demonstrated both in terms of pressure distributions and shock drag characteristics.

  11. Flow Cytometry Analysis of Thymic Epithelial Cells and Their Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ohigashi, Izumi; Takahama, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    The parenchyma of the thymus is compartmentalized into the cortex and the medulla, which are constructed by cortical thymic epithelial cells (cortical TECs, cTECs) and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), respectively. cTECs and mTECs essentially and differentially regulate the development and repertoire selection of T cells. Consequently, the biology of T cell development and selection includes the study of TECs in addition to the study of developing T cells and other hematopoietic cells including dendritic cells. In this chapter, we describe the methods for flow cytometric analysis and sorting of TECs and their subpopulations, including cTECs and mTECs. PMID:26294398

  12. Analysis of electric current flow through the HTc multilayered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowski, J.

    2016-02-01

    Issue of the flow of the transport current through multilayered high-temperature superconductors is considered, depending on the direction of the electric current towards the surface of the superconducting CuO2 layers. For configuration of the current flow inside of the layers and for perpendicular magnetic field, it will be considered the current limitations connected with interaction of pancake type vortices with nano-sized defects, created among other during fast neutrons irradiation. So it makes this issue associated with work of nuclear energy devices, like tokamak ITER, LHC and actually developed accelerator Nuclotron-NICA, as well as cryocables. Phenomenological analysis of the pinning potential barrier formation will be in the paper given, which determines critical current flow inside the plane. Comparison of theoretical model with experimental data will be presented too as well as influence of fast neutrons irradiation dose on critical current calculated. For current direction perpendicular to superconducting planes the current-voltage characteristics are calculated basing on model assuming formation of long intrinsic Josephson's junctions in layered HTc superconductors.

  13. Accurate analysis of multicomponent fuel spray evaporation in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Bastian; Calabria, Raffaela; Chiariello, Fabio; Le Clercq, Patrick; Massoli, Patrizio; Rachner, Michael

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to perform an accurate analysis of the evaporation of single component and binary mixture fuels sprays in a hot weakly turbulent pipe flow by means of experimental measurement and numerical simulation. This gives a deeper insight into the relationship between fuel composition and spray evaporation. The turbulence intensity in the test section is equal to 10%, and the integral length scale is three orders of magnitude larger than the droplet size while the turbulence microscale (Kolmogorov scales) is of same order as the droplet diameter. The spray produced by means of a calibrated droplet generator was injected in a gas flow electrically preheated. N-nonane, isopropanol, and their mixtures were used in the tests. The generalized scattering imaging technique was applied to simultaneously determine size, velocity, and spatial location of the droplets carried by the turbulent flow in the quartz tube. The spray evaporation was computed using a Lagrangian particle solver coupled to a gas-phase solver. Computations of spray mean diameter and droplet size distributions at different locations along the pipe compare very favorably with the measurement results. This combined research tool enabled further investigation concerning the influencing parameters upon the evaporation process such as the turbulence, droplet internal mixing, and liquid-phase thermophysical properties.

  14. Anthropogenic phosphorus flow analysis of Hefei City, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Sisi; Yuan, Zengwei; Bi, Jun; Wu, Huijun

    2010-11-01

    The substance flow analysis (SFA) method was employed to examine phosphorus flow and its connection to water pollution in the city of Hefei, China, in 2008. As human activity is the driving force of phosphorus flux from the environment to the economy, the study provides a conceptual framework for analyzing an anthropogenic phosphorus cycle that includes four stages: extraction, fabrication and manufacturing, use, and waste management. Estimates of phosphorus flow were based on existing data as well as field research, expert advice, local accounting systems, and literature. The total phosphorus input into Hefei in 2008 reached 7810 tons, mainly as phosphate ore, chemical fertilizer, pesticides, crops and animal products. Approximately 33% of the total phosphorus input left the area, and nearly 20% of that amount was discharged as waste to surface water. Effluent containing excessive fertilizer from farming operations plays an important role in phosphorus overloads onto surface water; the other major emission source is sewage discharge. We also provide suggestions for reducing phosphorus emissions, for example reducing fertilizer use, recycling farming residues, and changing human consumption patterns. PMID:20863550

  15. Nonclassical Symmetry Analysis of Heated Two-Dimensional Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Imran; Naz, Rehana; Khan, Muhammad Danish

    2015-12-01

    This article analyses the nonclassical symmetries and group invariant solution of boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flows. First, we derive the nonclassical symmetry determining equations with the aid of the computer package SADE. We solve these equations directly to obtain nonclassical symmetries. We follow standard procedure of computing nonclassical symmetries and consider two different scenarios, ξ1≠0 and ξ1=0, ξ2≠0. Several nonclassical symmetries are reported for both scenarios. Furthermore, numerous group invariant solutions for nonclassical symmetries are derived. The similarity variables associated with each nonclassical symmetry are computed. The similarity variables reduce the system of partial differential equations (PDEs) to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in terms of similarity variables. The reduced system of ODEs are solved to obtain group invariant solution for governing boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flow problems. We successfully formulate a physical problem of heat transfer analysis for fluid flow over a linearly stretching porous plat and, with suitable boundary conditions, we solve this problem.

  16. Analysis of turbulent cavitating flow in a micro channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerer, Christian; Hickel, Stefan; Schmidt, Steffen; Adams, Nikolaus

    2013-11-01

    Associated with the collapse of vapor cavities is the formation of shock waves and liquid micro-jets, which can lead to the damage of material (cavitation erosion) or even failure of engineering devices, e.g. fuel injectors. We performed Large-Eddy Simulations of the turbulent cavitating flow through a micro channel, resembling a throttle valve commonly found in fuel injectors, at two different operating points with the aim of indentifying such erosion sensitive areas. The underlying numerical method of our flow solver INCA solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on a Cartesian adaptive grid for a homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapor in order to account for all relevent physical effects, i.e., compressibility of the liquid-vapor mixture as well as transitional flow and turbulence. The effect of non-represented scales on the represented ones is accounted for by the Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method, a non-linear finite volume scheme for the convective fluxes. We will present a comparison of numerical results with experiments as well as a detailed analysis of the interplay between vortical and cavitation structures. Furthermore, tools enabling the automatic detection of erosion sensitive areas will be discussed and applied.

  17. Gust response analysis for cascades operating in nonuniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Verdon, Joseph M.

    1991-01-01

    The linearized unsteady aerodynamic response of a cascade of airfoils subjected to entropic, vortical, and acoustic gusts is analyzed. Field equations for the first-order unsteady perturbation flow are obtained by linearizing the full time-dependent mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations about a nonlinear, isentropic, and irrotational mean or steady flow. A splitting technique is then used to decompose the unsteady velocity field into irrotational and rotational parts leading to field equations for the unsteady entropy, rotational velocity, and irrotational velocity fluctuations that are coupled only sequentially. The entropic and rotational velocity fluctuations can be described in terms of the mean-flow drift and stream functions which can be computed numerically. The irrotational unsteady velocity is described by an inhomogeneous linearized potential equation which contains a source term that depends on the rotational velocity field. This equation is solved via a finite difference technique. Results are presented to indicate the status of the numerical solution procedure and to demonstrate the impact of blade geometry and mean blade loading on the aerodynamic response of cascades to vortical gust excitations. The analysis described leads to very efficient predictions of cascade unsteady aerodynamics phenomena making it useful for turbomachinery aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design applications.

  18. Gust response analysis for cascades operating in nonuniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Verdon, Joseph M.

    1990-01-01

    The linearized unsteady aerodynamic response of a cascade of airfoils subjected to entropic, vortical, and acoustic gusts is analyzed. Field equations for the first-order unsteady perturbation flow are obtained by linearizing the full time-dependent mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations about a nonlinear, isentropic, and irrotational mean or steady flow. A splitting technique is then used to decompose the unsteady velocity field into irrotational and rotational parts leading to field equations for the unsteady entropy, rotational velocity, and irrotational velocity fluctuations that are coupled only sequentially. The entropic and rotational velocity fluctuations can be described in terms of the mean-flow drift and stream functions which can be computed numerically. The irrotational unsteady velocity is described by an inhomogeneous linearized potential equation which contains a source term that depends on the rotational velocity field. This equation is solved via a finite difference technique. Results are presented to indicate the status of the numerical solution procedure and to demonstrate the impact of blade geometry and mean blade loading on the aerodynamic response of cascades to vortical gust excitations. The analysis described leads to very efficient predictions of cascade unsteady aerodynamic phenomena making it useful for turbomachinery aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design applications.

  19. Flow cytometric analysis of circulating microparticles in plasma.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Aaron F; Lewis, Dorothy E

    2010-06-01

    Microparticles, which include exosomes, micro-vesicles, apoptotic bodies and apoptotic microparticles, are small (0.05 - 3 mum in diameter), membranous vesicles that can contain DNA, RNA, miRNA, intracellular proteins and express extracellular surface markers from the parental cells. They can be secreted from intracellular multivesicular bodies or released from the surface of blebbing membranes. Circulating microparticles are abundant in the plasma of normal individuals and can be derived from circulating blood cells such as platelets, red blood cells and leukocytes as well as from tissue sources, such as endothelial and placental tissues. Elevated levels of microparticles are associated with various diseases such as thrombosis (platelet microparticles), congestive heart failure (endothelial microparticles), breast cancer patients (leukocyte microparticles) and women with preeclampsia (syncytiotrophoblast microparticles). Although microparticles can be detected by microscopy, enzyme-linked immunoassays and functional assays, flow cytometry is the preferred method because of the ability to quantitate (fluorescent bead- or flow rate-based method) and because of polychromatic capabilities. However, standardization of pre-analytical and analytical modus operandi for isolating, enumerating and fluorescent labeling of microparticles remains a challenge. The primary focus of this article is to review the preliminary steps required to optimally study circulating in vivo microparticles which include: 1) centrifugation speed used, 2) quantitation of microparticles before antibody labeling, 3) levels of fluorescence intensity of antibody-labeled microparticles, 4) polychromatic flow cytometric analysis of microparticle sub-populations and 5) use of polyclonal antibodies designed for Western blotting for flow cytometry. These studies determine a roadmap to develop microparticles as biomarkers for a variety of conditions. PMID:20235276

  20. Analysis of the Hessian for Aerodynamic Optimization: Inviscid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Ta'asan, Shlomo

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we analyze inviscid aerodynamic shape optimization problems governed by the full potential and the Euler equations in two and three dimensions. The analysis indicates that minimization of pressure dependent cost functions results in Hessians whose eigenvalue distributions are identical for the full potential and the Euler equations. However the optimization problems in two and three dimensions are inherently different. While the two dimensional optimization problems are well-posed the three dimensional ones are ill-posed. Oscillations in the shape up to the smallest scale allowed by the design space can develop in the direction perpendicular to the flow, implying that a regularization is required. A natural choice of such a regularization is derived. The analysis also gives an estimate of the Hessian's condition number which implies that the problems at hand are ill-conditioned. Infinite dimensional approximations for the Hessians are constructed and preconditioners for gradient based methods are derived from these approximate Hessians.

  1. Value flow mapping: Using networks to inform stakeholder analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Bruce G.; Crawley, Edward F.; Loureiro, Geilson; Rebentisch, Eric S.

    2008-02-01

    Stakeholder theory has garnered significant interest from the corporate community, but has proved difficult to apply to large government programs. A detailed value flow exercise was conducted to identify the value delivery mechanisms among stakeholders for the current Vision for Space Exploration. We propose a method for capturing stakeholder needs that explicitly recognizes the outcomes required of the value creating organization. The captured stakeholder needs are then translated into input-output models for each stakeholder, which are then aggregated into a network model. Analysis of this network suggests that benefits are infrequently linked to the root provider of value. Furthermore, it is noted that requirements should not only be written to influence the organization's outputs, but also to influence the propagation of benefit further along the value chain. A number of future applications of this model to systems architecture and requirement analysis are discussed.

  2. Portable real time analysis system for regional cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, T.; Entine, G.; Stump, D.A.; Prough, D.S.

    1988-02-01

    A very portable, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) analysis instrument system suitable for use in the operating theater during surgery is under development. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) solid state radiation detectors, an 8086 based data acquisition and communications module and a DEC Microvax computer are used so that the instrument is very compact, yet has the computational power to provide real time data analysis in the clinical environment. The instrument is currently being used at Bowman Gray School of Medicine to study rCBF during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB). Preliminary studies indicate that monitoring rCBF during this surgical procedure may provide insights into the mechanism that causes a significant fraction of these patients to suffer post operative neuropsychological deficit.

  3. Fluid Flow Simulation and Energetic Analysis of Anomalocarididae Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2014-11-01

    While an abundance of animal locomotion simulations have been performed modeling the motions of living arthropods and aquatic animals, little quantitative simulation and reconstruction of gait parameters has been done to model the locomotion of extinct animals, many of which bear little physical resemblance to their modern descendants. To that end, this project seeks to analyze potential swimming patterns used by the anomalocaridid family, (specifically Anomalocaris canadensis, a Cambrian Era aquatic predator), and determine the most probable modes of movement. This will serve to either verify or cast into question the current assumed movement patterns and properties of these animals and create a bridge between similar flexible-bodied swimmers and their robotic counterparts. This will be accomplished by particle-based fluid flow simulations of the flow around the fins of the animal, as well as an energy analysis of a variety of sample gaits. The energy analysis will then be compared to the extant information regarding speed/energy use curves in an attempt to determine which modes of swimming were most energy efficient for a given range of speeds. These results will provide a better understanding of how these long-extinct animals moved, possibly allowing an improved understanding of their behavioral patterns, and may also lead to a novel potential platform for bio-inspired underwater autonomous vehicles (UAVs).

  4. ASRM Multi-Port Igniter Flow Field Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kania, Lee; Dumas, Catherine; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program was initiated by NASA in response to the need for a new generation rocket motor capable of providing increased thrust levels over the existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) and thus augment the lifting capacity of the space shuttle orbiter. To achieve these higher thrust levels and improve motor reliability, advanced motor design concepts were employed. In the head end of the motor, for instance, the propellent cast has been changed from the conventional annular configuration to a 'multi-slot' configuration in order to increase the burn surface area and guarantee rapid motor ignition. In addition, the igniter itself has been redesigned and currently features 12 exhaust ports in order to channel hot igniter combustion gases into the circumferential propellent slots. Due to the close proximity of the igniter ports to the propellent surfaces, new concerns over possible propellent deformation and erosive burning have arisen. The following documents the effort undertaken using computational fluid dynamics to perform a flow field analysis in the top end of the ASRM motor to determine flow field properties necessary to permit a subsequent propellent fin deformation analysis due to pressure loading and an assessment of the extent of erosive burning.

  5. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  6. Flow cytometric life cycle analysis in cellular radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches to flow cytometric histogram analysis were developed: (1) differential histogram analysis, (2) DNA histogram analysis, and (3) multiparameter data analysis. These techniques were applied to an important unresolved problem in radiation biology. The initial responses to irradiation of a mammalian cell which occur during the first two cell cycles following the irradiation are of considerable interest to the radiation biologist. During the first two post-irradiation cell cycles, cells which ultimately will survive repair radiation-induced damage, while some cells begin to express some of the radiation-induced nuclear and chomatin damage. Caffeine- and thymidine-treated, and untreated gamma-irradiated cell populations were studied with respect to the radiation-induced G2 delay, deficient DNA synthesis, and the appearance of cells with abnormal DNA contents. It is hypothesized that the measured deficiency in DNA synthesis observed in the first post-irradiation cell cycle may be a result of daughter cells from abnormal first post-irradiation mitoses.

  7. Center-to-center analysis of flow lineation and flow direction in Eocene welded ignimbrites, Twin Peaks, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, H.J. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Ignimbrites of the Eocene Twin Peaks caldera (Hardyman, 1982) in central Idaho's Challis Volcanic Field comprise both caldera-fill and outflow facies. The vents and mode of emplacement of these ignimbrites are problematic, because the Twin Peaks caldera has been strongly structurally disrupted, and lineations are sparse in the ignimbrites. Six oriented samples from three separate cooling units were studied using the Fry center-to-center method (Seaman and Williams, 1992) in order to determine flow lineation and flow direction of the ignimbrites inside the caldera. Flow lineation is defined in the plane parallel to flattened pumice and assumes that phenocryst are at maximum spacing in this plane. The flow lineation then coincides with the long axis of a center-to-center ellipse. Flow direction is defined in the plane perpendicular to flattening, which is inclined with respect to the flow plane and dips towards the source of flow. Four of five samples from the upper two cooling units near the thickest part of the caldera fill have well developed center-to-center strain ellipsoids producing flow lineations oriented N35W ([+-]7[degree]). The samples from the bottom cooling unit also has a well developed strain ellipsoid, but with a lineation oriented N80E. The difference in flow lineation suggests that the lowest cooling unit had a separate vent. Strain analysis of perpendicular sections are underway to establish the flow direction of the ignimbrites.

  8. Material flow analysis of NdFeB magnets for Denmark: a comprehensive waste flow sampling and analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Habib, Komal; Schibye, Peter Klausen; Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Dall, Ole; Wenzel, Henrik

    2014-10-21

    Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become highly desirable for modern hi-tech applications. These magnets, in general, contain two key rare earth elements (REEs), i.e., neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy), which are responsible for the very high strength of these magnets, allowing for considerable size and weight reduction in modern applications. This study aims to explore the current and future potential of a secondary supply of neodymium and dysprosium from recycling of NdFeB magnets. For this purpose, material flow analysis (MFA) has been carried out to perform the detailed mapping of stocks and flows of NdFeB magnets in Denmark. A novel element of this study is the value added to the traditionally practiced MFAs at national and/or global levels by complementing them with a comprehensive sampling and elemental analysis of NdFeB magnets, taken out from a sample of 157 different products representing 18 various product types. The results show that the current amount of neodymium and dysprosium in NdFeB magnets present in the Danish waste stream is only 3 and 0.2 Mg, respectively. However, this number is estimated to increase to 175 Mg of neodymium and 11.4 Mg of dysprosium by 2035. Nevertheless, efficient recovery of these elements from a very diverse electronic waste stream remains a logistic and economic challenge. PMID:25238428

  9. Aqueous semi-solid flow cell: demonstration and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z; Smith, KC; Dong, YJ; Baram, N; Fan, FY; Xie, J; Limthongkul, P; Carter, WC; Chiang, YM

    2013-01-01

    An aqueous Li-ion flow cell using suspension-based flow electrodes based on the LiTi2(PO4)(3)-LiFePO4 couple is demonstrated. Unlike conventional flow batteries, the semi-solid approach utilizes fluid electrodes that are electronically conductive. A model of simultaneous advection and electrochemical transport is developed and used to separate flow-induced losses from those due to underlying side reactions. The importance of plug flow to achieving high energy efficiency in flow batteries utilizing highly non-Newtonian flow electrodes is emphasized.

  10. Correlation and analysis of oil flow data for an air-breathing missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoy, S. L.; Dillon, J. L.; Roman, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper will present the results of an oil flow investigation on an airbreathing missile model. This oil flow study examined the flow around the model, which can be configured with both axisymmetric and two-dimensional inlets. Flow visualization analyses were conducted for both types of geometries by examining the surface flow patterns made visible by the oil flows for Mach numbers of 2.5 and 3.95. The analysis has shown the extent of flow spillage around the inlet which has helped explain the force and moment data collected during previous testing of the model. The oil flow data has also been used to develop guidelines for modeling the location of the crossflow separation line along inlet fairings. Finally, the oil flow analysis has been used to identify unique features of the boattail flow. These boattail flow characteristics have been correlated with previous oil flow analysis of noncircular body models. This paper demonstrates the use of this type of oil flow analysis in developing missile flow field analysis and aerodynamic predictions ranging from impact angle methods through Navier-Stokes methods.

  11. Flow cytometric fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA binding fluorochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, Harry A.; Cui, H. H.; Steinkamp, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most flow cytometry (FCM) applications monitor fluorescence intensity to quantitate the various cellular parameters; however, the fluorescence emission also contains information relative to the fluorescence lifetime. Recent developments in FCM (Pinsky et al., 1993; Steinkamp & Crissman, 1993; Steinkamp et al., 1993), provide for the measurement of fluorescence lifetime which is also commonly referred to as fluorescence decay, or the time interval in which a fluorochrome remains in the excited state. Many unbound fluorochromes have characteristic lifetime values that are determined by their molecular structure; however, when the probe becomes bound, the lifetime value is influenced by a number of factors that affect the probe interaction with a target molecule. Monitoring the changes in the lifetime of the probe yields information relating to the molecular conformation, the functional state or activity of the molecular target. In addition, the lifetime values can be used as signatures to resolve the emissions of multiple fluorochrome labels with overlapping emission spectra that cannot be resolved by conventional FCM methodology. Such strategies can increase the number of fluorochrome combinations used in a flow cytometer with a single excitation source. Our studies demonstrate various applications of lifetime measurements for the analysis of the binding of different fluorochromes to DNA in single cells. Data presented in this session will show the utility of lifetime measurements for monitoring changes in chromatin structure associated with cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, or DNA damage, such as induced during apoptosis. Several studies show that dyes with specificity for nucleic acids display different lifetime values when bound to DNA or to dsRNA. The Phase Sensitive Flow Cytometer is a multiparameter instrument, capable of performing lifetime measurements in conjunction with all the conventional FCM measurements. Future modifications of this

  12. Interactive retinal blood flow analysis of the macular region.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Somfai, Gábor Márk; Campagnoli, Thalmon R; Smiddy, William E; Debuc, Delia Cabrera

    2016-03-01

    The study of retinal hemodynamics plays an important role to understand the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. In this work, we developed an interactive retinal analysis tool to quantitatively measure the blood flow velocity (BFV) and blood flow rate (BFR) in the macular region using the Retinal Function Imager (RFI). By employing a high definition stroboscopic fundus camera, the RFI device is able to assess retinal blood flow characteristics in vivo. However, the measurements of BFV using a user-guided vessel segmentation tool may induce significant inter-observer differences and BFR is not provided in the built-in software. In this work, we have developed an interactive tool to assess the retinal BFV and BFR in the macular region. Optical coherence tomography data was registered with the RFI image to locate the fovea accurately. The boundaries of the vessels were delineated on a motion contrast enhanced image and BFV was computed by maximizing the cross-correlation of pixel intensities in a ratio video. Furthermore, we were able to calculate the BFR in absolute values (μl/s). Experiments were conducted on 122 vessels from 5 healthy and 5 mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) subjects. The Pearson's correlation of the vessel diameter measurements between our method and manual labeling on 40 vessels was 0.984. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of BFV between our proposed method and built-in software was 0.924 and 0.830 for vessels from healthy and NPDR subjects, respectively. The coefficient of variation between repeated sessions was reduced significantly from 22.5% to 15.9% in our proposed method (p<0.001). PMID:26569349

  13. Analysis of flow behavior in fractured lithophysal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianchun; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2002-09-01

    This study develops a mathematical model for the analysis of pressure behavior in fractured lithophysal reservoirs. The lithophysal rock is described as a tri-continuum medium, consisting of fractures, rock matrices, and cavities. In the conceptual model, fractures have homogeneous properties throughout and interact with rock matrices and cavities that have different permeabilities and porosities. Global flow occurs through the fracture network only, while rock matrices and cavities contain the majority of fluid storage and provide fluid drainage to the fractures. Interporosity flows between the triple media are described using a pseudosteady-state concept and the system is characterized by interporosity transmissivity ratios and storativity ratio of each continuum. Pressure behavior is analyzed by examining the pressure drawdown curves, the derivative plots, and the effects of the characteristic parameters. Typical pressure responses from fractures, matrices, and cavities are represented by three semilog straight lines; the transitions by two troughs below the stabilization lines in the derivative plots. The analytical solution to the proposed model is further verified using a numerical simulation. The analytical model has also been applied to a published field-buildup well test and is able to match the pressure buildup data.

  14. Simple and clean determination of tetracyclines by flow injection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Michael Pérez; Pezza, Helena Redigolo; Pezza, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    An environmentally reliable analytical methodology was developed for direct quantification of tetracycline (TC) and oxytetracycline (OTC) using continuous flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection. The method is based on the diazo coupling reaction between the tetracyclines and diazotized sulfanilic acid in a basic medium, resulting in the formation of an intense orange azo compound that presents maximum absorption at 434 nm. Experimental design was used to optimize the analytical conditions. The proposed technique was validated over the concentration range of 1 to 40 μg mL- 1, and was successfully applied to samples of commercial veterinary pharmaceuticals. The detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) limits were 0.40 and 1.35 μg mL- 1, respectively. The samples were also analyzed by an HPLC method, and the results showed agreement with the proposed technique. The new flow injection method can be immediately used for quality control purposes in the pharmaceutical industry, facilitating monitoring in real time during the production processes of tetracycline formulations for veterinary use.

  15. Quantitation of glycerophosphorylcholine by flow injection analysis using immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mancini, A; Del Rosso, F; Roberti, R; Caligiana, P; Vecchini, A; Binaglia, L

    1996-09-20

    A method for quantitating glycerophosphorylcholine by flow injection analysis is reported in the present paper. Glycerophosphorylcholine phosphodiesterase and choline oxidase, immobilized on controlled porosity glass beads, are packed in a small reactor inserted in a flow injection manifold. When samples containing glycerophosphorylcholine are injected, glycerophosphorylcholine is hydrolyzed into choline and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate. The free choline produced in this reaction is oxidized to betain and hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is detected amperometrically. Quantitation of glycerophosphorylcholine in samples containing choline and phosphorylcholine is obtained inserting ahead of the reactor a small column packed with a mixed bed ion exchange resin. The time needed for each determination does not exceed one minute. The present method, applied to quantitate glycerophosphorylcholine in samples of seminal plasma, gave results comparable with those obtained using the standard enzymatic-spectrophotometric procedure. An alternative procedure, making use of co-immobilized glycerophosphorylcholine phosphodiesterase and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase for quantitating glycerophosphorylcholine, glycerophosphorylethanolamine and glycerophosphorylserine is also described. PMID:8905629

  16. Tracking flow of leukocytes in blood for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharat, Arslan; Turner, Wesley; Stephens, Gillian; Badillo, Benjamin; Lumpkin, Rick; Andre, Patrick; Perera, Amitha

    2011-03-01

    Modern microscopy techniques allow imaging of circulating blood components under vascular flow conditions. The resulting video sequences provide unique insights into the behavior of blood cells within the vasculature and can be used as a method to monitor and quantitate the recruitment of inflammatory cells at sites of vascular injury/ inflammation and potentially serve as a pharmacodynamic biomarker, helping screen new therapies and individualize dose and combinations of drugs. However, manual analysis of these video sequences is intractable, requiring hours per 400 second video clip. In this paper, we present an automated technique to analyze the behavior and recruitment of human leukocytes in whole blood under physiological conditions of shear through a simple multi-channel fluorescence microscope in real-time. This technique detects and tracks the recruitment of leukocytes to a bioactive surface coated on a flow chamber. Rolling cells (cells which partially bind to the bioactive matrix) are detected counted, and have their velocity measured and graphed. The challenges here include: high cell density, appearance similarity, and low (1Hz) frame rate. Our approach performs frame differencing based motion segmentation, track initialization and online tracking of individual leukocytes.

  17. Characterization of fracture networks for fluid flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.C.S.; Billaux, D.; Hestir, K.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Karasaki, K.; Nihei, K.; Gentier, S.; Cox, L.

    1989-06-01

    The analysis of fluid flow through fractured rocks is difficult because the only way to assign hydraulic parameters to fractures is to perform hydraulic tests. However, the interpretation of such tests, or ''inversion'' of the data, requires at least that we know the geometric pattern formed by the fractures. Combining a statistical approach with geophysical data may be extremely helpful in defining the fracture geometry. Cross-hole geophysics, either seismic or radar, can provide tomograms which are pixel maps of the velocity or attenuation anomalies in the rock. These anomalies are often due to fracture zones. Therefore, tomograms can be used to identify fracture zones and provide information about the structure within the fracture zones. This structural information can be used as the basis for simulating the degree of fracturing within the zones. Well tests can then be used to further refine the model. Because the fracture network is only partially connected, the resulting geometry of the flow paths may have fractal properties. We are studying the behavior of well tests under such geometry. Through understanding of this behavior, it may be possible to use inverse techniques to refine the a priori assignment of fractures and their conductances such that we obtain the best fit to a series of well test results simultaneously. The methodology described here is under development and currently being applied to several field sites. 4 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Computer program for analysis of flow across a gas turbine seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. J.; Zuk, J.

    1970-01-01

    Computer program analyzes the flow /leakage/ across a sealing dam for the case of steady, laminar, subsonic, isothermal, compressible flow. The analysis considers both parallel sealing-dam surfaces and surfaces with small tilt angles.

  19. Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Hassan; J. Chapman

    2008-11-01

    Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of

  20. Task 7: Endwall treatment inlet flow distortion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. J.; Topp, D. A.; Heidegger, N. J.; McNulty, G. S.; Weber, K. F.; Delaney, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop a 3-D numerical analysis for compressor casing treatment flowfields, and to perform a series of detailed numerical predictions to assess the effectiveness of various endwall treatments for enhancing the efficiency and stall margin of modern high speed fan rotors. Particular attention was given to examining the effectiveness of endwall treatments to counter the undesirable effects of inflow distortion. Calculations were performed using three different gridding techniques based on the type of casing treatment being tested and the level of complexity desired in the analysis. In each case, the casing treatment itself is modeled as a discrete object in the overall analysis, and the flow through the casing treatment is determined as part of the solution. A series of calculations were performed for both treated and untreated modern fan rotors both with and without inflow distortion. The effectiveness of the various treatments were quantified, and several physical mechanisms by which the effectiveness of endwall treatments is achieved are discussed.

  1. Residual aqueous ozone determination by gas diffusion flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Straka, M.R.; Gordon, G.; Pacey, G.E.

    1985-08-01

    A method for the determination of residual aqueous ozone utilizing the technique of gas diffusion flow injection analysis and the redox reagents potassium indigo trisulfonate and bis(terpyridine)iron(II) is described. The system uses a commercially available gas diffusion cell fitted with a microporous Teflon membrane to significantly reduce or eliminate potential interferences such as chlorine and oxidized forms of manganese. Detection limits of 0.03 mg/L ozone are possible with sensitivities and linear ranges comparable to the manual method. Selectivity is significantly improved and chlorine interference is reduced to 0.008 mg/L of apparent ozone for each part per million of chlorine present while oxidized manganese interference is completely eliminated. This method provides a sample throughput of 65 samples per hour. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Transonic airfoil analysis and design in nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. F.; Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    A nonuniform transonic airfoil code is developed for applications in analysis, inverse design and direct optimization involving an airfoil immersed in propfan slipstream. Problems concerning the numerical stability, convergence, divergence and solution oscillations are discussed. The code is validated by comparing with some known results in incompressible flow. A parametric investigation indicates that the airfoil lift-drag ratio can be increased by decreasing the thickness ratio. A better performance can be achieved if the airfoil is located below the slipstream center. Airfoil characteristics designed by the inverse method and a direct optimization are compared. The airfoil designed with the method of direct optimization exhibits better characteristics and achieves a gain of 22 percent in lift-drag ratio with a reduction of 4 percent in thickness.

  3. Transonic Flow Field Analysis for Wing-Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppe, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    A computational method for simulating the aerodynamics of wing-fuselage configurations at transonic speeds is developed. The finite difference scheme is characterized by a multiple embedded mesh system coupled with a modified or extended small disturbance flow equation. This approach permits a high degree of computational resolution in addition to coordinate system flexibility for treating complex realistic aircraft shapes. To augment the analysis method and permit applications to a wide range of practical engineering design problems, an arbitrary fuselage geometry modeling system is incorporated as well as methodology for computing wing viscous effects. Configuration drag is broken down into its friction, wave, and lift induced components. Typical computed results for isolated bodies, isolated wings, and wing-body combinations are presented. The results are correlated with experimental data. A computer code which employs this methodology is described.

  4. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  5. Remote calorimetric detection of urea via flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, David E; Demirel, Melik C; Reeves, W Brian; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-12-01

    The design and development of a calorimetric biosensing system enabling relatively high throughput sample analysis are reported. The calorimetric biosensor system consists of a thin (∼20 μm) micromachined Y-cut quartz crystal resonator (QCR) as a temperature sensor placed in close proximity to a fluidic chamber packed with an immobilized enzyme. Layer by layer enzyme immobilization of urease is demonstrated and its activity as a function of the number of layers, pH, and time has been evaluated. This configuration enables a sensing system where a transducer element is physically separated from the analyte solution of interest and is thereby free from fouling effects typically associated with biochemical reactions occuring on the sensor surface. The performance of this biosensing system is demonstrated by detection of 1-200 mM urea in phosphate buffer via a flow injection analysis (FIA) technique. Miniaturized fluidic systems were used to provide continuous flow through a reaction column. Under this configuration the biosensor has an ultimate resolution of less than 1 mM urea and showed a linear response between 0-50 mM. This work demonstrates a sensing modality in which the sensor itself is not fouled or contaminated by the solution of interest and the enzyme immobilized Kapton® fluidic reaction column can be used as a disposable cartridge. Such a system enables reuse and reliability for long term sampling measurements. Based on this concept a biosensing system is envisioned which can perform rapid measurements to detect biomarkers such as glucose, creatinine, cholesterol, urea and lactate in urine and blood continuously over extended periods of time. PMID:26479269

  6. Quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow across face seals and narrow slots. 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.; Ludwig, L. P.; Johnson, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented for compressible fluid flow across shaft face seals and narrow slots. The analysis includes fluid inertia, viscous friction, and entrance losses. Subsonic and choked flow conditions can be predicted and analyzed. The model is valid for both laminar and turbulent flows. Results agree with experiment and with solutions which are more limited in applicability. Results show that a parallel film can have a positive film stiffness under choked flow conditions.

  7. DETERMINATION OF PH BY FLOW INJECTION ANALYSIS AND BY FIBER OPTRODE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new procedures for measuring pH have been developed. The first measures pH colorimetrically using a proprietary indicator dye mixture in a flow injection analysis (FIA) procedure. The second measures pH using a fiber optic chemical sensor (FOCS) specifically developed for pH ...

  8. Finite element analysis and computer graphics visualization of flow around pitching and plunging airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.

    1973-01-01

    A general computational method for analyzing unsteady flow around pitching and plunging airfoils was developed. The finite element method was applied in developing an efficient numerical procedure for the solution of equations describing the flow around airfoils. The numerical results were employed in conjunction with computer graphics techniques to produce visualization of the flow. The investigation involved mathematical model studies of flow in two phases: (1) analysis of a potential flow formulation and (2) analysis of an incompressible, unsteady, viscous flow from Navier-Stokes equations.

  9. High throughput analysis of samples in flowing liquid

    DOEpatents

    Ambrose, W. Patrick; Grace, W. Kevin; Goodwin, Peter M.; Jett, James H.; Orden, Alan Van; Keller, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus and method enable imaging multiple fluorescent sample particles in a single flow channel. A flow channel defines a flow direction for samples in a flow stream and has a viewing plane perpendicular to the flow direction. A laser beam is formed as a ribbon having a width effective to cover the viewing plane. Imaging optics are arranged to view the viewing plane to form an image of the fluorescent sample particles in the flow stream, and a camera records the image formed by the imaging optics.

  10. Development of a three-dimensional supersonic inlet flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggeln, R. C.; Mcdonald, H.; Levy, R.; Kreskovsky, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    A method for computing three dimensional flow in supersonic inlets is described. An approximate set of governing equations is given for viscous flows which have a primary flow direction. The governing equations are written in general orthogonal coordinates. These equations are modified in the subsonic region of the flow to prevent the phenomenon of branching. Results are presented for the two sample cases: a Mach number equals 2.5 flow in a square duct, and a Mach number equals 3.0 flow in a research jet engine inlet. In the latter case the computed results are compared with the experimental data. A users' manual is included.

  11. High Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Azuma, Kumiko; Yamada, Hironobu; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades, Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analyses has been developed to reconstruct the past changes of the climate system 1), 2). Compared with traditional analyses of discrete samples, a CFA system offers much faster and higher depth resolution analyses. It also generates a decontaminated sample stream without time-consuming sample processing procedure by using the inner area of an ice-core sample.. The CFA system that we have been developing is currently able to continuously measure stable water isotopes 3) and electrolytic conductivity, as well as to collect discrete samples for the both inner and outer areas with variable depth resolutions. Chemistry analyses4) and methane-gas analysis 5) are planned to be added using the continuous water stream system 5). In order to optimize the resolution of the current system with minimal sample volumes necessary for different analyses, our CFA system typically melts an ice core at 1.6 cm/min. Instead of using a wire position encoder with typical 1mm positioning resolution 6), we decided to use a high-accuracy CCD Laser displacement sensor (LKG-G505, Keyence). At the 1.6 cm/min melt rate, the positioning resolution was increased to 0.27mm. Also, the mixing volume that occurs in our open split debubbler is regulated using its weight. The overflow pumping rate is smoothly PID controlled to maintain the weight as low as possible, while keeping a safety buffer of water to avoid air bubbles downstream. To evaluate the system's depth-resolution, we will present the preliminary data of electrolytic conductivity obtained by melting 12 bags of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core. The samples correspond to different climate intervals (Greenland Stadial 21, 22, Greenland Stadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 7, Greenland Stadial 8). We will present results for the Greenland Stadial -8, whose depths and ages are between 1723.7 and 1724.8 meters, and 35.520 to

  12. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 2: Launch vehicle aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    An exploratory analysis has been made of the aeroelastic stability of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration, with the objective of defining critical flow phenomena with adverse aeroelastic effects and developing simple analytic means of describing the time-dependent flow-interference effects so that they can be incorporated into a computer program to predict the aeroelastic stability of all free-free modes of the shuttle launch configuration. Three critical flow phenomana have been identified: (1) discontinuous jump of orbiter wing shock, (2) inlet flow between orbiter and booster, and (3) H.O. tank base flow. All involve highly nonlinear and often discontinuous aerodynamics which cause limit cycle oscillations of certain critical modes. Given the appropriate static data, the dynamic effects of the wing shock jump and the HO tank bulbous base effect can be analyzed using the developed quasi-steady techniques. However, further analytic and experimental efforts are required before the dynamic effects of the inlet flow phenomenon can be predicted for the shuttle launch configuration.

  13. Analysis of flow within a left ventricle model fully assisted with continuous flow through the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tetsuya; Funayama, Masanori; Sudo, Seiichi; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2012-08-01

    Blood compatibility of a ventricular assist device (VAD) depends on the dynamics of blood flow. The focus in most previous studies was on blood flow in the VAD. However, the tip shape and position of the VAD inflow cannula influence the dynamics of intraventricular blood flow and thus thrombus formation in the ventricle. In this study, blood flow in the left ventricle (LV) under support with a catheter-type continuous flow blood pump was investigated. The flow field was analyzed both numerically and experimentally to investigate the effects of catheter tip shape and its insertion depth on intraventricular flow patterns. A computational model of the LV cavity with a simplified shape was constructed using computer-aided design software. Models of catheters with three different tip shapes were constructed and each was integrated to the LV model. In addition, three variations of insertion depth were prepared for all models. The fully supported intraventricular flow field was calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A transparent LV model made of silicone was also fabricated to analyze the intraventricular flow field by the particle image velocimetry technique. A mock circulation loop was constructed and water containing tracer particles was circulated in the loop. The motion of particles in the LV model was recorded with a digital high-speed video camera and analyzed to reveal the flow field. The results of numerical and experimental analyses indicated the formation of two large vortices in the bisector plane of the mitral and aortic valve planes. The shape and positioning of the catheter tip affected the flow distribution in the LV, and some of these combinations elongated the upper vortex toward the ventricular apex. Assessment based on average wall shear stress on the LV wall indicated that the flow distribution improved the washout effect. The flow patterns obtained from flow visualization coincided with those calculated by CFD analysis. Through these

  14. SRM Internal Flow Tests and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis. Volume 4; Cold Flow Analyses and CFD Analysis Capability Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the effect of model inlet air temperature drift during a test run was performed to aid in the decision on the need for and/or the schedule for including heaters in the SRMAFTE. The Sverdrup acceptance test data was used to determine the drift in air temperature during runs over the entire range of delivered flow rates and pressures. The effect of this temperature drift on the model Reynolds number was also calculated. It was concluded from this study that a 2% change in absolute temperature during a test run could be adequately accounted for by the data analysis program. A handout package of these results was prepared and presented to ED35 management.

  15. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  16. Micropollutants in urban watersheds : substance flow analysis as management tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, L.; Copin, P. J.; Barry, A. D.; Bader, H.-P.; Scheidegger, R.; Chèvre, N.

    2009-04-01

    Micropollutants released by cities into water are of increasing concern as they are suspected of inducing long-term effects on both aquatic organisms and humans (eg., hormonally active substances). Substances found in the urban water cycle have different sources in the urban area and different fates in this cycle. For example, the pollutants emitted from traffic, like copper or PAHs get to surface water during rain events often without any treatment. Pharmaceuticals resulting from human medical treatments get to surface water mainly through wastewater treatment plants, where they are only partly treated and eliminated. One other source of contamination in urban areas for these compounds are combined sewer overflows (CSOs). Once in the receiving waters (lakes, rivers, groundwater), these substances may re-enter the cycle through drinking water. It is therefore crucial to study the behaviour of micropollutants in the urban water cycle and to get flexible tools for urban water management. Substance flow analysis (SFA) has recently been proposed as instrument for water pollution management in urban water systems. This kind of analysis is an extension of material flow analysis (MFA) originally developed in the economic sector and later adapted to regional investigations. In this study, we propose to test the application of SFA for a large number of classes of micropollutants to evaluate its use for urban water management. We chose the city of Lausanne as case study since the receiving water of this city (Lake Geneva) is an important source of drinking water for the surrounding population. Moreover a profound system-knowledge and many data were available, both on the sewer system and the water quality. We focus our study on one heavy metal (copper) and four pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, ibuprofen, carbamazepine and naproxen). Results conducted on copper reveals that around 1500 kg of copper enter the aquatic compartment yearly. This amount contributes to sediment

  17. Carcinoma of the anal canal and flow cytometric DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, N. A.; Beart, R. W.; Weiland, L. H.; Cha, S. S.; Lieber, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Using flow cytometric DNA analysis of paraffin embedded tissue, DNA histograms were successfully obtained from the anal cancers of 117 patients. DNA diploid patterns were given by 82 cancers (70%) and DNA non-diploid patterns by 35 cancers (30%): 15 DNA aneuploid, 20 DNA tetraploid. Well differentiated squamous cell cancers were mainly DNA diploid, while a larger proportion of poorly differentiated and small cell cancers were DNA non-diploid. The large majority of stage A cancers were DNA diploid. A greater proportion of tumours that had invaded through the anal sphincter or had lymph node metastases or distant spread were DNA non-diploid. Prognosis was slightly poorer for patients with DNA non-diploid cancers when compared to patients with DNA diploid tumours (P = 0.08) and significantly poorer for individuals with DNA aneuploid anal cancers (P = 0.037). However, in a multivariate analysis model, the DNA ploidy pattern of an anal cancer was not of independent prognostic significance alongside tumour histology and tumour stage. PMID:2803916

  18. Scientific Visualization Using the Flow Analysis Software Toolkit (FAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Kelaita, Paul G.; Mccabe, R. Kevin; Merritt, Fergus J.; Plessel, Todd C.; Sandstrom, Timothy A.; West, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past few years the Flow Analysis Software Toolkit (FAST) has matured into a useful tool for visualizing and analyzing scientific data on high-performance graphics workstations. Originally designed for visualizing the results of fluid dynamics research, FAST has demonstrated its flexibility by being used in several other areas of scientific research. These research areas include earth and space sciences, acid rain and ozone modelling, and automotive design, just to name a few. This paper describes the current status of FAST, including the basic concepts, architecture, existing functionality and features, and some of the known applications for which FAST is being used. A few of the applications, by both NASA and non-NASA agencies, are outlined in more detail. Described in the Outlines are the goals of each visualization project, the techniques or 'tricks' used lo produce the desired results, and custom modifications to FAST, if any, done to further enhance the analysis. Some of the future directions for FAST are also described.

  19. Development of an Aeroelastic Analysis Including a Viscous Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant, Version 4 of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) has been developed and verified. The TURBO-AE Version 4 aeroelastic code allows flutter calculations for a fan, compressor, or turbine blade row. This code models a vibrating three-dimensional bladed disk configuration and the associated unsteady flow (including shocks, and viscous effects) to calculate the aeroelastic instability using a work-per-cycle approach. Phase-lagged (time-shift) periodic boundary conditions are used to model the phase lag between adjacent vibrating blades. The direct-store approach is used for this purpose to reduce the computational domain to a single interblade passage. A disk storage option, implemented using direct access files, is available to reduce the large memory requirements of the direct-store approach. Other researchers have implemented 3D inlet/exit boundary conditions based on eigen-analysis. Appendix A: Aeroelastic calculations based on three-dimensional euler analysis. Appendix B: Unsteady aerodynamic modeling of blade vibration using the turbo-V3.1 code.

  20. Aerothermal Analysis of the Project Fire II Afterbody Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael J.; Loomis, Mark; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to simulate the wake flow and afterbody heating of the Project Fire II ballistic reentry to Earth at 11.4 km/sec. Laminar results are obtained over a portion of the trajectory between the initial heat pulse and peak afterbody heating. Although non-catalytic forebody convective heating results are in excellent agreement with previous computations, initial predictions of afterbody heating were about a factor of two below the experimental values. Further analysis suggests that significant catalysis may be occurring on the afterbody heat shield. Computations including finite-rate catalysis on the afterbody surface are in good agreement with the data over the early portion of the trajectory, but are conservative near the peak afterbody heating point, especially on the rear portion of the conical frustum. Further analysis of the flight data from Fire II shows that peak afterbody heating occurs before peak forebody heating, a result that contradicts computations and flight data from other entry vehicles. This result suggests that another mechanism, possibly pyrolysis, may be occurring during the later portion of the trajectory, resulting in less total heat transfer than the current predictions.

  1. Flow Analysis for Single and Multi-Nozzle Jet Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narabayashi, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Yukitaka; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Shakouchi, Toshihiko

    Jet pumps, driven by a Primary-Loop Recirculation (PLR) Pump, have been widely used in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants to recirculate the reactor core coolant. A jet pump consists of a driving nozzle, a bell-mouth, a throat and a diffuser. The improvement of the jet pump efficiency for BWR plants brings an economic advantage because it reduces the operating power cost of the PLR pump. In order to improve the efficiency of the BWR jet pump, a 1/5 scale jet pump test loop for BWR plant was used and intensive tests were conducted focusing on the types of driving nozzles and shapes of the throat. These test data were used for CFD flow analysis code verification. The analytical data showed good agreement with the test results. After the analytical model verification, improvement of jet pump efficiency was conducted. It was shown by the CFD analysis that the peak efficiency of the improved jet pump will be 36% with the tapered throat.

  2. Stormwater harvesting and WSUD frequent flow management: a compatibility analysis.

    PubMed

    Brodie, I

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting stormwater from urban catchments provides a supplementary water resource and, due to the physical abstraction of polluted water, also leads to environmental benefits. These benefits include the reduction of frequent ecosystem disturbance during small storms and less waterway erosion; hydrological impacts which are currently addressed by Water Sensitive Urban Design guidelines for stormwater frequent flow management (FFM). Although FFM and stormwater harvesting share the same store-release behaviour, they have a very different underlying basis to their design and operation. This paper explores the level of compatibility between these two systems and hence the potential for their integration. It was found by water balance analysis that the harvesting storage required to maximise most yields is similar to the recommended storage volume for FFM. This analysis was performed for a temperate-climate location in South East Queensland under historically low rainfalls. Environmental benefits associated with runoff quantity and pollutant load reductions are highest when the capture storage is rapidly emptied after storms. PMID:22744693

  3. Uncertainty Analysis of the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to identify the measurement uncertainty of NASA Langley s Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) over its operating range, and to identify the parameters that most significantly contribute to the acoustic impedance prediction. Two acoustic liners are used for this study. The first is a single-layer, perforate-over-honeycomb liner that is nonlinear with respect to sound pressure level. The second consists of a wire-mesh facesheet and a honeycomb core, and is linear with respect to sound pressure level. These liners allow for evaluation of the effects of measurement uncertainty on impedances educed with linear and nonlinear liners. In general, the measurement uncertainty is observed to be larger for the nonlinear liners, with the largest uncertainty occurring near anti-resonance. A sensitivity analysis of the aerodynamic parameters (Mach number, static temperature, and static pressure) used in the impedance eduction process is also conducted using a Monte-Carlo approach. This sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the impedance eduction process is virtually insensitive to each of these parameters.

  4. Power flow as a complement to statistical energy analysis and finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Present methods of analysis of the structural response and the structure-borne transmission of vibrational energy use either finite element (FE) techniques or statistical energy analysis (SEA) methods. The FE methods are a very useful tool at low frequencies where the number of resonances involved in the analysis is rather small. On the other hand SEA methods can predict with acceptable accuracy the response and energy transmission between coupled structures at relatively high frequencies where the structural modal density is high and a statistical approach is the appropriate solution. In the mid-frequency range, a relatively large number of resonances exist which make finite element method too costly. On the other hand SEA methods can only predict an average level form. In this mid-frequency range a possible alternative is to use power flow techniques, where the input and flow of vibrational energy to excited and coupled structural components can be expressed in terms of input and transfer mobilities. This power flow technique can be extended from low to high frequencies and this can be integrated with established FE models at low frequencies and SEA models at high frequencies to form a verification of the method. This method of structural analysis using power flo and mobility methods, and its integration with SEA and FE analysis is applied to the case of two thin beams joined together at right angles.

  5. Correlation analysis of spatio-temporal images for estimating two-dimensional flow velocity field in a rotating flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kwonkyu; Kim, Seojun; Kim, Dongsu

    2015-10-01

    Flow velocity estimation in actual rivers using image processing technique has been highlighted for hydrometric communities in the last decades, and this technique is called Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV). Although LSPIV has been successfully tested in many flow conditions, it has addressed several limitations estimating mean flow field because of difficult flow conditions such as rotating, lack of light and seeds, and noisy flow conditions. Recently, an alternative technique named STIV to use spatio-temporal images based on successively recorded images has been introduced to overcome the limitations of LSPIV. The STIV was successfully applied to obtain one-dimensional flow component in the river for estimating streamflow discharge, where the main flow direction is known. Using the 5th order of central difference scheme, the STIV directly calculated the mean angle of slopes which appeared as strips in the spatio-temporal images and has been proved to be more reliable and efficient for the discharge estimation as compared with the conventional LSPIV. However, yet it has not been sufficiently qualified to derive two-dimensional flow field in the complex flow, such as rotating or locally unsteady flow conditions. We deemed that it was because the strips in the given spatio-temporal images from not properly oriented for main flow direction are not narrow enough or clearly visible, thus the direct estimating strip slope could give erroneous results. Thereby, the STIV has been mainly applied for obtaining one-dimensional flow component. In this regard, we proposed an alternative algorithm to estimate the mean slope angle for enhancing the capability of the STIV, which used correlation coefficient between odd and even image splits from the given spatio-temporal image. This method was named CASTI (Correlation Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Image). This paper described the step-by-step procedure of the CASTI and validated its capability for estimating two

  6. Analysis of Fractional Flow for Transient Two-Phase Flow in Fractal Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Duan, Yonggang; Fang, Quantang; Dai, Xiaolu; Wu, Jinsui

    2016-03-01

    Prediction of fractional flow in fractal porous medium is important for reservoir engineering and chemical engineering as well as hydrology. A physical conceptual fractional flow model of transient two-phase flow is developed in fractal porous medium based on the fractal characteristics of pore-size distribution and on the approximation that porous medium consist of a bundle of tortuous capillaries. The analytical expression for fractional flow for wetting phase is presented, and the proposed expression is the function of structural parameters (such as tortuosity fractal dimension, pore fractal dimension, maximum and minimum diameters of capillaries) and fluid properties (such as contact angle, viscosity and interfacial tension) in fractal porous medium. The sensitive parameters that influence fractional flow and its derivative are formulated, and their impacts on fractional flow are discussed.

  7. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  8. Numerical analysis of the flows in annular slinger combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, S.; Exley, T.

    1990-07-01

    Improved gas-turbine combustor design techniques are developed through the application of CFD flow predictions. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy are solved using the finite-volume approach of Spalding. The geometry is a three-dimensional region of cyclic symmetry for a selected annular slinger combustor of reasonable performance. The flow is assumed nonreacting, isothermal, and turbulent. Mixing of the dilution jet stream with the bulk combustor flow is simulated by assuming different inlet temperatures for the two mass sources and noting the temperature profile at the combustor exit plane. A flow visualization experiment is performed on cold flow conditions and reasonably corroborates the CFD predictions.

  9. Miniature liquid flow sensor and feedback control of electroosmotic and pneumatic flows for a micro gas analysis system.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2006-01-01

    Accurate liquid flow control is important in most chemical analyses. In this work, the measurement of liquid flow in microliters per minute was performed, and feedback control of the flow rate was examined. The flow sensor was arranged on a channel made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) block. The center of the channel was cooled by a miniature Peltier device, and the change in temperature balance along the channel formed by the flow was measured by two temperature sensors. Using this flow sensor, feedback flow control was examined with two pumping methods. One was the electroosmotic flow method, made by applying a high voltage (HV) between the reagent and waste reservoirs; the other was the piezo valve method, in which a micro-valve-seat was fabricated in a PDMS cavity with a silicone diaphragm. The latter was adopted for a micro gas analysis system (microGAS) for measuring atmospheric H2S and SO2. The obtained baselines were stable, and better limits of detection were obtained. PMID:16429774

  10. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries’ roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading “trophic levels” have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows. PMID:26569618

  11. Verification Assessment of Flow Boundary Conditions for CFD Analysis of Supersonic Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2002-01-01

    Boundary conditions for subsonic inflow, bleed, and subsonic outflow as implemented into the WIND CFD code are assessed with respect to verification for steady and unsteady flows associated with supersonic inlets. Verification procedures include grid convergence studies and comparisons to analytical data. The objective is to examine errors, limitations, capabilities, and behavior of the boundary conditions. Computational studies were performed on configurations derived from a "parameterized" supersonic inlet. These include steady supersonic flows with normal and oblique shocks, steady subsonic flow in a diffuser, and unsteady flow with the propagation and reflection of an acoustic disturbance.

  12. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries' roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading "trophic levels" have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows. PMID:26569618

  13. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  14. Method and apparatus for coal analysis and flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rollwitz, W.L.; King, J.D.

    1985-07-23

    A flow meter apparatus and method for measuring the flow, composition and heat content of coal is set forth. In the preferred and illustrated embodiment, the free or unpaired electron population of flowing coal is measured by electron magnetic resonance (EMR); the hydrogen nucleii population is measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). By calibration utilizing a standard specimen for a given type of coal, a profile for various types of coal can be obtained wherein measurement data is converted into an indication of the heat content typically measured in BTU per pound. This enables provision of a volumetric flow meter, a flow meter indicating flow in calorie content. This device enables integration to provide total heat content flow. Other variables describing the coal can be obtained.

  15. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions. PMID:24231821

  16. F-111 natural laminar flow glove flight test data analysis and boundary layer stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. J.; Navran, B. H.; Rozendaal, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of 34 selected flight test data cases from a NASA flight program incorporating a natural laminar flow airfoil into partial wing gloves on the F-111 TACT airplane is given. This analysis determined the measured location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The report also contains the results of a boundary layer stability analysis of 25 of the selected cases in which the crossflow (C-F) and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) disturbance amplification factors are correlated with the measured transition location. The chord Reynolds numbers for these cases ranges from about 23 million to 29 million, the Mach numbers ranged from 0.80 to 0.85, and the glove leading-edge sweep angles ranged from 9 deg to 25 deg. Results indicate that the maximum extent of laminar flow varies from 56% chord to 9-deg sweep on the upper surface, and from 51% chord at 16-deg sweep to 6% chord at 25-deg sweep on the lower. The results of the boundary layer stability analysis indicate that when both C-F and T-S disturbances are amplified, an interaction takes place which reduces the maximum amplification factor of either type of disturbance that can be tolerated without causing transition.

  17. Numerical analysis of blood flow in the clearance regions of a continuous flow artificial heart pump.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Wood, H G; Allaire, P E; Olsen, D B

    2000-06-01

    The CFVAD3 is the third prototype of a continuous flow ventricular assist device being developed for implantation in humans. The pump consists of a fully shrouded 4-blade impeller supported by magnetic bearings. On either side of this suspended rotating impeller is a small clearance region through which the blood flows. The spacing and geometry of these clearance regions are very important to the successful operation of this blood pump. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions for this flow were obtained using TascFlow, a software package available from AEA Technology, U.K. Flow in these clearance regions was studied parametrically by varying the size of the clearance, the blood flow rate into the pump, and the rotational speed of the pump. The numerical solutions yield the direction and magnitude of the flow and the dynamic pressure. Experimentally measured pump flow rates are compared to the numerical study. The results of the study provide guidance for improving pump efficiency. It is determined that current clearances can be significantly reduced to improve pump efficiency without negative impacts. PMID:10886072

  18. "Just Clicks": An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis of Professional Dancers' Experience of Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hefferon, Kate M.; Ollis, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    The subjective experience of flow in professional dancers was analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA). Flow is believed to be a psychological state in which the mind and body "just click", creating optimal performance. Unfortunately, sport and performance research have severely neglected reviewing the flow experience in…

  19. VIDEO IMAGE ANALYSIS SYSTEM FOR CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS AND FLOW VISUALIZATION IN BUILDING WAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A video image analysis technique for concentration measurements and flow visualization was developed for the study of diffusion in building wakes and other wind tunnel flows. moke injected into the flow was photographed from above with a video camera, and the video signal was dig...

  20. The Flow of International Students from a Macro Perspective: A Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, George A.; Lee, Moosung; Jiang, Ke; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a network analysis of the international flow of students among 210 countries and the factors determining the structure of this flow. Among these factors, bilateral hyperlink connections between countries and the number of telephone minutes (communication variables) are the most important predictors of the flow's structure,…

  1. Analysis of Employment Flow of Landscape Architecture Graduates in Agricultural Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Xia; He, Linchun

    2012-01-01

    A statistical analysis of employment flow of landscape architecture graduates was conducted on the employment data of graduates major in landscape architecture in 2008 to 2011. The employment flow of graduates was to be admitted to graduate students, industrial direction and regional distribution, etc. Then, the features of talent flow and factors…

  2. SINDA/SINFLO computer routine, volume 1, revision A. [for fluid flow system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The SINFLO package was developed to modify the SINDA preprocessor to accept and store the input data for fluid flow systems analysis and adding the FLOSOL user subroutine to perform the flow solution. This reduced and simplified the user input required for analysis of flow problems. A temperature calculation method, the flow-hybrid method which was developed in previous VSD thermal simulator routines, was incorporated for calculating fluid temperatures. The calculation method accuracy was improved by using fluid enthalpy rather than specific heat for the convective term of the fluid temperature equation. Subroutines and data input requirements are described along with user subroutines, flow data storage, and usage of the plot program.

  3. Monoexponential analysis of /sup 133/Xe clearance curves for regional cerebral blood flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, E.

    1984-06-01

    The theoretical properties of a monoexponential flow index, analogous to the one used earlier by other investigators for regional CBF (rCBF) measured after intraarterial injection, were investigated after the administration of /sup 133/Xe intraarterially, intravenously, and by inhalation under high and low flow conditions. The sensitivity of the flow index to changes in fast flow components or changes in the weight ratio between the fast and the slow flow compartments was found to be dependent on whichever part of the /sup 133/Xe clearance curve was used for the flow calculation and on the shape of the input function for /sup 133/Xe. Since biexponential analysis of the clearance curves includes a monoexponential approximation for each of the two components of the clearance curve corresponding to the high and the low flow ''families'' in the brain, the limitations of the monoexponential flow index observed are in principle also valid for the results of biexponential analysis of the clearance curves.

  4. Flow-Based Network Analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans Connectome.

    PubMed

    Bacik, Karol A; Schaub, Michael T; Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Billeh, Yazan N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    We exploit flow propagation on the directed neuronal network of the nematode C. elegans to reveal dynamically relevant features of its connectome. We find flow-based groupings of neurons at different levels of granularity, which we relate to functional and anatomical constituents of its nervous system. A systematic in silico evaluation of the full set of single and double neuron ablations is used to identify deletions that induce the most severe disruptions of the multi-resolution flow structure. Such ablations are linked to functionally relevant neurons, and suggest potential candidates for further in vivo investigation. In addition, we use the directional patterns of incoming and outgoing network flows at all scales to identify flow profiles for the neurons in the connectome, without pre-imposing a priori categories. The four flow roles identified are linked to signal propagation motivated by biological input-response scenarios. PMID:27494178

  5. Analysis of Sabine river flow data using semiparametric spline modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Soutir; Maity, Arnab

    2011-03-01

    SummaryIn this article, a modeling approach for the mean annual flow in different segments of Sabine river, as released in the NHDPlus data in 2007, as a function of five predictor variables is described. Modeling flow is extremely complex and the deterministic flow models are widely used for that purpose. The justification for using these deterministic models comes from the fact that the flow is governed by some explicitly stated physical laws. In contrast, in this article, this complex issue is addressed from a completely statistical point of view. A semiparametric model is proposed to analyze the spatial distribution of the mean annual flow of Sabine river. Semiparametric additive models allow explicit consideration of the linear and nonlinear relations with relevant explanatory variables. We use a conditionally specified Gaussian model for the estimation of the univariate conditional distributions of flow to incorporate auxiliary information and this formulation does not require the target variable to be independent.

  6. Flow-Based Network Analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, Karol A.; Schaub, Michael T.; Billeh, Yazan N.; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We exploit flow propagation on the directed neuronal network of the nematode C. elegans to reveal dynamically relevant features of its connectome. We find flow-based groupings of neurons at different levels of granularity, which we relate to functional and anatomical constituents of its nervous system. A systematic in silico evaluation of the full set of single and double neuron ablations is used to identify deletions that induce the most severe disruptions of the multi-resolution flow structure. Such ablations are linked to functionally relevant neurons, and suggest potential candidates for further in vivo investigation. In addition, we use the directional patterns of incoming and outgoing network flows at all scales to identify flow profiles for the neurons in the connectome, without pre-imposing a priori categories. The four flow roles identified are linked to signal propagation motivated by biological input-response scenarios. PMID:27494178

  7. CFD Analysis for Flow of Liquids in Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Tarun Kanti; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The effects of liquid flow rate, coil diameter, pseudo plasticity of the liquids on the frictional pressure drop for the flow through helical coils have been reported through experimental investigation. Numerical modeling is carried using Fluent 6.3 software to find its applicability in the flow system. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are carried out using laminar non-Newtonian pseudo plastic power law model for laminar flow and k-ɛ model for turbulent flow for water. Water and dilute solution of Sodium Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (SCMC) as a non-Newtonian pseudo plastic fluid used for the study. Both hexahedral and tetrahedral grids are used for this simulation. The CFD results show the very good agreement with the experimental values. The comparison of the non-Newtonian liquid flow and water are also reported.

  8. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M.

    2006-04-27

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  9. Axial and Centrifugal Compressor Mean Line Flow Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate key aerodynamic parameters of single and multistage axial and centrifugal compressors. This mean-line compressor code COMDES provides the capability of sizing single and multistage compressors quickly during the conceptual design process. Based on the compressible fluid flow equations and the Euler equation, the code can estimate rotor inlet and exit blade angles when run in the design mode. The design point rotor efficiency and stator losses are inputs to the code, and are modeled at off design. When run in the off-design analysis mode, it can be used to generate performance maps based on simple models for losses due to rotor incidence and inlet guide vane reset angle. The code can provide an improved understanding of basic aerodynamic parameters such as diffusion factor, loading levels and incidence, when matching multistage compressor blade rows at design and at part-speed operation. Rotor loading levels and relative velocity ratio are correlated to the onset of compressor surge. NASA Stage 37 and the three-stage NASA 74-A axial compressors were analyzed and the results compared to test data. The code has been used to generate the performance map for the NASA 76-B three-stage axial compressor featuring variable geometry. The compressor stages were aerodynamically matched at off-design speeds by adjusting the variable inlet guide vane and variable stator geometry angles to control the rotor diffusion factor and incidence angles.

  10. Isogeometric analysis of drop deformation in isoviscous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi Joneidi, Amin; Verhoosel, Clemens; Anderson, Patrick

    2012-11-01

    We use the Boundary Integral Method (BIM) to study the deformation of a drop in iso-viscous shear flow. Traditionally the drop surface is represented by a linear triangular mesh. The novelty of this work compared to prior studies is applying Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) to define the drop interface. In this method splines are used as smooth shape functions to create the surface instead of the traditional non-smooth triangular surface. This makes IGA applicable in the case when the physics at the interface becomes more complicated, for example if the deformation of a red blood cell or a vesicle is investigated; these involve higher-order surface gradients in the force jump across the interface. For the iso-viscous drop it is observed that the drop deforms and deviates from the initial spherical shape and orients itself in the fixed direction. Different values of the capillary number -which is the measure of the ratio between viscous and surface tension forces- have been studied and the results match very well with traditional BIM. IGA results for more complex interfacial force jumps are discussed.

  11. Process Flow and Functional Analysis of the Iter Cryogenic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, D.; Chalifour, M.; Forgeas, A.; Kalinin, V.; Monneret, E.; Serio, L.; Vincent, G.; Voigt, T.

    2010-04-01

    The ITER cryogenic system is presently under design by a large international collaboration. It will start commissioning at Cadarache, south of France in 2015. The system is designed to provide an equivalent refrigeration capacity of 65 kW at 4.5 K for the superconducting magnet and 1300 kW at 80 K for the cryoplant pre-cooling stages and the Cryostat Thermal Shields (CTS). The cryoplant consists of three 4.5 K refrigerators and two 80 K helium loops coupled with two LN2 modules. Two 4.5 K modules are dedicated to the magnet system and a small one is devoted to the cryopumps and Pellet Injection System. One Interconnection box interfaces the cryoplant and a complex cryodistribution system which includes 5 Auxiliary Cold Boxes dedicated to each cryogenic subsystem. The ITER cryogenic system will have to cope with various normal and abnormal operational modes including superconducting magnets quench recovery and fast energy discharge. We will present the general Process Flow Diagram of the cryoplant and cryodistribution system and the operation requirements. The functional analysis of the cryogenic system will be performed leading to a proposal of the cryogenic control system architecture. The instrumentation and control requirements will also be outlined.

  12. Analysis of breathing air flow patterns in thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Fei, Jin; Pavlidis, Ioannis

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a novel methodology to characterize breathing patterns based on thermal infrared imaging. We have retrofitted a Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) imaging system with a narrow band-pass filter in the CO(2) absorption band (4130 - 4427 nm). We use this system to record the radiation information from within the breathing flow region. Based on this information we compute the mean dynamic thermal signal of breath. The breath signal is quasi-periodic due to the interleaving of high and low intensities corresponding to expirations and inspirations respectively. We sample the signal at a constant rate and then filter the high frequency noise due to tracking instability. We detect the breathing cycles through zero cross thresholding, which is insensitive to noise around the zero line. We normalize the breathing cycles and align them at the transition point from inhalation to exhalation. Then, we compute the mean breathing cycle. We use the first eight (8) harmonic components of the mean cycle to characterize the breathing pattern. The harmonic analysis highlights the intra-individual similarity of breathing patterns. Our method opens the way for desktop, unobtrusive monitoring of human respiration and may find widespread applications in clinical studies of chronic ailments. It also brings up the intriguing possibility of using breathing patterns as a novel biometric. PMID:17945610

  13. Automatic analysis of ciliary beat frequency using optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Lechner, Manuel; Werther, Tobias; Horak, Fritz; Hummel, Johann; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) can be a useful parameter for diagnosis of several diseases, as e.g. primary ciliary dyskinesia. (PCD). CBF computation is usually done using manual evaluation of high speed video sequences, a tedious, observer dependent, and not very accurate procedure. We used the OpenCV's pyramidal implementation of the Lukas-Kanade algorithm for optical flow computation and applied this to certain objects to follow the movements. The objects were chosen by their contrast applying the corner detection by Shi and Tomasi. Discrimination between background/noise and cilia by a frequency histogram allowed to compute the CBF. Frequency analysis was done using the Fourier transform in matlab. The correct number of Fourier summands was found by the slope in an approximation curve. The method showed to be usable to distinguish between healthy and diseased samples. However there remain difficulties in automatically identifying the cilia, and also in finding enough high contrast cilia in the image. Furthermore the some of the higher contrast cilia are lost (and sometimes found) by the method, an easy way to distinguish the correct sub-path of a point's path have yet to be found in the case where the slope methods doesn't work.

  14. Analysis of Alcove 8/Niche 3 Flow and Transport Tests

    SciTech Connect

    H.H. Liu

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document analyses of the Alcove 8/Niche 3 flow and transport tests, with a focus on the large-infiltration-plot tests and compare pre-test model predictions with the actual test observations. The tests involved infiltration that originated from the floor of Alcove 8 (located in the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift) and observations of seepage and tracer transport at Niche 3 (located in the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF)). The test results are relevant to drift seepage and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. The main objective of this analysis was to evaluate the modeling approaches used and the importance of the matrix diffusion process by comparing simulation and actual test observations. The pre-test predictions for the large plot test were found to differ from the observations and the reasons for the differences were documented in this report to partly address CR 6783, which concerns unexpected test results. These unexpected results are discussed and assessed with respect to the current baseline unsaturated zone radionuclide transport model in Sections 6.2.4, 6.3.2, and 6.4.

  15. Transonic analysis and design of axisymmetric bodies in nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Jen-Fu; Lan, C. Edward

    1987-01-01

    An inviscid nonuniform axisymmetric transonic code was developed for applications in analysis and design. Propfan slipstream effect on pressure distribution for a body with and without sting was investigated. Results show that nonuniformity causes pressure coefficient to be more negative and shock strength to be stronger and more rearward. Sting attached to a body reduced the pressure peak and moves the rear shock forward. Extent and Mach profile shapes of the nonuniformity region appeared to have little effect on the pressure distribution. Increasing nonuniformity magnitude made pressure coefficient more negative and moved the shock rearward. Design study was conducted with the CONMIN optimizer for an ellipsoid and a body with the NACA-0012 counter. For the ellipsoid, the general trend showed that to reduce the pressure drag, the front portion of the body should be thinner and the contour of the rear portion should be flatter than the ellipsoid. For the design of a body with a sharp trailing edge in transonic flow with an initial shape given by the NACA-0012 contour, the pressure drag was reduced by decreasing the nose radius and increasing the thickness in the aft portion. Drag reduction percentages are given.

  16. Flow cytometry reliability analysis and variations in sugarcane DNA content.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A C L; Pasqual, M; Bruzi, A T; Pio, L A S; Mendonça, P M S; Soares, J D R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of flow cytometry analysis and the use of this technique to differentiate species and varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum spp) according to their relative DNA content. We analyzed 16 varieties and three species belonging to this genus. To determine a reliable protocol, we evaluated three extraction buffers (LB01, Marie, and Tris·MgCl2), the presence and absence of RNase, six doses of propidium iodide (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 μg), four periods of exposure to propidium iodide (0, 5, 10, and 20 min), and seven external reference standards (peas, beans, corn, radish, rye, soybean, and tomato) with reference to the coefficient of variation and the DNA content. For statistical analyses, we used the programs Sisvar(®) and Xlstat(®). We recommend using the Marie extraction buffer and at least 15 μg propidium iodide. The samples should not be analyzed immediately after the addition of propidium iodide. The use of RNase is optional, and tomato should be used as an external reference standard. The results show that sugarcane has a variable genome size (8.42 to 12.12 pg/2C) and the individuals analyzed could be separated into four groups according to their DNA content with relative equality in the genome sizes of the commercial varieties. PMID:26125928

  17. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Marine Bacteria with Hoechst 33342 †

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Bruce C.; Landry, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the accuracy and precision of flow cytometric (FCM) estimates of bacterial abundances using 4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and Hoechst 33342 (HO342, a bisbenzamide derivative) on paraformaldehyde-fixed seawater samples collected from two stations near Oahu, Hawaii. The accuracy of FCM estimates was assessed against direct counts by using epifluorescence microscopy. DAPI and HO342 differ in two aspects of their chemistry that make HO342 better suited for staining marine heterotrophic bacteria for FCM analysis. These differences are most important in studies of open-ocean ecosystems that require dual-beam FCM analysis to clearly separate heterotrophic bacterial populations from populations of photosynthetic Prochlorococcus spp. Bacterial populations were easier to distinguish from background fluorescence when stained with HO342 than when stained with DAPI, because HO342 has a higher relative fluorescence quantum yield. A substantially higher coefficient of variation of blue fluorescence, which was probably due to fluorescent complexes formed by DAPI with double-stranded RNA, was observed for DAPI-stained populations. FCM estimates averaged 2.0 and 12% higher than corresponding epifluorescence microscopy direct counts for HO342 and DAPI-stained samples, respectively. A paired-sample t test between FCM estimates and direct counts found no significant difference for HO342-stained samples but a significant difference for DAPI-stained samples. Coefficients of variation of replicate FCM abundance estimates ranged from 0.63 to 2.9% (average, 1.5%) for natural bacterial concentrations of 6 × 105 to 15 × 105 cells ml-1. PMID:16348898

  18. Information Flow in the Launch Vehicle Design/Analysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R., Sr.; Holland, W.; Bishop, R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a team effort aimed at defining the information flow between disciplines at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engaged in the design of space launch vehicles. The information flow is modeled at a first level and is described using three types of templates: an N x N diagram, discipline flow diagrams, and discipline task descriptions. It is intended to provide engineers with an understanding of the connections between what they do and where it fits in the overall design process of the project. It is also intended to provide design managers with a better understanding of information flow in the launch vehicle design cycle.

  19. Extension of a three-dimensional viscous wing flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Bernard C.; Chen, Shyi-Yaung; Thoren, Stephen J.; Shamroth, Stephen J.

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional unsteady viscous effects can significantly influence the performance of fixed and rotary wing aircraft. These effects are important in both flows about helicopter rotors in forward flight and flows about 3-D (swept and tapered) supercritical wings. A computational procedure for calculating such flow field is developed, and therefore would be of great value in the design process as well as in understanding the corresponding flow phenomena. The procedure is based upon an alternating direction technique employing the Linearized Block Implicit method for solving 3-D viscous flow problems. In order to demonstrate the viability of this method, 2-D and 3-D problems are computed. These include the flow over a 2-D NACA 0012 airfoil under steady and oscillating conditions, and the steady, skewed, 3-D flow on a flat plate. Although actual 3-D flows over wings were not obtained, the ground work was laid for considering such flows. The description of the computational procedure and results are given.

  20. Analysis of separated flow using image enhanced thymol blue visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, J. M.; Disimile, Peter J.

    Image processing techniques have been developed which enhance the quality of thymol blue visualization. These new techniques allow meaningful quantitative data to be obtained from images using thymol blue flow visualization at velocities up to twice as high as the previous limit. As a demonstration of these techniques, measurements have been taken of the physical dimensions of the separation regions developing immediately downstream of a symmetric bifurcation. These measurements are then used to elicit trends in the separation physical dimensions as a function of flow rate. This particular information is applicable to a variety of flow separation problems found in biological flows and turbomachinery.

  1. Flow dynamics in anatomical models of abdominal aortic aneurysms: computational analysis of pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Finol, Ender A; Amon, Cristina H

    2003-01-01

    Blood flow in human arteries is dominated by time-dependent transport phenomena. In particular, in the abdominal segment of the aorta under a patient's average resting conditions, blood exhibits laminar flow patterns that are influenced by secondary flows induced by adjacent branches and in irregular vessel geometries. The flow dynamics becomes more complex when there is a pathological condition that causes changes in the normal structural composition of the vessel wall, for example, in the presence of an aneurysm. An aneurysm is an irreversible dilation of a blood vessel accompanied by weakening of the vessel wall. This work examines the importance of hemodynamics in the characterization of pulsatile blood flow patterns in individual Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) models. These patient-specific computational models have been developed for the numerical simulation of the momentum transport equations utilizing the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the spatial and temporal discretization. We characterize pulsatile flow dynamics in AAAs for average resting conditions by means of identifying regions of disturbed flow and quantifying the disturbance by evaluating wall pressure and wall shear stresses at the aneurysm wall. PMID:14515766

  2. Blood flow assessment in a heart with septal defect based on optical flow analysis of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Kuklik, P.; Kelso, R. M.; Worthley, S. G.; Sanders, P.; Mazumdar, J.; Abbott, D.

    2007-12-01

    This study describes an application based on the optical flow algorithm to construct a 2D velocity field plot. The estimated velocity field is used to track the movement of blood in real time. This methodology has been applied to medical images to quantify blood flow turbulence in the right atrium of the heart. Blood intensity fields that are obtained from clinical MRI scan sequences can be analyzed using this method. Septal defects and other heart diseases can be assessed for degrees of abnormality and post-surgical success can be evaluated. We have developed this technique specifically for characterizing the turbulence generated due to such heart abnormalities. The degree of turbulence and fluid shear stress can be determined from the measured flow field. The cardio dynamics information that is based on flow analysis and visualization of blood offers potential for the detection and quantification of myocardial malfunctioning.

  3. Flow analysis on sea-water mists flows among bridge beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Masaaki; Oshiro, Daigo

    2014-04-01

    In the subtropical islands enclosed in the ocean, there is a problem that corrosion of structures progresses quickly because of high temperature and humidity and adhesion of sea-water mists flying from sea. Authors are interested in corrosion of bridge made of weatherability steel. Therefore, it needs to investigate the flow structure around bridge beams and motion of sea-water mist (droplet). In this paper, authors attempt flow visualization and PIV to understand the flow structures around bridge beams and numerical approach of motion of droplets to understand the collision of seawater mists on the bridge wall.

  4. Analysis of daily river flow fluctuations using empirical mode decomposition and arbitrary order Hilbert spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongxiang; Schmitt, François G.; Lu, Zhiming.; Liu, Yulu

    2009-06-01

    SummaryIn this paper we presented the analysis of two long time series of daily river flow data, 32 years recorded in the Seine river (France), and 25 years recorded in the Wimereux river (Wimereux, France). We applied a scale based decomposition method, namely Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), on these time series. The data were decomposed into several Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF). The mean frequency of each IMF mode indicated that the EMD method acts as a filter bank. Furthermore, the cross-correlation between these IMF modes from the Seine river and Wimereux river demonstrated correlation among the large scale IMF modes, which indicates that both rivers are likely to be influenced by the same maritime climate event of Northern France. As a confirmation we found that the large scale parts have the same evolution trend. We finally applied arbitrary order Hilbert spectral analysis, a new technique coming from turbulence studies and time series analysis, on the flow discharge of the Seine river. This new method provides an amplitude-frequency representation of the original time series, giving a joint pdf p(ω,A). When marginal moments of the amplitude are computed, one obtains an intermittency study in the frequency space. Applied to river flow discharge data from the Seine river, this shows the scaling range and characterizes the intermittent fluctuations over the range of scales from 4.5 to 60 days, between synoptic and intraseasonal scales.

  5. AMS analysis and flow source relationship of lava flows and ignimbrites from the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, C. I.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Morales-Barrera, W.; Rodríguez, S. R.

    2013-05-01

    The results of an AMS analysis carried on 36 sites from a late Miocene - Holocene volcanic stratigraphic sequence from the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt is presented. 22 sites (450 samples) belong to lava flows, mainly of basaltic composition, from different emission centers from the Xalapa Monogenitc Volcanic Field, (Rodríguez et al 2010, González-Mercado, 2005), "Cofre de Perote Vent Cluster" (CPVC), "Naolinco Volcanic Field" (NVF), (Siebert and Carrasco-Núñez, 2002), and the Chiconquiaco-Palma Sola volcanic complex (López-Infanzón, 1991; Ferrari et al., 2005). 14 sites belong to the widely distributed El Castillo rhyolitic ignimbrite dated 2.44 to 2.21 Ma (Morales-Barrera, 2009) which is a non-welded to welded ignimbrite. AMS measurements were performed with a KLY2 Kappabridge and processed with Anisoft software using Jelinek statistics. Sometimes a density distribution analysis was also performed when magnetic fabric showed more dispersed distribution patterns. AMS ellipsoids from basalt sites show mostly prolate shapes, while those from ignimbrites show mostly oblate shapes, which may partly due to magnetic mineralogy and also to flow dynamics. Flow directions were mostly obtained from the imbrication angle of magnetic foliation (evaluated from kmin axis mean as corresponding to its pole) and considering the symmetry of the axes distribution. Flow direction inferences are discussed in relation with flow source when it is clearly evident from geologic field observations, as it is usually the case with basalt lava flows. While in ignimbrites, flow inferences from petrographic and facies distributions are compared with AMS flow inferences, showing agreement between them in some cases but not in others, may be due to local tilting occurring after ignimbrite emplacement.

  6. Information Flow Analysis of Level 4 Payload Processing Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danz, Mary E.

    1991-01-01

    The Level 4 Mission Sequence Test (MST) was studied to develop strategies and recommendations to facilitate information flow. Recommendations developed as a result of this study include revised format of the Test and Assembly Procedure (TAP) document and a conceptualized software based system to assist in the management of information flow during the MST.

  7. FLOW CYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE CELLULAR TOXICITY OF TRIBUTYLIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow cytometric and light/fluorescence microscopic analyses indicate that tributylin (TBT) alters the plasma membrane/cytoplasm complex of the murine erythrleukemic cell (MELC) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. he flow cytometric parameter axial light loss, a measure...

  8. Analysis of nitrogen condensation in an expanding nozzle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    Condensation of nitrogen flow in an expanding nozzle flow is analyzed using one-dimensional gas dynamic equations and the equations for nucleation and droplet growth. Effects of variations in the Tolman constant and the mass accommodation factor are discussed as well as the effect of foreign nuclei. Comparisons are made with experimental data obtained from a small, contoured nozzle.

  9. FLOW CYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE CELLULAR TOXICITY TRIBUTYLTIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow cytometric and light/fluorescence microscopic analyses indicate that tributyltin (TBT) alters the plasma membrane/cytoplasm complex of the murine erythroleukemic cell (MELC) in a dose dependent and time-dependent manner. he flow cytometric parameter axial light loss, a measu...

  10. Analysis of flood-flow frequency, flow duration, and channel-forming flow for the James River in South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The James River, which originates in North Dakota and joins the Missouri River near Yankton, South Dakota, is about 747 miles long, with about 474 river miles located in South Dakota. The James River basin includes 21,116 sq mi, with 14,428 sq mi located in South Dakota. Bankfull capacity of the James River in South Dakota ranges from a minimum of about 200 cu ft/sec near the mouth. Discharges that produce bankfull conditions on much of the river in South Dakota occur on an average of once in about 2 years. The 10-year flood flows, which range from 1,620 cu ft/sec (at the gage near Stratford) to 8,870 cu ft/sec (at the gage near Scotland), cause major flooding on most of the river in South Dakota. The river also has potential for extending periods of low or zero flow, especially in the northern portion within South Dakota. Generally, low flows occur from late summer until spring snowmelt. The James River at Columbia had zero flow for 623 consecutive days from July 13, 1958, through March 26, 1960. The channel pattern (channel alignment) has changed little since 1922. This channel stability indicates that channel formation is approaching a state of equilibrium. It does not appear that velocities in the river are sufficient to carry the sediment being delivered by the tributaries. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Statistical analysis of coherent structures in transitional pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Tobias M.; Eckhardt, Bruno; Vollmer, Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    Numerical and experimental studies of transitional pipe flow have shown the prevalence of coherent flow structures that are dominated by downstream vortices. They attract special attention because they contribute predominantly to the increase of the Reynolds stresses in turbulent flow. In the present study we introduce a convenient detector for these coherent states, calculate the fraction of time the structures appear in the flow, and present a Markov model for the transition between the structures. The fraction of states that show vortical structures exceeds 24% for a Reynolds number of about Re=2200 , and it decreases to about 20% for Re=2500 . The Markov model for the transition between these states is in good agreement with the observed fraction of states, and in reasonable agreement with the prediction for their persistence. It provides insight into dominant qualitative changes of the flow when increasing the Reynolds number.

  12. An Ion-Selective Electrode/Flow-Injection Analysis Experiment: Determination of Potassium in Serum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Kovach, Paul M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a low-cost, senior-level, instrumental analysis experiment in which a home-made potassium tubular flow-through electrode is constructed and incorporated into a flow injection analysis system (FIA). Also describes experiments for evaluating the electrode's response properties, examining basic FIA concepts, and determining potassium in…

  13. Analysis of ETMS Data Quality for Traffic Flow Management Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, Gano B.; Sridhar, Banavar; Kim, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    The data needed for air traffic flow management decision support tools is provided by the Enhanced Traffic Management System (ETMS). This includes both the tools that are in current use and the ones being developed for future deployment. Since the quality of decision support provided by all these tools will be influenced by the quality of the input ETMS data, an assessment of ETMS data quality is needed. Motivated by this desire, ETMS data quality is examined in this paper in terms of the unavailability of flight plans, deviation from the filed flight plans, departure delays, altitude errors and track data drops. Although many of these data quality issues are not new, little is known about their extent. A goal of this paper is to document the magnitude of data quality issues supported by numerical analysis of ETMS data. Guided by this goal, ETMS data for a 24-hour period were processed to determine the number of aircraft with missing flight plan messages at any given instant of time. Results are presented for aircraft above 18,000 feet altitude and also at all altitudes. Since deviation from filed flight plan is also a major cause of trajectory-modeling errors, statistics of deviations are presented. Errors in proposed departure times and ETMS-generated vertical profiles are also shown. A method for conditioning the vertical profiles for improving demand prediction accuracy is described. Graphs of actual sector counts obtained using these vertical profiles are compared with those obtained using the Host data for sectors in the Fort Worth Center to demonstrate the benefit of preprocessing. Finally, results are presented to quantify the extent of data drops. A method for propagating track positions during ETMS data drops is also described.

  14. Aequorea green fluorescent protein analysis by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ropp, J.D.; Cuthbertson, R.A.; Donahue, C.J.; Wolfgang-Kimball, D.

    1995-12-01

    The isolation and expression of the cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria has highlighted its potential use as a marker for gene expression in a variety of cell types. The longer wavelength peak (470 nm) of GFP`s bimodal absorption spectrum better matches standard fluorescein filter sets; however, it has a considerably lower amplitude than the major absorption peak at 395. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of GFP with routinely available instrumentation, Heim et al. have generated a GFP mutant (serine-65 to threonine; S65T-GFP) which possesses a single absorption peak centered at 490 nm. We have constructed this mutant in order to determine whether it or wild-type GFP (wt-GFP) afforded greater sensitivity when excited near their respective absorption maxima. Using the conventionally available 488 nm and ultraviolet (UV) laser lines from the argon ion laser as well as the 407 nm line from a krypton ion laser with enhanced violet emission, we were able to closely match the absorption maxima of both the S65T and wild-type forms of Aequorea GFP and analyze differences in fluorescence intensity of transiently transfected 293 cells with flow cytometry. The highest fluorescence signal was observed with 488 nm excitation of S65T-GFP relative to all other laser line/GFP pairs. The wt-GFP fluorescence intensity, in contrast, was significantly higher at 407 nm relative to either 488 nm or UV. These results were consistent with parallel spectrofluorometric analysis of the emission spectrum for wt-GFP and S65T- GFP. The relative contribution of cellular autofluorescence at each wavelength was also investigated and shown to be significantly reduced at 407 nm relative to either UV or 488 nm. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J.; Smith, Jeff; Dugan, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating

  16. Computational analysis of high-throughput flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flow cytometry has been around for over 40 years, but only recently has the opportunity arisen to move into the high-throughput domain. The technology is now available and is highly competitive with imaging tools under the right conditions. Flow cytometry has, however, been a technology that has focused on its unique ability to study single cells and appropriate analytical tools are readily available to handle this traditional role of the technology. Areas covered Expansion of flow cytometry to a high-throughput (HT) and high-content technology requires both advances in hardware and analytical tools. The historical perspective of flow cytometry operation as well as how the field has changed and what the key changes have been discussed. The authors provide a background and compelling arguments for moving toward HT flow, where there are many innovative opportunities. With alternative approaches now available for flow cytometry, there will be a considerable number of new applications. These opportunities show strong capability for drug screening and functional studies with cells in suspension. Expert opinion There is no doubt that HT flow is a rich technology awaiting acceptance by the pharmaceutical community. It can provide a powerful phenotypic analytical toolset that has the capacity to change many current approaches to HT screening. The previous restrictions on the technology, based on its reduced capacity for sample throughput, are no longer a major issue. Overcoming this barrier has transformed a mature technology into one that can focus on systems biology questions not previously considered possible. PMID:22708834

  17. Uncertainty analysis for K-reactor flow instability LOCA limits

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B.J. )

    1992-01-01

    A postulated accident scenario for the Savannah River Site (SRS) K reactor is a double-ended guillotine break loss-of-coolant accident (DEGB/LOCA) caused by a coolant pipe break at the plenum inlet. The DEBG/LOCA consists of two parts, the first of which applies to the first few seconds of the transient. The first part of the DEGB/LOCA is addressed in this paper. In the first few seconds after the pipe break, there is a rapid depressurization of the plenum, which results in a rapid reduction in the core flow rate. Safety rod insertion is not assumed to begin until 1 s after the pipe break, and the rods are assumed not to be fully inserted until {approximately} 2 s after the break. The resulting flow-power mismatch results in coolant heating and possible flow disruption via a Ledinegg-type flow instability. It is assumed that assembly integrity will be compromised if flow disruption occurs. Because Ledinegg flow instability is the limiting phenomenon for the initial phase of the DEGB/LOCA transient, this part of the transient is called the flow instability (FI) phase.

  18. Performance analysis of axial-flow mixing impellers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Pullum, L.

    2000-03-01

    Theoretical formulations for impeller performance were evaluated based on a blade-element theory. These enable the calculation of the head and power vs. flow-rate curves of axial-flow impellers. The technique uses the life and drag coefficients of the blade section of an impeller to calculate the spanwise swirl-velocity distribution. Using the angular-momentum equation, it is possible to calculate the corresponding spanwise distribution of the energy head of the impeller. Integration of these distributions of head and torque gives the impeller's performance. Parameters including the flow number, the power number, the thrust force number, and the swirl velocity can be found at the impeller operating point, determined using the head curve and an experimentally calibrated resistance curve. A laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure the velocity distribution for different axial flow impellers in mixing tanks. Calculated flow and power numbers agreed well with the experimental results. Using the blade's spanwise head distribution and a set of calibrated flow-resistance data, it is also possible to estimate an impeller's outlet axial-velocity distribution. Predictions compared well with LDV experimental data. The effect of impeller-blade angle, number of blades, blade camber, and blade thickness on the performance of axial-flow impellers was investigated using the Agitator software.

  19. Analysis of the time scales in time periodic Darcy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Waluga, C.; Wohlmuth, B.; Manhart, M.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate unsteady flow in a porous medium under time - periodic (sinusoidal) pressure gradient. DNS were performed to benchmark the analytical solution of the unsteady Darcy equation with two different expressions of the time scale : one given by a consistent volume averaging of the Navier - Stokes equation [1] with a steady state closure for the flow resistance term, another given by volume averaging of the kinetic energy equation [2] with a closure for the dissipation rate . For small and medium frequencies, the analytical solutions with the time scale obtained by the energy approach compare well with the DNS results in terms of amplitude and phase lag. For large frequencies (f > 100 [Hz]) we observe a slightly smaller damping of the amplitude. This study supports the use of the unsteady form of Darcy's equation with constant coefficients to solve time - periodic Darcy flows at low and medium frequencies. Our DNS simulations, however, indicate that the time scale predicted by the VANS approach together with a steady - state closure for the flow resistance term is too small. The one obtained by the energy approach matches the DNS results well. At large frequencies, the amplitudes deviate slightly from the analytical solution of the unsteady Darcy equation. Note that at those high frequencies, the flow amplitudes remain below 1% of those of steady state flow. This result indicates that unsteady porous media flow can approximately be described by the unsteady Darcy equation with constant coefficients for a large range of frequencies, provided, the proper time scale has been found.

  20. Performance analysis of vortex based mixers for confined flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschhagen, Timo

    The hybrid rocket is still sparsely employed within major space or defense projects due to their relatively poor combustion efficiency and low fuel grain regression rate. Although hybrid rockets can claim advantages in safety, environmental and performance aspects against established solid and liquid propellant systems, the boundary layer combustion process and the diffusion based mixing within a hybrid rocket grain port leaves the core flow unmixed and limits the system performance. One principle used to enhance the mixing of gaseous flows is to induce streamwise vorticity. The counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) mixer utilizes this principle and introduces two vortices into a confined flow, generating a stirring motion in order to transport near wall media towards the core and vice versa. Recent studies investigated the velocity field introduced by this type of swirler. The current work is evaluating the mixing performance of the CVP concept, by using an experimental setup to simulate an axial primary pipe flow with a radially entering secondary flow. Hereby the primary flow is altered by the CVP swirler unit. The resulting setup therefore emulates a hybrid rocket motor with a cylindrical single port grain. In order to evaluate the mixing performance the secondary flow concentration at the pipe assembly exit is measured, utilizing a pressure-sensitive paint based procedure.

  1. Fractal analysis: A new remote sensing tool for lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Rowland, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Self, S.

    1992-01-01

    Many important quantitative parameters have been developed that relate to the rheology and eruption and emplacement mechanics of lavas. This research centers on developing additional, unique parameters, namely the fractal properties of lava flows, to add to this matrix of properties. There are several methods of calculating the fractal dimension of a lava flow margin. We use the 'structured walk' or 'divider' method. In this method, we measure the length of a given lava flow margin by walking rods of different lengths along the margin. Since smaller rod lengths transverse more smaller-scaled features in the flow margin, the apparent length of the flow outline will increase as the length of the measuring rod decreases. By plotting the apparent length of the flow outline as a function of the length of the measuring rod on a log-log plot, fractal behavior can be determined. A linear trend on a log-log plot indicates that the data are fractal. The fractal dimension can then be calculated from the slope of the linear least squares fit line to the data. We use this 'structured walk' method to calculate the fractal dimension of many lava flows using a wide range of rod lengths, from 1/8 to 16 meters, in field studies of the Hawaiian islands. We also use this method to calculate fractal dimensions from aerial photographs of lava flows, using lengths ranging from 20 meters to over 2 kilometers. Finally, we applied this method to orbital images of extraterrestrial lava flows on Venus, Mars, and the Moon, using rod lengths up to 60 kilometers.

  2. A 2-D oscillating flow analysis in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted, simulating the gas flow inside Stirling heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10800 (Va = 272), 19300 (Va = 272), and 60800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Also, predictions of the flow regime on present oscillating flow conditions were checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase differences with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, performance evaluation of the K-epsilon model was made to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  3. A 2-D oscillating flow analysis in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted, simulating the gas flow inside Stirling heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10800 (Va = 272), 19300 (Va = 272), and 60800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Also, predictions of the flow regime on present oscillating flow conditions were checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase differences with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, performance evaluation of the K-epsilon model was made to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  4. DAMAGE DETECTION IN PLATE STRUCTURES USING MODAL POWER FLOW ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Wong, W. O.; Cheng, L.

    2010-05-28

    The power flow and energy distribution of a vibration mode of a damaged plate is studied experimentally. Variation of the modal reactive power distribution of a damaged plate is experimentally evaluated with a scanning LDV and compared to the theoretical predictions. Large variation of local reactive power flow in or around the damage region of a plate under resonant vibration is found to be related to the change of strain and kinetic energies in the damage region. Feasibility of damage identification based on the detection of this local variation of modal reactive power flow in a structure is studied.

  5. Finite element analysis of periodic transonic flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.

    1978-01-01

    Flow about an oscillating thin airfoil in a transonic stream was considered. It was assumed that the flow field can be decomposed into a mean flow plus a periodic perturbation. On the surface of the airfoil the usual Neumman conditions are imposed. Two computer programs were written, both using linear basis functions over triangles for the finite element space. The first program uses a banded Gaussian elimination solver to solve the matrix problem, while the second uses an iterative technique, namely SOR. The only results obtained are for an oscillating flat plate.

  6. Statistical analysis on the signals monitoring multiphase flow patterns in pipeline-riser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing; Guo, Liejin

    2013-07-01

    The signals monitoring petroleum transmission pipeline in offshore oil industry usually contain abundant information about the multiphase flow on flow assurance which includes the avoidance of most undesirable flow pattern. Therefore, extracting reliable features form these signals to analyze is an alternative way to examine the potential risks to oil platform. This paper is focused on characterizing multiphase flow patterns in pipeline-riser system that is often appeared in offshore oil industry and finding an objective criterion to describe the transition of flow patterns. Statistical analysis on pressure signal at the riser top is proposed, instead of normal prediction method based on inlet and outlet flow conditions which could not be easily determined during most situations. Besides, machine learning method (least square supported vector machine) is also performed to classify automatically the different flow patterns. The experiment results from a small-scale loop show that the proposed method is effective for analyzing the multiphase flow pattern.

  7. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  8. Similarity analysis of compressor tip clearance flow structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. T.; Greitzer, E. M.; Tan, C. S.; Marble, F. E.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach is presented for analyzing compressor tip clearance flow. The basic idea is that the clearance velocity field can be (approximately) decomposed into independent throughflow and crossflow, since chordwise pressure gradients are much smaller than normal pressure gradients in the clearance region. As in the slender body approximation in external aerodynamics, this description implies that the three-dimensional steady clearance flow can be viewed as a two-dimensional, unsteady flow. Using this approach, a similarity scaling for the crossflow in the clearance region is developed and a generalized description of the clearance vortex is derived. Calculations based on the similarity scaling agree well with a wide range of experimental data in regard to flow features such as crossflow velocity field, static pressure field, and tip clearance vortex trajectory.

  9. Analysis of biomaterial latex-derived flow mechanical controller.

    PubMed

    Paula, Patricia M C; Rodrigues, Suelia S R; Brasil, Lourdes M; Silva, Rita C; da Rocha, Adson F

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the basic guidelines for developing an innovative biomedical device. It covers the issues of researching about a suitable material, developing a new device, and testing its proprieties to check its effectiveness. The goal of the device is to control food flow into the esophagus, reducing its volume and the speed of food intake to help in the treatment of obesity. This module, called Esophageal Flow Controller (EFC®), is made of latex. Three different models of prototypes were developed, and 10 units of each model had their constructive and mechanical characteristics evaluated. All of them have followed the same manufacturing cycle. The results showed that the Esophageal Flow Control module has all the essential characteristics of an effective device for flow control in the esophagus. PMID:21096751

  10. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  11. Analysis of daily river flow fluctuations using empirical mode decomposition and arbitrary order Hilbert spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. X.; Schmitt, F. G.; Lu, Z. M.; Liu, Y. L.

    2009-04-01

    In this work, we present the analysis of two long time series of daily river flow data, 32 years recorded in the Seine river (France), and 25 years recorded in the Wimereux river (Wimereux, France). We apply a scale based decomposition method, namely Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), on these time series. The data are decomposed into several Intrinsic Mode Function (IMF). The mean frequency of each mode indicates that the EMD method acts as a filter bank. Furthermore, the cross-correlation between these IMF modes from the Seine river and the Wimereux river demonstrates strong correlation among the large scale IMF modes, which indicates that both rivers are influenced by the same events. We also find that the large scale parts have the same evolution trend. We finally apply arbitrary order Hilbert spectral analysis (Huang et al. EPL, 2008), a new technique coming from turbulence studies and time series analysis, on the flow of the Seine river. This new method provides on amplitude-frequency representation of the original time series, giving a joint pdf p(ω,A). When marginal moments of the amplitude are computed, one obtains an intermittency study in the frequency space. Applied to river flow discharge data from the Seine river, this shows the scaling range and characterizes the intermittent fluctuations over the range of scales from 4.5 day to 60 days. Reference Huang Y.X., Schmitt F. G., Lu Z.M. And Liu Y.L. An amplitude-frequency study of turbulent scaling intermittency using Hilbert spectral analysis Europhys. Lett. 2008, 84: 40010

  12. Analysis of Flow Angularity Repeatability Tests in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive data base of flow angularity repeatability measurements from four NTF check standard model tests is analyzed for statistical consistency and to characterize the results for prediction of angle-of-attack uncertainty for customer tests. A procedure for quality assurance for flow angularity measurements during customer tests is also presented. The efficacy of the procedure is tested using results from a customer test.

  13. Analysis of groundwater flow in mountainous, headwater catchments with permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Sarah G.; Ge, Shemin; Liang, Sihai

    2015-12-01

    Headwater catchments have a direct impact on the water resources of downstream lowland regions as they supply freshwater in the form of surface runoff and discharging groundwater. Often, these mountainous catchments contain expansive permafrost that may alter the natural topographically controlled groundwater flow system. As permafrost could degrade with climate change, it is imperative to understand the effect of permafrost on groundwater flow in headwater catchments. This study characterizes groundwater flow in mountainous headwater catchments and evaluates the effect of permafrost in the context of climate change on groundwater movement using a three-dimensional, finite element, hydrogeologic model. The model is applied to a representative headwater catchment on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China. Results from the model simulations indicate that groundwater contributes significantly to streams in the form of baseflow and the majority of groundwater flow is from the shallow aquifer above the permafrost, disrupting the typical topographically controlled flow pattern observed in most permafrost-free headwater catchments. Under a warming scenario where mean annual surface temperature is increased by 2°C, reducing the areal extent of permafrost in the catchment, groundwater contribution to streamflow may increase three-fold. These findings suggest that, in headwater catchments, permafrost has a large influence on groundwater flow and stream discharge. Increased annual air temperatures may increase groundwater discharge to streams, which has implications for ecosystem health and the long-term availability of water resources to downstream regions.

  14. Error analysis of combined stereo/optical-flow passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1991-01-01

    The motion of an imaging sensor causes each imaged point of the scene to correspondingly describe a time trajectory on the image plane. The trajectories of all imaged points are reminiscent of a flow (e.g., of liquid) which is the source of the term 'optical flow'. Optical-flow ranging is a method by which the stream of two-dimensional images obtained from a forward-looking forward-moving passive sensor is used to compute depth (or range) to points in the field of view. Another well-known ranging method consists of triangulation based on stereo images obtained from at least two stationary sensors. In this paper we analyze the potential accuracies of a combined optical flow and stereo passive-ranging system in the context of helicopter nap-of-the-earth obstacle avoidance. The Cramer-Rao lower bound is developed for the combined system under the assumption of an unknown angular bias error common to both cameras of a stereo pair. It is shown that the depth accuracy degradations caused by a bias error is negligible for a combined optical-flow and stereo system as compared to a monocular optical-flow system.

  15. Analysis of vortical flow with axial swirl and toroidal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sukalyan

    2006-11-01

    Vortical flows with an axial swirl and a toroidal circulation can be observed in a wide range of fluid mechanical phenomena such as flow around rotary machines or natural vortices like tornadoes and hurricanes. These flows can be described by a general scalar equation if incompressible fluid and negligible viscous dissipation are assumed. We consider one of the simpler cases of this general formulation where the involved equation has a resemblance with the governing equation of the hydrogen problem. As a result, we obtain a quantization relation similar to the expression of quantized energies in an hydrogen atom. We solve the equation for two systems. First, we consider three- dimensional vortices confined between two parallel walls. Our examples include flows between two infinite plates, inside and outside of a vertical cylinder bounded at the ends by walls, and in an axially confined annular region. Then we also use our formulation to compute highly chaotic velocity fields with three-dimensional vortical structures which qualitatively mimic the features of physical flows. Hence, these solutions may be used in modeling of complicated flow systems.

  16. Computerized tomographic analysis of fluid flow in fractured tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, C.W.; Sharer, J.C. ); Springer, E.P. )

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to demonstrate the usefulness of X-ray computerized tomography to observe fluid flow down a fracture and rock matrix imbibition in a sample of Bandelier tuff. This was accomplished by using a tuff sample 152.4 mm long and 50.8 mm in diameter. A longitudinal fracture was created by cutting the core with a wire saw. The fractured piece was then coupled to its adjacent section to that the fracture was not expected. Water was injected into a dry sample at five flow rates and CT scanning performed at set intervals during the flow. Cross sectional images and longitudinal reconstructions were built and saturation profiles calculated for the sample at each time interval at each flow rate. The results showed that for the test conditions, the fracture was not a primary pathway of fluid flow down the sample. At a slow fluid injection rate into the dry sample, the fluid was imbibed into the rock uniformly down the length of the core. With increasing injection rates, the flow remained uniform over the core cross section through complete saturation.

  17. Application Guide for AFINCH (Analysis of Flows in Networks of Channels) Described by NHDPlus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.

    2009-01-01

    AFINCH (Analysis of Flows in Networks of CHannels) is a computer application that can be used to generate a time series of monthly flows at stream segments (flowlines) and water yields for catchments defined in the National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHDPlus) value-added attribute system. AFINCH provides a basis for integrating monthly flow data from streamgages, water-use data, monthly climatic data, and land-cover characteristics to estimate natural monthly water yields from catchments by user-defined regression equations. Images of monthly water yields for active streamgages are generated in AFINCH and provide a basis for detecting anomalies in water yields, which may be associated with undocumented flow diversions or augmentations. Water yields are multiplied by the drainage areas of the corresponding catchments to estimate monthly flows. Flows from catchments are accumulated downstream through the streamflow network described by the stream segments. For stream segments where streamgages are active, ratios of measured to accumulated flows are computed. These ratios are applied to upstream water yields to proportionally adjust estimated flows to match measured flows. Flow is conserved through the NHDPlus network. A time series of monthly flows can be generated for stream segments that average about 1-mile long, or monthly water yields from catchments that average about 1 square mile. Estimated monthly flows can be displayed within AFINCH, examined for nonstationarity, and tested for monotonic trends. Monthly flows also can be used to estimate flow-duration characteristics at stream segments. AFINCH generates output files of monthly flows and water yields that are compatible with ArcMap, a geographical information system analysis and display environment. Chloropleth maps of monthly water yield and flow can be generated and analyzed within ArcMap by joining NHDPlus data structures with AFINCH output. Matlab code for the AFINCH application is presented.

  18. Flow analysis of Space Shuttle feed line 17-inch disconnect valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandula, Max; Pearce, Daniel

    A steady incompressible three-dimensional viscous flow analysis has been conducted for the Space Shuttle external-tank/orbiter propellant-feed-line disconnect flapper valves with upstream elbows. The full Navier-Stokes code INS3D is modified to handle interior obstacles. Important flow characteristics such as secondary flows, recirculation, vortex and wake regions, and separated flows are observed. Computed values for forces, moments, and pressure drop are in satisfactory agreement with water flow test data covering a maximum tube Reynolds number of 3.5 x 10 to the 6th.

  19. CFD-based aero-optical analysis of flow fields over two-dimensional cavities with active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan

    Prediction and control of optical wave front distortions and aberrations in a high energy laser beam due to interaction with an unsteady highly non-uniform flow field is of great importance in the development of directed energy weapon systems for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV). The unsteady shear layer over the weapons bay cavity is the primary cause of this distortion of the optical wave front. The large scale vortical structure of the shear layer over the cavity can be significantly reduced by employing an active flow control technique combined with passive flow control. This dissertation explores various active and passive control methods to suppress the cavity oscillations and thereby improve the aero-optics of cavity flow. In active flow control technique, a steady or a pulsed jet is applied at the sharp leading edge of cavities of different aspect ratios L/D (=2, 4, 15), where L and D are the width and the depth of a cavity respectively. In the passive flow control approach, the sharp leading or trailing edge of the cavity is modified into a round edge of different radii. Both of these active and passive flow control approaches are studied independently and in combination. Numerical simulations are performed, with and without active flow control for subsonic free stream flow past two-dimensional sharp and round leading or trailing edge cavities using Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model or a hybrid SST/Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. Aero-optical analysis is developed and applied to all the simulation cases. Index of refraction and Optical Path Difference (OPD) are compared for flow fields without and with active flow control. Root-Mean-Square (RMS) value of OPD is calculated and compared with the experimental data, where available. The effect of steady and pulsed blowing on buffet loading on the downstream face of the cavity is also computed. Using the numerical

  20. A Computer Program for Flow-Log Analysis of Single Holes (FLASH)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Johnson, C.D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Halford, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new computer program, FLASH (Flow-Log Analysis of Single Holes), is presented for the analysis of borehole vertical flow logs. The code is based on an analytical solution for steady-state multilayer radial flow to a borehole. The code includes options for (1) discrete fractures and (2) multilayer aquifers. Given vertical flow profiles collected under both ambient and stressed (pumping or injection) conditions, the user can estimate fracture (or layer) transmissivities and far-field hydraulic heads. FLASH is coded in Microsoft Excel with Visual Basic for Applications routines. The code supports manual and automated model calibration. ?? 2011, The Author(s). Ground Water ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  1. Spatial Temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (STICS) for Flow Analysis with Application for Blood Flow Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Rossow, Molly; Gratton, Enrico; Mantulin, William M.

    2009-04-19

    It is important for surgeons to be able to measure blood flow in exposed arterioles during surgery. We report our progress in the development of an optical technique that will measure blood flow in surgically exposed blood vessels and enable previously difficult measurements. By monitoring optical fluctuations, the optical technique, based on Spatial Temporal Image Correlation (STICS), will directly measure the velocity of micron-scale particles--such as red blood cells. It will complement existing technology and provide qualitative measurements that were not previously possible. It relies on the concept that blood, when viewed on a small enough scale, is an inhomogeneous substance. Individual blood cells passing between a near-infrared light source and a detector will cause fluctuations in the transmitted optical signal. The speed, direction, and flow pattern of blood cells can be determined from these optical fluctuations. We present a series of computer simulations and experiments on phantom and animal systems to test this technique's ability to map complex flow patterns.

  2. Spatial Temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (STICS) for Flow Analysis with Application for Blood Flow Mapping (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossow, Molly; Mantulin, William M.; Gratton, Enrico

    2009-04-01

    It is important for surgeons to be able to measure blood flow in exposed arterioles during surgery. We report our progress in the development of an optical technique that will measure blood flow in surgically exposed blood vessels and enable previously difficult measurements. By monitoring optical fluctuations, the optical technique, based on Spatial Temporal Image Correlation (STICS), will directly measure the velocity of micron-scale particles-such as red blood cells. It will complement existing technology and provide qualitative measurements that were not previously possible. It relies on the concept that blood, when viewed on a small enough scale, is an inhomogeneous substance. Individual blood cells passing between a near-infrared light source and a detector will cause fluctuations in the transmitted optical signal. The speed, direction, and flow pattern of blood cells can be determined from these optical fluctuations. We present a series of computer simulations and experiments on phantom and animal systems to test this technique's ability to map complex flow patterns.

  3. Material flow analysis of used personal computers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Aya; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Terazono, Atsushi

    2009-05-01

    Most personal computers (PCs) are discarded by consumers after the data files have been moved to a new PC. Therefore, a used PC collection scheme should be created that does not depend on the distribution route of new PCs. In Japan, manufacturers' voluntary take-back recycling schemes were established in 2001 (for business PCs) and 2003 (for household PCs). At the same time, the export of used PCs from Japan increased, affecting the domestic PC reuse market. These regulatory and economic conditions would have changed the flow of used PCs. In this paper, we developed a method of minimizing the errors in estimating the material flow of used PCs. The method's features include utilization of both input and output flow data and elimination of subjective estimation as much as possible. Flow rate data from existing surveys were used for estimating the flow of used PCs in Japan for fiscal years (FY) 2000, 2001, and 2004. The results show that 3.92 million and 4.88 million used PCs were discarded in FY 2000 and 2001, respectively. Approximately two-thirds of the discarded PCs were disposed of or recycled within the country, one-fourth was reused within the country, and 8% were exported. In FY 2004, 7.47 million used PCs were discarded. The ratio of domestic disposal and recycling decreased to 37% in FY 2004, whereas the domestic reuse and export ratios increased to 37% and 26%, respectively. Flows from businesses to retailers in FY 2004 increased dramatically, which led to increased domestic reuse. An increase in the flow of used PCs from lease and rental companies to secondhand shops has led to increased exports. Results of interviews with members of PC reuse companies were and trade statistics were used to verify the results of our estimation of domestic reuse and export of used PCs. PMID:19144503

  4. Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-04-28

    A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

  5. Novel flow-through pneumatoamperometric detector for determination of nanogram and subnanogram amounts of nitrite by flow-injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trojanek, A.; Bruckenstein, S.

    1986-04-01

    A gas porous electrode structure that detects volatile electroactive species in a flowing liquid stream is described and evaluated for its utility in flow injection analysis. The electrode is fabricated by depositing a porous gold layer on one side of a porous Teflon membrane. The gold serves as the amperometric electrode which consumes dissolved, volatile species that is transported from the flowing solution through the membrane to the metalized face where it is electrolyzed. Nitrite ion is determined by reaction in the carrier stream to produce nitric oxide and iodine, and both are electroxidized at the gold electrode. The detection limit is 30 pg of nitrite ion. Dissolved, nonvolatile electroactive species do not interfere. 17 references, 3 figures.

  6. Meanline Analysis of Turbines with Choked Flow in the Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of turbomachinery performance characteristics is an important part of the conceptual aircraft engine design process. During this phase, the designer must examine the effects of a large number of turbomachinery design parameters to determine their impact on overall engine performance and weight. The lack of detailed design information available in this phase necessitates the use of simpler meanline and streamline methods to determine the turbomachinery geometry characteristics and provide performance estimates prior to more detailed CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analyses. While a number of analysis codes have been developed for this purpose, most are written in outdated software languages and may be difficult or impossible to apply to new, unconventional designs. The Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code (OTAC) is currently being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center to provide a flexible meanline and streamline analysis capability in a modern object-oriented language. During the development and validation of OTAC, a limitation was identified in the code's ability to analyze and converge turbines as the flow approached choking. This paper describes a series of changes which can be made to typical OTAC turbine meanline models to enable the assessment of choked flow up to limit load conditions. Results produced with this revised model setup are provided in the form of turbine performance maps and are compared to published maps.

  7. Extended Conformal Mappings for Supersonic Aircraft Calculations. [of supersonic flow (numerical analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1976-01-01

    A gasdynamical analysis is presented for a three-dimensional, supersonic, inviscid, steady, shockless flow past an arbitrary airframe, using computational grids. The analysis, which includes special treatments for body points and bow-shock points, relies on the equations of motion written in terms of logarithm of pressure entropy and two angles reprising the velocity vector. A FORTRAN code was employed (sample geometry is shown). The flow analysis is considered reliable for aircraft cross-sections that are elliptical in shape.

  8. Studies of the analyte-carrier interface in flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical analysis in flowing solution is popular for automation of classical methods. However, most of the classical methods are not specific enough for direct multicomponent analysis of simple mixtures. This research project has the goals of study of rapid multicomponent analysis of transient species in flowing media, and investigations of chemical reactions at interfaces and of effects of competition on distribution of products from interfacial reaction. This report summarizes work done over the past 4.5 years; support has been terminated.

  9. Flow development and analysis of MHD generators and seawater thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D. ); Roy, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper, the flow characteristics inside magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma generators and seawater thrusters are analyzed and are compared using a three-dimensional computer model that solves the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and electrical fields. Calculations have been performed for a Faraday plasma generator and for a continuous electrode seawater thruster. The results of the calculations show that the effects caused by the interaction of the MHD forces with the fluid flow are strongly manifested in the case of the MHD generator as compared to the flow development in the MHD thruster. The existence of velocity overshoots over the sidewalls confirm previously published results for MHD generators with strong MHD interaction. For MHD thrusters, the velocity profile is found to be slightly flatter over the sidewall as compared to that over the electrode wall. As a result, distinct enhancement of the skin friction exists over the sidewalls of MHD generators in comparison to that of MHD thrusters. Plots of velocity profiles and skin friction distributions are presented to illustrate and compare the flow development in MHD generators and thrusters.

  10. Computational Analysis of Flow Field Inside Coral Colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Monir; Staples, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Development of the flow field inside coral colonies is a key issue for understanding coral natural uptake, photosynthesis and wave dissipation capabilities. But most of the computations and experiments conducted earlier, measured the flow outside the coral reef canopies. Experimental studies are also constrained due to the limitation of measurement techniques and limited environmental conditions. Numerical simulations can be an answer to overcome these shortcomings. In this work, a detailed, three-dimensional simulation of flow around a single coral colony was developed to examine the interaction between coral geometry and hydrodynamics. To simplify grid generation and minimize computational cost, Immersed Boundary method (IBM) was implemented. The computation of IBM involves identification of the interface between the solid body and the fluid, establishment of the grid/interface relation and identification of the forcing points on the grid and distribution of the forcing function on the corresponding points. LES was chosen as the framework to capture the turbulent flow field without requiring extensive modeling. The results presented will give insight into internal coral colony flow fields and the interaction between coral and surrounding ocean hydrodynamics.

  11. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of LH2 Feed Line Flow Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark A.; Dawicke, David S.; Brzowski, Matthew B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Harris, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    Inspections of the Space Shuttle Main Engine revealed fatigue cracks growing from slots in the flow liner of the liquid hydrogen (LH2) feed lines. During flight, the flow liners experience complex loading induced by flow of LH2 and the resonance characteristics of the structure. The flow liners are made of Inconel 718 and had previously not been considered a fracture critical component. However, fatigue failure of a flow liner could have catastrophic effect on the Shuttle engines. A fracture mechanics study was performed to determine if a damage tolerance approach to life management was possible and to determine the sensitivity to the load spectra, material properties, and crack size. The load spectra were derived separately from ground tests and material properties were obtained from coupon tests. The stress-intensity factors for the fatigue cracks were determined from a shell-dynamics approach that simulated the dominant resonant frequencies. Life predictions were obtained using the NASGRO life prediction code. The results indicated that adequate life could not be demonstrated for initial crack lengths of the size that could be detected by traditional NDE techniques.

  12. Quantitative flow analysis of swimming dynamics with coherent Lagrangian vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; van Rees, W. M.; Gazzola, M.; Rossinelli, D.; Haller, G.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2015-08-01

    Undulatory swimmers flex their bodies to displace water, and in turn, the flow feeds back into the dynamics of the swimmer. At moderate Reynolds number, the resulting flow structures are characterized by unsteady separation and alternating vortices in the wake. We use the flow field from simulations of a two-dimensional, incompressible viscous flow of an undulatory, self-propelled swimmer and detect the coherent Lagrangian vortices in the wake to dissect the driving momentum transfer mechanisms. The detected material vortex boundary encloses a Lagrangian control volume that serves to track back the vortex fluid and record its circulation and momentum history. We consider two swimming modes: the C-start escape and steady anguilliform swimming. The backward advection of the coherent Lagrangian vortices elucidates the geometry of the vorticity field and allows for monitoring the gain and decay of circulation and momentum transfer in the flow field. For steady swimming, momentum oscillations of the fish can largely be attributed to the momentum exchange with the vortex fluid. For the C-start, an additionally defined jet fluid region turns out to balance the high momentum change of the fish during the rapid start.

  13. Analysis and performance of radial flow rotary dessicant dehumidifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed, M.M.; Chamkha, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    A model is developed to predict the steady periodic performance of a radial flow desiccant wheel. The model is expressed in terms of the same dimensionless parameters that are commonly used in modeling of the conventional axial flow desiccant wheel. In addition a dimensionless geometrical ratio of the volume of the matrix to the volume of the wheel core is found to affect the performance of the wheel. A finite difference technique on staggered grid is used to discretize the governing dimensionless equations. The discretized equations are solved to predict the performance of the desiccant wheel at given values of operation parameters. A sensitivity study is carried out to investigate the effect of changing any of these parameters on the performance of the wheel. The performance of the radial flow desiccant wheel having the same values of the operation parameters.

  14. First-order analysis of optical flow in monkey brain.

    PubMed Central

    Orban, G A; Lagae, L; Verri, A; Raiguel, S; Xiao, D; Maes, H; Torre, V

    1992-01-01

    Optical flow is a rich source of information about the three-dimensional motion and structure of the visual environment. Little is known of how the brain derives this information. One possibility is that it analyzes first-order elementary components of optical flow, such as expansion, rotation, and shear. Using a combination of physiological recordings and modeling techniques, we investigated the contribution of the middle superior temporal area (MST), a third-order cortical area in the dorsal visual pathway that receives inputs from the medial temporal area (MT). The results show (i) that MST cells, but not MT cells, are selective for elementary flow components (EFCs) alone or their combination with translation, (ii) that MST cells selective for an EFC do not extract this component from a more complex motion pattern, and (iii) that position invariance as observed in MST is compatible with an input arrangement from MT cells matching the selectivity of MST neurons. PMID:1557363

  15. On the Analysis of Flows in Vibrating Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Sahab; Mohammadi, Alireza; Floryan, Jerzy Maciej

    2015-11-01

    Pressure losses in channels with vibrating walls have been analyzed. Surface vibrations were assumed to have the form of travelling waves. The waves can have arbitrary profiles. The spectrally accurate immersed boundary conditions (IBC) method based on the Fourier expansions in the flow direction and the Chebyshev expansions in the transverse direction has been developed. The results show dependence of the pressure losses on the phase speed of the waves, with the waves propagating in the downstream direction reducing the pressure gradient required to maintain a fixed flow rate. A drag increase is observed when the waves propagate with a phase speed similar to the flow velocity. Analytical solution demonstrates that the drag changes result from the nonlinear interactions and vary proportionally to A2 for small enough A, where A stands for the wave amplitude. This work has been carried out with support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada.

  16. Analysis and comparison between rough channel and pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassun, David; Flores, Oscar; Orlandi, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel and pipe flows are presented to highlight the effect of roughness at low Reynolds number (Reτ = 180 ‑ 360). Several surfaces are reproduced with the immersed boundaries method, allowing a one-to-one comparison of the two canonical flows. In general, all rough surfaces produce the same effect on the flow in pipes and channels, with small differences in the roughness function, RMS velocities and spectral energy density of pipes and channels. The only exception is for the rough surfaces made of longitudinal bars. In particular, the triangular bars (riblets) show drag reduction in the channel and drag increase in the pipe. This behaviour is linked to the development of spanwise rollers and wide u-structures near the plane of the crest of the pipe.

  17. Renormalization group analysis of anisotropic diffusion in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Barton, J. Michael

    1991-01-01

    The renormalization group is applied to compute anisotropic corrections to the scalar eddy diffusivity representation of turbulent diffusion of a passive scalar. The corrections are linear in the mean velocity gradients. All model constants are computed theoretically. A form of the theory valid at arbitrary Reynolds number is derived. The theory applies only when convection of the velocity-scalar correlation can be neglected. A ratio of diffusivity components, found experimentally to have a nearly constant value in a variety of shear flows, is computed theoretically for flows in a certain state of equilibrium. The theoretical value is well within the fairly narrow range of experimentally observed values. Theoretical predictions of this diffusivity ratio are also compared with data from experiments and direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and scalar gradients.

  18. Numerical analysis of flow through scramjet engine inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    A set of computer programs was developed to analyze flow through supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlets. These programs solve either the two or three dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes equations in full conservation form by MacCormack's explicit or explicit-implicit method. An algebraic two-layer eddy viscosity model is used for turbulent flow calculations. The programs are operational in Control Data CYBER-200 series vector-processing computer system and were optimized to take maximum advantage of the vector processing capability of the system. Since their development, the programs were extensively verified and used to analyze a number of very complex inlet configurations. Results are presented from two-dimensional, quasi-three-dimensional, and three-dimensional analyses of the inlet flow field to illustrate the use of the program.

  19. Numerical analysis of flow through scramjet engine inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    A set of computer programs has been developed to analyze flow through supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlets. These programs solve either the two- or three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes equations in full conservation form by MacCormack's explicit or explicit-implicit method. An algebraic two-layer eddy viscosity model is used for turbulent flow calculations. The programs are operational on Control Data CYBER-200 series vector-processing computer system and have been optimized to take maximum advantage of the vector processing capability of the system. Since their development, the programs have been extensively verified and used to analyze a number of very complex inlet configurations. In this paper, results are presented from two-dimensional, quasi-three-dimensional, and three-dimensional analyses of the inlet flow field to illustrate the use of the programs.

  20. Experimental evaluation of a facility for jet induced flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, M. H.; Santos, A. M.; Zanirath, Y. B.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the performance of a bench, which was designed for investigating the hydrodynamics of jets and plumes in quiescent environment is evaluated. This bench is mainly composed by a water tank with a nozzle placed at the center of its bottom. Through the nozzle, fluid is injected vertically upward into the tank. The tank, with square cross section, has a device attached to its upper edge for containing overflow. For fluid flow measurement and visualization, the optical technique Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) was employed and the influence parameters for the resulting flow pattern inside the tank were analyzed. The investigations showed that, in order to avoid tank wall effects to the axisymmetric jet profile, the minimum and maximum flow rate of injected liquid allowed in the stagnant environment were 0.05 L/min and 0.20 L/min, respectively. All the measurements were accomplished under the maximum water column in the tank.

  1. Analysis of two-equation turbulence models for recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thangam, S.

    1991-01-01

    The two-equation kappa-epsilon model is used to analyze turbulent separated flow past a backward-facing step. It is shown that if the model constraints are modified to be consistent with the accepted energy decay rate for isotropic turbulence, the dominant features of the flow field, namely the size of the separation bubble and the streamwise component of the mean velocity, can be accurately predicted. In addition, except in the vicinity of the step, very good predictions for the turbulent shear stress, the wall pressure, and the wall shear stress are obtained. The model is also shown to provide good predictions for the turbulence intensity in the region downstream of the reattachment point. Estimated long time growth rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate of homogeneous shear flow are utilized to develop an optimal set of constants for the two equation kappa-epsilon model. The physical implications of the model performance are also discussed.

  2. Finite element flow analysis; Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan, July 26-29, 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, T.

    Among the topics discussed are the application of FEM to nonlinear free surface flow, Navier-Stokes shallow water wave equations, incompressible viscous flows and weather prediction, the mathematical analysis and characteristics of FEM, penalty function FEM, convective, viscous, and high Reynolds number FEM analyses, the solution of time-dependent, three-dimensional and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, turbulent boundary layer flow, FEM modeling of environmental problems over complex terrain, and FEM's application to thermal convection problems and to the flow of polymeric materials in injection molding processes. Also covered are FEMs for compressible flows, including boundary layer flows and transonic flows, hybrid element approaches for wave hydrodynamic loadings, FEM acoustic field analyses, and FEM treatment of free surface flow, shallow water flow, seepage flow, and sediment transport. Boundary element methods and FEM computational technique topics are also discussed. For individual items see A84-25834 to A84-25896

  3. Design and Uncertainty Analysis for a PVTt Gas Flow Standard

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John D.; Johnson, Aaron N.; Moldover, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    A new pressure, volume, temperature, and, time (PVTt) primary gas flow standard at the National Institute of Standards and Technology has an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of between 0.02 % and 0.05 %. The standard spans the flow range of 1 L/min to 2000 L/min using two collection tanks and two diverter valve systems. The standard measures flow by collecting gas in a tank of known volume during a measured time interval. We describe the significant and novel features of the standard and analyze its uncertainty. The gas collection tanks have a small diameter and are immersed in a uniform, stable, thermostatted water bath. The collected gas achieves thermal equilibrium rapidly and the uncertainty of the average gas temperature is only 7 mK (22 × 10−6 T). A novel operating method leads to essentially zero mass change in and very low uncertainty contributions from the inventory volume. Gravimetric and volume expansion techniques were used to determine the tank and the inventory volumes. Gravimetric determinations of collection tank volume made with nitrogen and argon agree with a standard deviation of 16 × 10−6 VT. The largest source of uncertainty in the flow measurement is drift of the pressure sensor over time, which contributes relative standard uncertainty of 60 × 10−6 to the determinations of the volumes of the collection tanks and to the flow measurements. Throughout the range 3 L/min to 110 L/min, flows were measured independently using the 34 L and the 677 L collection systems, and the two systems agreed within a relative difference of 150 × 10−6. Double diversions were used to evaluate the 677 L system over a range of 300 L/min to 1600 L/min, and the relative differences between single and double diversions were less than 75 × 10−6. PMID:27413592

  4. Fluorescent eco-particles for surface flow physics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, F.; Porfiri, M.; Grimaldi, S.

    2013-03-01

    In this letter, we describe a novel methodology for fabricating inexpensive environmentally-friendly fluorescent microparticles for quantitative surface flow visualization. Particles are synthesized from natural white beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. Bead fluorescence exhibits a long lifetime in adverse conditions, such as exposure to weathering agents, and is enhanced by Ultra Violet radiation. The fluorescent eco-particles are integrated in a particle image velocimetry study of circular hydraulic jump to demonstrate their feasibility in tracing complex surface flows.

  5. Analysis and suppression of instabilities in viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Karkala Arun

    2001-10-01

    The viscoelastic character of polymer solutions and melts gives rise to instabilities not seen in the flows of Newtonian liquids. In this thesis, we computationally study four such instabilities. The first instability we discuss is melt fracture, which takes the form of gross distortions of the polymer surface during extrusion. This instability is linked to multiplicity in the slip curve. We show here that when the dependence of slip velocity on pressure is taken into account, multiplicity in the slip law does not necessarily imply a multi-valued flow curve or melt fracture. Next, we study the ``filament-stretching'' instability, which takes the form of non-axisymmetric deviations of the free surface of a polymeric liquid bridge being extended between two parallel plates. We model the portion of the filament near the endplates as an elastic membrane enclosing an incompressible fluid and show that this is unstable to non-axisymmetric disturbances. The third instability we discuss is the purely elastic instability in Dean flow. This instability is linked to elastic instabilities in more complicated and industrially important coating flows with curved streamlines. We show how the addition of a small secondary axial flow in a steady or periodic fashion can significantly delay the onset of the instability. Recent experimental observations by Groisman and Steinberg ( Phys. Rev. Lett. 78(8), 1460-1463, 1997) and Baumert and Muller (Phys. Fluids, 9(3), 566-586, 1999) have shown the formation of spatially isolated, stationary, axisymmetric patterns in the nonlinear regime of circular Couette flow, termed ``diwhirls'' or ``flame patterns.'' Modeling these patterns is complicated by the absence of a stationary bifurcation in isothermal circular Couette flow. We show here how these solutions may be accessed by numerical continuation from stationary bifurcations in Couette-Dean flows. Although the solutions we compute are unstable, they show qualitative and quantitative

  6. Unsteady transonic flow analysis for low aspect ratio, pointed wings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, K. R.; Ruo, S. Y.; Wu, J. M.; Liu, D. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Oswatitsch and Keune's parabolic method for steady transonic flow is applied and extended to thin slender wings oscillating in the sonic flow field. The parabolic constant for the wing was determined from the equivalent body of revolution. Laplace transform methods were used to derive the asymptotic equations for pressure coefficient, and the Adams-Sears iterative procedure was employed to solve the equations. A computer program was developed to find the pressure distributions, generalized force coefficients, and stability derivatives for delta, convex, and concave wing planforms.

  7. Analysis of viscous transonic flow over airfoil sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Wu, Jiunn-Chi; Sankar, L. N.

    1987-01-01

    A full Navier-Stokes solver has been used to model transonic flow over three airfoil sections. The method uses a two-dimensional, implicit, conservative finite difference scheme for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented as prescribed for the Viscous Transonic Airfoil Workshop to be held at the AIAA 25th Aerospace Sciences Meeting. The NACA 0012, RAE 2822 and Jones airfoils have been investigated for both attached and separated transonic flows. Predictions for pressure distributions, loads, skin friction coefficients, boundary layer displacement thickness and velocity profiles are included and compared with experimental data when possible. Overall, the results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. A detailed study of mean-flow solutions for stability analysis of transitional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Vatsa, V.; Otto, J.; Kumar, A.

    1993-01-01

    A finite-volume upwind-difference parabolized Navier-Stokes code is utilized to obtain laminar mean-flow solutions at Mach 3.5 on a half-angle cone of 5 deg at an angle-of-attack of 2 deg. A detailed study is conducted on this configuration; the main focus is the velocity profiles in the leeward and windward symmetry planes at various axial locations. Comparisons of the solution profiles are made with both a central-difference code that incorporates scalar and matrix dissipation models and another state-of-the-art upwind-difference finitevolume code. The results obtained emphasize the importance of using matrix dissipation models for schemes that require explicit artificial dissipation. These results also illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the planeby-plane marching procedure for computing mean-flow solutions for predicting the onset of transition with linear instability.

  9. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows. PMID:27306101

  10. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows. PMID:27306101

  11. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows.

  12. FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE IMMISCIBLE FLOW THROUGH SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equation...

  13. Analysis of vortex core in steady turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, Eduard

    2007-11-01

    Profiles of velocity and pressure for the vortex core in turbulent flow were obtained by solving Reynolds equation for the circumferential component of the fluid momentum. The viscous core radius is defined as a function of viscosity coefficient, vortex intensity, and a Reynolds stress component. The obtained velocity profiles are in much better agreement with known experimental data than are the Rankin vortex profiles.

  14. Linearized analysis of Richtmyer-Meshkov flow for elastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plohr, Jeeyeon N.; Plohr, Bradley J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a study of Richtmyer Meshkov flow for elastic materials. This flow, in which a material interface is struck by a shock wave, was originally investigated for gases, where growth of perturbations of the interface is observed. Here we consider two elastic materials in frictionless contact. The governing system of equations comprises conservation laws supplemented by constitutive equations. To analyse it, we linearize the equations around a one-dimensional background solution under the assumption that the perturbation is small. The background problem defines a Riemann problem that is solved numerically; its solution contains transmitted and reflected shock waves in the longitudinal modes. The linearized Rankine Hugoniot condition provides the interface conditions at the longitudinal and shear waves; the frictionless material interface conditions are also linearized. The resulting equations, a linear system of partial differential equations, is solved numerically using a finite-difference method supplemented by front tracking. In verifying the numerical code, we reproduce growth of the interface in the gas case. For the elastic case, in contrast, we find that the material interface remains bounded: the non-zero shear stiffness stabilizes the flow. In particular, the linear theory remains valid at late time. Moreover, we identify the principal mechanism for the stability of Richtmyer Meshkov flow for elastic materials: the vorticity deposited on the material interface during shock passage is propagated away by the shear waves, whereas for gas dynamics it stays on the interface.

  15. Thermal analysis of turbulent flow of a supercritical fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamane, E.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the large variation of thermodynamics and transport properties near the pseudocritical temperature on the heat transfer coefficient of supercritical fluid in turbulent flow was studied. The formation of the characteristics peak in the heat transfer coefficient vs. bulk temperature curve is described, and the necessity of the fluid element at pseudocritical temperature located in the buffer layer is discussed.

  16. Preliminary analysis of phosphorus flow in Hue Citadel.

    PubMed

    Anh, T N Q; Harada, H; Fujii, S; Anh, P N; Lieu, P K; Tanaka, S

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of waste and wastewater management can affect material flows. Our research investigates the management of waste and wastewater in urban areas of developing countries and its effects on phosphorus flow based on a case study in Hue Citadel, Hue, Vietnam. One hundred households were interviewed to gain insight into domestic waste and wastewater management together with secondary data collection. Next, a phosphorus flow model was developed to quantify the phosphorus input and output in the area. The results showed that almost all wastewater generated in Hue Citadel was eventually discharged into water bodies and to the ground/groundwater. This led to most of the phosphorus output flowing into water bodies (41.2 kg P/(ha year)) and ground/groundwater (25.3 kg P/(ha year)). Sewage from the sewer system was the largest source of phosphorus loading into water bodies, while effluent from on-site sanitation systems was responsible for a major portion of phosphorus into the ground/groundwater. This elevated phosphorus loading is a serious issue in considering surface water and groundwater protection. PMID:26744936

  17. Remarks on the stability analysis of reactive flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheurer, B.

    1987-01-01

    A simple model of compressible reacting flow is studied. First, a dispersion relation is derived for the linearized problem making a distinction between frozen and equilibrium sound speed. Second, the stability of the Von Neumann-Richtmyer scheme applied to this model is studied. A natural generalization of the C.F.L. condition is found.

  18. Computational analysis of hypersonic airbreathing aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    The general problem of calculating the flow fields associated with hypersonic airbreathing aircraft is presented. Unique aspects of hypersonic aircraft aerodynamics are introduced and their demands on computational fluid dynamics are outlined. Example calculations associated with inlet/forebody integration and hypersonic nozzle design are presented to illustrate the nature of the problems considered.

  19. Interpreting the Dispositional Flow Scale-2 scores: a pilot study of latent class factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Masato; Mallett, Clifford J

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which scores on the Dispositional Flow Scale-2 (DFS-2) could differentiate individuals who frequently experience flow characteristics in physical activity from those who do not. A total of 993 participants completed the Japanese version of the DFS-2. Latent class factor analysis (LCFA), which combines the strengths of both latent class analysis and factor analysis, was conducted on the DFS-2 responses. Six classes were identified through a series of LCFAs and the patterns of the item-average scores for the nine flow attributes were found to be parallel among these classes. The top two and bottom two classes (19.3% and 13.4% of the whole sample) were considered the groups who experience flow characteristics frequently and seldom, respectively. These results indicated that individuals who often experience flow attributes in physical activity could be differentiated from those who do not based on their DFS-2 scores. PMID:22709370

  20. Development of flow network analysis code for block type VHTR core by linear theory method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Yoon, S. J.; Park, J. W.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) is high-efficiency nuclear reactor which is capable of generating hydrogen with high temperature of coolant. PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor) type reactor consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks. The flow paths in the prismatic VHTR core consist of coolant holes, bypass gaps and cross gaps. Complicated flow paths are formed in the core since the coolant holes and bypass gap are connected by the cross gap. Distributed coolant was mixed in the core through the cross gap so that the flow characteristics could not be modeled as a simple parallel pipe system. It requires lot of effort and takes very long time to analyze the core flow with CFD analysis. Hence, it is important to develop the code for VHTR core flow which can predict the core flow distribution fast and accurate. In this study, steady state flow network analysis code is developed using flow network algorithm. Developed flow network analysis code was named as FLASH code and it was validated with the experimental data and CFD simulation results. (authors)

  1. Complexity analysis of the turbulent environmental fluid flow time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailović, D. T.; Nikolić-Đorić, E.; Drešković, N.; Mimić, G.

    2014-02-01

    We have used the Kolmogorov complexities, sample and permutation entropies to quantify the randomness degree in river flow time series of two mountain rivers in Bosnia and Herzegovina, representing the turbulent environmental fluid, for the period 1926-1990. In particular, we have examined the monthly river flow time series from two rivers (the Miljacka and the Bosnia) in the mountain part of their flow and then calculated the Kolmogorov complexity (KL) based on the Lempel-Ziv Algorithm (LZA) (lower-KLL and upper-KLU), sample entropy (SE) and permutation entropy (PE) values for each time series. The results indicate that the KLL, KLU, SE and PE values in two rivers are close to each other regardless of the amplitude differences in their monthly flow rates. We have illustrated the changes in mountain river flow complexity by experiments using (i) the data set for the Bosnia River and (ii) anticipated human activities and projected climate changes. We have explored the sensitivity of considered measures in dependence on the length of time series. In addition, we have divided the period 1926-1990 into three subintervals: (a) 1926-1945, (b) 1946-1965, (c) 1966-1990, and calculated the KLL, KLU, SE, PE values for the various time series in these subintervals. It is found that during the period 1946-1965, there is a decrease in their complexities, and corresponding changes in the SE and PE, in comparison to the period 1926-1990. This complexity loss may be primarily attributed to (i) human interventions, after the Second World War, on these two rivers because of their use for water consumption and (ii) climate change in recent times.

  2. Performance of Compressor of XJ-41-V Turbojet Engine VI - Analysis of Compressor Flow Choking. 6; Analysis of Compressor Flow Choking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, John W. R.; Ginsburg, Ambrose

    1948-01-01

    An extended analysis was made of the previously reported performance investigation of the original compressor from the XJ-41-v turbojet engine and a similar compressor revised a to obtain a 33-percent increase in the geometric passage area at the vaned-collector entrance. This analysis was based on the concept of the vaned-collector entrance as the throat section of a nozzle. Because of nonuniform air distribution at the vaned-collector entrance, approximately 90 percent of the available flow area was utilized in the original compressor and 94percent in the revised com$ressor. The increase in maximum weight flow obtained with the revised compressor was disproportionate to the increased effective critical throat area because. the air density at the revised vaned-collector entrance for maximum flow was lower than that obtained in the original compressor. This reduction in density resulted from the large pressure losses near the impeller inlet of the revised compressor, which is indicative of impending flow choking in the impeller, The.calculated maximum corrected weight-flow capacity of a compressor consisting of the revised vaneless diffuser and vaned collector with a theoretical impeller that combined peak impeller pressure ratio and peak impeller efficiency at the . maximum flow point would be 112 pounds per second for an equivalent impeller speed of 11,500 rpm;

  3. Analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flows and supersonic vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1991-01-01

    Topics relative to the analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flow and supersonic vortex breakdown are discussed. Specific topics include the computation of compressible, quasi-axisymmetric slender vortex flow and breakdown; supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown; and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes asymmetric solutions for cones and cone-cylinder configurations.

  4. Numerical and experimental analysis of local flow phenomena in laminar Taylor flow in a square mini-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconi, C. J.; Lehrenfeld, C.; Marschall, H.; Meyer, C.; Abiev, R.; Bothe, D.; Reusken, A.; Schlüter, M.; Wörner, M.

    2016-01-01

    The vertically upward Taylor flow in a small square channel (side length 2 mm) is one of the guiding measures within the priority program "Transport Processes at Fluidic Interfaces" (SPP 1506) of the German Research Foundation (DFG). This paper presents the results of coordinated experiments and three-dimensional numerical simulations (with three different academic computer codes) for typical local flow parameters (bubble shape, thickness of the liquid film, and velocity profiles) in different cutting planes (lateral and diagonal) for a specific co-current Taylor flow. For most quantities, the differences between the three simulation results and also between the numerical and experimental results are below a few percent. The experimental and computational results consistently show interesting three-dimensional flow effects in the rear part of the liquid film. There, a local back flow of liquid occurs in the fixed frame of reference which leads to a temporary reversal of the direction of the wall shear stress during the passage of a Taylor bubble. Notably, the axial positions of the region with local backflow and those of the minimum vertical velocity differ in the lateral and the diagonal liquid films. By a thorough analysis of the fully resolved simulation results, this previously unknown phenomenon is explained in detail and, moreover, approximate criteria for its occurrence in practical applications are given. It is the different magnitude of the velocity in the lateral film and in the corner region which leads to azimuthal pressure differences in the lateral and diagonal liquid films and causes a slight deviation of the bubble from the rotational symmetry. This deviation is opposite in the front and rear parts of the bubble and has the mentioned significant effects on the local flow field in the rear part of the liquid film.

  5. North South Asymmetry of Zonal and Meridional Flows Determined From Ring Diagram Analysis of Gong ++ Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaatri, A.; Komm, R.; González Hernández, I.; Howe, R.; Corbard, T.

    2006-07-01

    We study the North South asymmetry of zonal and meridional components of horizontal, solar subsurface flows during the years 2001 2004, which cover the declining phase of solar cycle 23. We measure the horizontal flows from the near-surface layers to 16 Mm depth by analyzing 44 consecutive Carrington rotations of Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Doppler images with a ring-diagram analysis technique. The meridional flow and the errors of both flow components show an annual variation related to the B 0-angle variation, while the zonal flow is less affected by the B 0-angle variation. After correcting for this effect, the meridional flow is mainly poleward but it shows a counter cell close to the surface at high latitudes in both hemispheres. During the declining phase of the solar cycle, the meridional flow mainly increases with time at latitudes poleward of about 20˚, while it mainly decreases at more equatorward latitudes. The temporal variation of the zonal flow in both hemispheres is significantly correlated at latitudes less than about 20˚. The zonal flow is larger in the southern hemisphere than the northern one, and this North South asymmetry increases with depth. Details of the North South asymmetry of zonal and meridional flow reflect the North South asymmetry of the magnetic flux. The North South asymmetries of the flows show hints of a variation with the solar cycle.

  6. A critical evaluation of various methods for the analysis of flow-solid interaction in a nest of thin cylinders subjected to cross flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1987-01-01

    Various experimental, analytical, and numerical analysis methods for flow-solid interaction of a nest of cylinders subjected to cross flows are reviewed. A nest of cylinders subjected to cross flows can be found in numerous engineering applications including the Space Shuttle Maine Engine-Main Injector Assembly (SSME-MIA) and nuclear reactor heat exchangers. Despite its extreme importance in engineering applications, understanding of the flow-solid interaction process is quite limited and design of the tube banks are mostly dependent on experiments and/or experimental correlation equations. For future development of major numerical analysis methods for the flow-solid interaction of a nest of cylinders subjected to cross flow, various turbulence models, nonlinear structural dynamics, and existing laminar flow-solid interaction analysis methods are included.

  7. Topological analysis of a mixing flow generated by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Pablo Sebastián; de la Cruz, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We use topological tools to describe the natural convective motion and the Lagrangian trajectories of a flow generated by stepwise, alternating heating and cooling protocol of opposite vertical walls of a cubic container. The working fluid considered is Newtonian and the system is in presence of the acceleration of gravity but the nonlinear terms are neglected, i.e., we study the piece-wise steady and linear problem. For this convective mixing flow, we identify invariant surfaces formed by the Lagrangian orbits of massless tracers that are topologically equivalent to spherical shells and period-1 lines with elliptic and hyperbolic segments that are located on symmetry planes. We describe the previous features as functions of the Rayleigh number in the range 3 × 104 ≤ Ra ≤ 5 × 105. We show that this system shares properties with other systems with non-toroidal invariant surfaces.

  8. Computational Analysis of Cryogenic Flow Through a Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danes, Russell; Woods, Jody; Sulyma, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The initial efforts to develop the capability to model valves used in rocket engine component testing at Stennis Space Center are documented. An axisymmetric model of a control valve with LN2 as the working fluid was developed. The goal was to predict the effect of change in the plug/sear region of the valve prior to testing. The valve flow coefficient was predicted for a range of plug positions. Verification of the calculations was carried out to quantify the uncertainty in the numerical answer. The modeled results compared well qualitatively to experimental trends. Additionally, insights into the flow processes in the valve were obtained. Benefits from the verification process included the ability to use coarser grids and insight into ways to reduce computational time by using double precision accuracy and non-integer grid ratios. Future valve modeling activities will include shape optimization of the valve/seat region and dynamic grid modeling.

  9. Numerical analysis of flow about a total temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Lavante, Ernst; Bruns, Russell L., Jr.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Lam, Tim

    1989-01-01

    The unsteady flowfield about an airfoil-shaped inlet temperature sensor has been investigated using the thin-layer and full Navier-Stokes equations. A finite-volume formulation of the governing equations was used in conjunction with a Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme to analyze the flow about the sensor. Flow characteristics for this configuration were established at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.8 for different Reynolds numbers. The results were obtained for configurations of increasing complexity; important physical phenomena such as shock formation, boundary-layer separation, and unsteady wake formation were noted. Based on the computational results, recommendations for further study and refinement of the inlet temperature sensor were made.

  10. Opto-fluidic flow analysis for monitoring of immunity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.; Bharadwaj, A.,; Marshkole, N.; Saiyed, T.; Prabhakar, A.

    2015-06-01

    We describes the design, development and testing of a cost effective and miniaturized version of a flow analyzer. It is designed to detect fluorescence labeled immunocytes in human blood sample. Availing of advancements in micro fluidics and nanolithographic technique, we fabricated a PDMS based device with integrated micro channels for accommodating the optical fibers. The lensed fibers serves as the waveguides for illumination and collection of laser and scattered signals respectively. As a cell crosses the interrogation point the forward scatter, side scatter and fluorescence are detected. Photomultiplier tubes used in conventional flow cytometers have been replaced here with APDs (avalanche photo detectors) and supplemented with digital signal processing. The prototype was tested with different sized polymer beads as well as the live cells.

  11. Numerical analysis of turbulent coaxial flow with internal heat generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, A.; Weinstein, H.

    1981-01-01

    A computational method with which to obtain a physical understanding of the turbulent field of two coaxial jets entering an axisymmetric chamber is developed. Even the laminar field of this flow is quite complicated. This is due to the many different domains which exist in the field especially in the entrance region. Physically, three regions may be identified: the wall region, the initial region near the axis of symmetry and the mixing region. Advancing downstream, these regions change relative size with the ratio of the two jets' mass fluxes as the main parameter. The turbulent field of these flows is much more complicated due to the difference in the effective transport coefficients and turbulence level from region to region. However, being aware beforehand of the complications and the different regions of this field, the appropriate turbulence model and numerical scheme can be adjusted to treat the problem.

  12. Lie group analysis and similarity solution for fractional Blasius flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Mingyang; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation for boundary layer flow of viscoelastic fluids past a flat plate. Fractional-order Blasius equation with spatial fractional Riemann-Liouville derivative is derived firstly by using Lie group transformation. The solution is obtained numerically by the generalized shooting method, employing the shifted Grünwald formula and classical fourth order Runge-Kutta method as the iterative scheme. The effects of the order of fractional derivative and the generalized Reynolds number on the velocity profiles are analyzed and discussed. Numerical results show that the smaller the value of the fractional order derivative leads to the faster velocity of viscoelastic fluids near the plate but not to hold near the outer flow. As the Reynolds number increases, the fluid is moving faster in the whole boundary layer consistently.

  13. Functional Analysis of Human NK cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bryceson, Yenan T.; Fauriat, Cyril; Nunes, João M.; Wood, Stephanie M.; Björkström, Niklas K.; Long, Eric O.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that contribute to innate immunity through cytokine secretion and target cell lysis. NK cell function is regulated by a multiplicity of activating and inhibitory receptors. The advance in instrumentation for multi-color flow cytometry and the generation of specific mAbs for different epitopes related to phenotypic and functional parameters have facilitated our understanding of NK cell responses. Here, we provide protocols for flow cytometric evaluation of degranulation and cytokine production by human NK cells from peripheral blood at the single cell level. In addition to offering insight into the regulation of human NK cell responses, these techniques are applicable to the assessment of various clinical conditions, including the diagnosis of immunodeficiency syndromes. PMID:20033652

  14. Flow Analysis over Batten Reinforced Wings for Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Kurtis; Hicks, Travis; Hubner, James P.

    2008-11-01

    Flexible membrane wings modify the flow separation of low Reynolds number micro air vehicles (MAVs). A specific type of fixed-wing geometry is a batten-reinforced configuration in which the membrane is attached to a rigid frame with chordwise battens, allowing the vibration of the membrane at the trailing-edge. In this study, smoke-wire visualization and hot-wire anemometry, both near the trailing-edge and further downstream in the wake, are used to quantify the frequency and energy of these fluctuations for various cell geometries and flow angles-of-attack. Improvement in the wake momentum deficit will be analyzed to determine preferred membrane cell geometries for MAV flight conditions.

  15. Analysis of an RNG based turbulence model for separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; Thangam, S.

    1992-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence model of the K-epsilon type was recently derived by using Renormalization Group (RNG) methods. It was later reported that this RNG based model yields substantially better predictions than the standard K-epsilon model for turbulent flow over a backward facing step - a standard test case used to benchmark the performance of turbulence models in separated flows. The improvements obtained from the RNG K-epsilon model were attributed to the better treatment of near wall turbulence effects. In contrast to these earlier claims, it is shown in this paper that the original version of the RNG K-epsilon model substantially underpredicts the reattachment point in the backstep problem. This is a deficiency that is traced to the modeling of the production of dissipation term. However, with the most recent improvements in the RNG K-epsilon model, excellent results for the backstep problem are now obtained.

  16. Experimental investigation of slope flows via image analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, Monica; Giorgilli, Marco; Cenedese, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    A vessel filled with distilled water is used to simulate the local circulation in the surroundings of an urban area that is situated in a mountain valley. The purpose of this study is to establish if the experimental setup is suitable for the investigation of katabatic and anabatic flows and their interaction with an urban heat island. Flow fields are derived by means of Feature Tracking and temperature fields are directly measured with thermocouples. The technique employed allows obtaining a high spatio-temporal resolution, providing robust statistics for the characterization of the fluid-dynamic field. General qualitative comparisons are made with expectations from analytical models. It appeared that the experimental setup as used in this study can be used for reproducing the phenomena occurring in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  17. Numerical analysis of internal waves in stratified wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philppe

    2014-05-01

    In laboratory investigations, increased attention has been given to internal waves generated by stationary placed oscillating sources and moving bodies in stratified fluids [1]. The main attention was paid to study flows past bodies of perfect shapes like sphere [2], cylinder [3] of thin strip [3] which are the best theoretical (analytical or numerical) studies. Due to simplicity of geometry, flow around a strip has a potential to investigate separately effects of a drag and lift forces on the body by changing the slope of the horizontally moving strip which can be placed vertically [1], horizontally [2], or be tilted under some angle to the direction of towing velocity [5]. Numeric modeling of a flow past vertical strip uniformly towing with permanent velocity in horizontal direction in a linearly stratified talk which was based on a finite differences solver adapted to the low Reynolds Navier-Stokes equation with transport equation for salinity (LES simulation [6] and RANS [7]) has demonstrated reasonable agreement with data of Schlieren visualization, density marker and probe measurements of internal wave fields. The chosen test cases allowed demonstrating the ability of selected numerical methods to represent stably stratified flows over horizontal strip [4] and hill type 2D obstacles [1, 3] with generation of internal waves. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research work was supported by the Region Provence Alpes Côte d'Azur - Modtercom project. The work was also supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 12-01-00128). REFERENCES [1] Chashechkin Yu.D., Mitkin V.V. Experimental study of a fine structure of 2D wakes and mixing past an obstacle in a continuously stratified fluid // Dynamics of Atmosphere and Oceans. 2001. V. 34. P. 165-187. [2] Chashechkin, Yu. D. Hydrodynamics of a sphere in a stratified fluid // Fluid Dyn. 1989. V.24(1) P. 1-7. [3] Mitkin V. V., Chashechkin Yu. D. Transformation of hanging discontinuities into vortex systems in a

  18. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of PEG-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    John, C; Herz, T; Boos, J; Langer, K; Hempel, G

    2016-01-01

    Monomethoxypolyethylene glycol L-asparaginase (PEG-ASNASE) is the PEGylated version of the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNASE). Both are used for remission induction in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The treatment control is generally carried out by performing activity assays, though methods to determine the actual enzyme rather than its activity are rare. Using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) offered the chance to develop a method capable of simultaneously measuring PEG-ASNASE and PEG. A method validation was performed in accordance with FDA guidelines for PEG-ASNASE from non-biological solutions. The method unfolded a linearity of 15-750 U/mL with coefficients of correlation of r(2)>0.99. The coefficients of variation (CV) for within-run and between-run variability were 1.18-10.15% and 2.43-8.73%, respectively. Furthermore, the method was used to perform stability tests of the product Oncaspar® (PEG-ASNASE) and estimation of the molecular weight by multi-angle light scattering (MALS) of stressed samples to correlate them with the corresponding activity. The findings indicate that Oncaspar® stock solution should not be stored any longer than 24 h at room temperature and cannot be frozen in pure aqueous media. The validated method might be useful for the pharmaceutical industry and its quality control of PEG-ASNASE production. PMID:26695272

  19. Steady, Nonrotating, Blade-to-Blade Potential Transonic Cascade Flow Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    CAS2D computer program numerically solves artifically time-dependent form of actual full potential equation, providing steady, nonrotating, bladeto-blade potential transonic cascade flow analysis code. CAS2D written in FORTRAN IV.

  20. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation related to the paper of the same name describing Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of low speed stall aerodynamics of a swept wing with a laminar flow wing glove.

  1. FLOW INJECTION ANALYSIS OF TRACE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE USING AN IMMOBILIZED ENZYME REACTOR (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sub-parts per billion (ppb) levels of aqueous hydrogen peroxide have been determined with a flow injection analysis system employing a single bead string reactor composed of horseradish peroxidase covalently bound to an aminated macroporous polymeric absorbent with glutaraldehyde...

  2. A nonlinear analysis of pulsatile flow in arteries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Atabek, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    An approximate numerical method for calculating flow profiles in arteries is developed. The theory takes into account the nonlinear terms of the Navier-Stokes equations as well as the nonlinear behaviour and large deformations of the arterial wall. Through the locally measured values of the pressure, pressure gradient, and pressure-radius function, the velocity distribution and wall shear at a given location along the artery can be determined. The computed results agree well with the corresponding experimental data.

  3. EPA flow reference method testing and analysis: Findings report. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    In the summer of 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a series of week-long field tests at three electric utility sites to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. The findings from that study are presented in document EPA/430-R-99-009a (NTIS Order Number PB99-150286). This document contains 10 appendices for that report.

  4. Method and apparatus for continuous flow injection extraction analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Siemer, Darryl D.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for a continuous flow injection batch extraction aysis system is disclosed employing extraction of a component of a first liquid into a second liquid which is a solvent for a component of the first liquid, and is immiscible with the first liquid, and for separating the first liquid from the second liquid subsequent to extraction of the component of the first liquid.

  5. Numerical analysis of respiratory flow patterns within human upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Shen; Gao, Fei

    2009-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is used to study the respiratory airflow dynamics within a human upper airway. The airway model which consists of the airway from nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx and trachea to triple bifurcation is built based on the CT images of a healthy volunteer and the Weibel model. The flow characteristics of the whole upper airway are quantitatively described at any time level of respiratory cycle. Simulation results of respiratory flow show good agreement with the clinical measures, experimental and computational results in the literature. The air mainly passes through the floor of the nasal cavity in the common, middle and inferior nasal meatus. The higher airway resistance and wall shear stresses are distributed on the posterior nasal valve. Although the airways of pharynx, larynx and bronchi experience low shear stresses, it is notable that relatively high shear stresses are distributed on the wall of epiglottis and bronchial bifurcations. Besides, two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models of normal and abnormal airways are built to discuss the flow-induced deformation in various anatomy models. The result shows that the wall deformation in normal airway is relatively small.

  6. Expert systems for flow cytometry data analysis: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C. ); Stewart, C.C. . Lab. of Flow Cytometry); Duque, R.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Flow Cytometry has become an accepted technique in the clinical laboratory for rapid immunophenotyping of patient blood samples. Multiple, fluorescent labeled monoclonal antibodies are used to tag the cells, which are then analyzed one at a time at rates of several thousand cells a second. Patient samples are processed through the flow cytometer at more than one a minute. Clinicians are being overwhelmed by the large amount of data that must be analyzed to provide the information needed to assist in disease diagnosis. An expert system is being developed to assist clinicians in analyzing this multivariate flow cytometry data. The data from each sample are processed by a clustering algorithm, which finds the means of the distinct cell subpopulations in a sample. These mean values of fluorescence are translated into words such as negative,'' dim'' and bright'' and the words are combined into patterns that are matched against the premises on the left hand side of the rules used to identify the disease categories. This is a report of work in progress. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Flow Control Analysis on the Hump Model with RANS Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Sally A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2003-01-01

    A concerted effort is underway at NASA Langley Research Center to create a benchmark for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes. both unstructured and structured, against a data set for the hump model with actuation. The hump model was tested in the NASA Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The CFD codes used for the analyses are the FUN2D (Full Unstructured Navier-Stokes 2-Dimensional) code, the structured TLNS3D (Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes 3-Dimensional) code, and the structured CFL3D code, all developed at NASA Langley. The current investigation uses the time-accurate Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach to predict aerodynamic performance of the active flow control experimental database for the hump model. Two-dimensional computational results verified that steady blowing and suction and oscillatory suction/blowing can be used to significantly reduce the separated flow region on the model. Discrepancies do exist between the CFD results and experimental data in the region downstream of the slot with the largest differences in the oscillatory cases. Overall, the structured CFD codes exhibited similar behavior with each other for a wide range of control conditions, with the unstructured FUN2D code showing moderately different results in the separated flow region for the suction and oscillatory cases.

  8. A numerical procedure for analysis of finite rate reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1993-01-01

    Combustion processes in rocket propulsion systems are characterized by the existence of multiple, vastly differing time and length scales, as well as flow-speeds at wide variation of Mach numbers. The chemical kinetics processes in the highly active reaction zone are characterized by much smaller scales compared to fluid convective and diffusive time scales. An operator splitting procedure for transient finite rate chemistry problems has been developed using a pressure based method, which can be applied to all speed flows without difficulties. The splitting of chemical kinetics terms formed the fluid-mechanical terms of the species equation ameliorated the difficulties associated with the disparate time scales and stiffness in the set of equations which describes highly exothermic combustion. A combined efficient ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver was used to integrate the effective chemical source terms over the residence time at each grid cell. One and two dimensional reacting flow situations were carried out to demonstrate and verify the current procedure. Different chemical kinetics with different degrees of nonlinearity have also been incorporated to test the robustness and generality of the proposed method.

  9. Numerical analysis of turbulent flows with pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Hirofumi; Nagano, Yasutaka

    1992-12-01

    A k-epsilon turbulence model is developed to calculate wall turbulent shear flows under various pressure gradient conditions. In the present model, the dissipation rate of turbulent energy zero at a wall is made, though the wall limiting behavior of velocity fluctuations is reproduced exactly. Thus, the model assures computational expediency and convergence. The proposed model is constructed to properly take into account the effects of pressure gradients on shear layers. It was found by Nagano et al. that in adverse pressure gradient flows a Van Driest damping constant decreased with increasing dimensionless pressure gradient parameter P(sup +). Therefore, the present model has introduced the modified Van Driest damping function which is a function of P(sup +). The proposed model was tested by application to a turbulent channel flow and boundary layers with P(sup +) is less than 0, P(sup +) = 0 and P(sup +) is greater than zero. The model predictions indicate that agreement with the experiment and the direct simulation data is good over a wide range of pressure variations.

  10. Analysis of intracardiac flows for Diastolic heart dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Zheng, Xudong; Vedula, Vijay; Abraham, Theodore

    2011-11-01

    Diastolic dysfunction (DD) is a common finding in a variety of cardiac diseases including hypertension, coronary disease and cardiomyopathy. Its prevalence increases with age and it manifests as incomplete or/and delayed ventricular relaxation and a compensatory stronger atrial contraction. DD is often associated with heart failure and contributes greatly to morbidity and hospitalizations especially in the elderly. In the current study, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations are employed to investigate intracardiac flow behavior in normal and diseased hearts with DD. The endocardial surface of the left ventricle is represented by a generic simplified prolate-spheroid and the wall motion is driven by the ventricular volume change. Diastolic dysfunction in the heart is modeled by prescribing different E/A filling ratios. The dominant flow features, such as vortices and swirling structures and associated Eulerian and Lagrangian metrics are examined to gain insights into the flow physics of this disease. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation through TeraGrid Grant TG-CTS100002.

  11. Unsteady flow analysis of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Lee, W. J.; Moshfeghi, M.; Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W.

    2016-06-01

    Hydraulic couplings are being widely used for torque transmitting between separate shafts. A mechanism for controlling the transmitted torque of a hydraulic system is to change the amount of working fluid inside the system. This paper numerically investigates three-dimensional turbulent flow in a real hydraulic coupling with different ratios of charged working fluid. Working fluid is assumed to be water and the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model together with the VOF method are used to investigate two-phase flow inside the wheels. Unsteady simulations are conducted using the sliding mesh technique. The primary wheel is rotating at a fixed speed of 1780 rpm and the secondary wheel rotates at different speeds for simulating different speed ratios. Results are investigated for different blade angles, speed ratios and also different water volume fractions, and are presented in the form of flow patterns, fluid average velocity and also torques values. According to the results, blade angle severely affects the velocity vector and the transmitted torque. Also in the partially-filled cases, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel forming a toroidal shape wrapped by water and the transmitted torque sensitively depends on the water volume fraction. In addition, in the fully-filled case the transmitted torque decreases as the speed ration increases and the average velocity associated with lower speed ratios are higher.

  12. Analysis of Developing Gas/liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Michael Z. Podowski; Steven P. Antal; Donna Post Guillen; Matthias Beyer; Dirk Lucas

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a mechanistically based CFD model that can be used to simulate process equipment operating in the churn-turbulent regime. The simulations were performed using a state-of-the-art computational multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE–CMFD [Antal et al,2000]. A complete four-field model, including the continuous liquid field and three dispersed gas fields representing bubbles of different sizes, was first carefully tested for numerical convergence and accuracy, and then used to reproduce the experimental results from the TOPFLOW test facility at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. Institute of Safety Research [Prasser et al,2007]. Good progress has been made in simulating the churn-turbulent flows and comparison the NPHASE-CMFD simulations with TOPFLOW experimental data. The main objective of the paper is to demonstrate capability to predict the evolution of adiabatic churn-turbulent gas/liquid flows. The proposed modelling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for dispersed bubble fields [Tselishcheva et al, 2009]. Along with closure laws based on interaction between bubbles and continuous liquid, the effect of height on air density has been included in the model. The figure below presents the developing flow results of the study, namely total void fraction at different axial locations along the TOPFLOW facility test section. The complete model description, as well as results of simulations and validation will be presented in the full paper.

  13. Crushed cement concrete substitution for construction aggregates; a materials flow analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the substitution of crushed cement concrete for natural construction aggregates is performed by using a materials flow diagram that tracks all material flows into and out of the cement concrete portion of the products made with cement concrete: highways, roads, and buildings. Crushed cement concrete is only one of the materials flowing into these products, and the amount of crushed cement concrete substituted influences the amount of other materials in the flow. Factors such as availability and transportation costs, as well as physical properties, that can affect stability and finishability, influence whether crushed cement concrete or construction aggregates should be used or predominate for a particular end use.

  14. Analysis of internal flow characteristics of a smooth-disk water-brake dynamometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The principal of absorbing power with an enclosed partially submerged rotating disk through the turbulent viscous shearing of water is discussed. Reference information is used to develop a flow model of the water brake. A method is then presented that uses vector diagrams to relate the effects of rotational flow, through flow, and secondary flow to power absorption. The method is used to describe the operating characteristics of an example 111-cm (43.7-in.) diameter water brake. Correlating performance parameters are developed in a dimensional analysis.

  15. CFD-Exergy analysis of the flow in a supersonic steam ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulenouar, M.; Ouadha, A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to carry out a CFD-exergy based analysis to assess the main areas of loss in a supersonic steam ejector encountered in ejector refrigeration systems. The governing equations for a compressible flow are solved using finite volume approach based on SST k-ω model to handle turbulence effects. Flow rates and the computed mean temperatures and pressures have been used to calculate the exergy losses within the different regions of the ejector as well as its overall exergy efficiency. The primary mass flow rate, the secondary mass flow rate and the entrainment ratio predicted by the model have been compared with the experimental data from the literature.

  16. A Flow-Channel Analysis for the Mars Hopper

    SciTech Connect

    W. Spencer Cooley

    2013-02-01

    The Mars Hopper is an exploratory vehicle designed to fly on Mars using carbon dioxide from the Martian atmosphere as a rocket propellant. The propellent gasses are thermally heated while traversing a radioisotope ther- mal rocket (RTR) engine’s core. This core is comprised of a radioisotope surrounded by a heat capacitive material interspersed with tubes for the propellant to travel through. These tubes, or flow channels, can be manu- factured in various cross-sectional shapes such as a special four-point star or the traditional circle. Analytical heat transfer and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) anal- yses were performed using flow channels with either a circle or a star cross- sectional shape. The nominal total inlet pressure was specified at 2,805,000 Pa; and the outlet pressure was set to 2,785,000 Pa. The CO2 inlet tem- perature was 300 K; and the channel wall was 1200 K. The steady-state CFD simulations computed the smooth-walled star shape’s outlet temper- ature to be 959 K on the finest mesh. The smooth-walled circle’s outlet temperature was 902 K. A circle with a surface roughness specification at 0.01 mm gave 946 K and at 0.1 mm yielded 989 K. The The effects of a slightly varied inlet pressure were also examined. The analytical calculations were based on the mass flow rates computed in the CFD simulations and provided significantly higher outlet temperature results while displaying the same comparison trends. Research relating to the flow channel heat transfer studies was also done. Mathematical methods to geometrically match the cross-sectional areas of the circle and star, along with a square and equilateral triangle, were derived. A Wolfram Mathematica 8 module was programmed to analyze CFD results using Richardson Extrapolation and calculate the grid convergence index (GCI). A Mathematica notebook, also composed, computes and graphs the bulk mean temperature along a flow channel’s length while the user dynam- ically provides the input

  17. Dynamical-systems analysis and unstable periodic orbits in reacting flows behind symmetric bluff bodies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Gunaratne, Gemunu H; Kostka, Stanislav; Jiang, Naibo; Kiel, Barry V; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2013-09-01

    Dynamical systems analysis is performed for reacting flows stabilized behind four symmetric bluff bodies to determine the effects of shape on the nature of flame stability, acoustic coupling, and vortex shedding. The task requires separation of regular, repeatable aspects of the flow from experimental noise and highly irregular, nonrepeatable small-scale structures caused primarily by viscous-mediated energy cascading. The experimental systems are invariant under a reflection, and symmetric vortex shedding is observed throughout the parameter range. As the equivalence ratio-and, hence, acoustic coupling-is reduced, a symmetry-breaking transition to von Karman vortices is initiated. Combining principal-components analysis with a symmetry-based filtering, we construct bifurcation diagrams for the onset and growth of von Karman vortices. We also compute Lyapunov exponents for each flame holder to help quantify the transitions. Furthermore, we outline changes in the phase-space orbits that accompany the onset of von Karman vortex shedding and compute unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) embedded in the complex flows prior to and following the bifurcation. For each flame holder, we find a single UPO in flows without von Karman vortices and a pair of UPOs in flows with von Karman vortices. These periodic orbits organize the dynamics of the flow and can be used to reduce or control flow irregularities. By subtracting them from the overall flow, we are able to deduce the nature of irregular facets of the flows. PMID:24125348

  18. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  19. A comparative analysis on different nanofluid models for the oscillatory stagnation point flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Khan, A. U.; Saleem, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we have presented the comparative analysis of the oscillatory stagnation point flow of nanofluids. Both the phase flow model and Buongiorno model are discussed for oscillatory stagnation point flows and a comparison between experimental model and theoretical model is presented. The resulting partial differential equations for oscillatory two-dimensional flows are simplified in a fixed frame and a moving frame of reference subject to the assumed form of solutions. The homotopy analysis method is used to solve the reduced system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The consequences are examined through graphs and tables. It is also found that comparatively both the Boungiorno nanofluid model and phase flow model are of compatible order for a special set of parameters but generally such results do not hold.

  20. Theoretical analysis of three-dimensional bifurcated flow inside a diagonally lid-driven cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    The instability mechanism of fully three-dimensional, highly separated, shear-driven confined flow inside a diagonally lid-driven cavity was investigated. The analysis was conducted on 1003 and 2003 stretched grids by a series of direct numerical simulations utilizing a standard second-order accuracy finite volume code, openFoam. The observed oscillatory instability was found to set in via a subcritical symmetry breaking Hopf bifurcation. Critical values of the Reynolds number Re cr = 2320 and the non-dimensional angular oscillating frequency for the transition from steady to oscillatory flow were accurately determined. An oscillatory regime of the bifurcated flow was analyzed in depth, revealing and characterizing the spontaneous symmetry breaking mechanism. Characteristic spatial patterns of the base flow and the main flow harmonic were determined for the velocity, vorticity and helicity fields. Lagrangian particle tracers were utilized to visualize the mixing phenomenon of the flow from both sides of the diagonal symmetry plane.

  1. Multicompartmental analysis of tracer clearance and its application to cerebral blood flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rusinek, H.

    1986-10-01

    A new algorithm for computing cerebral blood flow is shown to overcome compartmental slippage and unstability problems associated with the conventional bicompartmental analysis. The tracer clearance curve is decomposed into a nonnegative linear combination of predetermined flow components. A weighted average of flows above (below) a fixed threshold yields the gray (white) matter flow. The accuracy and the stability of the new algorithm are analyzed by Monte-Carlo simulations, determining the effect of factors such as random error in tracer concentration, gray-white flow difference, tissue content of gray matter, and end-fit time. While the new algorithm requires 50-100% more CPU time and memory space than the bicompartmental method, its accuracy and stability is superior, especially as the conditions of the measurement deteriorate. The results suggest that more than twofold error reduction in measuring the blood flow in pathological brain tissue is possible.

  2. The internal flow pattern analysis of a tidal power turbine operating on bidirectional generation-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Luo, Y.; Xiao, Y. X.; Wang, Z. W.

    2013-12-01

    Using tidal energy can reduce environment pollution, save conventional energy and improve energy structure, hence it presents great advantage and is developing potential. Influenced by flood tide and low tide, a fully functional tidal power station needs to experience six operating modes, including bidirectional generation, pumping and sluice; the internal unsteady flow pattern and dynamic characters are very complicated. Based on a bidirectional tidal generator unit, three-dimensional unsteady flows in the flow path were calculated for four typical operating conditions with the pressure pulsation characteristics analyzed. According to the numerical results, the internal flow characteristics in the flow path were discussed. The influence of gravity to the hydraulic performance and flow characteristics were analysed. The results provide a theoretical analysis method of the hydraulic optimization design of the same type unit as well as a direction for stable operation and optimal scheduling of existing tidal power unit.

  3. Acoustic attenuation analysis program for ducts with mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, R. K., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized acoustic attenuation prediction procedure has been developed to evaluate acoustically lined ducts for various geometric and environmental parameters. The analysis procedure is based on solutions to the acoustic wave equation, assuming uniform airflow on a duct cross section, combined with appropriate mathematical lining impedance models. The impedance models included in the analysis procedure are representative of either perforated sheet or porous polyimide impregnated fiberglass facing sheet coupled with a cellular backing space. Advantages and limitations of the analysis procedure are reviewed.

  4. Dynamical system analysis of unstable flow phenomena in centrifugal blower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, David; Stickland, Matthew; Liśkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    Methods of dynamical system analysis were employed to analyze unsteady phenomena in a centrifugal blower. Pressure signals gathered at different control points were decomposed into their Principal Components (PCs) by means of Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA). Certain number of PCs was considered in the analysis based on their statistical correlation. Projection of the original signal onto its PCs allowed to draw the phase trajectory that clearly separated non-stable blower working conditions from its regular operation.

  5. Haemodynamic analysis of femoral artery bifurcation models under different physiological flow waveforms.

    PubMed

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Lotfi, Azadeh; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-08-01

    Thrombus in a femoral artery may form under stagnant flow conditions which vary depending on the local arterial waveform. Four different physiological flow waveforms - poor (blunt) monophasic, sharp monophasic, biphasic and triphasic - can exist in the femoral artery as a result of different levels of peripheral arterial disease progression. This study aims to examine the effect of different physiological waveforms on femoral artery haemodynamics. In this regard, a fluid-structure interaction analysis was carried out in idealised models of bifurcated common femoral artery. The results showed that recirculation zones occur in almost all flow waveforms; however, the sites at where these vortices are initiated, the size and structure of vortices are highly dependent on the type of flow waveform being used. It was shown that the reverse diastolic flow in biphasic and triphasic waveforms leads to the occurrence of a retrograde flow which aids in 'washout' of the disturbed flow regions. This may limit the likelihood of thrombus formation, indicating the antithrombotic role of retrograde flow in femoral arteries. Furthermore, our data revealed that the flow particles experience considerably higher residence time under blunt and sharp monophasic waveforms than under biphasic and triphasic waveforms. This confirms that the risk of atherothrombotic plaque initiation and development in femoral arteries is higher under blunt and sharp monophasic waveforms than under biphasic and triphasic flow waveforms. PMID:26582544

  6. Experimental analysis of time-phase-shift flow sensing based on a piezoelectric peristaltic micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pao-Cheng; Wang, Min-Haw; Chen, Ming-Kun; Jang, Ling-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Flow rate sensing is a critical issue for piezoelectric-based micropump systems. This paper describes experimental analysis of flow rate sensing in a peristaltic micropump system. Sensing can be integrated with such a pump using piezoelectric actuators based on the time-phase-shift (TPS) method. To do this, an evaluation-window is added on the falling edge of the driving pulse to help detect the flow velocity without affecting the flow rate. We fabricate a prototype piezoelectric peristaltic micropump with three chambers and three piezoelectric actuators. The middle actuator works not only as an actuator for driving fluid but also as a transducer for sensing flow rate. An evaluation-window is performed to ascertain the relationship between the flow rate and the phase shift of output-signal responses from the transducer. The experimental results show that the evaluation-window response of flow rates in a piezoelectric peristaltic micropump has rates of from 5.56‒33.36 μl s-1. The results are extended to propose a practical flow rate sensor, the design of which can be realized easily in the piezoelectric peristaltic micropump system for sensorless responses that can detect flow rate without any sensors or circuits. The proposed TPS method is real-time, integrated, fast, efficient, and suitable for flow rate detection in piezoelectric peristaltic micropumps.

  7. Flow behaviour analysis and experimental investigation for emitter micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhengying; Cao, Meng; Liu, Xia; Tang, Yiping; Lu, Bingheng

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of the flow behavior in emitter micro-channels mainly focuses on the single-phase flow behavior. And the recent micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental research on the flow characteristics in various micro-channels mainly focuses on the single-phase fluid flow. However, using an original-size emitter prototype to perform the experiments on the two-phase flow characteristics of the labyrinth channels is seldom reported. In this paper, the practical flow of water, mixed with sand escaped from filtering, in the labyrinth channel, is investigated. And some research work on the clogging mechanism of the labyrinth channel's structure is conducted. Computational fluid dynamics(CFD) analysis has been performed on liquid-solid two-phase flow in labyrinthchannel emitters. Based on flow visualization technology—micro-PIV, the flow in labyrinth channel has been photographed and recorded. The path line graph and velocity vector graph are obtained through the post-treatment of experimental results. The graphs agree well with CFD analysis results, so CFD analysis can be used in optimal design of labyrinth-channel emitters. And the optimized anti-clogging structures of the rectangular channel and zigzag channel have been designed here. The CFD numerical simulation and the micro-PIV experiments analysis on labyrinth-channel emitter, make the "black box" of the flow behavior in the emitter channel broken. Furthermore, the proposed research promotes an advanced method to evaluate the emitter's performance and can be used to conducting the optimal design of the labyrinth-channel emitters.

  8. Performance and flow analysis of vortex wind power turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwalla, A.A.; Hsu, C.T.

    1982-10-01

    The theoretical study presented investigates some possible vortex flow solutions in the tornado-type wind energy system and evaluates the power coefficient that can be obtained theoretically. The actuator disc concept is applied to the vortex wind turbine configuration. The Burgers vortex model is then introduced and the performance of a turbine using it is derived. A generalized analytical solution of the model is given, followed by a numerical solution of the complete equations. The stability of a Burgers vortex is discussed. (LEW)

  9. Theoretical analysis of three phase flow experiments in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, A.; Blunt, M.; Guzman, R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a framework for analyzing three phase flow experiments in porous media. We analyze previously published data from a dynamic displacement experiment, where three phase relative permeabilities have been measured. The relative permeability of each phase is, to a good approximation, a polynomial function of the saturation of that phase. Then analytically, we calculate the saturation paths and recovery for the experiments using the method of characteristics. The predicted paths agree well with the experimental measurements, and with one-dimensional numerical solutions.

  10. Analysis of slipstream flow in two ruptured intracranial cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S G; Kerber, C W

    1999-10-01

    Replicas of ruptured posterior communicating and basilar artery aneurysms were created from cadaveric specimens and then were placed in a circuit of pulsating non-Newtonian fluid. Individual fluid slipstreams were opacified with isobaric dyes, and images were recorded on film. The slipstreams entered the distal aneurysm neck with impact against the distal lateral wall of the aneurysm. They then swirled slowly in a reverse vortical pattern within the aneurysm sac. Fluid exited the aneurysm at the proximal neck. The flow pattern clearly shows the impact zone of entering slipstreams (the point of aneurysm rupture) and provides information pertaining to aneurysm growth and formation. PMID:10543644

  11. Heat transfer and flow analysis of nanofluid flow between parallel plates in presence of variable magnetic field using HPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, M.; Jing, Dengwei; Song, Dongxing; Sheikholeslami, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, effect of variable magnetic field on nanofluid flow and heat transfer analysis between two parallel disks is investigated. By using the appropriate transformation for the velocity, temperature and concentration, the basic equations governing the flow, heat and mass transfer were reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations. These equations subjected to the associated boundary conditions were solved analytically using Homotopy perturbation method. The analytical investigation is carried out for different governing parameters namely: squeeze number, suction parameter, Hartmann number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophrotic parameter and Lewis number. Results show that Nusselt number has direct relationship with Brownian motion parameter and thermophrotic parameter but it is a decreasing function of squeeze number, suction parameter, Hartmann number and Lewis number.

  12. Integral Transport Analysis of Ions Flowing Through Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Gilbert; Santarius, John; Alderson, Eric

    2011-10-01

    A computational model for the flow of energetic ions through a background neutral gas is being developed. Its essence is to consider reactions as creating a new source of ions or neutrals if the energy or charge state of the resulting particle is changed. For a given source boundary condition, the creation and annihilation of the various species is formulated as a 1-D Volterra integral equation that can quickly be solved numerically by finite differences. The current work focuses on radially converging, multiple-pass, 1-D ion flow through neutral gas and a nearly transparent, concentric anode and cathode pair in spherical geometry. This has been implemented as a computer code for atomic (3He, 3He+) and molecular (D, D2, D-, D+, D2+, D3+) ion and neutral species, and applied to modeling inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices. The inclusion of negative ions is a recent development. The code yields detailed energy spectra of the various ions and energetic neutral species. Comparisons with experimental data for a University of Wisconsin IEC device will be presented. Research supported by US Dept of Energy, grant DE-FG02-04ER54745, and by the Grainger Foundation.

  13. Analysis of horizontal flows in the solar granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Suematsu, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Solar limb observations sometimes reveal the presence of a satellite lobe in the blue wing of the Stokes I profile from pixels belonging to granules. The presence of this satellite lobe has been associated in the past to strong line-of-sight gradients and, as the line-of-sight component is almost parallel to the solar surface, to horizontal granular flows. We aim to increase the knowledge about these horizontal flows studying a spectropolarimetric observation of the north solar pole. We will make use of two state of the art techniques, the spatial deconvolution procedure that increases the quality of the data removing the stray light contamination, and spectropolarimetric inversions that will provide the vertical stratification of the atmospheric physical parameters where the observed spectral lines form. We inverted the Stokes profiles using a two component configuration, obtaining that one component is strongly blueshifted and displays a temperature enhancement at upper photospheric layers while the second component has low redshifted velocities and it is cool at upper layers. In addition, we examined a large number of cases located at different heliocentric angles, finding smaller velocities as we move from the centre to the edge of the granule. Moreover, the height location of the enhancement on the temperature stratification of the blueshifted component also evolves with the spatial location on the granule being positioned on lower heights as we move to the periphery of the granular structure.

  14. Sensitive flow-injection spectrophotometric analysis of bromopride.

    PubMed

    Lima, Liliane Spazzapam; Los Weinert, Patrícia; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena Redigolo

    2014-12-10

    A flow injection spectrophotometric procedure employing merging zones is proposed for direct bromopride determination in pharmaceutical formulations and biological fluids. The proposed method is based on the reaction between bromopride and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (p-DAC) in acid medium, in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), resulting in formation of a violet product (λmax=565nm). Experimental design methodologies were used to optimize the experimental conditions. The Beer-Lambert law was obeyed in a bromopride concentration range of 3.63×10(-7) to 2.90×10(-5)molL(-1), with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9999. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.07×10(-7) and 3.57×10(-7)molL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of bromopride in pharmaceuticals and human urine, and recoveries of the drug from these media were in the ranges 99.6-101.2% and 98.6-102.1%, respectively. This new flow injection procedure does not require any sample pretreatment steps. PMID:24992919

  15. Aerothermodynamic Analysis of the Project FIRE II Afterbody Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Micheal J.; Loomis, Mark; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    35 years later, the Project FIRE II ballistic reentry to Earth at a nominal velocity of 11.4 km/s remains one of the best sources of heating data for the design of sample return capsules. The data from this flight experiment encompass both the thermochemical non-equilibrium and equilibrium flow regimes and include measurements of both radiative and total heating on the forebody and afterbody. Because of this, a number of researchers have performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the forebody of the FIRE II entry vehicle, with generally good results. In particular, Olynick et. al. coupled a Navier-Stokes solver (GIANTS) with a radiation code (NOVAR) and showed excellent agreement in surface heat transfer over the FIRE II trajectory between 1634 and 1651 seconds (77 km to 37 km). However, in most cases the primary motivation of the previous work was to understand and model the coupling between shock layer radiation and aerothermodynamics, and thus the simulations concentrated on the forebody flow only. To our knowledge there have been no prior published attempts to reproduce the afterbody heating data. However, an understanding of this data is critical to our efforts to design the next generation of Earth and planetary entry vehicles and to assess our need for additional flight data.

  16. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of vegetation-induced flow steering in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bywater-Reyes, S.; Wilcox, A. C.; Lightbody, A.; Stella, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Morphodynamic feedbacks result in alternating bars within channels, and the resulting convective accelerations dictate the cross-stream force balance of channels and in turn influence morphology. Pioneer woody riparian trees recruit on river bars and may steer flow and alter this force balance. This study uses two-dimensional hydraulic modeling to test the sensitivity of the flow field to riparian vegetation at the reach scale. We use two test systems with different width-to-depth ratios, substrate sizes, and vegetation structure: the gravel-bed Bitterroot River, MT and the sand-bed Santa Maria River, AZ. We model vegetation explicitly as a drag force by spatially specifying vegetation density, height, and drag coefficient, across varying hydraulic (e.g., discharge, eddy viscosity) conditions and compare velocity vectors between runs. We test variations in vegetation configurations, including the present-day configuration of vegetation in our field systems (extracted from LiDAR), removal of vegetation (e.g., from floods or management actions), and expansion of vegetation. Preliminary model runs suggest that the sensitivity of convective accelerations to vegetation reflects a balance between the extent and density of vegetation inundated and other sources of channel roughness. This research quantifies how vegetation alters hydraulics at the reach scale, a fundamental step to understanding vegetation-morphodynamic interactions.

  18. Numerical analysis of hydrodynamic instability in magnetized laser ablation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Naofumi; Ishii, Ayako; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Sakawa, Youichi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    We have conducted radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (RMHD) simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) in a magnetized counter flow produced by intense lasers. A jet-like plasma from a planar plastic target is formed and maintained in several-tens of nanoseconds by expanding plasma from rear side of two separated laser spots, and parallelly located another target is ablated by the radiation from the plasma, reproducing past experimental works. A planar shock driven by the radiation interacts with the jet as a nonuniform density structure, resulting in the RMI. The magnetic field is amplified up to ∼40 times greater than the background value at the interface at which the instability occurs. However, a certain extent of the amplification results from the compression effect induced by the counter flow, and the obtained amplification level is difficult to be measured in the experiments. An experiment for observing a clear amplification must be designed through the RMHD simulations so that the RMI takes place in the low-density area between two targets.

  19. Technical issues: flow cytometry and rare event analysis.

    PubMed

    Hedley, B D; Keeney, M

    2013-06-01

    Flow cytometry has become an essential tool for identification and characterization of hematological cancers and now, due to technological improvements, allows the identification and rapid enumeration of small tumor populations that may be present after induction therapy (minimal residual disease, MRD). The quantitation of MRD has been shown to correlate with relapse and survival rates in numerous diseases and in certain cases, and evidence of MRD is used to alter treatment protocols. Recent improvements in hardware allow for high data rate collection. Improved fluorochromes take advantage of violet laser excitation and maximize signal-to-noise ratio allowing the population of interest to be isolated in multiparameter space. This isolation, together with a low background rate, permits for detection of residual tumor populations in a background of normal cells. When counting such rare events, the distribution is governed by Poisson statistics, with precision increasing with higher numbers of cells collected. In several hematological malignancies, identification of populations at frequencies of 0.01% and lower has been attained. The choice of antibodies used in MRD detection facilitates the definition of a fingerprint to identify abnormal populations throughout treatment. Tumor populations can change phenotype, and an approach that relies on 'different from normal' has proven useful, particularly in the acute leukemias. Flow cytometry can and is used for detection of MRD in many hematological diseases; however, standardized approaches for specific diseases must be developed to ensure precise identification and enumeration that may alter the course of patient treatment. PMID:23590661

  20. Intake flow analysis of a pulsed detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strafaccia, Joshua A.

    A CFD program is converted and modified to explore unsteady flow within the intake system of a pulse detonation engine (PDE). Using a quasi-one-dimensional approach the program provides insight into the unsteady nature of localized equivalence ratios to include their effects on PDE performance. The original FORTRAN program is converted into the MATLAB architecture, taking full advantage of user availability and post processing convenience. The converted program was validated against the original program and modified to include a primitive intake manifold system with a single fuel injector located approximately 10 feet upstream of the primary intake valve. Constant fuel mass flow rate at the injector end creates local variations in equivalence ratio throughout the PDE that may have significant impact on overall engine performance. The results of the current thesis research suggest that performance effects of up to 21% can be attributed to non-uniform fuel distribution throughout the detonation process and are most prevalent at lower frequencies and fill ratios.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of shark skin texture surfaces for microchannel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Hao-Chun; Guo, Yang-Yu; Tan, He-Ping; Li, Yao; Xie, Gong-Nan

    2015-10-01

    The studies of shark skin textured surfaces in flow drag reduction provide inspiration to researchers overcoming technical challenges from actual production application. In this paper, three kinds of infinite parallel plate flow models with microstructure inspired by shark skin were established, namely blade model, wedge model and the smooth model, according to cross-sectional shape of microstructure. Simulation was carried out by using FLUENT, which simplified the computation process associated with direct numeric simulations. To get the best performance from simulation results, shear-stress transport k-omega turbulence model was chosen during the simulation. Since drag reduction mechanism is generally discussed from kinetics point of view, which cannot interpret the cause of these losses directly, a drag reduction rate was established based on the second law of thermodynamics. Considering abrasion and fabrication precision in practical applications, three kinds of abraded geometry models were constructed and tested, and the ideal microstructure was found to achieve best performance suited to manufacturing production on the basis of drag reduction rate. It was also believed that bionic shark skin surfaces with mechanical abrasion may draw more attention from industrial designers and gain wide applications with drag-reducing characteristics.

  2. Experimental Analysis of Flow over a Highly Maneuverable Airframe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirnak, Jonathan; Benson, Michael; van Poppel, Bret; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John; Team HMA Team

    2015-11-01

    One way to reduce the collateral damage in war is by increasing the accuracy of indirect fire weapons. The Army Research Laboratory is currently developing a Highly Maneuverable Airframe (HMA) consisting of four deflecting canards to provide in-flight maneuverability while fins maintain short duration aerodynamic stability. An experiment was conducted using Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) techniques to gather three dimensional, three-component velocity data for fluid flow over a scaled down HMA model. Tests were performed at an angle of attack of 2.3° and canard deflection angles of 0° and 2°. The resulting data serve to both validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and understand the flow over this complex geometry. Particular interest is given to the development of the tip and inboard vortices that originate at the canard/body junction and the canard tips to determine their effects on airframe stability. Results show the development of a strong tip vortex and four weaker inboard vortices off each canard. Although the weaker inboard vortices dissipate rapidly downstream of the canard trailing edges, the stronger tip vortices persist until reaching the fins approximately six chord lengths downstream of the canard trailing edges. Team HMA designed and built the water channel and airframe for this experiment.

  3. Sensitive flow-injection spectrophotometric analysis of bromopride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Liliane Spazzapam; Weinert, Patrícia Los; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena Redigolo

    2014-12-01

    A flow injection spectrophotometric procedure employing merging zones is proposed for direct bromopride determination in pharmaceutical formulations and biological fluids. The proposed method is based on the reaction between bromopride and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (p-DAC) in acid medium, in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), resulting in formation of a violet product (λmax = 565 nm). Experimental design methodologies were used to optimize the experimental conditions. The Beer-Lambert law was obeyed in a bromopride concentration range of 3.63 × 10-7 to 2.90 × 10-5 mol L-1, with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9999. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.07 × 10-7 and 3.57 × 10-7 mol L-1, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of bromopride in pharmaceuticals and human urine, and recoveries of the drug from these media were in the ranges 99.6-101.2% and 98.6-102.1%, respectively. This new flow injection procedure does not require any sample pretreatment steps.

  4. Particle response analysis for particle image velocimetry in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Owen J. H.; Nguyen, Tue; Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Smits, Alexander J.

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effects of compressibility, slip, and fluid inertia on the frequency response of particle-based velocimetry techniques for supersonic and hypersonic flows by solving the quasi-steady drag equation for solid, spherical particles. We demonstrate that non-continuum and fluid inertial effects significantly affect the particle response under all typical supersonic flow conditions. In particular, the particle frequency response obtained from a shock response test depends on the strength of the shock, decreasing with shock strength as non-continuum effects become more prominent. For weak disturbances, such as those typical of turbulence, the actual particle frequency response can therefore be much lower than that obtained from a typical shock response. The greatest variability in the response was found to occur at low supersonic Mach numbers. The results were found to be typical of solid particles used for velocimetry under a wide range of wind tunnel conditions, and so, previous particle frequency response analyses based solely on shock response tests may well have overestimated the response to turbulence.

  5. Least Squares Shadowing Sensitivity Analysis of Chaotic Flow Around a Two-Dimensional Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonigan, Patrick J.; Wang, Qiqi; Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Gradient-based sensitivity analysis has proven to be an enabling technology for many applications, including design of aerospace vehicles. However, conventional sensitivity analysis methods break down when applied to long-time averages of chaotic systems. This breakdown is a serious limitation because many aerospace applications involve physical phenomena that exhibit chaotic dynamics, most notably high-resolution large-eddy and direct numerical simulations of turbulent aerodynamic flows. A recently proposed methodology, Least Squares Shadowing (LSS), avoids this breakdown and advances the state of the art in sensitivity analysis for chaotic flows. The first application of LSS to a chaotic flow simulated with a large-scale computational fluid dynamics solver is presented. The LSS sensitivity computed for this chaotic flow is verified and shown to be accurate, but the computational cost of the current LSS implementation is high.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis and Stochastic Simulations of Non-equilibrium Plasma Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Karniadakis, George E.

    2009-11-05

    We study parametric uncertainties involved in plasma flows and apply stochastic sensitivity analysis to rank the importance of all inputs to guide large-scale stochastic simulations. Specifically, we employ different gradient-based sensitivity methods, namely Morris, multi-element probabilistic collocation method (ME-PCM) on sparse grids, Quasi-Monte Carlo, and Monte Carlo methods. These approaches go beyond the standard ``One-At-a-Time" sensitivity analysis and provide a measure of the nonlinear interaction effects for the uncertain inputs. The objective is to perform systematic stochastic simulations of plasma flows treating only as {\\em stochastic processes} the inputs with the highest sensitivity index, hence reducing substantially the computational cost. Two plasma flow examples are presented to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the stochastic sensitivity analysis. The first one is a two-fluid model in a shock tube while the second one is a one-fluid/two-temperature model in flow past a cylinder.

  7. The Evanston initial decision: is there a future for patient flow analysis?

    PubMed

    Bissegger, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    This Article analyzes the October 2005 Initial Decision of the Federal Trade Commission Administrative Law Judge ordering Evanston Northwestern Healthcare Corporation to divest Highland Park Hospital on the grounds that the January 2000 merger of the entities violated Section 7 of the Clayton Act. In particular, this Article focuses on the ALJ's discussion of the use of patient flow analysis and the Elzinga-Hogarty test in defining relevant markets in hospital merger cases. Despite the ALJ's explicit rejection of the Elzinga-Hogarty Test and patient flow analysis as irrelevant and inappropriate in defining markets in the highly differentiated Hospital market, the author concludes that the ALJ's rejection of patient flow analysis likely was a response to misplaced and over-reliance on patient flow analysis by a number of courts in past prospective government challenges to hospital mergers as evidenced by the fact that the ALJ's analysis of competition and competitive effects relied upon, and thereby implicity endorsed, the use of patient flow analysis for certain purposes. Finally, the author concludes that patient flowanalysis, when used appropriately, should continue to be used as a preliminary step in geographic market definition and competitive effects analysis. PMID:16761386

  8. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    P. Tucci

    2001-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

  9. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Cold Flow Test and Transient CFD Analysis of Out-of-Round Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Brown, Andrew; McDaniels, David; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes two nozzle fluid flow interactions. They include: 1) Cold flow nozzle tests with fluid-structure interaction at nozzle separated flow; and 2) CFD analysis for nozzle flow and side loads of nozzle extensions with various out-of-round cases.

  10. Computational analysis of turbine engine test cell flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prufert, Matthew Brian

    1998-11-01

    Turbine engine altitude test cells must incorporate an exhaust system collector to remove hot exhaust gases from the vicinity of the jet engine and to provide additional pumping to simulate the reduced pressure which would be encountered in flight. For economic reasons, it is desirable to utilize the same test configuration to simulate as much of the engine operating envelope as possible. To extend the test envelope, a cut-and-try approach is usually taken using available test data, one-dimensional analyses, and past experience. In this study, a computational approach was used to model some of the recognized operational problems which are commonly encountered. Specifically, computational models were used to evaluate the performance of an altitude test cell at low altitude conditions. Particular emphasis was placed on potential test section over-heating and the reduction of diffuser pumping to achieve near sea-level test conditions. A computational model which utilizes the NPARC Navier-Stokes code was applied to several test configurations operating at steady-state and to a single diffuser configuration in the presence of unsteady pressure fluctuations. During 1997/1998, the author developed two-dimensional and three-dimensional NPARC Navier-Stokes flow models and procedures for use in predicting test cell and engine surface cooling effectiveness for a military engine installation in an altitude test chamber. The predicted model flowfields for both steady-state and time variant flows were used to qualitatively verify limited infrared imaging camera data and quantitatively compare numerical results with test cell and diffuser pressure and temperature data. Prediction of surface convention heat transfer rates are currently beyond the capabilities of the NPARC CFD code. To quantify localized wall heat transfer rates, the BLAYER boundary layer code also was utilized. The BLAYER code is capable of quantifying boundary layer convection heat transfer rates based on near

  11. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; Jae, Moosung; Park, Goon -Cherl

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connectingmore » the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.« less

  12. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; Jae, Moosung; Park, Goon -Cherl

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connecting the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.

  13. Application of Effective Discharge Analysis to Environmental Flow Decision-Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, S. Kyle; Freeman, Mary C.; Covich, Alan P.

    2016-06-01

    Well-informed river management decisions rely on an explicit statement of objectives, repeatable analyses, and a transparent system for assessing trade-offs. These components may then be applied to compare alternative operational regimes for water resource infrastructure (e.g., diversions, locks, and dams). Intra- and inter-annual hydrologic variability further complicates these already complex environmental flow decisions. Effective discharge analysis (developed in studies of geomorphology) is a powerful tool for integrating temporal variability of flow magnitude and associated ecological consequences. Here, we adapt the effectiveness framework to include multiple elements of the natural flow regime (i.e., timing, duration, and rate-of-change) as well as two flow variables. We demonstrate this analytical approach using a case study of environmental flow management based on long-term (60 years) daily discharge records in the Middle Oconee River near Athens, GA, USA. Specifically, we apply an existing model for estimating young-of-year fish recruitment based on flow-dependent metrics to an effective discharge analysis that incorporates hydrologic variability and multiple focal taxa. We then compare three alternative methods of environmental flow provision. Percentage-based withdrawal schemes outcompete other environmental flow methods across all levels of water withdrawal and ecological outcomes.

  14. Application of Effective Discharge Analysis to Environmental Flow Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    McKay, S Kyle; Freeman, Mary C; Covich, Alan P

    2016-06-01

    Well-informed river management decisions rely on an explicit statement of objectives, repeatable analyses, and a transparent system for assessing trade-offs. These components may then be applied to compare alternative operational regimes for water resource infrastructure (e.g., diversions, locks, and dams). Intra- and inter-annual hydrologic variability further complicates these already complex environmental flow decisions. Effective discharge analysis (developed in studies of geomorphology) is a powerful tool for integrating temporal variability of flow magnitude and associated ecological consequences. Here, we adapt the effectiveness framework to include multiple elements of the natural flow regime (i.e., timing, duration, and rate-of-change) as well as two flow variables. We demonstrate this analytical approach using a case study of environmental flow management based on long-term (60 years) daily discharge records in the Middle Oconee River near Athens, GA, USA. Specifically, we apply an existing model for estimating young-of-year fish recruitment based on flow-dependent metrics to an effective discharge analysis that incorporates hydrologic variability and multiple focal taxa. We then compare three alternative methods of environmental flow provision. Percentage-based withdrawal schemes outcompete other environmental flow methods across all levels of water withdrawal and ecological outcomes. PMID:26961419

  15. Oscillatory flow at the end of parallel-plate stacks: phenomenological and similarity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoan; Jaworski, Artur J.

    2010-10-01

    This paper addresses the physics of the oscillatory flow in the vicinity of a series of parallel plates forming geometrically identical channels. This type of flow is particularly relevant to thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, where a reciprocating flow is responsible for the desirable energy transfer, but it is also of interest to general fluid mechanics of oscillatory flows past bluff bodies. In this paper, the physics of an acoustically induced flow past a series of plates in an isothermal condition is studied in detail using the data provided by PIV imaging. Particular attention is given to the analysis of the wake flow during the ejection part of the flow cycle, where either closed recirculating vortices or alternating vortex shedding can be observed. This is followed by a similarity analysis of the governing Navier-Stokes equations in order to derive the similarity criteria governing the wake flow behaviour. To this end, similarity numbers including two types of Reynolds number, the Keulegan-Carpenter number and a non-dimensional stack configuration parameter, d/h, are considered and their influence on the phenomena are discussed.

  16. Application of effective discharge analysis to environmental flow decision-making

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKay, S. Kyle; Freeman, Mary C.; Covich, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    Well-informed river management decisions rely on an explicit statement of objectives, repeatable analyses, and a transparent system for assessing trade-offs. These components may then be applied to compare alternative operational regimes for water resource infrastructure (e.g., diversions, locks, and dams). Intra- and inter-annual hydrologic variability further complicates these already complex environmental flow decisions. Effective discharge analysis (developed in studies of geomorphology) is a powerful tool for integrating temporal variability of flow magnitude and associated ecological consequences. Here, we adapt the effectiveness framework to include multiple elements of the natural flow regime (i.e., timing, duration, and rate-of-change) as well as two flow variables. We demonstrate this analytical approach using a case study of environmental flow management based on long-term (60 years) daily discharge records in the Middle Oconee River near Athens, GA, USA. Specifically, we apply an existing model for estimating young-of-year fish recruitment based on flow-dependent metrics to an effective discharge analysis that incorporates hydrologic variability and multiple focal taxa. We then compare three alternative methods of environmental flow provision. Percentage-based withdrawal schemes outcompete other environmental flow methods across all levels of water withdrawal and ecological outcomes.

  17. Observations and analysis of slope-valley flow interactions in MATERHORN-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocut, Christopher; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Leo, Laura S.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Wang, Yansen; Pardyjak, Eric; Fernando, Harindra JS

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, observations of flow interactions in complex terrain under low synoptic forcing are presented using a unique dataset collected at the Granite Mountain Atmospheric Science Testbed (GMAST), U.S. Army Dugway Proving Grounds (DPG), Utah, in fall 2012 as part of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN). Due to the complexity of the multi-scale interactions between thermally-driven meso-scale down valley and downslope flows, a vast suite of instrumentation was required to fully capture the process. Data analyses showed that even in presence of an isolated mountain, flow does not simply drain into the valley. To this respect, in addition to data from ultra-sonic anemometers, LiDAR measurements were particularly useful in identifying the interactions of the downslope flow with the valley flow. LiDAR scans clearly illustrate the formation of intense turbulent regions, intrusions and instabilities at the interface of the colliding flows. A detailed analysis of measurements showed that each collision consists of primary and secondary collisions in which the valley flow undercuts the slope flow. Such a combination of primary and secondary collisions repeats itself during the night in a cycle. An analysis of the type of collisions and relevant time scales including the decay of the collision is presented with a description of the relevant dynamics.

  18. Analysis of angle effect on particle flocculation in branch flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Karthik; Fink, Kathryn; Liepmann, Dorian

    2014-11-01

    Hollow point microneedle drug delivery systems are known to be highly susceptible to blockage, owing to their very small structures. This problem has been especially noted when delivering suspended particle solutions, such as vaccines. Attempts to reduce particle flocculation in such devices through surface treatments of the particles have been largely unsuccessful. Furthermore, the particle clog only forms at the mouths of the microneedle structures, leaving the downstream walls clear. This implies that the sudden change in length scales alter the hydrodynamic interactions, creating the conditions for particle flocculation. However, while it is known that particle flocculation occurs, the physics behind the event are obscure. We utilize micro-PIV to observe how the occurrence and formation of particle flocculation changes in relation to the angle encountered by particle laden flow into microfluidic branch structures. The results offer the ability to optimize particle flocculation in MEMS devices, increasing device efficacy and longevity.

  19. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase internalization using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hill, Kristen S; Elferink, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by endocytosis and their subsequent down regulation in lysosomes plays a critical role in regulating the duration and intensity of downstream signaling events. Uncoupling of the RTK cMet from ligand-induced degradation was recently shown to correlate with sustained receptor signaling and increased cell tumorigenicity, suggesting that the corruption of these endocytic mechanisms could contribute to increased cMet signaling in metastatic cancers. To understand how cMet signaling for normal cell growth is controlled by endocytosis and how these mechanisms are dysregulated in metastatic cancers, we developed flow cytometry-based assays to examine cMet internalization. PMID:19066037

  20. Oxidative product formation in irradiated neutrophils. A flow cytometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolber, R.A.; Duque, R.E.; Robinson, J.P.; Oberman, H.A.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of irradiation on neutrophil oxidative function was evaluated using a flow cytometric assay of intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) production. This assay quantitates the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-dependent conversion of the nonfluorescent compound, 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH), into fluorescent 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) on a single-cell basis. Intracellular H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production in response to stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate was not affected by neutrophil irradiation at doses up to 2500 rad. In addition, irradiation of intracellular DCFH and aqueous 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) resulted in DCF production, which suggested that oxidative molecules produced by aqueous radiolysis were detected by this assay. This study indicates that radiation doses of 1500 to 2500 rad, which are sufficient to prevent induction of graft-versus-host disease by transfused blood components, are not deleterious to neutrophil oxidative metabolism.

  1. An Analysis of Wave Interactions in Swept-Wing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Crossflow instabilities dominate disturbance growth in the leading-edge region of swept wings. Streamwise vortices in a boundary layer strongly influence the behavior of other disturbances. Amplification of crossflow vortices near the leading edge produces a residual spanwise nonuniformity in the mid-chord regions where Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves are strongly amplified. Should the T-S wave undergo double-exponential growth because of this effect, the usual transition prediction methods would fail. The crossflow/Tollmien-Schlichting wave interaction was modeled as a secondary instability. The effects of suction are included, and different stability criteria are examined. The results are applied to laminar flow control wings characteristic of energy-efficient aircraft designs.

  2. A simple flow analysis of diffuser-getter-diffuser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Howard, D. W.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition. (authors)

  3. FLOW ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSER-GETTER-DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Dave W. Howard, D

    2007-07-24

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition.

  4. Fusion of optical flow based motion pattern analysis and silhouette classification for person tracking and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangelder, Johan W. H.; Lebert, Ed; Burghouts, Gertjan J.; van Zon, Kasper; den Uyl, Marten J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to detect persons in video by combining optical flow based motion analysis and silhouette based recognition. A new fast optical flow computation method is described, and its application in a motion based analysis framework unifying human tracking and detection is outlined. Our optical flow algorithm represents optical flow by grid based motion vectors, which are computed very efficiently and robustly applying template matching. We model the motion patterns of the tracked human and non-human objects by the positions, velocities, motion magnitudes, and motion directions of their optical flow vectors, and build a random forest on these features. For recognition, the random forest computes a normalized score measuring the similarity of a track to a human track. Using edge detection on a motion image for each motion blob its silhouette is computed. Recognition scores are computed, which measure the similarity of the silhouettes with human silhouettes. The optical flow classifier and the silhouette classifier are used as a combined classifier. We analyze the ROC curve to set different decision thresholds on the recognition score for different scenarios. The experiments on the VIRAT test set demonstrate that for human detection the combination of the optical flow based motion method with one based on human silhouette analysis, obtains superior results, compared to the constituent methods.

  5. Rockford Public Library's Circulation Services: A Work Flow Analysis and Spacial Analysis Study with Recommendations and Comments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Elizabeth; Grant, Wallace

    The purpose of this project was to perform an analysis of the Rockford Public Library (Illinois) circulation services department and provide recommendations leading to customer service improvement, better space utilization, and improved departmental work flow. Based on an analysis of input from individual interviews with staff, review of…

  6. Cytochemical and cytofluorometric evidence for guard cell photosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, K.C.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence for photosynthetic linear electron transport in guard cells was obtained with two sensitive methods of high spacial resolution. Light-dependent diaminobenzidine oxidation (an indicator of PSI) and DCMU-sensitive, light-dependent thiocarbamyl nitroblue tetrazolium reduction (an indicator of PSII) were observed in guard cell plastids of Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya using electron microscopic cytochemical procedures. DCMU-sensitive Chl a fluorescence induction (an indicator of PSII) was detected in individual guard cell pairs of Vicia faba L. cv Longpod using an ultramicrofluorometer. At least for these species, we conclude these results are proof for the presence of PSII in guard cell chloroplasts, which until now has been somewhat controversial. 31 references, 2 figures.

  7. Numerical analysis of aeroacoustic-structural interaction of a flexible panel in uniform duct flow.

    PubMed

    Fan, Harris K H; Leung, Randolph C K; Lam, Garret C Y

    2015-06-01

    Accurate prediction of the acoustics of fluid-structure interaction is important in devising quieting designs for engineering systems equipped with extensive flow duct networks where the thin duct wall panels are in contact with the flowing fluid. The flow unsteadiness generates acoustic waves that propagate back to the source region to modify the flow process generating them. Meanwhile the unsteady flow pressure excites the thin panels to vibrate, which in turn modifies the flow processes. Evidently a strong coupling between the fluid aeroacoustics and the panel structural dynamics exists. Such coupled physical processes have to be thoroughly understood; otherwise, effective quieting design is never achieved. This paper reports an analysis, using a time-domain numerical methodology the authors have recently developed, of the nonlinear aeroacoustic-structural interaction experienced by a flexible panel in a duct carrying a uniform mean flow. With no mean flow, the numerical results agree well with existing theories and reveal the physics of duct transmission loss. Four regimes of aeroacoustic-structural interaction are identified when the duct flow velocity increases from low subsonic to low supersonic values. Insight in the underlying physics of duct transmission loss at different velocities are highlighted and discussed. PMID:26093403

  8. The Development of Loss of Flow Analysis Method for OPR1000 Using RETRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Hyuk Lee; Yo-Han Kim; Chang-Kyung Sung

    2006-07-01

    A new loss of flow transient analysis method for OPR1000 (Optimized Power Reactor 1000, previously called KSNP: Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant) based on RETRAN code were developed. The reference plant for the analysis is Ulchin Unit 3 and the transient analyzed is 4 pump coast-down. The current analysis for loss of RCS flow transient of OPR1000 uses COAST and CESEC codes. The new method uses RETRAN code to replace COAST and CESEC codes. Since the ability of RETRAN to replace CESEC has been studied in other non-LOCA transients, this paper will focus on COAST code and RCP coast-down flow rates. The results from simplified RETRAN nodalization corresponding to COAST show good agreement with RCS flow results from COAST code. The results are also compared with RETRAN base-deck for safety analysis which is more complex and show similar trends. Therefore, previous analysis method for loss of flow of OPR1000 using COAST code can be replaced with the new analysis method based on RETRAN. (authors)

  9. Flow-through enzyme immobilized amperometric detector for the rapid screening of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Vandeput, Marie; Parsajoo, Cobra; Vanheuverzwijn, Jérôme; Patris, Stéphanie; Yardim, Yavuz; le Jeune, Alexandre; Sarakbi, Ahmad; Mertens, Dominique; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    A commercially available thin-layer flow-through amperometric detector, with the sensing block customized in an original design, was applied to the screening of drug compounds known as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. AChE from electric eel was covalently immobilized onto a cysteamine modified gold disk adjacent to a silver disk working electrode. On-line studies were performed by flow injection analysis (FIA) in PBS buffer pH 7.4. Seven commercially available AChE inhibitors used in the medical field, namely neostigmine, eserine, tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, pyridostigmine and galantamine as well as two natural compounds, quercetin and berberine, were investigated. The same trend of inhibitory potency as described in the literature was observed. Of particular interest and in addition to the determination of the IC50 values, this flow-through system allowed the study of both, the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor complex and the kinetic of the enzyme activity recovery. PMID:25459923

  10. Visualization and finite element analysis of pulsatile flow in models of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Matsuzawa, T; Homma, T

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile flows in glass models simulating fusiform and lateral saccular aneurysms were investigated by a flow visualization method. When resting fluid starts to flow, the initial fluid motion is practically irrotational. After a short period of time, the flow began to separate from the proximal wall of the aneurysm. Then the separation bubble or vortex grew rapidly in size and filled the whole area of the aneurysm circumferentially. During this period of time, the center of the vortex moved from the proximal end to the distal point of the aneurysm. The transient reversal flow, for instance, which may occur at the end of the ejection period, passed between the wall of the aneurysm and the centrally located vortex. When the rate and pulsatile frequency of flow were high, the vortex broke down into highly disturbed flow (or turbulence) at the distal portion of the aneurysm. The same effect was observed when the length of the aneurysm was increased. A reduction in pulsatile amplitude made the flow pattern close to that in steady flow. A finite element analysis was made to obtain velocity and pressure fields in pulsatile flow through a tube with an axisymmetric expansion. Calculations were performed with the pulsatile flows used in the visualization experiment in order to study the effects of change in the pulsatile wave form by keeping the time-mean Reynolds number and Womersley's parameter unchanged. Calculated instantaneous patterns of velocity field and stream lines agreed well with the experimental results. The appearance and disappearance of the vortex in the dilated portion and its development resulted in complex distributions of pressure and shear fields. Locally minimum and maximum values of wall shear stress occurred at points just upstream and downstream of the distal end of the expansion when the flow rate reached its peak. PMID:2605323

  11. Gas sampling/analysis of the high enthalpy supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. H.; Zheng, B. K.; Chang, X. Y.

    Analysis of combustion efficiency is very important for evaluating the engine performance. The components of exhaust gas from the combustor may indicate the behavior of combustion. Therefore, a measurement system of the gas sampling/ chromatographic analysis has been developed under supersonic combustion condition. The components of H2, O2, N2, CO, and CO2 have been obtained under different pressure and temperature of kerosene injection. The results shown the combustion is not uniform, and the average combustion efficiency is around 70%. The further investigation should be carried out to get more details in order to improve the performance.

  12. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  13. Detection of Catechol by Potentiometric-Flow Injection Analysis in the Presence of Interferents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Suzanne K.; Widera, Justyna; Zhang, Hong

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate analytical chemistry experiment developed to teach instrumental lab skills while incorporating common interferents encountered in the real-world analysis of catechol. The lab technique incorporates potentiometric-flow injection analysis on a dibenzo-18-crown-6 dual platinum electrode to detect catechol in…

  14. Finite size scaling analysis on Nagel-Schreckenberg model for traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana

    2015-03-01

    The traffic flow problem as a many-particle non-equilibrium system has caught the interest of physicists for decades. Understanding the traffic flow properties and though obtaining the ability to control the transition from the free-flow phase to the jammed phase plays a critical role in the future world of urging self-driven cars technology. We have studied phase transitions in one-lane traffic flow through the mean velocity, distributions of car spacing, dynamic susceptibility and jam persistence -as candidates for an order parameter- using the Nagel-Schreckenberg model to simulate traffic flow. The length dependent transition has been observed for a range of maximum velocities greater than a certain value. Finite size scaling analysis indicates power-law scaling of these quantities at the onset of the jammed phase.

  15. Boundary-Layer Stability Analysis of the Mean Flows Obtained Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Wei; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Li, Fei; Nielsen, Eric J.; Buning, Pieter G.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    Boundary-layer stability analyses of mean flows extracted from unstructured-grid Navier- Stokes solutions have been performed. A procedure has been developed to extract mean flow profiles from the FUN3D unstructured-grid solutions. Extensive code-to-code validations have been performed by comparing the extracted mean ows as well as the corresponding stability characteristics to the predictions based on structured-grid solutions. Comparisons are made on a range of problems from a simple at plate to a full aircraft configuration-a modified Gulfstream-III with a natural laminar flow glove. The future aim of the project is to extend the adjoint-based design capability in FUN3D to include natural laminar flow and laminar flow control by integrating it with boundary-layer stability analysis codes, such as LASTRAC.

  16. Analysis of Debris Flow Behavior Using Airborne LIDAR and Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G.; Yune, C. Y.; Paik, J.; Lee, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency of debris flow events caused by severe rainstorms has increased in Korea. LiDAR provides high-resolution topographical data that can represent the land surface more effectively than other methods. This study describes the analysis of geomorphologic changes using digital surface models derived from airborne LiDAR and aerial image data acquired before and after a debris flow event in the southern part of Seoul, South Korea in July 2011. During this event, 30 houses were buried, 116 houses were damaged, and 22 human casualties were reported. Longitudinal and cross-sectional profiles of the debris flow path reconstructed from digital surface models were used to analyze debris flow behaviors such as landslide initiation, transport, erosion, and deposition. LiDAR technology integrated with GIS is a very useful tool for understanding debris flow behavior.

  17. Comparative analysis of whole blood lysis methods for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, X; Marti, G E; Fleisher, T A

    1997-06-15

    We performed a parallel evaluation of six whole blood lysis methods comparing light scatter and quantitative fluorescence intensity based on quantitative flow cytometry, of selected lymphocyte subsets and CD34+ cells. Leukocytes prepared with FACS Lysing Solution (BDIS), Immunolyse (Coulter) and Optilyse B (Immunotech) consistently gave lower forward scatter values than those prepared with ACK (BioWhitaker), Ortho-mune (Ortho) and ImmunoPrep (Coulter). Debris, defined as CD45 negative events with the threshold off, accounted approximately 80% of all events with ACK and Ortho-mune. The other lysing methods consistently yielded less debris (approximately 50%) with Immunolyse generating only approximately 16% debris. Optilyse and FACS lyse consistently displayed the lowest percentage of lymphoid cells (CD45+/CD14-) in the three part differential. The percentage of CD3+, CD20+, CD5+, and CD16/CD56+ cells was consistent with all methods but CD4 and CD8 determinants showed inconsistent variation with ACK and Ortho-mune. In addition, the fluorescence intensity of CD14 PE and CD8 PE staining was markedly decreased on cells prepared with ImmunoPrep. Finally, the clearest separation of CD34+ cells was observed with ACK and Ortho-mune. Our data demonstrate that the method used for red cell lysis can have definite impact on immunophenotyping and selected methods appear to be more suitable for specific applications. PMID:9222098

  18. Telomere analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Hultdin, M; Grönlund, E; Norrback, K; Eriksson-Lindström, E; Just, T; Roos, G

    1998-01-01

    Determination of telomere length is traditionally performed by Southern blotting and densitometry, giving a mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) value for the total cell population studied. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of telomere repeats has been used to calculate telomere length, a method called quantitative (Q)-FISH. We here present a quantitative flow cytometric approach, Q-FISHFCM, for evaluation of telomere length distribution in individual cells based on in situ hybridization using a fluorescein-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (CCCTAA)3probe and DNA staining with propidium iodide. A simple and rapid protocol with results within 30 h was developed giving high reproducibility. One important feature of the protocol was the use of an internal cell line control, giving an automatic compensation for potential differences in the hybridization steps. This protocol was tested successfully on cell lines and clinical samples from bone marrow, blood, lymph nodes and tonsils. A significant correlation was found between Southern blotting and Q-FISHFCMtelomere length values ( P = 0.002). The mean sub-telomeric DNA length of the tested cell lines and clinical samples was estimated to be 3.2 kbp. With the Q-FISHFCMmethod the fluorescence signal could be determined in different cell cycle phases, indicating that in human cells the vast majority of telomeric DNA is replicated early in S phase. PMID:9685479

  19. Collection, isolation, and flow cytometric analysis of human endocervical samples.

    PubMed

    Juno, Jennifer A; Boily-Larouche, Genevieve; Lajoie, Julie; Fowke, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the public health importance of mucosal pathogens (including HIV), relatively little is known about mucosal immunity, particularly at the female genital tract (FGT). Because heterosexual transmission now represents the dominant mechanism of HIV transmission, and given the continual spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), it is critical to understand the interplay between host and pathogen at the genital mucosa. The substantial gaps in knowledge around FGT immunity are partially due to the difficulty in successfully collecting and processing mucosal samples. In order to facilitate studies with sufficient sample size, collection techniques must be minimally invasive and efficient. To this end, a protocol for the collection of cervical cytobrush samples and subsequent isolation of cervical mononuclear cells (CMC) has been optimized. Using ex vivo flow cytometry-based immunophenotyping, it is possible to accurately and reliably quantify CMC lymphocyte/monocyte population frequencies and phenotypes. This technique can be coupled with the collection of cervical-vaginal lavage (CVL), which contains soluble immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines and anti-proteases, all of which can be used to determine the anti- or pro-inflammatory environment in the vagina. PMID:25045942

  20. Fluid Structural Analysis of Urine Flow in a Stented Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Blanco, J. Carlos; Martínez-Reina, F. Javier; Cruz, Domingo; Pagador, J. Blas; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.; Soria, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Many urologists are currently studying new designs of ureteral stents to improve the quality of their operations and the subsequent recovery of the patient. In order to help during this design process, many computational models have been developed to simulate the behaviour of different biological tissues and provide a realistic computational environment to evaluate the stents. However, due to the high complexity of the involved tissues, they usually introduce simplifications to make these models less computationally demanding. In this study, the interaction between urine flow and a double-J stented ureter with a simplified geometry has been analysed. The Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) of urine and the ureteral wall was studied using three models for the solid domain: Mooney-Rivlin, Yeoh, and Ogden. The ureter was assumed to be quasi-incompressible and isotropic. Data obtained in previous studies from ex vivo and in vivo mechanical characterization of different ureters were used to fit the mentioned models. The results show that the interaction between the stented ureter and urine is negligible. Therefore, we can conclude that this type of models does not need to include the FSI and could be solved quite accurately assuming that the ureter is a rigid body and, thus, using the more simple Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. PMID:27127535