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Sample records for flow cytometry platforms

  1. Flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.

    1984-09-01

    Flow cytometry instrumentation developed from early efforts to count cells and particles in liquid suspension as they passed through a sensing device. Since the mid-1960's sophisticated instruments have been designed for analyzing cells based on various cytological, biochemical, and functional properties. These instruments have revolutionized automated cell analysis methods in that measurements are made at high speed, multiparameter data is correlated on each cell, statistical precision is high, and cells are separated in high purity from heterogeneous mixtures for identification and functional analysis. Advanced instruments capable of measuring cell volume, surface area, multicolor fluorescence, fluorescence polarization, light scatter within various angular regions, and axial light loss (extinction) at different wavelengths are being used in biomedical research for analyzing and sorting normal and abnormal cell populations. This article reviews the development of flow cytometers, the conceptual basis of flow measurements, and discusses some of the numerous applications of the technology in biology and medicine.

  2. In vitro flow cytometry-based screening platform for cellulase engineering

    PubMed Central

    Körfer, Georgette; Pitzler, Christian; Vojcic, Ljubica; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh throughput screening (uHTS) plays an essential role in directed evolution for tailoring biocatalysts for industrial applications. Flow cytometry-based uHTS provides an efficient coverage of the generated protein sequence space by analysis of up to 107 events per hour. Cell-free enzyme production overcomes the challenge of diversity loss during the transformation of mutant libraries into expression hosts, enables directed evolution of toxic enzymes, and holds the promise to efficiently design enzymes of human or animal origin. The developed uHTS cell-free compartmentalization platform (InVitroFlow) is the first report in which a flow cytometry-based screened system has been combined with compartmentalized cell-free expression for directed cellulase enzyme evolution. InVitroFlow was validated by screening of a random cellulase mutant library employing a novel screening system (based on the substrate fluorescein-di-β-D-cellobioside), and yielded significantly improved cellulase variants (e.g. CelA2-H288F-M1 (N273D/H288F/N468S) with 13.3-fold increased specific activity (220.60 U/mg) compared to CelA2 wildtype: 16.57 U/mg). PMID:27184298

  3. In vitro flow cytometry-based screening platform for cellulase engineering.

    PubMed

    Körfer, Georgette; Pitzler, Christian; Vojcic, Ljubica; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh throughput screening (uHTS) plays an essential role in directed evolution for tailoring biocatalysts for industrial applications. Flow cytometry-based uHTS provides an efficient coverage of the generated protein sequence space by analysis of up to 10(7) events per hour. Cell-free enzyme production overcomes the challenge of diversity loss during the transformation of mutant libraries into expression hosts, enables directed evolution of toxic enzymes, and holds the promise to efficiently design enzymes of human or animal origin. The developed uHTS cell-free compartmentalization platform (InVitroFlow) is the first report in which a flow cytometry-based screened system has been combined with compartmentalized cell-free expression for directed cellulase enzyme evolution. InVitroFlow was validated by screening of a random cellulase mutant library employing a novel screening system (based on the substrate fluorescein-di-β-D-cellobioside), and yielded significantly improved cellulase variants (e.g. CelA2-H288F-M1 (N273D/H288F/N468S) with 13.3-fold increased specific activity (220.60 U/mg) compared to CelA2 wildtype: 16.57 U/mg). PMID:27184298

  4. A fluorescent hydrogel-based flow cytometry high-throughput screening platform for hydrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pitzler, Christian; Wirtz, Georgette; Vojcic, Ljubica; Hiltl, Stephanie; Böker, Alexander; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2014-12-18

    Screening throughput is a key in directed evolution experiments and enzyme discovery. Here, we describe a high-throughput screening platform based on a coupled reaction of glucose oxidase and a hydrolase (Yersinia mollaretii phytase [YmPh]). The coupled reaction produces hydroxyl radicals through Fenton's reaction, acting as initiator of poly(ethyleneglycol)-acrylate-based polymerization incorporating a fluorescent monomer. As a consequence, a fluorescent hydrogel is formed around Escherichia coli cells expressing active YmPh. We achieve five times enrichment of active cell population through flow cytometry analysis and sorting of mixed populations. Finally, we validate the performance of the fluorescent polymer shell (fur-shell) technology by directed phytase evolution that yielded improved variants starting from a library containing 10(7) phytase variants. Thus, fur-shell technology represents a rapid and nonlaborious way of identifying the most active variants from vast populations, as well as a platform for generation of polymer-hybrid cells for biobased interactive materials. PMID:25525992

  5. Photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional flow cytometry using scattering and fluorescent detection methods has been a fundamental tool of biological discoveries for many years. Invasive extraction of cells from a living organism, however, may lead to changes in cell properties and prevents the long-term study of cells in their native environment. Here, we summarize recent advances of new generation flow cytometry for in vivo noninvasive label-free or targeted detection of cells in blood, lymph, bone, cerebral and plant vasculatures using photoacoustic (PA) detection techniques, multispectral high-pulse-repetition-rate lasers, tunable ultrasharp (up to 0.8 nm) rainbow plasmonic nanoprobes, positive and negative PA contrasts, in vivo magnetic enrichment, time-of-flight cell velocity measurement, PA spectral analysis, and integration of PA, photothermal (PT), fluorescent, and Raman methods. Unique applications of this tool are reviewed with a focus on ultrasensitive detection of normal blood cells at different functional states (e.g., apoptotic and necrotic) and rare abnormal cells including circulating tumor cells (CTCs), cancer stem cells, pathogens, clots, sickle cells as well as pharmokinetics of nanoparticles, dyes, microbubbles and drug nanocarriers. Using this tool we discovered that palpation, biopsy, or surgery can enhance CTC release from primary tumors, increasing the risk of metastasis. The novel fluctuation flow cytometry provided the opportunity for the dynamic study of blood rheology including red blood cell aggregation and clot formation in different medical conditions (e.g., blood disorders, cancer, or surgery). Theranostics, as a combination of PA diagnosis and PT nanobubble-amplified multiplex therapy, was used for eradication of CTCs, purging of infected blood, and thrombolysis of clots using PA guidance to control therapy efficiency. In vivo flow cytometry using a portable fiber-based devices can provide a breakthrough platform for early diagnosis of cancer, infection and

  6. Microflow1, a sheathless fiber-optic flow cytometry biomedical platform: demonstration onboard the international space station.

    PubMed

    Dubeau-Laramée, Geneviève; Rivière, Christophe; Jean, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy; Cohen, Luchino Y

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-optic based flow cytometry platform was designed to build a portable and robust instrument for space applications. At the core of the Microflow1 is a unique fiber-optic flow cell fitted to a fluidic system and fiber coupled to the source and detection channels. A Microflow1 engineering unit was first tested and benchmarked against a commercial flow cytometer as a reference in a standard laboratory environment. Testing in parabolic flight campaigns was performed to establish Microflow1's performance in weightlessness, before operating the new platform on the International Space Station. Microflow1 had comparable performances to commercial systems, and operated remarkably and robustly in weightlessness (microgravity). Microflow1 supported immunophenotyping as well as microbead-based multiplexed cytokine assays in the space environment and independently of gravity levels. Results presented here provide evidence that this fiber-optic cytometer technology is inherently compatible with the space environment with negligible compromise to analytical performance. PMID:24339248

  7. Flow cytometry of sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1987-09-21

    This brief paper summarizes automated flow cytometric determination of sperm morphology and flow cytometry/sorting of sperm with application to sex preselection. In the latter context, mention is made of results of karyotypic determination of sex chromosome ratios in albumin-processed human sperm. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. National Flow Cytometry Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bell-Prince, C.; Dickson, J.A.; Jett, J.H.; Stevenson, A.P.; Sklar, L.A. )

    1993-01-01

    thee National Flow Cytometry and Sorting Resource (NFCR) was established in 1982 to develop advanced flow cytometric instrumentation and methodology, to provide facilities for using the fruits of the NFCR developments in collaborative projects and to disseminate the results to the cytometry community at large. Achievements of the NFCR for 1992 include: (1) preliminary studies of DNA inactivation in preparation for the development of an optical chromosome sorter; (2) modeling of real-time cytometry data using th ISML software package on a Cray supercomputer; (3) execution of proof-of-principle experiments on a phase sensitive flow cytometer in which cellular fluorescence lifetimes were determined; (4) continued development of the DiDAC data acquisition system to include bit mapped sorting and multi-laser capabilities; (5) development of new display modalities for flow cytometric data using the high level graphics language IDL; (6) development and testing of new approaches to clustering of multivariate data; (7) novel applications of Fourier transform flow cytometry to questions of cell activation and molecular structure.

  9. Prostate extracellular vesicles in patient plasma as a liquid biopsy platform for prostate cancer using nanoscale flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zahrani, Ali A.; Pardhan, Siddika; Brett, Sabine I.; Guo, Qiu Q.; Yang, Jun; Wolf, Philipp; Power, Nicholas E.; Durfee, Paul N.; MacMillan, Connor D.; Townson, Jason L.; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Fleshner, Neil E.; Izawa, Jonathan I.; Chambers, Ann F.; Chin, Joseph L.; Leong, Hon S.

    2016-01-01

    distinguishing metastatic PCa and localized PCa patients. Nanoscale flow cytometry of PMPs presents an emerging biomarker platform for various stages of prostate cancer. PMID:26814433

  10. Flow cytometry: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Givan, Alice L

    2011-01-01

    A flow cytometer is an instrument that illuminates cells (or other particles) as they flow individually in front of a light source and then detects and correlates the signals from those cells that result from the illumination. In this chapter, each of the aspects of that definition will be described: the characteristics of cells suitable for flow cytometry, methods to illuminate cells, the use of fluidics to guide the cells individually past the illuminating beam, the types of signals emitted by the cells and the detection of those signals, the conversion of light signals to digital data, and the use of computers to correlate and analyze the data after they are stored in a data file. The final section of the chapter will discuss the use of a flow cytometer to sort cells. This chapter can be read as a brief, self-contained survey. It can also be read as a gateway with signposts into the field. Other chapters in this book will provide more details, more references, and even an intriguing view of the future of cytometry. PMID:21116976

  11. Cell Surface Profiling Using High-Throughput Flow Cytometry: A Platform for Biomarker Discovery and Analysis of Cellular Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gedye, Craig A.; Hussain, Ali; Paterson, Joshua; Smrke, Alannah; Saini, Harleen; Sirskyj, Danylo; Pereira, Keira; Lobo, Nazleen; Stewart, Jocelyn; Go, Christopher; Ho, Jenny; Medrano, Mauricio; Hyatt, Elzbieta; Yuan, Julie; Lauriault, Stevan; Kondratyev, Maria; van den Beucken, Twan; Jewett, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Danska, Jayne; Wang, Jean; Wouters, Bradly; Neel, Benjamin; Rottapel, Robert; Ailles, Laurie E.

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface proteins have a wide range of biological functions, and are often used as lineage-specific markers. Antibodies that recognize cell surface antigens are widely used as research tools, diagnostic markers, and even therapeutic agents. The ability to obtain broad cell surface protein profiles would thus be of great value in a wide range of fields. There are however currently few available methods for high-throughput analysis of large numbers of cell surface proteins. We describe here a high-throughput flow cytometry (HT-FC) platform for rapid analysis of 363 cell surface antigens. Here we demonstrate that HT-FC provides reproducible results, and use the platform to identify cell surface antigens that are influenced by common cell preparation methods. We show that multiple populations within complex samples such as primary tumors can be simultaneously analyzed by co-staining of cells with lineage-specific antibodies, allowing unprecedented depth of analysis of heterogeneous cell populations. Furthermore, standard informatics methods can be used to visualize, cluster and downsample HT-FC data to reveal novel signatures and biomarkers. We show that the cell surface profile provides sufficient molecular information to classify samples from different cancers and tissue types into biologically relevant clusters using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Finally, we describe the identification of a candidate lineage marker and its subsequent validation. In summary, HT-FC combines the advantages of a high-throughput screen with a detection method that is sensitive, quantitative, highly reproducible, and allows in-depth analysis of heterogeneous samples. The use of commercially available antibodies means that high quality reagents are immediately available for follow-up studies. HT-FC has a wide range of applications, including biomarker discovery, molecular classification of cancers, or identification of novel lineage specific or stem cell markers. PMID:25170899

  12. GenePattern flow cytometry suite

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional flow cytometry data analysis is largely based on interactive and time consuming analysis of series two dimensional representations of up to 20 dimensional data. Recent technological advances have increased the amount of data generated by the technology and outpaced the development of data analysis approaches. While there are advanced tools available, including many R/BioConductor packages, these are only accessible programmatically and therefore out of reach for most experimentalists. GenePattern is a powerful genomic analysis platform with over 200 tools for analysis of gene expression, proteomics, and other data. A web-based interface provides easy access to these tools and allows the creation of automated analysis pipelines enabling reproducible research. Results In order to bring advanced flow cytometry data analysis tools to experimentalists without programmatic skills, we developed the GenePattern Flow Cytometry Suite. It contains 34 open source GenePattern flow cytometry modules covering methods from basic processing of flow cytometry standard (i.e., FCS) files to advanced algorithms for automated identification of cell populations, normalization and quality assessment. Internally, these modules leverage from functionality developed in R/BioConductor. Using the GenePattern web-based interface, they can be connected to build analytical pipelines. Conclusions GenePattern Flow Cytometry Suite brings advanced flow cytometry data analysis capabilities to users with minimal computer skills. Functionality previously available only to skilled bioinformaticians is now easily accessible from a web browser. PMID:23822732

  13. Two-Photon Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhog, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Myc, Andrzej; Cao, Zhengyl; Bielinska, Anna; Thomas, Thommey; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique for obtaining quantitative information from fluorescence in cells. Quantitation is achieved by assuring a high degree of uniformity in the optical excitation and detection, generally by using a highly controlled flow such as is obtained via hydrodynamic focusing. In this work, we demonstrate a two-beam, two- channel detection and two-photon excitation flow cytometry (T(sup 3)FC) system that enables multi-dye analysis to be performed very simply, with greatly relaxed requirements on the fluid flow. Two-photon excitation using a femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) laser has the advantages that it enables simultaneous excitation of multiple dyes and achieves very high signal-to-noise ratio through simplified filtering and fluorescence background reduction. By matching the excitation volume to the size of a cell, single-cell detection is ensured. Labeling of cells by targeted nanoparticles with multiple fluorophores enables normalization of the fluorescence signal and thus ratiometric measurements under nonuniform excitation. Quantitative size measurements can also be done even under conditions of nonuniform flow via a two-beam layout. This innovative detection scheme not only considerably simplifies the fluid flow system and the excitation and collection optics, it opens the way to quantitative cytometry in simple and compact microfluidics systems, or in vivo. Real-time detection of fluorescent microbeads in the vasculature of mouse ear demonstrates the ability to do flow cytometry in vivo. The conditions required to perform quantitative in vivo cytometry on labeled cells will be presented.

  14. Flow cytometry apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.

    1991-01-29

    This paper describes an apparatus for orienting cells in a sheath fluid in a otometer/sorter. It comprises: flow chamber; means for flowing the sheath fluid through the flow chamber along a direction of flow; means for obstructing the flow of the sheath fluid in the flow chamber with a first dimension, which extends substantially across the flow chamber and is substantially perpendicular to the direction of flow and with a thickness perpendicular to the first dimension of the obstructing means wherein the sheath fluid flows around the thickness so that the sheath fluid converges in only one dimension at the downstream edge of the means for obstructing; and means for introducing the cells through the means for obstructing the flow to the region where the sheath fluid converges in only one dimension in the sheath fluid to orient the cells, with an aperture wherein as the cells pass from the means for introducing the cells to the region where the sheath fluid converges the cells pass through the aperture with a cross-sectional length substantially less than or equal to the thickness of the means for obstructing the flow.

  15. Analyzing the Tumor Microenvironment by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Young, Yoon Kow; Bolt, Alicia M; Ahn, Ryuhjin; Mann, Koren K

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is an essential tool for studying the tumor microenvironment. It allows us to quickly quantify and identify multiple cell types in a heterogeneous sample. A brief overview of flow cytometry instrumentation and the appropriate considerations and steps in building a good flow cytometry staining panel are discussed. In addition, a lymphoid tissue and solid tumor leukocyte infiltrate flow cytometry staining protocol and an example of flow cytometry data analysis are presented. PMID:27581017

  16. MXS-Chaining: A Highly Efficient Cloning Platform for Imaging and Flow Cytometry Approaches in Mammalian Systems.

    PubMed

    Sladitschek, Hanna L; Neveu, Pierre A

    2015-01-01

    The continuous improvement of imaging technologies has driven the development of sophisticated reporters to monitor biological processes. Such constructs should ideally be assembled in a flexible enough way to allow for their optimization. Here we describe a highly reliable cloning method to efficiently assemble constructs for imaging or flow cytometry applications in mammalian cell culture systems. We bioinformatically identified a list of restriction enzymes whose sites are rarely found in human and mouse cDNA libraries. From the best candidates, we chose an enzyme combination (MluI, XhoI and SalI: MXS) that enables iterative chaining of individual building blocks. The ligation scar resulting from the compatible XhoI- and SalI-sticky ends can be translated and hence enables easy in-frame cloning of coding sequences. The robustness of the MXS-chaining approach was validated by assembling constructs up to 20 kb long and comprising up to 34 individual building blocks. By assessing the success rate of 400 ligation reactions, we determined cloning efficiency to be 90% on average. Large polycistronic constructs for single-cell imaging or flow cytometry applications were generated to demonstrate the versatility of the MXS-chaining approach. We devised several constructs that fluorescently label subcellular structures, an adapted version of FUCCI (fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) optimized to visualize cell cycle progression in mouse embryonic stem cells and an array of artificial promoters enabling dosage of doxycyline-inducible transgene expression. We made publicly available through the Addgene repository a comprehensive set of MXS-building blocks comprising custom vectors, a set of fluorescent proteins, constitutive promoters, polyadenylation signals, selection cassettes and tools for inducible gene expression. Finally, detailed guidelines describe how to chain together prebuilt MXS-building blocks and how to generate new customized MXS

  17. Flow cytometry and cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sherrif F; van den Engh, Ger

    2007-01-01

    Flow cytometry and cell sorting are well-established technologies in clinical diagnostics and biomedical research. Heterogeneous mixtures of cells are placed in suspension and passed single file across one or more laser interrogation points. Light signals emitted from the particles are collected and correlated to entities such as cell morphology, surface and intracellular protein expression, gene expression, and cellular physiology. Based on user-defined parameters, individual cells can then be diverted from the fluid stream and collected into viable, homogeneous fractions at exceptionally high speeds and a purity that approaches 100%. As such, the cell sorter becomes the launching point for numerous downstream studies. Flow cytometry is a cornerstone in clinical diagnostics, and cheaper, more versatile machines are finding their way into widespread and varied uses. In addition, advances in computing and optics have led to a new generation of flow cytometers capable of processing cells at orders of magnitudes faster than their predecessors, and with staggering degrees of complexity, making the cytometer a powerful discovery tool in biotechnology. This chapter will begin with a discussion of basic principles of flow cytometry and cell sorting, including a technical description of factors that contribute to the performance of these instruments. The remaining sections will then be divided into clinical- and research-based applications of flow cytometry and cell sorting, highlighting salient studies that illustrate the versatility of this indispensable technology. PMID:17728993

  18. Flow cytometry apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, D.

    1987-11-30

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one-dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the obstruction directs flat cells near to the area of one-dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates. 6 figs.

  19. Flow cytometry apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the construction directs flat cells near to the area of one dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates.

  20. Field evaluation in Chad of community usage of CD4 T lymphocyte counting by alternative single-platform flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Field and community evaluation of the routine usage of CD4 T counting platforms is essential in resource-poor countries for efficient and cost-effective monitoring of HIV-infected adults and children attending health care centers. Methods We herein addressed the principal issues raised by the implementation of the single-platform, volumetric Auto40 flow cytometer (Apogee Flow Systems Ltd, Hemel Hempstead, UK) in 8 community HIV monitoring laboratories of different levels throughout Chad. This is a country with particularly difficult conditions, both in terms of climate and vast geographical territory, making the decentralization of the therapeutic management of HIV-infected patients challenging. Results The routine usage of the Auto40 flow cytometers for a period of 5 years (2008–2013) confirms the reliability and robustness of the analyzer for community-based CD4 T cell enumeration in terms of both absolute numbers and percentages to enable accurate monitoring of HIV-infected adults and children. However, our observations suggest that the Auto40 mini flow cytometer is not suitable for all laboratories as it is oversized and ultimately very expensive. Conclusion The Chad experience with the Auto40 flow cytometer suggests that its usage in resource-limited settings should be mainly reserved to reference (level 1) or district (level 2) laboratories, rather than to laboratories of health care centres (level 3). PMID:24083615

  1. Two-photon flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Cheng F.; Ye, Jing Yong; Myc, Andrzej; Thomas, Thommey P.; Bielinska, Anna; Baker, James R., Jr.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2005-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique for obtaining quantitative information from fluorescence in cells. Quantization is achieved by assuring a high degree of uniformity in the optical excitation and detection, generally by using a highly controlled flow such as is obtained via hydrodynamic focusing. In this work, we demonstrate a two-beam, two-channel detection and two-photon excitation flow cytometry (T3FC) system that enables multi-dye analysis to be performed very simply, with greatly relaxed requirements on the fluid flow. Two-photon excitation using a femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) laser has the advantages that it enables simultaneous excitation of multiple dyes and achieves very high signal-to-noise ratio through simplified filtering and fluorescence background reduction. By matching the excitation volume to the size of a cell, single-cell detection is ensured. Labeling of cells by targeted nanoparticles with multiple fluorophores enables normalization of the fluorescence signal and thus ratiometric measurements under nonuniform excitation. Quantitative size measurements can also be done even under conditions of nonuniform flow via a two-beam layout. This innovative detection scheme not only considerably simplifies the fluid flow system and the excitation and collection optics, it opens the way to quantitative cytometry in simple and compact microfluidics systems, or in vivo.

  2. Development of a Human Whole Blood Screening Platform to Monitor JAK/STAT Signaling Using High-Throughput Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fereshteh, Mark P; Li, Xin; Li, Sha; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Rosemary; Farr, Glen A; Kolodin, Garrett; Lippy, Jonathan; Naglich, Joseph G; Schieven, Gary; Schweizer, Liang; Zhang, Litao

    2016-09-01

    Oral agents targeting Janus-associated kinases (JAKs) are promising new agents in clinical development. To better understand the relationship between JAK inhibition and biological outcome, compounds targeting JAKs were evaluated in peripheral human whole blood. To date, these analyses are low throughput and costly. Here, we developed a robust 384-well, high-throughput flow-based assay approach to screen small molecules for JAK/STAT signaling inhibition in human whole blood. This assay platform provides a highly sensitive analysis of signaling events in blood and facilitates measurement of target engagement. Further, the automation technologies and process optimizations developed here overcame sample integrity, handling, and multiparametric data analysis bottlenecks without affecting assay performance. Together these efforts dramatically increased sample throughput compared to conventional manual flow cytometric approaches and enabled development of novel JAK/STAT inhibitors. PMID:27142718

  3. Nanotechnology-based molecular photoacoustic and photothermal flow cytometry platform for in vivo detection and killing of circulating cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo multicolor photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry for ultra-sensitive molecular detection of the CD44+ circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is demonstrated on a mouse model of human breast cancer. Targeting of CTCs with stem-like phenotype, which are naturally shed from parent tumors, was performed with functionalized gold and magnetic nanoparticles. Results in vivo were verified in vitro with a multifunctional microscope, which integrates PA, photothermal (PT), fluorescent and transmission modules. Magnet-induced clustering of magnetic nanoparticles in individual cells significantly amplified PT and PA signals. The novel noninvasive platform, which integrates multispectral PA detection and PT therapy with a potential for multiplex targeting of many cancer biomarkers using multicolor nanoparticles, may prospectively solve grand challenges in cancer research for diagnosis and purging of undetectable yet tumor-initiating cells in circulation before they form metastasis. PMID:19957272

  4. Nanotechnology-based molecular photoacoustic and photothermal flow cytometry platform for in-vivo detection and killing of circulating cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Kim, Jin-Woo; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2009-12-01

    In-vivo multicolor photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry for ultrasensitive molecular detection of the CD44+ circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is demonstrated on a mouse model of human breast cancer. Targeting of CTCs with stem-like phenotype, which are naturally shed from parent tumors, was performed with functionalized gold and magnetic nanoparticles. Results in vivo were verified in vitro with a multifunctional microscope, which integrates PA, photothermal (PT), fluorescent and transmission modules. Magnet-induced clustering of magnetic nanoparticles in individual cells significantly amplified PT and PA signals. The novel noninvasive platform, which integrates multispectral PA detection and PT therapy with a potential for multiplex targeting of many cancer biomarkers using multicolor nanoparticles, may prospectively solve grand challenges in cancer research for diagnosis and purging of undetectable yet tumor-initiating cells in circulation before they form metastasis. PMID:19957272

  5. In Vivo Flow Cytometry: A Horizon of Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Tárnok, Attila; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been a fundamental tool of biological discovery for many years. Invasive extraction of cells from a living organism, however, may lead to changes in cell properties and prevents studying cells in their native environment. These problems can be overcome by use of in vivo flow cytometry which provides detection and imaging of circulating normal and abnormal cells directlyin blood or lymph flow. The goal of this mini-review is to provide a brief history, features and challenges of this new generation of flow cytometry methods and instruments. Spectrum of possibilities of in vivo flow cytometry in biological science (e.g., cell metabolism, immune function, or apoptosis) and medical fields (e.g., cancer, infection, cardiovascular disorder) including integrated photoacoustic-photothermal theranostics of circulating abnormal cells are discussed with focus on recent advances of this new platform. PMID:21915991

  6. Quantitative Functional Morphology by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Vorobjev, Ivan A; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes advantages and limitations of imaging flow cytometry (IFC) based on Imagestream instrumentation using a hybrid approach of morphometric measurement and quantitation of multiparametric fluorescent intensities' distribution in cells and particles. Brief comparison is given of IFC with conventional flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Some future directions of the IFC technology are described and discussed. PMID:27460234

  7. Web-Based Analysis and Publication of Flow Cytometry Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Nikesh; Krutzik, Peter O.; Irish, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Cytobank is a web-based application for storage, analysis, and sharing of flow cytometry experiments. Researchers use a web browser to log in and use a wide range of tools developed for basic and advanced flow cytometry. In addition to providing access to standard cytometry tools from any computer, Cytobank creates a platform and community for developing new analysis and publication tools. Figure layouts created on Cytobank are designed to allow transparent access to the underlying experiment annotation and data processing steps. Since all flow cytometry files and analysis data are stored on a central server, experiments and figures can be viewed or edited by anyone with the proper permissions from any computer with Internet access. Once a primary researcher has performed the initial analysis of the data, collaborators can engage in experiment analysis and make their own figure layouts using the gated, compensated experiment files. Cytobank is available to the scientific community at www.cytobank.org PMID:20578106

  8. DNA polymorphism identity determination using flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott; Cai, Hong

    2001-01-01

    DNA polymorphism identity determination using flow cytometry. Primers designed to be immobilized on microspheres are allowed to anneal to the DNA strand under investigation, and are extended by either DNA polymerase using fluorescent dideoxynucleotides or ligated by DNA ligase to fluorescent reporter oligonucleotides. The fluorescence of either the dideoxynucleotide or the reporter oligonucleotide attached to the immobilized primer is measured by flow cytometry, thereby identifying the nucleotide polymorphism on the DNA strand.

  9. Multiplex immunoassay for persistent organic pollutants in tilapia: Comparison of imaging- and flow cytometry-based platforms using spectrally encoded paramagnetic microspheres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in spectrally encoded microspheres (SEMs)-based technologies provide high multiplexing possibilities. Most SEMs-based assays required a flow cytometer with sophisticated fluidics and optics. The new imaging superparamagnetic SEMs-based platform transports SEMs with considerably ...

  10. Flow Cytometry: Impact On Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Modern flow cytometers can make optical measurements of 10 or more parameters per cell at tens-of-thousands of cells per second and over five orders of magnitude dynamic range. Although flow cytometry is used in most drug discovery stages, “sip-and-spit” sampling technology has restricted it to low sample throughput applications. The advent of HyperCyt sampling technology has recently made possible primary screening applications in which tens-of-thousands of compounds are analyzed per day. Target-multiplexing methodologies in combination with extended multi-parameter analyses enable profiling of lead candidates early in the discovery process, when the greatest numbers of candidates are available for evaluation. The ability to sample small volumes with negligible waste reduces reagent costs, compound usage and consumption of cells. Improved compound library formatting strategies can further extend primary screening opportunities when samples are scarce. Dozens of targets have been screened in 384- and 1536-well assay formats, predominantly in academic screening lab settings. In concert with commercial platform evolution and trending drug discovery strategies, HyperCyt-based systems are now finding their way into mainstream screening labs. Recent advances in flow-based imaging, mass spectrometry and parallel sample processing promise dramatically expanded single cell profiling capabilities to bolster systems level approaches to drug discovery. PMID:25805180

  11. Flow Cytometry: Impact on Early Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-07-01

    Modern flow cytometers can make optical measurements of 10 or more parameters per cell at tens of thousands of cells per second and more than five orders of magnitude dynamic range. Although flow cytometry is used in most drug discovery stages, "sip-and-spit" sampling technology has restricted it to low-sample-throughput applications. The advent of HyperCyt sampling technology has recently made possible primary screening applications in which tens of thousands of compounds are analyzed per day. Target-multiplexing methodologies in combination with extended multiparameter analyses enable profiling of lead candidates early in the discovery process, when the greatest numbers of candidates are available for evaluation. The ability to sample small volumes with negligible waste reduces reagent costs, compound usage, and consumption of cells. Improved compound library formatting strategies can further extend primary screening opportunities when samples are scarce. Dozens of targets have been screened in 384- and 1536-well assay formats, predominantly in academic screening lab settings. In concert with commercial platform evolution and trending drug discovery strategies, HyperCyt-based systems are now finding their way into mainstream screening labs. Recent advances in flow-based imaging, mass spectrometry, and parallel sample processing promise dramatically expanded single-cell profiling capabilities to bolster systems-level approaches to drug discovery. PMID:25805180

  12. New flow cytometry approaches in equine andrology.

    PubMed

    Peña, Fernando J; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Martín Muñoz, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Flow cytometry is currently recognized as a robust tool for the evaluation of sperm quality and function. However, within equine reproduction, this technique has not reached the sophistication of other areas of biology and medicine. In recent years, more sophisticated flow cytometers have been introduced in andrology laboratories, and the number of tests that can be potentially used in the evaluation of sperm physiology has increased accordingly. In this review, recent advances in the evaluation of stallion spermatozoa will be discussed. These new techniques in flow cytometry are able to simultaneously measure damage to different sperm regions and/or changes in functionality. PMID:27160445

  13. Spaceflight Flow Cytometry: Design Challenges and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, Dimitri; Kao, Shih-Hsin; Jeevarajan, Antony S.

    2004-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will require analytical technology capable of providing both autonomous medical care to the crew and investigative capabilities to researchers. While several promising candidate technologies exist for further development, flow cytometry is an attractive technology as it offers both crew health and a wide array of biochemistry and immunology assays. While flow cytometry has been widely used for cellular analysis in both clinical and research settings, the requirements for proper operation in spaceflight impose constraints on any instrument designs. The challenges of designing a spaceflight-ready flow cytometer are discussed, as well as some preliminary results using a prototype system.

  14. Microfluidic devices and methods for integrated flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-08-16

    Microfluidic devices and methods for flow cytometry are described. In described examples, various sample handling and preparation steps may be carried out within a same microfluidic device as flow cytometry steps. A combination of imaging and flow cytometry is described. In some examples, spiral microchannels serve as incubation chambers. Examples of automated sample handling and flow cytometry are described.

  15. Flow cytometry-based apoptosis detection

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    An apoptosing cell demonstrates multitude of characteristic morphological and biochemical features, which vary depending on the stimuli and cell type. The gross majority of classical apoptotic hallmarks can be rapidly examined by flow and image cytometry. Cytometry thus became a technology of choice in diverse studies of cellular demise. A large variety of cytometric methods designed to identify apoptotic cells and probe mechanisms associated with this mode of cell demise have been developed during the past two decades. In the present chapter we outline a handful of commonly used methods that are based on the assessment of: mitochondrial transmembrane potential, activation of caspases, plasma membrane alterations and DNA fragmentation. PMID:19609746

  16. A clinical flow cytometry data analysis assistant

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C. ); Stewart, C.C. ); Duque, R.E. ); Braylan, R.C. . Coll. of Medicine)

    1990-01-01

    A rule-based expert system is being developed to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data for patients with leukemias or lymphomas. The cells are stained with fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies and the cell fluorescence is measured with a flow cytometer. Cluster analysis is used to isolate subpopulations in the data on which the clinical decisions are made. Symbolic facts for the expert system are instantiated using these numerical data and the knowledge of the clinicians and experts in flow cytometry. The first prototype used a decision tree and rigid rules. Is successfully classified only nine of eleven leukemia cases. A second prototype incorporating certainty factors into the rules is now being developed that should remove the need for a rigid decision tree. 9 refs.

  17. Assaying Cell Cycle Status Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Ho; Sederstrom, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    In this unit, two protocols are described for analyzing cell cycle status using flow cytometry. The first is based on the simultaneous analysis of proliferation-specific marker (Ki-67) and cellular DNA content, which discriminate resting/quiescent cell populations (G0 cell) and quantify cell cycle distribution (G1, S, or G2/M), respectively. The second is based on differential staining of DNA and RNA through co-staining of Hoechst 33342 and Pyronin Y, which is also useful to identify G0 cells from G1 cells. Along with these methods for analyzing cell cycle status, two additional methods for cell proliferation assays with recent updates of newly developed fluorophores, which allow multiplex analysis of cell cycle status, cell proliferation, and a gene of interest using flow cytometry, are outlined. PMID:26131851

  18. Flow: Statistics, visualization and informatics for flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Jacob; Kepler, Thomas B; Chan, Cliburn

    2008-01-01

    Flow is an open source software application for clinical and experimental researchers to perform exploratory data analysis, clustering and annotation of flow cytometric data. Flow is an extensible system that offers the ease of use commonly found in commercial flow cytometry software packages and the statistical power of academic packages like the R BioConductor project. PMID:18559108

  19. Coaxial-Flow System for Chemical Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Paul J.; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, chemical cytometry performed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) has become increasingly valuable as a bio-analytical tool to quantify analytes from single cells. However, extensive use of CE-based chemical cytometry has been hindered by the relatively low throughput for the analysis of single adherent cells. In order to overcome the low throughput of CE-based analysis of adherent cells and increase its utility in evaluating cellular attributes, new higher throughput methods are needed. Integration of a coaxial buffer exchange system with CE-based chemical cytometry increased the rate of serial analyses of cells. In the designed system, fluid flow through a tube coaxial to the separation capillary was used to supply electrophoretic buffer to the capillary. This sheath or coaxial fluid was turned off between analysis of cells and on during cell sampling and electrophoresis. Thus, living cells were not exposed to the nonphysiologic electrophoretic buffer prior to lysis. Key parameters of the system such as the relative capillary-sheath positions, buffer flow velocities, and the cell chamber design were optimized. To demonstrate the utility of the system, rat basophilic leukemic cells loaded with Oregon Green and fluorescein were serially lysed and loaded into a capillary. Separation of the contents of 20 cells at a rate of 0.5 cells/min was demonstrated. PMID:17979298

  20. Applications of Imaging Flow Cytometry for Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Mark; Davis, Aubrey; Abbriano, Raffaela; Pugsley, Haley R; Traller, Jesse C; Smith, Sarah R; Shrestha, Roshan P; Cook, Orna; Sánchez-Alvarez, Eva L; Manandhar-Shrestha, Kalpana; Alderete, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image large numbers of cells at high resolution enhances flow cytometric analysis of cells and cell populations. In particular, the ability to image intracellular features adds a unique aspect to analyses, and can enable correlation between molecular phenomena resulting in alterations in cellular phenotype. Unicellular microalgae are amenable to high-throughput analysis to capture the diversity of cell types in natural samples, or diverse cellular responses in clonal populations, especially using imaging cytometry. Using examples from our laboratory, we review applications of imaging cytometry, specifically using an Amnis(®) ImageStream(®)X instrument, to characterize photosynthetic microalgae. Some of these examples highlight advantages of imaging flow cytometry for certain research objectives, but we also include examples that would not necessarily require imaging and could be performed on a conventional cytometer to demonstrate other concepts in cytometric evaluation of microalgae. We demonstrate the value of these approaches for (1) analysis of populations, (2) documentation of cellular features, and (3) analysis of gene expression. PMID:27460237

  1. Flow cytometry for health monitoring in space

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.; Martin, J.C.; Saunders, G.C.; Stewart, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Monitoring the health of space station or lunar base residents will be necessary to provide knowledge of the physiological status of astronauts. Flow cytometric techniques are uniquely capable of providing cellular, chromosome, hormone level and enzyme level information. The use of dyes provides the basis for fluorescently labeling specific cellular components. Laser induced fluorescence from stained cells is quantitated in a flow cytometer to measure cellular components such as DNA, RNA and protein. One major application of a flow cytometer will be to perform a complete blood count including hematocrit, hemoglobin content, and numbers of platelets, erythrocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes. A newly developed flow cytometry based fluoroimmunoassay will be able to measure levels of serum enzymes and hormones. It will also be possible to quantitate radiation exposure and some forms of chromosome damage with flow cytometric measurements. With relatively simple modifications to existing technology, it will be possible to construct a flight rated cytometer. 11 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Resources for flow and image cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes resources available to the flow and image cytometry community. I have been asked to limit the discussion to resources available in the United States, so reference to resources exclusively available in Japan, Europe, or Australia are not included. It is not the intention of this paper to include each and every resource available, rather, to describe the types available and give some examples. Included in this manuscript are listings of some of the examples of resources which readers may find useful. Addresses of commercial companies are not included in the interest of space. Most of the examples listed advertise on a regular basis in journals publishing in cytometry fields. The resources to be described are divided into five categories: instrument resources, computer and software resources, standards, physical or user'' resources, and instructional resources. Each of these resources will be discussed separately. 4 tabs.

  3. Optimized flow cytometry isolation of murine spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaysinskaya, Valeriya; Soh, Ina Y; van der Heijden, Godfried W; Bortvin, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Meiotic prophase I (MPI), is an initial stage of meiosis characterized by intricate homologous chromosome interactions, synapsis, and DNA recombination. These processes depend on the complex, but poorly understood early MPI events of homologous chromosome search, alignment, and pairing. Detailed molecular investigation of these early events requires isolation of individual MPI substages. Enrichment for Pachytene (P) and Diplotene (D) substages of late MPI was previously accomplished using flow cytometry. However, separation of early MPI spermatocytes, specifically, of Leptotene (L) and Zygotene (Z) substages, has been a challenge due to these cells' similar characteristics. In this report, we describe an optimized Hoechst-33342 (Hoechst)-based flow cytometry approach for isolating individual MPI populations from adult mouse testis. We get significant enrichment for individual L and Z spermatocytes, previously inseparable from each other, and optimize the isolation of other MPI substages. Our flow cytometry approach is a combination of three optimized strategies. The first is optimization of testis dissociation protocol that yields more consistent and reproducible testicular single cell suspension. The second involves optimization of flow cytometric gating protocol where a critical addition to the standard protocol for cell discrimination based on Hoechst fluorescence, involves a back-gating technique based on light scattering parameters. This step specifies selection of individual MPI substages. The third, is an addition of DNA content restriction to the gating protocol to minimize contamination from non-meiotic cells. Finally, we confirm significant enrichment of high-purity Preleptotene (PreL), L, Z, P, and D MPI spermatocytes using stage-specific marker distribution. The technique will facilitate understanding of the molecular events underlying MPI. PMID:24664803

  4. Multiparameter Flow Cytometry For Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Carleton C.

    1989-06-01

    Flow Cytometry facilities are well established and provide immunophenotyping and DNA content measurement services. The application of immunophenotyping has been primarily in monitoring therapy and in providing further information to aid in the definitive diagnosis of immunological and neoplastic disease such as: immunodeficiency disease, auto immune disease, organ transplantation, and leukemia and lymphoma. DNA content measurements have been particularly important in determining the fraction of cycling cells and presence of aneuploid cells in neoplasia. This information has been useful in the management of patients with solid tumors.

  5. Honey Bee Hemocyte Profiling by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Marringa, William J.; Krueger, Michael J.; Burritt, Nancy L.; Burritt, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple stress factors in honey bees are causing loss of bee colonies worldwide. Several infectious agents of bees are believed to contribute to this problem. The mechanisms of honey bee immunity are not completely understood, in part due to limited information about the types and abundances of hemocytes that help bees resist disease. Our study utilized flow cytometry and microscopy to examine populations of hemolymph particulates in honey bees. We found bee hemolymph includes permeabilized cells, plasmatocytes, and acellular objects that resemble microparticles, listed in order of increasing abundance. The permeabilized cells and plasmatocytes showed unexpected differences with respect to properties of the plasma membrane and labeling with annexin V. Both permeabilized cells and plasmatocytes failed to show measurable mitochondrial membrane potential by flow cytometry using the JC-1 probe. Our results suggest hemolymph particulate populations are dynamic, revealing significant differences when comparing individual hive members, and when comparing colonies exposed to diverse conditions. Shifts in hemocyte populations in bees likely represent changing conditions or metabolic differences of colony members. A better understanding of hemocyte profiles may provide insight into physiological responses of honey bees to stress factors, some of which may be related to colony failure. PMID:25285798

  6. Optical clearing in photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Menyaev, Yulian A.; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical applications of photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for detection of circulating tumor cells in deep blood vessels are hindered by laser beam scattering, that result in loss of PAFC sensitivity and resolution. We demonstrate biocompatible and rapid optical clearing (OC) of skin to minimize light scattering and thus, increase optical resolution and sensitivity of PAFC. OC effect was achieved in 20 min by sequent skin cleaning, microdermabrasion, and glycerol application enhanced by massage and sonophoresis. Using 0.8 mm mouse skin layer over a blood vessel in vitro phantom we demonstrated 1.6-fold decrease in laser spot blurring accompanied by 1.6-fold increase in PA signal amplitude from blood background. As a result, peak rate for B16F10 melanoma cells in blood flow increased 1.7-fold. By using OC we also demonstrated the feasibility of PA contrast improvement for human hand veins. PMID:24409398

  7. Optical clearing in photoacoustic flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Menyaev, Yulian A; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Juratli, Mazen A; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Clinical applications of photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for detection of circulating tumor cells in deep blood vessels are hindered by laser beam scattering, that result in loss of PAFC sensitivity and resolution. We demonstrate biocompatible and rapid optical clearing (OC) of skin to minimize light scattering and thus, increase optical resolution and sensitivity of PAFC. OC effect was achieved in 20 min by sequent skin cleaning, microdermabrasion, and glycerol application enhanced by massage and sonophoresis. Using 0.8 mm mouse skin layer over a blood vessel in vitro phantom we demonstrated 1.6-fold decrease in laser spot blurring accompanied by 1.6-fold increase in PA signal amplitude from blood background. As a result, peak rate for B16F10 melanoma cells in blood flow increased 1.7-fold. By using OC we also demonstrated the feasibility of PA contrast improvement for human hand veins. PMID:24409398

  8. Deep profiling of multitube flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Kieran; Aghaeepour, Nima; Parker, Jeremy; Hogge, Donna; Karsan, Aly; Dalal, Bakul; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Deep profiling the phenotypic landscape of tissues using high-throughput flow cytometry (FCM) can provide important new insights into the interplay of cells in both healthy and diseased tissue. But often, especially in clinical settings, the cytometer cannot measure all the desired markers in a single aliquot. In these cases, tissue is separated into independently analysed samples, leaving a need to electronically recombine these to increase dimensionality. Nearest-neighbour (NN) based imputation fulfils this need but can produce artificial subpopulations. Clustering-based NNs can reduce these, but requires prior domain knowledge to be able to parameterize the clustering, so is unsuited to discovery settings. Results: We present flowBin, a parameterization-free method for combining multitube FCM data into a higher-dimensional form suitable for deep profiling and discovery. FlowBin allocates cells to bins defined by the common markers across tubes in a multitube experiment, then computes aggregate expression for each bin within each tube, to create a matrix of expression of all markers assayed in each tube. We show, using simulated multitube data, that flowType analysis of flowBin output reproduces the results of that same analysis on the original data for cell types of >10% abundance. We used flowBin in conjunction with classifiers to distinguish normal from cancerous cells. We used flowBin together with flowType and RchyOptimyx to profile the immunophenotypic landscape of NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia, and present a series of novel cell types associated with that mutation. Availability and implementation: FlowBin is available in Bioconductor under the Artistic 2.0 free open source license. All data used are available in FlowRepository under accessions: FR-FCM-ZZYA, FR-FCM-ZZZK and FR-FCM-ZZES. Contact: rbrinkman@bccrc.ca. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25600947

  9. Applications of Flow Cytometry to Clinical Microbiology†

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Arroyo, Javier; Cantón, Rafael; Nombela, César; Sánchez-Pérez, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    Classical microbiology techniques are relatively slow in comparison to other analytical techniques, in many cases due to the need to culture the microorganisms. Furthermore, classical approaches are difficult with unculturable microorganisms. More recently, the emergence of molecular biology techniques, particularly those on antibodies and nucleic acid probes combined with amplification techniques, has provided speediness and specificity to microbiological diagnosis. Flow cytometry (FCM) allows single- or multiple-microbe detection in clinical samples in an easy, reliable, and fast way. Microbes can be identified on the basis of their peculiar cytometric parameters or by means of certain fluorochromes that can be used either independently or bound to specific antibodies or oligonucleotides. FCM has permitted the development of quantitative procedures to assess antimicrobial susceptibility and drug cytotoxicity in a rapid, accurate, and highly reproducible way. Furthermore, this technique allows the monitoring of in vitro antimicrobial activity and of antimicrobial treatments ex vivo. The most outstanding contribution of FCM is the possibility of detecting the presence of heterogeneous populations with different responses to antimicrobial treatments. Despite these advantages, the application of FCM in clinical microbiology is not yet widespread, probably due to the lack of access to flow cytometers or the lack of knowledge about the potential of this technique. One of the goals of this review is to attempt to mitigate this latter circumstance. We are convinced that in the near future, the availability of commercial kits should increase the use of this technique in the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:10755996

  10. Cellometer image cytometry as a complementary tool to flow cytometry for verifying gated cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Kuksin, Christina Arieta; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-15

    Traditionally, many cell-based assays that analyze cell populations and functionalities have been performed using flow cytometry. However, flow cytometers remain relatively expensive and require highly trained operators for routine maintenance and data analysis. Recently, an image cytometry system has been developed by Nexcelom Bioscience (Lawrence, MA, USA) for automated cell concentration and viability measurement using bright-field and fluorescent imaging methods. Image cytometry is analogous to flow cytometry in that gating operations can be performed on the cell population based on size and fluorescent intensity. In addition, the image cytometer is capable of capturing bright-field and fluorescent images, allowing for the measurement of cellular size and fluorescence intensity data. In this study, we labeled a population of cells with an enzymatic vitality stain (calcein-AM) and a cell viability dye (propidium iodide) and compared the data generated by flow and image cytometry. We report that measuring vitality and viability using the image cytometer is as effective as flow cytometric assays and allows for visual confirmation of the sample to exclude cellular debris. Image cytometry offers a direct method for performing fluorescent cell-based assays but also may be used as a complementary tool to flow cytometers for aiding the analysis of more complex samples. PMID:27033005

  11. Flow cytometry: A powerful technology for measuring biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    A broad definition of a biomarker is that it is a measurable characteristic of a biological system that changes upon exposure to a physical or chemical insult. While the definition can be further refined, it is sufficient for the purposes of demonstrating the advantages of flow cytometry for making quantitative measurements of biomarkers. Flow cytometry and cell sorting technologies have emerged during the past 25 years to take their place alongside other essential tools used in biology such as optical and electron microscopy. This paper describes the basics of flow cytometry technology, provides illustrative examples of applications of the technology in the field of biomarkers, describes recent developments in flow cytometry that have not yet been applied to biomarker measurements, and projects future developments of the technology. The examples of uses of flow cytometry for biomarker quantification cited in this paper are meant to be illustrative and not exhaustive in the sense of providing a review of the field.

  12. Bioaerosol characterization by flow cytometry with fluorochrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Shih; Li, Chih-Shan

    2005-10-01

    Traditional culture and microscopy methods for evaluation of bioaerosols are slow, tedious, and rather imprecise. In this study, the application of flow cytometry that was combined with a fluorescent technique (FCM/FL) was evaluated as a technique to quickly and accurately determine and quantify the total concentration and viability of bioaerosols. The optimal conditions of five fluorescent dyes [acridine orange (AO), SYTO-13, propidium iodide (PI), YOPRO-1, and 5-cyano-2,3-ditolytetrazolium chloride (CTC)] used in FCM/FL were determined for laboratory samples of bacterial aerosols (Escherichia coli, and endospores of Bacillus subtilis) and fungal aerosols (Candida famata and Penicillium citrinum spores). Based on the measured cell concentration, fluorescence intensity, and staining efficiency as indicators for dye performance evaluation, SYTO-13 was found to be the most suitable fluorescent dye for determining the total concentration of the bioaerosols, as well as YOPRO-1 was the most suitable for determining viability. Moreover, the established optimal FCM/FL with dyes was validated for characterizing microorganism profiles from both air and water samples from the aeration tank of hospital wastewater treatment plant. In conclusion, the FCM/FL successfully assessed the total concentration and viability for bacterial and fungal microorganisms in environmental field samples. PMID:16193165

  13. [Flow cytometry: applications in transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Boval, B

    2000-06-01

    In transfusion medicine, flow cytometry (FCM) is a methodology combining laser radiation, optics and a computerized treatment of numerous results. We can measure size, cellularity and fluorescence intensity of cells or particles in suspension after the binding of appropriate fluorescent antibodies or fluorescent dyes. The main utilisation of FCM in transfusion medicine is for quality control of the process of leukocyte reduction in red cell concentrates or in platelet units, using commercial kits. In addition, it is used for the enumeration of CD 34 positive cells before bone marrow transplantation and for control of platelet function in platelet units. For clinical investigations, FCM may be used for red cell phenotyping, essentially to detect minor populations (chimerism), for the estimation of red cell survival, or for the detection of fetal erythrocytes. In the field of platelet immunology, FCM is an essential tool for detecting platelet antibodies (auto or allo), for platelet phenotyping or for cross-matching. In the future perhaps, FCM will permit us to detect bacterial contamination or prion protein in transfused blood cells. PMID:10919227

  14. New Horizons in Platelets Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Saboor, Muhammad; Moinuddin, Moinuddin; Ilyas, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Platelet flow cytometry is an emerging tool in diagnostic and therapeutic hematology. It is eminently suited to study the expression of platelet surface receptors both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. It can serve as a useful marker for the documentation of in vivo platelet activation, and thus, fore-warn the risk of thromboembolism in patients with diabetes mellitus, coronary syndromes, peripheral vascular diseases, and pre-eclampsia. This technique can also be extended to study and compare the effect of various antiplatelet drugs on the level of activation of platelets and to establish any dose-effect relationship of these drugs. Topographical localization of platelet granules and study of platelet-platelet and platelet-leukocyte interaction is also possible by this procedure. All these parameters serve as pointers towards the presence of activated platelets in the circulation with its thromboembolic consequences. This is a simple reliable and cost effective technique which has a wide application in the diagnosis of various inherited and acquired platelet disorders. Study of platelet cluster of differentiation (CD) markers in various inherited disorders i.e. Bernard Soulier’s disease, von Willebrand disease, Glanzman’s disease, and Grey platelet syndrome may help categories the molecular lesions in these oft under-studied disorders. PMID:23983579

  15. Flow-cytometry techniques in radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.F.; Hale, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence exists that all blood cells are derived from HSC. These cells are of interest to radiobiologists because they are highly sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are present in the marrow at a concentration of approximately 2-3 HSC per 1000 nucleated marrow cells. In the past, only clonogenic assays requiring 8-13 days and ten irradiated recipient rodents were available for assaying HSC. Because of the importance of HSC in the post-irradiation syndrome, the authors developed a new rapid method based on flow cytometry not only to assay but also to purify and characterize HSC. This new method makes extensive use of non-clonal antibodies conjugated to fluorescent phycobiliproteins through the sulfhydryls of the hinge region of the IgG molecule. An optical bench arrangement with a dye laser and an argon laser was used for dual excitation of the phycobiliprotein-monoclonal antibody conjugates and various cellular and DNA probes. Using 4', 6-diamidino 2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAP) exclusion to identify viable cells, it was possible to follow regeneration of post-irradiated rat marrow HSC.

  16. In vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry for early malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chengzhong; Carey, Kai A; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Menyaev, Yulian A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Stumhofer, Jason S; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    In vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) has already demonstrated a great potential for the diagnosis of deadly diseases through ultrasensitive detection of rare disease-associated circulating markers in whole blood volume. Here, we demonstrate the first application of this powerful technique for early diagnosis of malaria through label-free detection of malaria parasite-produced hemozoin in infected red blood cells (iRBCs) as high-contrast PA agent. The existing malaria tests using blood smears can detect the disease at 0.001-0.1% of parasitemia. On the contrary, linear PAFC showed a potential for noninvasive malaria diagnosis at an extremely low level of parasitemia of 0.0000001%, which is ∼10(3) times better than the existing tests. Multicolor time-of-flight PAFC with high-pulse repetition rate lasers at wavelengths of 532, 671, and 820 nm demonstrated rapid spectral and spatial identification and quantitative enumeration of individual iRBCs. Integration of PAFC with fluorescence flow cytometry (FFC) provided real-time simultaneous detection of single iRBCs and parasites expressing green fluorescence proteins, respectively. A combination of linear and nonlinear nanobubble-based multicolor PAFC showed capability to real-time control therapy efficiency by counting of iRBCs before, during, and after treatment. Our results suggest that high-sensitivity, high-resolution ultrafast PAFC-FFC platform represents a powerful research tool to provide the insight on malaria progression through dynamic study of parasite-cell interactions directly in bloodstream, whereas portable hand-worn PAFC device could be broadly used in humans for early malaria diagnosis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27078044

  17. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula. PMID:27068992

  18. The application of flow cytometry to histocompatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, T; Martin, S; Robson, A J

    2000-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique that enables the sensitive and quantitative detection of both cellular antigens and bound biological moieties. This article reviews how flow cytometry is increasingly being used as histocompatibility laboratories for the analysis of antibody specificity and HLA antigen expression. A basic description of flow cytometry principles and standardisation is given, together with an outline of clinical application in the areas of pre-transplant cross-matching, antibody screening, post-transplant antibody monitoring and HLA-B27 detection. It is concluded that flow cytometry is a useful multi-parametric analytical tool, yielding clinical benefit especially in the identification of patients at risk of early transplant rejection. PMID:10834606

  19. Visible and Near Infrared Fluorescence Spectral Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, John P.; Condello, Danilo; Duggan, Erika; Naivar, Mark; Novo, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a long standing interest in measuring complete emission spectra from individual cells in flow cytometry. We have developed flow cytometry instruments and analysis approaches to enable this to be done routinely and robustly. Our spectral flow cytometers use a holographic grating to disperse light from single cells onto a CCD for high speed, wavelength-resolved detection. Customized software allows the single cell spectral data to be displayed and analyzed to produce new spectra-derived parameters. We show that familiar reference and calibration beads can be employed to quantitatively assess instrument performance. We use microspheres stained with six different quantum dots to compare a virtual bandpass filter approach with classic least squares (CLS) spectral unmixing, and then use antibody capture beads and CLS unmixing to demonstrate immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells using spectral flow cytometry. Finally, we characterize and evaluate several near infrared (NIR) emitting fluorophores for use in spectral flow cytometry. Spectral flow cytometry offers a number of attractive features for single cell analysis, including a simplified optical path, high spectral resolution, and streamlined approaches to quantitative multiparameter measurements. The availability of robust instrumentation, software, and analysis approaches will facilitate the development of spectral flow cytometry applications. PMID:23225549

  20. flowCore: a Bioconductor package for high throughput flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Florian; LeMeur, Nolwenn; Brinkman, Ryan R; Ellis, Byron; Haaland, Perry; Sarkar, Deepayan; Spidlen, Josef; Strain, Errol; Gentleman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent advances in automation technologies have enabled the use of flow cytometry for high throughput screening, generating large complex data sets often in clinical trials or drug discovery settings. However, data management and data analysis methods have not advanced sufficiently far from the initial small-scale studies to support modeling in the presence of multiple covariates. Results We developed a set of flexible open source computational tools in the R package flowCore to facilitate the analysis of these complex data. A key component of which is having suitable data structures that support the application of similar operations to a collection of samples or a clinical cohort. In addition, our software constitutes a shared and extensible research platform that enables collaboration between bioinformaticians, computer scientists, statisticians, biologists and clinicians. This platform will foster the development of novel analytic methods for flow cytometry. Conclusion The software has been applied in the analysis of various data sets and its data structures have proven to be highly efficient in capturing and organizing the analytic work flow. Finally, a number of additional Bioconductor packages successfully build on the infrastructure provided by flowCore, open new avenues for flow data analysis. PMID:19358741

  1. Computational analysis of high-throughput flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J Paul; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flow cytometry has been around for over 40 years, but only recently has the opportunity arisen to move into the high-throughput domain. The technology is now available and is highly competitive with imaging tools under the right conditions. Flow cytometry has, however, been a technology that has focused on its unique ability to study single cells and appropriate analytical tools are readily available to handle this traditional role of the technology. Areas covered Expansion of flow cytometry to a high-throughput (HT) and high-content technology requires both advances in hardware and analytical tools. The historical perspective of flow cytometry operation as well as how the field has changed and what the key changes have been discussed. The authors provide a background and compelling arguments for moving toward HT flow, where there are many innovative opportunities. With alternative approaches now available for flow cytometry, there will be a considerable number of new applications. These opportunities show strong capability for drug screening and functional studies with cells in suspension. Expert opinion There is no doubt that HT flow is a rich technology awaiting acceptance by the pharmaceutical community. It can provide a powerful phenotypic analytical toolset that has the capacity to change many current approaches to HT screening. The previous restrictions on the technology, based on its reduced capacity for sample throughput, are no longer a major issue. Overcoming this barrier has transformed a mature technology into one that can focus on systems biology questions not previously considered possible. PMID:22708834

  2. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  3. Application of Flow Cytometry in the Evaluation of Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Thomas A; Madkaikar, Manisha; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2016-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of the immune system. Currently more than 250 different PIDDs with a known genetic defect have been recognized. The diagnosis of many of these disorders is supported strongly by a wide variety of flow cytometry applications. Flow cytometry offers a rapid and sensitive tool for diagnosis and classification of PIDDs. It is applicable in the initial workup and subsequent management of several primary immunodeficiency diseases. As our understanding of the pathogenesis and management of these diseases increases, the majority of these tests can be easily established in the diagnostic laboratory. Thus, the focus of this article is on the application of flow cytometry in the diagnosis and/or evaluation of PIDDs. PMID:26865168

  4. Flow cytometry measurements of human chromosome kinetochore labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Malloy, P.; Sumner, A.T.

    1989-03-01

    A method for the preparation and measurement of immunofluorescent human chromosome centromeres in suspension is described using CREST antibodies, which bind to the centromeric region of chromosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antihuman antibodies provide the fluorescent label. Labeled chromosomes are examined on microscope slides and by flow cytometry. In both cases a dye which binds to DNA is added to provide identification of the chromosome groups. Sera from different CREST patients vary in their ability to bind to chromosome arms in addition to the centromeric region. Flow cytometry and microfluorimetry measurements have shown that with a given CREST serum the differences in kinetochore fluorescence between chromosomes are only minor. Flow cytometry experiments to relate the number of dicentric chromosomes, induced by in vitro radiation of peripheral blood cells to the slightly increased number of chromosomes with above-average kinetochore fluorescence did not produce decisive radiation dosimetry results.

  5. A Semiconductor Microlaser for Intracavity Flow Cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil, O.; Copeland, G.C.; Dunne, J.L.; Gourley, P.L.; Hendricks, J.K.; McDonald, A.E.

    1999-01-20

    Semiconductor microlasers are attractive components for micro-analysis systems because of their ability to emit coherent intense light from a small aperture. By using a surface-emitting semiconductor geometry, we were able to incorporate fluid flow inside a laser microcavity for the first time. This confers significant advantages for high throughput screening of cells, particulates and fluid analytes in a sensitive microdevice. In this paper we discuss the intracavity microfluidics and present preliminary results with flowing blood and brain cells.

  6. flowClust: a Bioconductor package for automated gating of flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kenneth; Hahne, Florian; Brinkman, Ryan R; Gottardo, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    Background As a high-throughput technology that offers rapid quantification of multidimensional characteristics for millions of cells, flow cytometry (FCM) is widely used in health research, medical diagnosis and treatment, and vaccine development. Nevertheless, there is an increasing concern about the lack of appropriate software tools to provide an automated analysis platform to parallelize the high-throughput data-generation platform. Currently, to a large extent, FCM data analysis relies on the manual selection of sequential regions in 2-D graphical projections to extract the cell populations of interest. This is a time-consuming task that ignores the high-dimensionality of FCM data. Results In view of the aforementioned issues, we have developed an R package called flowClust to automate FCM analysis. flowClust implements a robust model-based clustering approach based on multivariate t mixture models with the Box-Cox transformation. The package provides the functionality to identify cell populations whilst simultaneously handling the commonly encountered issues of outlier identification and data transformation. It offers various tools to summarize and visualize a wealth of features of the clustering results. In addition, to ensure its convenience of use, flowClust has been adapted for the current FCM data format, and integrated with existing Bioconductor packages dedicated to FCM analysis. Conclusion flowClust addresses the issue of a dearth of software that helps automate FCM analysis with a sound theoretical foundation. It tends to give reproducible results, and helps reduce the significant subjectivity and human time cost encountered in FCM analysis. The package contributes to the cytometry community by offering an efficient, automated analysis platform which facilitates the active, ongoing technological advancement. PMID:19442304

  7. Nanocrystal-based biomimetic system for quantitative flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Peter; Dobrovolskaia, Marina; Kang, HyeongGon; Clarke, Matthew; Patri, Anil K.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2007-02-01

    Flow cytometry has been instrumental in rapid analysis of single cells since the 1970s. One of the common approaches is the immunofluorescence study involving labeling of cells with antibodies conjugated to organic fluorophores. More recently, as the application of flow cytometry extended from simple cell detection to single-cell proteomic analysis, the need of determining the actual number of antigens in a single cell has driven the flow cytomery technique towards a quantitative methodology. However, organic fluorophores are challenging to use as probes for quantitative detection due to the lack of photostability and of quantitative fluorescence standards. National Institute of Standards and Technologies (NIST) provides a set of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled beads, RM 8640, which is the only nationally recognized fluorescent particle standard. On the other hand, optical characteristics of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots or QDs are superior to traditional dye molecules for the use as tags for biological and chemical fluorescent sensors and detectors. Compelling advantages of QDs include long photostability, broad spectral coverage, easy excitation, and suitability for multiplexed sensing. Recently, novel surface coatings have been developed to render QDs water soluble and bio-conjugation ready, leading to their use as fluorescent tags and sensors for a variety of biological applications including immunolabeling of cells. Here, we describe our approach of using fluorescent semiconductor QDs as a novel tool for quantitative flow cytometry detection. Our strategy involves the development of immuno-labeled QD-conjugated silica beads as "biomimetic cells." In addition to flow cytometry, the QD-conjugated silica beads were characterized by fluorescence microscopy to quantitate the number of QDs attached to a single silica bead. Our approach enables flow cytometry analysis to be highly sensitive, quantitative, and encompass a wide dynamic range of

  8. Human CD4+ lymphocytes for antigen quantification: characterization using conventional flow cytometry and mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Abbasi, Fatima; Ornatsky, Olga; Cole, Kenneth D; Misakian, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; He, Hua-Jun; Marti, Gerald E; Tanner, Scott; Stebbings, Richard

    2012-07-01

    To transform the linear fluorescence intensity scale obtained with fluorescent microspheres to an antibody bound per cell (ABC) scale, a biological cell reference material is needed. Optimally, this material should have a reproducible and tight ABC value for the expression of a known clinical reference biomarker. In this study, we characterized commercially available cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and two lyophilized PBMC preparations, Cyto-Trol and PBMC-National Institute for Biological Standard and Control (NIBSC) relative to freshly prepared PBMC and whole blood samples. It was found that the ABC values for CD4 expression on cryopreserved PBMC were consistent with those of freshly obtained PBMC and whole blood samples. By comparison, the ABC value for CD4 expression on Cyto-Trol is lower and the value on PBMC-NIBSC is much lower than those of freshly prepared cell samples using both conventional flow cytometry and CyTOF™ mass cytometry. By performing simultaneous surface and intracellular staining measurements on these two cell samples, we found that both cell membranes are mostly intact. Moreover, CD4(+) cell diameters from both lyophilized cell preparations are smaller than those of PBMC and whole blood. This could result in steric interference in antibody binding to the lyophilized cells. Further investigation of the fixation effect on the detected CD4 expression suggests that the very low ABC value obtained for CD4(+) cells from lyophilized PBMC-NIBSC is largely due to paraformaldehyde fixation; this significantly decreases available antibody binding sites. This study provides confirmation that the results obtained from the newly developed mass cytometry are directly comparable to the results from conventional flow cytometry when both methods are standardized using the same ABC approach. PMID:22539147

  9. Ultrafast quantitative time-stretch imaging flow cytometry of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Queenie T. K.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive quantification of phytoplankton abundance, sizes and other parameters, e.g. biomasses, has been an important, yet daunting task in aquatic sciences and biofuel research. It is primarily because of the lack of effective tool to image and thus accurately profile individual microalgae in a large population. The phytoplankton species are highly diversified and heterogeneous in terms of their sizes and the richness in morphological complexity. This fact makes time-stretch imaging, a new ultrafast real-time optical imaging technology, particularly suitable for ultralarge-scale taxonomic classification of phytoplankton together with quantitative image recognition and analysis. We here demonstrate quantitative imaging flow cytometry of single phytoplankton based on quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) - a new time-stretch imaging modality for label-free quantitative phase imaging without interferometric implementations. Sharing the similar concept of Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM accesses multiple phase-gradient contrasts of each single phytoplankton, from which the quantitative phase profile is computed. We employ such system to capture, at an imaging line-scan rate of 11.6 MHz, high-resolution images of two phytoplankton populations (scenedesmus and chlamydomonas) in ultrafast microfluidic flow (3 m/s). We further perform quantitative taxonomic screening analysis enabled by this technique. More importantly, the system can also generate quantitative phase images of single phytoplankton. This is especially useful for label-free quantification of biomasses (e.g. lipid droplets) of the particular species of interest - an important task adopted in biofuel applications. Combining machine learning for automated classification, Q-ATOM could be an attractive platform for continuous and real-time ultralarge-scale single-phytoplankton analysis.

  10. The Intersection of Flow Cytometry with Microfluidics and Microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Piyasena, Menake E.; Graves, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A modern flow cytometer can analyze and sort particles on a one by one basis at rates of 50,000 particles per second. Flow cytometers can also measure as many as 17 channels of fluorescence, several angles of scattered light, and other non-optical parameters such as particle impedance. More specialized flow cytometers can provide even greater analysis power, such as single molecule detection, imaging, and full spectral collection, at reduced rates. These capabilities have made flow cytometers an invaluable tool for numerous applications including cellular immunophenotyping, CD4+ T-cell counting, multiplex microsphere analysis, high-throughput screening, and rare cell analysis and sorting. Many bio-analytical techniques have been influenced by the advent of microfluidics as a component in analytical tools and flow cytometry is no exception. Here we detail the functions and uses of a modern flow cytometer, review the recent and historical contributions of microfluidics and microfabricated devices to field of flow cytometry, examine current application areas, and suggest opportunities for the synergistic application of microfabrication approaches to modern flow cytometry. PMID:24488050

  11. Phasor plotting with frequency-domain flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Peria, William; Sands, Bryan; Naivar, Mark; Brent, Roger; Houston, Jessica P

    2016-06-27

    Interest in time resolved flow cytometry is growing. In this paper, we collect time-resolved flow cytometry data and use it to create polar plots showing distributions that are a function of measured fluorescence decay rates from individual fluorescently-labeled cells and fluorescent microspheres. Phasor, or polar, graphics are commonly used in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In FLIM measurements, the plotted points on a phasor graph represent the phase-shift and demodulation of the frequency-domain fluorescence signal collected by the imaging system for each image pixel. Here, we take a flow cytometry cell counting system, introduce into it frequency-domain optoelectronics, and process the data so that each point on a phasor plot represents the phase shift and demodulation of an individual cell or particle. In order to demonstrate the value of this technique, we show that phasor graphs can be used to discriminate among populations of (i) fluorescent microspheres, which are labeled with one fluorophore type; (ii) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells labeled with one and two different fluorophore types; and (iii) Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that express combinations of fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes. The resulting phasor plots reveal differences in the fluorescence lifetimes within each sample and provide a distribution from which we can infer the number of cells expressing unique single or dual fluorescence lifetimes. These methods should facilitate analysis time resolved flow cytometry data to reveal complex fluorescence decay kinetics. PMID:27410612

  12. Per-channel basis normalization methods for flow cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Florian; Khodabakhshi, Alireza Hadj; Bashashati, Ali; Wong, Chao-Jen; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Weng, Andrew P.; Seifert-Margolis, Vicky; Bourcier, Katarzyna; Asare, Adam; Lumley, Thomas; Gentleman, Robert; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Between-sample variation in high throughput flow cytometry data poses a significant challenge for analysis of large scale data sets, such as those derived from multi-center clinical trials. It is often hard to match biologically relevant cell populations across samples due to technical variation in sample acquisition and instrumentation differences. Thus normalization of data is a critical step prior to analysis, particularly in large-scale data sets from clinical trials, where group specific differences may be subtle and patient-to-patient variation common. We have developed two normalization methods that remove technical between-sample variation by aligning prominent features (landmarks) in the raw data on a per-channel basis. These algorithms were tested on two independent flow cytometry data sets by comparing manually gated data, either individually for each sample or using static gating templates, before and after normalization. Our results show a marked improvement in the overlap between manual and static gating when the data are normalized, thereby facilitating the use of automated analyses on large flow cytometry data sets. Such automated analyses are essential for high throughput flow cytometry. PMID:19899135

  13. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang; Klocke, Axel

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide insights int eh dynamic and structural properties of dyes and their micro- environment. The implementation of fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometric systems allows to monitor large cell and particle populations with high statistical significance. In our system, a modulated laser beam is used for excitation and the phase shift of the fluorescence signal recorded with a fast computer controlled digital oscilloscope is processed digitally to determine the phase shift with respect to a reference beam by fast fourier transform. Total fluorescence intensity as well as other parameters can be determined simultaneously from the same fluorescence signal. We use the epi-illumination design to allow the use of high numerical apertures to collect as much light as possible to ensure detection of even weak fluorescence. Data storage and processing is done comparable to slit-scan flow cytometric data using data analysis system. The results are stored, displayed, combined with other parameters and analyzed as normal listmode data. In our report we discuss carefully the signal to noise ratio for analog and digital processed lifetime signals to evaluate the theoretical minimum fluorescence intensity for lifetime measurements. Applications to be presented include DNA staining, parameters of cell functions as well as different applications in non-mammalian cells such as algae.

  14. Critical assessment of automated flow cytometry data analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Finak, Greg; Hoos, Holger; Mosmann, Tim R; Brinkman, Ryan; Gottardo, Raphael; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Traditional methods for flow cytometry (FCM) data processing rely on subjective manual gating. Recently, several groups have developed computational methods for identifying cell populations in multidimensional FCM data. The Flow Cytometry: Critical Assessment of Population Identification Methods (FlowCAP) challenges were established to compare the performance of these methods on two tasks: (i) mammalian cell population identification, to determine whether automated algorithms can reproduce expert manual gating and (ii) sample classification, to determine whether analysis pipelines can identify characteristics that correlate with external variables (such as clinical outcome). This analysis presents the results of the first FlowCAP challenges. Several methods performed well as compared to manual gating or external variables using statistical performance measures, which suggests that automated methods have reached a sufficient level of maturity and accuracy for reliable use in FCM data analysis. PMID:23396282

  15. Sizing of DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mitchell E.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Martin, John C.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.

    1993-06-01

    Individual, stained DNA fragments were sized using a modified flow cytometer with high sensitivity fluorescence detection. The fluorescent intercalating dye ethidium homodimer was used to stain stoichiometrically lambda phage DNA and a Kpn I digest of lambda DNA. Stained, individual fragments of DNA were passed through a low average power, focused, mode-locked laser beam, and the fluorescence from each fragment was collected and quantified. Time-gated detection was used to discriminate against Raman scattering from the water solvent. The fluorescence burst from each fragment was related directly to its length, thus providing a means to size small quantities of kilobase lengths of DNA quickly. Improvements of several orders of magnitude in analysis time and sample size over current gel electrophoresis techniques were realized. Fragments of 17.1, 29.9, and 48.5 thousand base pairs were well resolved, and were sized in 164 seconds. Less than one pg of DNA was required for analysis.

  16. Sizing of DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Goodwin, P.M.; Ambrose, W.P.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    Individual, stained DNA fragments were sized using a modified flow cytometer with high sensitivity fluorescence detection. The fluorescent intercalating dye ethidium homodimer was used to stain stoichiometrically lambda phage DNA and a Kpn I digest of lambda DNA. Stained, individual fragments of DNA were passed through a low average power, focused, mode-locked laser beam, and the fluorescence from each fragment was collected and quantified. Time-gated detection was used to discriminate against Raman scattering from the water solvent. The fluorescence burst from each fragment was related directly to its length, thus providing a means to size small quantities of kilobase lengths of DNA quickly. Improvements of several orders of magnitude in analysis time and sample size over current gel electrophoresis techniques were realized. Fragments of 17.1,29.9, and 48.5 thousand base pairs were well resolved, and were sized in 164 seconds. Less than one pg of DNA was required for analysis. We have demonstrated sizing of individual, stained DNA fragments with resolution approaching that of gel electrophoresis for moderately large fragments, but with significant reductions in the analysis time and the amount of sample required. Furthermore, system response is linear with DNA fragment length, in contrast to the logarithmic response in gel electrophoresis. There exists the potential to perform this sizing using relatively simple instrumentation, i.e. a continuous wave laser of low power and current mode detection.

  17. Sizing of DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Goodwin, P.M.; Ambrose, W.P.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Individual, stained DNA fragments were sized using a modified flow cytometer with high sensitivity fluorescence detection. The fluorescent intercalating dye ethidium homodimer was used to stain stoichiometrically lambda phage DNA and a Kpn I digest of lambda DNA. Stained, individual fragments of DNA were passed through a low average power, focused, mode-locked laser beam, and the fluorescence from each fragment was collected and quantified. Time-gated detection was used to discriminate against Raman scattering from the water solvent. The fluorescence burst from each fragment was related directly to its length, thus providing a means to size small quantities of kilobase lengths of DNA quickly. Improvements of several orders of magnitude in analysis time and sample size over current gel electrophoresis techniques were realized. Fragments of 17.1,29.9, and 48.5 thousand base pairs were well resolved, and were sized in 164 seconds. Less than one pg of DNA was required for analysis. We have demonstrated sizing of individual, stained DNA fragments with resolution approaching that of gel electrophoresis for moderately large fragments, but with significant reductions in the analysis time and the amount of sample required. Furthermore, system response is linear with DNA fragment length, in contrast to the logarithmic response in gel electrophoresis. There exists the potential to perform this sizing using relatively simple instrumentation, i.e. a continuous wave laser of low power and current mode detection.

  18. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications. PMID:25938973

  19. Microfluidic fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometryFlowFISH)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Meagher, Robert J.; Light, Yooli Kim; Yilmaz, Suzan; Chakraborty, Romy; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an integrated microfluidic device (µFlowFISH) capable of performing 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) followed by flow cytometric detection for identifying bacteria in natural microbial communities. The device was used for detection of species involved in bioremediation of Cr(VI) and other metals in groundwater samples from a highly-contaminated environmental site (Hanford, WA, USA). The µFlowFISH seamlessly integrates two components: a hybridization chamber formed between two photopolymerized membranes, where cells and probes are electrophoretically loaded, incubated and washed; and a downstream cross structure for electrokinetically focusing cells into a single-file flow for flow cytometry analysis. The device is capable of analyzing a wide variety of bacteria including aerobic, facultative and anaerobic bacteria and was initially tested and validated using cultured microbes, including Escherichia coli, as well as two strains isolated from Hanford site: Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1, and Pseudomonas sp. strain RCH2 that are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. Combined labeling and detection efficiencies of 74–97% were observed in experiments with simple mixtures of cultured cells confirmed specific labeling. Results obtained were in excellent agreement with those obtained by conventional flow cytometry confirming the accuracy of µFlowFISH. Finally, the device was used for analyzing water samples collected on different dates from the Hanford Site. We were able to monitor the numbers of Pseudomonas sp. with only 100–200 cells loaded into the microchip. The µFlowFISH approach provides an automated platform for quantitative detection of microbial cells from complex samples, and is ideally suited for analysis of precious samples with low cell numbers such as those found at extreme environmental niches, bioremediation sites, and the human microbiome. PMID:21755095

  20. CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF AUTOMATED FLOW CYTOMETRY DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Finak, Greg; Hoos, Holger; Mosmann, Tim R.; Gottardo, Raphael; Brinkman, Ryan; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods for flow cytometry (FCM) data processing rely on subjective manual gating. Recently, several groups have developed computational methods for identifying cell populations in multidimensional FCM data. The Flow Cytometry: Critical Assessment of Population Identification Methods (FlowCAP) challenges were established to compare the performance of these methods on two tasks – mammalian cell population identification to determine if automated algorithms can reproduce expert manual gating, and sample classification to determine if analysis pipelines can identify characteristics that correlate with external variables (e.g., clinical outcome). This analysis presents the results of the first of these challenges. Several methods performed well compared to manual gating or external variables using statistical performance measures, suggesting that automated methods have reached a sufficient level of maturity and accuracy for reliable use in FCM data analysis. PMID:23396282

  1. Managing Multi-center Flow Cytometry Data for Immune Monitoring.

    PubMed

    White, Scott; Laske, Karoline; Welters, Marij Jp; Bidmon, Nicole; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M; Enzor, Jennifer; Staats, Janet; Weinhold, Kent J; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-01-01

    With the recent results of promising cancer vaccines and immunotherapy1-5, immune monitoring has become increasingly relevant for measuring treatment-induced effects on T cells, and an essential tool for shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for a successful treatment. Flow cytometry is the canonical multi-parameter assay for the fine characterization of single cells in solution, and is ubiquitously used in pre-clinical tumor immunology and in cancer immunotherapy trials. Current state-of-the-art polychromatic flow cytometry involves multi-step, multi-reagent assays followed by sample acquisition on sophisticated instruments capable of capturing up to 20 parameters per cell at a rate of tens of thousands of cells per second. Given the complexity of flow cytometry assays, reproducibility is a major concern, especially for multi-center studies. A promising approach for improving reproducibility is the use of automated analysis borrowing from statistics, machine learning and information visualization21-23, as these methods directly address the subjectivity, operator-dependence, labor-intensive and low fidelity of manual analysis. However, it is quite time-consuming to investigate and test new automated analysis techniques on large data sets without some centralized information management system. For large-scale automated analysis to be practical, the presence of consistent and high-quality data linked to the raw FCS files is indispensable. In particular, the use of machine-readable standard vocabularies to characterize channel metadata is essential when constructing analytic pipelines to avoid errors in processing, analysis and interpretation of results. For automation, this high-quality metadata needs to be programmatically accessible, implying the need for a consistent Application Programming Interface (API). In this manuscript, we propose that upfront time spent normalizing flow cytometry data to conform to carefully designed data models enables automated

  2. Managing Multi-center Flow Cytometry Data for Immune Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    White, Scott; Laske, Karoline; Welters, Marij JP; Bidmon, Nicole; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M; Enzor, Jennifer; Staats, Janet; Weinhold, Kent J; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-01-01

    With the recent results of promising cancer vaccines and immunotherapy1–5, immune monitoring has become increasingly relevant for measuring treatment-induced effects on T cells, and an essential tool for shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for a successful treatment. Flow cytometry is the canonical multi-parameter assay for the fine characterization of single cells in solution, and is ubiquitously used in pre-clinical tumor immunology and in cancer immunotherapy trials. Current state-of-the-art polychromatic flow cytometry involves multi-step, multi-reagent assays followed by sample acquisition on sophisticated instruments capable of capturing up to 20 parameters per cell at a rate of tens of thousands of cells per second. Given the complexity of flow cytometry assays, reproducibility is a major concern, especially for multi-center studies. A promising approach for improving reproducibility is the use of automated analysis borrowing from statistics, machine learning and information visualization21–23, as these methods directly address the subjectivity, operator-dependence, labor-intensive and low fidelity of manual analysis. However, it is quite time-consuming to investigate and test new automated analysis techniques on large data sets without some centralized information management system. For large-scale automated analysis to be practical, the presence of consistent and high-quality data linked to the raw FCS files is indispensable. In particular, the use of machine-readable standard vocabularies to characterize channel metadata is essential when constructing analytic pipelines to avoid errors in processing, analysis and interpretation of results. For automation, this high-quality metadata needs to be programmatically accessible, implying the need for a consistent Application Programming Interface (API). In this manuscript, we propose that upfront time spent normalizing flow cytometry data to conform to carefully designed data models enables

  3. Flow cytometry applications in the study of immunological lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Gudarzi, Hoda; Tabarsi, Payam; M Adcock, Ian; Masjedi, Mohamad Reza; Jamaati, Hamid Reza; Garssen, Johan; Velayati, Ali Akbar; A Redegeld, Frank

    2015-02-01

    The use of flow cytometry in the clinical laboratory has grown substantially in the past decade. Flow cytometric analysis provides a rapid qualitative and quantitative description of multiple characteristics of individual cells. For example, it is possible to detect the cell size and granularity, aspects of DNA and RNA content and the presence of cell surface and nuclear markers which are used to characterize the phenotype of single cells. Flow cytometry has been used for the immunophenotyping of a variety of specimens including whole blood, bone marrow, serous cavity fluids, (cerebrospinal fluid) CSF, urine and all types of body fluids. The technique has also been applied to human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, peritoneal fluids and blood. In this review, we describe the current status of the application of flow cytometry as a diagnostic tool in various lung diseases. We focus on the analysis of BAL cell composition in chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), asthma, lung cancer, sarcoidosis, tuberculosis and idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia (IEP). PMID:25530134

  4. Laser rastering flow cytometry: fast cell counting and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacca, G.; Junnarkar, M. R.; Goldblatt, N. R.; Yee, M. W.; Van Slyke, B. M.; Briese, T. C.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the concept of laser rastering flow cytometry, where a rapidly scanning laser beam allows counting and classification of cells at much higher rates than currently possible. Modifications to existing flow cytometers to implement the concept include an acousto-optic deflector, fast analog-to-digital conversion, and a two-step digital-signal-processing scheme that handles the high data rates and provides key assay information. Results are shown that prove the concept, demonstrating the ability to resolve closely spaced cells and to measure cells at rates more than an order of magnitude faster than on conventional flow-cytometer-based hematology analyzers.

  5. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization in Suspension by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla; Wallace, Paul K; Minderman, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of imaging flow cytometry (IFC) has brought novel applications exploiting its advantages over conventional flow cytometry and microscopy. One of the new applications is fluorescence in situ hybridization in suspension (FISH-IS). Conventional FISH is a slide-based approach in which the spotlike imagery resulting from hybridization with fluorescently tagged probes is evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. The FISH-IS approach evaluated by IFC enables the evaluation of tens to hundreds of thousands of cells in suspension and the analysis can be automated and standardized diminishing operator bias from the analysis. The high cell number throughput of FISH-IS improves the detection of rare events compared to conventional FISH. The applicability of FISH-IS is currently limited to detection of abnormal quantitative differences of hybridization targets such as occur in numerical chromosome abnormalities, deletions and amplifications.Here, we describe a protocol for FISH-IS using chromosome enumeration probes as an example. PMID:27460240

  6. Analyzing Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA Content by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Boye, Erik; Anda, Silje; Rothe, Christiane; Stokke, Trond; Grallert, Beáta

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry can be used to measure the DNA content of individual cells. The data are usually presented as DNA histograms that can be used to examine the cells' progression through the cell cycle. Under standard growth conditions, fission yeast cells do not complete cytokinesis until after G1 phase; therefore, DNA histograms show one major peak representing cells in G1 (2×1C DNA) and G2 phase (1×2C DNA). By analysis of the duration of the fluorescence signal as well as the intensity of the DNA-related signal, it is possible to discriminate between cells in M/G1, S, and G2 This protocol describes how to prepare cells for flow cytometry and analyze them. We also describe the application of barcoding for more accurate comparison of samples. PMID:27250946

  7. A CLIPS expert system for clinical flow cytometry data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, G. C.; Duque, R. E.; Braylan, R. C.; Stewart, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed using CLIPS to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data from cancer patients. Cluster analysis is used to find subpopulations representing various cell types in multiple datasets each consisting of four to five measurements on each of 5000 cells. CLIPS facts are derived from results of the clustering. CLIPS rules are based on the expertise of Drs. Stewart, Duque, and Braylan. The rules incorporate certainty factors based on case histories.

  8. Immunophenotyping by slide-based cytometry and by flow cytometry are comparable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstner, Andreas O.; Laffers, Wiebke; Mittag, Anja; Daehnert, Ingo; Lenz, Domnik; Bootz, Friedrich; Bocsi, Jozsef; Tarnok, Attila

    2005-03-01

    Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) is performed by flow cytometry (FCM) as the golden standard. Slide based cytometry systems for example laser scanning cytometer (LSC) can give additional information (repeated staining and scanning, morphology). In order to adequately judge on the clinical usefulness of immunophenotyping by LSC it is obligatory to compare it with the long established FCM assays. We performed this study to systematically compare the two methods, FCM and LSC for immunophenotyping and to test the correlation of the results. Leucocytes were stained with directly labeled monoclonal antibodies with whole blood staining method. Aliquots of the same paraformaldehyde fixed specimens were analyzed in a FACScan (BD-Biosciences) using standard protocols and parallel with LSC (CompuCyte) after placing to glass slide, drying and fixation by aceton and 7-AAD staining. Calculating the percentage distribution of PBLs obtained by LSC and by FCM shows very good correlation with regression coefficients close to 1.0 for the major populations (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes), as well as for the lymphocyte sub-populations (T-helper-, T-cytotoxic-, B-, NK-cells). LSC can be recommended for immunophenotyping of PBLs especially in cases where only very limited sample volumes are available or where additional analysis of the cells" morphology is important. There are limitations in the detection of rare leucocytes or weak antigens where appropriate amplification steps for immunofluorescence should be engaged.

  9. Sample handling for kinetics and molecular assembly in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sklar, L.A. |; Seamer, L.C.; Kuckuck, F.; Prossnitz, E.; Edwards, B.; Posner, G.

    1998-07-01

    Flow cytometry discriminates particle associated fluorescence from the fluorescence of the surrounding medium. It permits assemblies of macromolecular complexes on beads or cells to be detected in real-time with precision and specificity. The authors have investigated two types of robust sample handling systems which provide sub-second resolution and high throughput: (1) mixers which use stepper-motor driven syringes to initiate chemical reactions in msec time frames; and (2) flow injection controllers with valves and automated syringes used in chemical process control. In the former system, the authors used fast valves to overcome the disparity between mixing 100 {micro}ls of sample in 100 msecs and delivering sample to a flow cytometer at 1 {micro}l/sec. Particles were detected within 100 msec after mixing, but turbulence was created which lasted for 1 sec after injection of the sample into the flow cytometer. They used optical criteria to discriminate particles which were out of alignment due to the turbulent flow. Complex sample handling protocols involving multiple mixing steps and sample dilution have also been achieved. With the latter system they were able to automate sample handling and delivery with intervals of a few seconds. The authors used a fluidic approach to defeat turbulence caused by sample introduction. By controlling both sheath and sample with individual syringes, the period of turbulence was reduced to {approximately} 200 msecs. Automated sample handling and sub-second resolution should permit broad analytical and diagnostic applications of flow cytometry.

  10. FlowCam: Quantification and Classification of Phytoplankton by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Nicole J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to enumerate, classify, and determine biomass of phytoplankton from environmental samples is essential for determining ecosystem function and their role in the aquatic community and microbial food web. Traditional micro-phytoplankton quantification methods using microscopic techniques require preservation and are slow, tedious and very laborious. The availability of more automated imaging microscopy platforms has revolutionized the way particles and cells are detected within their natural environment. The ability to examine cells unaltered and without preservation is key to providing more accurate cell concentration estimates and overall phytoplankton biomass. The FlowCam(®) is an imaging cytometry tool that was originally developed for use in aquatic sciences and provides a more rapid and unbiased method for enumerating and classifying phytoplankton within diverse aquatic environments. PMID:27460250

  11. Rapid Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Nikolic, Radina; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed flowMeans, a time-efficient and accurate method for automated identification of cell populations in flow cytometry (FCM) data based on K-means clustering. Unlike traditional K-means, flowMeans can identify concave cell populations by modelling a single population with multiple clusters. flowMeans uses a change point detection algorithm to determine the number of sub-populations, enabling the method to be used in high throughput FCM data analysis pipelines. Our approach compares favourably to manual analysis by human experts and current state-of-the-art automated gating algorithms. flowMeans is freely available as an open source R package through Bioconductor. PMID:21182178

  12. Stochastic Measurement Models for Quantifying Lymphocyte Responses Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Andrey; Pavlyshyn, Damian; Markham, John F.; Dowling, Mark R.; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses are complex dynamic processes whereby B and T cells undergo division and differentiation triggered by pathogenic stimuli. Deregulation of the response can lead to severe consequences for the host organism ranging from immune deficiencies to autoimmunity. Tracking cell division and differentiation by flow cytometry using fluorescent probes is a major method for measuring progression of lymphocyte responses, both in vitro and in vivo. In turn, mathematical modeling of cell numbers derived from such measurements has led to significant biological discoveries, and plays an increasingly important role in lymphocyte research. Fitting an appropriate parameterized model to such data is the goal of these studies but significant challenges are presented by the variability in measurements. This variation results from the sum of experimental noise and intrinsic probabilistic differences in cells and is difficult to characterize analytically. Current model fitting methods adopt different simplifying assumptions to describe the distribution of such measurements and these assumptions have not been tested directly. To help inform the choice and application of appropriate methods of model fitting to such data we studied the errors associated with flow cytometry measurements from a wide variety of experiments. We found that the mean and variance of the noise were related by a power law with an exponent between 1.3 and 1.8 for different datasets. This violated the assumptions inherent to commonly used least squares, linear variance scaling and log-transformation based methods. As a result of these findings we propose a new measurement model that we justify both theoretically, from the maximum entropy standpoint, and empirically using collected data. Our evaluation suggests that the new model can be reliably used for model fitting across a variety of conditions. Our work provides a foundation for modeling measurements in flow cytometry experiments thus

  13. Stochastic Measurement Models for Quantifying Lymphocyte Responses Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kan, Andrey; Pavlyshyn, Damian; Markham, John F; Dowling, Mark R; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H S; Marchingo, Julia M; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses are complex dynamic processes whereby B and T cells undergo division and differentiation triggered by pathogenic stimuli. Deregulation of the response can lead to severe consequences for the host organism ranging from immune deficiencies to autoimmunity. Tracking cell division and differentiation by flow cytometry using fluorescent probes is a major method for measuring progression of lymphocyte responses, both in vitro and in vivo. In turn, mathematical modeling of cell numbers derived from such measurements has led to significant biological discoveries, and plays an increasingly important role in lymphocyte research. Fitting an appropriate parameterized model to such data is the goal of these studies but significant challenges are presented by the variability in measurements. This variation results from the sum of experimental noise and intrinsic probabilistic differences in cells and is difficult to characterize analytically. Current model fitting methods adopt different simplifying assumptions to describe the distribution of such measurements and these assumptions have not been tested directly. To help inform the choice and application of appropriate methods of model fitting to such data we studied the errors associated with flow cytometry measurements from a wide variety of experiments. We found that the mean and variance of the noise were related by a power law with an exponent between 1.3 and 1.8 for different datasets. This violated the assumptions inherent to commonly used least squares, linear variance scaling and log-transformation based methods. As a result of these findings we propose a new measurement model that we justify both theoretically, from the maximum entropy standpoint, and empirically using collected data. Our evaluation suggests that the new model can be reliably used for model fitting across a variety of conditions. Our work provides a foundation for modeling measurements in flow cytometry experiments thus

  14. Identification of contact and respiratory sensitizers using flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goutet, Michele . E-mail: michele.goutet@inrs.fr; Pepin, Elsa; Langonne, Isabelle; Huguet, Nelly; Ban, Masarin

    2005-06-15

    Identification of the chemicals responsible for respiratory and contact allergies in the industrial area is an important occupational safety issue. This study was conducted in mice to determine whether flow cytometry is an appropriate method to analyze and differentiate the specific immune responses to the respiratory sensitizer trimellitic anhydride (TMA) and to the contact sensitizer dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) used at concentrations with comparable immunogenic potential. Mice were exposed twice on the flanks (days 0, 5) to 10% TMA or 1% DNCB and challenged three times on the ears (days 10, 11, 12) with 2.5% TMA or 0.25% DNCB. Flow cytometry analyses were conducted on draining lymph node cells harvested on days 13 and 18. Comparing TMA and DNCB immune responses on day 13, we found obvious differences that persisted for most of them on day 18. An increased proportion of IgE+ cells correlated to total serum IgE level and an enhancement of MHC II molecule expression were observed in the lymph node B lymphocytes from TMA-treated mice. The percentage of IL-4-producing CD4+ lymphocytes and the IL-4 receptor expression were clearly higher following TMA exposure. In contrast, higher proportions of IL-2-producing cells were detected in CD4+ and CD8+ cells from DNCB-treated mice. Both chemicals induced a significant increase in the percentage of IFN-{gamma}-producing cells among CD8+ lymphocytes but to a greater proportion following TMA treatment. In conclusion, this study encourages the use of flow cytometry to discriminate between contact and respiratory sensitizers by identifying divergent expression of immune response parameters.

  15. Expert systems for flow cytometry data analysis: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C. ); Stewart, C.C. . Lab. of Flow Cytometry); Duque, R.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Flow Cytometry has become an accepted technique in the clinical laboratory for rapid immunophenotyping of patient blood samples. Multiple, fluorescent labeled monoclonal antibodies are used to tag the cells, which are then analyzed one at a time at rates of several thousand cells a second. Patient samples are processed through the flow cytometer at more than one a minute. Clinicians are being overwhelmed by the large amount of data that must be analyzed to provide the information needed to assist in disease diagnosis. An expert system is being developed to assist clinicians in analyzing this multivariate flow cytometry data. The data from each sample are processed by a clustering algorithm, which finds the means of the distinct cell subpopulations in a sample. These mean values of fluorescence are translated into words such as negative,'' dim'' and bright'' and the words are combined into patterns that are matched against the premises on the left hand side of the rules used to identify the disease categories. This is a report of work in progress. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Measurement of microvesicle levels in human blood using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Wayne L

    2016-07-01

    Microvesicles are fragments of cells released when the cells are activated, injured, or apoptotic. Analysis of microvesicle levels in blood has the potential to shed new light on the pathophysiology of many diseases. Flow cytometry is currently the only method that can simultaneously separate true lipid microvesicles from other microparticles in blood, determine the cell of origin and other microvesicle characteristics, and handle large numbers of clinical samples with a reasonable effort, but expanded use of flow cytometric measurement of microvesicle levels as a clinical and research tool requires improved, standardized assays. The goal of this review is to aid investigators in applying current best practices to microvesicle measurements. First pre-analytical factors are evaluated and data summarized for anticoagulant effects, sample transport and centrifugation. Next flow cytometer optimization is reviewed including interference from background in buffers and reagents, accurate microvesicle counting, swarm interference, and other types of coincidence errors, size calibration, and detection limits using light scattering, impedance and fluorescence. Finally current progress on method standardization is discussed and a summary of current best practices provided. © 2016 Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26606416

  17. Diagnostic Utility of Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana; Picot, Tiphanie; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Guyotat, Denis; Campos Catafal, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are clonal disorders of hematopoiesis that exhibit heterogeneous clinical presentation and morphological findings, which complicates diagnosis, especially in early stages. Recently, refined definitions and standards in the diagnosis and treatment of MDS were proposed, but numerous questions remain. Multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) is a helpful tool for the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected MDS, and various scores using MFC data have been developed. However, none of these methods have achieved the sensitivity that is required for a reassuring diagnosis in the absence of morphological abnormalities. One reason may be that each score evaluates one or two lineages without offering a broad view of the dysplastic process. The combination of two scores (e.g., Ogata and Red Score) improved the sensitivity from 50–60 to 88%, but the positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) must be improved. There are prominent differences between study groups when these scores are tested. Further research is needed to maximize the sensitivity of flow cytometric analysis in MDS. This review focuses on the application of flow cytometry for MDS diagnosis and discusses the advantages and limitations of different approaches. PMID:27446807

  18. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water. PMID:23603893

  19. Wide-field Fluorescent Microscopy and Fluorescent Imaging Flow Cytometry on a Cell-phone

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. ~ 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of ~ 81 mm2. This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water. PMID:23603893

  20. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3–7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  1. Technical issues: flow cytometry and rare event analysis.

    PubMed

    Hedley, B D; Keeney, M

    2013-06-01

    Flow cytometry has become an essential tool for identification and characterization of hematological cancers and now, due to technological improvements, allows the identification and rapid enumeration of small tumor populations that may be present after induction therapy (minimal residual disease, MRD). The quantitation of MRD has been shown to correlate with relapse and survival rates in numerous diseases and in certain cases, and evidence of MRD is used to alter treatment protocols. Recent improvements in hardware allow for high data rate collection. Improved fluorochromes take advantage of violet laser excitation and maximize signal-to-noise ratio allowing the population of interest to be isolated in multiparameter space. This isolation, together with a low background rate, permits for detection of residual tumor populations in a background of normal cells. When counting such rare events, the distribution is governed by Poisson statistics, with precision increasing with higher numbers of cells collected. In several hematological malignancies, identification of populations at frequencies of 0.01% and lower has been attained. The choice of antibodies used in MRD detection facilitates the definition of a fingerprint to identify abnormal populations throughout treatment. Tumor populations can change phenotype, and an approach that relies on 'different from normal' has proven useful, particularly in the acute leukemias. Flow cytometry can and is used for detection of MRD in many hematological diseases; however, standardized approaches for specific diseases must be developed to ensure precise identification and enumeration that may alter the course of patient treatment. PMID:23590661

  2. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-09-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3-7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  3. Measurement and Characterization of Apoptosis by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William; Tamul, Karen; Bradford, Jolene

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism in cell biology, playing a critical regulatory role in virtually every organ system. It has been particularly well characterized in the immune system, with roles ranging from immature immune cell development and selection to down-regulation of the mature immune response. Apoptosis is also the primary mechanism of action of anti-cancer drugs. Flow cytometry has been the method of choice for analyzing apoptosis in suspension cells for more than 25 years. Numerous assays have been devised to measure both the earliest and latest steps in the apoptotic process, from the earliest signal-transduction events to the late morphological changes in cell shape and granularity, proteolysis, and chromatin condensation. These assays are particularly powerful when combined into multicolor assays determining several apoptotic characteristics simultaneously. The multiparametric nature of flow cytometry makes this technology particularly suited to measuring apoptosis. In this unit, we will describe the four main techniques for analyzing caspase activity in apoptotic cells, combined with annexin V and cell permeability analysis. These relatively simple multiparametric assays are powerful techniques for assessing cell death. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367289

  4. Functional Analysis of Human NK cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bryceson, Yenan T.; Fauriat, Cyril; Nunes, João M.; Wood, Stephanie M.; Björkström, Niklas K.; Long, Eric O.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that contribute to innate immunity through cytokine secretion and target cell lysis. NK cell function is regulated by a multiplicity of activating and inhibitory receptors. The advance in instrumentation for multi-color flow cytometry and the generation of specific mAbs for different epitopes related to phenotypic and functional parameters have facilitated our understanding of NK cell responses. Here, we provide protocols for flow cytometric evaluation of degranulation and cytokine production by human NK cells from peripheral blood at the single cell level. In addition to offering insight into the regulation of human NK cell responses, these techniques are applicable to the assessment of various clinical conditions, including the diagnosis of immunodeficiency syndromes. PMID:20033652

  5. Digital Analysis and Sorting of Fluorescence Lifetime by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jessica P.; Naivar, Mark A.; Freyer, James P.

    2010-01-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal processing capabilities of the Open Reconfigurable Cytometric Acquisition System (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS’ digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5–25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 µs, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142° to 1.6°. The lowest coefficients of variation (<1%) were found for 10-MHz modulated waveforms having pulse widths of 6 µs and simulated lifetimes of 4 ns. Direct comparison of the digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a radiofrequency modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to ~98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to simply and inexpensively

  6. Opto-fluidics based microscopy and flow cytometry on a cell phone for blood analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    Blood analysis is one of the most important clinical tests for medical diagnosis. Flow cytometry and optical microscopy are widely used techniques to perform blood analysis and therefore cost-effective translation of these technologies to resource limited settings is critical for various global health as well as telemedicine applications. In this chapter, we review our recent progress on the integration of imaging flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using compact, light-weight and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments integrated onto the camera module of a smartphone. In our cell-phone based opto-fluidic imaging cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are delivered into the imaging area using a disposable micro-fluidic chip that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the sides of this micro-fluidic chip without any lenses, which effectively acts as a multimode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to excite the fluorescent targets within the micro-fluidic chip. Since the excitation light propagates perpendicular to the detection path, an inexpensive plastic absorption filter is able to reject most of the scattered light and create a decent dark-field background for fluorescent imaging. With this excitation geometry, the cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the particles/cells as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the solution under test. With a similar opto-fluidic design, we have recently demonstrated imaging and automated counting of stationary blood cells (e.g., labeled white blood cells or unlabeled red blood cells) loaded within a disposable cell counting chamber. We tested the performance of this cell-phone based imaging cytometry and blood analysis platform

  7. How validated receptor occupancy flow cytometry assays can impact decisions and support drug development.

    PubMed

    Moulard, Maxime; Ozoux, Marie-Laure

    2016-03-01

    Because of the pressure of significant attrition in drug development, demonstration of target engagement after drug administration enables dose and regimen optimization, patient selection, and stratification from the earliest stages of drug development. The determination of receptor occupancy (RO) can support these efforts. Flow cytometry is one of the preferred technologies to be used based on the important advances in the technology over the last years enabling the simultaneous determination on target cells, of multi intra or surface cell parameters with adequate precision in a regulated environment. Nevertheless, compared to other platforms using the same antigen-antibody binding concept, the flow cytometry approach has faced several challenges, not only due to the technology per se and the diversity of receptor occupancy approaches, but also related to the nature of the matrix where the determination is performed. To illustrate these points, three case studies (antibody-drug conjugate and naked antibody) are provided here to highlight the importance of the choice of the right antibody pair to measure both receptor density (RD) and occupancy by the drug on cancer cells in blood and in bone marrow and the possibility to circumvent the lack of a critical reagent with an innovative approach. In addition, the use of RO data to determine the minimum anticipated biological effect level (MABEL) with translational data from preclinical to human studies, selection of starting dose for the first in man study will be discussed. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26332593

  8. Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytometry Part A Special Section: Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range. The current Cytometry Part A Special Section presents three studies that utilize cytometers to study sub-micron particles. The three studies involve the 1...

  9. Analysis of High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Data Using plateCore

    PubMed Central

    Strain, Errol; Hahne, Florian; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Haaland, Perry

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) software packages from R/Bioconductor, such as flowCore and flowViz, serve as an open platform for development of new analysis tools and methods. We created plateCore, a new package that extends the functionality in these core packages to enable automated negative control-based gating and make the processing and analysis of plate-based data sets from high-throughput FCM screening experiments easier. plateCore was used to analyze data from a BD FACS CAP screening experiment where five Peripheral Blood Mononucleocyte Cell (PBMC) samples were assayed for 189 different human cell surface markers. This same data set was also manually analyzed by a cytometry expert using the FlowJo data analysis software package (TreeStar, USA). We show that the expression values for markers characterized using the automated approach in plateCore are in good agreement with those from FlowJo, and that using plateCore allows for more reproducible analyses of FCM screening data. PMID:19956418

  10. 3D flow focusing for microfluidic flow cytometry with ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Daghighi, Yasaman; van de Vondervoort, Mia; Kolios, Michael C.; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a flow cytometer that detects unique acoustic signature waves generated from single cells due to interactions between the cells and ultrasound waves. The generated acoustic waves depend on the size and biomechanical properties of the cells and are sufficient for identifying cells in the medium. A microfluidic system capable of focusing cells through a 10 x 10 μm ultrasound beam cross section was developed to facilitate acoustic measurements of single cells. The cells are streamlined in a hydro-dynamically 3D focused flow in a 300 x 300 μm channel made using PDMS. 3D focusing is realized by lateral sheath flows and an inlet needle (inner diameter 100 μm). The accuracy of the 3D flow focusing is measured using a dye and detecting its localization using confocal microscopy. Each flowing cell would be probed by an ultrasound pulse, which has a center frequency of 375 MHz and bandwidth of 250 MHz. The same probe would also be used for recording the scattered waves from the cells, which would be processed to distinguish the physical and biomechanical characteristics of the cells, eventually identifying them. This technique has potential applications in detecting circulating tumor cells, blood cells and blood-related diseases.

  11. Control of continuous polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis using calorimetry and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Maskow, Thomas; Müller, Susann; Lösche, Andreas; Harms, Hauke; Kemp, Richard

    2006-02-20

    The substrate-carbon flow can be controlled in continuous bioreactor cultures by the medium composition, for example, by the C/N ratio. The carbon distribution is optimal when a maximum fraction flows into the desired product and the residual is just sufficient to compensate for the dilution of the microbial catalyst. Undershooting of the latter condition is reflected immediately by changes in the Gibbs energy dissipation and cellular states. Two calorimetric measurement principles were applied to optimize the continuous synthesis of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by Variovorax paradoxus DSM4065 during growth with constantly increasing supply rates of fructose or toxic phenol. Firstly, the changed slope of the heat production rate in a complete heat balanced bioreactor (CHB) indicated optimum carbon channeling into PHB. The extent of the alteration depended directly on the toxic properties of the substrate. Secondly, a flow through calorimeter was connected with the bioreactor as a "measurement loop." The optimum substrate carbon distribution was indicated by a sudden change in the heat production rate independent of substrate toxicity. The sudden change was explained mathematically and exploited for the long-term control of phenol conversion into PHB. LASER flow cytometry measurements distinguished between subpopulations with completely different PHB-content. Populations grown on fructose preserved a constant ratio of two subpopulations with double and quadruple sets of DNA. Cells grown on phenol comprised a third subpopulation with a single DNA set. Rising phenol concentrations caused this subpopulation to increase. It may thus be considered as an indicator of chemostress. PMID:16245347

  12. Recent applications of flow cytometry in aquatic microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Troussellier, M; Courties, C; Vaquer, A

    1993-01-01

    Microorganisms (unicellular algae, bacteria) constitute fundamental compartments of aquatic ecosystems because of their high concentrations and activities. The evaluation and understanding of their behavior and role raise different problems for which traditional methodologies are often inadequate, whether they refer to global or classical microscopic analyses. Flow cytometry (FCM) has been recently used to study microorganisms in aquatic environments. Although this technology is still applied on a limited scale in our field, a large number of works has been done showing that FCM seems to be a promising tool for aquatic microbial ecology. This paper summarizes, from the literature produced during the last decade and with original data obtained in our laboratory, the main questions related to the cell identification, the evaluation of cell viability, biomasses and productions and the measurements of bacterial and phytoplanktonic activities. The representatives of sampling and observation scales is also discussed within the framework of the FCM measurements. PMID:8220221

  13. Extended cavity laser enhanced two-photon flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczyk, Eric R.; Tkaczyk, Alan H.; Katnik, Steve; Ye, Jing Yong; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.; Myc, Andrzej; Baker, James R.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced sensitivity in two-photon flow cytometry with an extended cavity laser excitation source. At low power, the home-built 20-MHz oscillator was able to detect a significantly larger fraction, in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or whole blood, of green fluorescent protein (GFP) –expressing MCA-207 cells cross-labeled with the membrane-binding lipophilic dye DiD. A geometrical model is used to explain unique features of the signals resulting from the different spatial distribution of DiD and GFP. These unique features include sub-square law scaling of unsaturated two-photon signal, a sigmoidal sensitivity curve for detection under varying powers for cell detection thresholds as low as a single photon, and uncorrelated signal strengths in two detection channels. PMID:19021327

  14. Analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase internalization using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hill, Kristen S; Elferink, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by endocytosis and their subsequent down regulation in lysosomes plays a critical role in regulating the duration and intensity of downstream signaling events. Uncoupling of the RTK cMet from ligand-induced degradation was recently shown to correlate with sustained receptor signaling and increased cell tumorigenicity, suggesting that the corruption of these endocytic mechanisms could contribute to increased cMet signaling in metastatic cancers. To understand how cMet signaling for normal cell growth is controlled by endocytosis and how these mechanisms are dysregulated in metastatic cancers, we developed flow cytometry-based assays to examine cMet internalization. PMID:19066037

  15. Detection of Apoptotic Versus Autophagic Cell Death by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sica, Valentina; Maiuri, M Chiara; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Different modes of regulated cell death (RCD) can be initiated by distinct molecular machineries and their morphological manifestations can be difficult to discriminate. Moreover, cells responding to stress often activate an adaptive response centered around autophagy, and whether such a response is cytoprotective or cytotoxic cannot be predicted based on morphological parameters only. Molecular definitions are therefore important to understand various RCD subroutines from a mechanistic perspective. In vitro, various forms of RCD including apoptosis and autophagic cell death can be easily discriminated from each other with assays that involve chemical or pharmacological interventions targeting key components of either pathway. Here, we detail a straightforward method to discriminate apoptosis from autophagic cell death by flow cytometry, based on the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the genetic inhibition of ATG5. PMID:27108427

  16. Applications of Flow Cytometry to Characterize Bacterial Physiological Responses

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Garduño, Jorge A.; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Although reports of flow cytometry (FCM) applied to bacterial analysis are increasing, studies of FCM related to human cells still vastly outnumber other reports. However, current advances in FCM combined with a new generation of cellular reporter probes have made this technique suitable for analyzing physiological responses in bacteria. We review how FCM has been applied to characterize distinct physiological conditions in bacteria including responses to antibiotics and other cytotoxic chemicals and physical factors, pathogen-host interactions, cell differentiation during biofilm formation, and the mechanisms governing development pathways such as sporulation. Since FCM is suitable for performing studies at the single-cell level, we describe how this powerful technique has yielded invaluable information about the heterogeneous distribution of differently and even specialized responding cells and how it may help to provide insights about how cell interaction takes place in complex structures, such as those that prevail in bacterial biofilms. PMID:25276788

  17. Bead-Based Assays for Biodetection: From Flow-Cytometry to Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby J.

    2009-05-04

    ABSTRACT The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for detection of biological species will be described: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. The methods and automated fluidic systems used for trapping functionalized microbeads will be described. This approach allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive assays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in assay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical assays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based assays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (> 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100’s of picomolar range (10’s of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach. Video taping magnetic nanoparticle capture and release was used to improve understanding of the process and revealed interesting behavior.

  18. Bead-based assays for biodetection: from flow-cytometry to microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozanich, Richard M., Jr.; Antolick, Kathryn; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2009-05-01

    The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for antibody-based detection of biological species are described in this paper: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. These approaches both involve the use of automated fluidic systems for trapping antibody-functionalized microbeads, which allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive immunoassays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in immunoassay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical immunoassays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based immunoassays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (>= 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100's of picomolar range (10's of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach.

  19. RchyOptimyx: Cellular Hierarchy Optimization for Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Jalali, Adrin; O’Neill, Kieran; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Roederer, Mario; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets can reveal novel cell populations with poorly understood biology. Following discovery, characterization of these populations in terms of the critical markers involved is an important step, as this can help to both better understand the biology of these populations and aid in designing simpler marker panels to identify them on simpler instruments and with fewer reagents (i.e., in resource poor or highly regulated clinical settings). However, current tools to design panels based on the biological characteristics of the target cell populations work exclusively based on technical parameters (e.g., instrument configurations, spectral overlap, and reagent availability). To address this shortcoming, we developed RchyOptimyx (cellular hieraRCHY OPTIMization), a computational tool that constructs cellular hierarchies by combining automated gating with dynamic programming and graph theory to provide the best gating strategies to identify a target population to a desired level of purity or correlation with a clinical outcome, using the simplest possible marker panels. RchyOptimyx can assess and graphically present the trade-offs between marker choice and population specificity in high-dimensional flow or mass cytometry datasets. We present three proof-of-concept use cases for RchyOptimyx that involve 1) designing a panel of surface markers for identification of rare populations that are primarily characterized using their intracellular signature; 2) simplifying the gating strategy for identification of a target cell population; 3) identification of a non-redundant marker set to identify a target cell population. PMID:23044634

  20. Use of CCD sensors in flow cytometry for nonimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang

    1997-05-01

    The use of charge coupled devices (CCDs) as non-imaging sensors in flow cytometric systems to replace the classical photomultplier tubes (PMTs) is very advantageous: the quantum efficiency of the CCDs is about 5 to 10 times higher as for PMTs, the charge storage capability of CCDs avoids analogue processing of the fluorescence signals, the dynamic range is up to 18 bits and the fluorescence intensity at different wavelengths can be recorded on the same chip. In this report a full frame CCD imager is used in a thermoelectrically cooled environment. The output signal for the CCD is digitized with a 12-bit ADC and the data are sorted as list-mode data typically used in flow cytometric work. The performance of the system is demonstrated with DNA staining of mammalian cells with acridine-orange, propidium iodide and ethidium bromide. DNA histograms comparable with standard flow cytometry are recorded. From the same data set pulse-widths histograms can be processed and used for doublet discrimination. The high quantum efficiency of the CCD sensors is of special interest for fluorescing dyes in the dark red or near IR wavelength range.

  1. Dielectrophoresis switching with vertical sidewall electrodes for microfluidic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Lisa A.; Jeon, Noo Li; Monuki, Edwin; Lee, Abraham P.

    2012-01-01

    A novel dielectrophoresis switching with vertical electrodes in the sidewall of microchannels for multiplexed switching of objects has been designed, fabricated and tested. With appropriate electrode design, lateral DEP force can be generated so that one can dynamically position particulates along the width of the channel. A set of interdigitated electrodes in the sidewall of the microchannels is used for the generation of non-uniform electrical fields to generate negative DEP forces that repel beads/cells from the sidewalls. A countering DEP force is generated from another set of electrodes patterned on the opposing sidewall. These lateral negative DEP forces can be adjusted by the voltage and frequency applied. By manipulating the coupled DEP forces, the particles flowing through the microchannel can be positioned at different equilibrium points along the width direction and continue to flow into different outlet channels. Experimental results for switching biological cells and polystyrene microbeads to multiple outlets (up to 5) have been achieved. This novel particle switching technique can be integrated with other particle detection components to enable microfluidic flow cytometry systems. PMID:17713608

  2. Digital analysis and sorting of fluorescence lifetime by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jessica P; Naivar, Mark A; Freyer, James P

    2010-09-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal-processing capabilities of the open reconfigurable cytometric acquisition system (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency (RF)-modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS' digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5-25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 micros, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142 degrees to 1.6 degrees. The lowest coefficients of variation (<1%) were found for 10-MHz modulated waveforms having pulse widths of 6 micros and simulated lifetimes of 4 ns. Direct comparison of the digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells, and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a RF-modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to approximately 98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to

  3. [Detection of anti-granulocyte antibodies using flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, T; Furihata, K; Misawa, K; Aoki, M; Kameko, M; Ichikawa, T; Okubo, Y; Ito, S; Ohto, H

    1994-03-01

    To detect anti-granulocyte antibodies (AGAs) in the sera of granulocytopenic patients is important to study the mechanism of the disease. In this report, we studied neutrophil associated immunoglobulin (NAIg) and neutrophil binding immunoglobulin (NBIg) in patients' sera using flow cytometry (FCM). We investigated the interference of circulating immune complexes (CIC) on measuring the NAIg and NBIg. No apparent effect of CIC was observed at concentrations up to 140 micrograms/ml. NAIg and NBIg were semiquantitated by determining the relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) on a flow cytometer and the normal ranges of NAIg and NBIg were less than 15 RFI and less than 10 RFI, respectively. Of 100 sera from patients with neutropenia, 5 were positive for NBIg and 3 of them were positive for granulocyte-specific antibodies. One serum of a patient with benign chronic neutropenia showed clear specificity for NA1 alloantigen but the other 4 AGAs were not specific for NA alloantigen system. Our NAIg, NBIg screening procedure, including NA specificity testing of NBIg and detection of reactivity with normal lymphocytes using FCM, is simple and useful for measuring and studying serological and immunological characteristics of AGAs. PMID:8152165

  4. Flow cytometry for the diagnosis of autoimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Autoimmune thrombocytopenia is a disorder characterized by antibody-mediated accelerated platelet destruction. Despite its clinical importance, the diagnosis of autoimmune thrombocytopenia is one of exclusion, thus inevitably associated with potential difficulties. Current clinically applicable methods used to determine antigen-specific antibodies, primarily directed to GPIIb/IIIa (CD41a) and GPIb (CD42b), include the monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen (MAIPA) assay and the radioactive immunobead assay. Neither of these assays is commonly used by clinical laboratories, however, because of methodologic and practical limitations. As a result, diagnoses are generally based on clinical impression despite patient presentations that are sometimes complex. To overcome some of these difficulties, flow cytometric techniques have been developed, employing standard methods and equipment suitable for testing a single sample or multiple samples, as may occur in cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenia. The availability of a feasible technique such as flow cytometry, with improved sensitivity and specificity, should facilitate the routine use of a diagnostic method in the evaluation of thrombo-cytopenic patients suspected of having an autoimmune disorder and permit follow-up to determine immune remission. PMID:16537048

  5. Characterization, detection, and counting of metal nanoparticles using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Robert M; Ortenzio, Jayna N R; Boyes, William K

    2016-02-01

    There is a need to accurately detect, characterize, and quantify nanoparticles in suspensions. This study helps to understand the complex interactions between similar types of nanoparticles. Before initiating a study of metal nanoparticles, five submicron PS beads with sizes between 200 nm and 1 µm were used to derive a reference scale that was useful in evaluating the flow cytometer for functionality, sensitivity, resolution, and reproducibility. Side scatter intensity (SSC) from metal nanoparticles was obtained simultaneously from 405 nm and 488 nm lasers. The 405 nm laser generally yielded histogram distributions with smaller CVs, less side scatter intensity, better separation indices between beads and decreased scatter differences between different sized particles compared with the 488 nm laser. Submicron particles must be diluted to 10(6) and 10(7) particles/mL before flow cytometer analysis to avoid coincidence counting artifacts. When particles were too concentrated the following occurred: swarm, electronic overload, coincidence counting, activation of doublet discrimination and rejection circuitry, increase of mean SSC histogram distributions, alterations of SSC and pulse width histogram shape, decrease and fluctuations in counting rate and decrease or elimination of particulate water noise and 1 µm reference bead. To insure that the concentrations were in the proper counting range, the nanoparticle samples were mixed with a known concentration of 1µm counting beads. Sequential dilutions of metal nanoparticles in a 1 µm counting bead suspension helped determine the diluted concentration needed for flow cytometer analysis. It was found that the original concentrated nanoparticle samples had to be diluted, between 1:10,000 and 1:100,000, before characterization by flow cytometry. The concentration of silver or gold nanoparticles in the undiluted sample were determined by comparing them with a known concentration (1.9 × 10(6) beads/mL) of 1 µm

  6. Evaluation of a green laser pointer for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Habbersett, Robert C; Naivar, Mark A; Woods, Travis A; Goddard, Gregory R; Graves, Steven W

    2007-10-01

    Flow cytometers typically incorporate expensive lasers with high-quality (TEM00) output beam structure and very stable output power, significantly increasing system cost and power requirements. Red diode lasers minimize power consumption and cost, but limit fluorophore selection. Low-cost DPSS laser pointer modules could possibly offer increased wavelength selection but presumed emission instability has limited their use. A $160 DPSS 532 nm laser pointer module was first evaluated for noise characteristics and then used as the excitation light source in a custom-built flow cytometer for the analysis of fluorescent calibration and alignment microspheres. Eight of ten modules tested were very quiet (RMS noise < or = 0.6% between 0 and 5 MHz). With a quiet laser pointer module as the light source in a slow-flow system, fluorescence measurements from alignment microspheres produced CVs of about 3.3%. Furthermore, the use of extended transit times and < or =1 mW of laser power produced both baseline resolution of all 8 peaks in a set of Rainbow microspheres, and a detection limit of <20 phycoerythrin molecules per particle. Data collected with the transit time reduced to 25 micros (in the same instrument but at 2.4 mW laser output) demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 75 phycoerythrin molecules and CVs of about 2.7%. The performance, cost, size, and power consumption of the tested laser pointer module suggests that it may be suitable for use in conventional flow cytometry, particularly if it were coupled with cytometers that support extended transit times. PMID:17712796

  7. Setting objective thresholds for rare event detection in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Richards, Adam J; Staats, Janet; Enzor, Jennifer; McKinnon, Katherine; Frelinger, Jacob; Denny, Thomas N; Weinhold, Kent J; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-07-01

    The accurate identification of rare antigen-specific cytokine positive cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after antigenic stimulation in an intracellular staining (ICS) flow cytometry assay is challenging, as cytokine positive events may be fairly diffusely distributed and lack an obvious separation from the negative population. Traditionally, the approach by flow operators has been to manually set a positivity threshold to partition events into cytokine-positive and cytokine-negative. This approach suffers from subjectivity and inconsistency across different flow operators. The use of statistical clustering methods does not remove the need to find an objective threshold between between positive and negative events since consistent identification of rare event subsets is highly challenging for automated algorithms, especially when there is distributional overlap between the positive and negative events ("smear"). We present a new approach, based on the Fβ measure, that is similar to manual thresholding in providing a hard cutoff, but has the advantage of being determined objectively. The performance of this algorithm is compared with results obtained by expert visual gating. Several ICS data sets from the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL) proficiency program were used to make the comparisons. We first show that visually determined thresholds are difficult to reproduce and pose a problem when comparing results across operators or laboratories, as well as problems that occur with the use of commonly employed clustering algorithms. In contrast, a single parameterization for the Fβ method performs consistently across different centers, samples, and instruments because it optimizes the precision/recall tradeoff by using both negative and positive controls. PMID:24727143

  8. Monitoring circulating apoptotic cells by in-vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Tan, Yuan; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Liu, Guangda; Wu, Bin; Wang, Chen

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapies currently constitute one main venue of cancer treatment. For a large number of adult and elderly patients, however, treatment options are poor. These patients may suffer from disease that is resistant to conventional chemotherapy or may not be candidates for curative therapies because of advanced age or poor medical conditions. To control disease in these patients, new therapies must be developed that are selectively targeted to unique characteristics of tumor cell growth and metastasis. A reliable early evaluation and prediction of response to the chemotherapy is critical to its success. Chemotherapies induce apoptosis in tumor cells and a portion of such apoptotic cancer cells may be present in the circulation. However, the fate of circulating tumor cells is difficult to assess with conventional methods that require blood sampling. We report the in situ measurement of circulating apoptotic cells in live animals using in vivo flow cytometry, a novel method that enables real-time detection and quantification of circulating cells without blood extraction. Apoptotic cells are rapidly cleared from the circulation with a half-life of ~10 minutes. Real-time monitoring of circulating apoptotic cells can be useful for detecting early changes in disease processes, as well as for monitoring response to therapeutic intervention.

  9. Comparative analysis of whole blood lysis methods for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, X; Marti, G E; Fleisher, T A

    1997-06-15

    We performed a parallel evaluation of six whole blood lysis methods comparing light scatter and quantitative fluorescence intensity based on quantitative flow cytometry, of selected lymphocyte subsets and CD34+ cells. Leukocytes prepared with FACS Lysing Solution (BDIS), Immunolyse (Coulter) and Optilyse B (Immunotech) consistently gave lower forward scatter values than those prepared with ACK (BioWhitaker), Ortho-mune (Ortho) and ImmunoPrep (Coulter). Debris, defined as CD45 negative events with the threshold off, accounted approximately 80% of all events with ACK and Ortho-mune. The other lysing methods consistently yielded less debris (approximately 50%) with Immunolyse generating only approximately 16% debris. Optilyse and FACS lyse consistently displayed the lowest percentage of lymphoid cells (CD45+/CD14-) in the three part differential. The percentage of CD3+, CD20+, CD5+, and CD16/CD56+ cells was consistent with all methods but CD4 and CD8 determinants showed inconsistent variation with ACK and Ortho-mune. In addition, the fluorescence intensity of CD14 PE and CD8 PE staining was markedly decreased on cells prepared with ImmunoPrep. Finally, the clearest separation of CD34+ cells was observed with ACK and Ortho-mune. Our data demonstrate that the method used for red cell lysis can have definite impact on immunophenotyping and selected methods appear to be more suitable for specific applications. PMID:9222098

  10. Tracking Immune Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxic Potential Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tario, Joseph D.; Muirhead, Katharine A.; Pan, Dalin; Munson, Mark E.; Wallace, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    In the second edition of this series, we described the use of cell tracking dyes in combination with tetramer reagents and traditional phenotyping protocols to monitor levels of proliferation and cytokine production in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. In particular, we illustrated how tracking dye fluorescence profiles could be used to ascertain the precursor frequencies of different subsets in the T-cell pool that are able to bind tetramer, synthesize cytokines, undergo antigen-driven proliferation, and/or carry out various combinations of these functional responses. Analysis of antigen-specific proliferative responses represents just one of many functions that can be monitored using cell tracking dyes and flow cytometry. In this third edition, we address issues to be considered when combining two different tracking dyes with other phenotypic and viability probes for the assessment of cytotoxic effector activity and regulatory T-cell functions. We summarize key characteristics of and differences between general protein- and membrane-labeling dyes, discuss determination of optimal staining concentrations, and provide detailed labeling protocols for both dye types. Examples of the advantages of two-color cell tracking are provided in the form of protocols for (a) independent enumeration of viable effector and target cells in a direct cytotoxicity assay and (b) simultaneous monitoring of proliferative responses in effector and regulatory T cells. PMID:21116982

  11. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  12. Flow cytometry reliability analysis and variations in sugarcane DNA content.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A C L; Pasqual, M; Bruzi, A T; Pio, L A S; Mendonça, P M S; Soares, J D R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of flow cytometry analysis and the use of this technique to differentiate species and varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum spp) according to their relative DNA content. We analyzed 16 varieties and three species belonging to this genus. To determine a reliable protocol, we evaluated three extraction buffers (LB01, Marie, and Tris·MgCl2), the presence and absence of RNase, six doses of propidium iodide (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 μg), four periods of exposure to propidium iodide (0, 5, 10, and 20 min), and seven external reference standards (peas, beans, corn, radish, rye, soybean, and tomato) with reference to the coefficient of variation and the DNA content. For statistical analyses, we used the programs Sisvar(®) and Xlstat(®). We recommend using the Marie extraction buffer and at least 15 μg propidium iodide. The samples should not be analyzed immediately after the addition of propidium iodide. The use of RNase is optional, and tomato should be used as an external reference standard. The results show that sugarcane has a variable genome size (8.42 to 12.12 pg/2C) and the individuals analyzed could be separated into four groups according to their DNA content with relative equality in the genome sizes of the commercial varieties. PMID:26125928

  13. Improving the signal analysis for in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhenyu; Yang, Ping; Wei, Dan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    At early stage of cancer, a small number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear in the blood circulation. Thus, early detection of malignant circulating tumor cells has great significance for timely treatment to reduce the cancer death rate. We have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of CTCs and record the signals from target cells. Information of target cells which is helpful to the early therapy would be obtained through analyzing and processing the signals. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The PAFC technique can detect signals from circulating tumor cells or other particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly.

  14. In vivo flow cytometry of circulating clots using negative phototothermal and photoacoustic contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Keyrouz, Salah G.; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional photothermal (PT) and photoacousic (PA) imaging, spectroscopy, and cytometry are preferentially based on positive PT/PA effects, when signals are above background. Here, we introduce PT/PA technique based on detection of negative signals below background. Among various new applications, we propose label-free in vivo flow cytometry of circulating clots. No method has been developed for the early detection of clots of different compositions as a source of severe thromboembolisms including ischemia at strokes and myocardial dysfunction at heart attack. When a low-absorbing, platelet-rich clot passes a laser-irradiated vessel volume, a transient decrease in local absorption results in an ultrasharp negative PA hole in blood background. Using this phenomenon alone or in combination with positive contrasts, we demonstrated identification of white, red and mixed clots on a mouse model of myocardial infarction and human blood. The concentration and size of clots were measured with threshold down to few clots in the entire circulation with size as low as 20 µm. This multiparameter diagnostic platform using portable personal high-speed flow cytometer with negative dynamic contrast mode has potential to real-time defining risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and for prognosis and prevention of stroke or use clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy. Possibility for label-free detection of platelets, leukocytes, tumor cells or targeting them by negative PA probes (e.g., nonabsorbing beads or bubbles) is also highlighted. PMID:21976458

  15. Homogeneous agglutination assay based on micro-chip sheathless flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zengshuai; Zhang, Pan; Cheng, Yinuo; Xie, Shuai; Zhang, Shuai; Ye, Xiongying

    2015-11-01

    Homogeneous assays possess important advantages that no washing or physical separation is required, contributing to robust protocols and easy implementation which ensures potential point-of-care applications. Optimizing the detection strategy to reduce the number of reagents used and simplify the detection device is desirable. A method of homogeneous bead-agglutination assay based on micro-chip sheathless flow cytometry has been developed. The detection processes include mixing the capture-probe conjugated beads with an analyte containing sample, followed by flowing the reaction mixtures through the micro-chip sheathless flow cytometric device. The analyte concentrations were detected by counting the proportion of monomers in the reaction mixtures. Streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (bBSA) were used as a model system to verify the method, and detection limits of 0.15 pM and 1.5 pM for bBSA were achieved, using commercial Calibur and the developed micro-chip sheathless flow cytometric device, respectively. The setup of the micro-chip sheathless flow cytometric device is significantly simple; meanwhile, the system maintains relatively high sensitivity, which mainly benefits from the application of forward scattering to distinguish aggregates from monomers. The micro-chip sheathless flow cytometric device for bead agglutination detection provides us with a promising method for versatile immunoassays on microfluidic platforms. PMID:26649133

  16. Aequorea green fluorescent protein analysis by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ropp, J.D.; Cuthbertson, R.A.; Donahue, C.J.; Wolfgang-Kimball, D.

    1995-12-01

    The isolation and expression of the cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria has highlighted its potential use as a marker for gene expression in a variety of cell types. The longer wavelength peak (470 nm) of GFP`s bimodal absorption spectrum better matches standard fluorescein filter sets; however, it has a considerably lower amplitude than the major absorption peak at 395. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of GFP with routinely available instrumentation, Heim et al. have generated a GFP mutant (serine-65 to threonine; S65T-GFP) which possesses a single absorption peak centered at 490 nm. We have constructed this mutant in order to determine whether it or wild-type GFP (wt-GFP) afforded greater sensitivity when excited near their respective absorption maxima. Using the conventionally available 488 nm and ultraviolet (UV) laser lines from the argon ion laser as well as the 407 nm line from a krypton ion laser with enhanced violet emission, we were able to closely match the absorption maxima of both the S65T and wild-type forms of Aequorea GFP and analyze differences in fluorescence intensity of transiently transfected 293 cells with flow cytometry. The highest fluorescence signal was observed with 488 nm excitation of S65T-GFP relative to all other laser line/GFP pairs. The wt-GFP fluorescence intensity, in contrast, was significantly higher at 407 nm relative to either 488 nm or UV. These results were consistent with parallel spectrofluorometric analysis of the emission spectrum for wt-GFP and S65T- GFP. The relative contribution of cellular autofluorescence at each wavelength was also investigated and shown to be significantly reduced at 407 nm relative to either UV or 488 nm. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Understanding microbial/DOM interactions using fluorescence and flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Bethany; Rushworth, Cathy; Attridge, John; Anesio, Alexandre; Cox, Tim; Reynolds, Darren

    2015-04-01

    The transformation and movement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within freshwater aquatic systems is an important factor in the global cycling of carbon. DOC within aquatic systems is known to underpin the microbial food web and therefore plays an essential role in supporting and maintaining the aquatic ecosystem. Despite this the interactions between bacteria and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are not well understood, although the literature indicates that the microbial processing of bioavailable DOM is essential during the production of autochthonous, labile, DOM. DOM can be broadly characterised by its fluorescing properties and Coble et al. (2014) define terrestrially derived DOM as exhibiting "peak C" fluorescence, whilst labile microbially derived DOM is defined as showing "peak T" fluorescence. Our work explores the microbial/DOM interactions by analysing aquatic samples using fluorescence excitation and emission matrices (EEMs) in conjunction with microbial consumption of dissolved oxygen. Environmental and synthetic water samples were subjected to fluorescence characterisation using both fluorescence spectroscopy and in situ fluorescence sensors (Chelsea Technologies Group Ltd.). PARAFAC analysis and peak picking were performed on EEMs and compared with flow cytometry data, used to quantify bacterial numbers present within samples. Synthetic samples were created using glucose, glutamic acid, nutrient-rich water and a standard bacterial seed. Synthetic samples were provided with terrestrially derived DOM via the addition of an aliquot of environmental water. Using a closed system approach, samples were incubated over time (up to a maximum of 20 days) and analysed at pre-defined intervals. The main focus of our work is to improve our understanding of microbial/DOM interactions and how these interactions affect both the DOM characteristics and microbial food web in freshwater aquatic systems. The information gained, in relation to the origin, microbial

  18. Performance of calibration standards for antigen quantitation with flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lenkei, R; Gratama, J W; Rothe, G; Schmitz, G; D'hautcourt, J L; Arekrans, A; Mandy, F; Marti, G

    1998-10-01

    In the frame of the activities initiated by the Task Force for Antigen Quantitation of the European Working Group on Clinical Cell Analysis (EWGCCA), an experiment was conducted to evaluate microbead standards used for quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM). An unified window of analysis (UWA) was established on three different instruments (EPICS XL [Coulter Corporation, Miami, FL], FACScan and FACS Calibur [Becton Dickinson, San Jose, CA]) with QC3 microbeads (FCSC, PR). By using this defined fluorescence intensity scale, the performance of several monoclonal antibodies directed to CD3, CD4, and CD8 (conjugated and unconjugated), from three manufacturers (BDIS, Coulter [Immunotech], and DAKO) was tested. In addition, the QIFI system (DAKO) and QuantiBRITE (BDIS), and a method of relative fluorescence intensity (RFI, method of Giorgi), were compared. mAbs reacting with three more antigens, CD16, CD19, and CD38 were tested on the FACScan instrument. Quantitation was carried out using a single batch of cryopreserved peripheral blood leukocytes, and all tests were performed as single color analyses. Significant correlations were observed between the antibody-binding capacity (ABC) values of the same CD antigen measured with various calibrators and with antibodies differing in respect to vendor, labeling and possible epitope recognition. Despite the significant correlations, the ABC values of most monoclonal antibodies differed by 20-40% when determined by the different fluorochrome conjugates and different calibrators. The results of this study indicate that, at the present stage of QFCM consistent ABC values may be attained between laboratories provided that a specific calibration system is used including specific calibrators, reagents, and protocols. PMID:9773879

  19. Flow cytometry systems for drug discovery and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, John T.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Kuckuck, Frederick W., III; Okun, Alex; Mattox, David K.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Sklar, Larry A.

    2000-04-01

    HT-PS is a fluidics-based pharmacology platform that uses viable cells and test compounds to rapidly identify active compounds and immediately determine their potency and specificity. Axiom employs this proprietary flow-through fluidics system coupled to a flow cytometer (FCM) as a detection system. Integration of FCM was enabled through a Plug-Flow Coupler (PFC) device that allows mixtures of cells and test compounds to be delivered to the FCM as discrete plugs of samples under positive air pressure. An FCM detector provides the advantages of multi parametric measurements and multiplexed, single cell analyses. Assays that combine two or more compatible, fluorescent bioresponse indicators simultaneously, such as measurements of intracellular pH and Ca2+, are possible. Alternatively, measurements of one or more bioresponses can be performed on several distinct cell populations individually stained with uniquely addressable fluorescent chromophores. These formats enable multiple experiments on a single sample and provide high content information thereby greatly increasing decision-making power regarding the activity, potency and selectivity of a test compound. Development of significant data with several hundred cells enables reduction in all requisite sample volumes. The PFC enables FCM sample analysis rates of at least 10 samples/minute. The data will illustrate HT-PS/PFC/FCM utility in the drug discovery arena.

  20. Discovery of Regulators of Receptor Internalization with High-Throughput Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Phillip H.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Simons, Peter C.; Strouse, J. Jacob; Foutz, Terry; Waggoner, Alan S.; Jarvik, Jonathan; Sklar, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a platform combining fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) technology with high-throughput flow cytometry to detect real-time protein trafficking to and from the plasma membrane in living cells. The hybrid platform facilitates drug discovery for trafficking receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors and was validated with the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) system. When a chemical library containing ∼1200 off-patent drugs was screened against cells expressing FAP-tagged β2ARs, all 33 known β2AR-active ligands in the library were successfully identified, together with a number of compounds that might regulate receptor internalization in a nontraditional manner. Results indicated that the platform identified ligands of target proteins regardless of the associated signaling pathway; therefore, this approach presents opportunities to search for biased receptor modulators and is suitable for screening of multiplexed targets for improved efficiency. The results revealed that ligands may be biased with respect to the rate or duration of receptor internalization and that receptor internalization may be independent of activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. PMID:22767611

  1. Computational flow cytometry: helping to make sense of high-dimensional immunology data.

    PubMed

    Saeys, Yvan; Gassen, Sofie Van; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in flow cytometry allow scientists to measure an increasing number of parameters per cell, generating huge and high-dimensional datasets. To analyse, visualize and interpret these data, newly available computational techniques should be adopted, evaluated and improved upon by the immunological community. Computational flow cytometry is emerging as an important new field at the intersection of immunology and computational biology; it allows new biological knowledge to be extracted from high-throughput single-cell data. This Review provides non-experts with a broad and practical overview of the many recent developments in computational flow cytometry. PMID:27320317

  2. Analysis of Individual Molecular Events of DNA Damage Response by Flow and Image Assisted Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Traganos, Frank; Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H. Dorota; Skommer, Joanna; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes molecular mechanisms of DNA damage response (DDR) and presents flow- and image-assisted cytometric approaches to assess these mechanisms and measure the extent of DDR in individual cells. DNA damage was induced by cell treatment with oxidizing agents, UV light, DNA topoisomerase I or II inhibitors, cisplatin, tobacco smoke, and by exogenous and endogenous oxidants. Chromatin relaxation (decondensation) is an early event of DDR chromatin that involves modification of high mobility group proteins (HMGs) and histone H1 and was detected by cytometry by analysis of the susceptibility of DNA in situ to denaturation using the metachromatic fluorochrome acridine orange. Translocation of the MRN complex consisting of Meiotic Recombination 11 Homolog A (Mre11), Rad50 homolog and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome 1 (NMR1) into DNA damage sites was assessed by laser scanning cytometry as the increase in the intensity of maximal pixel as well as integral value of Mre11 immunofluorescence. Examples of cytometric detection of activation of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), and Check 2 (Chk2) protein kinases using phospho-specific Abs targeting Ser1981 and Thr68 of these proteins, respectively are also presented. We also discuss approaches to correlate activation of ATM and Chk2 with phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15 and histone H2AX on Ser139 as well as with cell cycle position and DNA replication. The capability of laser scanning cytometry to quantify individual foci of phosphorylated H2AX and/or ATM that provides more dependable assessment of the presence of DNA double-strand breaks is outlined. The new microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip platforms for interrogation of individual cells offer a novel approach for DDR cytometric analysis. PMID:21722802

  3. Minimally Invasive Assessment of Tumor Angiogenesis by Fine Needle Aspiration and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Sottnik, Joseph L.; Guth, Amanda M.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Dow, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    The development of a new, less invasive, and more rapidly implemented method of quantifying endothelial cell density in tumors could facilitate experimental and clinical studies of angiogenesis. Therefore, we evaluated the utility of tumor fine needle aspiration (FNA) coupled with flow cytometry for assessment of tumor angiogenesis. Samples were obtained from cutaneous tumors of mice using FNA, then immunostained and assessed by flow cytometry to determine the number of CD31+ endothelial cells. Results of the FNA/flow cytometry technique were compared with quantification of tumor microvessel density using immunohistochemistry. The ability of the FNA/cytometry technique to quantify the effects of anti-angiogenic therapy and to monitor changes in tumor angiogenesis over time in individual tumors was also determined. We found that endothelial cell percentages determined in tumor tissue aspirates by flow cytometry correlated well with the percentages of endothelial cells determined in whole tumor digests by flow cytometry and with tumor microvessel density measurements by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we found that repeated FNA sampling of tumors did not induce endothelial cell changes. Interestingly, by employing repeated FNA sampling of the same tumors we were able to observe a sudden and marked decline in tumor angiogenesis triggered when tumors reached a certain size. Thus, we conclude that the FNA/flow cytometry technique is an efficient, reproducible, and relatively non-invasive method of rapidly assessing tumor angiogenesis, which could be readily applied to evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in clinical settings in humans. PMID:20734228

  4. Examination of Thymic Positive and Negative Selection by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Troy A.

    2012-01-01

    premature negative selection. Our lab has developed the HYcd4 model, in which the transgenic HY TCRα is conditionally expressed at the DP stage, allowing negative selection to occur during the DP to SP transition as occurs in wildtype mice10. Here, we describe a flow cytometry-based protocol to examine thymic positive and negative selection in the HYcd4 mouse model. While negative selection in HYcd4 mice is highly physiological, these methods can also be applied to other TCR transgenic models. We will also present general strategies for analyzing positive selection in a polyclonal repertoire applicable to any genetically manipulated mice. PMID:23093039

  5. Flow cytometry using Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-11-01

    A novel concept of Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements is introduced for flow cytometry applications. The system affords robust, maintenance-free and high-speed elasticity-sensitive measurements. PMID:26347908

  6. Rapid Flow Cytometry Test for Identification of Different Carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana P; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Ricardo, Elisabete; Miranda, Isabel M; Espinar, Maria J; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Cantón, Rafael; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2016-06-01

    A flow cytometry test was developed to identify carbapenemase production by Enterobacteriaceae and to discriminate between the different types of carbapenemases (classes A, B, and D). It is based on the detection of meropenem activity against bacteria, coupled with different carbapenemase inhibitors, which is assessed by flow cytometry. It represents a convenient, fast, and reliable approach (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity) for the detection and characterization of different carbapenemases. PMID:27021318

  7. The emergence of flow cytometry for sensitive, real-time measurements of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.P.; Sklar, L.A. |

    1998-07-01

    The analysis of macromolecular interactions is an essential element of biomedical research. Flow cytometry is uniquely capable of making sensitive and quantitative measurements of molecular interactions. These measurements can be made in real time with subsecond kinetic resolution using purified biomolecules or living cells. Combined with automated sample handling, these features make flow cytometry a versatile and robust technology for the analysis of molecular interactions.

  8. Rapid Patterning of 1-D Collagenous Topography as an ECM Protein Fibril Platform for Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Niannan; Li, Xia; Bertulli, Cristina; Li, Zhaoying; Patharagulpong, Atipat; Sadok, Amine; Huang, Yan Yan Shery

    2014-01-01

    Cellular behavior is strongly influenced by the architecture and pattern of its interfacing extracellular matrix (ECM). For an artificial culture system which could eventually benefit the translation of scientific findings into therapeutic development, the system should capture the key characteristics of a physiological microenvironment. At the same time, it should also enable standardized, high throughput data acquisition. Since an ECM is composed of different fibrous proteins, studying cellular interaction with individual fibrils will be of physiological relevance. In this study, we employ near-field electrospinning to create ordered patterns of collagenous fibrils of gelatin, based on an acetic acid and ethyl acetate aqueous co-solvent system. Tunable conformations of micro-fibrils were directly deposited onto soft polymeric substrates in a single step. We observe that global topographical features of straight lines, beads-on-strings, and curls are dictated by solution conductivity; whereas the finer details such as the fiber cross-sectional profile are tuned by solution viscosity. Using these fibril constructs as cellular assays, we study EA.hy926 endothelial cells' response to ROCK inhibition, because of ROCK's key role in the regulation of cell shape. The fibril array was shown to modulate the cellular morphology towards a pre-capillary cord-like phenotype, which was otherwise not observed on a flat 2-D substrate. Further facilitated by quantitative analysis of morphological parameters, the fibril platform also provides better dissection in the cells' response to a H1152 ROCK inhibitor. In conclusion, the near-field electrospun fibril constructs provide a more physiologically-relevant platform compared to a featureless 2-D surface, and simultaneously permit statistical single-cell image cytometry using conventional microscopy systems. The patterning approach described here is also expected to form the basics for depositing other protein fibrils, seen among

  9. A Competitive Flow Cytometry Screening System for Directed Evolution of Therapeutic Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Kardashliev, Tsvetan; Pitzler, Christian; Shehzad, Aamir; Lue, Hongqi; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Zhu, Leilei; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-07-17

    A ligand-mediated eGFP-expression system (LiMEx) was developed as a novel flow cytometry based screening platform that relies on a competitive conversion/binding of arginine between arginine deiminase and arginine repressor. Unlike product-driven detection systems, the competitive screening platform allows to evolve enzymes toward efficient operation at low substrate concentrations under physiological conditions. The principle of LiMEx was validated by evolving arginine deiminase (ADI, an anticancer therapeutic) for stronger inhibition of tumor growth. After screening of ∼8.2 × 10(6) clones in three iterative rounds of epPCR libraries, PpADI (ADI from Pseudomonas plecoglossicida) variant M31 with reduced S0.5 value (0.17 mM compared to 1.23 mM (WT)) and, importantly, increased activity at physiological arginine concentration (M31:6.14 s(-1); WT: not detectable) was identified. Moreover, M31 showed a significant inhibitory effect against SK-MEL-28 and G361 melanoma cell lines. (IC50 = 0.02 μg/mL for SK-MEL-28 and G361). PMID:25658761

  10. Simplified protocol for flow cytometry analysis of fluorescently labeled exosomes and microvesicles using dedicated flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Pospichalova, Vendula; Svoboda, Jan; Dave, Zankruti; Kotrbova, Anna; Kaiser, Karol; Klemova, Dobromila; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Crha, Igor; Jandakova, Eva; Minar, Lubos; Weinberger, Vit; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method, which is widely used for high-throughput quantitative and qualitative analysis of cells. However, its straightforward applicability for extracellular vesicles (EVs) and mainly exosomes is hampered by several challenges, reflecting mostly the small size of these vesicles (exosomes: ~80–200 nm, microvesicles: ~200–1,000 nm), their polydispersity, and low refractive index. The current best and most widely used protocol for beads-free flow cytometry of exosomes uses ultracentrifugation (UC) coupled with floatation in sucrose gradient for their isolation, labeling with lipophilic dye PKH67 and antibodies, and an optimized version of commercial high-end cytometer for analysis. However, this approach requires an experienced flow cytometer operator capable of manual hardware adjustments and calibration of the cytometer. Here, we provide a novel and fast approach for quantification and characterization of both exosomes and microvesicles isolated from cell culture media as well as from more complex human samples (ascites of ovarian cancer patients) suitable for multiuser labs by using a flow cytometer especially designed for small particles, which can be used without adjustments prior to data acquisition. EVs can be fluorescently labeled with protein-(Carboxyfluoresceinsuccinimidyl ester, CFSE) and/or lipid- (FM) specific dyes, without the necessity of removing the unbound fluorescent dye by UC, which further facilitates and speeds up the characterization of microvesicles and exosomes using flow cytometry. In addition, double labeling with protein- and lipid-specific dyes enables separation of EVs from common contaminants of EV preparations, such as protein aggregates or micelles formed by unbound lipophilic styryl dyes, thus not leading to overestimation of EV numbers. Moreover, our protocol is compatible with antibody labeling using fluorescently conjugated primary antibodies. The presented methodology opens the possibility for

  11. Confocal Microscopy and Flow Cytometry System Performance: Assessment of QA Parameters that affect data Quanitification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow and image cytometers can provide useful quantitative fluorescence data. We have devised QA tests to be used on both a flow cytometer and a confocal microscope to assure that the data is accurate, reproducible and precise. Flow Cytometry: We have provided two simple perform...

  12. flowCL: ontology-based cell population labelling in flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Courtot, Mélanie; Meskas, Justin; Diehl, Alexander D.; Droumeva, Radina; Gottardo, Raphael; Jalali, Adrin; Taghiyar, Mohammad Jafar; Maecker, Holden T.; McCoy, J. Philip; Ruttenberg, Alan; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Finding one or more cell populations of interest, such as those correlating to a specific disease, is critical when analysing flow cytometry data. However, labelling of cell populations is not well defined, making it difficult to integrate the output of algorithms to external knowledge sources. Results: We developed flowCL, a software package that performs semantic labelling of cell populations based on their surface markers and applied it to labelling of the Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies Human Immunology Project Consortium lyoplate populations as a use case. Conclusion: By providing automated labelling of cell populations based on their immunophenotype, flowCL allows for unambiguous and reproducible identification of standardized cell types. Availability and implementation: Code, R script and documentation are available under the Artistic 2.0 license through Bioconductor (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/devel/bioc/html/flowCL.html). Contact: rbrinkman@bccrc.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25481008

  13. FuGEFlow: data model and markup language for flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu; Tchuvatkina, Olga; Spidlen, Josef; Wilkinson, Peter; Gasparetto, Maura; Jones, Andrew R; Manion, Frank J; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2009-01-01

    Background Flow cytometry technology is widely used in both health care and research. The rapid expansion of flow cytometry applications has outpaced the development of data storage and analysis tools. Collaborative efforts being taken to eliminate this gap include building common vocabularies and ontologies, designing generic data models, and defining data exchange formats. The Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) standard was recently adopted by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. This standard guides researchers on the information that should be included in peer reviewed publications, but it is insufficient for data exchange and integration between computational systems. The Functional Genomics Experiment (FuGE) formalizes common aspects of comprehensive and high throughput experiments across different biological technologies. We have extended FuGE object model to accommodate flow cytometry data and metadata. Methods We used the MagicDraw modelling tool to design a UML model (Flow-OM) according to the FuGE extension guidelines and the AndroMDA toolkit to transform the model to a markup language (Flow-ML). We mapped each MIFlowCyt term to either an existing FuGE class or to a new FuGEFlow class. The development environment was validated by comparing the official FuGE XSD to the schema we generated from the FuGE object model using our configuration. After the Flow-OM model was completed, the final version of the Flow-ML was generated and validated against an example MIFlowCyt compliant experiment description. Results The extension of FuGE for flow cytometry has resulted in a generic FuGE-compliant data model (FuGEFlow), which accommodates and links together all information required by MIFlowCyt. The FuGEFlow model can be used to build software and databases using FuGE software toolkits to facilitate automated exchange and manipulation of potentially large flow cytometry experimental data sets. Additional project

  14. Monitoring of population dynamics of Corynebacterium glutamicum by multiparameter flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Neumeyer, Andrea; Hübschmann, Thomas; Müller, Susann; Frunzke, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Phenotypic variation of microbial populations is a well-known phenomenon and may have significant impact on the success of industrial bioprocesses. Flow cytometry (FC) and the large repertoire of fluorescent dyes bring the high-throughput analysis of multiple parameters in single bacterial cells into reach. In this study, we evaluated a set of different fluorescent dyes for suitability in FC single cell analysis of the biotechnological platform organism Corynebacterium glutamicum. Already simple scattering properties of C. glutamicum cells in the flow cytometer were shown to provide valuable information on the growth activity of analysed cells. Furthermore, we used DAPI staining for a FC-based determination of the DNA content of C. glutamicum cells grown on standard minimal or complex media. Characteristic DNA patterns were observed mirroring the typical uncoupled DNA synthesis in the logarithmic (log) growth phase and are in agreement with a symmetric type of cell division of C. glutamicum. Application of the fluorescent dyes Syto 9, propidium iodide, and DiOC2(3) allowed the identification of subpopulations with reduced viability and membrane potential within early log and stationary phase populations. The presented data highlight the potential of FC-based analyses for online monitoring of C. glutamicum bioprocesses and provide a first reference for future applications and protocols. PMID:23279937

  15. Detection of cyclin D1 in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Jain, P; Giustolisi, G M; Atkinson, S; Elnenaei, M O; Morilla, R; Owusu-Ankomah, K; Rafiq-Mohammed, F; Matutes, E; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To describe and revise a flow cytometric assay for evaluating cyclin D1 overexpression in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders (B-LPDs). Methods: Cyclin D1 expression was evaluated in 11 healthy controls and 51 patients with B-LPD by flow cytometry using the 5D4 monoclonal antibody. In 25 cases, experiments were repeated up to four times with mononuclear cells (MNC) fixed in ethanol for 1–120 days to evaluate the consistency of cyclin D1 expression. Flow cytometry results were compared with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for the t(11;14) translocation in 19 patients and with immunohistochemistry (IHC) using the DCS-6 monoclonal antibody in nine patients. Results: A mean fluorescence intensity ratio (MFIR) of 4.8 was defined as the cut off point for positivity based on cyclin D1 expression in healthy controls (mean + 3 SD). Ten patients overexpressed cyclin D1 by flow cytometry. These included five of eight patients with mantle cell lymphoma, four of 19 with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and one with follicular lymphoma. MFIR in the repeat experiments differed less than 25% in 20 of 25 patients and in no cases did it cross the cut off point. There was a good correlation between cyclin D1 expression by flow cytometry and FISH for t(11;14) in 15 of 19 patients and six of nine had concordant results with flow cytometry, FISH, and IHC. Conclusion: Cyclin D1 expression remains fairly stable once MNC are fixed in ethanol and the flow cytometric assay can be used for the routine screening of B-LPD. Further comparisons between flow cytometry, IHC, and FISH may be needed to ascertain the diagnostic value of the flow cytometric assay. PMID:12461064

  16. Role of Flow Cytometry in the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Plasma Cell Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Olteanu, Horatiu

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the role of flow cytometry in the diagnosis and follow-up of plasma cell myeloma. A brief introduction to the general immunophenotypic features of normal and myeloma plasma cells is provided, followed by a discussion of technical issues as they relate to the application of flow cytometry in this entity. The prognostic and therapeutic utility of flow cytometric immunophenotyping in myeloma is also analyzed, with an emphasis on the growing role of minimal residual analysis as potential biomarker for evaluating treatment efficacy and for tailoring risk-adapted treatment, in prospective clinical trials. PMID:26940271

  17. Enumeration and Biomass Estimation of Bacteria in Aquifer Microcosm Studies by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    DeLeo, P. C.; Baveye, P.

    1996-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and characterize bacteria from a sand column microcosm simulating aquifer conditions. Pure cultures of a species of Bacillus isolated from subsurface sediments or Bacillus megaterium were first evaluated to identify these organisms' characteristic histograms. Counting was then carried out with samples from the aquifer microcosms. Enumeration by flow cytometry was compared with more-traditional acridine orange direct counting. These two techniques gave statistically similar results. However, counting by flow cytometry, in this case, surveyed a sample size 700 times greater than did acridine orange direct counting (25 (mu)l versus 0.034 (mu)l) and required 1/10 the time (2 h versus 20 h). Flow cytometry was able to distinguish the same species of bacteria grown under different nutrient conditions, and it could distinguish changes in cell growth patterns, specifically single cell growth versus chained cell growth in different regions of an aquifer microcosm. A biomass estimate was calculated by calibrating the total fluorescence of a sample from a pure culture with the dry weight of a freeze-dried volume from the original pure culture. Growth conditions significantly affected histograms and biomass estimates, so the calibration was carried out with cells grown under conditions similar to those in the aquifer microcosm. Costs associated with using flow cytometry were minimal compared with the amount of time saved in counting cells and estimating biomass. PMID:16535470

  18. MIFlowCyt: The Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jamie A.; Spidlen, Josef; Boyce, Keith; Cai, Jennifer; Crosbie, Nicholas; Dalphin, Mark; Furlong, Jeff; Gasparetto, Maura; Goldberg, Michael; Goralczyk, Elizabeth M.; Hyun, Bill; Jansen, Kirstin; Kollmann, Tobias; Kong, Megan; Leif, Robert; McWeeney, Shannon; Moloshok, Thomas D.; Moore, Wayne; Nolan, Garry; Nolan, John; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Parrish, David; Purcell, Barclay; Qian, Yu; Selvaraj, Biruntha; Smith, Clayton; Tchuvatkina, Olga; Wertheimer, Anne; Wilkinson, Peter; Wilson, Christopher; Wood, James; Zigon, Robert; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background A fundamental tenet of scientific research is that published results are open to independent validation and refutation. Minimum data standards aid data providers, users and publishers by providing a specification of what is required to unambiguously interpret experimental findings. Here, we present the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) standard, stating the minimum information required to report flow cytometry (FCM) experiments. Methods We brought together a cross-disciplinary international collaborative group of bioinformaticians, computational statisticians, software developers, instrument manufacturers, and clinical and basic research scientists to develop the standard. The standard was subsequently vetted by the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) Data Standards Task Force, Standards Committee, membership and Council. Results The MIFlowCyt standard includes recommendations about descriptions of the specimens and reagents included in the FCM experiment, the configuration of the instrument used to perform the assays and the data processing approaches used to interpret the primary output data. MIFlowCyt has been adopted as a standard by ISAC, representing the flow cytometry scientific community including scientists as well as software and hardware manufactures. Conclusions MIFlowCyt’s adoption by the scientific and publishing communities will facilitate third-party understanding and reuse of flow cytometry data. PMID:18752282

  19. Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Clague, David S.; Wheeler, Elizabeth K.; Lee, Abraham P.

    2006-07-25

    A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

  20. Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Clague, David S.; Wheeler, Elizabeth K.; Lee, Abraham P.

    2009-03-17

    A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

  1. Beyond conventional cell analysis: the latest science and technology in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wright, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    Combining powerful performance and innovative design and technology, it is possible to deliver a compact, easy-to-use flow cytometry system. Pushing the 'norms' of conventional flow cytometry, today's--and tomorrow's--systems enable complex research into high-content applications in cell biology, as well as a deeper understanding of the advantages gained from the emerging nanoparticle frontier. Flow cytometry is a powerful tool for interrogating complex biological questions at the forefront of biomedical and life science research and increasingly for clinical laboratory applications. Today's investigators want to harness that power and are demanding smaller and more powerful instruments that are more affordable and easier to use. Using innovation, engineers are able to deliver solutions to meet the challenge. PMID:26887094

  2. Intermittent blood flow in the KHT sarcoma--flow cytometry studies using Hoechst 33342.

    PubMed Central

    Minchinton, A. I.; Durand, R. E.; Chaplin, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    The administration of the fluorescent DNA stain, Hoechst 33342, to mice bearing the KHT sarcoma, combined with flow cytometry, can be used to select cells according to their proximity to functional vasculature. Different protocols of administration of Hoechst 33342 were used in order to differentiate between the presence of temporary and chronically hypoxic cells. The results show a large difference in radiosensitivity between cells close to, and distant from, functional vasculature. However, this pattern of radiosensitivity is observed only when the staining period with Hoechst 33342 is short and coincides with the period of irradiation. When the radiation treatment is temporally divorced from the staining period then the radiosensitivity and staining intensity are not related. This result can be interpreted as indicating that hypoxic cells exist within this tumour as a result of fluctuations in tumour blood flow. PMID:2386734

  3. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation. PMID:26114386

  4. flowClean: Automated identification and removal of fluorescence anomalies in flow cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Fletez-Brant, Kipper; Špidlen, Josef; Brinkman, Ryan R; Roederer, Mario; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K

    2016-05-01

    Modern flow cytometry systems can be coupled to plate readers for high-throughput acquisition. These systems allow hundreds of samples to be analyzed in a single day. Quality control of the data remains challenging, however, and is further complicated when a large number of parameters is measured in an experiment. Our examination of 29,228 publicly available FCS files from laboratories worldwide indicates 13.7% have a fluorescence anomaly. In particular, fluorescence measurements for a sample over the collection time may not remain stable due to fluctuations in fluid dynamics; the impact of instabilities may differ between samples and among parameters. Therefore, we hypothesized that tracking cell populations (which represent a summary of all parameters) in centered log ratio space would provide a sensitive and consistent method of quality control. Here, we present flowClean, an algorithm to track subset frequency changes within a sample during acquisition, and flag time periods with fluorescence perturbations leading to the emergence of false populations. Aberrant time periods are reported as a new parameter and added to a revised data file, allowing users to easily review and exclude those events from further analysis. We apply this method to proof-of-concept datasets and also to a subset of data from a recent vaccine trial. The algorithm flags events that are suspicious by visual inspection, as well as those showing more subtle effects that might not be consistently flagged by investigators reviewing the data manually, and out-performs the current state-of-the-art. flowClean is available as an R package on Bioconductor, as a module on the free-to-use GenePattern web server, and as a plugin for FlowJo X. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26990501

  5. High-throughput autofluorescence flow cytometry of breast cancer metabolism (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amy T.; Cannon, Taylor M.; Higginbotham, Jim N.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-02-01

    Tumor heterogeneity poses challenges for devising optimal treatment regimens for cancer patients. In particular, subpopulations of cells can escape treatment and cause relapse. There is a need for methods to characterize tumor heterogeneity of treatment response. Cell metabolism is altered in cancer (Warburg effect), and cells use the autofluorescent cofactor NADH in numerous metabolic reactions. Previous studies have shown that microscopy measurements of NADH autofluorescence are sensitive to treatment response in breast cancer, and these techniques typically assess hundreds of cells per group. An alternative approach is flow cytometry, which measures fluorescence on a single-cell level and is attractive for characterizing tumor heterogeneity because it achieves high-throughput analysis and cell sorting in millions of cells per group. Current applications for flow cytometry rely on staining with fluorophores. This study characterizes flow cytometry measurements of NADH autofluorescence in breast cancer cells. Preliminary results indicate flow cytometry of NADH is sensitive to cyanide perturbation, which inhibits oxidative phosphorylation, in nonmalignant MCF10A cells. Additionally, flow cytometry is sensitive to higher NADH intensity for HER2-positive SKBr3 cells compared with triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. These results agree with previous microscopy studies. Finally, a mixture of SKBr3 and MDA-MB-231 cells were sorted into each cell type using NADH intensity. Sorted cells were cultured, and microscopy validation showed the expected morphology for each cell type. Ultimately, flow cytometry could be applied to characterize tumor heterogeneity based on treatment response and sort cell subpopulations based on metabolic profile. These achievements could enable individualized treatment strategies and improved patient outcomes.

  6. The use of flow cytometry to monitor chitin synthesis in regenerating protoplasts of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hector, R F; Braun, P C; Hart, J T; Kamarck, M E

    1990-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to monitor chitin synthesis in regenerating protoplasts of the yeast Candida albicans. Comparisons of cells stained with Calcofluor White, a fluorochrome with known affinity for chitin, and cells incubated in the presence of N-[3H]-acetylglucosamine, the precursor substrate for chitin, showed a linear relationship between fluorescence and incorporation of label over time. Changes in both the fluorescence and light scatter of regenerating protoplasts treated with inhibitors of fungal chitin synthase were also quantitated by flow cytometry. PMID:2194018

  7. Microbial flow cytometry: An ideal tool for prospective antimicrobial drug development.

    PubMed

    Muthirulan, Pushpanathan; Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    2016-09-15

    Flow cytometry has tremendous applications in qualitative and quantitative analysis of characteristics of single microbial cells. Its ability to efficiently discriminate and quantify multiple parameters of microbial cells has made it a powerful tool to catalog the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) on target cells. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview and strategic design on how multi-parametric analysis of flow cytometry is unsurpassed in studying the antimicrobial process of AMPs in an accurate and rapid way. This strategy provides a conceptual framework for understanding distinct classes of AMPs and getting insights into antimicrobial mechanisms of novel AMPs. PMID:27288557

  8. Flow cytometry as an improved method for the titration of Chlamydiaceae and other intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Käser, T; Pasternak, J A; Hamonic, G; Rieder, M; Lai, K; Delgado-Ortega, M; Gerdts, V; Meurens, F

    2016-05-01

    Chlamydiaceae is a family of intracellular bacteria causing a range of diverse pathological outcomes. The most devastating human diseases are ocular infections with C. trachomatis leading to blindness and genital infections causing pelvic inflammatory disease with long-term sequelae including infertility and chronic pelvic pain. In order to enable the comparison of experiments between laboratories investigating host-chlamydia interactions, the infectious titer has to be determined. Titer determination of chlamydia is most commonly performed via microscopy of host cells infected with a serial dilution of chlamydia. However, other methods including fluorescent ELISpot (Fluorospot) and DNA Chip Scanning Technology have also been proposed to enumerate chlamydia-infected cells. For viruses, flow cytometry has been suggested as a superior alternative to standard titration methods. In this study we compared the use of flow cytometry with microscopy and Fluorospot for the titration of C. suis as a representative of other intracellular bacteria. Titer determination via Fluorospot was unreliable, while titration via microscopy led to a linear read-out range of 16 - 64 dilutions and moderate reproducibility with acceptable standard deviations within and between investigators. In contrast, flow cytometry had a vast linear read-out range of 1,024 dilutions and the lowest standard deviations given a basic training in these methods. In addition, flow cytometry was faster and material costs were lower compared to microscopy. Flow cytometry offers a fast, cheap, precise, and reproducible alternative for the titration of intracellular bacteria like C. suis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26849001

  9. National flow cytometry and sorting research resource. Annual progress report, July, 1, 1994--June 30, 1995, Year 12

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.

    1995-04-27

    Research progress utilizing flow cytometry is described. Topics include: rapid kinetics flow cytometry; characterization of size determinations for small DNA fragments; statistical analysis; energy transfer measurements of molecular confirmation in micelles; and enrichment of Mus spretus chromosomes by dual parameter flow sorting and identification of sorted fractions by fluorescence in-situ hybridization onto G-banded mouse metaphase spreads.

  10. Matching of flow-cytometry histograms using information theory in feature space.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing; Wand, Matthew; Young, Alan J.; Rawn, James; Milford, Edgar L.; Mentzer, Steven J.; Greenes, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a widely available technique for analyzing cell-surface protein expression. Data obtained from flow cytometry is frequently used to produce fluorescence intensity histograms. Comparison of histograms can be useful in the identification of unknown molecules and in the analysis of protein expression. In this study, we examined the combination of a new smoothing technique called SiZer with information theory to measure the difference between cytometry histograms. SiZer provides cross-bandwidth smoothing and allowed analysis in feature space. The new methods were tested on a panel of monoclonal antibodies raised against proteins expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes and compared with previous methods. The findings suggest that comparing information content of histograms in feature space is effective and efficient for identifying antibodies with similar cell-surface binding patterns. PMID:12463961

  11. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348 PMID:26001791

  12. Flow cytometry for the assessment of animal sperm integrity and functionality: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Sharoare; Johannisson, Anders; Wallgren, Margareta; Nagy, Szabolcs; Siqueira, Amanda Pimenta; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto

    2011-01-01

    Flow cytometry is now a recognized methodology within animal spermatology, and has moved from being a research tool to become routine in the assessment of animal semen destined to breeding. The availability of ‘bench-top' flow cytometers and of newer and versatile markers for cell structure and function had allowed the instrumentation to measure more sperm parameters, from viability to reactiveness when exposed to exogenous stimuli, and to increase our capabilities to sort spermatozoa for potential fertilizing capacity, or chromosomal sex. The present review summarizes the state of the art regarding flow cytometry applied to animal andrology, albeit keeping an open comparative intent. It critically evaluates the present and future capabilities of flow cytometry for the diagnostics of potential fertility and for the development of current reproductive technologies such as sperm freezing, sperm selection and sperm sorting. The flow cytometry methods will probably further revolutionize our understanding of the sperm physiology and their functionality, and will undoubtedly extend its application in isolating many uncharacterized features of spermatozoa. However, continuous follow-up of the methods is a necessity owing to technical developments and the complexity of mapping spermatozoa. PMID:21478895

  13. Determination of natural killer cell function by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, K L; Ashton, F A; Schmitz, J L; Folds, J D

    1996-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) are a subset of peripheral blood lymphocytes that mediate non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxicity of foreign target cells. The "gold standard" assay for NK cell activity has been the chromium release assay. This method is not easily performed in the clinical laboratory because of difficulties with disposal of radioactive and hazardous materials, short reagent half-lives, expense, and difficulties with assay standardization. We describe a flow cytometric assay for the clinical measurement of NK cell activity. This study compared the chromium release assay and the flow cytometric assay by using clinically relevant specimens. There were no significant differences between the two assays in the measurement of lytic activity for 17 peripheral blood specimens or in reproducibility in repeated samplings of healthy individuals. We also established a normal range of values for NK activity in healthy adults and identified a small cluster of individuals who have exceptionally high or low levels of NK activity. The flow cytometric assay was validated by testing specimens from subjects expected to have abnormally low levels of NK activity (pregnant women) and specimens from healthy individuals in whom the activity of NK cells was enhanced by exposure to interleukin-2 or alpha interferon. Treatment with these agents was associated with a significant increase in NK activity. These results confirm and extend those of others, showing that the flow cytometric assay is a viable alternative to the chromium release assay for measuring NK cell activity. PMID:8705672

  14. Statistical Mixture Modeling for Cell Subtype Identification in Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cliburn; Feng, Feng; Ottinger, Janet; Foster, David; West, Mike; Kepler, Thomas B

    2010-01-01

    Background Statistical mixture modeling provides an opportunity for automated identification and resolution of cell subtypes in flow cytometric data. The configuration of cells as represented by multiple markers simultaneously can be modeled arbitrarily well as a mixture of Gaussian distributions in the dimension of the number of markers. Cellular subtypes may be related to one or multiple components of such mixtures, and fitted mixture models can be evaluated in the full set of markers as an alternative, or adjunct, to traditional subjective gating methods that rely on choosing one or two dimensions. Methods Four color flow data from human blood cells labeled with FITC-conjugated anti-CD3, PE-conjugated anti-CD8, PE-Cy5-conjugated anti-CD4 and APC-conjugated anti-CD19 Abs was acquired on a FACSCalibur. Cells from four murine cell lines, JAWS II, RAW 264.7, CTLL-2 and A20, were also stained with FITC-conjugated anti-CD11c, PE-conjugated anti-CD11b, PE-Cy5-conjugated anti-CD8a and PE-Cy7-conjugated-CD45R/B220 Abs respectively, and single color flow data were collected on an LSRII. The data was fitted with a mixture of multivariate Gaussians using standard Bayesian statistical approaches and Markov chain Monte Carlo computations. Results Statistical mixture models were able to identify and purify major cell subsets in human peripheral blood, using an automated process that can be generalized to an arbitrary number of markers. Validation against both traditional expert gating and synthetic mixtures of murine cell lines with known mixing proportions was also performed. Conclusions This paper describes studies of statistical mixture modeling of flow cytometric data, and demonstrates their utility in examples with four-color flow data from human peripheral blood samples and synthetic mixtures of murine cell lines. PMID:18496851

  15. Assessment of Equine Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia (EAT) by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Rafael; Gomes-Keller, M Alice; Schwarzwald, Colin; Feige, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    Rationale Thrombocytopenia is a platelet associated process that occurs in human and animals as result of i) decreased production; ii) increased utilization; iii) increased destruction coupled to the presence of antibodies, within a process know as immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT); or iv) platelet sequestration. Thus, the differentiation of the origin of IMT and the development of reliable diagnostic approaches and methodologies are important in the clarification of IMT pathogenesis. Therefore, there is a growing need in the field for easy to perform assays for assessing platelet morphological characteristics paired with detection of platelet-bound IgG. Objectives This study is aimed to develop and characterize a single color flow cytometric assay for detection of platelet-bound IgG in horses, in combination with flow cytometric assessment of platelet morphological characteristics. Findings The FSC and SSC evaluation of the platelets obtained from the thrombocytopenic animals shows several distinctive features in comparison to the flow cytometric profile of platelets from healthy animals. The thrombocytopenic animals displayed i) increased number of platelets with high FSC and high SSC, ii) a significant number of those gigantic platelets had strong fluorescent signal (IgG bound), iii) very small platelets or platelet derived microparticles were found significantly enhanced in one of the thrombocytopenic horses, iv) significant numbers of these microplatelet/microparticles/platelet-fragments still carry very high fluorescence. Conclusions This study describes the development and characterization of an easy to perform, inexpensive, and noninvasive single color flow cytometric assay for detection of platelet-bound IgG, in combination with flow cytometric assessment of platelet morphological characteristics in horses. PMID:11313001

  16. iFlow: A Graphical User Interface for Flow Cytometry Tools in Bioconductor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyongryun; Hahne, Florian; Sarkar, Deepayan; Gentleman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) has become an important analysis technology in health care and medical research, but the large volume of data produced by modern high-throughput experiments has presented significant new challenges for computational analysis tools. The development of an FCM software suite in Bioconductor represents one approach to overcome these challenges. In the spirit of the R programming language (Tree Star Inc., “FlowJo,” http://www.owjo.com), these tools are predominantly console-driven, allowing for programmatic access and rapid development of novel algorithms. Using this software requires a solid understanding of programming concepts and of the R language. However, some of these tools|in particular the statistical graphics and novel analytical methods|are also useful for nonprogrammers. To this end, we have developed an open source, extensible graphical user interface (GUI) iFlow, which sits on top of the Bioconductor backbone, enabling basic analyses by means of convenient graphical menus and wizards. We envision iFlow to be easily extensible in order to quickly integrate novel methodological developments. PMID:20049160

  17. Ultrasonic analyte concentration and application in flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Goddard, Greg; Salzman, Gary; Sinha, Dipen; Martin, John C.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher; Graves, Steven

    2008-03-11

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for concentrating analytes within a fluid flowing through a tube using acoustic radiation pressure. The apparatus includes a function generator that outputs a radio frequency electrical signal to a transducer that transforms the radio frequency electric signal to an acoustic signal and couples the acoustic signal to the tube. The acoustic signal is converted within the tube to acoustic pressure that concentrates the analytes within the fluid.

  18. Ultrasonic analyte concentration and application in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Goddard, Greg; Salzman, Gary; Sinha, Dipen; Martin, John C.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher; Graves, Steven

    2014-07-22

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for concentrating analytes within a fluid flowing through a tube using acoustic radiation pressure. The apparatus includes a function generator that outputs a radio frequency electrical signal to a transducer that transforms the radio frequency electric signal to an acoustic signal and couples the acoustic signal to the tube. The acoustic signal is converted within the tube to acoustic pressure that concentrates the analytes within the fluid.

  19. Ultrasonic analyte concentration and application in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Goddard, Greg; Salzman, Gary; Sinha, Dipen; Martin, John C.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher; Graves, Steven

    2015-07-07

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for concentrating analytes within a fluid flowing through a tube using acoustic radiation pressure. The apparatus includes a function generator that outputs a radio frequency electrical signal to a transducer that transforms the radio frequency electric signal to an acoustic signal and couples the acoustic signal to the tube. The acoustic signal is converted within the tube to acoustic pressure that concentrates the analytes within the fluid.

  20. Circulation times of cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, with approximately 1,000,000 cases reported every year. Hepatocellular carcinoma may metastasize to lung, bones, kidney, and many other organs. Surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current HCC therapies. However the outcomes are poor: the survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" combined with real-time confocal fluorescence imaging are used to assess spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. The in vivo flow cytometer has the capability to detect and quantify continuously the number and flow characteristics of fluorescently labeled cells in vivo in real time without extracting blood sample. We have measured the depletion kinetics of two related human HCC cell lines, high-metastatic HCCLM3 cells and low-metastatic HepG2 cells, which were from the same origin and obtained by repetitive screenings in mice. >60% HCCLM3 cells are depleted within the first hour. Interestingly, the low-metastatic HepG2 cells possess noticeably slower depletion kinetics. In comparison, <40% HepG2 cells are depleted within the first hour. The differences in depletion kinetics might provide insights into early metastasis processes.

  1. A flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter binding assay using antagonist-conjugated quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Oleg; Ross, Emily; Tomlinson, Ian; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the development and validation of a flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assay that uses antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (QDs).We anticipate that our QD-based assay is of immediate value to the high throughput screening of novel DAT modulators.

  2. Data File Standard for Flow Cytometry, Version FCS 3.1

    SciTech Connect

    Spidlen, Josef; Moore, Wayne; Parks, David; Goldberg, Michael; Bray, Chris; Gorombey, Peter; Hyun, Bill; Hubbard, Mark; Lange, Simon; Lefebvre, Ray; Leif, Robert; Novo, David; Ostruszka, Leo; Treister, Adam; Wood, James; Murphy, Robert F.; Roederer, Mario; Sudar, Damir; Zigon, Robert; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Brierre, Pierre

    2009-11-10

    The flow cytometry data file standard provides the specifications needed to completely describe flow cytometry data sets within the confines of the file containing the experimental data. In 1984, the first Flow Cytometry Standard format for data files was adopted as FCS 1.0. This standard was modified in 1990 as FCS 2.0 and again in 1997 as FCS 3.0. We report here on the next generation flow cytometry standard data file format. FCS 3.1 is a minor revision based on suggested improvements from the community. The unchanged goal of the standard is to provide a uniform file format that allows files created by one type of acquisition hardware and software to be analyzed by any other type. The FCS 3.1 standard retains the basic FCS file structure and most features of previous versions of the standard. Changes included in FCS 3.1 address potential ambiguities in the previous versions and provide a more robust standard. The major changes include simplified support for international characters and improved support for storing compensation. The major additions are support for preferred display scale, a standardized way of capturing the sample volume, information about originality of the data file, and support for plate and well identification in high throughput, plate based experiments. Please see the normative version of the FCS 3.1 specification in Supporting Information for this manuscript (or at http://www.isac-net.org/ in the Current standards section) for a complete list of changes.

  3. Report of the European Myeloma Network on multiparametric flow cytometry in multiple myeloma and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, Andy C; Orfao, Alberto; Beksac, Meral; Bezdickova, Ludmila; Brooimans, Rik A; Bumbea, Horia; Dalva, Klara; Fuhler, Gwenny; Gratama, Jan; Hose, Dirk; Kovarova, Lucie; Lioznov, Michael; Mateo, Gema; Morilla, Ricardo; Mylin, Anne K; Omedé, Paola; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Perez Andres, Martin; Petrucci, Maria; Ruggeri, Marina; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schmitz, Alexander; Schreder, Martin; Seynaeve, Carine; Spacek, Martin; de Tute, Ruth M; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Weston-Bell, Nicky; Owen, Roger G; San Miguel, Jesús F; Sonneveld, Pieter; Johnsen, Hans E

    2008-03-01

    The European Myeloma Network (EMN) organized two flow cytometry workshops. The first aimed to identify specific indications for flow cytometry in patients with monoclonal gammopathies, and consensus technical approaches through a questionnaire-based review of current practice in participating laboratories. The second aimed to resolve outstanding technical issues and develop a consensus approach to analysis of plasma cells. The primary clinical applications identified were: differential diagnosis of neoplastic plasma cell disorders from reactive plasmacytosis; identifying risk of progression in patients with MGUS and detecting minimal residual disease. A range of technical recommendations were identified, including: 1) CD38, CD138 and CD45 should all be included in at least one tube for plasma cell identification and enumeration. The primary gate should be based on CD38 vs. CD138 expression; 2) after treatment, clonality assessment is only likely to be informative when combined with immunophenotype to detect abnormal cells. Flow cytometry is suitable for demonstrating a stringent complete remission; 3) for detection of abnormal plasma cells, a minimal panel should include CD19 and CD56. A preferred panel would also include CD20, CD117, CD28 and CD27; 4) discrepancies between the percentage of plasma cells detected by flow cytometry and morphology are primarily related to sample quality and it is, therefore, important to determine that marrow elements are present in follow-up samples, particularly normal plasma cells in MRD negative cases. PMID:18268286

  4. High-resolution microbiota flow cytometry reveals dynamic colitis-associated changes in fecal bacterial composition.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Jakob; Hübschmann, Thomas; Schattenberg, Florian; Schumann, Joachim; Durek, Pawel; Riedel, René; Friedrich, Marie; Glauben, Rainer; Siegmund, Britta; Radbruch, Andreas; Müller, Susann; Chang, Hyun-Dong

    2016-05-01

    Using high-resolution flow cytometry of bacterial shape (forward scatter) and DNA content (DAPI staining), we detected dramatic differences in the fecal microbiota composition during murine colitis that were validated using 16S rDNA sequencing. This innovative method provides a fast and inexpensive tool to interrogate the microbiota on the single-cell level. PMID:26909672

  5. Application of flow cytometry and cell sorting to the bacterial analysis of environmental aerosol samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow cytometry (FCM) combined with viability staining is a useful tool in discerning viable bacteria in environmental samples where traditional culture methods may fail. Contamination of aerosol samples with dust and other non-biological particles can interfere with accurate sample analysis and ther...

  6. SETTLING AND COAGULATION CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUORESCENT PARTICLES DETERMINED BY FLOW CYTOMETRY AND FLUOROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new technique for detecting particles in natural waters relies upon analysis of fluorescent emission by flow cytometry. luorescent pigment particles ranging in radius from 0.1 to 5 um are available in sufficient quantity to be useful as model particles. aboratory coagulation an...

  7. Flow Cytometry To Assess Cerebrospinal Fluid Fungal Burden in Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Lisa M.; Schutz, Charlotte; Scriba, Thomas J.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Boulware, David R.; Meintjes, Graeme; Lalloo, David G.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal burden in the cerebrospinal fluid is an important determinant of mortality in cryptococcal meningitis, but its use in aiding clinical decision making is hampered by the time involved to perform quantitative cultures. Here, we demonstrate the potential of flow cytometry as a novel and rapid technique to address this issue. PMID:26719441

  8. Ploidy of USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) world pear germplasm collection determined by flow cytometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Living germplasm collections representing world diversity of pear (Pyrus L.) are maintained by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Corvallis, Oregon, USA. Flow cytometry was performed on young leaf tissue from 1,284 genebank accessions to assess p...

  9. Teaching the Microbial Growth Curve Concept Using Microalgal Cultures and Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forget, Nathalie; Belzile, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Nozais, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The microbial growth curve is widely studied within microbiology classes and bacteria are usually the microbial model used. Here, we describe a novel laboratory protocol involving flow cytometry to assess the growth dynamics of the unicellular microalgae "Isochrysis galbana." The algal model represents an appropriate alternative to bacteria…

  10. Application of flow cytometry and fluorescent in situ hybridization for assessment of exposures to airborne bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, J L; Thorne, P S; Lynch, N

    1997-01-01

    Current limitations in the methodology for enumeration and identification of airborne bacteria compromise the precision and accuracy of bioaerosol exposure assessment. In this study, flow cytometry and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were evaluated for the assessment of exposures to airborne bacteria. Laboratory-generated two-component bioaerosols in exposures chambers and complex native bioaerosols in swine barns were sampled with two types of liquid impingers (all-glass impinger-30 and May 3-stage impinger). Aliquots of collection media were processed and enumerated by a standard culture technique, microscopy, or flow cytometry after nucleic acid staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and identified taxonomically by FISH. DAPI-labeled impinger samples yielded comparable estimates of bioaerosol concentrations when enumerated by microscopy or flow cytometry. The standard culture method underestimated bioaerosol concentrations by 2 orders of magnitude when compared to microscopy or flow cytometry. In the FISH method, aliquots of collection media were incubated with a probe universally complementary to eubacteria, a probe specific for several Pseudomonas species, and a probe complementary to eubacteria for detection of nonspecific binding. With these probes, FISH allowed quantitative identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bioaerosols in the exposure chamber without measurable nonspecific binding. Impinger samples from the swine barn demonstrated the efficacy of the FISH method for the identification of eubacteria in a complex organic dust. This work demonstrates the potential of emerging molecular techniques to complement traditional methods of bioaerosol exposure assessment. PMID:9097451

  11. Improved Method for Bacterial Cell Capture after Flow Cytometry Cell Sorting ▿

    PubMed Central

    Guillebault, D.; Laghdass, M.; Catala, P.; Obernosterer, I.; Lebaron, P.

    2010-01-01

    Fixed cells with different nucleic acid contents and scatter properties (low nucleic acid [LNA], high nucleic acid 1 [HNA1], and HNA2) were sorted by flow cytometry (FCM). For each sort, 10,000 cells were efficiently captured on poly-l-lysine-coated microplates, resulting in efficient and reproducible PCR amplification. PMID:20817799

  12. Flow Cytometry Analysis of Thymic Epithelial Cells and Their Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ohigashi, Izumi; Takahama, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    The parenchyma of the thymus is compartmentalized into the cortex and the medulla, which are constructed by cortical thymic epithelial cells (cortical TECs, cTECs) and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), respectively. cTECs and mTECs essentially and differentially regulate the development and repertoire selection of T cells. Consequently, the biology of T cell development and selection includes the study of TECs in addition to the study of developing T cells and other hematopoietic cells including dendritic cells. In this chapter, we describe the methods for flow cytometric analysis and sorting of TECs and their subpopulations, including cTECs and mTECs. PMID:26294398

  13. Measuring Cell Death by Propidium Iodide Uptake and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Scott, Adrian P; Marfell, Brooke J; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Propidium iodide (PI) is a small fluorescent molecule that binds to DNA but cannot passively traverse into cells that possess an intact plasma membrane. PI uptake versus exclusion can be used to discriminate dead cells, in which plasma membranes become permeable regardless of the mechanism of death, from live cells with intact membranes. PI is excited by wavelengths between 400 and 600 nm and emits light between 600 and 700 nm, and is therefore compatible with lasers and photodetectors commonly available in flow cytometers. This protocol for PI staining can be used to quantitate cell death in most modern research facilities and universities. PMID:27371595

  14. Detection of single lambda DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Goodwin, P.M.; Ambrose, W.P.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated flow cytometric detection and sizing of single pieces of fluorescently stained lambda DNA (48.5 kb) and individual Kpn I restriction fragments of lambda DNA at 17.05 kb and 29.95 kb. DNA fragments were stained stoichiometrically with an intercalating dye such that the fluorescence from each fragment was directly proportional to fragment length. Laser powers range from 10 to 100 mW and transit times through the focused laser beam were several milliseconds. Measurements were made using time-resolved single photon counting of the detected fluorescence emission from individual stained DNA fragments. Samples were analyzed at rates of about 50 fragments per second. The measured fluorescence intensities are linearly correlated with DNA fragment length over the range measured. Detection sensitivity and resolution needed for analysis of small pieces of DNA are discussed and a comparison of single photon counting measurements of DNA fragments to measurements using more conventional flow cytometers is made. Applications of this methodology to DNA sizing and DNA fingerprinting are discussed.

  15. FlowSOM: Using self-organizing maps for visualization and interpretation of cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Van Gassen, Sofie; Callebaut, Britt; Van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N; Demeester, Piet; Dhaene, Tom; Saeys, Yvan

    2015-07-01

    The number of markers measured in both flow and mass cytometry keeps increasing steadily. Although this provides a wealth of information, it becomes infeasible to analyze these datasets manually. When using 2D scatter plots, the number of possible plots increases exponentially with the number of markers and therefore, relevant information that is present in the data might be missed. In this article, we introduce a new visualization technique, called FlowSOM, which analyzes Flow or mass cytometry data using a Self-Organizing Map. Using a two-level clustering and star charts, our algorithm helps to obtain a clear overview of how all markers are behaving on all cells, and to detect subsets that might be missed otherwise. R code is available at https://github.com/SofieVG/FlowSOM and will be made available at Bioconductor. PMID:25573116

  16. Flow-cytometry-based DNA hybidization and polymorphism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong; Kommander, Kristina; White, P. S.; Nolan, John P.

    1998-05-01

    Functional analysis of the human genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well- suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. We are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. Our approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advantages of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  17. Hyperspectral cytometry.

    PubMed

    Grégori, Gérald; Rajwa, Bartek; Patsekin, Valery; Jones, James; Furuki, Motohiro; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Paul Robinson, J

    2014-01-01

    Hyperspectral cytometry is an emerging technology for single-cell analysis that combines ultrafast optical spectroscopy and flow cytometry. Spectral cytometry systems utilize diffraction gratings or prism-based monochromators to disperse fluorescence signals from multiple labels (organic dyes, nanoparticles, or fluorescent proteins) present in each analyzed bioparticle onto linear detector arrays such as multianode photomultipliers or charge-coupled device sensors. The resultant data, consisting of a series of characterizing every analyzed cell, are not compensated by employing the traditional cytometry approach, but rather are spectrally unmixed utilizing algorithms such as constrained Poisson regression or non-negative matrix factorization. Although implementations of spectral cytometry were envisioned as early as the 1980s, only recently has the development of highly sensitive photomultiplier tube arrays led to design and construction of functional prototypes and subsequently to introduction of commercially available systems. This chapter summarizes the historical efforts and work in the field of spectral cytometry performed at Purdue University Cytometry Laboratories and describes the technology developed by Sony Corporation that resulted in release of the first commercial spectral cytometry system-the Sony SP6800. A brief introduction to spectral data analysis is also provided, with emphasis on the differences between traditional polychromatic and spectral cytometry approaches. PMID:24271566

  18. In vivo plant flow cytometry: A first proof-of-concept

    PubMed Central

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Wang, Daoyuan; Xu, Yang; Villagarcia, Hector; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo flow cytometry has facilitated advances in the ultrasensitive detection of tumor cells, bacteria, nanoparticles, dyes, and other normal and abnormal objects directly in blood and lymph circulatory systems. Here, we propose in vivo plant flow cytometry for the real-time noninvasive study of nanomaterial transport in xylem and phloem plant vascular systems. As a proof of this concept, we demonstrate in vivo real-time photoacoustic monitoring of quantum dot-carbon nanotube conjugate uptake and uptake by roots and spreading through stem to leaves in a tomato plant. In addition, in vivo scanning cytometry using multimodal photoacoustic, photothermal, and fluorescent detection schematics provided multiplex detection and identification of nanoparticles accumulated in plant leaves in the presence of intensive absorption, scattering, and autofluorescent backgrounds. The use of a portable fiber-based photoacoustic flow cytometer for studies of plant vasculature was demonstrated. These integrated cytometry modalities using both endogenous and exogenous contrast agents have a potential to open new avenues of in vivo study of the nutrients, products of photosynthesis and metabolism, nanoparticles, infectious agents, and other objects transported through plant vasculature. PMID:21905208

  19. Real-time on-line flow cytometry for bioprocess monitoring.

    PubMed

    Broger, Tobias; Odermatt, Res P; Huber, Pascal; Sonnleitner, Bernhard

    2011-07-20

    As the understanding of variation is the key to a good process and product quality one should pay attention to dynamics on the single-cell level. The basic idea of this approach was to qualify and quantify variations on the single-cell level during bioreactor cultivations by monitoring the expression of an eGFP tagged target protein (human membrane protein) using fully automated real-time, flow injection flow cytometry (FI-FCM). The FI-FCM system consists of a sampling- and defoaming- as well as of a dilution-section. It allows a very short monitoring interval (5 min) and is able to dilute the reactor sample by a factor ranging up to more than 10,000. In bioreactor cultivations of recombinant Pichia pastoris expressing the eGFP tagged target protein, high correlations (R(2)≥ 0.97) between the FI-FCM fluorescent signal and other, however, population-averaged fluorescence signals (off-line fluorescence, in situ fluorescence probe) were obtained. FI-FCM is the only method able to distinguish between few cells with high fluorescence and many cells with low fluorescence intensity and proved that cells differ significantly from each other within the population during bioreactor cultivations. Single-cell fluorescence was distributed over a broad range within the cell population. These distributions strongly suggest that (a) the AOX-I promoter is leaky and (b) a fraction of the population is able to express more protein of interest within shorter time and (c) a fraction of the population does not express the fusion protein at all. These findings can help in the selection of high producing, stable strains. To show the platform-independency of the system, it has successfully been tested during bioreactor cultivations of three different strains (P. pastoris, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli). Along with its applications in PAT, the FI-FCM could be used as a platform-independent (prokaryotes and eukaryotes) method in various other applications; for example in the

  20. A flow injection flow cytometry system for on-line monitoring of bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Natarajan, A; Srienc, F

    1999-03-01

    For direct and on-line study of the physiological states of cell cultures, a robust flow injection system has been designed and interfaced with flow cytometry (FI-FCM). The core of the flow injection system includes a microchamber designed for sample processing. The design of this microchamber allows not only an accurate on-line dilution but also on-line cell fixation, staining, and washing. The flow injection part of the system was tested by monitoring the optical density of a growing E.coli culture on-line using a spectrophotometer. The entire growth curve, from lag phase to stationary phase, was obtained with frequent sampling. The performance of the entire FI-FCM system is demonstrated in three applications. The first is the monitoring of green fluorescent protein fluorophore formation kinetics in E.coli by visualizing the fluorescence evolution after protein synthesis is inhibited. The data revealed a subpopulation of cells that do not become fluorescent. In addition, the data show that single-cell fluorescence is distributed over a wide range and that the fluorescent population contains cells that are capable of reaching significantly higher expression levels than that indicated by the population average. The second application is the detailed flow cytometric evaluation of the batch growth dynamics of E.coli expressing Gfp. The collected single-cell data visualize the batch growth phases and it is shown that a state of balanced growth is never reached by the culture. The third application is the determination of distribution of DNA content of a S. cerevisiae population by automatically staining cells using a DNA-specific stain. Reproducibility of the on-line staining reaction shows that the system is not restricted to measuring the native properties of cells; rather, a wider range of cellular components could be monitored after appropriate sample processing. The system is thus particularly useful because it operates automatically without direct operator

  1. Telomere analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Hultdin, M; Grönlund, E; Norrback, K; Eriksson-Lindström, E; Just, T; Roos, G

    1998-01-01

    Determination of telomere length is traditionally performed by Southern blotting and densitometry, giving a mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) value for the total cell population studied. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of telomere repeats has been used to calculate telomere length, a method called quantitative (Q)-FISH. We here present a quantitative flow cytometric approach, Q-FISHFCM, for evaluation of telomere length distribution in individual cells based on in situ hybridization using a fluorescein-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (CCCTAA)3probe and DNA staining with propidium iodide. A simple and rapid protocol with results within 30 h was developed giving high reproducibility. One important feature of the protocol was the use of an internal cell line control, giving an automatic compensation for potential differences in the hybridization steps. This protocol was tested successfully on cell lines and clinical samples from bone marrow, blood, lymph nodes and tonsils. A significant correlation was found between Southern blotting and Q-FISHFCMtelomere length values ( P = 0.002). The mean sub-telomeric DNA length of the tested cell lines and clinical samples was estimated to be 3.2 kbp. With the Q-FISHFCMmethod the fluorescence signal could be determined in different cell cycle phases, indicating that in human cells the vast majority of telomeric DNA is replicated early in S phase. PMID:9685479

  2. Real Time Detection of Protein Trafficking with High Throughput Flow Cytometry (HTFC) and Fluorogen Activating Protein (FAP) Base Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Tapia, Phillip H.; Jarvik, Jonathan; Waggoner, Alan S.; Sklar, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    We combined fluorogen activating protein (FAP) technology with high-throughput flow cytometry to detect real-time protein trafficking to and from the plasma membrane in living cells. The hybrid platform allows drug discovery for trafficking receptors, such as G-protein coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases and ion channels, that were previously not suitable for high throughput screening by flow cytometry.. The system has been validated using the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) system and extended to other GPCRs. When a chemical library containing ~1,200 off-patent drugs was screened against cells expressing FAP tagged β2AR, all known β2AR active ligands in the library were successfully identified, together with a few compounds that were later confirmed to regulate receptor internalization in a non-traditional manner. The unexpected discovery of new ligands by this approach indicates the potential of using this protocol for GPCR de-orphanization. In addition, screens of multiplexed targets promise improved efficiency with minor protocol modification. PMID:24510772

  3. Label-free cell cycle analysis for high-throughput imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, Thomas; Hennig, Holger; Summers, Huw D.; Theis, Fabian J.; Cerveira, Joana; Patterson, James O.; Davies, Derek; Filby, Andrew; Carpenter, Anne E.; Rees, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Imaging flow cytometry combines the high-throughput capabilities of conventional flow cytometry with single-cell imaging. Here we demonstrate label-free prediction of DNA content and quantification of the mitotic cell cycle phases by applying supervised machine learning to morphological features extracted from brightfield and the typically ignored darkfield images of cells from an imaging flow cytometer. This method facilitates non-destructive monitoring of cells avoiding potentially confounding effects of fluorescent stains while maximizing available fluorescence channels. The method is effective in cell cycle analysis for mammalian cells, both fixed and live, and accurately assesses the impact of a cell cycle mitotic phase blocking agent. As the same method is effective in predicting the DNA content of fission yeast, it is likely to have a broad application to other cell types. PMID:26739115

  4. Non-Linear Optical Flow Cytometry Using a Scanned, Bessel Beam Light-Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Bradley B.; Awasthi, Samir; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chan, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Modern flow cytometry instruments have become vital tools for high-throughput analysis of single cells. However, as issues with the cellular labeling techniques often used in flow cytometry have become more of a concern, the development of label-free modalities for cellular analysis is increasingly desired. Non-linear optical phenomena (NLO) are of growing interest for label-free analysis because of the ability to measure the intrinsic optical response of biomolecules found in cells. We demonstrate that a light-sheet consisting of a scanned Bessel beam is an optimal excitation geometry for efficiently generating NLO signals in a microfluidic environment. The balance of photon density and cross-sectional area provided by the light-sheet allowed significantly larger two-photon fluorescence intensities to be measured in a model polystyrene microparticle system compared to measurements made using other excitation focal geometries, including a relaxed Gaussian excitation beam often used in conventional flow cytometers. PMID:26021750

  5. Non-linear optical flow cytometry using a scanned, Bessel beam light-sheet.

    PubMed

    Collier, Bradley B; Awasthi, Samir; Lieu, Deborah K; Chan, James W

    2015-01-01

    Modern flow cytometry instruments have become vital tools for high-throughput analysis of single cells. However, as issues with the cellular labeling techniques often used in flow cytometry have become more of a concern, the development of label-free modalities for cellular analysis is increasingly desired. Non-linear optical phenomena (NLO) are of growing interest for label-free analysis because of the ability to measure the intrinsic optical response of biomolecules found in cells. We demonstrate that a light-sheet consisting of a scanned Bessel beam is an optimal excitation geometry for efficiently generating NLO signals in a microfluidic environment. The balance of photon density and cross-sectional area provided by the light-sheet allowed significantly larger two-photon fluorescence intensities to be measured in a model polystyrene microparticle system compared to measurements made using other excitation focal geometries, including a relaxed Gaussian excitation beam often used in conventional flow cytometers. PMID:26021750

  6. Application of flow cytometry to studies of pathogenic free-living amoebae.

    PubMed Central

    Muldrow, L L; Tyndall, R L; Fliermans, C B

    1982-01-01

    Species of small, free-living amoebae of the genera Naegleria and Acanthamoeba can cause fatal amoebic meningoencephalitis. Previous investigations have shown that pathogenic amoebae are associated with thermally altered water. Flow cytometric techniques for identifying species of pathogenic and nonpathogenic amoebae from such water have been developed, using immunofluorescence and fluorescein-bound concanavalin A. Flow cytometry is accomplished with a cytofluorograph, in which cells are dispersed in a suspended carrier liquid and passed in front of a focused argon ion laser beam. Cells are then distinguished by the degree of scattered light (size) or fluorescence. Flow cytometry techniques have proven efficient for environmental samples, as indicated by the identification of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and nonpathogenic Naegleri gruberi and Acanthamoeba castellanii isolated from the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. Cytofluorographic analysis of environmental samples has several advantages over the current methods of isolation and classification of free-living amoebae. With this system, it is possible to rapidly identify species and quantitate mixtures of pathogenic amoebae in environmental samples. Cytofluorographic analysis of amoebic isolates reduces the time presently required to screen environmental sites for pathogenic amoebae. The cytofluorograph permits detection and species identification of nonthermophilic Naegleria spp. and Acanthamoeba spp. that could not easily be isolated for species identification by conventional methods. Other advantages of flow cytometry over fluorescent microscopy include a high degree of statistical precision due to the large numbers measured, high immunofluorescent titers, and elimination of subjectivity and fluorescence fading. PMID:6186196

  7. Magnetic fingerprints of rolling cells for quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Reisbeck, Mathias; Helou, Michael Johannes; Richter, Lukas; Kappes, Barbara; Friedrich, Oliver; Hayden, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, flow cytometry has had a profound impact on preclinical and clinical applications requiring single cell function information for counting, sub-typing and quantification of epitope expression. At the same time, the workflow complexity and high costs of such optical systems still limit flow cytometry applications to specialized laboratories. Here, we present a quantitative magnetic flow cytometer that incorporates in situ magnetophoretic cell focusing for highly accurate and reproducible rolling of the cellular targets over giant magnetoresistance sensing elements. Time-of-flight analysis is used to unveil quantitative single cell information contained in its magnetic fingerprint. Furthermore, we used erythrocytes as a biological model to validate our methodology with respect to precise analysis of the hydrodynamic cell diameter, quantification of binding capacity of immunomagnetic labels, and discrimination of cell morphology. The extracted time-of-flight information should enable point-of-care quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood for clinical applications, such as immunology and primary hemostasis. PMID:27596736

  8. New fluorogenic dyes for analysis of cellular processes by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Kalina; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Stoitsova, Stoyanka; Chausheva, Stela; Vasilev, Aleksey; Lesev, Nedyalko; Dimitrova, Petya; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2013-12-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging by flow cytometry are two of the fastest growing areas in the medical and biological research. Innovations in fluorescent chemistry and synthesis of new dye probes are closely related to the development of service equipment such as light sources, and detection techniques. Among compounds known as fluorescent labels, the cyanine-based dyes have become widely used since they have high excitation coefficients, narrow emission bands and high fluorescence upon binding to nucleic acids. The key methods for evaluation of apoptosis and cell cycle allow measuring DNA content by several flow cytometric techniques. We have synthesized new monomethine cyanine dyes and have characterized their applicability for staining of live and/or apoptotic cells. Imaging experiments by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have been also performed. Two of the dyes have shown high-affinity binding to the nuclei at high dilutions, up to 10(-9)M. Flow cytometry and CLSM have confirmed that these dyes labeled selectively non-living, e.g. ethanol-fixed cells that makes them appropriate for estimations of cell viability and apoptosis. The novel structures proved to be appropriate also for analysis of the cell cycle. PMID:24231377

  9. An improved method for differentiating cell-bound from internalized particles by imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Asya; Solga, Michael D; Lannigan, Joanne; Criss, Alison K

    2015-01-01

    Recognition, binding, internalization, and elimination of pathogens and cell debris are important functions of professional as well as non-professional phagocytes. However, high-throughput methods for quantifying cell-associated particles and discriminating bound from internalized particles have been lacking. Here we describe a protocol for using imaging flow cytometry to quantify the attached and phagocytosed particles that are associated with a population of cells. Cells were exposed to fluorescent particles, fixed, and exposed to an antibody of a different fluorophore that recognizes the particles. The antibody is added without cell permeabilization, such that the antibody only binds extracellular particles. Cells with and without associated particles were identified by imaging flow cytometry. For each cell with associated particles, a spot count algorithm was employed to quantify the number of extracellular (double fluorescent) and intracellular (single fluorescent) particles per cell, from which the percent particle internalization was determined. The spot count algorithm was empirically validated by examining the fluorescence and phase contrast images acquired by the flow cytometer. We used this protocol to measure binding and internalization of the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae by primary human neutrophils, using different bacterial variants and under different cellular conditions. The results acquired using imaging flow cytometry agreed with findings that were previously obtained using conventional immunofluorescence microscopy. This protocol provides a rapid, powerful method for measuring the association and internalization of any particle by any cell type. PMID:25967947

  10. Magnetic fingerprints of rolling cells for quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Reisbeck, Mathias; Helou, Michael Johannes; Richter, Lukas; Kappes, Barbara; Friedrich, Oliver; Hayden, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, flow cytometry has had a profound impact on preclinical and clinical applications requiring single cell function information for counting, sub-typing and quantification of epitope expression. At the same time, the workflow complexity and high costs of such optical systems still limit flow cytometry applications to specialized laboratories. Here, we present a quantitative magnetic flow cytometer that incorporates in situ magnetophoretic cell focusing for highly accurate and reproducible rolling of the cellular targets over giant magnetoresistance sensing elements. Time-of-flight analysis is used to unveil quantitative single cell information contained in its magnetic fingerprint. Furthermore, we used erythrocytes as a biological model to validate our methodology with respect to precise analysis of the hydrodynamic cell diameter, quantification of binding capacity of immunomagnetic labels, and discrimination of cell morphology. The extracted time-of-flight information should enable point-of-care quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood for clinical applications, such as immunology and primary hemostasis. PMID:27596736

  11. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo. Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry, super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers, drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and high-speed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow. In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell’s functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic), and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed. PMID:17226898

  12. Waveguide detection of right-angle-scattered light in flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2000-01-01

    A transparent flow cell is used as an index-guided optical waveguide. A detector for the flow cell but not the liquid stream detects the Right-Angle-Scattered (RAS) Light exiting from one end of the flow cell. The detector(s) could view the trapped RAS light from the flow cell either directly or through intermediate optical light guides. If the light exits one end of the flow cell, then the other end of the flow cell can be given a high-reflectivity coating to approximately double the amount of light collected. This system is more robust in its alignment than the traditional flow cytometry systems which use imaging optics, such as microscope objectives.

  13. Antimicrobial properties of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles studied by flow cytometry and related techniques.

    PubMed

    Railean-Plugaru, Viorica; Pomastowski, Pawel; Rafinska, Katarzyna; Wypij, Magdalena; Kupczyk, Wojciech; Dahm, Hanna; Jackowski, Marek; Buszewski, Boguslaw

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the effect of silver bionanoparticles (Bio(AgNPs) synthesized by Actinobacteria CGG 11n on selected Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria. Flow cytometry, classical antibiogram method and fluorescent microscopy approach was used for evaluation of antimicrobial activity of Bio(AgNPs) and their combination with antibiotics. Furthermore, the performed research specified the capacity of flow cytometry method as an alternative to the standard ones and as a complementary method to electromigration techniques. The study showed antibacterial activity of both BioAgNPs and the combination of antibiotics/BioAgNPs against all the tested bacteria strains in comparison with a diffusion, dilution and bioautographic methods. The synergistic effect of antibiotics/BioAgNPs combination (e.g. kanamycin, ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin) was found to be more notable against Pseudomonas aeruginosa representing a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbugs" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. PMID:26763104

  14. In Vivo Monitoring of Multiple Circulating Cell Populations Using Two-photon Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczyk, Eric R.; Zhong, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Myc, Andrzej; Thomas, Thommey; Cao, Zhengyi; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, James R.

    2008-01-01

    To detect and quantify multiple distinct populations of cells circulating simultaneously in the blood of living animals, we developed a novel optical system for two-channel, two-photon flow cytometry in vivo. We used this system to investigate the circulation dynamics in live animals of breast cancer cells with low (MCF-7) and high (MDA-MB-435) metastatic potential, showing for the first time that two different populations of circulating cells can be quantified simultaneously in the vasculature of a single live mouse. We also non-invasively monitored a population of labeled, circulating red blood cells for more than two weeks, demonstrating that this technique can also quantify the dynamics of abundant cells in the vascular system for prolonged periods of time. These data are the first in vivo application of multichannel flow cytometry utilizing two-photon excitation, which will greatly enhance our capability to study circulating cells in cancer and other disease processes. PMID:19221581

  15. Multi-parameter flow cytometry for discovery of disease mechanisms in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Soloski, Mark J.; Chrest, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry has emerged as an essential tool for investigators in the study of the complexity of the immune system and the examination of its role in human health and disease. This technology has developed to the point where one can readily generate a large descriptive data set that details the levels of important immune cell subsets and defines an individual immune cell signature or “Immune-cellome”. This immune cell signature would clearly display individual variation but also would change in a manner reflective of disease state. Analysis of the “immune-cellome” may provide novel insight into disease pathophysiology, provide new biomarkers of disease activity and perhaps identify therapeutic targets. In this brief review we will cover current advances in complex flow cytometry and suggest ways this may be applied to the study of rheumatic diseases. PMID:23334929

  16. AutoGate: A Macintosh cluster analysis program for flow cytometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C.; Parson, J.D.; Beckman, R.J. ); Stewart, S.J.; Stewart, C.C. )

    1993-01-01

    AutoGate, a cluster analysis program for Flow Cytometry Standard Data, has been developed for use on the Macintosh computer. AutoGate reads FCS format list mode files. It partitions the list mode events into a user-selected number of populations using K-means cluster analysis. One or more of the populations can be displayed as colored, bivariate dot plots. Eight variate data and up to twelve clusters can be analyzed. The dot plots can be saved as PICT format files. Data for individual clusters can be saved as FCS or ASCII format files. AutoGate is available from the authors through the National Flow Cytometry and Sorting Research Resource at Los Alamos.

  17. Evolution of flow cytometry standard, FCS3.0, into a DICOM-compatible format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Suzanne B.

    1997-05-01

    The International Society for Analytical Cytology, ISAC, has developed a flow cytometry standard (FCS) to permit data interchange, ISAC will soon replace FCS 2.0 with FCS 3.0. Unfortunately, the proposed FCS 3.0 is still fraught with problems, which are of sufficient magnitude as to warrant its early replacement. The most reasonable replacement is as a supplement to the digital imaging and communications in medicine, DICOM 3.0, standard. The recent digital microscopy extension of DICOM can be extended and modified to include flow cytometry data. DICOM includes: image graphics objects, specifications for describing: studies, reports, the acquisition of the data and the individuals involved, physician, patient, etc. Storing the present FCS data in a database, which has already been accomplished with the QC tracker software, will facilitate the transition of FCS to DICOM.

  18. Monitoring of microbial communities by flow cytometry and rRNA-targeted hybridization probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Guenter; Amann, Rudolf

    1995-10-01

    Flow cytometry in combination with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) based fluorescence in situ hybridization is a new technique for the analysis of microbial communities. Oligonucleotide probes directed against ribosomal RNA allow the identification of species or groups of micro- organisms. Combined with flow cytometry, up to several thousand cells per second can be classified. In addition to the identification and specific enumeration of micro-organisms, further information on the distribution of cell size, DNA and ribosome content -- and therefore an assessment of activity -- within the entire community or subpopulations can be obtained. This technique is much more accurate, informative, and rapid than classical culture-dependent methods. Data of activated sludge samples hybridized with fluorescein labeled oligonucleotides and counterstained with the DNA-specific dye Hoechst 33342 are presented as examples for its applicability to complex microbial communities.

  19. Application of flow cytometry in diagnosing lymphomas in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Aniołek, Olga; Gajewski, Zdzisław; Giziński, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Classification of types of lymphomas is done by interpreting cell morphology results obtained in cytological and/or histological examinations. In recent years, additional methods like immunocytochemistry (ICC), immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for antigen receptor rearrangements (PARR), have been used to diagnose and classify lymphomas. Unfortunately, none of these methods is completely specific and sensitive. Thus, a combination of several diagnostic methods or use of all available techniques allows for evaluation of morphological properties of cells like their maturity and diversification. Owing to the use of sets of antibodies it is possible to identify the phenotype of hyperplastic cells as well as their origin. Combination of results obtained through phenotypical analysis with flow cytometry examination with morphological, histological and genetic testing enables a detailed analysis of, in this case, lymphoproliferative diseases including reaction changes, primary and secondary immunological deficits as well as autoimmune diseases. PMID:26155143

  20. Use of Flow Cytometry to Measure Biogeochemical Rates and Processes in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomas, Michael W.; Bronk, Deborah A.; van den Engh, Ger

    2011-01-01

    An important goal of marine biogeochemists is to quantify the rates at which elements cycle through the ocean's diverse microbial assemblage, as well as to determine how these rates vary in time and space. The traditional view that phytoplankton are producers and bacteria are consumers has been found to be overly simplistic, and environmental metagenomics is discovering new and important microbial metabolisms at an accelerating rate. Many nutritional strategies previously attributed to one microorganism or functional group are also or instead carried out by other groups. To tease apart which organism is doing what will require new analytical approaches. Flow cytometry, when combined with other techniques, has great potential for expanding our understanding of microbial interactions because groups can be distinguished optically, sorted, and then collected for subsequent analyses. Herein, we review the advances in our understanding of marine biogeochemistry that have arisen from the use of flow cytometry.

  1. A comparative study of frozen-section immunoperoxidase and flow cytometry for immunophenotypic analysis of lymph node biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Biesemier, K W; Dent, G A; Pryzwansky, K B; Folds, J D

    1994-01-01

    Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and frozen-section immunoperoxidase was compared on 21 consecutive lymph node biopsy specimens, of which a diagnosis of lymphoma was made for 11 specimens. Samples for flow cytometry were obtained by a fine-needle aspiration technique. Concordance between frozen-section immunoperoxidase and flow cytometry for all routine markers on all specimens ranged from 76 to 100%. In general, B-cell markers showed poorer concordance than T-cell markers, with kappa and lambda light chains having the poorest concordance, at 76% each. Flow cytometry was significantly more sensitive (90 versus 30%; P < 0.006) and had a significantly higher negative predictive value (100 versus 63%; P < 0.006) than frozen-section immunoperoxidase for demonstrating light-chain restriction. There was no significant difference in the specificities (100 versus 91%) or positive predictive values (100% each) between the two methods. Both methods demonstrated characteristic immunophenotypes for intermediate cell lymphomas, small lymphocytic lymphomas, and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphomas. Frozen-section immunoperoxidase and flow cytometry appear to be significantly concordant methods for immunophenotypic analysis of lymph node biopsies. Light-chain restriction is more readily demonstrated by flow cytometry than frozen-section immunoperoxidase. We believe that ex vivo fine-needle aspiration is a simple and reliable method of obtaining cell suspensions of lymph nodes for flow cytometry. PMID:7496966

  2. Assessment of the infectivity potential of Leishmania infantum, using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis; Dokianakis, Emmanouil; Tsirigotakis, Nikolaos; Koutala, Eleni; Antoniou, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum causes leishmaniases, a sandfly-borne disease of humans and dogs, in all countries of the Mediterranean basin. The promastigote, infective stage of the parasite, once inoculated to the mammalian host by the vector, is ingested by macrophages. Leishmania lives within the lysosome of the phagocytic immune cells inactivating the enzymes contained. The ability of an isolate to survive within the macrophage and its rate of multiplication in this environment is an important factor determining the infectivity potential of the isolate and the manifestation of the disease. This capacity of the parasite is measured as the percentage of infected cells and the mean value of parasites per cell. The infectivity potential, of clinical isolates of L. infantum infecting THP-1 cells in vitro, was studied by flow cytometry and light microscopy. The percentages of cells in a sample containing a specific number of parasites, as recorded by light microscopy, were used in flow cytometry to manually gate the mean fluorescence intensity which corresponded to the percentage of cells with that number of parasites. The gating obtained, was then used as a "standard reference curve" to evaluate results by flow cytometry compared to those obtained by light microscopy. The results, of the overall percentage of infected cells and the number of parasites per cell in the culture, matched in the two methods. So, flow cytometry can be used as a rapid, cost effective, easy and reproducible method to study the infectivity potential of isolates, either in biological, epidemiological, or clinical tests, particularly for the assessment of drug efficiency trials. PMID:25045849

  3. Flow cytometry community fingerprinting and amplicon sequencing for the assessment of landfill leachate cellulolytic bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Kinet, R; Dzaomuho, P; Baert, J; Taminiau, B; Daube, G; Nezer, C; Brostaux, Y; Nguyen, F; Dumont, G; Thonart, P; Delvigne, F

    2016-08-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a high throughput single cell technology that is actually becoming widely used for studying phenotypic and genotypic diversity among microbial communities. This technology is considered in this work for the assessment of a bioaugmentation treatment in order to enhance cellulolytic potential of landfill leachate. The experimental results reveal the relevant increase of leachate cellulolytic potential due to bioaugmentation. Cytometric monitoring of microbial dynamics along these assays is then realized. The flow FP package is used to establish microbial samples fingerprint from initial 2D cytometry histograms. This procedure allows highlighting microbial communities' variation along the assays. Cytometric and 16S rRNA gene sequencing fingerprinting methods are then compared. The two approaches give same evidence about microbial dynamics throughout digestion assay. There are however a lack of significant correlation between cytometric and amplicon sequencing fingerprint at genus or species level. Same phenotypical profiles of microbiota during assays matched to several 16S rRNA gene sequencing ones. Flow cytometry fingerprinting can thus be considered as a promising routine on-site method suitable for the detection of stability/variation/disturbance of complex microbial communities involved in bioprocesses. PMID:27160955

  4. Quantification of mitochondrial toxicity in HIV-infected individuals by quantitative PCR compared to flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Thor A.; Lin, Chen-Han; Tobin, Nicole H.; Côté, Hélène C.F.; Sloan, Derek D.; Jerome, Keith R.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-invasive diagnostic assays to evaluate mitochondrial toxicity could have significant clinical utility for HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods This study compared the ratio of mitochondrial to nuclear DNA determined by quantitative PCR to the ratio of mitochondrial to nuclear-encoded proteins by flow cytometry, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 73 HIV-infected individuals with and without risk factors for mitochondrial toxicity. Results PCR detected similar mitochondrial/nuclear DNA in HIV-infected individuals without a history of ART, and those receiving ART with lipodystrophy, lipoatrophy or a history of suspected lactic acidosis. However, the ratio was significantly greater in ART-untreated compared to those receiving either stavudine or didanosine. In contrast, flow cytometry did not detect any differences in mitochondrial/nuclear protein (1). There was no correlation between the assays (rho = −0.05, p = 0.65). Conclusions Assessment of the mitochondrial/nuclear DNA ratio by quantitative PCR performed better than the mitochondrial/nuclear-encoded protein ratio by flow cytometry to detect adverse effects of nucleoside analogues on mitochondria. PMID:23044657

  5. Demonstration of cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in acute leukaemia using flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Farahat, N; van der Plas, D; Praxedes, M; Morilla, R; Matutes, E; Catovsky, D

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To detect cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens using flow cytometry in acute leukaemia and to use this technique for double marker combinations. METHODS--Cytoplasmic staining was carried out in samples from 40 cases of acute leukaemia with monoclonal antibodies against the myeloid antigen CD13, the lymphoid antigens CD3, CD22, mu chain and the enzymes terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde and permeabilised with Tween 20 and Becton Dickinson's FACS lysing solution. Flow cytometry results were compared in the same cases with immunocytochemistry results using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS--The gentle permeabilisation induced by this method permitted preservation of the membrane antigens and the size and morphology of the cells. The results using flow cytometry were comparable with those obtained using immunocytochemistry, with nearly complete concordance in most cases. CONCLUSIONS--This technique is simple, rapid, sensitive and reproducible and it is suitable for double staining procedures, such as nuclear and cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane, or cytoplasmic and membrane. It therefore provides a powerful tool for extending the use of immunophenotyping for the diagnosis and follow up of acute leukaemia. It could also be used for the investigation of minimal residual disease. PMID:7962655

  6. In vivo, label-free, and noninvasive detection of melanoma metastasis by photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Cheng; Wang, Xueding; Wei, Xunbin

    2014-02-01

    Melanoma, a malignant tumor of melanocytes, is the most serious type of skin cancer in the world. It accounts for about 80% of deaths of all skin cancer. For cancer detection, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) serve as a marker for metastasis development, cancer recurrence, and therapeutic efficacy. Melanoma tumor cells have high content of melanin, which has high light absorption and can serve as endogenous biomarker for CTC detection without labeling. Here, we have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of melanoma cancer by counting CTCs of melanoma tumor bearing mice in vivo. To test in vivo PAFC's capability of detecting melanoma cancer, we have constructed a melanoma tumor model by subcutaneous inoculation of highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10. In order to effectively distinguish the targeting PA signals from background noise, we have used the algorithm of Wavelet denoising method to reduce the background noise. The in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) has shown a great potential for detecting circulating tumor cells quantitatively in the blood stream. Compared with fluorescence-based in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC), PAFC technique can be used for in vivo, label-free, and noninvasive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

  7. Discovering cell types in flow cytometry data with random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Nussenblatt, Robert; Losert, Wolfgang

    Flow cytometry is a widely used experimental technique in immunology research. During the experiments, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a single patient, labeled with multiple fluorescent stains that bind to different proteins, are illuminated by a laser. The intensity of each stain on a single cell is recorded and reflects the amount of protein expressed by that cell. The data analysis focuses on identifying specific cell types related to a disease. Different cell types can be identified by the type and amount of protein they express. To date, this has most often been done manually by labelling a protein as expressed or not while ignoring the amount of expression. Using a cross correlation matrix of stain intensities, which contains both information on the proteins expressed and their amount, has been largely ignored by researchers as it suffers from measurement noise. Here we present an algorithm to identify cell types in flow cytometry data which uses random matrix theory (RMT) to reduce noise in a cross correlation matrix. We demonstrate our method using a published flow cytometry data set. Compared with previous analysis techniques, we were able to rediscover relevant cell types in an automatic way. Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742.

  8. Monitoring antibacterial permeabilization in real time using time-resolved flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Freire, João Miguel; Gaspar, Diana; de la Torre, Beatriz Garcia; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-02-01

    Despite the intensive study of antibiotic-induced bacterial permeabilization, its kinetics and molecular mechanism remain largely elusive. A new methodology that extends the concept of the live-dead assay in flow cytometry to real time-resolved detection was used to overcome these limitations. The antimicrobial activity of pepR was monitored in time-resolved flow cytometry for three bacterial strains: Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), E. coli K-12 (CGSC Strain 4401) and E. coli JW3596-1 (CGSC Strain 11805). The latter strain has truncated lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer membrane. This new methodology provided information on the efficacy of the antibiotics and sheds light on their mode of action at membrane-level. Kinetic data regarding antibiotic binding and lytic action were retrieved. Membrane interaction and permeabilization events differ significantly among strains. The truncation of LPS moieties does not hamper AMP binding but compromises membrane disruption and bacterial killing. We demonstrated the usefulness of time-resolved flow cytometry to study antimicrobial-induced permeabilization by collecting kinetic data that contribute to characterize the action of antibiotics directly on bacteria. PMID:25445678

  9. Procoagulant and platelet-derived microvesicle absolute counts determined by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Lisa; Harrison, Paul; Kohler, Malcolm; Ferry, Berne

    2014-01-01

    Background Flow cytometry is the most commonly used technology to measure microvesicles (MVs). Despite reported limitations of this technique, MV levels obtained using conventional flow cytometry have yielded many clinically relevant findings, such as associations with disease severity and ability to predict clinical outcomes. This study aims to determine if MV enumeration by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity, as this may explain how flow cytometry generates clinically relevant results. Methods One hundred samples from healthy individuals and patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were analysed by conventional flow cytometry (FACSCalibur) and by three functional MV assays: Zymuphen MP-activity in which data were given as phosphatidylserine equivalent, STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay expressed as clotting time and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) reflecting in vitro thrombin generation. Correlations were determined by Spearman correlation. Results Absolute counts of lactadherin+ procoagulant MVs generated by flow cytometry weakly correlated with the results obtained from the Zymuphen MP-activity (r=0.5370, p<0.0001); correlated with ETP (r=0.7444, p<0.0001); negatively correlated with STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay clotting time (−0.7872, p<0.0001), reflecting a positive correlation between clotting activity and flow cytometry. Levels of Annexin V+ procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs were also associated with functional assays. Absolute counts of MVs derived from other cell types were not correlated with the functional results. Conclusions Quantitative results of procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs from conventional flow cytometry are associated with the functional capability of the MVs, as defined by three functional MV assays. Flow cytometry is a valuable technique for the quantification of MVs from different cellular origins; however, a combination of several analytical techniques may give the most comprehensive

  10. Flow Cytometry with Gold Nanoparticles and their Clusters as scattering Contrast Agents: FDTD Simulation of Light-Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tanev, Stoyan; Sun, Wenbo; Pond, James; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    The formulation of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) approach is presented in the framework of its potential applications to in vivo flow cytometry based on light scattering. The consideration is focused on comparison of light scattering by a single biological cell alone in controlled refractive index matching conditions and by cells labeled by gold nanoparticles. The optical schematics including phase contrast (OPCM) microscopy as a prospective modality for in vivo flow cytometry is also analyzed. The validation of the FDTD approach for the simulation of flow cytometry may open a new avenue in the development of advanced cytometric techniques based on scattering effects from nanoscale targets. PMID:19670359

  11. Flow Cytometry Enables Multiplexed Measurements of Genetically Encoded Intramolecular FRET Sensors Suitable for Screening.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Jaimee; Zhao, Ziyan; Geyer, Rory J; Barra, Melanie M; Balunas, Marcy J; Zweifach, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Genetically encoded sensors based on intramolecular FRET between CFP and YFP are used extensively in cell biology research. Flow cytometry has been shown to offer a means to measure CFP-YFP FRET; we suspected it would provide a unique way to conduct multiplexed measurements from cells expressing different FRET sensors, which is difficult to do with microscopy, and that this could be used for screening. We confirmed that flow cytometry accurately measures FRET signals using cells transiently transfected with an ERK activity reporter, comparing responses measured with imaging and cytometry. We created polyclonal long-term transfectant lines, each expressing a different intramolecular FRET sensor, and devised a way to bar-code four distinct populations of cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of multiplexed measurements and determined that robust multiplexed measurements can be conducted in plate format. To validate the suitability of the method for screening, we measured responses from a plate of bacterial extracts that in unrelated experiments we had determined contained the protein kinase C (PKC)-activating compound teleocidin A-1. The multiplexed assay correctly identifying the teleocidin A-1-containing well. We propose that multiplexed cytometric FRET measurements will be useful for analyzing cellular function and for screening compound collections. PMID:26908592

  12. An improved protocol for flow cytometry analysis of phytoplankton cultures and natural samples.

    PubMed

    Marie, Dominique; Rigaut-Jalabert, Fabienne; Vaulot, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Preservation of cells, choice of fixative, storage, and thawing conditions are recurrent issues for the analysis of phytoplankton by flow cytometry. We examined the effects of addition of the surfactant Pluronic F68 to glutaraldehyde-fixed photosynthetic organisms in cultures and natural samples. In particular, we examined cell losses and modifications of side scatter (a proxy of cell size) and fluorescence of natural pigments. We found that different marine phytoplankton species react differently to the action of Pluronic F68. In particular, photosynthetic prokaryotes are less sensitive than eukaryotes. Observed cell losses may result from cell lysis or from cell adhesion to the walls of plastic tubes that are commonly used for flow cytometry analysis. The addition of the surfactant, Pluronic F68, has a positive effect on cells for long-term storage. We recommend to modify current protocols for preservation of natural marine planktonic samples, by fixing them with glutaraldehyde 0.25% (final concentration) and adding Pluronic F68 at a final concentration of 0.01% in the samples before preservation. Pluronic F68 also appears effective for preserving samples without fixation for subsequent sorting, e.g. for molecular biology analyses. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:25155102

  13. Flow cytometry and single nucleus sorting for Cre-based analysis of changes in transcriptional states.

    PubMed

    Samadder, Partha; Weng, Ning; Doetschman, Thomas; Heimark, Ronald L; Galbraith, David W

    2016-05-01

    The organs of eukaryotic organisms comprise complex interspersions of cell types, whose different molecular activities, and corresponding cellular states, cooperate during development to produce the final, functional organ. Dysfunction of organs in disease, particularly oncogenesis, initiates with changes of state of a minor subset of cells. It therefore is hard to detect early molecular indicators of disease within an overwhelming background of normal cells. Flow cytometry and sorting provides a convenient way to purify minority subpopulations, if a specific fluorophore can be unambiguously and exclusively associated with this subpopulation. We have generated a number of transgenic mouse lines expressing a nuclear-localized version of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), within which the production of a chimeric histone 2B-GFP protein occurs under the control of a constitutively-active, actin-derived promoter, separated by a Floxed-STOP sequence. In the presence of Cre recombinase, within F1 progeny of these mouse lines, excision of the STOP sequence activates transcription which results in the emergence of cells containing green fluorescent nuclei. We describe the characterization of these lines using a combination of microscopic imaging, flow cytometry and sorting, and Reverse-Transcription polymerase chain reaction of transcripts within single sorted nuclei isolated from tissue homogenates. These lines should be particularly useful for analysis of transcriptional changes in oncogenesis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27003621

  14. Barrett's esophagus. Correlation between mucin histochemistry, flow cytometry, and histologic diagnosis for predicting increased cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Haggitt, R. C.; Reid, B. J.; Rabinovitch, P. S.; Rubin, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    A predominance of sulfated mucin in the nongoblet columnar cells of Barrett's specialized metaplastic epithelium has been postulated to be a form of mild dysplasia and to indicate an increased risk of adenocarcinoma. Flow cytometry for the analysis of nuclear DNA content and cell cycle parameters has also been postulated to be an objective aid in the diagnosis of dysplasia and carcinoma in Barrett's esophagus. The authors investigated the relationship among sulfated mucin, flow cytometric data, and histologic diagnosis in each of 152 biopsies from 42 patients who had Barrett's specialized metaplastic epithelium. Sulfated mucin, as detected by the high iron diamine-Alcian blue stain, was present in biopsies from 8 of 11 (73%) patients with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia or carcinoma, in 7 of 9 (78%) patients whose biopsies were indefinite for dysplasia, and in 12 of 22 (55%) patients whose biopsies were negative for dysplasia (P = 0.37). Sulfated mucins predominated in 9%, 22%, and 9% of the patients, respectively (P = 0.56). Abnormal flow cytometry (aneuploidy or increased G2/tetraploid fraction) was found in all patients with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia or carcinoma, in 3 of 9 (33%) indefinite for dysplasia, and in 1 of 22 (5%) negative for dysplasia (P = less than 0.0001). Neither the presence nor the predominance of sulfated mucin in the specialized metaplastic epithelium of Barrett's esophagus has sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity for dysplasia or carcinoma to be of value in managing patients. Abnormal flow cytometry shows excellent correlation with the histologic diagnosis of dysplasia and carcinoma; it detects a subset of patients whose biopsies are histologically indefinite or negative for dysplasia, but who have flow cytometric abnormalities similar to those otherwise seen only in dysplasia and carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3354644

  15. Deformation of double emulsions under conditions of flow cytometry hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaohua; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-11-21

    Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) microfluidics double emulsions offer a new route to compartmentalise reagents into isolated aqueous microenvironments while maintaining an aqueous carrier fluid phase; this enables compatibility with commercial flow cytometry systems such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Double emulsion (inner core) deformation under hydrodynamic focusing conditions that mimic the environment double emulsions experience in flow cytometry applications is of particular importance for droplet stability and cell viability. This paper reports on an experimental study of the dynamic deformation of aqueous cores of w/o/w double emulsions under hydrodynamic focusing, with the sheath flow directed at 45° to the sample flow. A number of factors affecting the inner core deformation and recovery were examined. Deformation was found to depend significantly on the core or shell viscosity, the droplet-to-sheath flow velocity ratio, and core and shell sizes. Core deformation was found to depend more on the type of surfactant rather concentration with high molecular weight surfactant exhibiting a negligible effect on deformation whereas low molecular weight surfactant enhancing deformation at low concentrations due to their lateral mobility at the interface. PMID:26394745

  16. A high-throughput method for detection of DNA in chloroplasts using flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Beth A; Oldenburg, Delene J; Bendich, Arnold J

    2007-01-01

    Background The amount of DNA in the chloroplasts of some plant species has been shown recently to decline dramatically during leaf development. A high-throughput method of DNA detection in chloroplasts is now needed in order to facilitate the further investigation of this process using large numbers of tissue samples. Results The DNA-binding fluorophores 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), SYBR Green I (SG), SYTO 42, and SYTO 45 were assessed for their utility in flow cytometric analysis of DNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Fluorescence microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to validate flow cytometry data. We found neither DAPI nor SYTO 45 suitable for flow cytometric analysis of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) content, but did find changes in cpDNA content during development by flow cytometry using SG and SYTO 42. The latter dye provided more sensitive detection, and the results were similar to those from the fluorescence microscopic analysis. Differences in SYTO 42 fluorescence were found to correlate with differences in cpDNA content as determined by qPCR using three primer sets widely spaced across the chloroplast genome, suggesting that the whole genome undergoes copy number reduction during development, rather than selective reduction/degradation of subgenomic regions. Conclusion Flow cytometric analysis of chloroplasts stained with SYTO 42 is a high-throughput method suitable for determining changes in cpDNA content during development and for sorting chloroplasts on the basis of DNA content. PMID:17381841

  17. Detection of an Abnormal Myeloid Clone by Flow Cytometry in Familial Platelet Disorder With Propensity to Myeloid Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Chi Young; Leventaki, Vasiliki; Wang, Sa A.; Dinardo, Courtney; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Konoplev, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To report aberrant myeloblasts detected by flow cytometry immunophenotypic studies in an asymptomatic patient with familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy, a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by germline heterozygous mutations in Runt-related transcription factor 1. Methods Morphologic evaluation, flow cytometry immunophenotypic studies, nanofluidics-based qualitative multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Sanger sequencing, and next-generation sequencing-based mutational hotspot analysis of 53 genes were performed on bone marrow biopsy and aspirate samples. Results Flow cytometry immunophenotypic analysis showed 0.6% CD34+ blasts with an abnormal immunophenotype: CD13 increased, CD33+, CD38 decreased, CD117 increased, and CD123 increased. Conclusions The acquisition of new phenotypic aberrancies in myeloblasts as detected by flow cytometry immunophenotypic studies might be a harbinger of impending myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia in a patient with familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy. PMID:26800764

  18. Two New Nuclear Isolation Buffers for Plant DNA Flow Cytometry: A Test with 37 Species

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, João; Rodriguez, Eleazar; Doležel, Jaroslav; Santos, Conceição

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims After the initial boom in the application of flow cytometry in plant sciences in the late 1980s and early 1990s, which was accompanied by development of many nuclear isolation buffers, only a few efforts were made to develop new buffer formulas. In this work, recent data on the performance of nuclear isolation buffers are utilized in order to develop new buffers, general purpose buffer (GPB) and woody plant buffer (WPB), for plant DNA flow cytometry. Methods GPB and WPB were used to prepare samples for flow cytometric analysis of nuclear DNA content in a set of 37 plant species that included herbaceous and woody taxa with leaf tissues differing in structure and chemical composition. The following parameters of isolated nuclei were assessed: forward and side light scatter, propidium iodide fluorescence, coefficient of variation of DNA peaks, quantity of debris background, and the number of particles released from sample tissue. The nuclear genome size of 30 selected species was also estimated using the buffer that performed better for a given species. Key Results In unproblematic species, the use of both buffers resulted in high quality samples. The analysis of samples obtained with GPB usually resulted in histograms of DNA content with higher or similar resolution than those prepared with the WPB. In more recalcitrant tissues, such as those from woody plants, WPB performed better and GPB failed to provide acceptable results in some cases. Improved resolution of DNA content histograms in comparison with previously published buffers was achieved in most of the species analysed. Conclusions WPB is a reliable buffer which is also suitable for the analysis of problematic tissues/species. Although GPB failed with some plant species, it provided high-quality DNA histograms in species from which nuclear suspensions are easy to prepare. The results indicate that even with a broad range of species, either GPB or WPB is suitable for preparation of high

  19. Fluorogen Activating Proteins in Flow Cytometry for the Study of Surface Molecules and Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Fisher, Gregory W.; Jarvik, Jonathan W.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent proteins, particularly when genetically fused to proteins of biological interest, have greatly advanced many flow cytometry research applications. However, there remains a major limitation to this methodology in that only total cellular fluorescence is measured. Commonly used fluorescent proteins (e.g. EGFP and its variants) are fluorescent whether the fusion protein exists on the surface or in sub-cellular compartments. A flow cytometer cannot distinguish between these separate sources of fluorescence. This can be of great concern when using flow cytometry, plate readers or microscopy to quantify cell surface receptors or other surface proteins genetically fused to fluorescent proteins. Recently developed fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs) solve many of these issues by allowing the selective visualization of only those cell surface proteins that are exposed to the extra cellular milieu. FAPs are GFP-sized single chain antibodies that specifically bind to and generate fluorescence from otherwise non-fluorescent dyes (‘activate the fluorogen’). Like the fluorescent proteins, FAPs can be genetically fused to proteins of interest. When exogenously added fluorogens bind FAPs, fluorescence immediately increases by as much as 20,000 fold, rendering the FAP fusion proteins highly fluorescent. Moreover, since fluorogens can be made membrane impermeant, fluorescence can be limited to only those receptors expressed on the cell surface. Using cells expressing beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) fused at its N-terminus to a FAP, flow cytometry based receptor internalization assays have been developed and characterized. The fluorogen/FAP system is ideally suited to the study of cell surface proteins by fluorescence and avoids drawbacks of using receptor/fluorescent protein fusions, such as internal accumulation. We also briefly comment on extending FAP-based technologies to the study of events occurring inside of the cell as well. PMID:22366230

  20. Determination of cluster composition in heteroaggregation of binary particle systems by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rollié, Sascha; Sundmacher, Kai

    2008-12-01

    Cluster composition in aggregation processes of multiple particle species can be dynamically determined by flow cytometry if particle populations are fluorescently labeled. By flow cytometric single particle analysis, aggregates can be characterized according to the exact amount of constituent particles, allowing the detailed and separate quantification of homo- and heteroaggregation. This contribution demonstrates the application of flow cytometry for the experimental detection of heteroaggregation in a binary particle mixture of oppositely charged polystyrene (PS) particles and Rhodamine-B labeled melamine-formaldehyde (MF-RhB) particles. Experiments with different particle concentration, temperature, mixing mode, ionic strength and particle mixing ratio are presented. Aggregation kinetics are enhanced with increasing particle concentration and temperature as well as by increased shear of mixing. These results represent well-known behavior published in previous investigations and validate the performance of flow cytometry for probing heteroaggregation processes. Physical insight with a novel level of detail is gained by the quantification of de- and restabilization phenomena. At low ionic strength, "raspberry"-type aggregates with PS cores are formed by primary heteroaggregation. At moderate particle number ratios, these aggregates are electrostatically destabilized and form more complex aggregates in a secondary heteroaggregation process. At high particle number ratios (> or =50:1), the raspberry-type aggregates are electrostatically restabilized and secondary heteroaggregation is prevented. The dynamic change of aggregate charge was verified by zeta-potential measurements. The elevation of salt concentration over several orders of magnitude retards aggregation dynamics, since attractive interparticle forces are diminished by an electrostatic double layer. This indicates that heteroaggregation induced by attractive interparticle forces is faster than aggregation

  1. Flow cytometry for intracellular SPION quantification: specificity and sensitivity in comparison with spectroscopic methods

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Ralf P; Janko, Christina; Poettler, Marina; Tripal, Philipp; Zaloga, Jan; Cicha, Iwona; Dürr, Stephan; Nowak, Johannes; Odenbach, Stefan; Slabu, Ioana; Liebl, Maik; Trahms, Lutz; Stapf, Marcus; Hilger, Ingrid; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Due to their special physicochemical properties, iron nanoparticles offer new promising possibilities for biomedical applications. For bench to bedside translation of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), safety issues have to be comprehensively clarified. To understand concentration-dependent nanoparticle-mediated toxicity, the exact quantification of intracellular SPIONs by reliable methods is of great importance. In the present study, we compared three different SPION quantification methods (ultraviolet spectrophotometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, atomic adsorption spectroscopy) and discussed the shortcomings and advantages of each method. Moreover, we used those results to evaluate the possibility to use flow cytometric technique to determine the cellular SPION content. For this purpose, we correlated the side scatter data received from flow cytometry with the actual cellular SPION amount. We showed that flow cytometry provides a rapid and reliable method to assess the cellular SPION content. Our data also demonstrate that internalization of iron oxide nanoparticles in human umbilical vein endothelial cells is strongly dependent to the SPION type and results in a dose-dependent increase of toxicity. Thus, treatment with lauric acid-coated SPIONs (SEONLA) resulted in a significant increase in the intensity of side scatter and toxicity, whereas SEONLA with an additional protein corona formed by bovine serum albumin (SEONLA-BSA) and commercially available Rienso® particles showed only a minimal increase in both side scatter intensity and cellular toxicity. The increase in side scatter was in accordance with the measurements for SPION content by the atomic adsorption spectroscopy reference method. In summary, our data show that flow cytometry analysis can be used for estimation of uptake of SPIONs by mammalian cells and provides a fast tool for scientists to evaluate the safety of nanoparticle products. PMID:26170658

  2. Flow cytometry protocols for surface and intracellular antigen analyses of neural cell types.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Ghale, Arun R; Reinhard, Christina; Pruszak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been extensively used to define cell populations in immunology, hematology and oncology. Here, we provide a detailed description of protocols for flow cytometric analysis of the cluster of differentiation (CD) surface antigens and intracellular antigens in neural cell types. Our step-by-step description of the methodological procedures include: the harvesting of neural in vitro cultures, an optional carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeling step, followed by surface antigen staining with conjugated CD antibodies (e.g., CD24, CD54), and subsequent intracellar antigen detection via primary/secondary antibodies or fluorescently labeled Fab fragments (Zenon labeling). The video demonstrates the most critical steps. Moreover, principles of experimental planning, the inclusion of critical controls, and fundamentals of flow cytometric analysis (identification of target population and exclusion of debris; gating strategy; compensation for spectral overlap) are briefly explained in order to enable neurobiologists with limited prior knowledge or specific training in flow cytometry to assess its utility and to better exploit this powerful methodology. PMID:25549236

  3. Simultaneous evaluation of plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in bovine spermatozoa by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Chihiro; Kang, Sung-Sik; Kitade, Yasuyuki; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to develop an objective evaluation procedure to estimate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bull spermatozoa simultaneously by flow cytometry. Firstly, we used frozen-thawed semen mixed with 0, 25, 50, 75 or 100% dead spermatozoa. Semen was stained using three staining solutions: SYBR-14, propidium iodide (PI), and phycoerythrin-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PE-PNA), for the evaluation of plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity. Then, characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were compared. Characteristics of spermatozoa (viability and acrosomal integrity) evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were found to be similar. Secondly, we attempted to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and also mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa by flow cytometry using conventional staining with three dyes (SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA) combined with MitoTracker Deep Red (MTDR) staining (quadruple staining). The spermatozoon characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry using quadruple staining were then compared with those of staining using SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA and staining using SYBR-14 and MTDR. There were no significant differences in all characteristics (viability, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential) evaluated by quadruple staining and the other procedures. In conclusion, quadruple staining using SYBR-14, PI, PE-PNA, and MTDR for flow cytometry can be used to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bovine spermatozoa simultaneously. PMID:26369275

  4. A Flow Cytometry Method for Rapidly Assessing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Responses to Antibiotics with Different Modes of Action

    PubMed Central

    Hendon-Dunn, Charlotte Louise; Doris, Kathryn Sarah; Thomas, Stephen Richard; Allnutt, Jonathan Charles; Marriott, Alice Ann Neville; Hatch, Kim Alexandra; Watson, Robert James; Bottley, Graham; Marsh, Philip David; Taylor, Stephen Charles

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for assessing the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are lengthy and do not capture information about viable organisms that are not immediately culturable under standard laboratory conditions as a result of antibiotic exposure. We have developed a rapid dual-fluorescence flow cytometry method using markers for cell viability and death. We show that the fluorescent marker calcein violet with an acetoxy-methyl ester group (CV-AM) can differentiate between populations of M. tuberculosis growing at different rates, while Sytox green (SG) can differentiate between live and dead mycobacteria. M. tuberculosis was exposed to isoniazid or rifampin at different concentrations over time and either dual stained with CV-AM and SG and analyzed by flow cytometry or plated to determine the viability of the cells. Although similar trends in the loss of viability were observed when the results of flow cytometry and the plate counting methods were compared, there was a lack of correlation between these two approaches, as the flow cytometry analysis potentially captured information about cell populations that were unable to grow under standard conditions. The flow cytometry approach had an additional advantage in that it could provide insights into the mode of action of the drug: antibiotics targeting the cell wall gave a flow cytometry profile distinct from those inhibiting intracellular processes. This rapid drug susceptibility testing method could identify more effective antimycobacterials, provide information about their potential mode of action, and accelerate their progress to the clinic. PMID:26902767

  5. A cytometry microparticle platform approach for screening tobacco microRNA changes after agrobacterium delivery.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua D; Chen, Qiang; Mason, Hugh S

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs that can modulate development as well as alter innate antiviral defenses in plants. In this study we explored changes in Nicotiana benthamiana tobacco microRNA expression as it relates to expression of a recombinant anti-Ebola GP1 antibody. The antibody was delivered to tobacco leaves through a bacterial Agrobacterium tumefaciens "agroinfiltration" expression strategy. A multiplex microparticle-based cytometry assay tracked the expression changes of 53 host tobacco microRNAs. Our results revealed that the most abundant microRNAs in actively growing leaves corresponded to nanoparticle probes specific to nta-mir-6149 and nta-miR-168b. After agroinfiltration, probes specific for nta-mir-398, and nta-mir-482d were significantly altered in their respective expression levels, however changes were partially attributed to the infiltration broth medium used in the antibody delivery process. Confirmation of nta-mir-398 and nta-mir-482d expression changes was also verified through RT-qPCR. To our knowledge this study is the first to profile medium and Agrobacterium injection at the microRNA level through a multiplex microparticle approach. PMID:27343681

  6. Expanding the potential of standard flow cytometry by extracting fluorescence lifetimes from cytometric pulse shifts

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruofan; Naivar, Mark A; Wilder, Mark; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide information about the fluorescence relaxation, or intensity decay, of organic fluorophores, fluorescent proteins, and other inorganic molecules that fluoresce. The fluorescence lifetime is emerging in flow cytometry and is helpful in a variety of multiparametric, single cell measurements because it is not impacted by nonlinearity that can occur with fluorescence intensity measurements. Yet time-resolved cytometry systems rely on major hardware modifications making the methodology difficult to reproduce. The motivation of this work is, by taking advantage of the dynamic nature of flow cytometry sample detection and applying digital signal processing methods, to measure fluorescence lifetimes using an unmodified flow cytometer. We collect a new lifetime-dependent parameter, referred to herein as the fluorescence-pulse-delay (FPD), and prove it is a valid representation of the average fluorescence lifetime. To verify we generated cytometric pulses in simulation, with light emitting diode (LED) pulsation, and with true fluorescence measurements of cells and microspheres. Each pulse is digitized and used in algorithms to extract an average fluorescence lifetime inherent in the signal. A range of fluorescence lifetimes is measurable with this approach including standard organic fluorophore lifetimes (∼1 to 22 ns) as well as small, simulated shifts (0.1 ns) under standard conditions (reported herein). This contribution demonstrates how digital data acquisition and signal processing can reveal time-dependent information foreshadowing the exploitation of full waveform analysis for quantification of similar photo-physical events within single cells. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25274073

  7. Leukocyte Populations in Human Preterm and Term Breast Milk Identified by Multicolour Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Trend, Stephanie; de Jong, Emma; Lloyd, Megan L.; Kok, Chooi Heen; Richmond, Peter; Doherty, Dorota A.; Simmer, Karen; Kakulas, Foteini; Strunk, Tobias; Currie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Extremely preterm infants are highly susceptible to bacterial infections but breast milk provides some protection. It is unknown if leukocyte numbers and subsets in milk differ between term and preterm breast milk. This study serially characterised leukocyte populations in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants using multicolour flow cytometry methods for extended differential leukocyte counts in blood. Methods Sixty mothers of extremely preterm (<28 weeks gestational age), very preterm (28–31 wk), and moderately preterm (32–36 wk), as well as term (37–41 wk) infants were recruited. Colostrum (d2–5), transitional (d8–12) and mature milk (d26–30) samples were collected, cells isolated, and leukocyte subsets analysed using flow cytometry. Results The major CD45+ leukocyte populations circulating in blood were also detectable in breast milk but at different frequencies. Progression of lactation was associated with decreasing CD45+ leukocyte concentration, as well as increases in the relative frequencies of neutrophils and immature granulocytes, and decreases in the relative frequencies of eosinophils, myeloid and B cell precursors, and CD16- monocytes. No differences were observed between preterm and term breast milk in leukocyte concentration, though minor differences between preterm groups in some leukocyte frequencies were observed. Conclusions Flow cytometry is a useful tool to identify and quantify leukocyte subsets in breast milk. The stage of lactation is associated with major changes in milk leukocyte composition in this population. Fresh preterm breast milk is not deficient in leukocytes, but shorter gestation may be associated with minor differences in leukocyte subset frequencies in preterm compared to term breast milk. PMID:26288195

  8. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium in dairy products with flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R G; Pinder, A C

    1994-01-01

    Flow cytometry, combined with fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies, offers advantages of speed and sensitivity for the detection of specific pathogenic bacteria in foods. We investigated the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in eggs and milk. Using a sample clearing procedure, we determined that the detection limit was on the order of 10(3) cells per ml after a total analysis time of 40 min. After 6 h of nonselective enrichment, the detection limits were 10 cells per ml for milk and 1 cell per ml for eggs, even in the presence of a 10,000-fold excess of Escherichia coli cells. Images PMID:7811064

  9. Protocol for Apoptosis Assay by Flow Cytometry Using Annexin V Staining Method

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Batra, Surinder K

    2016-01-01

    This assay is used to count the number of cells that have undergone apoptosis. Apoptosis will be detected by initially staining the cells with Annexin V and propidium Iodide solution followed by flow cytometry analysis. It is based on the principle that normal cells are hydrophobic in nature as they express phosphatidyl serine in the inner membrane (side facing the cytoplasm) and when the cells undergo apoptosis, the inner membrane flips to become the outer membrane, thus exposing phosphatidyl serine. The exposed phosphatidyl serine is detected by Annexin V, and propidium iodide stains the necrotic cells, which have leaky DNA content that help to differentiate the apoptotic and necrotic cells.

  10. A comparison of avalanche photodiode and photomultiplier tube detectors for flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, William G.; Varadi, Gyula; Entine, Gerald; Podniesinski, Edward; Wallace, Paul K.

    2008-02-01

    Commercial flow cytometers use photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for fluorescence detection. These detectors have high linear gain and broad dynamic range, but have limited sensitivity in the red and near infrared spectral regions. We present a comparison of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and PMTs as detectors in flow cytometry instruments, and demonstrate improved sensitivity and resolution in the red and near infrared spectral regions using the APD. The relative performance of the PMT and APD were evaluated by simultaneously measuring the mean fluorescence intensity and coefficient of variation for emission from light emitting diode pulses, flow cytometry test beads, and fluorescently labeled cells. The relative signal to noise performance of the APD and PMT was evaluated over the 500 nm to 1050 nm wavelength range using pulsed light emitting diode light sources. While APDs have higher quantum efficiency but lower internal gain than PMTs, with appropriate external amplification the APD has signal to noise response that is comparable to PMTs in the 500 nm to 650 nm range and improved response in the 650 nm to 850 nm range The data demonstrates that the APD had performance comparable to the PMT in the spectral region between 500 to 650 nm and improved performance in the range of 650 to 1000 nm, where the PMT performance is quite poor. CD4 positive lymphocyte populations were easily identified in normal human blood both by APD and PMT using phycoerythrin labeled antibodies. In contrast, only the APD detector could resolve CD4 positive populations using 800 nm Quantum dot labeled antibodies.