Science.gov

Sample records for flow distribution test

  1. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  2. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  3. Interpreting Variations in Groundwater Flows from Repeated Distributed Thermal Perturbation Tests.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Mark B; Kryder, Levi; Klenke, John; Reinke, Richard; Tyler, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    To better understand the groundwater resources of southern Nye County, Nevada, a multipart distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) test was performed on a complex of three wells. These wells penetrate an alluvial aquifer that drains the Nevada National Security Site, and characterizing the hydraulic properties and flow paths of the regional groundwater flow system has proven very difficult. The well complex comprised one pumping well and two observation wells, both located 18 m from the pumping well. Using fiber-optic cables and line heaters, DTPS tests were performed under both stressed and unstressed conditions. Each test injects heat into the water column over a period of one to two days, and observes the rising temperature during heat injection and falling temperatures after heating ceases. Aquifer thermal properties are inferred from temperature patterns in the cased section of the wells, and fluxes through the 30-m screened section are estimated based on a model that incorporates conductive and advective heat fluxes. Vertical variations in flux are examined on a scale of tens of cm. The actively flowing zones of the aquifer change between the stressed and unstressed test, and anisotropy in the aquifer permeability is apparent from the changing fluxes between tests. The fluxes inferred from the DTPS tests are compared to solute tracer tests previously performed on the same site. The DTPS-based fluxes are consistent with the fastest solute transport observed in the tracer test, but appear to overestimate the mean flux through the system. PMID:26714003

  4. Development, testing and application of DrainFlow: A fully distributed integrated surface-subsurface flow model for drainage study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2016-06-01

    Hydrological and hydrogeological investigation of drained land is a complex and integrated procedure. The scale of drainage studies may vary from a high-resolution small scale project through to comprehensive catchment or regional scale investigations. This wide range of scales and integrated system behaviour poses a significant challenge for the development of suitable drainage models. Toward meeting these requirements, a fully distributed coupled surface-subsurface flow model titled DrainFlow has been developed and is described. DrainFlow includes both the diffusive wave equation for surface flow components (overland flow, open drain, tile drain) and Richard's equation for saturated/unsaturated zones. To overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between wet and dry boundaries, a smooth transitioning technique is introduced to buffer the model at tile drains and at interfaces between surface and subsurface flow boundaries. This gives a continuous transition between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. DrainFlow is tested against five well-known integrated surface-subsurface flow benchmarks. DrainFlow as applied to some synthetic drainage study examples is quite flexible for changing all or part of the model dimensions as required by problem complexity, problem scale, and data availability. This flexibility enables DrainFlow to be modified to allow for changes in both scale and boundary conditions, as often encountered in real-world drainage studies. Compared to existing drainage models, DrainFlow has the advantage of estimating actual infiltration directly from the partial differential form of Richard's equation rather than through analytical or empirical infiltration approaches like the Green and Ampt equation.

  5. The distributed-order fractional diffusion-wave equation of groundwater flow: Theory and application to pumping and slug tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ninghu; Nelson, Paul N.; Connor, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    We present a distributed-order fractional diffusion-wave equation (dofDWE) to describe radial groundwater flow to or from a well, and three sets of solutions of the dofDWE for flow from a well for aquifer tests: one for pumping tests, and two for slug tests. The dofDWE is featured by two temporal orders of fractional derivatives, β1 and β2, which characterise small and large pores, respectively. By fitting the approximate solutions of the dofDWE to data from slug tests in the field, we determined the effective saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ke, transmissivity, Tf, and the order of fractional derivatives, β2 in one test and β2 and β1 in the second test. We found that the patterns of groundwater flow from a well during the slug tests at this site belong to the class of sub-diffusion with β2 < 1 and β1 < 1 using both the short-time and large-time solutions. We introduce the concept of the critical time to link Ke as a function of β2 and β1. The importance of the orders of fractional derivatives is obvious in the approximate solutions: for short time slug tests only the parameter β2 for flow in large pores is present while for long time slug tests the parameters β2 and β1 are present indicating both large and small pores are functioning.

  6. Nonuniform steam generator U-tube flow distribution during natural circulation tests in ROSA-IV large scale test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kukita, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Tasaka, K. ); Chauliac, C. )

    1988-08-01

    Natural circulation experiments were conducted in a large-scale (1/48 scale in volume) full-height simulator of a Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor. This facility has two steam generators each containing 141 full-size U-tubes of 9 different heights. Transition of the natural circulation mode was observed in the experiments as the primary of side mass inventory was decreased. Three major circulation modes were observed: single-phase liquid natural circulation, two-phase natural circulation, and reflux condensation. For all these circulation modes, and during the transitions between the modes, the mass flow distribution among the steam generator U-tubes was significantly nonuniform. The longer U-tubes indicated reversed flow at higher primary side mass inventories and also tended to empty earlier than the shorter U-tubes when the primary side mass inventory was decreased.

  7. Pressure distributions from subsonic tests of an advanced laminar-flow-control wing with leading- and trailing-edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An unswept, semispan wing model equipped with full-span leading- and trailing-edge flaps was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of high-lift components on the aerodynamics of an advanced laminar-flow-control (LFC) airfoil section. Chordwise pressure distributions near the midsemispan were measured for four configurations: cruise, trailing-edge flap only, and trailing-edge flap with a leading-edge Krueger flap of either 0.10 or 0.12 chord. Part 1 of this report (under separate cover) presents a representative sample of the plotted pressure distribution data for each configuration tested. Part 2 presents the entire set of plotted and tabulated pressure distribution data. The data are presented without analysis.

  8. Standardized performance tests of collectors of solar thermal energy: An evacuated flatplate copper collector with a serpentine flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Basic test results are given for a flat plate solar collector whose performance was determined in the NASA-Lewis solar simulator. The collector was tested over ranges of inlet temperatures, fluxes and one coolant flow rate. Collector efficiency is correlated in terms of inlet temperature and flux level.

  9. Airflow Model Testing to Determine the Distribution of Hot Gas Flow and O/F Ratio Across the Space Shuttle Main Engine Main Injector Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahorter, L.; Chik, J.; McDaniels, D.; Dill, C.

    1990-01-01

    Engine 0209, the certification engine for the new Phase 2+ Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), showed severe deterioration of the Main Combustion Chamber (MCC) liner during hot fire tests. One theory on the cause of the damage held that uneven local distribution of the fuel rich hot gas flow through the main injector assembly was producing regions of high oxidizer/fuel (O/F) ratio near the wall of the MCC liner. Airflow testing was proposed to measure the local hot gas flow rates through individual injector elements. The airflow tests were conducted using full scale, geometrically correct models of both the current Phase 2 and the new Phase 2+ HGMs. Different main injector flow shield configurations were tested for each HGM to ascertain their effect on the pressure levels and distribution of hot gas flow. Instrumentation located on the primary faceplate of the main injector measured hot gas flow through selected injector elements. These data were combined with information from the current space shuttle main engine (SSME) power balances to produce maps of pressure, hot gas flow rate, and O/F ratio near the main injector primary plate. The O/F distributions were compared for the different injector and HGM configurations.

  10. Flow-Meter and Passive Diffusion Bag Tests and Potential Influences on the Vertical Distribution of Contaminants in Wells at Galena Airport, Galena, Alaska, August to October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peterson, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Past activities at Galena Airport, a U.S. Air Force Base in Galena, Alaska, have resulted in ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds. The primary contaminants are petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The U.S. Geological Survey and Earth Tech, in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, conducted investigations at Galena Airport from August to October 2002 using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers and borehole flow-meter testing to examine the vertical distribution of ground-water contamination in selected wells. This investigation was limited to the vicinity of building 1845 and to the area between building 1845 and the Yukon River. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey was asked to determine whether additional wells are needed to more clearly define the nature and extent of the ground-water contamination at the Air Force Base. Little or no vertical water movement occurred under ambient conditions in the wells tested at Galena Airport, Alaska, in August 2002. All of the ambient vertical flows detected in wells were at rates less than the quantitative limit of the borehole flow meter (0.03 gallons per minute). In wells 06-MW-07 and 10-MW-01, no vertical flow was detected. In wells where ambient flow was detected, the direction of flow was downward. In general, concentrations of volatile organic compounds detected in the low-flow samples from wells at Galena Airport were approximately the same concentrations detected in the closest polyethylene diffusion bag sample for a wide variety of volatile organic compounds. The data indicate that the polyethylene diffusion bag sample results are consistent with the low-flow sample results. Vertical profiling of selected wells using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers at Galena Airport showed that from September 30 to October 1, 2002, little vertical change occurred in volatile organic compound concentrations along the screen length despite the fact that

  11. Fluorescent Particles For Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, Jeremy L.; Stern, Susan M.; Torkelson, Jan R.

    1995-01-01

    Small alumina spheres coated with fluorescent dye used in flow testing of transparent plastic model of check valve. Entrained fluroescent particles make flows visible. After completion of flow test, particles remaining in valve easily detectable and removed for measurement of their sizes.

  12. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  13. Standardized performance tests of collectors of solar thermal energy-a flat-plate collector with a single-tube serpentine flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S.

    1976-01-01

    This preliminary data report gives basic test results of a flat-plate solar collector whose performance was determined in the NASA-Lewis solar simulator. The collector was tested over ranges of inlet temperatures, fluxes and coolant flow rates. Collector efficienty is correlated in terms of inlet temperature and flux level.

  14. Infiltration Flow Path Distributions in Unsaturated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T. K.; Olson, K. R.; Wan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial distributions of infiltration flow paths through rock formations are complex networks that determine flow velocities, control rates of natural geochemical reactions in the subsurface, as well as rates of contaminant transport to underlying groundwater. Despite these important consequences, distributions of infiltration paths and locally fast seepage rates through rocks are not well understood. Laboratory-based studies on fractured rocks cannot easily be conducted on systems large enough to include sufficient fracture network complexity, so that inferences of field-scale flux distributions cannot be reliably made. Field-based studies to date have permitted quantification of only a small fraction of the flow distribution, typically while imposing extremely high fluxes, and therefore have not allowed comprehensive delineation of flow distributions expected under natural recharge. Based on hydraulic scaling considerations, we hypothesize that unsaturated flow path distributions in rock deposits will be similar to those occurring in fractured rock formations under low overall infiltration rates. Talus rock deposits and mine waste rock piles control flow and transport into their respective underlying groundwaters. All of these reasons motivated infiltration experiments in rock packs. Experiments have been conducted on 4 different rock types and system scales ranging from 1 to 46 rock layers. Our experiments showed that infiltration through rocks conforms to no previously reported behavior in soils, and that flow paths do not progressively converge into fewer and fewer flow paths. Instead, a fundamentally different hydraulic structure develops, having an exponential (geometric) flux distribution, with the characteristic scale determined by the characteristic rock size. Although the phenomena are very different, the evolution of flow path distributions and local seepage rate distributions is predictable based on a statistical mechanical model for energy

  15. Effects of flow separation and cove leakage on pressure and heat-transfer distributions along a wing-cove-elevon configuration at Mach 6.9. [Langley 8-ft high temperature tunnel test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveikis, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    External and internal pressure and cold-wall heating-rate distributions were obtained in hypersonic flow on a full-scale heat-sink representation of the space shuttle orbiter wing-elevon-cove configuration in an effort to define effects of flow separation on cove aerothermal environment as a function of cove seal leak area, ramp angle, and free-stream unit Reynolds number. Average free-stream Mach number from all tests was 6.9; average total temperature from all tests was 3360 R; free-stream dynamic pressure ranged from about 2 to 9 psi; and wing angle of attack was 5 deg (flow compression). For transitional and turbulent flow separation, increasing cove leakage progressively increased heating rates in the cove. When ingested mass flow was sufficient to force large reductions in extent of separation, increasing cove leakage reduced heating rates in the cove to those for laminar attached flow. Cove heating-rate distributions calculated with a method that assumed laminar developing channel flow agreed with experimentally obtained distributions within root-mean-square differences that varied between 11 and 36 percent where cove walls were parallel for leak areas of 50 and 100 percent.

  16. Cold Flow Verification Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsi, A.; Shadle, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    The cold flow verification test facility consists of a 15-foot high, 3-foot diameter, domed vessel made of clear acrylic in two flanged sections. The unit can operate up to pressures of 14 psig. The internals include a 10-foot high jetting fluidized bed, a cylindrical baffle that hangs from the dome, and a rotating grate for control of continuous solids removal. The fluid bed is continuously fed solids (20 to 150 lb/hr) through a central nozzle made up of concentric pipes. It can either be configured as a half or full cylinder of various dimensions. The fluid bed has flow loops for separate air flow control for conveying solids (inner jet, 500 to 100000 scfh) , make-up into the jet (outer jet, 500 to 8000 scfh), spargers in the solids removal annulus (100 to 2000 scfh), and 6 air jets (20 to 200 scfh) on the sloping conical grid. Additional air (500 to 10000 scfh) can be added to the top of the dome and under the rotating grate. The outer vessel, the hanging cylindrical baffles or skirt, and the rotating grate can be used to study issues concerning moving bed reactors. There is ample allowance for access and instrumentation in the outer shell. Furthermore, this facility is available for future Cooperative Research and Development Program Manager Agreements (CRADA) to study issues and problems associated with fluid- and fixed-bed reactors. The design allows testing of different dimensions and geometries.

  17. Modeling depth distributions of overland flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark W.; Cox, Nicholas J.; Bracken, Louise J.

    2011-02-01

    Hydrological and erosion models use water depth to estimate routing velocity and resultant erosion at each spatial element. Yet the shear stress distribution imposed on the soil surface and any resulting flow detachment and rill incision is controlled by the full probability distribution of depths of overland flow. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is used in conjunction with simple field-flume experiments to provide high-resolution measures of overland flow depth-distributions for three semi-arid hillslope transects with differing soil properties. A two-parameter gamma distribution is proposed as the optimum model for depths of both interrill and rill flows. The shape and scale parameters are shown to vary consistently with distance downslope reflecting the morphological signature of runoff processes. The scale parameter is related to the general increase of depths with discharge ( P < 0.0001) as flows gradually concentrate; the shape parameter is more related to the soil surface roughness and potentially provides a control on the rate of depth, but also velocity increase with discharge. Such interactions between surface roughness and overland flows are of crucial importance for flow hydraulics and modeling sediment transport.

  18. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  19. Probability Distribution for Flowing Interval Spacing

    SciTech Connect

    S. Kuzio

    2004-09-22

    Fracture spacing is a key hydrologic parameter in analyses of matrix diffusion. Although the individual fractures that transmit flow in the saturated zone (SZ) cannot be identified directly, it is possible to determine the fractured zones that transmit flow from flow meter survey observations. The fractured zones that transmit flow as identified through borehole flow meter surveys have been defined in this report as flowing intervals. The flowing interval spacing is measured between the midpoints of each flowing interval. The determination of flowing interval spacing is important because the flowing interval spacing parameter is a key hydrologic parameter in SZ transport modeling, which impacts the extent of matrix diffusion in the SZ volcanic matrix. The output of this report is input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, the analysis of data and development of a data distribution reported herein is used to develop the uncertainty distribution for the flowing interval spacing parameter for the SZ transport abstraction model. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this report to other model reports that also pertain to flow and transport in the SZ. Figure 1-1 also shows the flow of key information among the SZ reports. It should be noted that Figure 1-1 does not contain a complete representation of the data and parameter inputs and outputs of all SZ reports, nor does it show inputs external to this suite of SZ reports. Use of the developed flowing interval spacing probability distribution is subject to the limitations of the assumptions discussed in Sections 5 and 6 of this analysis report. The number of fractures in a flowing interval is not known. Therefore, the flowing intervals are assumed to be composed of one flowing zone in the transport simulations. This analysis may overestimate the flowing interval spacing because the number of fractures that contribute to a flowing interval cannot be

  20. Blood flow distribution in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinkoob, Laleh; Ambarki, Khalid; Wåhlin, Anders; Birgander, Richard; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution phase–contrast magnetic resonance imaging can now assess flow in proximal and distal cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to describe how total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) is distributed into the vascular tree with regard to age, sex and anatomic variations. Forty-nine healthy young (mean 25 years) and 45 elderly (mean 71 years) individuals were included. Blood flow rate (BFR) in 21 intra- and extracerebral arteries was measured. Total cerebral blood flow was defined as BFR in the internal carotid plus vertebral arteries and mean cerebral perfusion as tCBF/brain volume. Carotid/vertebral distribution was 72%/28% and was not related to age, sex, or brain volume. Total cerebral blood flow (717±123 mL/min) was distributed to each side as follows: middle cerebral artery (MCA), 21% distal MCA, 6% anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 12%, distal ACA, 4% ophthalmic artery, 2% posterior cerebral artery (PCA), 8% and 20% to basilar artery. Deviating distributions were observed in subjects with ‘fetal' PCA. Blood flow rate in cerebral arteries decreased with increasing age (P<0.05) but not in extracerebral arteries. Mean cerebral perfusion was higher in women (women: 61±8; men: 55±6 mL/min/100 mL, P<0.001). The study describes a new method to outline the flow profile of the cerebral vascular tree, including reference values, and should be used for grading the collateral flow system. PMID:25564234

  1. Statistical Distribution of Inflation on Lava Flows: Analysis of Flow Surfaces on Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazel, L. S.; Anderson, S. W.; Stofan, E. R.; Baloga, S.

    2003-01-01

    -dominated terrestrial flows can be identified. Since tumuli form by the injection of lava beneath a crust, the distribution of tumuli on a flow should represent the distribution of thermally preferred pathways beneath the surface of the crust. That distribution of thermally preferred pathways may be a function of the evolution of a basaltic lava flow. As a longer-lived flow evolves, initially broad thermally preferred pathways would evolve to narrower, more well-defined tube-like pathways. The final flow morphology clearly preserves the growth of the flow over time, with inflation features indicating pathways that were not necessarily contemporaneously active. Here, we test using statistical analysis whether this final flow morphology produces distinct distributions that can be used to readily determine the distribution of thermally preferred pathways beneath the surface of the crust.

  2. Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C. P.

    2011-05-23

    To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

  3. Resource Prospector Propulsion Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Pederson, Kevin; Dervan, Melanie; Holt, Kimberly; Jernigan, Frankie; Trinh, Huu; Flores, Sam

    2014-01-01

    For the past year, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center have been working on a government version of a lunar lander design for the Resource Prospector Mission. A propulsion cold flow test system, representing an early flight design of the propulsion system, has been fabricated. The primary objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the Resource Prospector propulsion system operation through water flow testing and obtain data for anchoring analytical models. This effort will also provide an opportunity to develop a propulsion system mockup to examine hardware integration to a flight structure. This paper will report the work progress of the propulsion cold flow test system development and test preparation. At the time this paper is written, the initial waterhammer testing is underway. The initial assessment of the test data suggests that the results are as expected and have a similar trend with the pretest prediction. The test results will be reported in a future conference.

  4. Calculation of flow distribution in large radius ratio stages of axial flow turbines and comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, J.

    1974-01-01

    A method of calculating stage parameters and flow distribution of axial turbines is described. The governing equations apply to space between the blade rows and are based on the assumption of rotationally symmetrical, compressible, adiabatic flow conditions. Results are presented for stage design and flow analysis calculations. Theoretical results from the calculation system are compared with experimental data from low pressure steam turbine tests.

  5. Inspiratory flow and intrapulmonary gas distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rehder, K.; Knopp, T.J.; Brusasco, V.; Didier, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of flow of inspired gas on intrapulmonary gas distribution was examined by analysis of regional pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearances and of total pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearance measured at the mouth after equilibration of the lungs with /sup 133/Xe. Five awake healthy volunteers (24 to 40 yr of age) and another 5 healthy, anesthetized-paralyzed volunteers (26 to 28 yr of age) were studied while they were in the right lateral decubitus position. The awake subjects were studied at 3 inspiratory flows (0.4, 0.7, and 1.0 L/s) and the anesthetized-paralyzed subjects at 4 inspiratory flows (0.2, 0.5, 1.1, and 1.6 L/s). Interregional differences in /sup 133/Xe clearances along the vertical axis were significantly less during anesthesia-paralysis and mechanical ventilation than during spontaneous breathing in the awake state. No differences in the regional or total pulmonary /sup 133/Xe clearances were detected at these different flows in either of the two states, i.e., the difference between the awake and anesthetized-paralyzed states persisted.

  6. A void distribution model-flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new model for flashing flow based on wall nucleations is proposed here and the model predictions are compared with some experimental data. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites was used. Thus it was possible to avoid the usual assumption of a constant bubble number density. Comparisons of the model with the data shows that the model based on the nucleation site density correlation appears to be acceptable to describe the vapor generation in the flashing flow. For the limited data examined, the comparisons show rather satisfactory agreement without using a floating parameter to adjust the model. This result indicated that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic predictions of the flashing phenomenon is possible on the present wall nucleation based model.

  7. THE DENSITY DISTRIBUTION IN TURBULENT BISTABLE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Gazol, Adriana; Kim, Jongsoo E-mail: jskim@kasi.re.kr

    2013-03-01

    We numerically study the volume density probability distribution function (n-PDF) and the column density probability distribution function ({Sigma}-PDF) resulting from thermally bistable turbulent flows. We analyze three-dimensional hydrodynamic models in periodic boxes of 100 pc by side, where turbulence is driven in the Fourier space at a wavenumber corresponding to 50 pc. At low densities (n {approx}< 0.6 cm{sup -3}), the n-PDF is well described by a lognormal distribution for an average local Mach number ranging from {approx}0.2 to {approx}5.5. As a consequence of the nonlinear development of thermal instability (TI), the logarithmic variance of the distribution of the diffuse gas increases with M faster than in the well-known isothermal case. The average local Mach number for the dense gas (n {approx}> 7.1 cm{sup -3}) goes from {approx}1.1 to {approx}16.9 and the shape of the high-density zone of the n-PDF changes from a power law at low Mach numbers to a lognormal at high M values. In the latter case, the width of the distribution is smaller than in the isothermal case and grows slower with M. At high column densities, the {Sigma}-PDF is well described by a lognormal for all of the Mach numbers we consider and, due to the presence of TI, the width of the distribution is systematically larger than in the isothermal case but follows a qualitatively similar behavior as M increases. Although a relationship between the width of the distribution and M can be found for each one of the cases mentioned above, these relations are different from those of the isothermal case.

  8. Performance testing of the Silo Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, S.P.; O`Connor, D.; Gould, A.F.

    1994-12-31

    Several instruments are commercially available for on-line analysis of coal properties such as total moisture, ash, sulfur, and mineral matter content. These instruments have found use in coal cleaning and coal-fired utility applications. However, in many instances, the coal is stored in large bunkers or silos after on-line analysis, making the data gathered from on-line analysis a poor predictor of short-term coal quality due to the flow pattern and mixing within the silo. A computerized model, the Silo Flow Model, has been developed to model the flow of coal through a silo or bunker thus providing a prediction of the output coal quality based on on-line measurements of the quality of coal entering the silo. A test procedure was developed and demonstrated to test the performance of the Silo Flow Model. The testing was performed using controlled addition of silver nitrate to the coal, in conjunction with surface profile measurements using an array of ultrasonic gauges and data acquired from plant instrumentation. Results obtained from initial testing provided estimates of flow-related parameters used in the Silo flow Model. Similar test techniques are also used to compare predicted and actual silver content at the silo outlet as a measure of model performance. This paper describes test procedures used to validate the Silo Flow Model, the testing program, and the results obtained to data. The Silo Flow Model performance is discussed and compared against other modeling approaches.

  9. Stationary velocity distributions in traffic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies,; Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics,

    1997-12-01

    We introduce a traffic flow model that incorporates clustering and passing. We obtain analytically the steady state characteristics of the flow from a Boltzmann-like equation. A single dimensionless parameter, R=c{sub 0}v{sub 0}t{sub 0} with c{sub 0} the concentration, v{sub 0} the velocity range, and t{sub 0}{sup {minus}1} the passing rate, determines the nature of the steady state. When R{lt}1, uninterrupted flow with single cars occurs. When R{gt}1, large clusters with average mass {l_angle}m{r_angle}{approximately}R{sup {alpha}} form, and the flux is J{approximately}R{sup {minus}{gamma}}. The initial distribution of slow cars governs the statistics. When P{sub 0}(v){approximately}v{sup {mu}} as v{r_arrow}0, the scaling exponents are {gamma}=1/({mu}+2), {alpha}=1/2 when {mu}{gt}0, and {alpha}=({mu}+1)/({mu}+2) when {mu}{lt}0. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. LADEE Propulsion System Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter; Chapman, Jack M.; Trinh, Hau, P.; Bell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a NASA mission that will orbit the Moon. Its main objective is to characterize the atmosphere and lunar dust environment. The spacecraft development is being led by NASA Ames Research Center and scheduled for launch in 2013. The LADEE spacecraft will be operated with a bi-propellant hypergolic propulsion system using MMH and NTO as the fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propulsion system utilizes flight-proven hardware on major components. The propulsion layout is composed of one 100-lbf main thruster and four 5-lbf RCS thrusters. The propellants are stored in four tanks (two parallel-connected tanks per propellant component). The propellants will be pressurized by regulated helium. A simulated propulsion system has been built for conducting cold flow test series to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes, such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. Propellant drainage differential between propellant tanks will also be assessed. Since the oxidizer feed line system has a higher flow demand than the fuel system does, the cold flow test focuses on the oxidizer system. The objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the LADEE propulsion fluid flow operation through water cold flow test and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. The test activities, including the simulated propulsion test article, cold flow test, and analytical modeling, are being performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At the time of the abstract submission, the test article checkout is being performed. The test series will be completed by November, 2012

  11. Flowing electrolyte battery testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.; Miller, D.; Verardo, A.

    1982-08-01

    A laboratory to evaluate the performance and cycle life of flowing electrolyte battery systems has been established at Sandia National Laboratories. Four unique flow batteries are being tested in the laboratory using a four-variable two-level factorial experimental plan. Two Exxon zinc bromine batteries and one Gould zinc bromine battery are under test. One NASA Redox battery is on test. This paper describes results obtained to date from the test program. Cycle history, efficiency values, and general performance observations for these batteries are reported. The factorial test program and available statistical results are also discussed.

  12. Flowing-electrolyte-battery testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.C.; Miller, D.W.; Verardo, A.E.

    1982-01-01

    A laboratory to evaluate the performance and cycle life of flowing electrolyte battery systems has been established at Sandia National Laboratories. Four unique flow batteries are being tested in the laboratory using a four-variable two-level factorial experimental plan. Two Exxon zinc bromine batteries and one Gould zinc bromine battery are under test. One NASA Redox battery is on test. This paper describes results obtained to date from the test program. Cycle history, efficiency values, and general performance observations for these batteries are reported. The factorial test program and available statistical results are also discussed.

  13. Flowing electrolyte battery testing and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. C.; Miller, D. W.; Verardo, A. E.

    A laboratory to evaluate the performance and cycle life of flowing electrolyte battery systems has been established at Sandia National Laboratories. Four unique flow batteries are being tested in the laboratory using a four-variable two-level factorial experimental plan. Two Exxon zinc bromine batteries and one Gould zinc bromine battery are under test. One NASA Redox battery is on test. This paper describes results obtained to date from the test program. Cycle history, efficiency values, and general performance observations for these batteries are reported. The factorial test program and available statistical results are also discussed.

  14. Counter-Flow Cooling Tower Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Nožička, Jiří

    2014-03-01

    The article contains a design of a functional experimental model of a cross-flow mechanical draft cooling tower and the results and outcomes of measurements. This device is primarily used for measuring performance characteristics of cooling fills, but with a simple rebuild, it can be used for measuring other thermodynamic processes that take part in so-called wet cooling. The main advantages of the particular test cell lie in the accuracy, size, and the possibility of changing the water distribution level. This feature is very useful for measurements of fills of different heights without the influence of the spray and rain zone. The functionality of this test cell has been verified experimentally during assembly, and data from the measurement of common film cooling fills have been compared against the results taken from another experimental line. For the purpose of evaluating the data gathered, computational scripts were created in the MATLAB numerical computing environment. The first script is for exact calculation of the thermal balance of the model, and the second is for determining Merkel's number via Chebyshev's method.

  15. Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay Test Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As easy to read as a home pregnancy test, three Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay (QLFA) strips used to test water for E. coli show different results. The brightly glowing control line on the far right of each strip indicates that all three tests ran successfully. But the glowing test line on the middle left and bottom strips reveal their samples were contaminated with E. coli bacteria at two different concentrations. The color intensity correlates with concentration of contamination.

  16. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into

  17. Smoothing Methods for Estimating Test Score Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Estimation/smoothing methods that are flexible enough to fit a wide variety of test score distributions are reviewed: kernel method, strong true-score model-based method, and method that uses polynomial log-linear models. Applications of these methods include describing/comparing test score distributions, estimating norms, and estimating…

  18. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 6. Single annulus tests, transient test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1 to 2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. This report presents the experimental results for the transient portion of the single annulus test program. The test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a ribless heater and a ribbed heater under steady state as well as transient conditions. The ribbed heater testing is currently underway and will be reported separately. The steady state portion of this test program with ribless heater was completed and reported in report No. CU-HTRF-T3A. The present report presents transient test results obtained from a ribless, uniform annulus test section. A total of thirty five transients were conducted with six cases in which flow excursion occurred. No unstable conditions resulted for tests in which the steady state Q{sub ratio} OFI limit was not exceeded.

  19. Boundary layer flow visualization for flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.

    1986-01-01

    Flow visualization is used extensively in flight testing to determine aerodynamic characteristics such as surface flow direction and boundary layer state. Several visualization techniques are available to the aerodynamicist. Two of the most popular are oil flows and sublimating chemicals. Oil is used to visualize boundary layer transition, shock wave location, regions of separated flow, and surface flow direction. Boundary layer transition can also be visualized with sublimating chemicals. A summary of these two techniques is discussed, and the use of sublimating chemicals is examined in some detail. The different modes of boundary layer transition are characterized by different patterns in the sublimating chemical coating. The discussion includes interpretation of these chemical patterns and the temperature and velocity operating limitations of the chemical substances. Information for selection of appropriate chemicals for a desired set of flight conditions is provided.

  20. Precipitator inlet particulate distribution flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LaRose, J.A.; Averill, A.

    1994-12-31

    The B and W Rothemuhle precipitators located at PacifiCorp`s Wyodak Generating Station in Gillette, Wyoming have, for the past two years, been experiencing discharge wire breakage. The breakage is due to corrosion of the wires: however, the exact cause of the corrosion is unknown. One aspect thought to contribute to the problem is an unbalance of ash loading among the four precipitators. Plant operation has revealed that the ash loading to precipitator C appears to be the heaviest of the four casing, and also appears to have the most severe corrosion. Data from field measurements showed that the gas flows to the four precipitators are fairly uniform, within {+-}9% of the average. The ash loading data showed a large maldistribution among the precipitators. Precipitator C receives 60% more ash than the next heaviest loaded precipitator. A numerical model was created which showed the same results. The model was then utilized to determine design modifications to the existing flue and turning vanes to improve the ash loading distribution. The resulting design was predicted to improve the ash loading to all the precipitators, within {+-}10% of the average.

  1. Cold-Flow Propulsion Research Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An engineer at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Wind Tunnel Facility uses lasers to measure the velocity and gradient distortion across an eight inch curved pipe with joints and turning valves during a cold-flow propulsion research test; simulating the conditions found in the X-33's hydrogen feedline. Lasers are used because they are non-intrusive and do not disturb the flow like a probe would. The feedline supplies propellants to the turbo pump. The purpose of this project was to design the feedline to provide uniform flow into the turbo pump.

  2. Distributing Radiant Heat in Insulation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freitag, H. J.; Reyes, A. R.; Ammerman, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally radiating blanket of stepped thickness distributes heat over insulation sample during thermal vacuum testing. Woven of silicon carbide fibers, blanket spreads heat from quartz lamps evenly over insulation sample. Because of fewer blanket layers toward periphery of sample, more heat initially penetrates there for more uniform heat distribution.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Flow Distribution in Micro-Fluidics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Cole, Helen; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an application of a general purpose computer program, GFSSP (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) for calculating flow distribution in a network of micro-channels. GFSSP employs a finite volume formulation of mass and momentum conservation equations in a network consisting of nodes and branches. Mass conservation equation is solved for pressures at the nodes while the momentum conservation equation is solved at the branches to calculate flowrate. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. The numerical results have been compared with test data and detailed CFD (computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations. The agreement between test data and predictions is satisfactory. The discrepancies between the predictions and test data can be attributed to the frictional correlation which does not include the effect of surface tension or electro-kinetic effect.

  4. Characterization of Flow Bench Engine Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voris, Alex; Riley, Lauren; Puzinauskas, Paul

    2015-11-01

    This project was an attempt at characterizing particle image velocimetry (PIV) and swirl-meter test procedures. The flow direction and PIV seeding were evaluated for in-cylinder steady state flow of a spark ignition engine. For PIV seeding, both wet and dry options were tested. The dry particles tested were baby powder, glass particulate, and titanium dioxide. The wet particles tested were fogs created with olive oil, vegetable oil, DEHS, and silicon oil. The seeding was evaluated at 0.1 and 0.25 Lift/Diameter and at cylinder pressures of 10, 25 and 40 inches of H2O. PIV results were evaluated through visual and fluid momentum comparisons. Seeding particles were also evaluated based on particle size and cost. It was found that baby powder and glass particulate were the most effective seeding options for the current setup. The oil fogs and titanium dioxide were found to deposit very quickly on the mock cylinder and obscure the motion of the particles. Based on initial calculations and flow measurements, the flow direction should have a negligible impact on PIV and swirl-meter results. The characterizations found in this project will be used in future engine research examining the effects of intake port geometry on in-cylinder fluid motion and exhaust gas recirculation tolerances. Thanks to NSF site grant #1358991.

  5. LaRC Separate Flow Testing Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of this presentation is to give some of the objectives of the testing program. This includes: develop jet noise data base for separate flow nozzles with bypass ratio's 5 to 14; evaluate effect of pylon on noise; develop low performance impact noise suppression concepts; and evaluate potential for active control of jet noise.

  6. Resource Prospector Propulsion System Cold Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Addona, Brad; Trinh, Huu

    2015-01-01

    Resource Prospector (RP) is a NASA mission being led by NASA Ames Research Center with current plans to deliver a scientific payload package aboard a rover to the lunar surface. As part of an early risk reduction activity, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC) have jointly developed a government-version concept of a lunar lander for the mission. The spacecraft consists of two parts, the lander and the rover which carries the scientific instruments. The lander holds the rover during launch, cruise, and landing on the surface. Following terminal descent and landing the lander portion of the spacecraft become dormant after the rover embarks on the science mission. The lander will be equipped with a propulsion system for lunar descent and landing, as well as trajectory correction and attitude control maneuvers during transit to the moon. Hypergolic propellants monomethyl hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide will be used to fuel sixteen 70-lbf descent thrusters and twelve 5-lbf attitude control thrusters. A total of four metal-diaphragm tanks, two per propellant, will be used along with a high-pressure composite-overwrapped pressure vessel for the helium pressurant gas. Many of the major propulsion system components are heritage missile hardware obtained by NASA from the Air Force. In parallel with the flight system design activities, a simulated propulsion system based on flight drawings was built for conducting a series of water flow tests to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. The primary objective of the cold flow testing was to simulate the RP propulsion system fluid flow operation through water flow testing and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. All design and

  7. Vascular structure determines pulmonary blood flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific knowledge develops through the evolution of new concepts. This process is usually driven by new methodologies that provide observations not previously available. Understanding of pulmonary blood flow determinants advanced significantly in the 1960s and is now changing rapidly again, because of increased spatial resolution of regional pulmonary blood flow measurements.

  8. Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test (FFFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test was designed to study flame spreading over solid fuels when air is flowing at a low speed in the same direction as the flame spread. Previous research has shown that in low-speed concurrent airflows, some materials are more flammable in microgravity than earth. This image shows a 10-cm flame in microgravity that burns almost entirely blue on both sides of a thin sheet of paper. The glowing thermocouple in the lower half of the flame provides temperature measurements.

  9. SSME hot gas manifold flow comparison test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Dill, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFT) component of NASA's Alternate Turbopump Development effort, which is aimed at the proper aerodynamic integration of the current Phase II three-duct SSME Hot Gas Manifold (HGM) and the future 'Phase II-plus' two-duct HGM. Half-scale water flow tests of both HGM geometries were conducted to provide initial design data for the HPFT. The results reveal flowfield results and furnish insight into the performance differences between the two HGM flowpaths. Proper design of the HPFT can potentially secure significant flow improvements in either HGM configuration.

  10. A flow path model for regional water distribution optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chen; Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Ming; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2009-09-01

    We develop a flow path model for the optimization of a regional water distribution system. The model simultaneously describes a water distribution system in two parts: (1) the water delivery relationship between suppliers and receivers and (2) the physical water delivery network. In the first part, the model considers waters from different suppliers as multiple commodities. This helps the model clearly describe water deliveries by identifying the relationship between suppliers and receivers. The physical part characterizes a physical water distribution network by all possible flow paths. The flow path model can be used to optimize not only the suppliers to each receiver but also their associated flow paths for supplying water. This characteristic leads to the optimum solution that contains the optimal scheduling results and detailed information concerning water distribution in the physical system. That is, the water rights owner, water quantity, water location, and associated flow path of each delivery action are represented explicitly in the results rather than merely as an optimized total flow quantity in each arc of a distribution network. We first verify the proposed methodology on a hypothetical water distribution system. Then we apply the methodology to the water distribution system associated with the Tou-Qian River basin in northern Taiwan. The results show that the flow path model can be used to optimize the quantity of each water delivery, the associated flow path, and the water trade and transfer strategy.

  11. Traffic Flow Density Distribution Based on FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jing; Cui, Jianming

    In analysis of normal traffic flow, it usually uses the static or dynamic model to numerical analyze based on fluid mechanics. However, in such handling process, the problem of massive modeling and data handling exist, and the accuracy is not high. Finite Element Method (FEM) is a production which is developed from the combination of a modern mathematics, mathematics and computer technology, and it has been widely applied in various domain such as engineering. Based on existing theory of traffic flow, ITS and the development of FEM, a simulation theory of the FEM that solves the problems existing in traffic flow is put forward. Based on this theory, using the existing Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software, the traffic flow is simulated analyzed with fluid mechanics and the dynamics. Massive data processing problem of manually modeling and numerical analysis is solved, and the authenticity of simulation is enhanced.

  12. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980–2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  13. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada; Vollmer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980-2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  14. Review of flow battery testing at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.C.; Miller, D.W.; Robinson, C.E.; Rodriguez, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating prototype zinc/bromine, Redox, and zinc/ferricyanide flowing electrolyte batteries and cells. This paper will update previous reports of test results of two Exxon zinc/bromine batteries and one NASA Redox iron/chromium battery. Two 60-sq. cm. zinc/ferricyanide cells from Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. are also being evaluated. Performance, life, and operating data will be described for these batteries and cells.

  15. Power flow control using distributed saturable reactors

    DOEpatents

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D.

    2016-02-13

    A magnetic amplifier includes a saturable core having a plurality of legs. Control windings wound around separate legs are spaced apart from each other and connected in series in an anti-symmetric relation. The control windings are configured in such a way that a biasing magnetic flux arising from a control current flowing through one of the plurality of control windings is substantially equal to the biasing magnetic flux flowing into a second of the plurality of control windings. The flow of the control current through each of the plurality of control windings changes the reactance of the saturable core reactor by driving those portions of the saturable core that convey the biasing magnetic flux in the saturable core into saturation. The phasing of the control winding limits a voltage induced in the plurality of control windings caused by a magnetic flux passing around a portion of the saturable core.

  16. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  17. F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment was part of the NASA High-Speed Research Program. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate extensive laminar flow, to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and design methodology, and to establish laminar flow control design criteria. Topics include the flight test hardware and design, airplane modification, the pressure and suction distributions achieved, the laminar flow achieved, and the data analysis and code correlation.

  18. Declarative flow control for distributed instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Parvin, Bahram; Taylor, John; Fontenay, Gerald; Callahan, Daniel

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a 'microscopy channel' to advertise a unique set of on-line scientific instruments and to let users join a particular session, perform an experiment, collaborate with other users, and collect data for further analysis. The channel is a collaborative problem solving environment (CPSE) that allows for both synchronous and asynchronous collaboration, as well as flow control for enhanced scalability. The flow control is a declarative feature that enhances software functionality at the experimental scale. Our testbed includes several unique electron and optical microscopes with applications ranging from material science to cell biology. We have built a system that leverages current commercial CORBA services, Web Servers, and flow control specifications to meet diverse requirements for microscopy and experimental protocols. In this context, we have defined and enhanced Instrument Services (IS), Exchange Services (ES), Computational Services (CS), and Declarative Services (DS) that sit on top of CORBA and its enabling services (naming, trading, security, and notification) IS provides a layer of abstraction for controlling any type of microscope. ES provides a common set of utilities for information management and transaction. CS provides the analytical capabilities needed for online microscopy. DS provides mechanisms for flow control for improving the dynamic behavior of the system.

  19. Blood flow distribution in submerged and surface-swimming ducks.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, R; Jones, D R

    1992-05-01

    Observations that the response of the avian heart rate to submergence varies under different circumstances have led to speculation about variability of blood flow distribution during voluntary dives. We used a radiological imaging technique to examine the patterns of circulating blood flow in captive redhead ducks (Aythya americana) during rest, swimming, escape dives, forced dives and trapped escape dives and have shown that blood flow distribution in escape dives was the same as that in ducks swimming at the water surface. The response during trapped escape dives, however, was highly variable. Blood pressure was unchanged from the resting value during all activities. Predictions made about blood flow distribution during unrestrained dives on the basis of heart rate and other indirect data were confirmed in this study. However, the trapped escape dive responses indicated that heart rate alone is not always a reliable indicator of tissue blood flow in exercising ducks. PMID:1602277

  20. CFD study on electrolyte distribution in redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolin, S.; Toninelli, P.; Maggiolo, D.; Guarnieri, M.; Del, D., Col

    2015-11-01

    The most important component in a redox flow battery (RFB) cell is the MEA (membrane electrode assembly), a sandwich consisting of two catalyzed electrodes with an interposed polymeric membrane. In order to allow electrolyte flow toward the electroactive sites, the electrodes have a porous structure that can be obtained with carbon base materials such as carbon felts. The RFB cell is closed by two plates containing the distribution flow channels. Considering that a uniform electrolyte distribution in the reaction region is a prerequisite for high-efficiency operation, the flow pattern is an important parameter to be investigated for the optimization of the cell. In the present work, the effect of different channels patterns on the electrolyte distribution and on the pressure drop is numerically investigated. Three-dimensional simulations have been carried out with ANSYS Fluent code and four different layouts have been considered. Calculations have been performed both in the distribution channels and in the felt porous region.

  1. Velocity distribution in horizontal slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kvernvold, O.; Saasen, A.; Selmor-Olsen, S.; Sontvedt, T.; Vindoy, V.

    1984-08-01

    An experimental device for measurement of the velocity distribution in a two-phase slug is developed. Velocity profiles both in the film and the liquid slug besides velocity variation along the pipe bottom (at a distance of 1 mm) through the slug front are presented.

  2. Experimental evaluation of blockage ratio and plenum evacuation system flow effects on pressure distribution for bodies of revolution in 0.1 scale model test section of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard R.; Harrington, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the slotted test section of the 0.1-scale model of the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel to evaluate wall interference effects at tunnel Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.95 on bodies of revolution with blockage rates of 0.43, 3, 6, and 12 percent. The amount of flow that had to be removed from the plenum chamber (which surrounded the slotted test section) by the plenum evacuation system (PES) to eliminate wall interference effects was determined. The effectiveness of tunnel reentry flaps in removing flow from the plenum chamber was examined. The 0.43-percent blockage model was the only one free of wall interference effects with no PES flow. Surface pressures on the forward part of the other models were greater than interference-free results and were not influenced by PES flow. Interference-free results were achieved on the aft part of the 3- and 6-percent blockage models with the proper amount of PES flow. The required PES flow was substantially reduced by opening the reentry flaps.

  3. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  4. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  5. Interconnection Testing of Distributed Resources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2004-02-01

    With the publication of IEEE 1547-2003(TM) Standard for Interconnecting Distributed Resources With Electric Power Systems, the electric power industry has a need to develop tests and procedures to verify that interconnection equipment meets 1547 technical requirements. A new standard, IEEE P1547.1(TM), is being written to give detailed tests and procedures for confirming that equipment meets the interconnection requirements. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been validating test procedures being developed as part of IEEE P1547.1. As work progresses on the validation of those procedures, information and test reports are passed on to the working group of IEEE P1547.1 for future revisions.

  6. Testing the Markov hypothesis in fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Saggini, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic Markov processes are used very frequently to model, for example, processes in turbulence and subsurface flow and transport. Based on the weak Chapman-Kolmogorov equation and the strong Markov condition, we present methods to test the Markov hypothesis that is at the heart of these models. We demonstrate the capabilities of our methodology by testing the Markov hypothesis for fluid and inertial particles in turbulence, and fluid particles in the heterogeneous subsurface. In the context of subsurface macrodispersion, we find that depending on the heterogeneity level, Markov models work well above a certain scale of interest for media with different log-conductivity correlation structures. Moreover, we find surprising similarities in the velocity dynamics of the different media considered.

  7. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  8. Experimental Investigation on Liquid Metal Flow Distribution in Insulating Manifold under Uniform Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masato; Ueki, Yoshitaka; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problem which is caused by interaction between electrical conducting fluid flow and the magnetic field is one of the biggest problem in the liquid metal blanket of the fusion reactor. In the liquid metal blanket concept, it is necessary to distribute liquid metal flows uniformly in the manifold because imbalance of flow rates should affect the heat transfer performance directly, which leads to safety problem. While the manifold is insulated electrically as well as the flow duct, the 3D-MHD effect on the flowing liquid metal in the manifold is more apparent than that in straight duct. With reference to the flow distribution in this concept, the liquid metal flow in the electrical insulating manifold under the uniform transverse magnetic field is investigated experimentally. In this study, GaInSn is selected as working fluid. The experimental system includes the electrical magnet and the manifold test section which is made of acrylic resin for perfectly electrical insulation. The liquid metal flows in a non-symmetric 180°-turn with manifold, which consists of one upward channel and two downward channels. The flow rates in each channel are measured by electromagnetic flow meters for several combinations Reynolds number and Hartman number. The effects of magnetic field on the uniformity of flow distribution are cleared.

  9. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  10. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  11. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Keelan T; Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system. PMID:27343484

  12. Final report for the flow excursion follow-on testing

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.; Walters, T.W.

    1992-08-05

    The purpose of the Mark 22 Flow Excursion Follow-On testing was to investigate the theory that approximately 15% of the flow bypassed the primary flow channels in previous testing, whereas the design called for only a 3% bypass. The results of the follow-on tests clearly confirmed this theory. The testing was performed in two phases. During the first phase, characterization tests performed during the earlier test program were repeated.

  13. Pressure distribution in unsteady sink and source flows.

    PubMed

    Voropayev, S I

    2015-05-01

    Basic flow generated in a viscous incompressible fluid by a "point" sink (source) of mass is revised. In practice, such flow can be modeled by sucking (pushing) fluid from a thin tube with a small porous sphere at one end. Intuitively, by sucking (pushing) fluid, one creates low (high) pressure near the origin and a positive (negative) radial pressure gradient drives the fluid to (from) the origin. A simple analysis, however, shows that the pressure distribution for both steady flows is the same. Then a question arises: How does the fluid "know" in what direction to flow? To explain this "paradox" an unsteady flow is considered and the pressure terms responsible for the flow direction are derived. PMID:26066255

  14. Applying well flow adapted filtering to transient pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Attinger, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    Transient pumping tests are often used to estimate porous medium characteristics like hydraulic conductivity and storativity. The interpretation of pumping test drawdowns is based on methods which are normally developed under the assumption of homogeneous porous media. However aquifer heterogeneity strongly impacts on well flow pattern, in particular in the vicinity of the pumping well. The purpose of this work is to present a method to interpret drawdowns of transient pumping tests in heterogeneous porous media. With this method we are able to describe the effects that statistical quantities like variance and correlation length have on pumping test drawdowns. Furthermore it allows inferring on the statistical parameters of aquifer heterogeneity from drawdown data by invers estimation, which is not possible using methods for homogeneous media like Theis' solution. The method is based on a representative description of hydraulic conductivity for radial flow regimes. It is derived from a well flow adapted filtering procedure (Coarse Graining), where the heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity is assumed to be log-normal distributed with a Gaussian correlation structure. applying the up scaled hydraulic conductivity to the groundwater flow equation results in a hydraulic head which depends on the statistical parameters of the porous medium. It describes the drawdown of a transient pumping test in heterogeneous media. We used an ensemble of transient pumping test simulations to verify the up scaled drawdown solution. We generated transient pumping tests in heterogeneous media for various values of the statistical parameters variance and correlation length and evaluated their impact on the drawdown behavior as well as on the temporal evolution. We further examined the impact of several aspects like the location of an observation well or the local conductivity at the pumping well on the drawdown behavior. This work can be understood as an expansion of the work of Zech et

  15. Two-dimensional automatic measurement for nozzle flow distribution using improved ultrasonic sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Changyuan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wang, Xiu; Wang, Ning; Zou, Wei; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Spray deposition and distribution are affected by many factors, one of which is nozzle flow distribution. A two-dimensional automatic measurement system, which consisted of a conveying unit, a system control unit, an ultrasonic sensor, and a deposition collecting dish, was designed and developed. The system could precisely move an ultrasonic sensor above a pesticide deposition collecting dish to measure the nozzle flow distribution. A sensor sleeve with a PVC tube was designed for the ultrasonic sensor to limit its beam angle in order to measure the liquid level in the small troughs. System performance tests were conducted to verify the designed functions and measurement accuracy. A commercial spray nozzle was also used to measure its flow distribution. The test results showed that the relative error on volume measurement was less than 7.27% when the liquid volume was 2 mL in trough, while the error was less than 4.52% when the liquid volume was 4 mL or more. The developed system was also used to evaluate the flow distribution of a commercial nozzle. It was able to provide the shape and the spraying width of the flow distribution accurately. PMID:26501288

  16. Two-Dimensional Automatic Measurement for Nozzle Flow Distribution Using Improved Ultrasonic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Changyuan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wang, Xiu; Wang, Ning; Zou, Wei; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Spray deposition and distribution are affected by many factors, one of which is nozzle flow distribution. A two-dimensional automatic measurement system, which consisted of a conveying unit, a system control unit, an ultrasonic sensor, and a deposition collecting dish, was designed and developed. The system could precisely move an ultrasonic sensor above a pesticide deposition collecting dish to measure the nozzle flow distribution. A sensor sleeve with a PVC tube was designed for the ultrasonic sensor to limit its beam angle in order to measure the liquid level in the small troughs. System performance tests were conducted to verify the designed functions and measurement accuracy. A commercial spray nozzle was also used to measure its flow distribution. The test results showed that the relative error on volume measurement was less than 7.27% when the liquid volume was 2 mL in trough, while the error was less than 4.52% when the liquid volume was 4 mL or more. The developed system was also used to evaluate the flow distribution of a commercial nozzle. It was able to provide the shape and the spraying width of the flow distribution accurately. PMID:26501288

  17. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  18. Three Phase Probabilistic Load Flow in Radial Distribution Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Melhorn, Alexander C; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Tomsovic, Kevin L

    2012-01-01

    Probabilistic load flow is a helpful tool in accounting for inconsistent or unknown loads and generation. This is especially true with the push for renewable generation and demand response. This paper proposes an improved version of the probabilistic load flow solution for balanced distribution systems and takes the next step by applying it to unbalanced three phase systems. It is validated by comparing the solutions to that obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The proposed method provides an accurate and practical way for finding the solution to the stochastic problems occurring in power distribution system analysis today.

  19. Distributed measurement of flow rate in conduits using heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Zubelzu, Sergio; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis

    2016-04-01

    In some cases flow varies along conduits, such as in irrigated land drainage pipes and channels, irrigation laterals and others. Detailed knowledge of flow rate along the conduit makes possible analytical evaluation of water distribution and collection systems performance. Flow rate can change continuously in some systems, like in drainage pipes and channels, or abruptly, like in conduits bifurcations or emitter insertions. A heat pulse along the conduit makes possible to get flow rate from continuity and heat balance equations. Due to the great value of specific heat of water, temperature changes along conduit are smaller than the noise that involves the measurement process. This work presents a methodology that, dealing with the noise of distributed temperature measurements, leads to flow rate determination along pressurized pipes or open channel flows.

  20. Distribution of melt during Poiseuille flow of partially molten rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Dillman, Amanda; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms of melt extraction from the Earth's partially molten mantle are a key factor in the chemical and physical evolution of our planet and therefore are the topic of intense research. Since such processes cannot be observed directly, most of our understanding of the dynamics of partially molten rock relies on numerical models. Laboratory experiments are important for testing the validity of models at scales that we can observe. We designed a set of experiments to investigate the role of viscous anisotropy on melt segregation in partially molten rocks through Poiseuille flow. Partially molten rock samples composed of forsterite plus a few percent melt of different composition (anorthite, albite or lithium silicate) were prepared from high-purity nano-powders and taken to T = 1300oC at P = 0.1 MPa. The melt composition was varied in order to vary its viscosity. The partially molten samples were then extruded through a channel of circular cross section under a fixed pressure gradient. Different extrusion assemblies and consequently different flow geometries were explored. The melt distribution in the channel was subsequently mapped using image analysis on backscattered electron microscopy images and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps. In all experiments, melt segregates from the center toward the outer radius of the channel with the melt fraction at the outer radius increasing to at least twice that at the center. Furthermore, melt enriched areas are also observed in the center of the channel. The shape of the melt distribution depends on the extrusion geometry and on the melt viscosity. The segregation of melt toward the outer radius of the channel is consistent with the base-state melt segregation as predicted by viscous anisotropy theory developed by Takei and Holtzman (2009) and Takei and Katz (2014). However, the melt distribution profiles observed in our experiments have steeper gradients than the base-state melt segregation profiles described

  1. Liquid flow and distribution in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2004-01-01

    Flow and transport in permeable or porous media and microchannels occurs in a variety of situations in micro- and reduced-gravity environments, many of them associated with environmental control and life support systems. While the role of gravity is limited, due to the typically small size scales associated permeable media, gravity, at the very least, affects the overall disposition of fluid in a macroscopic system. This presentation will discuss examples where the absence of gravity affects flow and phase distribution in selected examples of unsaturated flow and transport of heat and mass in porous media and microchannels that are pertinent to spacecraft systems.

  2. Distributed allocation of mobile sensing swarms in gyre flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, K.; Hsieh, M. A.; Forgoston, E.; Schwartz, I. B.

    2013-09-01

    We address the synthesis of distributed control policies to enable a swarm of homogeneous mobile sensors to maintain a desired spatial distribution in a geophysical flow environment, or workspace. In this article, we assume the mobile sensors (or robots) have a "map" of the environment denoting the locations of the Lagrangian coherent structures or LCS boundaries. Using this information, we design agent-level hybrid control policies that leverage the surrounding fluid dynamics and inherent environmental noise to enable the team to maintain a desired distribution in the workspace. We discuss the stability properties of the ensemble dynamics of the distributed control policies. Since realistic quasi-geostrophic ocean models predict double-gyre flow solutions, we use a wind-driven multi-gyre flow model to verify the feasibility of the proposed distributed control strategy and compare the proposed control strategy with a baseline deterministic allocation strategy. Lastly, we validate the control strategy using actual flow data obtained by our coherent structure experimental testbed.

  3. Variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum flow transport model for compound channels accounting for distributed non-uniform lateral flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Ratnakar; Sahoo, Bhabagrahi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the fully volume conservative simplified hydrodynamic-based variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum (VPMM) flow transport model advocated by Perumal and Price in 2013 is extended to exclusively incorporate the distributed non-uniform lateral flow in the routing scheme accounting for compound river channel flows. The revised VPMM formulation is exclusively derived from the combined form of the de Saint-Venant's continuity and momentum equations with the spatiotemporally distributed lateral flow which is solved using the finite difference box scheme. This revised model could address the earlier model limitations of: (i) non-accounting non-uniformly distributed lateral flow, (ii) ignoring floodplain flow, and (iii) non-consideration of catchment dynamics of lateral flow generation restricting its real-time application. The efficacy of the revised formulation is tested to simulate 16 years (1980-1995) river runoff from real-time storm events under scarce morpho-hydrological data conditions in a tropical monsoon-type 48 km Bolani-Gomlai reach of the Brahmani River in eastern India. The spatiotemporally distributed lateral flows generated in real-time is computed by water balance approach accounting for catchment characteristics of normalized network area function, land use land cover classes, and soil textural classes; and hydro-meteorological variables of precipitation, soil moisture, minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, relative humidity, and solar radiation. The multiple error measures used in this study and the simulation results reveal that the revised VPMM model has a greater practical utility in estimating the event-based and long-term meso-scale river runoff (both discharge and its stage) at any ungauged site, enhancing its application for real-time flood estimation.

  4. Electron concentration distribution in a glow discharge in air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedzianov, R. B.; Gaisin, F. M.; Sabitov, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    Electron concentration distributions in a glow discharge in longitudinal and vortex air flows are determined from the attenuation of the electromagnetic wave passing through the plasma using microwave probes. An analysis of the distribution curves obtained indicates that electron concentration decreases in the direction of the anode. This can be explained by charge diffusion toward the chamber walls and electron recombination and sticking within the discharge.

  5. A thermal distribution function for relativistic magnetically insulated electron flows

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, M.P.; Sudan, R.N.

    1986-05-01

    A distribution function is presented that may be used to study the effects of finite temperature on the equilibrium and stability properties of magnetically insulated electron flows. This distribution function has the useful property that it generates the thoroughly studied class of constant Q = ..omega../sup 2//sub p//..cap omega../sup 2/ equilibria in its zero-temperature limit. Analytic solutions are given for the general, constant Q, zero-temperature equilibria.

  6. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flow rating tests. 162.018-7 Section 162.018-7 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII...

  7. Goodness of fit tests for generalized gamma distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadaǧ, Özge; Aktaş, Serpil

    2016-06-01

    Gamma distribution is used to model the right skewed data. The goodness of fit tests determine how well the data fit to the underlying distribution. This paper compares the performances of goodness of fit tests for generalized gamma distribution. Kolmogrov Smirnov, Cramer-von Mises and Anderson-Darling tests are considered for testing the goodness of fit between the distribution of sample data and generalized gamma distribution under some different parametric scenarios.

  8. Mathematical modelling of flow distribution in the human cardiovascular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, V. K.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed model of the entire human cardiovascular system which aims to study the changes in flow distribution caused by external stimuli, changes in internal parameters, or other factors. The arterial-venous network is represented by 325 interconnected elastic segments. The mathematical description of each segment is based on equations of hydrodynamics and those of stress/strain relationships in elastic materials. Appropriate input functions provide for the pumping of blood by the heart through the system. The analysis employs the finite-element technique which can accommodate any prescribed boundary conditions. Values of model parameters are from available data on physical and rheological properties of blood and blood vessels. As a representative example, simulation results on changes in flow distribution with changes in the elastic properties of blood vessels are discussed. They indicate that the errors in the calculated overall flow rates are not significant even in the extreme case of arteries and veins behaving as rigid tubes.

  9. Influence of pressure distribution on flow field temperature reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-yun; Song, Yang; Li, Zhen-hua; He, An-zhi

    2011-05-20

    This research proposes an issue that has previously been omitted in flow field temperature reconstruction by optical computerized tomography (OCT). To prove that it is not reasonable to always assume an isobaric process occurs when OCT is adopted to obtain the temperature distributions of flow fields, a propane-air flame and an argon arc plasma are chosen as two practical examples for experiment. In addition, the measurement of the refractive index is achieved by moiré deflection tomography. The results indicate that the influence of pressure distribution on temperature reconstruction is a universal phenomenon for various flow fields. Hence, the condition that can be introduced to estimate when an isobaric process can no longer be assumed is presented. In addition, an equation is offered to describe the temperature reconstruction imprecision that is caused by using the supposed pressure instead of the practical pressure. PMID:21614105

  10. Distribution of Thermally Activated Plastic Events in a Flowing Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, David; Schuh, Christopher

    2009-06-01

    The potential energy landscape of a flowing metallic glass is revealed using the activation-relaxation technique. For a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones system initially deformed into a steady-state condition through quasistatic shear, the distribution of activation energies is shown to contain a large fraction of low-energy barriers, consistent with a highly nonequilibrium flow state. The distribution of plastic strains has a fundamentally different shape than that obtained during quasistatic simulations, exhibiting a peak at finite strain and, after elastic unloading, a nonzero mean plastic strain that evidences a polarization of the flow state. No significant correlation is found between the activation energy of a plastic event and its associated plastic strain.

  11. Distributed Power Flow Control: Distributed Power Flow Control using Smart Wires for Energy Routing

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-24

    GENI Project: Smart Wire Grid is developing a solution for controlling power flow within the electric grid to better manage unused and overall transmission capacity. The 300,000 miles of high-voltage transmission line in the U.S. today are congested and inefficient, with only around 50% of all transmission capacity utilized at any given time. Increased consumer demand should be met in part with more efficient and an economical power flow. Smart Wire Grid’s devices clamp onto existing transmission lines and control the flow of power within—much like how internet routers help allocate bandwidth throughout the web. Smart wires could support greater use of renewable energy by providing more consistent control over how that energy is routed within the grid on a real-time basis. This would lessen the concerns surrounding the grid’s inability to effectively store intermittent energy from renewables for later use.

  12. Numerical Modelling of Vegetation Flow Interaction: the Wienfluss Test Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Yagci, O.; Rauch, H.; Stoesser, T.

    2003-04-01

    We apply a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code based on a finite-volume discretisation to a 170m test reach of the a river in Vienna. One of the primary aims of this paper is to test various methods for representing the flow resistance of natural vegetation. The two approaches considered vary in complexity and could be practically implemented and applied within 2D and 3D flood modelling tools. The first approach uses empirical relationships derived from the laboratory data and modifies the existing friction term in the momentum equations. While the second approach introduces a drag related sink term in addition to the bed friction term. The roughness closure models considered do not modify the turbulence model (in this case the k-e model) and hence do not require re-calibration for each application. The test reach is straight and comprises an asymmetrical compound channel that is vegetated on the floodplain by willows and unvegetated within the main channel. The development of the willows has been monitored over a four year period and plant parameters which characterise the dimensions of individual trees and their distribution have been quantified. Further, streamwise velocity data of high-spatial resolution has been collected at one cross-section for a series of flood events. The performance of each approach is quantified in terms of its ability to reproduce the streamwise velocity distribution in a partially vegetated channel. Different parameter tests are conducted to allow the sensitivity of the computed velocities against mesh resolution, and other important plant properties to be examined. For both flow resistance approaches, reasonable agreement is found between the measured and computed floodplain velocities.

  13. LPT. EBOR (TAN646) reactor vessel, flow distribution tank. Outlet nozzle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. EBOR (TAN-646) reactor vessel, flow distribution tank. Outlet nozzle on side of vessel will be connected to coolant duct. Photographer: Lowin. Date: January 20, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-237 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Mean and fluctuating flow measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow subjected to distributed adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the mean flow properties and turbulent fluctuations in adiabatic turbulent boundary layer flows subjected to distributed adverse pressure gradients. In the freestream region upstream of the adverse pressure gradient the Mach number was 3.86, the unit Reynolds number 5.3 million per foot. The boundary layer developed on the wall of an axisymmetric nozzle and straight test section. In order to avoid the effects of streamwise surface curvature the adverse pressure gradients at the test section wall were induced by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The flow under study simulated that which might be found in an axially symmetric engine inlet of a supersonic aircraft.

  15. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  16. Concentration distribution of contaminant transport in wetland flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zi; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Guangqian

    2015-06-01

    Study on contaminant transport in wetland flows is of fundamental importance. Recent investigation on scalar transport in laminar tube flows (Wu and Chen, 2014. J. Fluid Mech., 740: 196-213.) indicates that the vertical concentration difference in wetland flows may be remarkable for a very long time, which cannot be captured by the extensively applied one-dimensional Taylor dispersion model. To understand detailed information for the vertical distribution of contaminant in wetland flows, for the first time, the present paper deduces an analytical solution for the multi-dimensional concentration distribution by the method of mean concentration expansion. The solution is verified by both our analytical and numerical results. Representing the effects of vegetation in wetlands, the unique dimensionless parameter α can cause the longitudinal contraction of the contaminant cloud and the change of the shape of the concentration contours. By these complicated effects, it is shown unexpectedly that the maximum vertical concentration difference remains nearly unaffected, although its longitudinal position may change. Thus the slow-decaying transient effect (Wu and Chen, 2014. J. Hydrol., 519: 1974-1984.) is shown also apply to the process of contaminant transport in wetland flows.

  17. Analysis of Flow Angularity Repeatability Tests in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive data base of flow angularity repeatability measurements from four NTF check standard model tests is analyzed for statistical consistency and to characterize the results for prediction of angle-of-attack uncertainty for customer tests. A procedure for quality assurance for flow angularity measurements during customer tests is also presented. The efficacy of the procedure is tested using results from a customer test.

  18. Moisture Distribution and Flow During Drying of Wood and Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Zink-Sharp, Audrey; Hanna, Robert B.

    2001-12-28

    New understanding, theories, and techniques for moisture flow and distribution were developed in this research on wood and wood fiber. Improved understanding of the mechanisms of flake drying has been provided. Observations of flake drying and drying rate curves revealed that rate of moisture loss consisted of two falling rate periods and no constant rate drying period was observed. Convective heat transfer controls the first period, and bound water diffusion controls the second period. Influence of lower drying temperatures on bending properties of wood flakes was investigated. Drying temperature was found to have a significant influence on bending stiffness and strength. A worksheet for calculation of the energy required to dry a single strandboard flake was developed but has not been tested in an industrial setting yet. A more complete understanding of anisotropic transverse shrinkage of wood is proposed based on test results and statistical analysis. A simplified mod el of a wood cell's cross-section was drawn for calculating differential transverse shrinkage. The model utilizes cell wall thickness and microfibrillar packing density and orientation. In spite of some phenomena of cell wall structure not yet understood completely, the results might explain anisotropic transverse shrinkage to a major extent. Boundary layer theory was found useful for evaluating external moisture resistance during drying. Simulated moisture gradients were quire comparable to the actual gradients in dried wood. A mathematical procedure for determining diffusion and surface emission coefficients was also developed. Thermal conductivity models of wood derived from its anatomical structure were created and tested against experimental values. Model estimations provide insights into changes in heat transfer parameters during drying. Two new techniques for measuring moisture gradients created in wood during drying were developed. A new technique that utilizes optical properties of cobalt

  19. Some Effects of Air Flow on the Penetration and Distribution of Oil Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Beardsley, E G

    1929-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effects of air flow on the characteristics of fuel sprays from fuel injection valves. Curves and photographs are presented showing the airflow throughout the chamber and the effects of the air flow on the fuel spray characteristics. It was found that the moving air had little effect on the spray penetration except with the 0.006 inch orifice. The moving air did, however, affect the oil particles on the outside of the spray cone. After spray cut-off, the air flow rapidly distributed the atomized fuel throughout the spray chamber.

  20. Regenerator flow distribution by means of a burner

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.W.

    1983-03-01

    In a regenerative furnace of the type used for melting glass, employment of a gas stream (preferably from a high-velocity burner) in the plenum of the regenerator controls the gas flow distribution within the regenerator. The employment of this auxiliary burner makes the heating of the packing more uniform, minimizes localized overheating of the packing, and improves regenerator efficiency. This flow control device can be added readily to an existing operating furnace with no disruption of operation and at relatively low cost.

  1. Pitot-pressure distributions of the flow field of a delta-wing orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleary, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pitot pressure distributions of the flow field of a 0.0075-scale model of a typical delta wing shuttle orbiter are presented. Results are given for the windward and leeward sides on centerline in the angle-of-attack plane from wind tunnel tests conducted in air. Distributions are shown for three axial stations X/L = .35, .60, and .98 and for angles of attack from 0 to 60 deg. The tests were made at a Mach number of 7.4 and for Reynolds numbers based on body length from 1,500,000 to 9,000,000. The windward distributions at the two survey stations forward of the body boat tail demonstrate the compressive aspects of the flow from the shock wave to the body. Conversely, the distributions at the aft station display an expansion of the flow that is attributed to body boat tail. On the lee side, results are given at low angles of attack that illustrate the complicating aspects of the canopy on the flow field, while results are given to show the effects of flow separation at high angles of attack.

  2. 10 CFR 431.198 - Enforcement testing for distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Enforcement testing for distribution transformers. 431.198... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Compliance and Enforcement § 431.198 Enforcement testing for distribution transformers. (a) Test notice. Upon receiving information in...

  3. Catchment travel time distributions and water flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Beven, K. J.; Bertuzzo, E.; Nicotina, L.; Davies, J.; Fiori, A.; Russo, D.; Botter, G.

    2011-07-01

    Many details about the flow of water in soils in a hillslope are unknowable given current technologies. One way of learning about the bulk effects of water velocity distributions on hillslopes is through the use of tracers. However, this paper will demonstrate that the interpretation of tracer information needs to become more sophisticated. The paper reviews, and complements with mathematical arguments and specific examples, theory and practice of the distribution(s) of the times water particles injected through rainfall spend traveling through a catchment up to a control section (i.e., "catchment" travel times). The relevance of the work is perceived to lie in the importance of the characterization of travel time distributions as fundamental descriptors of catchment water storage, flow pathway heterogeneity, sources of water in a catchment, and the chemistry of water flows through the control section. The paper aims to correct some common misconceptions used in analyses of travel time distributions. In particular, it stresses the conceptual and practical differences between the travel time distribution conditional on a given injection time (needed for rainfall-runoff transformations) and that conditional on a given sampling time at the outlet (as provided by isotopic dating techniques or tracer measurements), jointly with the differences of both with the residence time distributions of water particles in storage within the catchment at any time. These differences are defined precisely here, either through the results of different models or theoretically by using an extension of a classic theorem of dynamic controls. Specifically, we address different model results to highlight the features of travel times seen from different assumptions, in this case, exact solutions to a lumped model and numerical solutions of the 3-D flow and transport equations in variably saturated, physically heterogeneous catchment domains. Our results stress the individual characters of the

  4. Footprints of Lagrangian flow structures in Eulerian concentration distributions in periodic mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speetjens, M. F. M.; Lauret, M.; Nijmeijer, H.; Anderson, P. D.

    2013-05-01

    Transport of passive tracers may be described through the spatio-temporal evolution of Eulerian concentration distributions or via the geometrical composition of the Lagrangian flow structure. The present study seeks to deepen insight into the connection between the Eulerian and Lagrangian perspectives by investigating the role of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in the Eulerian concentration distributions in time-periodic and spatially-periodic mixing flows. Representation of the Eulerian transport by the mapping method, describing realistic transport problems by distribution matrices, admits a generic analysis based on matrix and graph theory. This reveals that LCSs-and the transport barriers that separate them-leave a distinct “footprint” in the eigenmode spectrum of the distribution matrix and, by proxy, of the underlying Eulerian transport operator. Transport barriers impart a block-diagonal structure upon the mapping matrix, where each block matrix A corresponds with a given LCS. Its kind is reflected in the spectrum of A; higher-order periodicity yields a distinct permutation within A. The composition of the distribution matrix versus the Lagrangian flow structure thus predicted is demonstrated by way of examples. These findings increase fundamental understanding of transport phenomena and have great practical potential for e.g. flow and mixing control.

  5. Endogenic craters on basaltic lava flows - Size frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Gault, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Circular crater forms, termed collapse depressions, which occur on many basalt flows on the earth have also been detected on the moon and Mars and possibly on Mercury and Io. The admixture of collapse craters with impact craters would affect age determinations of planetary surface units based on impact crater statistics by making them appear anomalously old. In the work described in the present paper, the techniques conventionally used in planetary crater counting were applied to the determination of the size range and size frequency distribution of collapse craters on lava flows in Idaho, California, and New Mexico. Collapse depressions range in size from 3 to 80 m in diameter; their cumulative size distributions are similar to those of small impact craters on the moon.

  6. Study of fractal aperture distribution and flow in fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines the roughness profiles and aperture distributions of fractures and faults by using concepts from fractal geometry. Simple models of flow of fluid in rough fractures are also discussed. A deterministic fractal representation of the roughness profile is presented which is shown to have many distinct advantages over other numerical methods, such as information compression, uniqueness and repeatability of surface simulation, retention of statistical information, and self-similarity over many scales. Also the fractal representation enables an isotropic surface and an aperture distribution to be simulated by examining a measured profile. Saturated fluid flow in fractures is then computed using a combined Navier-Stokes and Darcy equation. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Stokes flow in a pipe with distributed regions of slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Stone, Howard A.

    2002-11-01

    Steady pressure-driven Stokes flow in a circular pipe is investigated analytically in the case where the pipe surface contains periodically distributed transverse regions of zero surface shear stress. One physical motivation for this problem is the recent experimental observation of nanobubbles on smooth hydrophobic surfaces (Ishida et al. (2000) Langmuir vol. 16, Tyrrell and Attard (2001) Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 87) while a second motivation is the possible presence of bubbles trapped on rough surfaces. The bubbles may provide a zero shear stress boundary condition for the flow and modify considerably the friction generated by the solid boundary. In the spirit of experimental studies probing apparent slip at solid surfaces, the effective slip length of the resulting macroscopic flow is evaluated numerically and asymptotically as a function of the relative width of the no-slip and no-shear stress regions and their distribution along the pipe. Comparison of the model with experimental studies of pressure-driven flow in capillaries and microchannels is made and a possible interpretation of the results is offered which is consistent with a large number of nano-size and micron-size bubbles coating the solid surface. Finally, an explanation for the seemingly paradoxical behavior of the measured slip length increasing with system size reported by Watanabe et al. (1999) (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 381) is proposed and the possibility of a shear-dependent effective slip length is suggested.

  8. Capillary flow solderability test for printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Hernandez, C.L.; Sackinger, S.J.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes a new technique for evaluating capillary flow solderability on printed circuit boards. The test involves the flow of molten solder from a pad onto different-sized conductor lines. It simulates the spreading dynamics of either plated-through-hole (PTH) or surface mount technology (SMT) soldering. A standard procedure has been developed for the test. Preliminary experiments were conducted and the results demonstrate test feasibility. Test procedures and results are presented in this report.

  9. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  10. Blood flow distribution with adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.H.; Davis, D.L.; Sutton, E.T.

    1989-03-01

    Superficial fibular nerve stimulation (SFNS) causes increased pre- and post-capillary resistances as well as increased capillary permeability in the dog hind paw. These responses indicate possible adrenergic and histaminergic interactions. The distribution of blood flow between capillaries and arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) may depend on the relative effects of these neural inputs. Right hind paws of anesthetized heparinized dogs were vascularly and neurally isolated and perfused with controlled pressure. Blood flow distribution was calculated from the venous recovery of 85Sr-labeled microspheres (15 microns). The mean transit times of 131I-albumin and 85Sr-labeled microspheres were calculated. The effects of adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists with and without SFNS were determined. Phentolamine blocked the entire response to SFNS. Prazosin attenuated increases in total and AVA resistance. Yohimbine prevented increased total resistance, attenuated the AVA resistance increase, and revealed a decrease in capillary circuit resistance. Pyrilamine attenuated total resistance increase while SFNS increased capillary and AVA resistances. Metiamide had no effect on blood flow distribution with SFNS. The increase in AVA resistance with SFNS apparently resulted from a combination of alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptor stimulation but not histaminergic effects.

  11. Oscillating-flow regenerator test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. G.; Gedeon, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed in setting up and performing tests on a regenerator test rig. An earlier status report presented test results, together with heat transfer correlations, for four regenerator samples (two woven screen samples and two felt metal samples). Lessons learned from this testing led to improvements to the experimental setup, mainly instrumentation as well as to the test procedure. Given funding and time constraints for this project it was decided to complete as much testing as possible while the rig was set up and operational, and to forego final data reduction and analysis until later. Additional testing was performed on several of the previously tested samples as well an on five newly fabricated samples. The following report is a summary of the work performed at OU, with many of the final test results included in raw data form.

  12. High Temperature Ceramic Guide Vane Temperature and Pressure Distribution Calculation for Flow with Cooling Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Rakesh

    2004-01-01

    A ceramic guide vane has been designed and tested for operation under high temperature. Previous efforts have suggested that some cooling flow may be required to alleviate the high temperatures observed near the trailing edge region. The present report describes briefly a three-dimensional viscous analysis carried out to calculate the temperature and pressure distribution on the blade surface and in the flow path with a jet of cooling air exiting from the suction surface near the trailing edge region. The data for analysis was obtained from Dr. Craig Robinson. The surface temperature and pressure distribution along with a flowfield distribution is shown in the results. The surface distribution is also given in a tabular form at the end of the document.

  13. Laminar flow control leading edge glove flight test article development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.; Mcnay, D. E.; Thelander, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A laminar flow control (LFC) flight test article was designed and fabricated to fit into the right leading edge of a JetStar aircraft. The article was designed to attach to the front spar and fill in approx. 70 inches of the leading edge that are normally occupied by the large slipper fuel tank. The outer contour of the test article was constrained to align with an external fairing aft of the front spar which provided a surface pressure distribution over the test region representative of an LFC airfoil. LFC is achieved by applying suction through a finely perforated surface, which removes a small fraction of the boundary layer. The LFC test article has a retractable high lift shield to protect the laminar surface from contamination by airborne debris during takeoff and low altitude operation. The shield is designed to intercept insects and other particles that could otherwise impact the leading edge. Because the shield will intercept freezing rain and ice, a oozing glycol ice protection system is installed on the shield leading edge. In addition to the shield, a liquid freezing point depressant can be sprayed on the back of the shield.

  14. NASA Flight Tests Explore Supersonic Laminar Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    In partnership with Aerion Corporation of Reno, Nevada, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center’s tested supersonic airflow over a small experimental airfoil design on its F-15B Test Bed aircraft du...

  15. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Cold Flow Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of four altitude compensating nozzle (ACN) concepts were evaluated by NASA MSFC in the Nozzle Test Facility. The ACN concepts were a dual bell, a dual expander, an annular plug nozzle and an expansion deflection nozzle. Two reference bell nozzles were also tested. Axial thrust and nozzle wall static pressures were measured for each nozzle over a wide range of nozzle pressure ratios. The nozzle hardware and test program are described. Sample test results are presented.

  16. Noninvasive blood flow tests in vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, O. K.; Cole, C. W.

    1993-01-01

    Noninvasive testing is now routine for assessing vascular conditions. Many noninvasive tests are available for obtaining physiologic and anatomic information that is both precise and reproducible. This paper discusses noninvasive testing with plethysmography, Doppler ultrasonography, and duplex scanning for carotid artery occlusive disease, deep venous thrombosis, and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8268746

  17. Assessment of the National Transonic Facility for Laminar Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Jeffrey D.; Sutanto, Mary I.; Witkowski, David P.; Watkins, A. Neal; Rivers, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    A transonic wing, designed to accentuate key transition physics, is tested at cryogenic conditions at the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley. The collaborative test between Boeing and NASA is aimed at assessing the facility for high-Reynolds number testing of configurations with significant regions of laminar flow. The test shows a unit Reynolds number upper limit of 26 M/ft for achieving natural transition. At higher Reynolds numbers turbulent wedges emanating from the leading edge bypass the natural transition process and destroy the laminar flow. At lower Reynolds numbers, the transition location is well correlated with the Tollmien-Schlichting-wave N-factor. The low-Reynolds number results suggest that the flow quality is acceptable for laminar flow testing if the loss of laminar flow due to bypass transition can be avoided.

  18. Quantification of hepatic flow distribution using particle tracking for patient specific virtual Fontan surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiguang; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Troianowski, Guillaume; Shadden, Shawn; Mohhan Reddy, V.; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Marsden, Alison

    2010-11-01

    The Fontan surgery is the third and final stage in a palliative series to treat children with single ventricle heart defects. In the extracardiac Fontan procedure, the inferior vena cava (IVC) is connected to the pulmonary arteries via a tube-shaped Gore-tex graft. Clinical observations have shown that the absence of a hepatic factor, carried in the IVC flow, can cause pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Although it is clear that hepatic flow distribution is an important determinant of Fontan performance, few studies have quantified its relation to Fontan design. In this study, we virtually implanted three types of grafts (T-junction, offset and Y-graft) into 5 patient specific models of the Glenn (stage 2) anatomy. We then performed 3D time-dependent simulations and systematically compared the IVC flow distribution, energy loss, and pressure levels in different surgical designs. A robustness test is performed to evaluate the sensitivity of hepatic distribution to pulmonary flow split. Results show that the Y-graft design effectively improves the IVC flow distribution, compared to traditional designs and that surgical designs could be customized on a patient-by-patient basis.

  19. Reliability and field testing of distributed strain and temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaudi, Daniele; Glisic, Branko

    2006-03-01

    Distributed fiber optic sensing presents unique features that have no match in conventional sensing techniques. The ability to measure temperatures and strain at thousands of points along a single fiber is particularly interesting for the monitoring of large structures such as pipelines, flow lines, oil wells, dams and dikes. Sensing systems based on Brillouin and Raman scattering have been used for example to detect pipeline leakages, verify pipeline operational parameters, prevent failure of pipelines installed in landslide areas, optimize oil production from wells and detect hot-spots in high-power cables. The measurement instruments have been vastly improved in terms of spatial, temperature and strain resolution, distance range, measurement time, data processing and system cost. Analyzers for Brillouin and Raman scattering are now commercially available and offer reliable operation in field conditions. New application opportunities have however demonstrated that the design and production of sensing cables is a critical element for the success of any distributed sensing instrumentation project. Although standard telecommunication cables can be effectively used for sensing ordinary temperatures, monitoring high and low temperatures or distributed strain present unique challenges that require specific cable designs. This contribution presents three cable designs for high-temperature sensing, strain sensing and combined strain and temperature monitoring as well as the respective testing procedures during production and in the field.

  20. Influence of Gravity on Blood Volume and Flow Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D.; Olszowka, A.; Bednarczyk, E.; Shykoff, B.; Farhi, L.

    1999-01-01

    In our previous experiments during NASA Shuttle flights SLS 1 and 2 (9-15 days) and EUROMIR flights (30-90 days) we observed that pulmonary blood flow (cardiac output) was elevated initially, and surprisingly remained elevated for the duration of the flights. Stroke volume increased initially and then decreased, but was still above 1 Gz values. As venous return was constant, the changes in SV were secondary to modulation of heart rate. Mean blood pressure was at or slightly below 1 Gz levels in space, indicating a decrease in total peripheral resistance. It has been suggested that plasma volume is reduced in space, however cardiac output/venous return do not return to 1 Gz levels over the duration of flight. In spite of the increased cardiac output, central venous pressure was not elevated in space. These data suggest that there is a change in the basic relationship between cardiac output and central venous pressure, a persistent "hyperperfusion" and a re-distribution of blood flow and volume during space flight. Increased pulmonary blood flow has been reported to increase diffusing capacity in space, presumably due to the improved homogeneity of ventilation and perfusion. Other studies have suggested that ventilation may be independent of gravity, and perfusion may not be gravity- dependent. No data for the distribution of pulmonary blood volume were available for flight or simulated microgravity. Recent studies have suggested that the pulmonary vascular tree is influenced by sympathetic tone in a manner similar to that of the systemic system. This implies that the pulmonary circulation is dilated during microgravity and that the distribution of blood flow and volume may be influenced more by vascular control than by gravity. The cerebral circulation is influenced by sympathetic tone similarly to that of the systemic and pulmonary circulations; however its effects are modulated by cerebral autoregulation. Thus it is difficult to predict if cerebral perfusion is

  1. Flow generation in a novel centrifugal diffuser test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidos, P.

    1983-09-01

    Recognition of the need to develop optimum diffusers for advanced centrifugal compressors, resulted in the design and manufacture of a novel low-speed test facility for centrifugal diffuser testing. The CDTD was designed to allow the flow angle and wall boundary profiles into the test diffuser to be controlled by variable geometry in the flow generator. The present study reports on the design of the flow generator and the analysis of the internal flow using a NASA computer code (MERIDL). First test results are given and are compared with the results of a control volume analysis. The flow angle control technique was found to work effectively but to give somewhat smaller angles (by 4 deg) than were predicted. It was concluded that the information obtained would allow scaling of the device; however, an analysis code was needed which would accept the real physical boundary conditions.

  2. Effects of intraborehole flow on groundwater age distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinn, B.A.; Konikow, L.F.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental tracers are used to estimate groundwater ages and travel times, but the strongly heterogeneous nature of many subsurface environments can cause mixing between waters of highly disparate ages, adding additional complexity to the age-estimation process. Mixing may be exacerbated by the presence of wells because long open intervals or long screens with openings at multiple depths can transport water and solutes rapidly over a large vertical distance. The effect of intraborehole flow on groundwater age was examined numerically using direct age transport simulation coupled with the Multi-Node Well Package of MODFLOW. Ages in a homogeneous, anisotropic aquifer reached a predevelopment steady state possessing strong depth dependence. A nonpumping multi-node well was then introduced in one of three locations within the system. In all three cases, vertical transport along the well resulted in substantial changes in age distributions within the system. After a pumping well was added near the nonpumping multi-node well, ages were further perturbed by a flow reversal in the nonpumping multi-node well. Results indicated that intraborehole flow can substantially alter groundwater ages, but the effects are highly dependent on local or regional flow conditions and may change with time. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  3. Pressure Distribution in Nonuniform Two-Dimensional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabe, M.

    1943-01-01

    In an attempt to follow the time rate of change of the processes in turbulent flows by quantitative measurements the measurement of the pressure is often beset with insuperable difficulties for the reason that the speeds and hence the pressures to be measured are often very small. On the other hand, the measurement of very small pressures requires, at least, considerable time, so that the follow-up of periodically varying processes is as goad as impossible. In order to obviate these difficulties a method, suggested by Prof. Prandtl, has been developed by which the pressure distribution is simply determined from the photographic flow picture. This method is described and proved on a worked-out example. It was found that quantitatively very satisfactory results can be achieved.

  4. Test report light duty utility arm power distribution system (PDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.

    1996-03-04

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Power Distribution System has completed vendor and post-delivery acceptance testing. The Power Distribution System has been found to be acceptable and is now ready for integration with the overall LDUA system.

  5. Separate Flow Nozzle Test Status Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, Naseem H. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn, in partnership with US industry, completed an exhaustive experimental study on jet noise reduction from separate flow nozzle exhaust systems. The study developed a data base on various bypass ratio nozzles, screened quietest configurations and acquired pertinent data for predicting the plume behavior and ultimately its corresponding jet noise. Several exhaust system configurations provided over 2.5 EPNdB jet noise reduction at take-off power. These data were disseminated to US aerospace industry in a conference hosted by NASA GRC whose proceedings are shown in this report.

  6. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  7. Test flow disturbances in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The operation of an expansion tube is investigated theoretically with emphasis on the factors that have limited the utility of the expansion tube in the past. It is shown why the window of steady test conditions is narrow and how this window can be expanded so that these facilities can be used in a variety of hypersonic research. The theoretical predictions are supported by centerline Pitot pressure measurements using air as the test gas.

  8. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  9. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    A flight-test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  10. PATHFINDER: Probing Atmospheric Flows in an Integrated and Distributed Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelmson, R. B.; Wojtowicz, D. P.; Shaw, C.; Hagedorn, J.; Koch, S.

    1995-01-01

    PATHFINDER is a software effort to create a flexible, modular, collaborative, and distributed environment for studying atmospheric, astrophysical, and other fluid flows in the evolving networked metacomputer environment of the 1990s. It uses existing software, such as HDF (Hierarchical Data Format), DTM (Data Transfer Mechanism), GEMPAK (General Meteorological Package), AVS, SGI Explorer, and Inventor to provide the researcher with the ability to harness the latest in desktop to teraflop computing. Software modules developed during the project are available in the public domain via anonymous FTP from the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The address is ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu, and the directory is /SGI/PATHFINDER.

  11. Probabilistic Vulnerability Assessment Based on Power Flow and Voltage Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jian; Huang, Zhenyu; Wong, Pak C.; Ferryman, Thomas A.

    2010-04-30

    Risk assessment of large scale power systems has been an important problem in power system reliability study. Probabilistic technique provides a powerful tool to solve the task. In this paper, we present the results of a study on probabilistic vulnerability assessment on WECC system. Cumulant based expansion method is applied to obtain the probabilistic distribution function (PDF) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) of power flows on transmission lines and voltage. Overall risk index based on the system vulnerability analysis is calculated using the WECC system. The simulation results based on WECC system is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The methodology can be applied to the risk analysis on large scale power systems.

  12. Emulsification in turbulent flow: 3. Daughter drop-size distribution.

    PubMed

    Tcholakova, Slavka; Vankova, Nina; Denkov, Nikolai D; Danner, Thomas

    2007-06-15

    Systematic set of experiments is performed to clarify the effects of several factors on the size distribution of the daughter drops, which are formed as a result of drop breakage during emulsification in turbulent flow. The effects of oil viscosity, etaD, interfacial tension, sigma, and rate of energy dissipation in the turbulent flow, epsilon, are studied. As starting oil-water premixes we use emulsions containing monodisperse oil drops, which have been generated by membrane emulsification. By passing these premixes through a narrow-gap homogenizer, working in turbulent regime of emulsification, we monitor the changes in the drop-size distribution with the emulsification time. The experimental data are analyzed by using a new numerical procedure, which is based on the assumption (supported by the experimental data) that the probability for formation of daughter drops with diameter smaller than the maximum diameter of the stable drops, ddistribution of these daughter drops depend strongly on the viscosity of the dispersed phase. Different scaling laws are found to describe the experimental results for the oils of low and high viscosity. The obtained results for the daughter drop-size distribution are in a reasonably good agreement with the experimental results reported by other authors. In contrast, the comparison with several basic model functions, proposed in the literature, does not show good agreement and the possible reasons are discussed. The proposed numerical procedure allows us to describe accurately the evolution of all main characteristics of the drop-size distribution during emulsification, such as the number and volume averaged diameters, and the distributive and cumulative functions by

  13. Flow Quality Studies of the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel Circuit (1995 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of conducting the flow-field surveys described in this report was to more fully document the flow quality in several areas of the tunnel circuit in the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel. The results from these surveys provide insight into areas of the tunnel that were known to exhibit poor flow quality characteristics and provide data that will be useful to the design of flow quality improvements and a new heat exchanger for the facility. An instrumented traversing mechanism was used to survey the flow field at several large cross sections of the tunnel loop over the entire speed range of the facility. Flow-field data were collected at five stations in the tunnel loop, including downstream of the fan drive motor housing, upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, and upstream and downstream of the spraybars located in the settling chamber upstream of the test section. The data collected during these surveys greatly expanded the data base describing the flow quality in each of these areas. The new data matched closely the flow quality trends recorded from earlier tests. Data collected downstream of the heat exchanger and in the settling chamber showed how the configuration of the folded heat exchanger affected the pressure, velocity, and flow angle distributions in these areas. Smoke flow visualization was also used to qualitatively study the flow field in an area downstream of the drive fan and in the settling chamber/contraction section.

  14. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01

    The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

  15. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The wing was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  16. The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test (FFFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test was designed to study flame spreading over solid fuels when air is flowing at a low speed concurrent airflows, some materials are more flammable in microgravity than earth. 1.5 cm flame in microgravity that melts a polyethylene cylinder into a liquid ball.

  17. Flow-test device fits into restricted access passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J. J.; Oberschmidt, M.; Rosenbaum, B. J.

    1967-01-01

    Test device using a mandrel with a collapsible linkage assembly enables a fluid flow sensor to be properly positioned in a restricted passage by external manipulation. This device is applicable to the combustion chamber of a rocket motor.

  18. How is flow experienced and by whom? Testing flow among occupations.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Susana; Salanova, Marisa; Rodríguez, Alma M

    2013-04-01

    The aims of this paper are to test (1) the factorial structure of the frequency of flow experience at work; (2) the flow analysis model in work settings by differentiating the frequency of flow and the frequency of its prerequisites; and (3) whether there are significant differences in the frequency of flow experience depending on the occupation. A retrospective study among 957 employees (474 tile workers and 483 secondary school teachers) using multigroup confirmatory factorial analyses and multiple analyses of variance suggested that on the basis of the flow analysis model in work settings, (1) the frequency of flow experience has a two-factor structure (enjoyment and absorption); (2) the frequency of flow experience at work is produced when both challenge and skills are high and balanced; and (3) secondary school teachers experience flow more frequently than tile workers. PMID:22674654

  19. Measurement of countercurrent phase separation and distribution in a two-dimensional test section

    SciTech Connect

    Bukhari, K M; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1984-01-01

    The degree of phase separation that occurs in the core of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during various postulated accidents is an important consideration for studying the course of events during such accidents. The dependence of countercurrent phase separation and distribution phenomena on flow quality, mass flux and system geometry was studied experimentally in a two-dimensional (2-D) test section. A two-phase (air/water) mixture flowed upwards and single-phase water flowed downward along one side of the test section. This countercurrent flow configuration was intended to simulate the so-called chimney effect in the diabatic JAERI 2-D experiments in Japan. A large air/water loop used with a 91.44 cm x 91.44 cm x 1.27 cm test section to study phase separation and distribution effects. A traversing single beam gamma-densitometer was used to measure the chordal average void fractions at several elevations along the test section. Cross-plots between various flow conditions and geometries were made. An error analysis giving the total error in the void fraction measurements was also performed. High speed photographs were also made of the flow structure, to provide information on flow regimes. The photographic records and the void fraction and hydraulic inflow/outflow data are presented in a form suitable for the assessment of advanced generation computer codes (e.g., TRAC).

  20. Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J.; Smith, Jeff; Dugan, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating

  1. Distributed acoustic receptivity in laminar flow control configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1992-01-01

    A model problem related to distributed receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in laminar flow control (LFC) configurations is studied, within the Orr-Sommerfield framework, by a suitable extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory for receptivity due to localized disturbances on the airfoil surface. The results, thus, complement the earlier work on the receptivity produced by local variations in the surface suction and/or surface admittance. In particular, we show that the cumulative effect of the distributed receptivity can be substantially larger than that of a single, isolated suction strip or slot. Furthermore, even if the receptivity is spread out over very large distances, the most effective contributions come from a relatively short region in vicinity of the lower branch of the neutral stability curve. The length scale of this region is intermediate to that of the mean of these two length scales. Finally, it is found that the receptivity is effectively dominated by a narrow band of Fourier components from the wall-suction and admittance distributions, roughly corresponding to a detuning of less than ten percent with respect to the neutral instability wavenumber at the frequency under consideration. The results suggest that the drop-off in receptivity magnitudes away from the resonant wavenumber is nearly independent of the frequency parameter.

  2. 10 CFR 431.198 - Enforcement testing for distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Enforcement testing for distribution transformers. 431.198 Section 431.198 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Compliance and Enforcement § 431.198 Enforcement testing for...

  3. The Absolute Differential Area Technique for Testing Distributional Normality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Richard P.

    The results of a study of find alternative techniques for testing distributional normality are presented. A group of statistical techniques--some established and some new--were compared using empirical techniques. One new technique which appears to have higher power than the Lilliefors test was subjected to a better definition. Distributions under…

  4. Investigation of the velocity distribution in the flow of a journal bearing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, Matthias; Reinke, Peter; Schmidt, Marcus; Riedel, Marco; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    In many previous studies the main focus was put on the pressure distribution in the lubricating gap. Due to the limited space in the gap an investigation of the velocity distribution is very difficult or rather impossible. Based on the geometrical shapes of a real journal bearing, a bearing model test rig with an increased relative gap width has been developed. Thus, it is possible to detect the distribution of the flow speed within the gap by using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). The comparability of the flow to the flow in a real journal bearing is ensured by observing the Reynolds similarity. Due to a targeted eccentricity in the system and the circumferential groove over 180°, there is in connection with the outlet hole in the rotating shaft a permanent change in the outflow conditions. The consequence is a periodically varying system pressure with effects to the pressure and volumetric flow rate at the inlet and outlet. The velocity measurements with a triggered LDV are done by considering these transient boundary conditions at the system boundaries. In this paper the experimental setup, the expiration of the investigations and some exemplary results are presented. Attendant to the experiment, numerical simulations are carried out and the results are compared with the experimental data.

  5. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-13

    The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

  6. Snow distribution and heat flow in the taiga

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M. )

    1992-05-01

    The trees of the taiga intercept falling snow and cause it to become distributed in an uneven fashion. Around aspen and birch, cone-shaped accumulations form. Beneath large spruce trees, the snow cover is depleted, forming a bowl-shaped depression called a tree well. Small spruce trees become covered with snow, creating cavities that funnel cold air to the snow/ground interface. The depletion of snow under large spruce trees results in greater heat loss from the ground. A finite difference model suggests that heat flow from tree wells can be more than twice that of undisturbed snow. In forested watersheds, this increase can be a significant percentage of the total winter energy exchange.

  7. Influence of flow rate on aerosol particle size distributions from pressurized and breath-actuated inhalers.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Chan, H K; Brown, K F

    1998-01-01

    Particle size distribution of delivered aerosols and the total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler are important determinants of pulmonary deposition and response to inhalation therapy. Inhalation flow rate may vary between patients and from dose to dose. The Andersen Sampler (AS) cascade impactor operated at flow rates of 30 and 55 L/min and the Marple-Miller Impactor (MMI) operated at flow rates of 30, 55, and 80 L/min were used in this study to investigate the influence of airflow rate on the particle size distributions of inhalation products. Total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler, fine particle mass, fine particle fraction, percentage of nonrespirable particles, and amount of formulation retained within the inhaler were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry for several commercial bronchodilator products purchased in the marketplace, including a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), breath-actuated pressurized inhaler (BAMDI), and three dry powder inhalers (DPIs), two containing salbutamol sulphate and the other containing terbutaline sulphate. Varying the flow rate through the cascade impactor produced no significant change in performance of the pressurized inhalers. Increasing the flow rate produced a greater mass of drug delivered and an increase in respirable particle mass and fraction from all DPIs tested. PMID:10346666

  8. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 3. Single tube parallel flow tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-06-01

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1--2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. A series of down flow experiments have been conducted on three different size single tubes. The objective of these experiments was to determine the effect of a parallel flow path on the occurrence of flow instability. In all cases, it has been shown that the point of flow instability (OFI) determined under controlled flow operation does not change when operating in a controlled pressure drop mode (parallel path operation).

  9. Analytical flow/thermal modeling of combustion gas flows in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor test joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, G. H.; Knox, E. C.; Pond, J. E.; Bacchus, D. L.; Hengel, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical tool, TOPAZ (Transient One-dimensional Pipe flow AnalyZer), was used to model the flow characteristics of hot combustion gases through Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints and to compute the resultant material surface temperatures and o-ring seal erosion of the joints. The capabilities of the analytical tool were validated with test data during the Seventy Pound Charge (SPC) motor test program. The predicted RSRM joint thermal response to ignition transients was compared with test data for full-scale motor tests. The one-dimensional analyzer is found to be an effective tool for simulating combustion gas flows in RSRM joints and for predicting flow and thermal properties.

  10. ac power control in the Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    This work represents a status report on a development effort to design an ac power controller for the Core Flow Test Loop. The Core Flow Test Loop will be an engineering test facility which will simulate the thermal environment of a gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. The problems and limitations of using sinusoidal ac power to simulate the power generated within a nuclear reactor are addressed. The transformer-thyristor configuration chosen for the Core Flow Test Loop power supply is presented. The initial considerations, design, and analysis of a closed-loop controller prototype are detailed. The design is then analyzed for improved performance possibilities and failure modes are investigated at length. A summary of the work completed to date and a proposed outline for continued development completes the report.

  11. Distribution Pattern of Terrestrial Heat Flow in Bohai Bay Basin, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Gong, Y.; Liu, S.; Li, C.; Li, H.

    2004-12-01

    New temperature data from wells in Bohai bay basin increasing associated with the enhancement of oil and gas exploration there provides more reliable information about studying on Terrestrial heat flow pattern. Based on the data from 88 systematic continuous temperature logging curves and more than 1000 well test temperature data, along with the corresponding thermo-physical parameters of rock samples, here we determined 53 heat flow data and estimated other 172 according to thermal resistance method, then the distribution Pattern of heat flow in Bohai Bay basin is presented. Heat flow in Bohai bay basin is relatively large than those in the surrounding mountain areas. For instance, heat flow of Yanshan, north of the basin, is only low as 25 ~ 54 mW/m2, and less than 50 mW/m2 for Taihang mountain to the west, the average heat flow of Luxi Uplift is about 54 mW/m2. Crustal thickness of regions outside the basin to the west and north approximating to 36~44km, apparently is larger than that of basin, which maybe accounts for the high heat flow in Bohai bay basin. Those regions of relatively thin crust within the basin are of middle-high heat flow. Heat flow in such depressions as the Lower Liaohe, Bozhong, Jiyang and Yongqing area northeast of Jizhong Depression, together with Bohai offshore, for example, are all larger than 64 mW/m2, and even high as 70 mW/m2 for some regions with mantle upwelling. Low heat flow appears in those areas with relatively thick crust. For instance, heat flow in Linqing Depression, southwest margin of Jizhong Depression and southern Huanghua Depression, are all less than 64 mW/m2, even less than 60 mW/m2 for those areas with mantle downwelling. Heat flow pattern in Bohai Bay basin is negative correlation with crustal thickness, for those regions with relatively crustal thinning, heat derived from the deep earth is more due to the large lithospheric extension, resulting in the high heat flow; while for those with crustal thickening, heat

  12. Computational strategies for three-dimensional flow simulations on distributed computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Weed, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    This research effort is directed towards an examination of issues involved in porting large computational fluid dynamics codes in use within the industry to a distributed computing environment. This effort addresses strategies for implementing the distributed computing in a device independent fashion and load balancing. A flow solver called TEAM presently in use at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company was acquired to start this effort. The following tasks were completed: (1) The TEAM code was ported to a number of distributed computing platforms including a cluster of HP workstations located in the School of Aerospace Engineering at Georgia Tech; a cluster of DEC Alpha Workstations in the Graphics visualization lab located at Georgia Tech; a cluster of SGI workstations located at NASA Ames Research Center; and an IBM SP-2 system located at NASA ARC. (2) A number of communication strategies were implemented. Specifically, the manager-worker strategy and the worker-worker strategy were tested. (3) A variety of load balancing strategies were investigated. Specifically, the static load balancing, task queue balancing and the Crutchfield algorithm were coded and evaluated. (4) The classical explicit Runge-Kutta scheme in the TEAM solver was replaced with an LU implicit scheme. And (5) the implicit TEAM-PVM solver was extensively validated through studies of unsteady transonic flow over an F-5 wing, undergoing combined bending and torsional motion. These investigations are documented in extensive detail in the dissertation, 'Computational Strategies for Three-Dimensional Flow Simulations on Distributed Computing Systems', enclosed as an appendix.

  13. Testing the instream flow method in trout streams

    SciTech Connect

    Studley, T.K.; Railsback, S.F.; Asce, M.

    1995-12-31

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s (PG&E) Department of Research and Development and co-sponsors are fieldtesting the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) at a number of trout stream study sites. Fish populations, flows, and other variables were measured for an eight-year baseline period. Three levels of increasingly sophisticated predictions of population response to increased flows were made. The flow increases have been implemented and additional data are being collected to test the predictions. The baseline data and prediction analyses indicate that (1) using different habitat suitability criteria produces substantially different predictions of how populations respond to flow changes, (2) overlaps in habitat used by trout species can lead to misleading predictions of a population`s response to flow changes, and (3) factors other than habitat during summer low flows can limit trout populations (these include spawning habitat, high flows, stream channel characteristics, and stream temperature). Comprehensive field studies are expensive, but are more likely to result in instream flows that provide a cost-effective tradeoff between power and fisheries values.

  14. Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. )

    1992-04-01

    This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

  15. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  16. Effect of relative velocity distribution on efficiency and exit flow of centrifugal impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishina, H.; Nishida, H.

    1983-03-01

    A quasi-three-dimensional flow analysis proposed by Senoo and Nakase (1972) is applied in order to estimate the relative velocity distribution within a centrifugal impeller, assuming that the flow is both isentropic and inviscid. The relationship between relative velocity distribution, impeller efficiency, and meridional exit flow is experimentally investigated for the case of shrouded impellers having various relative velocity distributions. Analytical results are used to establish design criteria for the relative velocity distribution of centrifugal impellers.

  17. Flow-Log Analysis for Hydraulic Characterization of Selected Test Wells at the Indian Point Energy Center, Buchanan, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Flow logs from 24 test wells were analyzed as part of the hydraulic characterization of the metamorphosed and fractured carbonate bedrock at the Indian Point Energy Center in Buchanan, New York. The flow logs were analyzed along with caliper, optical- and acoustic-televiewer, and fluid-resistivity and temperature logs to determine the character and distribution of fracture-flow zones and estimate their transmissivities and hydraulic heads. Many flow zones were associated with subhorizontal to shallow-dipping fractured zones, southeast-dipping bedding fractures, northwest-dipping conjugate fractures, or combinations of bedding and conjugate fractures. Flow-log analysis generally provided reasonable first-order estimates of flow-zone transmissivity and head differences compared with the results of conventional hydraulic-test analysis and measurements. Selected results of an aquifer test and a tracer test provided corroborating information in support of the flow-log analysis.

  18. A modification to vertical distribution of tidal flow Reynolds stress in shallow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Zhi-hui; Song, Zhi-yao; Zhang, Xu-jin; Wu, Li-chun; Yi, Jing

    2012-09-01

    Tidal flow is a periodic movement of unsteady and non-uniform, which has acceleration and deceleration process obviously, especially in coastal shallow waters. Many researches show that vertical distribution of tidal flow Reynolds stress deviated from linear distribution. The parabolic distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress was proposed by Song et al. (2009). Although the model fills better with field observations and indoor experimental data, it has the lower truncated series expansion of tidal flow Reynolds stress, and the description of the distribution is not very comprehensive. By introducing the motion equation of tidal flow and improving the parabolic distribution established by Song et al. (2009), the cubic distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress is proposed. The cubic distribution is verified well by field data (Bowden and Fairbairn, 1952; Bowden et al., 1959; Rippeth et al., 2002) and experimental data (Anwar and Atkins, 1980), is consistent with the numerical model results of Kuo et al. (1996), and is compared with the parabolic distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress. It is shown that this cubic distribution is not only better than the parabolic distribution, but also can better reflect the basic features of Reynolds stress deviating from linear distribution downward with the tidal flow acceleration and upward with the tidal flow deceleration, for the foundation of further study on the velocity profile of tidal flow.

  19. Ground vibration test of the laminar flow control JStar airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Ellison, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A ground vibration test was conducted on a Lockheed JetStar airplane that had been modified for the purpose of conducting laminar flow control experiments. The test was performed prior to initial flight flutter tests. Both sine-dwell and single-point-random excitation methods were used. The data presented include frequency response functions and a comparison of mode frequencies and mode shapes from both methods.

  20. Experiments of Flow Field Influenced by Vegetation Distribution on Floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Fu; Wang, Shun-Chang; Chen, Su-Chin

    2015-04-01

    The vegetation on floodplain can block river flow, raise flood level, and scour riverbed downstream the vegetation region. However, it can also protect the dike, reduce flood velocity, and increase the stability of channel. This experiment analyzed the relationship between vegetation distribution and flow field. We designed three vegetation arrangement pattern of unilateral vegetation, unilateral interval vegetation and no vegetation, respectively. The unilateral vegetation was defined as a 4.9 m length and 0.5 m width with vegetative area in one side of the experiment flume. The unilateral interval vegetation was defined as the same dimension of vegetative area but inserted 2 gaps with 1 m interval, and the vegetative area was separated into 3 blocks. The model of a single plant was assembled with stem and frond. The stem was a woody cylinder with 10 cm height and 2.2 cm in diameter. The other part was plastic frond with 10 cm in height. The flume was 20 m length, 1 m width and 0.7 m height with 2 kinds of bed slopes in 0.001 and 0.002, and 3 different discharges in 0.2 m3/s, 0.145 m3/s and 0.0855 m3/s. The velocity was measured by 2-D electromagnetic velocimeter (ACM2-R2). In addition, water depth was measured by Vernier calipers. The velocity distribution showed that the current were divided into two parts. In the part of inside vegetation area, water level uplifted when flow entering the vegetation area, and it declined until the current leaving vegetation area. Compared with the current in the other half part of flume, the magnitudes of uplift were about 50% in both case of unilateral vegetation and unilateral interval vegetation. Downstream the vegetation area edge, the water level dropped immediately and violently. The water depth was shallower than that in the other half non-vegetation part, and the decline magnitude were 48% and 39% in cases of unilateral vegetation and unilateral interval vegetation, respectively. To explain this phenomenon, we measured

  1. Flow distribution in parallel connected manifolds for evacuated tubular solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhedran, R. C.; Mackey, D. J. M.; McKenzie, D. R.; Collins, R. E.

    A model is presented for predicting the flow distribution in solar collector manifolds in which risers are connected in parallel between headers. Both frictional and Bernoulli effects are considered. The distributions resulting from flow in the manifold in which header streams are parallel and opposed are calculated and compared with experiment. Parallel flow gives a more uniform distribution. The outlet header is found to be more critical in balancing the flow distribution than the inlet header. Conditions under which thermosiphon effects are important and flow reversal in risers may occur are discussed with reference to experiment.

  2. Influence of impactor operating flow rate on particle size distribution of four jet nebulizers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Brasel, Trevor L; Kracko, Dean; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Ahuja, Amitkumar; Norenberg, Jeffrey P; Kelly, H William

    2007-01-01

    When a nebulizer is evaluated by the Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI), the flow rate is generally maintained at 28.3 L/min, as recommended by the manufacturer. However, the nebulizer flow rate that a patient inhales is only around 18 L/min. Because the drive flow of a nebulizer is approximately 6-8 L/min, the nebulized drug is mixed with outside air when delivered. Evaluating impactor performance at the 28.3 L/min flow rate is less than ideal because an additional 10 L/min of outside air is mixed with the drug, thereby affecting the drug size distribution and dose before inhalation and deposition in the human lung. In this study we operated the ACI at an 18.0 L/min flow rate to test whether the effect of the changing ambient humidity was being exaggerated by the 28.3 L/min flow rate. The study was carried out at three different relative humidity levels and two different impactor flow rates with four commercially available nebulizers. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and the geometric standard deviation (GSD) of the droplets were found to increase when the impactor was operated at a flow rate of 18 L/min compared to that of 28.3 L/min. The higher MMAD and GSD could cause the patient to inhale less of the drug than expected if the nebulizer was evaluated by the ACI at the operating flow rate of 28.3 L/min. PMID:17763140

  3. An experimental study of a self-confined flow with ring-vorticity distribution. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. M.; Moore, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A new form of self-confined flow was investigated in which a recirculation zone forms away from any solid boundary. An inviscid flow analysis indicated that in a purely meridional axisymmetric flow a stationary, spherical, self-confined region should occur in the center of a streamlined divergent-convergent enlargement zone. The spherical confinement region would be at rest and at constant pressure. Experimental investigations were carried out in a specially built test apparatus to establish the desired confined flow. The streamlined divergent-convergent interior shape of the test section was fabricated according to the theoretical calculation for a particular streamline. The required inlet vorticity distribution was generated by producing a velocity profile with a shaped gauze screen in the straight pipe upstream of the test section. Fluid speed and turbulence intensity were measured with a constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer system. The measured results indicated a very orderly and stable flow field.

  4. Fractional flow in fractured chalk; a flow and tracer test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odling, N. E.; West, L. J.; Hartmann, S.; Kilpatrick, A.

    2013-04-01

    A multi-borehole pumping and tracer test in fractured chalk is revisited and reinterpreted in the light of fractional flow. Pumping test data analyzed using a fractional flow model gives sub-spherical flow dimensions of 2.2-2.4 which are interpreted as due to the partially penetrating nature of the pumped borehole. The fractional flow model offers greater versatility than classical methods for interpreting pumping tests in fractured aquifers but its use has been hampered because the hydraulic parameters derived are hard to interpret. A method is developed to convert apparent transmissivity and storativity (L4-n/T and S2-n) to conventional transmissivity and storativity (L2/T and dimensionless) for the case where flow dimension, 2 < n < 3. These parameters may then be used in further applications, facilitating application of the fractional flow model. In the case illustrated, improved fits to drawdown data are obtained and the resultant transmissivities and storativities are found to be lower by 30% and an order of magnitude respectively, than estimates from classical methods. The revised hydraulic parameters are used in a reinterpretation of a tracer test using an analytical dual porosity model of solute transport incorporating matrix diffusion and modified for fractional flow. Model results show smaller fracture apertures, spacings and dispersivities than those when 2D flow is assumed. The pumping and tracer test results and modeling presented illustrate the importance of recognizing the potential fractional nature of flow generated by partially penetrating boreholes in fractured aquifers in estimating aquifer properties and interpreting tracer breakthrough curves.

  5. [Flow field test on the tangential section of polypropylene tubular membrane module annular gap in rotating linear tangential flow].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengduan; Chen, Wenmei; Li, Jianming; Jiang, Guangming

    2002-07-01

    A new type of polypropylene tubular membrane apparatus of rotating cross flow was designed to study experimentally the flow field characteristics of the tangential section of the membrane annular gap. The authors designed rotary linear tangential flow tubular membrane separator and its test system for the first time. Through the system, the flow field of rotary linear tangential flow with the advanced Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was tested for the first time. A lot of streamlines and vorticity maps of the tangential section of separator in different operation conditions were obtained. The velocity distribution characteristics were analyzed quantitatively: 1. At non-vortex area, no matter how the operation parameters change, the velocity near to rotary tangential flow entrance was higher than the velocity far from entrance at the same radial coordinates. At vortex area, generally the flow velocity of inner vortex was lower than the outer vortex. At the vortex center, the velocity was lowest, the tangential velocity were equal to zero generally. At the vortex center zone, the tangential velocity was less than the axial velocity. 2. Under test operations, the tangential velocity and axial velocity of vortices borders are 1-2 times of average axial velocity of membrane module annular gap. The maximum tangential velocity and axial velocity of ellipse vortices were 2-6 times of average axial velocity of membrane module annular gap. 3. The vortices that are formed on the tangential section, there existed mass transfer between inner and outer parts of fluid. Much fluid of outer vortices got into the inner ones, which was able to prevent membrane tube from particles blocking up very soon. PMID:12371104

  6. Laminar flow test installation in the Boeing Research Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George-Falvy, Dezso

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the initial wind tunnels tests in the 5- by 8-ft Boeing Research Wind Tunnel of a near full-scale (20-foot chord) swept wing section having laminar flow control (LFC) by slot suction over its first 30 percent chord. The model and associated test apparatus were developed for use as a testbed for LFC-related experimentation in support of preliminary design studies done under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This paper contains the description of the model and associated test apparatus as well as the results of the initial test series in which the proper functioning of the test installation was demonstrated and new data were obtained on the sensitivity of suction-controlled laminar flow to surface protuberances in the presence of crossflow due to sweep.

  7. Wind Tunnel Test Results for Gas Flows Inside Axisymmetric Cavities on Cylindric Bodies with Nose Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvets, A. L.; Gilinsky, M.; Blankson, I. M.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental test results of air flow inside and at the cylindrical cavity located on axisymmetric body are presented. These tests were conducted in the wind tunnel A-7 of Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University. Pressure distribution along the cavities and optical measurements were obtained. Dependence of these characteristics of length of a cavity in the range: L/D = 0.5 - 14 and free stream Mach in the range: M(sub infinity) = 0.6 - 3.0 was determined. Flow structure inside the cavity, cause of flow regime change, separation zones geometry and others were studied. In particular, the flow modes of with open and closed separation zones are determined.

  8. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  9. Univariate and Bivariate Loglinear Models for Discrete Test Score Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Paul W.; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    2000-01-01

    Applied the theory of exponential families of distributions to the problem of fitting the univariate histograms and discrete bivariate frequency distributions that often arise in the analysis of test scores. Considers efficient computation of the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters using Newton's Method and computationally efficient…

  10. Distribution of "Compound" and "Simple" Flows in the Deccan Traps (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Self, S.; Jay, A. E.; Sheth, H. C.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deccan Traps are a dominantly mafic large igneous province (LIP) that, prior to erosion, covered ~1 million km2 of west-central India with lava flows. The type sections of the Western Ghats escarpment, where the Deccan lava pile reaches a maximum reconstructed stratigraphic thickness of ~3400 m, are subdivided into eleven formations defined on chemo-stratigraphic grounds. Earlier work recognized that emplacement of Deccan basalt flows primarily occurs following two main modes: as a stack of meter-sized pāhoehoe toes and lobes, termed "compound" flows; or as inflated sheet lobes tens to hundreds of meters in width and meters to tens of meters in height, previously termed "simple" flows. Initially, the distribution of small lobes and sheet lobes in the Deccan was thought to be controlled by distance from source, but later work suggested the distribution to be mainly controlled along stratigraphic, formational boundaries, with six of the lower formations being composed exclusively of compound flows, and the upper 4-5 formations being wholly built of sheet lobes. This simple stratigraphic subdivision of lava flow morphologies has also been documented in the volcanic architecture of other LIPs, e.g., the Etendeka, the Ethiopian Traps, and in the Faeroe Islands (North Atlantic LIP). Upon examination of eight sections carefully logged along the Western Ghats, this traditional view must be challenged. Where the lower Deccan formations crop out, we found that as much as 65% of the exposed thickness (below the Khandala Formation) is made up of sheet lobes, from 40% in the Bhimashankar Formation to 75% in the Thakurvadi Formation. Near the bottom of the sequence, 25% of the Neral Formation is composed of sheet lobes ≥15 m in thickness. This distribution in lava flow morphology does not seem to be noticeably affected by the inferred distance to the source (based on the location of similar-composition dikes for each formation). Several mechanisms have been proposed to

  11. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  12. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-06-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  13. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  14. Flow Visualization of Liquid Hydrogen Line Chilldown Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen John B.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of wall and fluid temperature during chill-down tests of a warm cryogenic line with liquid hydrogen. Synchronized video and fluid temperature measurements are used to interpret stream temperature profiles versus time. When cold liquid hydrogen starts to flow into the warm line, a sequence of flow regimes, spanning from all-vapor at the outset to bubbly with continuum liquid at the end can be observed at a location far downstream of the cold inlet. In this paper we propose interpretations to the observed flow regimes and fluid temperature histories for two chilldown methods, viz. trickle (i.e. continuous) flow and pulse flow. Calculations of heat flux from the wall to the fluid versus wall temperature indicate the presence of the transition/nucleate boiling regimes only. The present tests, run at typical Reynolds numbers of approx O(10 (exp 5)), are in sharp contrast to similar tests conducted at lower Reynolds numbers where a well-defined film boiling region is observed.

  15. Flow reference method testing and analysis: Field test plan, Texas Utilities Decordova Steam Electric Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Werner, A.S.

    1997-05-30

    This report describes the experimental design and test plan for the first of three field tests that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted in 1997 as part of a major study to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. The experimental design involved four test teams taking concurrent in-stack measurements with velocity sensing probes. Seven types of probes were included in the study. Three test matrices were used to gather data for inter-probe and inter-team comparisons and to assess the impact of velocity decline near the stack wall on volumetric flow measurements.

  16. Flow measurements in a centrifugal diffusor test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitting, T.

    1985-06-01

    This work sought to verify concepts used in the design of a large scale, low speed, radial cascade wind tunnel which was to be used to investigate flow phenomena in and the performance of vaned radial diffusors. A major contributor to centrifugal compressor efficiency is the performance of the vaned diffusor which closely follows the impeller of the compressor. The purpose of this diffusor is to efficiently convert most of the kinetic energy of the transonic flow entering the vane into pressure. The need for an experimental facility which could simulate adequately, at low cost and in a controlled way, the environment of the centrifugal compressor motivated the development of the Centrifugal Diffusor Test Device (CDTD). It was expected that the generation of a three dimensional flow would provide improved empirical data on annular cascade performance. This measurement program surveyed the axial and circumferential uniformity of the flow at the inlet of a transonic wedge-type blading mounted in the device. Evaluation of the results showed the flow uniformity to be unsatisfactory. Leakage and other small perturbations in the flow field in the swirl generator are believed to be amplified by the basic flow configuration of the device.

  17. EPA flow reference method testing and analysis: Findings report. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    In the summer of 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a series of week-long field tests at three electric utility sites to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. The findings from that study are presented in document EPA/430-R-99-009a (NTIS Order Number PB99-150286). This document contains 10 appendices for that report.

  18. Mesoscale Simulations of Particulate Flows with Parallel Distributed Lagrange Multiplier Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kanarska, Y

    2010-03-24

    Fluid particulate flows are common phenomena in nature and industry. Modeling of such flows at micro and macro levels as well establishing relationships between these approaches are needed to understand properties of the particulate matter. We propose a computational technique based on the direct numerical simulation of the particulate flows. The numerical method is based on the distributed Lagrange multiplier technique following the ideas of Glowinski et al. (1999). Each particle is explicitly resolved on an Eulerian grid as a separate domain, using solid volume fractions. The fluid equations are solved through the entire computational domain, however, Lagrange multiplier constrains are applied inside the particle domain such that the fluid within any volume associated with a solid particle moves as an incompressible rigid body. Mutual forces for the fluid-particle interactions are internal to the system. Particles interact with the fluid via fluid dynamic equations, resulting in implicit fluid-rigid-body coupling relations that produce realistic fluid flow around the particles (i.e., no-slip boundary conditions). The particle-particle interactions are implemented using explicit force-displacement interactions for frictional inelastic particles similar to the DEM method of Cundall et al. (1979) with some modifications using a volume of an overlapping region as an input to the contact forces. The method is flexible enough to handle arbitrary particle shapes and size distributions. A parallel implementation of the method is based on the SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) library, which allows handling of large amounts of rigid particles and enables local grid refinement. Accuracy and convergence of the presented method has been tested against known solutions for a falling sphere as well as by examining fluid flows through stationary particle beds (periodic and cubic packing). To evaluate code performance and validate particle

  19. Numerical and experimental study on the flow distribution in a water manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gwansik; Jong Lee, Pil; Kang, Jong Hoon

    2016-03-01

    This study presents water distribution analysis of the device for spraying cooling water through specific nozzles numerically and experimentally. Numerical analysis was performed using the 3-D incompressible, multi-phase flow model, for different Reynolds numbers of 4 × 105, 8 × 105. Experimental analysis was performed at real-size, under the same conditions. The calculated results and the measured results for the distribution of flow were matched relatively well. The distribution of the nozzle flow depends on the Reynolds number.

  20. CONSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION OF A FLOW TEST STAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    A test stand for the examination of flow monitors in a 3-inch pipe was designed, constructed, and evaluated. The calculations necessary for the proper design are based on empirical data and are described in detail. A statistical analysis was used to estimate the error generated f...

  1. Cotton-Harvester-Flow Simulator for Testing Cotton Yield Monitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experimental system was developed to simulate the pneumatic flow arrangement found in picker-type cotton harvesters. The simulation system was designed and constructed for testing a prototype cotton yield monitor developed at Mississippi State University. The simulation system was constructed to ...

  2. Review of Test Facilities for Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    AKHIL,ABBAS ALI; MARNAY,CHRIS; KIPMAN,TIMOTHY

    2003-05-01

    Since initiating research on integration of distributed energy resources (DER) in 1999, the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) has been actively assessing and reviewing existing DER test facilities for possible demonstrations of advanced DER system integration concepts. This report is a compendium of information collected by the CERTS team on DER test facilities during this period.

  3. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  4. Model-Driven Test Generation of Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easwaran, Arvind; Hall, Brendan; Schweiker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a novel test generation technique for distributed systems. Utilizing formal models and formal verification tools, spe cifically the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL) tool-suite from SRI, we present techniques to generate concurrent test vectors for distrib uted systems. These are initially explored within an informal test validation context and later extended to achieve full MC/DC coverage of the TTEthernet protocol operating within a system-centric context.

  5. Testing the global flow reconstruction method on coupled chaotic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachy, Emese; Kolláth, Zoltán

    2010-03-01

    Irregular behaviour of pulsating variable stars may occur due to low dimensional chaos. To determine the quantitative properties of the dynamics in such systems, we apply a suitable time series analysis, the global flow reconstruction method. The robustness of the reconstruction can be tested through the resultant quantities, like Lyapunov dimension and Fourier frequencies. The latter is specially important as it is directly derivable from the observed light curves. We have performed tests using coupled Rossler oscillators to investigate the possible connection between those quantities. In this paper we present our test results.

  6. Method of Estimating the Incompressible-flow Pressure Distribution of Compressor Blade Sections at Design Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, John R; Yacobi, Laura A

    1953-01-01

    A method was devised for estimating the incompressible-flow pressure distribution over compressor blade sections at design angle of attack. The theoretical incremental velocities due to camber and thickness of the section as an isolated airfoil are assumed proportional to the average passage velocity and are modified by empirically determined interference factors. Comparisons were made between estimated and test pressure distributions of NACA 65-series sections for typical conditions. Good agreement was obtained.

  7. Flow and diffusion of high-stakes test scores

    PubMed Central

    Marder, M.; Bansal, D.

    2009-01-01

    We apply visualization and modeling methods for convective and diffusive flows to public school mathematics test scores from Texas. We obtain plots that show the most likely future and past scores of students, the effects of random processes such as guessing, and the rate at which students appear in and disappear from schools. We show that student outcomes depend strongly upon economic class, and identify the grade levels where flows of different groups diverge most strongly. Changing the effectiveness of instruction in one grade naturally leads to strongly nonlinear effects on student outcomes in subsequent grades. PMID:19805049

  8. Cold Flow Plume Entrainment Test Final Report NTF Test Number 2456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David; Mishtawy, Jason; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Hammad, Khaled J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Space Shuttle Return to Flight (RTF) program, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to define the velocity flowfields around the Shuttle stack at liftoff. These CFD predicted velocity flowfields were used in debris transport analysis (DTA). High speed flows such as plumes induce or 'entrain' mass from the surrounding environment. Previous work had shown that CFD analysis over-predicts plume induced flows. Therefore, the DTA would tend to 1) predict more debris impacts, and 2) the debris velocity (and kinetic energy) of those impacts would be too high. At a November, 2004 peer-review it was recommended that the Liftoff DTA team quantify the uncertainty in the DTA caused by the CFD's over prediction of plume induced flow. To do so, the Liftoff DTA team needed benchmark quality data for plume induced flow to quantify the CFD accuracy and its effect on the DTA. MSFC's Nozzle Test Facility (NTF) conducted the "Nozzle Induced Flows test, P#2456" to obtain experimental data for plume induced flows for nozzle flow exhausting into q quiescent freestream. Planning for the test began in December, 2004 and the experimental data was obtained in February and March of 2005. The funding for this test was provided by MSFC's Space Shuttle Propulsion Systems Integration and Engineering office.

  9. Suppression of secondary flows in a double suction centrifugal pump with different loading distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, H. F.; Wang, F. J.; Zhang, Z. C.; Yao, Z. F.; Zhou, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary flow is one of the main reasons for low efficiency in double suction centrifugal pump. In a 3-D inverse design method, the pump blade could be designed by a specified loading distribution to control the flow field in pump. In order to study the influence of loading distribution on secondary flow of a double suction centrifugal pump, the external characteristics and the internal flow field of the pump with three kinds of loading distributions are analysed by using CFD approach. According to the simulation results, it is found that the form of fore-loading distribution at shroud and aft-loading distribution at hub could improve the optimal efficiency and broaden the high efficiency area of the pump. Furthermore, the secondary flow in impeller exit region and volute could be significantly suppressed if the slope of loading distribution curve of shroud is set to be -0.7.

  10. Fluid flow measurements of Test Series A and B for the Small Scale Seal Performance Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.

    1987-12-01

    The degree of waste isolation achieved by a repository seal system is dependent upon the fluid flow characteristics, or permeability, of the seals. In order to obtain meaningful, site-specific data on the performance of various possible seal system components, a series of in situ experiments called the Small Scale Seal Performance Tests (SSSPT) are being conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report contains the results of gas flow, tracer penetration, and brine flow tests conducted on concrete seals in vertical (Test Series A) and horizontal (Test Series B) configurations. The test objectives were to evaluate the seal performance and to determine if there existed scaling effects which could influence future SSSPT designs. 3 refs., 77 figs.

  11. A note on the asymptotic distribution of likelihood ratio tests to test variance components.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Peter M

    2006-08-01

    When using maximum likelihood methods to estimate genetic and environmental components of (co)variance, it is common to test hypotheses using likelihood ratio tests, since such tests have desirable asymptotic properties. In particular, the standard likelihood ratio test statistic is assumed asymptotically to follow a chi2 distribution with degrees of freedom equal to the number of parameters tested. Using the relationship between least squares and maximum likelihood estimators for balanced designs, it is shown why the asymptotic distribution of the likelihood ratio test for variance components does not follow a chi2 distribution with degrees of freedom equal to the number of parameters tested when the null hypothesis is true. Instead, the distribution of the likelihood ratio test is a mixture of chi2 distributions with different degrees of freedom. Implications for testing variance components in twin designs and for quantitative trait loci mapping are discussed. The appropriate distribution of the likelihood ratio test statistic should be used in hypothesis testing and model selection. PMID:16899155

  12. 3D modelling of the flow of self-compacting concrete with or without steel fibres. Part I: slump flow test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, R.; Kulasegaram, S.; Karihaloo, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    In part I of this two-part paper, a three-dimensional Lagrangian smooth particle hydrodynamics method has been used to model the flow of self-compacting concrete (SCC) with or without short steel fibres in the slump cone test. The constitutive behaviour of this non-Newtonian viscous fluid is described by a Bingham-type model. The 3D simulation of SCC without fibres is focused on the distribution of large aggregates (larger than or equal to 8 mm) during the flow. The simulation of self-compacting high- and ultra-high- performance concrete containing short steel fibres is focused on the distribution of fibres and their orientation during the flow. The simulation results show that the fibres and/or heavier aggregates do not precipitate but remain homogeneously distributed in the mix throughout the flow.

  13. Measurements of Turbulent Flow Field in Separate Flow Nozzles with Enhanced Mixing Devices - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a series of experiments was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on the effect of mixing enhancement devices on the aeroacoustic performance of separate flow nozzles. Initial acoustic evaluations of the devices showed that they reduced jet noise significantly, while creating very little thrust loss. The explanation for the improvement required that turbulence measurements, namely single point mean and RMS statistics and two-point spatial correlations, be made to determine the change in the turbulence caused by the mixing enhancement devices that lead to the noise reduction. These measurements were made in the summer of 2000 in a test program called Separate Nozzle Flow Test 2000 (SFNT2K) supported by the Aeropropulsion Research Program at NASA Glenn Research Center. Given the hot high-speed flows representative of a contemporary bypass ratio 5 turbofan engine, unsteady flow field measurements required the use of an optical measurement method. To achieve the spatial correlations, the Particle Image Velocimetry technique was employed, acquiring high-density velocity maps of the flows from which the required statistics could be derived. This was the first successful use of this technique for such flows, and shows the utility of this technique for future experimental programs. The extensive statistics obtained were likewise unique and give great insight into the turbulence which produces noise and how the turbulence can be modified to reduce jet noise.

  14. Materials Science Research Rack-1 Fire Suppressant Distribution Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    Fire suppressant distribution testing was performed on the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1), a furnace facility payload that will be installed in the U.S. Lab module of the International Space Station. Unlike racks that were tested previously, the MSRR-1 uses the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) to reduce vibration on experiments, so the effects of ARIS on fire suppressant distribution were unknown. Two tests were performed to map the distribution of CO2 fire suppressant throughout a mockup of the MSRR-1 designed to have the same component volumes and flowpath restrictions as the flight rack. For the first test, the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 60 percent, achieved within 45 s of discharge initiation, meeting the requirement to reach 50 percent throughout the rack within 1 min. For the second test, one of the experiment mockups was removed to provide a worst-case configuration, and the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 58 percent. Comparing the results of this testing with results from previous testing leads to several general conclusions that can be used to evaluate future racks. The MSRR-1 will meet the requirements for fire suppressant distribution. Primary factors that affect the ability to meet the CO2 distribution requirements are the free air volume in the rack and the total area and distribution of openings in the rack shell. The length of the suppressant flowpath and degree of tortuousness has little correlation with CO2 concentration. The total area of holes in the rack shell could be significantly increased. The free air volume could be significantly increased. To ensure the highest maximum CO2 concentration, the PFE nozzle should be inserted to the stop on the nozzle.

  15. Flap survey test of a combined surface blowing model: Flow measurements at static flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1978-01-01

    The Combined Surface Blowing (CSB) V/STOL lift/propulsion system consists of a blown flap system which deflects the exhaust from a turbojet engine over a system of flaps deployed at the trailing edge of the wing. Flow measurements consisting of velocity measurements using split film probes and total measure surveys using a miniature Kiel probe were made at control stations along the flap systems at two spanwise stations, the centerline of the nozzle and 60 percent of the nozzle span outboard of the centerline. Surface pressure measurements were made in the wing cove and the upper surface of the first flap element. The test showed a significant flow separation in the wing cove. The extent of the separation is so large that the flow into the first flap takes place only at the leading edge of the flap. The velocity profile measurements indicate that large spanwise (3 dimensional) flow may exist.

  16. 3D Particle image velocimetry test of inner flow in a double blade pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Houlin; Wang, Kai; Yuan, Shouqi; Tan, Minggao; Wang, Yong; Ru, Weimin

    2012-05-01

    The double blade pump is widely used in sewage treatment industry, however, the research on the internal flow characteristics of the double blade pump with particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology is very little at present. To reveal inner flow characteristics in double blade pump impeller under off-design and design conditions, inner flows in a double blade pump impeller, whose specific speed is 111, are measured under the five off-design conditions and design condition by using 3D PIV test technology. In order to ensure the accuracy of the 3D PIV test, the external trigger synchronization system which makes use of fiber optic and equivalent calibration method are applied. The 3D PIV relative velocity synthesis procedure is compiled by using Visual C++ 2005. Then absolute velocity distribution and relative velocity distribution in the double blade pump impeller are obtained. Test results show that vortex exists in each condition, but the location, size and velocity of vortex core are different. Average absolute velocity value of impeller outlet increases at first, then decreases, and then increases again with increase of flow rate. Again average relative velocity values under 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 design condition are higher than that under 1.0 design condition, while under 0.6 and 1.4 design condition it is lower. Under low flow rate conditions, radial vectors of absolute velocities at impeller outlet and blade inlet near the pump shaft decrease with increase of flow rate, while that of relative velocities at the suction side near the pump shaft decreases. Radial vectors of absolute velocities and relative velocities change slightly under the two large flow rate conditions. The research results can be applied to instruct the hydraulic optimization design of double blade pumps.

  17. Critical speed in the rat: implications for hindlimb muscle blood flow distribution and fibre recruitment.

    PubMed

    Copp, Steven W; Hirai, Daniel M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2010-12-15

    Critical speed (CS) constitutes an important metabolic and performance demarcator. However, active skeletal muscle blood flow distribution specifically surrounding CS remains unknown. We tested the hypotheses that CS could be accurately determined in the running rat and that measurement of hindlimb inter- and intramuscular blood flow below and above CS would support that the greatest muscle fibre recruitment above, relative to below, CS occurs in the predominantly glycolytic muscles. Seven male Sprague-Dawley rats performed five constant-speed tests to exhaustion at speeds between 95 and 115% of the speed that elicited to determine CS. Subsequent constant-speed tests were performed at speeds incrementally surrounding CS to determine time to exhaustion, V(O2), and hindlimb muscle blood flow distribution. Speed and time to exhaustion conformed to a hyperbolic relationship (r(2) = 0.92 ± 0.03) which corresponded to a linear 1/time function (r(2) = 0.93 ± 0.02) with a CS of 48.6 ± 1.0 m min(-1). Time to exhaustion below CS was ∼ 5× greater (P < 0.01) than that above. Below CS V(O2) stabilized at a submaximal value (58.5 ± 2.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) whereas above CS (81.7 ± 2.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) increased to (84.0 ± 1.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P > 0.05 vs. above CS). The 11 individual muscles or muscle parts that evidenced the greatest blood flow increases above, relative to below, CS were composed of ≥ 69% Type IIb/d/x muscle fibres. Moreover, there was a significant correlation (P < 0.05, r = 0.42) between the increased blood flow above expressed relative to below CS and the percentage Type IIb/d/x fibres found in the individual muscles or muscle parts. These data validate the powerful CS construct in the rat and identify that running above CS, relative to below CS, incurs disproportionate blood flow increases (indicative of recruitment) in predominantly highly glycolytic muscle fibres. PMID:20962004

  18. Laminar heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laminar heating distributions were measured at hypersonic-hypervelocity flow conditions on a 1.9-percent-scale model of an aeroassisted vehiclee proposed for missions to a number of planets. This vehicle is a spherically blunted, 12.84/7deg biconic with the fore-cone axis bent upward 7 deg relative to the aft-cone axis to provide selftrim capability. Also tested was a straight biconic (i.e., without nose bend) with the same nose radius and half-angles as the bent-nose biconic. These measurements were made in the Langley Expansion Tube at free-stream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6.0 to 9.0 with helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases. The range of calculated thermochemical equilibrium normal-shock density ratios for these four test gases was 4 to 19. Angles of attack, referenced to the aft-cone, varied from 0 to 20 deg. Heating distributions predicted with a parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code were compared with measurement for helium and air test gases. Measured windward and leeward heating levels were generally underpredicted by the PNS code for both test gases, and agreement was poorer on the leeward side than on the windward side.

  19. Universal Verification Methodology Based Register Test Automation Flow.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jae Hun; Cho, Yong Kwan; Park, Sun Kyu

    2016-05-01

    In today's SoC design, the number of registers has been increased along with complexity of hardware blocks. Register validation is a time-consuming and error-pron task. Therefore, we need an efficient way to perform verification with less effort in shorter time. In this work, we suggest register test automation flow based UVM (Universal Verification Methodology). UVM provides a standard methodology, called a register model, to facilitate stimulus generation and functional checking of registers. However, it is not easy for designers to create register models for their functional blocks or integrate models in test-bench environment because it requires knowledge of SystemVerilog and UVM libraries. For the creation of register models, many commercial tools support a register model generation from register specification described in IP-XACT, but it is time-consuming to describe register specification in IP-XACT format. For easy creation of register model, we propose spreadsheet-based register template which is translated to IP-XACT description, from which register models can be easily generated using commercial tools. On the other hand, we also automate all the steps involved integrating test-bench and generating test-cases, so that designers may use register model without detailed knowledge of UVM or SystemVerilog. This automation flow involves generating and connecting test-bench components (e.g., driver, checker, bus adaptor, etc.) and writing test sequence for each type of register test-case. With the proposed flow, designers can save considerable amount of time to verify functionality of registers. PMID:27483924

  20. Analysis of Alcove 8/Niche 3 Flow and Transport Tests

    SciTech Connect

    H.H. Liu

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document analyses of the Alcove 8/Niche 3 flow and transport tests, with a focus on the large-infiltration-plot tests and compare pre-test model predictions with the actual test observations. The tests involved infiltration that originated from the floor of Alcove 8 (located in the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift) and observations of seepage and tracer transport at Niche 3 (located in the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF)). The test results are relevant to drift seepage and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. The main objective of this analysis was to evaluate the modeling approaches used and the importance of the matrix diffusion process by comparing simulation and actual test observations. The pre-test predictions for the large plot test were found to differ from the observations and the reasons for the differences were documented in this report to partly address CR 6783, which concerns unexpected test results. These unexpected results are discussed and assessed with respect to the current baseline unsaturated zone radionuclide transport model in Sections 6.2.4, 6.3.2, and 6.4.

  1. Flow through a mechanical distraction enterogenesis device: a pilot test

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Okawada, Manabu; Herman, Richard; Utter, Brent; Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Background We tested the coupling portion of a prototype intraluminal distraction enterogenesis device to allow flow-through of simulated enteric contents (SEC) in both pig and human jejunum. Materials and methods SEC was made using 80% corn syrup. Ten cm pig and human intestinal segments had a spoke-shaped 2.2cm coupling adaptor sutured in place intraluminally. The adaptor had a flow-through area of 33.6mm2. SEC was pumped into the proximal part of the intestinal segment at 0.083mL/sec. The times to first passage of SEC through the coupler (first drop), 10mL and 20mL of SEC eluted from the distal end were recorded. Results Mean time to first drop elution was 155±38 seconds with pig, and 149±22 seconds with human bowel (p = 0.8). This corresponded to a hydrostatic pressure of 37.5mmHg before the initial drop passed through. Mean flow rates were 0.094mL/sec in pig bowel and 0.084mL/sec in human bowel (p=0.09). To account for occlusion from luminal debris, a 75% occlusion of coupler holes was studied in the smaller pig bowel to investigate if reductions in flow-through area could be tolerated. Mean time to first drop increased slightly to 171±15 seconds, and the elution rate stayed the same (p=0.5). Conclusions After a physiological level of initial pressure buildup allowing the first drop of SEC to pass the coupling adaptor, our prototype intestinal coupling adaptor did not obstruct flow-through of SEC, even after a 75% decrease in flow-through area. This type of attachment represents a viable approach to placing a device in-continuity without obstructing flow of enteric contents. PMID:21571307

  2. Conceptual framework for the thermal distribution method of test

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1994-11-01

    A Standard Method of Test for residential thermal distribution efficiency is being developed under the auspices of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment that produces this thermal energy to the building spaces that need it. Because thermal distribution systems are embedded in and interact with the larger building system as a whole, a new set of parameters has been developed to describe these systems. This paper was written to fill a perceived need for a concise introduction to this terminology.

  3. Computational analysis of turbine engine test cell flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prufert, Matthew Brian

    1998-11-01

    Turbine engine altitude test cells must incorporate an exhaust system collector to remove hot exhaust gases from the vicinity of the jet engine and to provide additional pumping to simulate the reduced pressure which would be encountered in flight. For economic reasons, it is desirable to utilize the same test configuration to simulate as much of the engine operating envelope as possible. To extend the test envelope, a cut-and-try approach is usually taken using available test data, one-dimensional analyses, and past experience. In this study, a computational approach was used to model some of the recognized operational problems which are commonly encountered. Specifically, computational models were used to evaluate the performance of an altitude test cell at low altitude conditions. Particular emphasis was placed on potential test section over-heating and the reduction of diffuser pumping to achieve near sea-level test conditions. A computational model which utilizes the NPARC Navier-Stokes code was applied to several test configurations operating at steady-state and to a single diffuser configuration in the presence of unsteady pressure fluctuations. During 1997/1998, the author developed two-dimensional and three-dimensional NPARC Navier-Stokes flow models and procedures for use in predicting test cell and engine surface cooling effectiveness for a military engine installation in an altitude test chamber. The predicted model flowfields for both steady-state and time variant flows were used to qualitatively verify limited infrared imaging camera data and quantitatively compare numerical results with test cell and diffuser pressure and temperature data. Prediction of surface convention heat transfer rates are currently beyond the capabilities of the NPARC CFD code. To quantify localized wall heat transfer rates, the BLAYER boundary layer code also was utilized. The BLAYER code is capable of quantifying boundary layer convection heat transfer rates based on near

  4. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Flow Measurements Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Modern aircraft design often puts the engine exhaust in close proximity to the airframe surfaces. Aircraft noise prediction tools must continue to develop in order to meet the challenges these aircraft present. The Jet-Surface Interaction Tests have been conducted to provide a comprehensive quality set of experimental data suitable for development and validation of these exhaust noise prediction methods. Flow measurements have been acquired using streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating surface pressure data acquired using flush mounted pressure transducers near the surface trailing edge. These data combined with previously reported far-field and phased array noise measurements represent the first step toward the experimental data base. These flow data are particularly applicable to development of noise prediction methods which rely on computational fluid dynamics to uncover the flow physics. A representative sample of the large flow data set acquired is presented here to show how a surface near a jet affects the turbulent kinetic energy in the plume, the spatial relationship between the jet plume and surface needed to generate surface trailing-edge noise, and differences between heated and unheated jet flows with respect to surfaces.

  5. Performance testing of a Savonius windmill rotor in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojola, O. O.; Onasanya, O. E.

    The effects of flow shear and/or unsteadiness on the power producing performance of a Savonius windmill rotor are studied. Measurements are made in two laboratory statistically-steady shear flows, and in the natural wind, which is both viscous and unsteady. The measurements were made of the speed, torque, and power of the rotor at a number of streamwise stations for each of four values of the bucket overlap ratio. Flow velocity profiles and graphs of wind shear variation are given. It is concluded that even in the presence of shear, the power coefficient of a Savonius windmill rotor is most strongly dependent on the tip speed ratio. As in inviscid flow, the power coefficient peaked at a tip speed ratio = 0.8. The major effect of shear was to reduce the power coefficient below the inviscid flow level, the magnitude of reduction depending on the magnitude of shear present. In field testing of the Savonius rotor, the unsteadiness of the wind proved to be a greater source of power loss than the wind shear.

  6. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation

    PubMed Central

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  7. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation.

    PubMed

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  8. Dynamic change of collateral flow varying with distribution of regional blood flow in acute ischemic rat cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Luo, Weihua; Zhou, Fangyuan; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is critical for the maintenance of cerebral function by guaranteed constant oxygen and glucose supply to brain. Collateral channels (CCs) are recruited to provide alternatives to CBF to ischemic regions once the primary vessel is occluded during ischemic stroke. However, the knowledge of the relationship between dynamic evolution of collateral flow and the distribution of regional blood flow remains limited. In this study, laser speckle imaging was used to assess dynamic changes of CCs and regional blood flow in a rat cortex with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). We found that CCs immediately provided blood flow to ischemic territories after MCAo. More importantly, there were three kinds of dynamic changes of CCs during acute stroke: persistent CC, impermanent CC, and transient CC, respectively, related to different distributions of regional blood flow. Although there was the possible occurrence of peri-infarct depolarization (PID) during ischemia, there was no obvious significance about the onset time and duration of CCs between rats with and without PID. These results suggest that the initial arising of CCs does not ensure their persistence, and that collateral flow could be varied with distribution of regional blood flow in acute ischemic stroke, which may facilitate the understanding of collateral recruitment and promote the development of collateral therapeutics in the future.

  9. A review of flow battery testing at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.C.; Miller, D.W.; Robinson, C.E.; Rodriguez, G.P.

    1984-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating prototype zinc/bromine, Redox, and zinc/ferricyanide flowing electrolyte batteries and cells. This paper updates previous reports of test results of two Exxon zinc/bromine batteries and one NASA Redox iron/chromium battery. Two 60sq. cm. zinc/ferricyanide cells from Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. are also being evaluated. Performance, life, and operating data are described for these batteries and cells.

  10. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24

    The purpose of this test report is to document the testing performed under the guidance of HNF-SD-WM-TC-073, {ital Flammable Gas Interlock Spoolpiece Flow Response Test Plan and Procedure}. This testing was performed for Lockheed Martin Hanford Characterization Projects Operations (CPO) in support of Rotary Mode Core Sampling jointly by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation and Numatec Hanford Company. The testing was conducted in the 305 building Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL). NHC provides the engineering and technical support for the 305 ETL. The key personnel identified for the performance of this task are as follows: Test responsible engineering manager, C. E. Hanson; Flammable Gas Interlock Design Authority, G. P. Janicek; 305 ETL responsible manager, N. J. Schliebe; Cognizant RMCS exhauster engineer, E. J. Waldo/J. D. Robinson; Cognizant 305 ETL engineer, K. S. Witwer; Test director, T. C. Schneider. Other support personnel were supplied, as necessary, from 305/306 ETL. The testing, on the flammable Gas Interlock (FGI) system spoolpiece required to support Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) of single shell flammable gas watch list tanks, took place between 2-13-97 and 2-25-97.

  11. Radial flow permeability testing of an argillaceous limestone.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, A P S; Jenner, L

    2013-01-01

    Argillaceous Lindsay limestone is the geologic storage formation that will be encountered at the site for the construction of a deep ground repository in Ontario, Canada, for the storage of low to intermediate level nuclear waste. The permeability of the Lindsay limestone is a key parameter that will influence the long-term movement of radionuclides from the repository to the geosphere. This paper describes the use of both steady-state and transient radial flow laboratory tests to determine the permeability of this argillaceous limestone. The interpretation of the tests is carried out using both analytical results and computational models of flow problems that exhibit radial symmetry. The results obtained from this research investigation are compared with the data available in the literature for similar argillaceous limestones mainly found in the Lindsay (Cobourg) formation. The experiments give permeabilities in the range of 1.0 × 10(-22) to 1.68 × 10(-19) m(2) for radial flows that are oriented along bedding planes under zero axial stress. The factors influencing transient pulse tests in particular and the interpretation of the results are discussed. PMID:22489872

  12. Modeling free molecular plume flow and impingement by an ellipsoidal distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, Hubert

    Modeling frozen plume flow is outlined using a freezing surface and an ellipsoidal distribution function beyond a freezing surface. Formulas are given for the number flux, pressure, shear stress, and heat-transfer on a surface element in free molecular flow with an ellipsoidal distribution function. To demonstrate the accuracy of the modeling, the method is applied to the totally frozen Knudsen effusion, for which the flow quantities are given. For the given example, the accuracy is better than 2.5 percent.

  13. Enthalpy Distributions of Arc Jet Flow Based on Measured Laser Induced Fluorescence, Heat Flux and Stagnation Pressure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Leonard E.; Milhoan, James D.; Oelke, Lance; Godfrey, Dennis; Larin, Maksim Y.; Scott, Carl D.; Grinstead, Jay H.; DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centerline total enthalpy of arc jet flow is determined using laser induced fluorescence of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Each component of the energy, kinetic, thermal, and chemical can be determined from LIF measurements. Additionally, enthalpy distributions are inferred from heat flux and pressure probe distribution measurements using an engineering formula. Average enthalpies are determined by integration over the radius of the jet flow, assuming constant mass flux and a mass flux distribution estimated from computational fluid dynamics calculations at similar arc jet conditions. The trends show favorable agreement, but there is an uncertainty that relates to the multiple individual measurements and assumptions inherent in LIF measurements.

  14. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1992-02-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  15. On-line updating of a distributed flow routing model - River Vistula case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamuz, Emilia; Romanowicz, Renata; Napiorkowski, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an application of methods of on-line updating in the River Vistula flow forecasting system. All flow-routing codes make simplifying assumptions and consider only a reduced set of the processes known to occur during a flood. Hence, all models are subject to a degree of structural error that is typically compensated for by calibration of the friction parameters. Calibrated parameter values are not, therefore, physically realistic, as in estimating them we also make allowance for a number of distinctly non-physical effects, such as model structural error and any energy losses or flow processes which occur at sub-grid scales. Calibrated model parameters are therefore area-effective, scale-dependent values which are not drawn from the same underlying statistical distribution as the equivalent at-a-point parameter of the same name. The aim of this paper is the derivation of real-time updated, on-line flow forecasts at certain strategic locations along the river, over a specified time horizon into the future, based on information on the behaviour of the flood wave upstream and available on-line measurements at a site. Depending on the length of the river reach and the slope of the river bed, a realistic forecast lead time, obtained in this manner, may range from hours to days. The information upstream can include observations of river levels and/or rainfall measurements. The proposed forecasting system will integrate distributed modelling, acting as a spatial interpolator with lumped parameter Stochastic Transfer Function models. Daily stage data from gauging stations are typically available at sites 10-60 km apart and test only the average routing performance of hydraulic models and not their ability to produce spatial predictions. Application of a distributed flow routing model makes it possible to interpolate forecasts both in time and space. This work was partly supported by the project "Stochastic flood forecasting system (The River Vistula reach

  16. HammerCloud: A Stress Testing System for Distributed Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ster, Daniel C.; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Úbeda García, Mario; Paladin, Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Distributed analysis of LHC data is an I/O-intensive activity which places large demands on the internal network, storage, and local disks at remote computing facilities. Commissioning and maintaining a site to provide an efficient distributed analysis service is therefore a challenge which can be aided by tools to help evaluate a variety of infrastructure designs and configurations. HammerCloud is one such tool; it is a stress testing service which is used by central operations teams, regional coordinators, and local site admins to (a) submit arbitrary number of analysis jobs to a number of sites, (b) maintain at a steady-state a predefined number of jobs running at the sites under test, (c) produce web-based reports summarizing the efficiency and performance of the sites under test, and (d) present a web-interface for historical test results to both evaluate progress and compare sites. HammerCloud was built around the distributed analysis framework Ganga, exploiting its API for grid job management. HammerCloud has been employed by the ATLAS experiment for continuous testing of many sites worldwide, and also during large scale computing challenges such as STEP'09 and UAT'09, where the scale of the tests exceeded 10,000 concurrently running and 1,000,000 total jobs over multi-day periods. In addition, HammerCloud is being adopted by the CMS experiment; the plugin structure of HammerCloud allows the execution of CMS jobs using their official tool (CRAB).

  17. 242A Distributed Control System Year 2000 Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    TEATS, M.C.

    1999-08-31

    This report documents acceptance test results for the 242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. This report documents the test results obtained by acceptance testing as directed by procedure HNF-2695. This verification procedure will document the initial testing and evaluation of the potential 242-A Distributed Control System (DCS) operating difficulties across the year 2000 boundary and the calendar adjustments needed for the leap year. Baseline system performance data will be recorded using current, as-is operating system software. Data will also be collected for operating system software that has been modified to correct year 2000 problems. This verification procedure is intended to be generic such that it may be performed on any D/3{trademark} (GSE Process Solutions, Inc.) distributed control system that runs with the VMSTM (Digital Equipment Corporation) operating system. This test may be run on simulation or production systems depending upon facility status. On production systems, DCS outages will occur nine times throughout performance of the test. These outages are expected to last about 10 minutes each.

  18. 21 CFR 211.165 - Testing and release for distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing and release for distribution. 211.165 Section 211.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS...

  19. 21 CFR 211.165 - Testing and release for distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing and release for distribution. 211.165 Section 211.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS...

  20. 21 CFR 211.165 - Testing and release for distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing and release for distribution. 211.165 Section 211.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS...

  1. 21 CFR 211.165 - Testing and release for distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing and release for distribution. 211.165 Section 211.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS...

  2. Nevada test site radionuclide inventory and distribution: project operations plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kordas, J.F.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1982-06-01

    This document is the operational plan for conducting the Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The basic objective of this program is to inventory the significant radionuclides of NTS origin in NTS surface soil. The expected duration of the program is five years. This plan includes the program objectives, methods, organization, and schedules.

  3. 21 CFR 211.165 - Testing and release for distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and release for distribution. 211.165 Section 211.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS...

  4. Nature and extent of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Prothro, L.B.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    Work is currently underway within the Underground Test Area subproject of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Program to develop corrective action plans in support of the overall corrective action strategy for the Nevada Test Site as established in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A closure plan is currently being developed for Pahute Mesa, which has been identified in the FFACO as consisting of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units. Part of this effort requires that hydrogeologic data be compiled for inclusion in a regional model that will be used to predict a contaminant boundary for these Corrective Action Units. Hydrogeologic maps have been prepared for use in the model to define the nature and extent of aquifers and confining units that might influence the flow of contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear tests conducted at Pahute Mesa. Much of the groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa occurs within lava-flow aquifers. An understanding of the distribution and hydraulic character of these important hydrogeologic units is necessary to accurately model groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa. This report summarizes the results of a study by Bechtel Nevada geologists to better define the hydrogeology of lava-flow aquifers at Pahute Mesa. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) aid in the development of the hydrostratigraphic framework for Pahute Mesa, and (2) provide information on the distribution and hydraulic character of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa for more accurate computer modeling of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  5. Pressure and flow distribution in internal gas manifolds of a fuel-cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Joon-Ho; Seo, Hai-Kyung; Lee, Choong Gon; Yoo, Young-Sung; Lim, Hee Chun

    Gas-flow dynamics in internal gas manifolds of a fuel-cell stack are analyzed to investigate overall pressure variation and flow distribution. Different gas-flow patterns are considered in this analysis. Gas-flow through gas channels of each cell is modeled by means of Darcy's law where permeability should be determined on an experimental basis. Gas-flow in manifolds is modeled from the macroscopic mechanical energy balance with pressure-loss by wall friction and geometrical effects. A systematic algorithm to solve the proposed flow model is suggested to calculate pressure and flow distribution in fuel-cell stacks. Calculation is done for a 100-cell molten carbonate fuel-cell stack with internal manifolds. The results show that the pressure-loss by wall friction is negligible compared with the pressure recovery in inlet manifolds or loss in outlet manifolds due to mass dividing or combining flow at manifold-cell junctions. A more significant effect on manifold pressure possibly arises from the geometrical manifold structure which depends on the manifold size and shape. The geometrical effect is approximated from pressure-loss coefficients of several types of fittings and valves. The overall pressure and flow distribution is significantly affected by the value of the geometrical pressure-loss coefficient. It is also found that the flow in manifolds is mostly turbulent in the 100-cell stack and this way result in an uneven flow distribution when the stack manifold is incorrectly, designed.

  6. Spectral distributed Lagrange multiplier method: algorithm and benchmark tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Suchuan; Liu, Dong; Maxey, Martin R.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2004-04-01

    We extend the formulation of the distributed Lagrange multiplier (DLM) approach for particulate flows to high-order methods within the spectral/ hp element framework. We implement the rigid-body motion constraint inside the particle via a penalty method. The high-order DLM method demonstrates spectral convergence rate, i.e. discretization errors decrease exponentially as the order of spectral polynomials increases. We provide detailed comparisons between the spectral DLM method, direct numerical simulations, and the force coupling method for a number of 2D and 3D benchmark flow problems. We also validate the spectral DLM method with available experimental data for a transient problem. The new DLM method can potentially be very effective in many-moving body problems, where a smaller number of grid points is required in comparison with low-order methods.

  7. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  8. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  9. Utilization of temperature distribution in expiratory speaking flow as a new parameter for speech production analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, G F; Vargas, J V C; Filho, E D M

    2004-01-01

    A new instrument with potential use for speech production analysis is utilized in this study to measure the temperature and velocity of the expiratory speaking flow outside the oral cavity. From a physical point of view, the temperature patterns of individuals with healthy voices are expected to be different from individuals with breathy voices, since their air flow patterns are different: during breathy speech production, the glottis does not close completely, and the leakage of warm air through the glottis increases the extent of the hotter-than-ambient temperature field outside the oral cavity. The instrument is a pipe through which the tested individual breathes out while producing a sustained vowel. A tap water heat exchanger keeps the pipe wall at a temperature level considerably lower than the body temperature. The temperature gradient along the pipe centreline is measured and related to the average air velocity at the oral cavity. The measurements were performed in 30 male and 30 female subjects without vocal complaints. The objective of this initial investigation was to evaluate the possibility of establishing patterns of normality for the temperature distribution outside the oral cavity in expiratory speaking flow. In the experiments, all the temperature measurements increased as the expiratory air flow of the individual increased during speech production, therefore the instrument results agree with the physical behavior predicted by fluid mechanics and heat transfer principles. The collected data allowed for the construction of charts with two distinct normalized temperature distributions outside the oral cavity, for male and female individuals, respectively. These charts have the potential for future utilization in a follow-up study for comparison with similar measurements obtained with individuals with vocal fold pathologies, aiming to eventually produce a reliable new instrument for early detection of vocal problems through a non-invasive procedure

  10. Lateral flow-based antibody testing for Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Gwyn, Sarah; Mitchell, Alexandria; Dean, Deborah; Mkocha, Harran; Handali, Sukwan; Martin, Diana L

    2016-08-01

    We describe here a lateral flow-based assay (LFA) for the detection of antibodies against immunodominant antigen Pgp3 from Chlamydia trachomatis, the causative agent of urogenital chlamydia infection and ocular trachoma. Optimal signal detection was achieved when the gold-conjugate and test line contained Pgp3, creating a dual sandwich capture assay. The LFA yielded positive signals with serum and whole blood but not with eluted dried blood spots. For serum, the agreement of the LFA with the non-reference multiplex assay was 96%, the specificity using nonendemic pediatric sera was 100%, and the inter-rater agreement was κ=0.961. For whole blood, the agreement of LFA with multiplex was 81.5%, the specificity was 100%, and the inter-rater agreement was κ=0.940. The LFA was tested in a field environment and yielded similar results to those from laboratory-based testing. These data show the successful development of a lateral flow assay for detection of antibodies against Pgp3 with reliable use in field settings, which would make antibody-based testing for trachoma surveillance highly practical, especially after cessation of trachoma elimination programs. PMID:27208400

  11. A new Goodness-of-fit test for Frequency Analysis of Peak Flows in L-moment Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Bidroha; Srinivas Vemavarapu, Venkata

    2015-04-01

    Over the past two decades, L-moment based flood frequency analysis (FFA) procedure is being extensively used in hydrology for estimation of flood quantiles at target locations in river basins. The procedure is based on the assumption that (i) peak flows at a location constitute a sample drawn from one of the known frequency distributions such as Generalized extreme value (GEV), Generalized Pareto (GPA), and Pearson Type III (PE3), and (ii) the distribution can be identified using L-moment ratio diagram. Through Monte-Carlo simulation experiments it would be demonstrated that conventional L-moment goodness-of-fit (GOF) test, which is widely used for identifying the best-fit frequency distribution, may not be effective in identifying true distribution (population) corresponding to samples, when L-moments specified for sample generation belong to certain ranges. The ranges identified corresponding to various forms of frequency distributions would be presented and discussed. To overcome the limitation of L-moment GOF test, an alternate test would be presented, which examines the hypothesis that peak flow data follows GEV, GPA, PE3, Generalized Logistic or Generalized Normal distributions. The proposed test involves: (i) use of a transformation mechanism to map peak flows from the original space to a dimensionless space where the form of their frequency distribution does not change, (ii) estimation of location, scale and shape parameters of the hypothesized distribution using the transformed data, (iii) computation of deviation of the estimated parameters with respect to their population values that are determined based on analytic formulations proposed by the authors in a previous work, and (iv) considering the deviation as the basis to accept/reject the hypothesis that the chosen distribution is appropriate to fit the peak flow data. The proposed GOF test would be demonstrated to be effective compared to conventional L-moment GOF test through Monte-Carlo simulation

  12. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  13. Motif distributions in phase-space networks for characterizing experimental two-phase flow patterns with chaotic features.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2010-07-01

    The dynamics of two-phase flows have been a challenging problem in nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. We propose a method to characterize and distinguish patterns from inclined water-oil flow experiments based on the concept of network motifs that have found great usage in network science and systems biology. In particular, we construct from measured time series phase-space complex networks and then calculate the distribution of a set of distinct network motifs. To gain insight, we first test the approach using time series from classical chaotic systems and find a universal feature: motif distributions from different chaotic systems are generally highly heterogeneous. Our main finding is that the distributions from experimental two-phase flows tend to be heterogeneous as well, suggesting the underlying chaotic nature of the flow patterns. Calculation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent provides further support for this. Motif distributions can thus be a feasible tool to understand the dynamics of realistic two-phase flow patterns. PMID:20866710

  14. FishMORPH - An agent-based model to predict salmonid growth and distribution responses under natural and low flows

    PubMed Central

    Phang, S. C.; Stillman, R. A.; Cucherousset, J.; Britton, J. R.; Roberts, D.; Beaumont, W. R. C.; Gozlan, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting fish responses to modified flow regimes is becoming central to fisheries management. In this study we present an agent-based model (ABM) to predict the growth and distribution of young-of-the-year (YOY) and one-year-old (1+) Atlantic salmon and brown trout in response to flow change during summer. A field study of a real population during both natural and low flow conditions provided the simulation environment and validation patterns. Virtual fish were realistic both in terms of bioenergetics and feeding. We tested alternative movement rules to replicate observed patterns of body mass, growth rates, stretch distribution and patch occupancy patterns. Notably, there was no calibration of the model. Virtual fish prioritising consumption rates before predator avoidance replicated observed growth and distribution patterns better than a purely maximising consumption rule. Stream conditions of low predation and harsh winters provide ecological justification for the selection of this behaviour during summer months. Overall, the model was able to predict distribution and growth patterns well across both natural and low flow regimes. The model can be used to support management of salmonids by predicting population responses to predicted flow impacts and associated habitat change. PMID:27431787

  15. FishMORPH - An agent-based model to predict salmonid growth and distribution responses under natural and low flows.

    PubMed

    Phang, S C; Stillman, R A; Cucherousset, J; Britton, J R; Roberts, D; Beaumont, W R C; Gozlan, R E

    2016-01-01

    Predicting fish responses to modified flow regimes is becoming central to fisheries management. In this study we present an agent-based model (ABM) to predict the growth and distribution of young-of-the-year (YOY) and one-year-old (1+) Atlantic salmon and brown trout in response to flow change during summer. A field study of a real population during both natural and low flow conditions provided the simulation environment and validation patterns. Virtual fish were realistic both in terms of bioenergetics and feeding. We tested alternative movement rules to replicate observed patterns of body mass, growth rates, stretch distribution and patch occupancy patterns. Notably, there was no calibration of the model. Virtual fish prioritising consumption rates before predator avoidance replicated observed growth and distribution patterns better than a purely maximising consumption rule. Stream conditions of low predation and harsh winters provide ecological justification for the selection of this behaviour during summer months. Overall, the model was able to predict distribution and growth patterns well across both natural and low flow regimes. The model can be used to support management of salmonids by predicting population responses to predicted flow impacts and associated habitat change. PMID:27431787

  16. Higher-order axial singularity distributions for potential flow about bodies of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedan, M. F.; Dalton, C.

    1980-03-01

    The approach of using axial singularity distributions of different orders for representing bodies of revolution in axial flow to solve both the direct and inverse problems has been developed and critically evaluated. A polynomial of arbitrary degree is used to represent the variation of the intensity of the source distribution over each element. The effects of the order of the distribution, the number of elements, the normalization of the body coordinates, the fineness ratio and the geometry of the profile on the performance of the method have been studied in detail by using a number of test cases of known solutions. With appropriate choice of these parameters, this approach for both the direct and inverse axisymmetric problems can be as accurate as the surface singularity approach even for simple bodies with inflection points. However, the present scheme has the advantage of being much simpler and faster. A new technique has been developed for the calculation of the body radius in the iterative inverse problem scheme. This technique proved to be essential for velocity distributions representing bodies with inflection points. Such bodies are of great interest in the design of low-drag shapes.

  17. Parametric Testing of Chevrons on Single Flow Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Brown, Clifford A.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric family of chevron nozzles have been studied, looking for relationships between chevron geometric parameters, flow characteristics, and far-field noise. Both cold and hot conditions have been run at acoustic Mach number 0.9. Ten models have been tested, varying chevron count, penetration, length, and chevron symmetry. Four comparative studies were defined from these datasets which show: that chevron length is not a major impact on either flow or sound; that chevron penetration increases noise at high frequency and lowers it at low frequency, especially for low chevron counts; that chevron count is a strong player with good low frequency reductions being achieved with high chevron count without strong high frequency penalty; and that chevron asymmetry slightly reduces the impact of the chevron. Finally, it is shown that although the hot jets differ systematically from the cold one, the overall trends with chevron parameters is the same.

  18. Testing of models of flow-induced hemolysis in blood flow through hypodermic needles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangsheng; Kent, Timothy L; Sharp, M Keith

    2013-03-01

    Hemolysis caused by flow in hypodermic needles interferes with a number of tests on blood samples drawn by venipuncture, including assays for metabolites, electrolytes, and enzymes, causes discomfort during dialysis sessions, and limits transfusion flow rates. To evaluate design modifications to address this problem, as well as hemolysis issues in other cardiovascular devices, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based prediction of hemolysis has potential for reducing the time and expense for testing of prototypes. In this project, three CFD-integrated blood damage models were applied to flow-induced hemolysis in 16-G needles and compared with experimental results, which demonstrated that a modified needle with chamfered entrance increased hemolysis, while a rounded entrance decreased hemolysis, compared with a standard needle with sharp entrance. After CFD simulation of the steady-state velocity field, the time histories of scalar stress along a grid of streamlines were calculated. A strain-based cell membrane failure model and two empirical power-law blood damage models were used to predict hemolysis on each streamline. Total hemolysis was calculated by weighting the predicted hemolysis along each streamline by the flow rate along each streamline. The results showed that only the strain-based blood damage model correctly predicted increased hemolysis in the beveled needle and decreased hemolysis in the rounded needle, while the power-law models predicted the opposite trends. PMID:23419169

  19. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Mike; Banks, Dan; Garzon, Andres; Matisheck, Jason

    2014-01-01

    IR thermography was used to characterize the transition front on a S-NLF test article at chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million Changes in transition due to Mach number, Reynolds number, and surface roughness were investigated - Regions of laminar flow in excess of 80% chord at chord Reynolds numbers greater than 14 million IR thermography clearly showed the transition front and other flow features such as shock waves impinging upon the surface A series of parallel oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, were found to cause premature transition at higher Reynolds numbers. NASA has a current goal to eliminate barriers to the development of practical supersonic transport aircraft Drag reduction through the use of supersonic natural laminar flow (S-NLF) is currently being explored as a means of increasing aerodynamic efficiency - Tradeoffs work best for business jet class at M<2 Conventional high-speed designs minimize inviscid drag at the expense of viscous drag - Existence of strong spanwise pressure gradient leads to crossflow (CF) while adverse chordwise pressure gradients amplifies and Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instabilities Aerion Corporation has patented a S-NLF wing design (US Patent No. 5322242) - Low sweep to control CF - dp/dx < 0 on both wing surfaces to stabilize TS - Thin wing with sharp leading edge to minimize wave drag increase due to reduction in sweep NASA and Aerion have partnered to study S-NLF since 1999 Series of S-NLF experiments flown on the NASA F-15B research test bed airplane Infrared (IR) thermography used to characterize transition - Non-intrusive, global, good spatial resolution - Captures significant flow features well

  20. Effects of perfluorohexane vapor on relative blood flow distribution in an animal model of surfactant-depleted lung injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubler, Matthias; Souders, Jennifer E.; Shade, Erin D.; Polissar, Nayak L.; Bleyl, Jorg U.; Hlastala, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that treatment with vaporized perfluorocarbon affects the relative pulmonary blood flow distribution in an animal model of surfactant-depleted acute lung injury. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: A university research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Fourteen New Zealand White rabbits (weighing 3.0-4.5 kg). INTERVENTIONS: The animals were ventilated with an FIO(2) of 1.0 before induction of acute lung injury. Acute lung injury was induced by repeated saline lung lavages. Eight rabbits were randomized to 60 mins of treatment with an inspiratory perfluorohexane vapor concentration of 0.2 in oxygen. To compensate for the reduced FIO(2) during perfluorohexane treatment, FIO(2) was reduced to 0.8 in control animals. Change in relative pulmonary blood flow distribution was assessed by using fluorescent-labeled microspheres. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Microsphere data showed a redistribution of relative pulmonary blood flow attributable to depletion of surfactant. Relative pulmonary blood flow shifted from areas that were initially high-flow to areas that were initially low-flow. During the study period, relative pulmonary blood flow of high-flow areas decreased further in the control group, whereas it increased in the treatment group. This difference was statistically significant between the groups (p =.02) as well as in the treatment group compared with the initial injury (p =.03). Shunt increased in both groups over time (control group, 30% +/- 10% to 63% +/- 20%; treatment group, 37% +/- 20% to 49% +/- 23%), but the changes compared with injury were significantly less in the treatment group (p =.03). CONCLUSION: Short treatment with perfluorohexane vapor partially reversed the shift of relative pulmonary blood flow from high-flow to low-flow areas attributable to surfactant depletion.

  1. Distribution of incompressible flow within interdigitated channels and porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Robert J.; Zhu, Huayang

    2015-12-01

    This paper develops a general model with which to evaluate flow uniformity and pressure drop within interdigitated-channel structures, especially in the context of redox flow batteries. The governing equations are cast in dimensionless variables, leading to a set of characteristic dimensionless parameter groups. The systems of governing equations are solved computationally, with the results presented graphically. Because the results are general, the underlying model itself is not needed to apply the quantitative design guidelines. However, the paper presents and discusses all the information required to recreate the model as needed.

  2. UNSATURATED FLOW IN A CENTRIFUGAL FIELD: MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND TESTING OF DARCY'S LAW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Rubin, J.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed to establish steady flow of water in unsaturated soil sample spinning in a centrifuge. Theoretical analysis predicts moisture conditions in the sample that depend strongly on soil type and certain operating parameter. For Oakley sand, measurements of flux, water content, and matric potential during and after centrifugation verify that steady state flow can be achieved. Experiments have confirmed the theoretical prediction of a nearly uniform moisture distribution for this medium and have demonstrated that the flow can be effectively one-dimensional. The method was used for steady state measurements of hydraulic conductivity K for relatively dry soil, giving values at low as 7. 6 multiplied by 10** minus **1**1 m/s with data obtained in a few hours. Darcy's law was tested by measuring K for different centrifugal driving forces but with the same water content.

  3. Evaluation of pumping induced flow in observation wells during aquifer testing.

    PubMed

    Székely, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    The vertical variation of drawdown around pumping wells generates an induced flow in the observation wells. A set of governing equations is presented to couple the drawdown variation and the vertical flux distribution in observation wells. A numerical example is performed to justify the governing equations and to verify the solution methods used by the simulation software WT. The example analyzes the effect of skin loss, wellbore storage, and vertical segmentation on the drawdown and induced flow in observation well during pumping. The evaluation of the Fairborn pumping test involves a vertically homogeneous and anisotropic water table aquifer, uniform well-face drawdown conditions in the pumping well and simulation of the drawdown evolution in the observation well with and without the effect of induced flow. The computer calibrations resulted in small differences between the measured and simulated drawdown curves. PMID:23198759

  4. Preliminary Results of Testing of Flow Effects on Evaporator Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2002-02-15

    This investigation has focused on the effects of fluid flow on solids deposition from solutions that simulate the feed to the 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site. Literature studies indicate that the fluid flow (or shear) affects particle-particle and particle-surface interactions and thus the phenomena of particle aggregation in solution and particle deposition (i.e., scale formation) onto solid surfaces. Experimental tests were conducted with two configurations: (1) using a rheometer to provide controlled shear conditions and (2) using controlled flow of reactive solution through samples of stainless steel tubing. All tests were conducted at 80 C and at high silicon and aluminum concentrations, 0.133 M each, in solutions containing 4 M sodium hydroxide and 1 A4 each of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Two findings from these experiments are important for consideration in developing approaches for reducing or eliminating evaporator scaling problems: (1) The rheometer tests suggested that for the conditions studied, maximum solids deposition occurs at a moderate shear rate, approximately 12 s{sup -1}. That value is expected to be on the order of shear rates that will occur in various parts of the evaporator system; for instance, a 6 gal/min single-phase liquid flow through the 2-in. lift or gravity drain lines would result in a shear rate of approximately 16 s{sup -1}. These results imply that engineering approaches aimed at reducing deposits through increased mixing would need to generate shear near all surfaces significantly greater than 12 s{sup -1}. However, further testing is needed to set a target value for shear that is applicable to evaporator operation. This is because the measured trend is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval due to variability in the results. In addition, testing at higher temperatures and lower concentrations of aluminum and silicon would more accurately represent conditions in the evaporator. Without

  5. Corrosion erosion test of SS316 in flowing Pb Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Kurata, Y.; Saito, S.; Futakawa, M.; Sasa, T.; Oigawa, H.; Wakai, E.; Miura, K.

    2003-05-01

    Corrosion tests of austenitic stainless tube were done under flowing Pb-Bi conditions for 3000 h at 450 °C. Specimens were 316SS produced as a tubing form with 13.8 mm outer diameter, 2 mm thickness and 40 cm length. During operation, maximum temperature, temperature difference and flow velocity of Pb-Bi at the specimen were kept at 450, 50 °C, and 1 m/s, respectively. After the test, specimen and components of the loop were cut and examined by optical microscope, SEM, EDX, WDX and X-ray diffraction. Pb-Bi adhered on the surface of the specimen even after Pb-Bi was drained out to the storage tank from the circulating loop. Results differed from a stagnant corrosion test in that the specimen surface became rough and the corrosion rate was maximally 0.1 mm/3000 h. Mass transfer from the high temperature to the lower temperature area was observed: crystals of Fe-Cr were found on the tube surface in the low-temperature region. The sizes of crystals varied from 0.1 to 0.2 mm. The depositing crystals were ferrite grains and the chemical composition ratio (mass%) of Fe to Cr was 9:1.

  6. Modeling and testing of two-phase flow in manifolds under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Frederick; Kurwitz, Cable

    2001-02-01

    Previous work relating to two-phase flow in manifolds has dealt primarily with 1-g phase distribution at each junction. Understanding the redistribution of gas and liquid at each junction in microgravity allows the investigator to calculate specific thermal-hydraulic phenomena in each branch or run. A model was developed at Texas A&M to determine the phasic distribution in an arbitrary manifold. Previously developed phase distribution equations are used to describe the redistribution at a dividing T-junction (Young et al., 1999). Mass flow rate, void fraction, and pressure drop are calculated iteratively for the entire manifold. Output from the model was compared to data taken from tests aboard NASA's KC-135. The test manifold consisted of a run with three branches. The system allowed the output to be directed to a phase separator or to collection bags. The distribution of liquid and gas in each collection bag could be used to determine the mass fraction in each branch and run. Results show good agreement between predicted mass fraction and flight data. .

  7. Bulk stress distributions in the pore space of sphere-packed beds under Darcy flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ngoc H; Voronov, Roman S; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, bulk stress distributions in the pore space of columns packed with spheres are numerically computed with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Three different ideally packed and one randomly packed configuration of the columns are considered under Darcy flow conditions. The stress distributions change when the packing type changes. In the Darcy regime, the normalized stress distribution for a particular packing type is independent of the pressure difference that drives the flow and presents a common pattern. The three parameter (3P) log-normal distribution is found to describe the stress distributions in the randomly packed beds within statistical accuracy. In addition, the 3P log-normal distribution is still valid when highly porous scaffold geometries rather than sphere beds are examined. It is also shown that the 3P log-normal distribution can describe the bulk stress distribution in consolidated reservoir rocks like Berea sandstone. PMID:24730946

  8. Bulk stress distributions in the pore space of sphere-packed beds under Darcy flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Voronov, Roman S.; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, bulk stress distributions in the pore space of columns packed with spheres are numerically computed with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Three different ideally packed and one randomly packed configuration of the columns are considered under Darcy flow conditions. The stress distributions change when the packing type changes. In the Darcy regime, the normalized stress distribution for a particular packing type is independent of the pressure difference that drives the flow and presents a common pattern. The three parameter (3P) log-normal distribution is found to describe the stress distributions in the randomly packed beds within statistical accuracy. In addition, the 3P log-normal distribution is still valid when highly porous scaffold geometries rather than sphere beds are examined. It is also shown that the 3P log-normal distribution can describe the bulk stress distribution in consolidated reservoir rocks like Berea sandstone.

  9. Impact of heterogeneous permeability distribution on the groundwater flow systems of a small sedimentary basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Zehner, Björn; Kolditz, Olaf; Attinger, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Ground water flow systems of shallow sedimentary basins are studied in general by analyzing the fluid dynamics at the real world example of the Thuringian Basin. The impact of the permeability distribution and density differences on the flow velocity pattern, the salt concentration, and the temperature distribution is quantified by means of transient coupled simulations of fluid flow, heat, and mass transport processes. Simulations are performed with different permeabilities in the sedimentary layering and heterogeneous permeability distributions as well as with a non-constant fluid density. Three characteristic numbers are useful to describe the effects of permeability on the development of flow systems and subsurface transport: the relation of permeability between aquiclude and aquifer, the variance, and the correlation length of the log-normal permeability distribution. Density dependent flow due to temperature or concentration gradients is of minor importance for the distribution of the flow systems, but can lead to increased mixing dissolution of salt. Thermal convection is in general not present. The dominant driver of groundwater flow is the topography in combination with the permeability distribution. The results obtained for the Thuringian Basin give general insights into the dynamics of a small sedimentary basin due to the representative character of the basin structure as well as the transferability of the settings to other small sedimentary basins.

  10. Pressure distribution method for ex-situ evaluation of flow distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, S.; Mueller, S.

    2015-04-01

    Fuel cells for automotive applications consist of cells with large active areas. The active area is generally between 150 cm2 and 400 cm2. The reaction gases and the cooling media are distributed via bipolar plates to the reaction zones. Understanding local and cell wide gas distribution within the flow field at high current densities greater than 2.0 A/cm2 is a key factor regarding efficiency at low stoichiometry, lambda less than 2. In this paper a new method is introduced, which can be used as ex-situ evaluation of flow distribution. The gas pressure distribution is mapped with an array of 5 × 12 membrane differential pressure sensors by measuring the static pressure locally against the outlet pressure. Below a differential pressure of 100 mbar the signal measurement accuracy is ±2.5 mbar. This is demonstrated in a flow field with an active area of 250 cm2. The sensors are located next to the micro porous layer of the gas diffusion layer to avoid any impact of dynamic pressure. The effect of the intrusion of gas diffusion layer material into the flow channels on the fluid distribution is evaluated at clamping pressures between 0.6 MPa and 4.2 MPa.