Science.gov

Sample records for flow fractionation devices

  1. Model-based analysis of a dielectrophoretic microfluidic device for field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Abutayeh, Mohammad; Stiharu, Ion

    2016-08-01

    We present the development of a dynamic model for predicting the trajectory of microparticles in microfluidic devices, employing dielectrophoresis, for Hyperlayer field-flow fractionation. The electrode configuration is such that multiple finite-sized electrodes are located on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel; the electrodes on the walls are aligned with each other. The electric potential inside the microchannel is described using the Laplace equation while the microparticles' trajectory is described using equations based on Newton's second law. All equations are solved using finite difference method. The equations of motion account for forces including inertia, buoyancy, drag, gravity, virtual mass, and dielectrophoresis. The model is used for parametric study; the geometric parameters analyzed include microparticle radius, microchannel depth, and electrode/spacing lengths while volumetric flow rate and actuation voltage are the two operating parameters considered in the study. The trajectory of microparticles is composed of transient and steady state phases; the trajectory is influenced by all parameters. Microparticle radius and volumetric flow rate, above the threshold, do not influence the steady state levitation height; microparticle levitation is not possible below the threshold of the volumetric flow rate. Microchannel depth, electrode/spacing lengths, and actuation voltage influence the steady-state levitation height. PMID:27322871

  2. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  3. Paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokbin; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Wonjung

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation. The paper fluidic system consisting of a straight channel connected with expansion regions can generate a fluid flow with a constant flow rate for 10 min without any external pumping devices. The flow bifurcates with a fraction ratio of up to 30 depending on the control parameters of the channel geometry. Utilizing this simple paper-based bifurcation system, we developed a continuous-flow preconcentrator and a field-flow fractionator on a paper platform. Our experimental results show that the continuous-flow preconcentrator can produce a 33-fold enrichment of the ion concentration and that the flow fractionation system successfully separates the charged dyes. Our study suggests simple, cheap ways to construct preconcentration and field-flow fractionation systems for paper-based microfluidic diagnostic devices. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MSIP) (NRF-2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  4. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  5. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  6. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  7. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, Mark D.; Sweeney, Chad E.; Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel

    1993-01-01

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  8. Flow rate measuring devices for gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfig, K. W.

    1985-07-01

    Flowrate measuring devices are described: volume meter with fixed or mobile walls; turbine meter; throttling procedure; ultrasonic and Doppler methods; vortex method; rotary flowmeter; and swinging body flow measuring procedure. Flowrate can also be measured from the force exerted on bodies immersed in a fluid or based on thermodynamical principles. The characteristics and operating envelope of each device/method are given.

  9. Flow modifying device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelm, J. S.; Vickers, E. C.; Williams, J. J.; Taylor, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A swirler for a gas turbine engine combustor is disclosed for simultaneously controlling combustor flow rate, swirl angle, residence time and fuel-air ratio to provide three regimes of operation. A first regime is provided in which fuel-air ratio is less than stoichiometric, NOx is produced at one level, and combustor flow rate is high. In a second regime, fuel-air ratio is nearly stoichiometric, NOx production is less than that of the first regime, and combustor flow rate is low. In a third regime, used for example at highoff, fuel-air ratio is greater than stoichiometric and the combustor flow rate is less than in either of the other regimes.

  10. Assessing a pneumatic fractionator as a lint cleaning device

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study assessed a pneumatic fractionator as a lint cleaning device for ginned lint. Results from a test that used two line pressures and three fractionation times showed that higher line pressure and longer fractionation time produced fiber that was shorter in staple length, contained more neps, a...

  11. Principles of transverse flow fractionation of microparticles in superhydrophobic channels.

    PubMed

    Asmolov, Evgeny S; Dubov, Alexander L; Nizkaya, Tatiana V; Kuehne, Alexander J C; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2015-07-01

    We propose a concept of fractionation of micron-sized particles in a microfluidic device with a bottom wall decorated by superhydrophobic stripes. The stripes are oriented at an angle α to the direction of a driving force, G, which generally includes an applied pressure gradient and gravity. Separation relies on the initial sedimentation of particles under gravity in the main forward flow, and their subsequent lateral deflection near a superhydrophobic wall due to generation of a secondary flow transverse to G. We provide some theoretical arguments allowing us to quantify the transverse displacement of particles in the microfluidic channel, and confirm the validity of theoretical predictions in test experiments with monodisperse fractions of microparticles. Our results can guide the design of superhydrophobic microfluidic devices for efficient sorting of microparticles with a relatively small difference in size and density. PMID:26016651

  12. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    The first topic of this project involved the preparation, fractionation by sedimentation/steric Field Flow Fractionation (FFF), and modeling of metaphase chromosomes. After numerous unsuccessful attempts to prepare chromosomes, we have implemented a procedure (in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory) to prepare metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. Extensive experimentation was necessary to identify a suitable FFF channel surface to minimize chromosome adsorption and a carrier liquid to stabilize and disperse the chromosomes. Under suitable operating conditions, the Chinese hamster chromosomes were purified from cell debris and partially fractionated. The purified, preenriched chromosomes that can be prepared by sedimentation/steric FFF or produced continuously by continuous SPLITT fractionation provide an enriched feed material for subsequent flow cytometry. In the second project component, flow FFF permitted successful separations of single- from double-stranded circular DNA, double-stranded circular DNAs of various sizes, and linear double-stranded DNA fragments of various lengths. Diffusion coefficients extracted from retention data agreed well with literature data as well as predictions of major polymer theories. The capacity of FFF separations was evaluated to examine potential applications to long DNA chains.

  13. Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-08-09

    Embodiments of the present invention provide devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation. Analytes in a sample may be isolated according to their isoelectric point within a fractionation microchannel. A microfluidic device according to an embodiment of the invention includes a substrate at least partially defining a fractionation microchannel. The fractionation microchannel has at least one cross-sectional dimension equal to or less than 1 mm. A plurality of membranes of different pHs are disposed in the microchannel. Analytes having an isoelectric point between the pH of the membranes may be collected in a region of the fractionation channel between the first and second membranes through isoelectric fractionation.

  14. Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K

    2015-04-14

    Embodiments of the present invention provide devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation. Analytes in a sample may be isolated according to their isoelectric point within a fractionation microchannel. A microfluidic device according to an embodiment of the invention includes a substrate at least partially defining a fractionation microchannel. The fractionation microchannel has at least one cross-sectional dimension equal to or less than 1 mm. A plurality of membranes of different pHs are disposed in the microchannel. Analytes having an isoelectric point between the pH of the membranes may be collected in a region of the fractionation channel between the first and second membranes through isoelectric fractionation.

  15. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement with a handheld device.

    PubMed

    Magori, Erhard; Hiltawsky, Karsten; Fleischer, Maximilian; Simon, Elfriede; Pohle, Roland; von Sicard, Oliver; Tawil, Angelika

    2011-06-01

    A sensing system for fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurement is presented, which is characterized by a compact setup and a cost potential to be made available for the patient at home. The sensing is based on the work function measurement of a phthalocyanine-type sensing material, which is shown to be sufficiently sensitive for NO(2) in the ppb range. The transducer used to measure the work function is a field effect transistor with a suspended gate electrode. Selectivity is given with respect to other breath components including typically metabolic by-products. The measurement system includes breath treatments in a simple setup, which essentially are dehumidification and a quantitative conversion of NO to NO(2) with a conversion rate of approx. 95%, using a disposable oxidation catalyst. The accomplishment of the correct exhalation maneuver and feeding of the suited portion of exhaled air to the sensor is provided by breath sampling means. The sensor is not gas consuming. This allows us to fill the measurement chamber once, instead of establishing a gas flow for the measurement. This feature simplifies the device architecture. In this paper, we report on sensor characteristics, system architecture and measurement with artificial breath-gas as well as with human breath with the device. PMID:21646688

  16. Method and device for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, Richard; Marinkovich, Phillip S.; Spadaro, Peter R.; Stout, J. Wilson

    1976-11-23

    This invention is a fluid flow measuring device for determining the coolant flow at the entrance to a specific nuclear reactor fuel region. The device comprises a plurality of venturis having the upstream inlet and throat pressure of each respectively manifolded together to provide one static pressure signal for each region monitored. The device provides accurate flow measurement with low pressure losses and uniform entrance and discharge flow distribution.

  17. Paper-Based Flow Fractionation System Applicable to Preconcentration and Field-Flow Separation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seokbin; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow separation. In this passive fluidic device, a straight channel is divided into multiple daughter channels, each of which is connected with an expanded region. The hydrodynamic resistance of the straight channel is predominant compared with those of expanded regions, so we can create steady flows through the straight and daughter channels. While the expanded regions absorb a great amount of water via capillarity, the steady flow continues for 10 min without external pumping devices. By controlling the relative hydrodynamic resistances of the daughter channels, we successfully divide the flow with flow rate ratios of up to 30. Combining this bifurcation system with ion concentration polarization (ICP), we develop a continuous-flow preconcentrator on a paper platform, which can preconcentrate a fluorescent dye up to 33-fold. In addition, we construct a field-flow separation system to divide two different dyes depending on their electric polarities. Our flow fractionation systems on a paper-based platform would make a breakthrough for point-of-care diagnostics with specific functions including preconcentration and separation. PMID:26713779

  18. Comprehensive assessment of coronary fractional flow reserve

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaolong; Fan, Guoxin; Zhu, Deqiu; Ma, Wanrong

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is considered nowadays as the gold standard for invasive assessment of physiologic stenosis significance and an indispensable tool for decision-making in coronary revascularization. Robust studies have shown that FFR is more effective in accurately identifying which lesions should be stented, and revascularization guided by FFR improves the outcome of coronary artery disease in patients. Therefore, FFR has been upgraded to a class A recommendation in current guidelines when the ischemic potential for specific target lesions is controversial. This article reviews the laboratory practice, functional evaluation of FFR as a gold standard and its emerging clinical application. In addition, novel noninvasive technologies of FFR measurement are discussed in depth. PMID:26170840

  19. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The work done on this project is divided into two principal areas. The first involves the application of sedimentation/steric FFF to metaphase chromosomes in an attempt to fractionate the chromosomes according to their size. The preparation of chromosomes from a number of organisms was attempted; procedures were finally worked out in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory for the preparation of metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. After extensive experimental work was done to identify suitable operating conditions, the partial fractionation of the Chinese hamster chromosomes was achieved. In the second component of the project, flow FFF was applied to the separation of DNA fragments. Figures are provided that show considerable success in the separation of plasmid digests and in the separation of single from double stranded DNA under 10{sup 4} base pairs. Preliminary work was done on DNA fragments having a size greater than 10{sup 4} base pairs. This work has served to establish the inversion point for DNA.

  20. Fractional-order variational optical flow model for motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dali; Sheng, Hu; Chen, YangQuan; Xue, Dingyü

    2013-05-13

    A new class of fractional-order variational optical flow models, which generalizes the differential of optical flow from integer order to fractional order, is proposed for motion estimation in this paper. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are derived by solving a typical fractional variational problem, and the numerical implementation based on the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional derivative definition is proposed to solve these complicated fractional partial differential equations. Theoretical analysis reveals that the proposed fractional-order variational optical flow model is the generalization of the typical Horn and Schunck (first-order) variational optical flow model and the second-order variational optical flow model, which provides a new idea for us to study the optical flow model and has an important theoretical implication in optical flow model research. The experiments demonstrate the validity of the generalization of differential order. PMID:23547225

  1. A novel approach to improve operation and performance in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Roesch, Ulrich; Rambaldi, Diana C; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2011-07-01

    A new system design and setup are proposed for the combined use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) within the same instrumentation. To this purpose, three innovations are presented: (a) a new flow control scheme where focusing flow rates are measured in real time allowing to adjust the flow rate ratio as desired; (b) a new HF5 channel design consisting of two sets of ferrule, gasket and cap nut used to mount the fiber inside a tube. This design provides a mechanism for effective and straightforward sealing of the fiber; (c) a new AF4 channel design with only two fluid connections on the upper plate. Only one pump is needed to deliver the necessary flow rates. In the focusing/relaxation step the two parts of the focusing flow and a bypass flow flushing the detectors are created with two splits of the flow from the pump. In the elution mode the cross-flow is measured and controlled with a flow controller device. This leads to reduced pressure pulsations in the channel and improves signal to noise ratio in the detectors. Experimental results of the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and of a mix of four proteins demonstrate a significant improvement in the HF5 separation performance, in terms of efficiency, resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility compared to what has been reported in the literature. Separation performance in HF5 mode is shown to be comparable to the performance in AF4 mode using a channel with two connections in the upper plate. PMID:21227436

  2. High energy density redox flow device

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  3. Compact and tunable size-based dielectrophoretic flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Han-Sheng; Chung, Tien-Yu; Li, Yun

    2014-12-01

    A compact and tunable size-based flow fractionation microchip using negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) is presented in this paper. In the microchip, a sample containing a mixture of particles is hydrodynamically focused in a contraction section and then sorted by size after flowing over planar interdigitated electrodes. The electrodes and flow chamber were aligned at an angle of 45° to produce effective sorting. 1, 2.5 and 4.8 µm polystyrene (PS) particles were successfully separated into three distinct streams in a short distance (1 mm) and collected in different outlet channels. The sorting was subjected to flow rates and electric potential. The experimental sorting efficiencies of 1, 2.5 and 4.8 µm particles reached 97.2%, 79.6% and 99.8%, respectively. With the same device, lipid vesicle sorting was demonstrated. 86.9% of vesicles larger than 10 µm were effectively extracted from the sample stream. Likewise, sorting of other biological particles can be achieved in the same fashion.

  4. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  5. Self-regulating flow control device

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, Duane A.

    1984-01-01

    A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

  6. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  7. Void fraction correlations in two-phase horizontal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Papathanassiou, G.; Maeder, P.F.; DiPippo, R.; Dickinson, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This study examines some physical mechanisms which impose limits on the possible existence of two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe. With the aid of this analysis and the use of the Martinelli variable, X, a method is developed which determines the range of possible void fractions for a given two-phase flow. This method affords a means of direct comparison among void fraction correlations, as well as between correlation predictions and experimental results. In this respect, four well-known void fraction correlations are compared against each other and with experimental results obtained in the Brown University Two-Phase Flow Research Facility.

  8. Granular flow through an aperture: influence of the packing fraction.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, M A; De Schant, R; Géminard, J-C

    2014-07-01

    For the last 50 years, the flow of a granular material through an aperture has been intensely studied in gravity-driven vertical systems (e.g., silos and hoppers). Nevertheless, in many industrial applications, grains are horizontally transported at constant velocity, lying on conveyor belts or floating on the surface of flowing liquids. Unlike fluid flows, that are controlled by the pressure, granular flow is not sensitive to the local pressure but rather to the local velocity of the grains at the outlet. We can also expect the flow rate to depend on the local density of the grains. Indeed, vertical systems are packed in dense configurations by gravity, but, in contrast, in horizontal systems the density can take a large range of values, potentially very small, which may significantly alter the flow rate. In the present article, we study, for different initial packing fractions, the discharge through an orifice of monodisperse grains driven at constant velocity by a horizontal conveyor belt. We report how, during the discharge, the packing fraction is modified by the presence of the outlet, and we analyze how changes in the packing fraction induce variations in the flow rate. We observe that variations of packing fraction do not affect the velocity of the grains at the outlet, and, therefore, we establish that flow-rate variations are directly related to changes in the packing fraction. PMID:25122295

  9. Low volume fraction rimming flow in a rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ju; Tsai, Yu-Te; Liu, Ta-Jo; Wu, Ping-Yao

    2007-12-01

    An experimental study was carried out to examine how uniform rimming flow is established for a very small volume fraction of aqueous Newtonian solutions in a partially filled rotating horizontal cylinder. There exists a certain critical volume fraction (Vc) for each solution, where the rotational speed required to achieve uniform rimming flow takes a minimum value. Counterintuitively, it takes greater rotation speeds for both larger and smaller volume fractions than this. Axial instabilities are observed for liquid volume fractions above or below this critical value. For V >Vc the defects are mainly of shark-teeth and turbulent types, while for V fraction increases with increasing fluid viscosity. Reducing surface tension increases the minimum rotational speed for V >Vc, but has very little effect for V fraction for rimming flow found in the present study is 0.25%. The dimensionless minimum rotational speed Ω to achieve rimming flow is presented as a function of the dimensionless liquid volume fraction ϕ. The competing effects of fluid inertia and viscous force on rimming flow are demonstrated from a dimensionless plot of Ω versus ϕ.

  10. Trajectory of microscale entities in a microdevice for field-flow fractionation based on dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Khashan, Saud A.; El-Khasawneh, Bashar S.

    2015-06-01

    This article deals with the development of a two-dimensional dynamic model for tracking the path of cells subjected to dielectrophoresis, in a continuous flow microfluidic device, for purposes of field-flow fractionation. The nonuniform electric field exists between the top and bottom surface of the microchannel; the top electrode runs over the entire length of the microchannel while the bottom surface of the same holds multiple finite sized electrodes of opposite polarity. The model consists of two governing equations with each describing the movement of the cell in one of the two dimensions of interest. The equations governing of the cell trajectories as well as that of the electric potential inside the microchannel are solved using finite difference method. The model is subsequently used for parametric study; the parameters considered include cell radii, actuation voltage, microchannel height and volumetric flow rate. The model is particularly useful in the design of microfluidic device employing dielectrophoresis for field flow fractionation.

  11. Experimental Flow Characterization of a Flow Diverting Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Eph; Chow, Ricky; Campbell, Gary; Divani, Afshin; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    Flow diverters, such as the Pipeline Embolization Device, are a new class of endovascular devices for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. While clinical studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy, their impact on intra-aneurysmal flow is not confirmed experimentally. As such, optimization of the flow diversion behavior is not currently possible. A quasi-3D PIV technique was developed and applied in various glass models at Re = 275 and 550 to determine the changes to flow characteristics due to the deployment of a flow diverter across the aneurysm neck. Outcomes such as mean velocity, wall shear stress, and others metrics will be presented. Glass models with varying radii of curvature and aneurysm locations will be examined. Experiments were performed in a fully index-matched flow facility using ~10 μm diameter polystyrene particles doped with Rhodium 6G dye. The particles were illuminated with a 532nm laser sheet and observed with a CCD camera and a 592nm +/-43 nm bandpass filter. A quasi 3D flow field was reconstructed from multiple orthogonal planes (spaced 0.4mm apart) encompassing the entire glass model. Wall stresses were evaluated from the near-wall flow viscous stresses.

  12. Tunable Microfluidic Devices for Hydrodynamic Fractionation of Cells and Beads: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    The adjustable microfluidic devices that have been developed for hydrodynamic-based fractionation of beads and cells are important for fast performance tunability through interaction of mechanical properties of particles in fluid flow and mechanically flexible microstructures. In this review, the research works reported on fabrication and testing of the tunable elastomeric microfluidic devices for applications such as separation, filtration, isolation, and trapping of single or bulk of microbeads or cells are discussed. Such microfluidic systems for rapid performance alteration are classified in two groups of bulk deformation of microdevices using external mechanical forces, and local deformation of microstructures using flexible membrane by pneumatic pressure. The main advantage of membrane-based tunable systems has been addressed to be the high capability of integration with other microdevice components. The stretchable devices based on bulk deformation of microstructures have in common advantage of simplicity in design and fabrication process. PMID:26610519

  13. Lie group analysis and similarity solution for fractional Blasius flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Mingyang; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation for boundary layer flow of viscoelastic fluids past a flat plate. Fractional-order Blasius equation with spatial fractional Riemann-Liouville derivative is derived firstly by using Lie group transformation. The solution is obtained numerically by the generalized shooting method, employing the shifted Grünwald formula and classical fourth order Runge-Kutta method as the iterative scheme. The effects of the order of fractional derivative and the generalized Reynolds number on the velocity profiles are analyzed and discussed. Numerical results show that the smaller the value of the fractional order derivative leads to the faster velocity of viscoelastic fluids near the plate but not to hold near the outer flow. As the Reynolds number increases, the fluid is moving faster in the whole boundary layer consistently.

  14. Analysis of Fractional Flow for Transient Two-Phase Flow in Fractal Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Duan, Yonggang; Fang, Quantang; Dai, Xiaolu; Wu, Jinsui

    2016-03-01

    Prediction of fractional flow in fractal porous medium is important for reservoir engineering and chemical engineering as well as hydrology. A physical conceptual fractional flow model of transient two-phase flow is developed in fractal porous medium based on the fractal characteristics of pore-size distribution and on the approximation that porous medium consist of a bundle of tortuous capillaries. The analytical expression for fractional flow for wetting phase is presented, and the proposed expression is the function of structural parameters (such as tortuosity fractal dimension, pore fractal dimension, maximum and minimum diameters of capillaries) and fluid properties (such as contact angle, viscosity and interfacial tension) in fractal porous medium. The sensitive parameters that influence fractional flow and its derivative are formulated, and their impacts on fractional flow are discussed.

  15. Fractionating power and outlet stream polydispersity in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: isocratic operation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF) has become the most commonly used of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, because of the interdependence of the channel flow and the cross flow through the accumulation wall, it is the most difficult of the techniques to optimize, particularly for programmed cross flow operation. For the analysis of polydisperse samples, the optimization should ideally be guided by the predicted fractionating power. Many experimentalists, however, neglect fractionating power and rely on light scattering detection simply to confirm apparent selectivity across the breadth of the eluted peak. The size information returned by the light scattering software is assumed to dispense with any reliance on theory to predict retention, and any departure of theoretical predictions from experimental observations is therefore considered of no importance. Separation depends on efficiency as well as selectivity, however, and efficiency can be a strong function of retention. The fractionation of a polydisperse sample by field-flow fractionation never provides a perfectly separated series of monodisperse fractions at the channel outlet. The outlet stream has some residual polydispersity, and it will be shown in this manuscript that the residual polydispersity is inversely related to the fractionating power. Due to the strong dependence of light scattering intensity and its angular distribution on the size of the scattering species, the outlet polydispersity must be minimized if reliable size data are to be obtained from the light scattering detector signal. It is shown that light scattering detection should be used with careful control of fractionating power to obtain optimized analysis of polydisperse samples. Part I is concerned with isocratic operation of As-FlFFF, and part II with programmed operation. Graphical abstract The dash-dotted blue curve describes an assumed log-normal sample molecular weight distribution (right axis

  16. Microfluidic devices and methods for integrated flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-08-16

    Microfluidic devices and methods for flow cytometry are described. In described examples, various sample handling and preparation steps may be carried out within a same microfluidic device as flow cytometry steps. A combination of imaging and flow cytometry is described. In some examples, spiral microchannels serve as incubation chambers. Examples of automated sample handling and flow cytometry are described.

  17. Affinity flow fractionation of cells via transient interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Suman; Singh, Rishi; Hanewich-Hollatz, Mikhail; Shen, Chong; Lee, Chia-Hua; Dorfman, David M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-07-01

    Flow fractionation of cells using physical fields to achieve lateral displacement finds wide applications, but its extension to surface molecule-specific separation requires labeling. Here we demonstrate affinity flow fractionation (AFF) where weak, short-range interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns laterally displace cells in a continuous, label-free process. We show that AFF can directly draw neutrophils out of a continuously flowing stream of blood with an unprecedented 400,000-fold depletion of red blood cells, with the sorted cells being highly viable, unactivated, and functionally intact. The lack of background erythrocytes enabled the use of AFF for direct enumeration of neutrophils by a downstream detector, which could distinguish the activation state of neutrophils in blood. The compatibility of AFF with capillary microfluidics and its ability to directly separate cells with high purity and minimal sample preparation will facilitate the design of simple and portable devices for point-of-care diagnostics and quick, cost-effective laboratory analysis.

  18. Pressure and flow characteristics of restrictive flow orifice devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Shrouf, Roger D.

    2003-06-01

    A Restrictive Flow Orifice (RFO) can be used to enhance the safe design of a pressure system in several ways. Pressure systems frequently incorporate a regulator and relief valve to protect the downstream equipment from accidental overpressure caused by regulator failure. Analysis frequently shows that in cases of high-flow regulator failure, the downstream pressure may rise significantly above the set pressure of the relief valve. This is due to limited flow capacity of the relief valve. A different regulator or relief valve may need to be selected. A more economical solution to this problem is to use an RFO to limit the maximum system flow to acceptable limits within the flow capacity of the relief valve, thereby enhancing the overpressure protection of laboratory equipment. An RFO can also be used to limit the uncontrolled release of system fluid (gas or liquid) upon component or line failure. As an example, potential asphyxiation hazards resultant from the release of large volumes of inert gas from a 'house' nitrogen system can be controlled by the use of an RFO. This report describes a versatile new Sandia-designed RFO available from the Swagelok Company and specifies the gas flow characteristics of this device. Two sizes, 0.010 and 0.020 inch diameter RFOs are available. These sizes will allow enhanced safety for many common applications. This new RFO design are now commercially available and provide advantages over existing RFOs: a high pressure rating (6600 psig); flow through the RFO is equal for either forward or reverse directions; they minimize the potential for leakage by incorporating the highest quality threaded connections; and can enhance the safety of pressure systems.

  19. Gravitational field-flow fractionation of human hemopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Alviano, Francesco; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Bagnara, Gian Paolo; Ricci, Francesca; Buzzi, Marina; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Michelini, Elisa; Roda, Aldo

    2009-12-25

    New cell sorting methodologies, which are simple, fast, non-invasive, and able to isolate homogeneous cell populations, are needed for applications ranging from gene expression analysis to cell-based therapy. In particular, in the forefront of stem cell isolation, progenitor cells have to be separated under mild experimental conditions from complex heterogeneous mixtures prepared from human tissues. Most of the methodologies now employed make use of immunological markers. However, it is widely acknowledged that specific markers for pluripotent stem cells are not as yet available, and cell labelling may interfere with the differentiation process. This work presents for the first time gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF), as a tool for tag-less, direct selection of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from cell samples obtained by peripheral blood aphaeresis. These cells are responsible to repopulate the hemopoietic system and they are used in transplantation therapies. Blood aphaeresis sample were injected into a GrFFF system and collected fractions were characterized by flow cytometry for CD34 and CD45 expression, and then tested for viability and multi-differentiation potential. The developed GrFFF method allowed obtaining high enrichment levels of viable, multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells in specific fraction and it showed to fulfil major requirements of analytical performance, such as selectivity and reproducibility of the fractionation process and high sample recovery. PMID:19647835

  20. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  1. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  2. Miniaturised free flow isotachophoresis of bacteria using an injection moulded separation device.

    PubMed

    Prest, Jeff E; Baldock, Sara J; Fielden, Peter R; Goddard, Nicholas J; Goodacre, Royston; O'Connor, Richard; Treves Brown, Bernard J

    2012-08-15

    A new design of miniaturised free flow electrophoresis device has been produced. The design contains a separation chamber that is 45 mm long by 31.7 mm wide with a depth of 50 μm and has nine inlet and nine outlet holes to allow for fraction collection. The devices were formed of polystyrene with carbon fibre loaded polystyrene drive electrodes and produced using injection moulding. This means that the devices are low cost and can potentially be mass produced. The devices were used for free flow isotachophoresis (FFITP), a technique that can be used for focussing and concentrating analytes contained within complex sample matrices. The operation of the devices was demonstrated by performing separations of dyes and bacterial samples. Analysis of the output from FFITP separations of samples containing the bacterium Erwinia herbicola, a biological pathogen, by cell culturing and counting showed that fractionation of the output was achieved. PMID:22819202

  3. High energy density redox flow device

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yet -Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2015-10-06

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  4. High energy density redox flow device

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, William Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  5. Fractional flow in fractured chalk; a flow and tracer test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odling, N. E.; West, L. J.; Hartmann, S.; Kilpatrick, A.

    2013-04-01

    A multi-borehole pumping and tracer test in fractured chalk is revisited and reinterpreted in the light of fractional flow. Pumping test data analyzed using a fractional flow model gives sub-spherical flow dimensions of 2.2-2.4 which are interpreted as due to the partially penetrating nature of the pumped borehole. The fractional flow model offers greater versatility than classical methods for interpreting pumping tests in fractured aquifers but its use has been hampered because the hydraulic parameters derived are hard to interpret. A method is developed to convert apparent transmissivity and storativity (L4-n/T and S2-n) to conventional transmissivity and storativity (L2/T and dimensionless) for the case where flow dimension, 2 < n < 3. These parameters may then be used in further applications, facilitating application of the fractional flow model. In the case illustrated, improved fits to drawdown data are obtained and the resultant transmissivities and storativities are found to be lower by 30% and an order of magnitude respectively, than estimates from classical methods. The revised hydraulic parameters are used in a reinterpretation of a tracer test using an analytical dual porosity model of solute transport incorporating matrix diffusion and modified for fractional flow. Model results show smaller fracture apertures, spacings and dispersivities than those when 2D flow is assumed. The pumping and tracer test results and modeling presented illustrate the importance of recognizing the potential fractional nature of flow generated by partially penetrating boreholes in fractured aquifers in estimating aquifer properties and interpreting tracer breakthrough curves.

  6. Flow-test device fits into restricted access passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J. J.; Oberschmidt, M.; Rosenbaum, B. J.

    1967-01-01

    Test device using a mandrel with a collapsible linkage assembly enables a fluid flow sensor to be properly positioned in a restricted passage by external manipulation. This device is applicable to the combustion chamber of a rocket motor.

  7. Fraction of clogging configurations in granular hopper flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Charles; Durian, Douglas

    2015-03-01

    The clogging of granular media flowing from a hopper is a quintessential example of a system that spontaneously evolves from a freely flowing state to a jammed state under constant forcing. If suitably arranged, the grains at the opening are stable, initiate a jamming front, and block the flow throughout the bulk. We measure the fraction F of possible grain arrangements that lead to such a system-spanning clog for a range of experimental conditions, varying aperture shape, size, and orientation. We find for circular holes that F is a function only of the aperture size projected in the direction of the average exiting grain velocity. Furthermore, for long narrow slits F is found to be identical to the value expected for a set of independent holes. Finally, we successfully model the form of F versus aperture size by considering the accessible microstates of individual grains near the exit. The data as interpreted through this model suggest that the fraction of individual grain microstates that can lead to a clog is constant for large opening sizes. This conclusion implies that there may be no well-defined critical aperture size above which clogging is impossible.

  8. Standardization of Fractional Flow Reserve Measurements.

    PubMed

    Toth, Gabor G; Johnson, Nils P; Jeremias, Allen; Pellicano, Mariano; Vranckx, Pascal; Fearon, William F; Barbato, Emanuele; Kern, Morton J; Pijls, Nico H J; De Bruyne, Bernard

    2016-08-16

    Pressure wire-based fractional flow reserve is considered the standard of reference for evaluation of the ischemic potential of coronary stenoses and the expected benefit from revascularization. Accordingly, its application in daily practice or for research purposes has to be as standardized as possible to avoid technical or operator-related artifacts in pressure recordings. This document proposes a standardized way of acquiring, recording, interpreting, and archiving the pressure tracings for daily practice and for the purpose of clinical research involving a core laboratory. Proposed standardized steps enhance the uniformity of clinical practices and data interpretation. PMID:27515335

  9. Fraction of Clogging Configurations Sampled by Granular Hopper Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. C.; Durian, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    We measure the fraction F of flowing grain configurations that precede a clog, based on the average mass discharged between clogging events for various aperture geometries. By tilting the hopper, we demonstrate that F is a function of the hole area projected in the direction of the exiting grain velocity. By varying the length of slits, we demonstrate that grains clog in the same manner as if they were flowing out of a set of smaller independent circular openings. The collapsed data for F can be fit to a decay that is exponential in hole width raised to the power of the system dimensionality. This is consistent with a simple model in which individual grains near the hole have a large but constant probability to precede a clog. Such a picture implies that there is no sharp clogging transition, and that all hoppers have a nonzero probability to clog.

  10. Hydrodynamic chromatography and field flow fractionation in finite aspect ratio channels.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, T N; Slater, G W

    2014-04-25

    Hydrodynamic chromatography (HC) and field-flow fractionation (FFF) separation methods are often performed in 3D rectangular channels, though ideal retention theory assumes 2D systems. Devices are commonly designed with large aspect ratios; however, it can be unavoidable or desirable to design rectangular channels with small or even near-unity aspect ratios. To assess the significance of finite-aspect ratio effects and interpret experimental retention results, an ideal, analytical retention theory is needed. We derive a series solution for the ideal retention ratio of HC and FFF rectangular channels. Rather than limiting devices' ability to resolve samples, our theory predicts that retention curves for normal-mode FFF are well approximated by the infinite plate solution and that the performance of HC is actually improved. These findings suggest that FFF devices need not be designed with large aspect ratios and that rectangular HC channels are optimal when the aspect ratio is unity. PMID:24674643

  11. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  12. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of superferrimagnetic iron oxide multicore nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dutz, Silvio; Kuntsche, Judith; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Müller, Robert; Zeisberger, Matthias

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are very useful for various medical applications where each application requires particles with specific magnetic properties. In this paper we describe the modification of the magnetic properties of magnetic multicore nanoparticles (MCNPs) by size dependent fractionation. This classification was carried out by means of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). A clear increase of the particle size with increasing elution time was confirmed by multi-angle laser light scattering coupled to the AF4 system, dynamic light scattering and Brownian diameters determined by magnetorelaxometry. In this way 16 fractions of particles with different hydrodynamic diameters, ranging between around 100 and 500 nm, were obtained. A high reproducibility of the method was confirmed by the comparison of the mean diameters of fractions of several fractionation runs under identical conditions. The hysteresis curves were measured by vibrating sample magnetometry. Starting from a coercivity of 1.41 kA m(-1) for the original MCNPs the coercivity of the particles in the different fractions varied from 0.41 to 3.83 kA m(-1). In our paper it is shown for the first time that fractions obtained from a broad size distributed MCNP fluid classified by AF4 show a strong correlation between hydrodynamic diameter and magnetic properties. Thus we state that AF4 is a suitable technology for reproducible size dependent classification of magnetic multicore nanoparticles suspended as ferrofluids. PMID:22875740

  13. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide-measuring devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Maniscalco, Mauro; Vitale, Carolina; Vatrella, Alessandro; Molino, Antonio; Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) has been employed in the diagnosis of specific types of airway inflammation, guiding treatment monitoring by predicting and assessing response to anti-inflammatory therapy and monitoring for compliance and detecting relapse. Various techniques are currently used to analyze exhaled NO concentrations under a range of conditions for both health and disease. These include chemiluminescence and electrochemical sensor devices. The cost effectiveness and ability to achieve adequate flexibility in sensitivity and selectivity of NO measurement for these methods are evaluated alongside the potential for use of laser-based technology. This review explores the technologies involved in the measurement of exhaled NO. PMID:27382340

  14. “Virtual” (Computed) Fractional Flow Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D.; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Lawford, Patricia V.; Hose, D. Rodney; Gunn, Julian P.

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is the “gold standard” for assessing the physiological significance of coronary artery disease during invasive coronary angiography. FFR-guided percutaneous coronary intervention improves patient outcomes and reduces stent insertion and cost; yet, due to several practical and operator related factors, it is used in <10% of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures. Virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR) is computed using coronary imaging and computational fluid dynamics modeling. vFFR has emerged as an attractive alternative to invasive FFR by delivering physiological assessment without the factors that limit the invasive technique. vFFR may offer further diagnostic and planning benefits, including virtual pullback and virtual stenting facilities. However, there are key challenges that need to be overcome before vFFR can be translated into routine clinical practice. These span a spectrum of scientific, logistic, commercial, and political areas. The method used to generate 3-dimensional geometric arterial models (segmentation) and selection of appropriate, patient-specific boundary conditions represent the primary scientific limitations. Many conflicting priorities and design features must be carefully considered for vFFR models to be sufficiently accurate, fast, and intuitive for physicians to use. Consistency is needed in how accuracy is defined and reported. Furthermore, appropriate regulatory and industry standards need to be in place, and cohesive approaches to intellectual property management, reimbursement, and clinician training are required. Assuming successful development continues in these key areas, vFFR is likely to become a desirable tool in the functional assessment of coronary artery disease. PMID:26117471

  15. "Virtual" (Computed) Fractional Flow Reserve: Current Challenges and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Morris, Paul D; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2015-07-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is the "gold standard" for assessing the physiological significance of coronary artery disease during invasive coronary angiography. FFR-guided percutaneous coronary intervention improves patient outcomes and reduces stent insertion and cost; yet, due to several practical and operator related factors, it is used in <10% of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures. Virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR) is computed using coronary imaging and computational fluid dynamics modeling. vFFR has emerged as an attractive alternative to invasive FFR by delivering physiological assessment without the factors that limit the invasive technique. vFFR may offer further diagnostic and planning benefits, including virtual pullback and virtual stenting facilities. However, there are key challenges that need to be overcome before vFFR can be translated into routine clinical practice. These span a spectrum of scientific, logistic, commercial, and political areas. The method used to generate 3-dimensional geometric arterial models (segmentation) and selection of appropriate, patient-specific boundary conditions represent the primary scientific limitations. Many conflicting priorities and design features must be carefully considered for vFFR models to be sufficiently accurate, fast, and intuitive for physicians to use. Consistency is needed in how accuracy is defined and reported. Furthermore, appropriate regulatory and industry standards need to be in place, and cohesive approaches to intellectual property management, reimbursement, and clinician training are required. Assuming successful development continues in these key areas, vFFR is likely to become a desirable tool in the functional assessment of coronary artery disease. PMID:26117471

  16. Determination of the functioning parameters in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with an exponential channel.

    PubMed

    Déjardin, P

    2013-08-30

    The flow conditions in normal mode asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation are determined to approach the high retention limit with the requirement d≪l≪w, where d is the particle diameter, l the characteristic length of the sample exponential distribution and w the channel height. The optimal entrance velocity is determined from the solute characteristics, the channel geometry (exponential to rectangular) and the membrane properties, according to a model providing the velocity fields all over the cell length. In addition, a method is proposed for in situ determination of the channel height. PMID:23885667

  17. [Effects of carrier liquid and flow rate on the separation in gravitational field-flow fractionation].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang; Zhu, Chenqi; Gao-Yang, Yaya; Qiu, Bailing; Wu, Di; Liang, Qihui; He, Jiayuan; Han, Nanyin

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation is the simplest field-flow fractionation technique in terms of principle and operation. The earth' s gravity is its external field. Different sized particles are injected into a thin channel and carried by carrier fluid. The different velocities of the carrier liquid in different places results in a size-based separation. A gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) instrument was designed and constructed. Two kinds of polystyrene (PS) particles with different sizes (20 µm and 6 µm) were chosen as model particles. In this work, the separation of the sample was achieved by changing the concentration of NaN3, the percentage of mixed surfactant in the carrier liquid and the flow rate of carrier liquid. Six levels were set for each factor. The effects of these three factors on the retention ratio (R) and plate height (H) of the PS particles were investigated. It was found that R increased and H decreased with increasing particle size. On the other hand, the R and H increased with increasing flow rate. The R and H also increased with increasing NaN3 concentration. The reason was that the electrostatic repulsive force between the particles and the glass channel wall increased. The force allowed the samples approach closer to the channel wall. The results showed that the resolution and retention time can be improved by adjusting the experimental conditions. These results can provide important values to the further applications of GrFFF technique. PMID:27382718

  18. Rational strategy for characterization of nanoscale particles by asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Gigault, Julien; Pettibone, John M; Schmitt, Charlène; Hackley, Vincent A

    2014-01-27

    This tutorial proposes a comprehensive and rational measurement strategy that provides specific guidance for the application of asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation (A4F) to the size-dependent separation and characterization of nanoscale particles (NPs) dispersed in aqueous media. A range of fractionation conditions are considered, and challenging applications, including industrially relevant materials (e.g., metal NPs, asymmetric NPs), are utilized in order to validate and illustrate this approach. We demonstrate that optimization is material dependent and that polystyrene NPs, widely used as a reference standard for retention calibration in A4F, in fact represent a class of materials with unique selectivity, recovery and optimal conditions for fractionation; thus use of these standards to calibrate retention for other materials must be validated a posteriori. We discuss the use and relevance of different detection modalities that can potentially yield multi-dimensional and complementary information on NP systems. We illustrate the fractionation of atomically precise nanoclusters, which are the lower limit of the nanoscale regime. Conversely, we address the upper size limit for normal mode elution in A4F. The protocol for A4F fractionation, including the methods described in the present work is proposed as a standardized strategy to realize interlaboratory comparability and to facilitate the selection and validation of material-specific measurement parameters and conditions. It is intended for both novice and advanced users of this measurement technology. PMID:24418128

  19. LAM actuated propellant flow control device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Robert H.; Cust, Kevin M.

    1992-02-01

    An advanced design LAM (limited angle motor) positions an integral flow control element for bi-level flow control of storable propellants. The LAM incorporates permanent magnet latching to maintain the flow control element in either the low or high flow position without continuous electrical energization. The LAM stator and rotor are fully sheathed within stainless steel. This construction method permits the LAM to control storable propellants without using dynamic seals to isolate the LAM from the propellants. All welded construction prevents external leakage. The design concept selection rationale and the computer FEA (finite element analysis) methods employed to optimize design characteristics are presented. Correlations of analyses to test results are described.

  20. On the no-field method for void time determination in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michel; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2011-07-01

    Elution time measurements of colloidal particles injected in a symmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (flow FFF) system when the inlet and outlet cross-flow connections are closed have been performed. This no-field method has been proposed earlier for void time (and void volume) determination in flow FFF Giddings et al. (1977). The elution times observed were much larger than expected on the basis of the channel geometrical volume and the flow rate. In order to explain these discrepancies, a flow model allowing the carrier liquid to flow through the porous walls toward the reservoirs located behind the porous elements and along these reservoirs was developed. The ratio between the observed elution time and expected one is found to depend only on a parameter which is a function of the effective permeability and thickness of the porous elements and of the channel thickness and length. The permeabilities of the frits used in the system were measured. Their values lead to predicted elution times in reasonable agreement with experimental ones, taking into account likely membrane protrusion inside the channel on system assembly. They comfort the basic feature of the flow model, in the no-field case. The carrier liquid mostly bypasses the channel to flow along the system mainly in the reservoir. It flows through the porous walls toward the reservoirs near channel inlet and again through the porous walls from the reservoirs to the channel near channel outlet before exiting the system. In order to estimate the extent of this bypassing process, it is desirable that the hydrodynamic characteristics of the permeable elements (permeability and thickness) are provided by flow FFF manufacturers. The model applies to symmetrical as well as asymmetrical flow FFF systems. PMID:21256498

  1. Pressure-flow reducer for aerosol focusing devices

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric; Riot, Vincent; Coffee, Keith; Woods, Bruce; Tobias, Herbert; Birch, Jim; Weisgraber, Todd

    2008-04-22

    A pressure-flow reducer, and an aerosol focusing system incorporating such a pressure-flow reducer, for performing high-flow, atmosphere-pressure sampling while delivering a tightly focused particle beam in vacuum via an aerodynamic focusing lens stack. The pressure-flow reducer has an inlet nozzle for adjusting the sampling flow rate, a pressure-flow reduction region with a skimmer and pumping ports for reducing the pressure and flow to enable interfacing with low pressure, low flow aerosol focusing devices, and a relaxation chamber for slowing or stopping aerosol particles. In this manner, the pressure-flow reducer decouples pressure from flow, and enables aerosol sampling at atmospheric pressure and at rates greater than 1 liter per minute.

  2. Meeting in Florida: Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of nanomaterials in environmental systems requires robust and specific analytical methods. Analytical methods which discriminate based on particle size and molecular composition are not widely available. Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation...

  3. Modeling magnetically insulated devices using flow impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Rosenthal, S.E. )

    1995-04-01

    In modern pulsed power systems the electric field stresses at metal surfaces in vacuum transmission lines are so high that negative surfaces are space-charge-limited electron emitters. These electrons do not cause unacceptable losses because magnetic fields due to system currents result in net motion parallel to the electrodes. It has been known for several years that a parameter known as flow impedance is useful for describing these flows. Flow impedance is a measure of the separation between the anode and the mean position of the electron cloud, and it will be shown in this paper that in many situations flow impedance depends upon the geometry of the transmission line upstream of the point of interest. It can be remarkably independent of other considerations such as line currents and voltage. For this reason flow impedance is a valuable design parameter. Models of impedance transitions and voltage adders using flow impedance will be developed. Results of these models will be compared to two-dimensional, time-dependent, particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. High Speed Size Sorting of Subcellular Organelles by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joon Seon; Lee, Ju Yong; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-06-16

    Separation/isolation of subcellular species, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, peroxisomes, Golgi apparatus, and others, from cells is important for gaining an understanding of the cellular functions performed by specific organelles. This study introduces a high speed, semipreparative scale, biocompatible size sorting method for the isolation of subcellular organelle species from homogenate mixtures of HEK 293T cells using flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). Separation of organelles was achieved using asymmetrical FlFFF (AF4) channel system at the steric/hyperlayer mode in which nuclei, lysosomes, mitochondria, and peroxisomes were separated in a decreasing order of hydrodynamic diameter without complicated preprocessing steps. Fractions in which organelles were not clearly separated were reinjected to AF4 for a finer separation using the normal mode, in which smaller sized species can be well fractionated by an increasing order of diameter. The subcellular species contained in collected AF4 fractions were examined with scanning electron microscopy to evaluate their size and morphology, Western blot analysis using organelle specific markers was used for organelle confirmation, and proteomic analysis was performed with nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS). Since FlFFF operates with biocompatible buffer solutions, it offers great flexibility in handling subcellular components without relying on a high concentration sucrose solution for centrifugation or affinity- or fluorescence tag-based sorting methods. Consequently, the current study provides an alternative, competitive method for the isolation/purification of subcellular organelle species in their intact states. PMID:26005782

  5. Laser Activated Flow Regulator for Glaucoma Drainage Devices

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jeffrey L.; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Bhandari, Ramanath

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capabilities of a new glaucoma drainage device regulator in controlling fluid flow as well as to demonstrate that this effect may be titratable by noninvasive means. Methods A rigid eye model with two main ports was used. On the first port, we placed a saline solution column. On the second, we placed a glaucoma shunt. We then measured the flow and flow rate through the system. After placing the regulator device on the tip of the tube, we measured again with the intact membrane and with the membrane open 50% and 100%. For the ex vivo testing we used a similar setting, using a cadaveric porcine eye, we measured again the flow and flow rate. However, this time we opened the membrane gradually using laser shots. A one-way analysis of variance and a Fisher's Least Significant Difference test were used for statistical significance. We also calculated the correlation between the numbers of laser shots applied and the main outcomes. Results The flow through the system with the glaucoma drainage device regulator (membrane intact and 50% open) was statistically lower than with the membrane open 100% and without device (P < 0.05). The flow was successfully controlled by the number of laser shots applied, and showed a positive correlation (+ 0.9). The flow rate was almost doubled every 10 shots and statistically lower than without device at all time (P < 0.05). Conclusions The glaucoma drainage device regulator can be controlled noninvasively with laser, and allows titratable control of aqueous flow. Translational Relevance Initial results and evidence from this experiment will justify the initiation of in vivo animal trials with the glaucoma drainage device regulator; which brings us closer to possible human trials and the chance to significantly improve the existing technology to treat glaucoma surgically. PMID:25374772

  6. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  7. Numerical simulation of flow through biofluid devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1990-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of flow through an artificial heart and through an artificial tilting-disk heart valve are presented. The simulation involves solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations; the solution process is described. The details and difficulties of modeling these particular geometries are discussed. The artificial heart geometry uses a single moving grid, and the valve computation uses an overlaid-grid approach with one moving grid and one stationary grid. The equations must be solved iteratively for each discrete time step of the computations, requiring a significant amount of computing time. It is particularly difficult to analyze and present the fluid physics represented by these calculations because of the time-varying nature of the flow, and because the flows are internal. Three-dimensional graphics and scientific visualization techniques have become instrumental in solving these problems.

  8. Optimization of flow control devices in a single-strand slab continuous casting tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ning; Bao, Yan-Ping; Sun, Qi-Song; Wang, Li-Feng

    2011-06-01

    The optimization of flow control devices in a single-slab continuous casting tundish was carried out by physical modeling, and the optimized scheme was presented. With the optimal tundish configuration, the minimum residence time of liquid steel was increased by 1.4 times, the peak concentration time was increased by 97%, and the dead volume fraction was decreased by 72%. A mathematical model for molten steel in the tundish was established by using the fluid dynamics package Fluent. The velocity field, concentration field, and the residence time distribution (RTD) curves of molten steel flow before and after optimization were obtained. Experimental results showed that the reasonable configuration with flow control devices can improve the fluid flow characteristics in the tundish. The results of industrial application show that the nonmetallic inclusion area ratio in casting slabs is decreased by 32% with the optimal tundish configuration.

  9. A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Herr, Michael D; Hogeman, Cynthia S; Koch, Dennis W; Krishnan, Anandi; Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2010-05-01

    A Doppler signal converter has been developed to facilitate cardiovascular and exercise physiology research. This device directly converts audio signals from a clinical Doppler ultrasound imaging system into a real-time analog signal that accurately represents blood flow velocity and is easily recorded by any standard data acquisition system. This real-time flow velocity signal, when simultaneously recorded with other physiological signals of interest, permits the observation of transient flow response to experimental interventions in a manner not possible when using standard Doppler imaging devices. This converted flow velocity signal also permits a more robust and less subjective analysis of data in a fraction of the time required by previous analytic methods. This signal converter provides this capability inexpensively and requires no modification of either the imaging or data acquisition system. PMID:20173048

  10. A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity

    PubMed Central

    Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Koch, Dennis W.; Krishnan, Anandi; Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A.

    2010-01-01

    A Doppler signal converter has been developed to facilitate cardiovascular and exercise physiology research. This device directly converts audio signals from a clinical Doppler ultrasound imaging system into a real-time analog signal that accurately represents blood flow velocity and is easily recorded by any standard data acquisition system. This real-time flow velocity signal, when simultaneously recorded with other physiological signals of interest, permits the observation of transient flow response to experimental interventions in a manner not possible when using standard Doppler imaging devices. This converted flow velocity signal also permits a more robust and less subjective analysis of data in a fraction of the time required by previous analytic methods. This signal converter provides this capability inexpensively and requires no modification of either the imaging or data acquisition system. PMID:20173048

  11. Electrochemical response and separation in cyclic electric field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Chauhan, Anuj

    2007-03-01

    Electric field-flow fractionation (EFFF) is a separation technique that couples a lateral electric field with axial Poiseuille flow to separate particles on the basis of size and/or mobility. In unidirectional EFFF, the field rapidly decreases in time due to charging of the double layer. The field strength could be increased by performing EFFF with cyclic electric fields. In cyclic electric field-flow fractionation (CEFFF), a periodic voltage, which can be either sinusoidal or square-wave, is applied in the lateral direction. In this paper, we measure the electrochemical response of CEFFF, i.e., the current-time response for a given time-dependent voltage and then utilize this electrochemical response in a transport model to predict separation. The CEFFF device studied here comprises two gold-coated glass plates separated by a spacer. The transient current profiles are measured for a step change and cyclic square-shaped voltage. The current profile is compared with the equivalent circuit model, and is fitted to a sum of two decaying exponentials. The dependence of the electrochemical response on voltage, frequency, channel thickness, and salt concentration is studied. Next, the electrochemical data are utilized in the convection-diffusion equation to develop a model for separation by CEFFF. The equations are solved by using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques to determine the mean velocity and the dispersion coefficient of molecules, and to determine the effect of various parameters on the separation efficiency of the EFFF device. Also, the model predictions are compared with experimental data available in the literature. PMID:17265539

  12. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1984-01-27

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  13. Flow control concepts for thread-based microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, David R.; Li, Xu; Shen, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The emerging concept of thread-based microfluidics has shown great promise for application to inexpensive disease detection and environmental monitoring. To allow the creation of more sophisticated and functional thread-based sensor designs, the ability to better control and understand the flow of fluids in the devices is required. To meet this end, various mechanisms for controlling the flow of reagents and samples in thread-based microfluidic devices are investigated in this study. A study of fluid penetration in single threads and in twined threads provides greater practical understanding of fluid velocity and ultimate penetration for the design of devices. “Switches” which control when or where flow can occur, or allow the mixing of multiple fluids, have been successfully prototyped from multifilament threads, plastic films, and household adhesive. This advancement allows the fabrication of more functional sensory devices which can incorporate more complex detection chemistries, while maintaining low production cost and simplicity of construction. PMID:21483659

  14. Effect of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel geometry on separation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ki Hun; Lee, Ju Yong; Williams, P Stephen; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2010-06-11

    The separation efficiencies of three different asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel designs were evaluated using polystyrene latex standards. Channel breadth was held constant for one channel (rectangular profile), and was reduced either linearly (trapezoidal profile) or exponentially (exponential profile) along the length for the other two. The effective void volumes of the three channel types were designed to be equivalent. Theoretically, under certain flow conditions, the mean channel flow velocity of the exponential channel could be arranged to remain constant along the channel length, thereby improving separation in AF4. Particle separation obtained with the exponential channel was compared with particle separation obtained with the trapezoidal and rectangular channels. We demonstrated that at a certain flow rate condition (outflow/inflow rate=0.2), the exponential channel design indeed provided better performance with respect to the separation of polystyrene nanoparticles in terms of reducing band broadening. While the trapezoidal channel exhibited a little poorer performance than the exponential, the strongly decreasing mean flow velocity in the rectangular channel resulted in serious band broadening, a delay in retention time, and even failure of larger particles to elute. PMID:20439106

  15. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP. PMID:23261297

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Fractional Flow Reserve From Anatomic CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Min, James K.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Pencina, Michael J.; Berman, Daniel S.; Koo, Bon-Kwon; van Mieghem, Carlos; Erglis, Andrejs; Lin, Fay Y.; Dunning, Allison M.; Apruzzese, Patricia; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cole, Jason H.; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Leon, Martin B.; Malpeso, Jennifer; John Mancini, G. B.; Park, Seung-Jung; Schwartz, Robert S.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Mauri, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Context Coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography is a noninvasive anatomic test for diagnosis of coronary stenosis that does not determine whether a stenosis causes ischemia. In contrast, fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a physiologic measure of coronary stenosis expressing the amount of coronary flow still attainable despite the presence of a stenosis, but it requires an invasive procedure. Noninvasive FFR computed from CT (FFRCT) is a novel method for determining the physiologic significance of coronary artery disease (CAD), but its ability to identify ischemia has not been adequately examined to date. Objective To assess the diagnostic performance of FFRCT plus CT for diagnosis of hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis. Design, Setting, and Patients Multicenter diagnostic performance study involving 252 stable patients with suspected or known CAD from 17 centers in 5 countries who underwent CT, invasive coronary angiography (ICA), FFR, and FFRCT between October 2010 and October 2011. Computed tomography, ICA, FFR, and FFRCT were interpreted in blinded fashion by independent core laboratories. Accuracy of FFRCT plus CT for diagnosis of ischemia was compared with an invasive FFR reference standard. Ischemia was defined by an FFR or FFRCT of 0.80 or less, while anatomically obstructive CAD was defined by a stenosis of 50% or larger on CT and ICA. Main Outcome Measures The primary study outcome assessed whether FFRCT plus CT could improve the per-patient diagnostic accuracy such that the lower boundary of the 1-sided 95% confidence interval of this estimate exceeded 70%. Results Among study participants, 137 (54.4%) had an abnormal FFR determined by ICA. On a per-patient basis, diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of FFRCT plus CT were 73% (95% CI, 67%–78%), 90% (95% CI, 84%–95%), 54% (95% CI, 46%–83%), 67% (95% CI, 60%–74%), and 84% (95% CI, 74%–90%), respectively. Compared

  17. Efficiencies of intracoronary sodium nitroprusside on fractional flow reserve measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaosheng; Deng, Jie; Wang, Xiaozeng; Zhao, Xin; Han, Yaling

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractional flow reserve (FFR) has certain advantages of assessing functional severity of coronary stenosis. Adenosine(AD) is the most widely used agents in FFR measurement but has the disadvantages of higher rate of complications. Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) represents a valuable alternative. Methods and results: In 75 patients with 86 moderate coronary stenosis, FFR values, heart rate and blood pressure were measured at baseline, after 0.6 μg boluses of intracoronary (IC) SNP, and after 140 μg/kg /min of continuous intravenous (IV) AD. FFR values decreased significantly after administering IV AD and IC SNP compared with the baseline Pd/Pa values (P < 0.001). Mean FFR induced by IV AD was not significantly different from that by IC SNP (t = 0.577, P = 0.566). The mean kappa value in the evaluation of two methods was 0.973 for FFR. There was a significant correlation between the FFR values of IV AD and IC SNP (R = 0.911, P < 0.001). Significant decreases in the blood pressures were found after agents were given compared to the baseline. No significant difference was found between AD and SNP. In addition, immediate complications occurred in 60.5% patients of IV AD in contrast to no adverse events after IC SNP. Conclusion: SNP is a safe and effective agent and easy to use for the FFR measurement. Maximal hyperemia by IC SNP is equivalent to that by IV AD. IC SNP could be considered a potential alternative in patients with contraindications to AD administration. PMID:25932219

  18. Method of fabricating a flow device

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is a novel method for fabricating leak-tight tubular articles which have an interior flow channel whose contour must conform very closely with design specifications but which are composed of metal which tends to warp if welded. The method comprises designing two longitudinal half-sections of the article, the half-sections being contoured internally to cooperatively form the desired flow passageway. Each half-section is designed with a pair of opposed side flanges extending between the end flanges and integral therewith. The half-sections are positioned with their various flanges in confronting relation and with elongated metal gaskets extending between the confronting flanges for the length of the array. The gaskets are a deformable metal which is fusion-weldable to the end flanges. The mating side flanges are joined mechanically to deform the gaskets and provide a longitudinally sealed assembly. The portions of the end flanges contiguous with the ends of the gaskets then are welded to provide localized end welds which incorporate ends of the gaskets, thus transversely sealing the assembly. This method of fabrication provides leak-tight articles having the desired precisely contoured flow channels, whereas various conventional methods have been found unsatisfactory.

  19. Depolymerization study of sodium hyaluronate by flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Hye; Hwang, Euijin; Cho, Il-Hwan; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2009-09-01

    Thermal depolymerization of ultrahigh-molecular-weight (UHMW) sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) was studied systematically by using frit-inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle light scattering/differential refractive index (FI-AFlFFF/MALS/DRI). FI-AFlFFF was utilized for the size separation of NaHA samples which had been thermally degraded for varied treatment times, followed by light-scattering detection to determine MW and structural information of degraded NaHA products. Analysis of NaHA products showed time-dependent depolymerization of raw molecules into smaller-MW components, as well as unfolding of compact structures of UHMW NaHA. To determine whether the observed decrease in MW of sodium hyaluronate originated from the chain degradation of UHMW molecules or from dissociation of entangled complex particles that may have been formed by intermolecular association, narrow size fractions (1 x 10(7)-6 x 10(7) and >6 x 10(7) MW) of NaHA molecules were collected during FlFFF separation and followed by thermal treatment. Subsequent FI-AFlFFF/MALS analysis of collected fractions after thermal treatment suggested that the ultrahigh-MW region (>10(7) Da) of NaHA is likely to result from supermolecular structures formed by aggregation of large molecules. PMID:19649622

  20. Size characterization and quantification of exosomes by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Sitar, Simona; Kejžar, Anja; Pahovnik, David; Kogej, Ksenija; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Lenassi, Metka; Žagar, Ema

    2015-09-15

    In the past few years extracellular vesicles called exosomes have gained huge interest of scientific community since they show a great potential for human diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, an ongoing challenge is accurate size characterization and quantification of exosomes because of the lack of reliable characterization techniques. In this work, the emphasis was focused on a method development to size-separate, characterize, and quantify small amounts of exosomes by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) technique coupled to a multidetection system (UV and MALS). Batch DLS (dynamic light-scattering) and NTA (nanoparticle tracking analysis) analyses of unfractionated exosomes were also conducted to evaluate their shape and internal structure, as well as their number density. The results show significant influence of cross-flow conditions and channel thickness on fractionation quality of exosomes, whereas the focusing time has less impact. The AF4/UV-MALS and DLS results display the presence of two particles subpopulations, that is, the larger exosomes and the smaller vesicle-like particles, which coeluted in AF4 together with impurities in early eluting peak. Compared to DLS and AF4-MALS results, NTA somewhat overestimates the size and the number density for larger exosome population, but it discriminates the smaller particle population. PMID:26291637

  1. Zn isotope fractionation in the komatiitic and tholeiitic lava flows of Fred's flow and Theo's flow (Ontario, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattielli, N. D.; Haenecour, P.; Debaille, V.

    2010-12-01

    Komatiites are subvolcanic or volcanic ultramafic rocks characterized by a high MgO content (>18 wt%) usually but not systematically associated to a spinifex texture. Komatiites are nearly exclusively Archean in age and essentially found in the greenstone belts of the oldest cratons, although some rare Proterozoic and Cretaceous examples are also known. Komatiitic flows are commonly associated with tholeiitic lavas, which have many petrological, textural and geochemical similarities with komatiites. We present new high-precision MC-ICPMS Zinc isotopic data for the komatiitic lavas of Fred’s flow and the associated tholeiitic lavas of Theo’s flow from Munro Township in the 2.7 Ga Abitibi greenstone belt (Ontario, Canada). Zinc isotopes show a significant shift between Fred’s flow (mean δ66Zn = +0.30±0.04‰ (2SD)) and Theo’s flow samples (mean δ66Zn = +0.39±0.03‰ (1)). In addition, the two flows show a systematic shift in δ66Zn between the ultrabasic level at the bottom of the sequence (= +0.51± 0.04‰ and +0.47±0.04‰ for Fred’s Flow and Theo’s Flow, respectively) and the rest of the pile (Δ = 0.21±0.01‰). According to the literature, processes of secondary alteration may cause Zn isotope fractionation. However, petrographic data indicate a slight alteration fingerprint while the geochemical study (whole rock and in-situ) shows no remobilization of HFSE and REE by secondary alteration (low-grade metamorphism and/or hydrothermal alteration). In addition, if similar levels of alteration affected the two lava flows, the alteration process cannot explain the difference of δ66Zn between Fred’s and Theo’s flows. Alternatively, this isotopic difference can be interpreted as reflecting either source effects or mineral fractionation related to spinel crystallization. The correlation between the δ66Zn values and the Cr bulk concentrations may suggest fractionation effects of Zn isotopes by the crystallization of spinel minerals. However, the

  2. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of manufactured silver nanoparticles spiked into soil solution.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, G F; Hiemstra, T; Regelink, I C; Molleman, B; Comans, R N J

    2015-05-01

    Manufactured metallic silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are intensively utilized in consumer products and this will inevitably lead to their release to soils. To assess the environmental risks of AgNP in soils, quantification of both their concentration and size in soil solution is essential. We developed a methodology consisting of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with on-line detection by UV-vis spectroscopy and off-line HR-ICP-MS measurements to quantify the concentration and size of AgNP, coated with either citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), in water extracts of three different soils. The type of mobile phase was a critical factor in the fractionation of AgNP by AF4. In synthetic systems, fractionation of a series of virgin citrate- and PVP-coated AgNP (10-90 nm) with reasonably high recoveries could only be achieved with ultrahigh purity water as a mobile phase. For the soil water extracts, 0.01% (w:v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 8 was the key to a successful fractionation of the AgNP. With SDS, the primary size of AgNP in all soil water extracts could be determined by AF4, except for PVP-coated AgNP when clay colloids were present. The PVP-coated AgNP interacted with colloidal clay minerals, leading to an overestimation of their primary size. Similar interactions between PVP-coated AgNP and clay colloids can take place in the environment and facilitate their transport in soils, aquifers, and surface waters. In conclusion, AF4 in combination with UV-vis spectroscopy and HR-ICP-MS measurements is a powerful tool to characterize AgNP in soil solution if the appropriate mobile phase is used. PMID:25798868

  3. Microfabrication of multi-layered electrodes for dielectrophoresis-based field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Khashan, Saud A.

    2015-06-01

    This article details the process layout required for realizing a three-dimensional arrangement of electrodes in a microfluidic device for field flow fractionation based on dielectrophoresis. The metal electrodes are placed horizontally, in a stair-case arrangement, and pass through the bulk of the fluid. Several standard microfabrication processes are employed, in realizing this microdevice, including multi-layer photolithography, casting and plasma bonding. Thus the process layout is repeatable and reproducible. The feasibility of this process layout is demonstrated using three electrodes arranged in aforementioned manner; nevertheless, this process can be extended to as many electrodes as desired in the horizontal direction. This process layout can will make applications possible that were not possible till date due to the inability in microfabricating three-dimensional horizontal metal electrodes that run through the entire width of the microchannel.

  4. Microparticles manipulation and enhancement of their separation in pinched flow fractionation by insulator-based dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Khashei, Hesamodin; Latifi, Hamid; Seresht, Mohsen Jamshidi; Ghasemi, Amir Hossein Baradaran

    2016-03-01

    The separation and manipulation of microparticles in lab on a chip devices have importance in point of care diagnostic tools and analytical applications. The separation and sorting of particles from biological and clinical samples can be performed using active and passive techniques. In passive techniques, no external force is applied while in active techniques by applying external force (e.g. electrical), higher separation efficiency is obtained. In this article, passive (pinched flow fractionation) and active (insulator-based dielectrophoresis) methods were combined to increase the separation efficiency at lower voltages. First by simulation, appropriate values of geometry and applied voltages for better focusing, separation, and lower Joule heating were obtained. Separation of 1.5 and 6 μm polystyrene microparticles was experimentally obtained at optimized geometry and low total applied voltage (25 V). Also, the trajectory of 1.5 μm microparticles was controlled by adjusting the total applied voltage. PMID:26685118

  5. Laser absorption phenomena in flowing gas devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. K.; Otis, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation is presented of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of CW CO2 laser radiation in flowing gases seeded with alkali metals. In order to motivate this development, some simple models are described of several space missions which could use laser powered rocket vehicles. Design considerations are given for a test call to be used with a welding laser, using a diamond window for admission of laser radiation at power levels in excess of 10 kW. A detailed analysis of absorption conditions in the test cell is included. The experimental apparatus and test setup are described and the results of experiments presented. Injection of alkali seedant and steady state absorption of the laser radiation were successfully demonstrated, but problems with the durability of the diamond windows at higher powers prevented operation of the test cell as an effective laser powered thruster.

  6. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Mello, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the down-scaled platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency. PMID:26258119

  7. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge.

    PubMed

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Mello, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the down-scaled platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency. PMID:26258119

  8. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; deMello, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the scale-down platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency.

  9. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement. PMID:25817708

  10. Numerical investigation of a space-fractional model of turbulent fluid flow in rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churbanov, Alexander G.; Vabishchevich, Petr N.

    2016-09-01

    Models containing fractional derivatives are among the most promising new approaches for description of turbulent flows. In the present work, a steady-state flow in a duct is considered under the condition that the turbulent diffusion is governed by a fractional power of the Laplace operator. To study numerically flows in rectangular channels, finite-difference approximations are employed. The resulting discrete problem is solved by a preconditioned conjugate gradient method. At each iteration, the problem with a fractional power of the grid Laplace operator is solved. Predictions of turbulent flows in ducts at different Reynolds numbers are presented via mean velocity fields.

  11. Flow measurements in a centrifugal diffusor test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitting, T.

    1985-06-01

    This work sought to verify concepts used in the design of a large scale, low speed, radial cascade wind tunnel which was to be used to investigate flow phenomena in and the performance of vaned radial diffusors. A major contributor to centrifugal compressor efficiency is the performance of the vaned diffusor which closely follows the impeller of the compressor. The purpose of this diffusor is to efficiently convert most of the kinetic energy of the transonic flow entering the vane into pressure. The need for an experimental facility which could simulate adequately, at low cost and in a controlled way, the environment of the centrifugal compressor motivated the development of the Centrifugal Diffusor Test Device (CDTD). It was expected that the generation of a three dimensional flow would provide improved empirical data on annular cascade performance. This measurement program surveyed the axial and circumferential uniformity of the flow at the inlet of a transonic wedge-type blading mounted in the device. Evaluation of the results showed the flow uniformity to be unsatisfactory. Leakage and other small perturbations in the flow field in the swirl generator are believed to be amplified by the basic flow configuration of the device.

  12. An Innovative Flow-Measuring Device: Thermocouple Boundary Layer Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative flow-measuring device, a thermocouple boundary layer rake, was developed. The sensor detects the flow by using a thin-film thermocouple (TC) array to measure the temperature difference across a heater strip. The heater and TC arrays are microfabricated on a constant-thickness quartz strut with low heat conductivity. The device can measure the velocity profile well into the boundary layer, about 65 gm from the surface, which is almost four times closer to the surface than has been possible with the previously used total pressure tube.

  13. Particle motion past cylindrical flow-obstacles in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustin, Benjamin; Drazer, German; Stoeber, Boris

    2011-11-01

    A microfluidic device has been developed for the systematic investigation of particle trajectories near micro-flow obstacles. The device incorporates a 3D stream-focusing concept that focuses a micro-particle suspension into a thin stream by means of four sheath flows before sending it towards an obstacle. Stream focusing is used to control the initial position of each particle in the unidirectional flow field upstream of the obstacle. Two types of obstacles often met in practice are considered in this work: a single cylinder and a pair of cylinders in a straight micro-channel. The particle trajectories are observed with a high-speed camera connected to an inverted epi-fluorescence microscope. The motion of non-Brownian polystyrene particles near the obstacles is investigated for different initial particle positions, particle sizes and obstacle configurations. For a given initial position, the role of the particle velocity is investigated by performing experiments at different flow rates.

  14. A multiple disk centrifugal pump as a blood flow device.

    PubMed

    Miller, G E; Etter, B D; Dorsi, J M

    1990-02-01

    A multiple disk, shear force, valveless centrifugal pump was studied to determine its suitability as a blood flow device. A pulsatile version of the Tesla viscous flow turbine was designed by modifying the original steady flow pump concept to produce physiological pressures and flows with the aid of controlling circuitry. Pressures and flows from this pump were compared to a Harvard Apparatus pulsatile piston pump. Both pumps were connected to an artificial circulatory system. Frequency and systolic duration were varied over a range of physiological conditions for both pumps. The results indicated that the Tesla pump, operating in a pulsatile mode, is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows similar to the Harvard pump and other pulsatile blood pumps. PMID:2312140

  15. Quantum fluctuation theorem in an interacting setup: point contacts in fractional quantum Hall edge state devices.

    PubMed

    Komnik, A; Saleur, H

    2011-09-01

    We verify the validity of the Cohen-Gallavotti fluctuation theorem for the strongly correlated problem of charge transfer through an impurity in a chiral Luttinger liquid, which is realizable experimentally as a quantum point contact in a fractional quantum Hall edge state device. This is accomplished via the development of an analytical method to calculate the full counting statistics of the problem in all the parameter regimes involving the temperature, the Hall voltage, and the gate voltage. PMID:21981487

  16. Separation and characterization of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) latex particles by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Collins, Melissa E; Soto-Cantu, Erick; Cueto, Rafael; Russo, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) latex particles have been analyzed and sorted according to size using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with multiple-angle light scattering (MALS). Characterization of fractions by regular and depolarized dynamic light scattering confirmed that smaller particles elute prior to larger ones, as expected for field flow fractionation. The measured radii of the optically and geometrically anisotropic particles are consistent with those determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A certain amount of heterogeneity remains in the fractions, but their uniformity for use as diffusion probes is improved. Full characterization of PTFE colloids will require a difficult assessment of the distribution, even within fractions, of the optical anisotropy. A general method to obtain number versus size distributions is presented. This approach is valid even when an online concentration detector is not available or ineffective. The procedure is adaptable to particles of almost any regular shape. PMID:24635125

  17. Device for deriving energy from a flow of fluid

    SciTech Connect

    van Holten, T.

    1982-12-07

    Improved process and device for extracting energy present in a flowing fluid medium wherein a supported hub with propellers or blades is placed in said medium and the blades are provided with a wing or vane at the tip. The wing is of such a form that it generates a ''venturi effect'' in the flowing medium by which a part of the fluid which should normally pass outside the propeller disc area, is drawn into the propeller. The improvement consists of mixing of fluid which normally should pass outside the venturi with fluid which has flowed through the blades by provisions on blades and/or wing or vanes.

  18. Global Optimization Techniques for Fluid Flow and Propulsion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei; Papila, Nilay; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Tucker, Kevin; Griffin, Lisa; Dorney, Dan; Huber, Frank; Tran, Ken; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of global optimization techniques for fluid flow and propulsion devices. Details are given on the need, characteristics, and techniques for global optimization. The techniques include response surface methodology (RSM), neural networks and back-propagation neural networks, design of experiments, face centered composite design (FCCD), orthogonal arrays, outlier analysis, and design optimization.

  19. Sedimentation field flow fractionation and flow field flow fractionation as tools for studying the aging effects of WO₃ colloids for photoelectrochemical uses.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    WO₃ colloidal suspensions obtained through a simple sol-gel procedure were subjected to a controlled temperature aging process whose time evolution in terms of particle mass and size distribution was followed by sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF) and flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF). The experiments performed at a temperature of 60 °C showed that in a few hours the initially transparent sol of WO₃ particles, whose size was less than 25 nm, undergoes a progressive size increase allowing nanoparticles to reach a maximum equivalent spherical size of about 130 nm after 5 h. The observed shift in particle size distribution maxima (SdFFF), the broadening of the curves (FlFFF) and the SEM-TEM observations suggest a mixed mechanism of growth-aggregation of initial nanocrystals to form larger particles. The photoelectrochemical properties of thin WO₃ films obtained from the aged suspensions at regular intervals, were tested in a biased photoelectrocatalytic cell with 1M H₂SO₄ under solar simulated irradiation. The current-voltage polarization curves recorded in the potential range 0-1.8 V (vs. SCE) showed a diminution of the maximum photocurrent from 3.7 mA cm⁻² to 2.8 mA cm⁻² with aging times of 1h and 5h, respectively. This loss of performance was mainly attributed to the reduction of the electroactive surface area of the sintered particles as suggested by the satisfactory linear correlation between the integrated photocurrent and the cyclic voltammetry cathodic wave area of the W(VI)→W(V) process measured in the dark. PMID:21168138

  20. Flow generation in a novel centrifugal diffuser test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidos, P.

    1983-09-01

    Recognition of the need to develop optimum diffusers for advanced centrifugal compressors, resulted in the design and manufacture of a novel low-speed test facility for centrifugal diffuser testing. The CDTD was designed to allow the flow angle and wall boundary profiles into the test diffuser to be controlled by variable geometry in the flow generator. The present study reports on the design of the flow generator and the analysis of the internal flow using a NASA computer code (MERIDL). First test results are given and are compared with the results of a control volume analysis. The flow angle control technique was found to work effectively but to give somewhat smaller angles (by 4 deg) than were predicted. It was concluded that the information obtained would allow scaling of the device; however, an analysis code was needed which would accept the real physical boundary conditions.

  1. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-08-31

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by either fluid or gas pressure against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  2. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2005-11-11

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  3. Retention ratio and nonequilibrium bandspreading in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2015-06-01

    In asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF), only the membrane-covered accumulation wall is permeable to fluid; the opposite channel wall is impermeable. Fluid enters the channel at the inlet and exits partly through the membrane-covered accumulation wall and partly through the channel outlet. This means that not only does the volumetric channel flow rate decrease along the channel length as fluid exits through the membrane but also the cross-channel component to fluid velocity must approach zero at the impermeable wall. This dependence of cross-channel fluid velocity on distance across the channel thickness influences the equilibrium concentration profile for the sample components introduced to the channel. The concentration profile departs from the exponential profile predicted for the ideal model of field-flow fractionation. This influences both the retention ratio and the principal contribution to bandspreading--the nonequilibrium contribution. The derivation of an equation for the nonequilibrium bandspreading parameter χ in As-FlFFF is presented, and its numerical solution graphed. At high retention, it is shown that the solutions for both retention ratio R and χ converge on those for the ideal model, as expected. At lower levels of retention, the departures from the ideal model are significant, particularly for bandspreading. For example, at a level of retention corresponding to a retention parameter λ of 0.05, R is almost 4% higher than for the ideal model (0.28047 as compared to 0.27000) but the value of χ is almost 60% higher. The equations presented for both R and χ include a first-order correction for the finite size of the particles--the steric exclusion correction. These corrections are shown to be significant for particle sizes eluting well before steric inversion. For example, particles of half the inversion diameter are predicted to elute 25% slower and to show almost 40% higher bandspreading when steric effects are not accounted

  4. Capillary liquid chromatography fraction collection and postcolumn reaction using segmented flow microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing; Kennedy, Robert T

    2013-11-01

    A challenge for capillary LC (cLC) is fraction collection and the manipulation of fractions from microscale columns. An emerging approach is the use of segmented flow or droplet technology to perform such tasks. In this work, a fraction collection and postcolumn reaction system based on segmented flow was developed for the gradient cLC of proteins. In the system, column effluent and immiscible oil are pumped into separate arms of a tee resulting in regular fractions of effluent segmented by oil. Fractions were generated at 1 Hz corresponding to 5 nL volumes. The fraction collection rate was high enough to generate over 30 fractions per peak and preserve chromatographic resolution achieved for a five-protein test mixture. The resulting fractions could be stored and subsequently derivatized for fluorescence detection by pumping them into a second tee where naphthalene dicarboxyaldehyde, a fluorogenic reagent, was pumped into a second arm and added to each fraction. Proteins were derivatized within the droplets enabling postcolumn fluorescence detection of the proteins. The experiments demonstrate that fraction collection from cLC by segmented flow can be extended to proteins. Further, they illustrate a potential workflow for protein analysis based on postcolumn derivatization for fluorescence detection. PMID:24039151

  5. Flow Control Device Evaluation for an Internal Flow with an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Anders, Scott G.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of several active and passive devices to control flow in an adverse pressure gradient with secondary flows present was evaluated in the 15 Inch Low Speed Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. In this study, passive micro vortex generators, micro bumps, and piezoelectric synthetic jets were evaluated for their flow control characteristics using surface static pressures, flow visualization, and 3D Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Data also were acquired for synthetic jet actuators in a zero flow environment. It was found that the micro vortex generator is very effective in controlling the flow environment for an adverse pressure gradient, even in the presence of secondary vortical flow. The mechanism by which the control is effected is a re-energization of the boundary layer through flow mixing. The piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators must have sufficient velocity output to produce strong longitudinal vortices if they are to be effective for flow control. The output of these devices in a laboratory or zero flow environment will be different than the output in a flow environment. In this investigation, the output was higher in the flow environment, but the stroke cycle in the flow did not indicate a positive inflow into the synthetic jet.

  6. Prediction of refrigerant void fraction in horizontal tubes using probabilistic flow regime maps

    SciTech Connect

    Jassim, E.W.; Newell, T.A.; Chato, J.C.

    2008-04-15

    A state of the art review of two-phase void fraction models in smooth horizontal tubes is provided and a probabilistic two-phase flow regime map void fraction model is developed for refrigerants under condensation, adiabatic, and evaporation conditions in smooth, horizontal tubes. Time fraction information from a generalized probabilistic two-phase flow map is used to provide a physically based weighting of void fraction models for different flow regimes. The present model and void fraction models in the literature are compared to data from multiple sources including R11, R12, R134a, R22, R410A refrigerants, 4.26-9.58 mm diameter tubes, mass fluxes from 70 to 900 kg/m{sup 2} s, and a full quality range. The present model has a mean absolute deviation of 3.5% when compared to the collected database. (author)

  7. Numerical simulation of bioparticle separation by dielectrophoretic field-flow-fractionation (DEP-FFF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, Andreea; Neculae, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    The separation systems based on dielectrophoretic field-flow-fractionation (DEP-FFF) are used for a wide range of bioparticle types, including cells, bacteria, viruses, proteins, etc. An array of interdigitated microelectrodes lining the bottom surface of a thin chamber is used to generate dielectrophoretic forces that levitate the bioparticle mixture. The balance between DEP levitation and gravitational forces determines the bioparticles position at equilibrium heights within a fluid-flow profile, and consequently determines their velocities and the corresponding elution times. The elution time depends on the voltage applied on the microelectrodes, geometry of the device, bioparticle dielectric properties and density. This paper analyses numerically the behavior of a bioparticle mixture suspended in a dense and viscous fluid under dielectrophoresis. The controlled spatial separation of bioparticle mixture is performed by a combination of dielectrophoretic and hydrodynamic forces. The theoretical background and a set of numerical results (calculated DEP force, particle trajectories, etc.) are presented. The numerical solutions are obtained using the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element solver. The presented results demonstrate that the DEP-FFF method can be successfully applicable to many biomedical cell separation problems, including microfluidic-scale diagnosis and preparative-scale purification of cell subpopulations.

  8. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions. PMID:24231821

  9. Simple functionalization strategies for enhancing nanoparticle separation and recovery with asymmetric flow field flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mudalige, Thilak K; Qu, Haiou; Sánchez-Pomales, Germarie; Sisco, Patrick N; Linder, Sean W

    2015-02-01

    Due to the increasing use of engineered nanomaterials in consumer products, regulatory agencies and other research organizations have determined that the development of robust, reliable, and accurate methodologies to characterize nanoparticles in complex matrices is a top priority. Of particular interest are methods that can separate and determine the size of nanomaterials in samples that contain polydisperse and/or multimodal nanoparticle populations. Asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation (AF4) has shown promise for the separation of nanoparticles with wide size range distributions; however, low analyte recoveries and decreased membrane lifetimes, due to membrane fouling, have limited its application. Herein, we report straightforward strategies to minimize membrane fouling and improve nanoparticle recovery by functionalizing the surface of the nanoparticles, as well as that of the AF4 membranes. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) were stabilized through functionalization with a phosphine molecule, whereas the surface of the membranes was coated with a negatively charged polystyrenesulfonate polymer. Improved nanoparticle separation, recoveries of 99.1 (±0.5) %, and a detection limit of 6 μg/kg were demonstrated by analyzing AuNP reference materials of different sizes (e.g., 10, 30, and 60 nm), obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Furthermore, the stability of the polymer coating and its specificity toward minimizing membrane fouling were demonstrated. PMID:25556296

  10. Flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of nanoparticles used in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zattoni, Andrea; Roda, Barbara; Borghi, Francesco; Marassi, Valentina; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Structured nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled size distribution and novel physicochemical features present fundamental advantages as drug delivery systems with respect to bulk drugs. NPs can transport and release drugs to target sites with high efficiency and limited side effects. Regulatory institutions such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Commission have pointed out that major limitations to the real application of current nanotechnology lie in the lack of homogeneous, pure and well-characterized NPs, also because of the lack of well-assessed, robust routine methods for their quality control and characterization. Many properties of NPs are size-dependent, thus the particle size distribution (PSD) plays a fundamental role in determining the NP properties. At present, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) are among the most used techniques to size characterize NPs. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is also applied to the size separation of complex NP samples. SEC selectivity is, however, quite limited for very large molar mass analytes such as NPs, and interactions with the stationary phase can alter NP morphology. Flow field-flow fractionation (F4) is increasingly used as a mature separation method to size sort and characterize NPs in native conditions. Moreover, the hyphenation with light scattering (LS) methods can enhance the accuracy of size analysis of complex samples. In this paper, the applications of F4-LS to NP analysis used as drug delivery systems for their size analysis, and the study of stability and drug release effects are reviewed. PMID:24012480

  11. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of PEG-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    John, C; Herz, T; Boos, J; Langer, K; Hempel, G

    2016-01-01

    Monomethoxypolyethylene glycol L-asparaginase (PEG-ASNASE) is the PEGylated version of the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNASE). Both are used for remission induction in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The treatment control is generally carried out by performing activity assays, though methods to determine the actual enzyme rather than its activity are rare. Using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) offered the chance to develop a method capable of simultaneously measuring PEG-ASNASE and PEG. A method validation was performed in accordance with FDA guidelines for PEG-ASNASE from non-biological solutions. The method unfolded a linearity of 15-750 U/mL with coefficients of correlation of r(2)>0.99. The coefficients of variation (CV) for within-run and between-run variability were 1.18-10.15% and 2.43-8.73%, respectively. Furthermore, the method was used to perform stability tests of the product Oncaspar® (PEG-ASNASE) and estimation of the molecular weight by multi-angle light scattering (MALS) of stressed samples to correlate them with the corresponding activity. The findings indicate that Oncaspar® stock solution should not be stored any longer than 24 h at room temperature and cannot be frozen in pure aqueous media. The validated method might be useful for the pharmaceutical industry and its quality control of PEG-ASNASE production. PMID:26695272

  12. Determining Aqueous Fullerene Particle Size Distributions by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) without Surfactants

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the behavior of nanoparticles in environmental systems, methods must be developed to measure nanoparticle size. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) is an aqueous compatible size separation technique which is able to separate particles from 1 nm to 10 µm in...

  13. Fractional Flow Assessment for the Evaluation of Intracranial Atherosclerosis: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Miao, ZhongRong; Liebeskind, David S.; Lo, WaiTing; Liu, LiPing; Pu, YueHua; Leng, XinYi; Song, LiGang; Xu, XiaoTong; Jia, BaiXue; Gao, Feng; Mo, DaPeng; Sun, Xuan; Liu, Lian; Ma, Ning; Wang, Bo; Wang, YiLong; Wang, YongJun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current studies on endovascular intervention for intracranial atherosclerosis select patients based on luminal stenosis. Coronary studies demonstrated that fractional flow measurements assess ischemia better than anatomical stenosis and can guide patient selection for intervention. We similarly postulated that fractional flow can be used to assess ischemic stroke risk. Methods This was a feasibility study to assess the technical use and safety of applying a pressure guidewire to measure fractional flow across intracranial stenoses. Twenty patients with severe intracranial stenosis were recruited. The percentage of luminal stenosis, distal to proximal pressure ratios (fractional flow) and the fractional flow gradients across the stenosis were measured. Procedural success rate and safety outcomes were documented. Results All 20 patients had successful crossing of stenosis by the pressure guidewire. Ten patients underwent angioplasty, and 5 had stenting performed. There was one perforator stroke, but not related to the use of the pressure wire. For the 13 patients with complete pre- and postintervention data, the mean preintervention stenosis, fractional flow and translesional pressure gradient were 76.2%, 0.66 and 29.9 mm Hg, whilst the corresponding postintervention measurements were 24.7%, 0.88 and 10.9 mm Hg, respectively. Fractional flow (r = −0.530, p = 0.001) and the translesional pressure gradient (r = 0.501, p = 0.002) only had a modest correlation with the luminal stenosis. Conclusion Fractional flow measurement by floating a pressure guidewire across the intracranial stenosis was technically feasible and safe in this study. Further studies are needed to validate its use for ischemic stroke risk assessment. PMID:27610123

  14. Quantum dot agglomerates in biological media and their characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Moquin, Alexandre; Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica; Winnik, Françoise M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the biological environment of nanoparticles influences their physical properties and changes their pristine physicochemical identity. In order to understand, or predict, the interactions of cells with specific nanoparticles, it is critical to know their size, shape, and agglomeration state not only in their nascent state but also in biological media. Here, we use asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with on-line multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Visible absorption detections to determine the relative concentration of isolated nanoparticles and agglomerates in the case of three types of semi-conductor quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Media (DMEM) containing 10% of fetal bovine serum (DMEM-FBS). AF4 analysis also yielded the size and size distribution of the agglomerates as a function of the time of QDs incubation in DMEM-FBS. The preferred modes of internalization of the QDs are assessed for three cell-types, N9 microglia, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and human embryonic kidney cells (Hek293), by confocal fluorescence imaging of live cells, quantitative determination of the intracellular QD concentration, and flow cytometry. There is an excellent correlation between the agglomeration status of the three types of QDs in DMEM-FBS determined by AF4 analysis and their preferred mode of uptake by the three cell lines, which suggests that AF4 yields an accurate description of the nanoparticles as they encounter cells and advocates its use as a means to characterize particles under evaluation. PMID:25542679

  15. Evaluation of Microneedling Fractional Radiofrequency Device for Treatment of Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Byalekere Shivanna; Sriram, Rashmi; Mysore, Rajdeep; Bhaskar, Sapnashree; Shetty, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various treatment modalities including non-invasive methods such as chemical peels, topical retinoids, microdermabrasion, minimally invasive techniques such as microneedling, fractional lasers, microneedling radiofrequency devices and invasive procedures such as acne scar surgeries and ablative lasers are used for acne scars, each with its own unique advantages and disadvantages. This study is a retrospective assessment of efficacy and safety of microneedling fractional radiofrequency in the treatment of acne scars. Methods: Thirty one patients of skin types III-V with moderate and severe facial acne scarring received four sequential fractional radiofrequency treatments over a period of 6 months with an interval of 6 weeks between each session. Goodman & Baron's acne scar grading system was used for assessment by a side by side comparison of preoperative and post- operative photographs taken at their first visit and at the end of 3 months after the last session. Results: Estimation of improvement with Goodman and Baron's Global Acne Scarring System showed that by qualitative assessment of 31 patients with grade 3 and grade 4 acne scars, 80.64% showed improvement by 2 grades and 19.35% showed improvement by 1 grade. Quantitative assessment showed that 58% of the patients had moderate, 29% had minimal, 9% had good and 3% showed very good improvement. Adverse effects were limited to transient pain, erythema, edema and hyperpigmentation. Conclusion: Microneedling fractional radiofrequency is efficacious for the treatment of moderate and severe acne scars. PMID:25136209

  16. Power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back converter

    DOEpatents

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Kandula, Rajendra Prasad; Prasai, Anish

    2016-03-08

    A power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back (BTB) converter is provided. The power flow controller provide dynamic control of both active and reactive power of a power system. The power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources at the same frequency; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between the two AC sources. A transformer may be augmented with a fractionally rated bi-directional Back to Back (BTB) converter. The fractionally rated BTB converter comprises a transformer side converter (TSC), a direct-current (DC) link, and a line side converter (LSC). By controlling the switches of the BTB converter, the effective phase angle between the two AC source voltages may be regulated, and the amplitude of the voltage inserted by the power flow controller may be adjusted with respect to the AC source voltages.

  17. Optimization design for selective extraction of size-fractioned DNA sample in microfabricated electrophoresis devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Rongsheng; Burke, David T.; Burns, Mark A.

    2004-03-01

    In recent years, there has been tremendous interest in developing a highly integrated DNA analysis system using microfabrication techniques. With the success of incorporating sample injection, reaction, separation and detection onto a monolithic silicon device, addition of otherwise time-consuming components in macroworld such as sample preparation is gaining more and more attention. In this paper, we designed and fabricated a miniaturized device, capable of separating size-fractioned DNA sample and extracting the band of interest. In order to obtain pure target band, a novel technique utilizing shaping electric field is demonstrated. Both theoretical analysis and experimental data shows significant agreement in designing appropriate electrode structures to achieve the desired electric field distribution. This technique has a very simple fabrication procedure and can be readily added with other existing components to realize a highly integrated "lab-on-a-chip" system for DNA analysis.

  18. 3D Printed Micro Free-Flow Electrophoresis Device.

    PubMed

    Anciaux, Sarah K; Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    The cost, time, and restrictions on creative flexibility associated with current fabrication methods present significant challenges in the development and application of microfluidic devices. Additive manufacturing, also referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, provides many advantages over existing methods. With 3D printing, devices can be made in a cost-effective manner with the ability to rapidly prototype new designs. We have fabricated a micro free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) device using a low-cost, consumer-grade 3D printer. Test prints were performed to determine the minimum feature sizes that could be reproducibly produced using 3D printing fabrication. Microfluidic ridges could be fabricated with dimensions as small as 20 μm high × 640 μm wide. Minimum valley dimensions were 30 μm wide × 130 μm wide. An acetone vapor bath was used to smooth acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surfaces and facilitate bonding of fully enclosed channels. The surfaces of the 3D-printed features were profiled and compared to a similar device fabricated in a glass substrate. Stable stream profiles were obtained in a 3D-printed μFFE device. Separations of fluorescent dyes in the 3D-printed device and its glass counterpart were comparable. A μFFE separation of myoglobin and cytochrome c was also demonstrated on a 3D-printed device. Limits of detection for rhodamine 110 were determined to be 2 and 0.3 nM for the 3D-printed and glass devices, respectively. PMID:27377354

  19. Active flow control of subsonic flow in an adverse pressure gradient using synthetic jets and passive micro flow control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, Michael E.

    Several recent studies have shown the advantages of active and/or passive flow control devices for boundary layer flow modification. Many current and future proposed air vehicles have very short or offset diffusers in order to save vehicle weight and create more optimal vehicle/engine integration. Such short coupled diffusers generally result in boundary layer separation and loss of pressure recovery which reduces engine performance and in some cases may cause engine stall. Deployment of flow control devices can alleviate this problem to a large extent; however, almost all active flow control devices have some energy penalty associated with their inclusion. One potential low penalty approach for enhancing the diffuser performance is to combine the passive flow control elements such as micro-ramps with active flow control devices such as synthetic jets to achieve higher control authority. The goal of this dissertation is twofold. The first objective is to assess the ability of CFD with URANS turbulence models to accurately capture the effects of the synthetic jets and micro-ramps on boundary layer flow. This is accomplished by performing numerical simulations replicating several experimental test cases conducted at Georgia Institute of Technology under the NASA funded Inlet Flow Control and Prediction Technologies Program, and comparing the simulation results with experimental data. The second objective is to run an expanded CFD matrix of numerical simulations by varying various geometric and other flow control parameters of micro-ramps and synthetic jets to determine how passive and active control devices interact with each other in increasing and/or decreasing the control authority and determine their influence on modification of boundary layer flow. The boundary layer shape factor is used as a figure of merit for determining the boundary layer flow quality/modification and its tendency towards separation. It is found by a large number of numerical experiments and

  20. Flow through a mechanical distraction enterogenesis device: a pilot test

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Okawada, Manabu; Herman, Richard; Utter, Brent; Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Background We tested the coupling portion of a prototype intraluminal distraction enterogenesis device to allow flow-through of simulated enteric contents (SEC) in both pig and human jejunum. Materials and methods SEC was made using 80% corn syrup. Ten cm pig and human intestinal segments had a spoke-shaped 2.2cm coupling adaptor sutured in place intraluminally. The adaptor had a flow-through area of 33.6mm2. SEC was pumped into the proximal part of the intestinal segment at 0.083mL/sec. The times to first passage of SEC through the coupler (first drop), 10mL and 20mL of SEC eluted from the distal end were recorded. Results Mean time to first drop elution was 155±38 seconds with pig, and 149±22 seconds with human bowel (p = 0.8). This corresponded to a hydrostatic pressure of 37.5mmHg before the initial drop passed through. Mean flow rates were 0.094mL/sec in pig bowel and 0.084mL/sec in human bowel (p=0.09). To account for occlusion from luminal debris, a 75% occlusion of coupler holes was studied in the smaller pig bowel to investigate if reductions in flow-through area could be tolerated. Mean time to first drop increased slightly to 171±15 seconds, and the elution rate stayed the same (p=0.5). Conclusions After a physiological level of initial pressure buildup allowing the first drop of SEC to pass the coupling adaptor, our prototype intestinal coupling adaptor did not obstruct flow-through of SEC, even after a 75% decrease in flow-through area. This type of attachment represents a viable approach to placing a device in-continuity without obstructing flow of enteric contents. PMID:21571307

  1. Visualization and void fraction measurement of decompressed boiling flow in a capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, H.; Murakawa, H.; Takenaka, N.; Takiguchi, K.; Okamoto, M.; Tsuchiya, T.; Kitaide, Y.; Maruyama, N.

    2011-09-01

    A capillary tube is often used as a throttle for a refrigerating cycle. Subcooled refrigerant usually flows from a condenser into the capillary tube. Then, the refrigerant is decompressed along the capillary tube. When the static pressure falls below the saturation pressure for the liquid temperature, spontaneous boiling occurs. A vapor-liquid two-phase mixture is discharged from the tube. In designing a capillary tube, it is necessary to calculate the flow rate for given boundary conditions on pressure and temperature at the inlet and exit. Since total pressure loss is dominated by frictional and acceleration losses during two-phase flow, it is first necessary to specify the boiling inception point. However, there will be a delay in boiling inception during decompressed flow. This study aimed to clarify the boiling inception point and two-phase flow characteristics of refrigerant in a capillary tube. Refrigerant flows in a coiled copper capillary tube were visualized by neutron radiography. The one-dimensional distribution of volumetric average void fraction was measured from radiographs through image processing. From the void fraction distribution, the boiling inception point was determined. Moreover, a simplified CT method was successfully applied to a radiograph for cross-sectional measurements. The experimental results show the flow pattern transition from intermittent flow to annular flow that occurred at a void fraction of about 0.45.

  2. Effect of reference conditions on flow rate, modifier fraction and retention in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Shoykhet Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2016-08-12

    When using compressible mobile phases such as fluidic CO2, the density, the volumetric flow rates and volumetric fractions are pressure dependent. The pressure and temperature definition of these volumetric parameters (referred to as the reference conditions) may alter between systems, manufacturers and operating conditions. A supercritical fluid chromatography system was modified to operate in two modes with different definition of the eluent delivery parameters, referred to as fixed and variable mode. For the variable mode, the volumetric parameters are defined with reference to the pump operating pressure and actual pump head temperature. These conditions may vary when, e.g. changing the column length, permeability, flow rate, etc. and are thus variable reference conditions. For the fixed mode, the reference conditions were set at 150bar and 30°C, resulting in a mass flow rate and mass fraction of modifier definition which is independent of the operation conditions. For the variable mode, the mass flow rate of carbon dioxide increases with system pump operating pressure, decreasing the fraction of modifier. Comparing the void times and retention factor shows that the deviation between the two modes is almost independent of modifier percentage, but depends on the operating pressure. Recalculating the set volumetric fraction of modifier to the mass fraction results in the same retention behaviour for both modes. This shows that retention in SFC can be best modelled using the mass fraction of modifier. The fixed mode also simplifies method scaling as it only requires matching average column pressure. PMID:27401813

  3. A Microfluidic Device for Continuous-Flow Magnetically Controlled Capture and Isolation of Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yao; Wang, Yi; Lin, Qiao

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic device that exploits magnetic manipulation for integrated capture and isolation of microparticles in continuous flow. The device, which was fabricated from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft-lithography techniques, consists of an incubator and a separator integrated on a single chip. The incubator is based on a novel scheme termed target acquisition by repetitive traversal (TART), in which surface-functionalized magnetic beads repetitively traverse a sample to seek out and capture target particles. This is accomplished by a judicious combination of a serpentine microchannel geometry and a time-invariant magnetic field. Subsequently, in the separator, the captured target particles are isolated from nontarget particles via magnetically driven fractionation in the same magnetic field. Due to the TART incubation scheme that uses a corner-free serpentine channel, the device has no dead volume and allows minimization of undesired particle or magnetic-bead retention. Single-chip integration of the TART incubator with the magnetic-fractionation separator further allows automated continuous isolation and retrieval of specific microparticles in an integrated manner that is free of manual off-chip sample incubation, as often required by alternative approaches. Experiments are conducted to characterize the individual incubation and separation components, as well as the integrated device. The device is found to allow 90% of target particles in a sample to be captured and isolated and 99% of nontarget particles to be eliminated. With this high separation efficiency, along with excellent reliability and flexibility, the device is well suited to sorting, purification, enrichment, and detection of micro/nanoparticles and cells in lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:24511214

  4. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  5. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  6. Measurements of Turbulent Flow Field in Separate Flow Nozzles with Enhanced Mixing Devices - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a series of experiments was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on the effect of mixing enhancement devices on the aeroacoustic performance of separate flow nozzles. Initial acoustic evaluations of the devices showed that they reduced jet noise significantly, while creating very little thrust loss. The explanation for the improvement required that turbulence measurements, namely single point mean and RMS statistics and two-point spatial correlations, be made to determine the change in the turbulence caused by the mixing enhancement devices that lead to the noise reduction. These measurements were made in the summer of 2000 in a test program called Separate Nozzle Flow Test 2000 (SFNT2K) supported by the Aeropropulsion Research Program at NASA Glenn Research Center. Given the hot high-speed flows representative of a contemporary bypass ratio 5 turbofan engine, unsteady flow field measurements required the use of an optical measurement method. To achieve the spatial correlations, the Particle Image Velocimetry technique was employed, acquiring high-density velocity maps of the flows from which the required statistics could be derived. This was the first successful use of this technique for such flows, and shows the utility of this technique for future experimental programs. The extensive statistics obtained were likewise unique and give great insight into the turbulence which produces noise and how the turbulence can be modified to reduce jet noise.

  7. Quantifying uranium complexation by groundwater dissolved organic carbon using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranville, James F.; Hendry, M. Jim; Reszat, Thorsten N.; Xie, Qianli; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2007-05-01

    The long-term mobility of actinides in groundwaters is important for siting nuclear waste facilities and managing waste-rock piles at uranium mines. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may influence the mobility of uranium, but few field-based studies have been undertaken to examine this in typical groundwaters. In addition, few techniques are available to isolate DOC and directly quantify the metals complexed to it. Determination of U-organic matter association constants from analysis of field-collected samples compliments laboratory measurements, and these constants are needed for accurate transport calculations. The partitioning of U to DOC in a clay-rich aquitard was investigated in 10 groundwater samples collected between 2 and 30 m depths at one test site. A positive correlation was observed between the DOC (4-132 mg/L) and U concentrations (20-603 μg/L). The association of U and DOC was examined directly using on-line coupling of Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV absorbance (UVA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) detectors. This method has the advantages of utilizing very small sample volumes (20-50 μL) as well as giving molecular weight information on U-organic matter complexes. AsFlFFF-UVA results showed that 47-98% of the DOC (4-136 mg C/L) was recovered in the AsFlFFF analysis, of which 25-64% occurred in the resolvable peak. This peak corresponded to a weight-average molecular weight of about 900-1400 Daltons (Da). In all cases, AsFlFFF-ICP-MS suggested that ≤ 2% of the U, likely present as U(VI), was complexed with the DOC. This result was in good agreement with the U speciation modeling performed on the sample taken from the 2.3 m depth, which predicted approximately 3% DOC-complexed U. This good agreement suggests that the AsFlFFF-ICP-MS method may be very useful for determining U-organic matter association in small volume samples. Because the pH (7.0-8.1) and carbonate concentrations of these waters

  8. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.; Turknett, Jerry C.; Smith, Alvin

    1989-01-01

    The effects of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in circular coolant channels, which are heated over a fraction of their perimeters, are studied. The variations were examined in both the mean and local (axial, and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls. Improvements were initiated in the present data reduction analysis. These efforts should lead to the development of heat transfer correlations which include effects of single side heat flux and enhancement device configuration. It is hoped that a stage will be set for the study of heat transfer and pressure drop in single sided heated systems under zero gravity conditions.

  9. Evaluation of methods for calculating volume fraction in Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diggs, Angela; Balachandar, S.

    2016-05-01

    The present work addresses numerical methods required to compute particle volume fraction or number density. Local volume fraction of the lth particle, αl, is the quantity of foremost importance in calculating the gas-mediated particle-particle interaction effect in multiphase flows. A general multiphase flow with a distribution of Lagrangian particles inside a fluid flow discretized on an Eulerian grid is considered. Particle volume fraction is needed both as a Lagrangian quantity associated with each particle and also as an Eulerian quantity associated with the grid cell for Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations. In Grid-Based (GB) methods the particle volume fraction is first obtained within each grid cell as an Eulerian quantity and then the local particle volume fraction associated with any Lagrangian particle can be obtained from interpolation. The second class of methods presented are Particle-Based (PB) methods, where particle volume fraction will first be obtained at each particle as a Lagrangian quantity, which then can be projected onto the Eulerian grid. Traditionally, the GB methods are used in multiphase flow, but sub-grid resolution can be obtained through use of the PB methods. By evaluating the total error, and its discretization, bias and statistical error components, the performance of the different PB methods is compared against several common GB methods of calculating volume fraction. The standard von Neumann error analysis technique has been adapted for evaluation of rate of convergence of the different methods. The discussion and error analysis presented focus on the volume fraction calculation, but the methods can be extended to obtain field representations of other Lagrangian quantities, such as particle velocity and temperature.

  10. Characterization of colloidal phosphorus species in drainage waters from a clay soil using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Regelink, Inge C; Koopmans, Gerwin F; van der Salm, Caroline; Weng, Liping; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus transport from agricultural land contributes to eutrophication of surface waters. Pipe drain and trench waters from a grassland field on a heavy clay soil in the Netherlands were sampled before and after manure application. Phosphorus speciation was analyzed by physicochemical P fractionation, and the colloidal P fraction in the dissolved fraction (<0.45 μm) was analyzed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and ultraviolet diode array detector. When no manure was applied for almost 7 mo, total P (TP) concentrations were low (<21 μmol L), and TP was almost evenly distributed among dissolved reactive P (DRP), dissolved unreactive P (DUP), and particulate P (PP). Total P concentrations increased by a factor of 60 and 4 when rainfall followed shortly after application of cattle slurry or its solid fraction, respectively. Under these conditions, DRP contributed 50% or more to TP. The P speciation within the DUP and PP fractions varied among the different sampling times. Phosphorus associated with dissolved organic matter, probably via cation bridging, comprised a small fraction of DUP at all sampling times. Colloidal P coeluted with clay particles when P application was withheld for almost 7 mo and after application of the solid cattle slurry fraction. At these sampling times, PP correlated well with particulate Fe, Al, and Si, indicating that P is associated with colloidal clay particles. After cattle slurry application, part of DUP was probably present as phospholipids. Physicochemical fractionation combined with AF4 analysis is a promising tool to unravel the speciation of colloidal P in environmental water samples. PMID:23673839

  11. Device for passive flow control around vertical axis marine turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşoiu, C. I.; Georgescu, A. M.; Degeratu, M.; Haşegan, L.; Hlevca, D.

    2012-11-01

    The power supplied by a turbine with the rotor placed in a free stream flow may be increased by augmenting the velocity in the rotor area. The energy of the free flow is dispersed and it may be concentrated by placing a profiled structure around the bare turbine in order to concentrate more energy in the rotor zone. At the Aerodynamic and Wind Engineering Laboratory (LAIV) of the Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest (UTCB) it was developed a concentrating housing to be used for hydro or aeolian horizontal axis wind turbines, in order to increase the available energy in the active section of turbine rotor. The shape of the concentrating housing results by superposing several aero/hydro dynamic effects, the most important being the one generated by the passive flow control devices that were included in the housing structure. Those concentrating housings may be also adapted for hydro or aeolian turbines with vertical axis. The present paper details the numerical research effectuated at the LAIV to determine the performances of a vertical axis marine turbine equipped with such a concentrating device, in order to increase the energy quantity extracted from the main flow. The turbine is a Darrieus type one with three vertical straight blades, symmetric with respect to the axis of rotation, generated using a NACA4518 airfoil. The global performances of the turbine equipped with the concentrating housing were compared to the same characteristics of the bare turbine. In order to validate the numerical approach used in this paper, test cases from the literature resulting from experimental and numerical simulations for similar situations, were used.

  12. Flow fraction in charged rectangular microchannel to optimally design hydrodynamic filtration chip for cell sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Myung-Suk; Jeong, Sohyun; Kim, Jae Hun; Lee, Tae Seok

    2015-11-01

    Among the passive separations, hydrodynamic filtration (HDF) can perform the fractionation of cells or particles by selective extraction of streamlines controlled by the flow fraction at each branch. Only the stream near the sidewall enters the branches as the focusing, with the amount of fluid leaving the main channel being determined by the flow distribution related to the hydraulic flow resistances. Its understanding is important, but in-depth consideration has not been treated until now. The virtual boundary of the fluid layer should be first specified, and the parabolic velocity profile starts to form from the steady state flow with high Péclet numbers. We computed the 3-dimensional flow profile at the rectangular cross-section with any aspect ratios, by considering electrokinetic transport coupled with the Poisson-Boltzmann and Navier-Stokes equations. The chip was designed with the parameters rigorously determined by the complete analysis of laminar flow for flow fraction and complicated networks of main and multi-branched channels for cell sorting into the finite number of subpopulations. For potential applications to the precise sorting, our designed microfluidic chip can be validated by applying model cells consisting of heterogeneous subpopulations. Supported by the KIST Institutional Program (No. 2E25382).

  13. Effect of passive flow-control devices on turbulent low-speed base flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari-Miandoab, Farid

    Some configurations of blunt trailing-edge airfoils are known to have a lower pressure drag compared to sharp trailing-edge airfoils. However, this advantage in addition to the structural advantage of a thick trailing-edge airfoil is offset by its high base drag. At subsonic velocities, this is attributed to the low-pressure base flow dominated by a Karman vortex street. In the limiting case, the steady separated flow over a rearward-facing step is attained if the periodically shed vortices from a blunt trailing-edge are suppressed by the addition of a base spiltter-plate. Experimental studies in the Old Dominion University Low-Speed Closed-Circuit Wind Tunnel were conducted to examine the effect of several passive flow-control devices such as Wheeler doublets and wishbone vortex generators, longitudinal surface grooves, base cavities, and serrations on the characteristics of two- and three-dimensional base flows. Flow over flat-plate airfoil and rearward-facing step models was studied in the turbulent incompressible subsonic flow regime. Models with trailing-edge and step-sweep angles of 0, 30, and 45 degrees with respect to the crossflow direction were considered. Constant-temperature hot-wire anemometry, infrared surface thermography, and pitot-static probes were used to conduct flow measurements. The parameters measured included vortex shedding frequency, convective heat-transfer rates, base pressure, and flow reattachment distance. Surveys of mean velocity profiles in the wake were also conducted. Results have shown that most of the flow control devices tested increased the base pressure of the 2-D and 3-D flat-plate airfoils. Use of longitudinal surface grooves resulted in shorter flow reattachment distances and higher convective heat transfer rates downstream of the 2-D rearward-facing steps.

  14. Fractional flow reserve-guided management in stable coronary disease and acute myocardial infarction: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Colin; Corcoran, David; Hennigan, Barry; Watkins, Stuart; Layland, Jamie; Oldroyd, Keith G.

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading global cause of morbidity and mortality, and improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of CAD can reduce the health and economic burden of this condition. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is an evidence-based diagnostic test of the physiological significance of a coronary artery stenosis. Fractional flow reserve is a pressure-derived index of the maximal achievable myocardial blood flow in the presence of an epicardial coronary stenosis as a ratio to maximum achievable flow if that artery were normal. When compared with standard angiography-guided management, FFR disclosure is impactful on the decision for revascularization and clinical outcomes. In this article, we review recent developments with FFR in patients with stable CAD and recent myocardial infarction. Specifically, we review novel developments in our understanding of CAD pathophysiology, diagnostic applications, prognostic studies, clinical trials, and clinical guidelines. PMID:26038588

  15. Characterization of Flow Behavior of Semi-Solid Slurries with Low Solid Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chucheep, Thiensak; Wannasin, Jessada; Canyook, Rungsinee; Rattanochaikul, Tanate; Janudom, Somjai; Wisutmethangoon, Sirikul; Flemings, Merton C.

    2013-10-01

    Semi-solid slurry casting is a metal-forming process that involves transforming liquid metal into slurry having a low solid fraction and then forming the slurry into solid parts. To successfully apply this slurry-forming process, it is necessary to fully understand the flow behavior of semi-solid slurries. This present work applied the rapid quenching method and the modified gravity fluidity casting to investigate the flow behavior, which involves characterizations of the initial solid fraction, fluidity, and microstructure of semi-solid slurries. Three commercial aluminum alloys were used in this study: 383 (Al-Si11Cu), 356 (Al-Si7MgFe), and 7075 (Al-Zn6MgCu) alloys. The results show that the initial solid fractions can be controlled by varying the rheocasting time. The rapid quenching mold can be used to determine the initial solid fractions. In this method, it is important to apply the correcting procedure to account for growth during quenching and to include all the solid phases. Results from the fluidity study of semi-solid slurries show that the fluidity decreases as the initial solid fraction increases. The decrease is relatively rapid near the low end of the initial solid fraction curves, but is quite slow near the high end of the curves. All the three alloys follow this trend. The results also demonstrate that the slurries that contain high solid fractions of up to 30 pct can still flow well. The microstructure characterization results show that the solid particles in the slurries flow uniformly in the channel. A uniform and fine microstructure with limited phase segregation is observed in the slurry cast samples.

  16. Rapid prototyping of electrochemical lateral flow devices: stencilled electrodes.

    PubMed

    Aller Pellitero, Miguel; Kitsara, Maria; Eibensteiner, Friedrich; del Campo, F Javier

    2016-04-21

    A straightforward and very cost effective method is proposed to prototype electrodes using pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) and a simple cutting technique. Two cutting methods, namely blade cutting and CO2 laser ablation, are compared and their respective merits are discussed. The proposed method consists of turning the protective liner on the adhesive into a stencil to apply screen-printing pastes. After the electrodes have been printed, the liner is removed and the PSA can be used as a backing material for standard lateral flow membranes. We present the fabrication of band electrodes down to 250 μm wide, and their characterization using microscopy techniques and cyclic voltammetry. The prototyping approach presented here facilitates the development of new electrochemical devices even if very limited fabrication resources are available. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a simple lateral-flow device capable of determining glucose in blood. The prototyping approach presented here is highly suitable for the development of novel electroanalytical tools. PMID:26998899

  17. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide: comparison between portable devices and correlation with sputum eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Yune, Sehyo; Lee, Jin Young; Choi, Dong Chull; Lee, Byung Jae

    2015-07-01

    This study was performed to compare the 2 different portable devices measuring fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and to see the correlation between FeNO and induced sputum eosinophil count (ISE). Forty consecutive subjects clinically suspected to have asthma underwent FeNO measurement by NIOX-MINO® and NObreath® concurrently. All also had induced sputum analysis, methacholine provocation test or bronchodilator response test, and spin prick test. Agreement between the 2 devices was evaluated. The correlation between FeNO and ISE was assessed, as well as the cut-off level of FeNO to identify ISE ≥3%. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between FeNO levels measured by NIOX-MINO® (FeNO(NIOX-MINO)) and NObreath® (FeNO(NObreath)) was 0.972 with 95% confidence interval of 0.948-0.985. The 95% limits of agreement were -28.9 to 19.9 ppb. The correlation coefficient between ISE and FeNO(NIOX-MINO) was 0.733 (P<0.001), and 0.751 between ISE and FeNO(NObreath) (P<0.001). The ROC curve found that the FeNO(NIOXMINO) of 37.5 ppb and the FeNO(NObreath) of 36.5 ppb identified ISE ≥3% with 90% sensitivity and 81% specificity. Age, sex, body mass index, smoking history, atopy, and the presence of asthma did not affect the FeNO level and its correlation with ISE. The NIOX-MINO ® and NObreath® agree with each other to a high degree. Both devices showed close correlation with ISE with similar cut-off value in identifying ISE ≥3%. PMID:25749783

  18. Measurement of air distribution and void fraction of an upwards air-water flow using electrical resistance tomography and a wire-mesh sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olerni, Claudio; Jia, Jiabin; Wang, Mi

    2013-03-01

    Measurements on an upwards air-water flow are reported that were obtained simultaneously with a dual-plane electrical resistance tomograph (ERT) and a wire-mesh sensor (WMS). The ultimate measurement target of both ERT and WMS is the same, the electrical conductivity of the medium. The ERT is a non-intrusive device whereas the WMS requires a net of wires that physically crosses the flow. This paper presents comparisons between the results obtained simultaneously from the ERT and the WMS for evaluation and calibration of the ERT. The length of the vertical testing pipeline section is 3 m with an internal diameter of 50 mm. Two distinct sets of air-water flow rate scenarios, bubble and slug regimes, were produced in the experiments. The fast impedance camera ERT recorded the data at an approximate time resolution of 896 frames per second (fps) per plane in contrast with the 1024 fps of the wire-mesh sensor WMS200. The set-up of the experiment was based on well established knowledge of air-water upwards flow, particularly the specific flow regimes and wall peak effects. The local air void fraction profiles and the overall air void fraction were produced from two systems to establish consistency for comparison of the data accuracy. Conventional bulk flow measurements in air mass and electromagnetic flow metering, as well as pressure and temperature, were employed, which brought the necessary calibration to the flow measurements. The results show that the profiles generated from the two systems have a certain level of inconsistency, particularly in a wall peak and a core peak from the ERT and WMS respectively, whereas the two tomography instruments achieve good agreement on the overall air void fraction for bubble flow. For slug flow, when the void fraction is over 30%, the ERT underestimates the void fraction, but a linear relation between ERT and WMS is still observed.

  19. Lysozyme fractionation from egg white at pilot scale by means of tangential flow membrane adsorbers: Investigation of the flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Janina; Voigt, Katharina; Zochowski, Bianca; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2016-03-18

    The application of membrane adsorbers instead of classical packed bed columns for protein fractionation is still a growing field. In the case of egg white protein fractionation, the application of classical chromatography is additionally limited due to its high viscosity that impairs filtration. By using tangential flow membrane adsorbers as stationary phase this limiting factor can be left out, as they can be loaded with particle containing substrates. The flow conditions existing in tangential flow membrane adsorbers are not fully understood yet. Thus, the aim of the present study was to gain a deeper understanding of the transport mechanisms in tangential flow membrane adsorbers. It was found that loading in recirculation mode instead of single pass mode increased the binding capacity (0.39 vs. 0.52mgcm(-2)). Further, it was shown that either higher flow rates (0.39mgcm(-2) vs. 0.57mgcm(-2) at 1CVmin(-1) or 20CVmin(-1), respectively) or higher amounts of the target protein in the feed (0.24mgcm(-2) vs. 0.85mgcm(-2) for 2.5 or 39.0g lysozyme, respectively) led to more protein binding. These results show that, in contrast to radial flow or flat sheet membrane adsorbers, the transport in tangential flow membrane adsorbers is not purely based on convection, but on a mix of convection and diffusion. Additionally, investigations concerning the influence of fouling formation were performed that can lead to transport limitations. It was found that this impact is neglectable. It can be concluded that the usage of tangential flow membrane adsorbers is very recommendable for egg white protein fractionations, although the transport is partly diffusion-limited. PMID:26898148

  20. Interfacial area, velocity and void fraction in two-phase slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kojasoy, G.; Riznic, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The internal flow structure of air-water plug/slug flow in a 50.3 mm dia transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a four-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 0.55 to 2.20 m/s and 0.27 to 2.20 m/s, respectively, and area-averaged void fractions ranged from about 10 to 70%. The local distributions of void fractions, interfacial area concentration and interface velocity were measured. Contributions from small spherical bubbles and large elongated slug bubbles toward the total void fraction and interfacial area concentration were differentiated. It was observed that the small bubble void contribution to the overall void fraction was small indicating that the large slug bubble void fraction was a dominant factor in determining the total void fraction. However, the small bubble interfacial area contribution was significant in the lower and upper portions of the pipe cross sections.

  1. Illustrating Some Principles of Separation Science through Gravitational Field-Flow Fractionation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, Ronald; Sharma, Reshmi; Andric, Goja; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Grudpan, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Particle separation is an important but often neglected topic in undergraduate curricula. This article discusses how the method of gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) can be used to illustrate many principles of separation science and some fundamental concepts of physical chemistry. GrFFF separates particles during their elution through…

  2. Flow cytometry on the stromal-vascular fraction of white adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue contains cell types other than adipocytes that may contribute to complications linked to obesity. For example, macrophages have been shown to infiltrate adipose tissue in response to a high-fat diet. Isolation of the stromal-vascular fraction of adipose tissue allows one to use flow c...

  3. Computational analysis of an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Matherne, Gaynell Paul; Lim, David Scott; Peeler, Ben B; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    Longer-term (>2 weeks) mechanical circulatory support will provide an improved quality of life for thousands of pediatric cardiac failure patients per year in the United States. These pediatric patients suffer from severe congenital or acquired heart disease complicated by congestive heart failure. There are currently very few mechanical circulatory support systems available in the United States as viable options for this population. For that reason, we have designed an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device (PVAD) with an impeller that is fully suspended by magnetic bearings. As a geometrically similar, smaller scaled version of our axial flow pump for the adult population, the PVAD has a design point of 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg to meet the full physiologic needs of pediatric patients. Conventional axial pump design equations and a nondimensional scaling technique were used to estimate the PVAD's initial dimensions, which allowed for the creation of computational models for performance analysis. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the axial flow PVAD, which measures approximately 65 mm in length by 35 mm in diameter, shows that the pump will produce 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg for 8000 rpm. Fluid forces (approximately 1 N) were also determined for the suspension and motor design, and scalar stress values remained below 350 Pa with maximum particle residence times of approximately 0.08 milliseconds in the pump. This initial design demonstrated acceptable performance, thereby encouraging prototype manufacturing for experimental validation. PMID:15384993

  4. Towards molecular gas flows in micro propulsion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groll, Rodion; Rath, Hans J.

    Developing micro propulsion devices like cold gas thrusters the geometry has to be optimized for the varying pressure and temperature fields inside the unit. Modelling diluted gas flows in microchannels the influence of the mean free path of molecules has to be respected describing pressure drop and specific momentum of a micro-propulsion unit. With the molecule mass factor the density is given used for a five-equation-system modelling the momentum and heat diffusion inside a channel flow for higher Knudsen numbers. The five equations are transport equation for the three mean velocity components, the velocity standard deviation and the molecule collision rate. The present model does not base on the definition of a Dirichlet boundary condition. The momentum boundary condition is given by a shear stress function depending on the collision rate and the standard deviation square of the molecule velocity. With this new wall stress modelling method the slip velocity results from the computation of the transported parameters. The present model is validated computing Poiseuille and Couette flows with different Knudsen numbers. Showing the advantages of the present model the simulation results are compared with simulation results of the wall-distance depending diffusivity model of Lockerby and Reese and BGK results of a Lattice-Boltzmann simulation.

  5. Preparative free-flow electrophoresis as a method of fractionation of natural organic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1973-01-01

    Preparative free-flow electrophoresis was found to be an efficient method of conducting large-scale fractionations of the natural organic polyelectrolytes occurring in many surface waters and soils. The method of free-flow electrophoresis obviates, the problem of adsorption upon a supporting medium and permits the use of high potential gradients and currents because of an efficient cooling system. Separations were monitored by determining organic carbon concentration with a dissolved carbon analyzer, and color was measured by absorbance at 400 nanometers. Organic materials from waters and soils were purified by filtration, hydrogen exchange, and dialysis and were concentrated by freeze drying or freeze concentration. In electrophoretic fractionations of natural organic materials typically found in surface waters and soils, color was found to increase with the charge of the fraction.

  6. Structural Effects of Biodiesel on Soot Volume Fraction in a Laminar Co-Flow Diffusion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Jason

    An experimental study was performed to determine the structural effects of biodiesel on soot volume fraction in a laminar co-flow diffusion flame. These include the effects of the ester function group, the inclusion of a double bond, and its positional effect. The soot volume fraction and temperature profiles of a biodiesel surrogate, n-Decane, 1-Decene, and 5-Decene fuels were measured. Improvements were made to existing laser extinction and rapid thermocouple insertion apparatus and were used to measure soot volume fraction and temperature profiles respectively. Flow rates of each fuel were determined in order to keep the temperature effects on soot negligible. Using n-Decane as a baseline, the double bond increased soot production and was further increased with a more centrally located double bond. The ester function group containing oxygen decreased soot production. The order of most to least sooting fuels were as follows 5-Decene > 1-Decene > n-Decane > Biodiesel Surrogate.

  7. The aerodynamic performance of several flow control devices for internal flow systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Wettlaufer, B. M.; Mort, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental reseach and development program was undertaken to develop and document new flow-control devices for use in the major modifications to the 40 by 80 Foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center. These devices, which are applicable to other facilities as well, included grid-type and quasi-two-dimensional flow straighteners, louver panels for valving, and turning-vane cascades with net turning angles from 0 deg to 90 deg. The tests were conducted at model scale over a Reynolds number range from 2 x 100,000 to 17 x 100,000, based on chord. The results showed quantitatively the performance benefits of faired, low-blockage, smooth-surface straightener systems, and the advantages of curved turning-vanes with hinge-line gaps sealed and a preferred chord-to-gap ratio between 2.5 and 3.0 for 45 deg or 90 deg turns.

  8. Computational flow study of the continuous flow ventricular assist device, prototype number 3 blood pump.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J B; Wood, H G; Allaire, P E; Bearnson, G; Khanwilkar, P

    2000-05-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of blood flow in the continuous flow ventricular assist device, Prototype No. 3 (CFVAD3), which consists of a 4 blade shrouded impeller fully supported in magnetic bearings, was performed. This study focused on the regions within the pump where return flow occurs to the pump inlet, and where potentially damaging shear stresses and flow stagnation might occur: the impeller blade passages and the narrow gap clearance regions between the impeller-rotor and pump housing. Two separate geometry models define the spacing between the pump housing and the impeller's hub and shroud, and a third geometry model defines the pump's impeller and curved blades. The flow fields in these regions were calculated for various operating conditions of the pump. Pump performance curves were calculated, which compare well with experimentally obtained data. For all pump operating conditions, the flow rates within the gap regions were predicted to be toward the inlet of the pump, thus recirculating a portion of the impeller flow. Two smaller gap clearance regions were numerically examined to reduce the recirculation and to improve pump efficiency. The computational and geometry models will be used in future studies of a smaller pump to determine increased pump efficiency and the risk of hemolysis due to shear stress, and to insure the washing of blood through the clearance regions to prevent thrombosis. PMID:10848679

  9. Readmissions After Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Differences Observed Between Two Contemporary Device Types.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Nicholas A; Davis, Mary E; Tricarico, Nicole M; Keebler, Mary E; Maltais, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Readmissions after continuous flow left ventricular assist devices implantation are common. We compared the frequency and etiology of readmissions between two continuous flow left ventricular assist devices 6 months after implant. We retrospectively assessed readmissions in 81 patients who received a bridge to transplant HeartMate-II (HM-II) n = 35, 43% or HeartWare (HW) n = 46, 57%, from 2009 to 2014. Readmissions were divided into cardiac, infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, stroke, pump thrombosis, and miscellaneous profiles. Age, gender, creatinine, INTERMACS profiles were comparable between groups (p > 0.05). Sixty-one patients accounted for 141 readmissions. At 6 months, the overall readmission rate was higher among HM-II versus HW recipients (2.3 ± 1.7 vs. 1.4 ± 1.3; p = 0.024). Multiple readmissions (≥2) occurred more frequently in HM-II recipients (HM-II 23, 66% vs. HW 20, 44%; p = 0.047) which accounted for 87% of overall readmission frequency. Cardiac profile was the most common reason for readmission (HM-II = 15, HW = 17; p = 0.95). Readmission for arrhythmia (HM-II = 10, HW = 3; p = 0.021) and overall infection rate (0.49 ± 0.70 vs. 0.17 ± 0.68; p = 0.001) were more common among HM-II recipients; however, other readmission profiles were comparable between devices (p > 0.05). Readmission frequency, multiple readmissions, and clinical profile characteristics were different between HM-II and HW recipients. PMID:25806614

  10. Fabrication of a gas flow device consisting of micro-jet pump and flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Dau, Van T.; Otake, Tomonori; Dinh, Thien X.; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2008-12-01

    A gas-flow device consisting of a valveless micro jet pump and flow sensor has been designed and fabricated using a Si micromachining process. The valveless micro pump is composed of a piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) diaphragm actuator and flow channels. The design of the valvless pump focuses on a crosss junction formed by the neck of the pump chamber and one outlet and two opposite inlet channnels. The structure allows differences in the fluidic resistance and fluidic momentum inside the channels during each pump vibration cycle, which leads to the gas flow being rectified without valves. Before the Si micro-pump was developed, a prototype of it was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a conventional machining techinique, and experiments on it confirmed the working principles underlying the pump. The Si micro-pump was designed and fabricated based on these working principles. The Si pump was composed of a Si flow channel plate and top and botom covers of PMMA. The flow channels were easily fabricated by using a silicon etching process. To investigate the effects of the step nozzle structure on the gas flow rate, two types of pumps with different channel depths (2D- and 3D-nozzle structures) were designed, and flow simulations were done using ANSYS-Fluent software. The simulations and excperimental data revealed that the 3D-nozzle structure is more advantageous than the 2D-nozzle structure. A flow rate of 4.3 ml/min was obtained for the pump with 3D-nozzle structure when the pump was driven at a resonant frequency of 7.9 kHz by a sinusoidal voltage of 40Vpp. A hot wire was fabricated as a gas-flow sensor near the outlet port on the Si wafer.

  11. Chromium Isotope Fractionation During Reduction of Cr(VI) Under Saturated Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Gibson, Blair D.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W.

    2012-10-25

    Chromium isotopes are potentially useful indicators of Cr(VI) reduction reactions in groundwater flow systems; however, the influence of transport on Cr isotope fractionation has not been fully examined. Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate isotopic fractionation of Cr during Cr(VI) reduction under both static and controlled flow conditions. Organic carbon was used to reduce Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater containing 20 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI) in both batch and column experiments. Isotope measurements were performed on dissolved Cr on samples from the batch experiments, and on effluent and profile samples from the column experiment. Analysis of the residual solid-phase materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed association of Cr(III) with organic carbon in the column solids. Decreases in dissolved Cr(VI) concentrations were coupled with increases in {delta}{sup 53}Cr, indicating that Cr isotope enrichment occurred during reduction of Cr(VI). The {delta}{sup 53}Cr data from the column experiment was fit by linear regression yielding a fractionation factor ({alpha}) of 0.9979, whereas the batch experiments exhibited Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation ({alpha} = 0.9965). The linear characteristic of the column {delta}{sup 53}Cr data may reflect the contribution of transport on Cr isotope fractionation.

  12. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes. Final technical report, July 1, 1989--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    The first topic of this project involved the preparation, fractionation by sedimentation/steric Field Flow Fractionation (FFF), and modeling of metaphase chromosomes. After numerous unsuccessful attempts to prepare chromosomes, we have implemented a procedure (in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory) to prepare metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. Extensive experimentation was necessary to identify a suitable FFF channel surface to minimize chromosome adsorption and a carrier liquid to stabilize and disperse the chromosomes. Under suitable operating conditions, the Chinese hamster chromosomes were purified from cell debris and partially fractionated. The purified, preenriched chromosomes that can be prepared by sedimentation/steric FFF or produced continuously by continuous SPLITT fractionation provide an enriched feed material for subsequent flow cytometry. In the second project component, flow FFF permitted successful separations of single- from double-stranded circular DNA, double-stranded circular DNAs of various sizes, and linear double-stranded DNA fragments of various lengths. Diffusion coefficients extracted from retention data agreed well with literature data as well as predictions of major polymer theories. The capacity of FFF separations was evaluated to examine potential applications to long DNA chains.

  13. A novel optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Luca; Nicolina Papa, Maria; Carleo, Luigi; Tai, Yih-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical phenomena, such as debris flows, pyroclastic flows and rock avalanches, involve the rapid flow of granular mixtures. Today the dynamics of these flows is far from being deeply understood, due to their huge complexity compared to clear water or monophasic fluids. To this regard, physical models at laboratory scale represent important tools for understanding the still unclear properties of granular flows and their constitutive laws, under simplified experimental conditions. Beside the velocity and the shear rate, the volume fraction is also strongly interlinked with the rheology of granular materials. Yet, a reliable estimation of this quantity is not easy through non-invasive techniques. In this work a novel cost-effective optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction is presented and, then, applied to a laboratory study on steady-state granular flows. A preliminary numerical investigation, through Monte-Carlo generations of grain distributions under controlled illumination conditions, allowed to find the stochastic relationship between the near-wall volume fraction, c3D, and a measurable quantity (the two-dimensional volume fraction), c2D, obtainable through an appropriate binarization of gray-scale images captured by a camera placed in front of the transparent boundary. Such a relation can be well described by c3D = aexp(bc2D), with parameters only depending on the angle of incidence of light, ζ. An experimental validation of the proposed approach is carried out on dispersions of white plastic grains, immersed in various ambient fluids. The mixture, confined in a box with a transparent window, is illuminated by a flickering-free LED lamp, placed so as to form a given ζ with the measuring surface, and is photographed by a camera, placed in front of the same window. The predicted exponential law is found to be in sound agreement with experiments for a wide range of ζ (10° <ζ<45°). The technique is, then, applied to steady-state dry

  14. X-ray densitometry based void fraction flow field measurements of cavitating flow in the wake of a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tiezhi; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2015-11-01

    At sufficiently low cavitation number, the wake vortices behind bluff objects will cavitate. The presence of developed cavitation can alter the underlying vortical flow. In this study, cavitation dynamics in the wake of a circular cylinder is examined in order to determine the relationship between the void fraction in the cavity wake and the resulting modification to the flow compared to the non-cavitating flow. Cavitation in the wake of a cylinder is investigated using high-speed video cameras and cinematographic X-ray densitometry. Using synchronized top and side views from high-speed video cameras, the morphology and extent of the cavities forming on the wake of the circular cylinder is studied for a range of cavitation numbers, at a Reynolds number of 1x10-5, which lies at the transition region between sub-critical to critical regime of wake transitions. The time resolved and mean X-ray densitometry based void fraction of the spanwise and plan view averaged flow field will be related to the vortex dynamics in an attempt to understand the role of vapor production in the observed dynamics.

  15. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers’ works. PMID:26828488

  16. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers' works. PMID:26828488

  17. The Fractional Step Method Applied to Simulations of Natural Convective Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes research done to apply the Fractional Step Method to finite-element simulations of natural convective flows in pure liquids, permeable media, and in a directionally solidified metal alloy casting. The Fractional Step Method has been applied commonly to high Reynold's number flow simulations, but is less common for low Reynold's number flows, such as natural convection in liquids and in permeable media. The Fractional Step Method offers increased speed and reduced memory requirements by allowing non-coupled solution of the pressure and the velocity components. The Fractional Step Method has particular benefits for predicting flows in a directionally solidified alloy, since other methods presently employed are not very efficient. Previously, the most suitable method for predicting flows in a directionally solidified binary alloy was the penalty method. The penalty method requires direct matrix solvers, due to the penalty term. The Fractional Step Method allows iterative solution of the finite element stiffness matrices, thereby allowing more efficient solution of the matrices. The Fractional Step Method also lends itself to parallel processing, since the velocity component stiffness matrices can be built and solved independently of each other. The finite-element simulations of a directionally solidified casting are used to predict macrosegregation in directionally solidified castings. In particular, the finite-element simulations predict the existence of 'channels' within the processing mushy zone and subsequently 'freckles' within the fully processed solid, which are known to result from macrosegregation, or what is often referred to as thermo-solutal convection. These freckles cause material property non-uniformities in directionally solidified castings; therefore many of these castings are scrapped. The phenomenon of natural convection in an alloy under-going directional solidification, or thermo-solutal convection, will be explained. The

  18. Study on performance of double helical capacitance probe for water fraction measurement in multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, J.; Guo, L. J.; Zhou, H. L.

    2012-03-01

    A type of capacitance probe performance with two brass electrodes intertwined on the outer wall of insulation pipe like a double helix is investigated numerically in this paper, which can measure water fraction in air-oil-water two or three-phase flow in oil industry. The motivation of this paper is to optimize this kind of probe to improve its electric response and spatial resolution and so a 3-D numerical simulation using finite element method is employed to evaluate the effect of electrodes configuration of this capacitance probe on measuring water fraction in horizontal pipes. The electrostatic field of the probe is preliminarily analyzed referred to stratified flow of air-water two-phase flow regime. Several parameters are considered as main variables which have an important effect on the precision of the probe, such as central angle, position angle and length of the two electrodes. From the electrostatic field analysis, lumped capacitance between the two electrodes is obtained in every different electrode geometry model and the results of each model are compared to each other in order to select a better arrangement of the electrodes that has a better response to water fraction. And by using circuit simulation method, the numerical calculated lumped capacitance is transferred to voltage output through the circuit used in the experiment. The relationship between voltage and water fraction of calculated and experimental result are compared in order to test the reasonableness of the simulation. The results show that at high water fraction, the difference between numerical and measured data agrees very well.

  19. Shape-based Particle Separation via Elasto-Inertia Pinched Flow Fractionation (eiPFF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinyu; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-11-01

    We report in this talk a continuous-flow shape-based separation of spherical and peanut-shaped rigid particles of equal volume via elasto-inertial pinched flow fractionation (eiPFF). This separation exploits the shape-dependence of the cross-stream particle migration induced by the elaso-inertial lift force in viscoelastic fluids. The parametric effects on this separation are systematically investigated in terms of dimensionless numbers. It is found that this separation is strongly affected by the Reynolds number, Weissenberg number and channel aspect ratio. Interestingly, the elasto-inertial deflection of peanut particles can be either greater or smaller than that of spherical particles.

  20. Fractionalizing the vortex lattice in multiband superconductors in the flux flow region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng

    2014-03-01

    Because of the discovery of MgB2 and iron-based superconductors, multiband superconductors have attracted considerable attention recently. Multiband superconductors are not always straightforward extensions of the single-band counterpart, and novel features may arise. In multiband superconductors, electrons in different bands form distinct superfluid condensates, which are coupled to the same gauge field. Each condensate thus supports vortex excitation with fractional flux quantum. However the energy of a fractional vortex diverges logarithmically in the thermodynamic limit. In the ground state vortices in different bands are bounded and their normal cores are locked together to form a composite vortex with the standard integer quantum flux. It is interesting to ask whether the vortices in different condensates can decouple under certain conditions. In this talk, I will discuss the dissociation of the composite vortex lattice in the flux flow region when the disparity of superfluid density and coherence length between different bands is large. The fractional vortex lattice in different bands move with different velocities after the dissociation transition, and the dissociation transition shows up as an increase of flux flow resistivity. In the dissociated phase, the Shapiro steps are developed when an ac current is superimposed with a dc current. We also propose to stabilize the fractional vortices by periodic pinning arrays. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering.

  1. Effects of the fractional order and magnetic field on the blood flow in cylindrical domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Shah, Nehad; Vieru, Dumitru; Fetecau, Constantin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, based on the magnetohydrodynamics approach, the blood flow along with magnetic particles through a circular cylinder is studied. The fluid is acted by an oscillating pressure gradient and an external magnetic field. The study is based on a mathematical model with Caputo fractional derivatives. The model of ordinary fluid, corresponding to time-derivatives of integer order, is obtained as a particular case. Closed forms of the fluid velocity and magnetic particles velocity are obtained by means of the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms. Effects of the order of Caputo's time-fractional derivatives and of the external magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles are studied. Numerical simulations and graphical illustrations are used in order to study the influence of the fractional parameter α, Reynolds number and Hartmann number on the fluid and particles velocity. The results highlights that, models with fractional derivatives bring significant differences compared to the ordinary model. This fact can be an important advantage for some practical problems. It also results that the blood velocity, as well as that of magnetic particles, is reduced under influence of the exterior magnetic field.

  2. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  3. Fractional Flow Reserve Assessment of a Significant Coronary Stenosis Masked by a Downstream Serial Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) has been recognized as an effective tool to determine functional significance in intermediate coronary lesions and FFR-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) improves clinical outcomes. However, hemodynamic interaction between serial stenoses within one coronary artery complicates the assessment of functional severity of each individual lesion. We present a case in which FFR measurement by intracoronary bolus injection of adenosine helps to make appropriate revascularization decision in serial stenoses when the procedures are performed systemically and properly. PMID:27529035

  4. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles using programmed quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation is a relatively new technique for the separation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles are often of composite nature having a magnetic component, which may be a very finely divided material, and a polymeric or other material coating that incorporates this magnetic material and stabilizes the particles in suspension. There may be other components such as antibodies on the surface for specific binding to biological cells, or chemotherapeutic drugs for magnetic drug delivery. Magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF) has the potential for determining the distribution of the magnetic material among the particles in a given sample. MgFFF differs from most other forms of field-flow fractionation in that the magnetic field that brings about particle separation induces magnetic dipole moments in the nanoparticles, and these potentially can interact with one another and perturb the separation. This aspect is examined in the present work. Samples of magnetic nanoparticles were analysed under different experimental conditions to determine the sensitivity of the method to variation of conditions. The results are shown to be consistent and insensitive to conditions, although magnetite content appeared to be somewhat higher than expected. PMID:20732895

  5. Constant-fractional-lag model for axisymmetric two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Chow; Fendell, Francis; Brent, David

    1991-10-01

    The suitability of the constant-fractional-lag model for axisymmetric two-phase flow with small particle loading is examined for an inviscid incompressible counterflow. A counterflow is a low-order approximation for the flow within a solid-rocket motor with a long bore of constant radius. In the model, each component of the particle-phase velocity is expressed as a certain multiple of the corresponding component of the gas-phase velocity. A different lag constant is required for the radial and the axial components of the particle-velocity field. For light particle loading, the constant-fractional-lag model yields mathematically accurate solutions (of the formulation) for both small and finite values of the interphase-velocity-slip parameter. Comparisons with results from the Lagrangian-particle-tracking method show excellent agreement at sites outside the Stokes layer holding in that portion of the two-phase flow immediately contiguous to the gas-grain interface; i.e., the agreement holds independently of the initial particle velocity at the solid-gas interface. The constant-fractional-lag model is easier to apply than the Lagrangian-particle-tracking method, and results are conveniently obtained in Eulerian form.

  6. One-layer microfluidic device for hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing operating in low flow speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghighi, Yasaman; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing techniques in microfluidics are categorized as (a) sheathless techniques which require high flow rates and long channels, resulting in high operating cost and high flow rates which are inappropriate for applications with flow rate limitations, and (b) sheath-flow based techniques which usually require excessive sheath flow rate to achieve hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing. Many devices based on these principles use complicated fabrication methods to create multi-layer microchannels. We have developed a sheath-flow based microfluidic device that is capable of hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing. In this device the main flow (black ink) in a low speed, and a sheath flow, enter through two inlets and enter a 180 degree curved channel (300 × 300 μm cross-section). Main flow migrates outwards into the sheath-flow due to centrifugal effects and consequently, vertical focusing is achieved at the end of the curved channel. Then, two other sheath flows horizontally confine the main flow to achieve horizontal focusing. Thus, the core flow is three-dimensionally focused at the center of the channel at the downstream. Using centrifugal force for 3D flow-focusing in a single-layer fabricated microchannel has been previously investigated by few groups. However, their demonstrated designs required high flow speed (>1 m/s) which is not suitable for many applications that live biomedical specie are involved. Here, we introduce a new design which is operational in low flow speed (<0.05 m/s) and is suitable for applications involving live cells. This microfluidic device can be used in detecting, counting and isolating cells in many biomedical applications.

  7. Devices and methods of operation thereof for providing stable flow for centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Stevens, Mark A. (Inventor); Jett, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Centrifugal compressor flow stabilizing devices and methods of operation thereof are disclosed that act upon the flow field discharging from the impeller of a centrifugal compressor and modify the flow field ahead of the diffuser vanes such that flow conditions contributing to rotating stall and surge are reduced or even eliminated. In some embodiments, shaped rods and methods of operation thereof are disclosed, whereas in other embodiments reverse-tangent air injection devices and methods are disclosed.

  8. Silicon isotope fractionation during abiotic silica precipitation at low temperatures: Inferences from flow-through experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilert, Sonja; Vroon, Pieter Z.; Roerdink, Desiree L.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2014-10-01

    Silicon isotopes have considerable potential as proxy for (near-) surface processes and environmental conditions. However, unambiguous interpretations of isotope signatures in natural silica deposits are often hampered by a lack of independent quantitative information on isotopic fractionations operating under the environmental conditions of interest. We performed seeded silica precipitation experiments using flow-through reactors in the 10-60 °C temperature range to alleviate this problem. The principal objective was to quantify the silicon isotope fractionations during controlled precipitation of amorphous silica from a flowing aqueous solution. The experiments were designed to simulate silica deposition induced by a temperature drop, with particular relevance for (near-) surface hydrothermal systems associated with steep temperature gradients. Monitored differences in silicon isotope ratios (30Si/28Si and 29Si/28Si) between input and output solutions demonstrated a systematic sequence in behavior. During an initial time interval, that is, before the reaction system reached steady state, the observed isotope shifts were influenced by dissolution of the seed material, the saturation state of the solution and the specific surface area of the seeds. After reaching steady state, the selective incorporation of silicon isotopes by the solid phase exhibited an explicit temperature dependency: the lighter isotopes were preferentially incorporated, and apparent fractionation magnitudes increased with decreasing temperature. Calculated magnitudes of silicon isotope fractionations between precipitated and dissolved silica (Δ30Si = δ30Siprecipitate (calculated) - δ30Siinput solution) were -2.1‰ at 10 °C, -1.2‰ at 20 °C, -1.0‰ at 30 °C, -0.5‰ at 40 °C, 0.1‰ at 50 °C, and 0.2‰ at 60 °C (s.d. ⩽ 0.6‰, based on replicate experiments). Hence, fractionation was nearly insignificant at temperatures ⩾50 °C. Apart from this relationship with temperature

  9. A novel crowd flow model based on linear fractional stable motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Juan; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Zhenya; He, Junlin; Guo, Yangyong

    2016-03-01

    For the evacuation dynamics in indoor space, a novel crowd flow model is put forward based on Linear Fractional Stable Motion. Based on position attraction and queuing time, the calculation formula of movement probability is defined and the queuing time is depicted according to linear fractal stable movement. At last, an experiment and simulation platform can be used for performance analysis, studying deeply the relation among system evacuation time, crowd density and exit flow rate. It is concluded that the evacuation time and the exit flow rate have positive correlations with the crowd density, and when the exit width reaches to the threshold value, it will not effectively decrease the evacuation time by further increasing the exit width.

  10. Lift-enhanced Electrical Pinched Flow Fractionation for Particle and Cell Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Cory; Todd, Andrew; Lu, Xinyu; Xuan, Xiangchun

    Pinched flow fractionation (PFF) is a microfluidic technique that utilizes the laminar flow profile in microchannels to continuously separate particles or cells by size. The flow can be either pressure-driven or electric field-driven. We demonstrate in this work that the wall-induced electrical lift force can be exploited to significantly increase the particle or cell displacement in electrical PFF due to its strong size dependence. This enhanced particle and cell separation is implemented by a simple elongation of the pinched segment in electrical PFF. It is demonstrated through both a binary and a ternary separation of polymer particles and biological cells based on surface charge and/or size. We also develop a numerical model to predict and understand this lift-enhanced electrical PFF. This work was supported by the Honors and Creative Inquiry programs at Clemson University.

  11. A critical evaluation of an asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation system for colloidal size characterization of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengzhen; Guo, Laodong

    2015-06-19

    Colloidal retention characteristics, recovery and size distribution of model macromolecules and natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) were systematically examined using an asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AFlFFF) system under various membrane size cutoffs and carrier solutions. Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) standards with known molecular weights (MW) were used to determine their permeation and recovery rates by membranes with different nominal MW cutoffs (NMWCO) within the AFlFFF system. Based on a ≥90% recovery rate for PSS standards by the AFlFFF system, the actual NMWCOs were determined to be 1.9 kDa for the 0.3 kDa membrane, 2.7 kDa for the 1 kDa membrane, and 33 kDa for the 10 kDa membrane, respectively. After membrane calibration, natural DOM samples were analyzed with the AFlFFF system to determine their colloidal size distribution and the influence from membrane NMWCOs and carrier solutions. Size partitioning of DOM samples showed a predominant colloidal size fraction in the <5 nm or <10 kDa size range, consistent with the size characteristics of humic substances as the main terrestrial DOM component. Recovery of DOM by the AFlFFF system, as determined by UV-absorbance at 254 nm, decreased significantly with increasing membrane NMWCO, from 45% by the 0.3 kDa membrane to 2-3% by the 10 kDa membrane. Since natural DOM is mostly composed of lower MW substances (<10 kDa) and the actual membrane cutoffs are normally larger than their manufacturer ratings, a 0.3 kDa membrane (with an actual NMWCO of 1.9 kDa) is highly recommended for colloidal size characterization of natural DOM. Among the three carrier solutions, borate buffer seemed to provide the highest recovery and optimal separation of DOM. Rigorous calibration with macromolecular standards and optimization of system conditions are a prerequisite for quantifying colloidal size distribution using the flow field-flow fractionation technique. In addition, the coupling of AFlFFF with fluorescence

  12. Flow characteristics of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices in a novel open-loop system.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H; Pardyjak, Eric R; Bamberg, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Fluid-pumping technology is a mature engineering subject area with a well-documented knowledge base. However, the pump design optimization techniques accepted in industry are geared toward steady-state constant-flow conditions. In contrast, the implantation of a continuous-flow pump to aid the output of the human left ventricle subjects the device to perpetual variation. This study measures pressure-flow performance characteristics for both axial- and centrifugal continuous-flow rotary blood pumps across a wide range of pressure differential values under uniform conditions by means of a novel open-loop flow system. The axial-flow devices show lower hydraulic efficiency. All pumps yield best efficiency point at a head to flow coefficient ratio of approximately 1.7. The open-loop flow system accounts for the dynamic changes associated with human heart physiology and allows for more precise characterization of existing heart pumps and those in development. PMID:22990285

  13. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Sinha, Dipen N.; Osterhoudt, Curtis F.

    2012-08-15

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  14. A fluidic device for measuring constituent masses of a flowing binary gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A continuous reading mass flow device was developed to measure the component flow of a binary gas mixture. The basic components of the device are a fluidic humidity sensor and a specially designed flow calorimeter. These components provide readings of gas mixture ratio, mixture heat capacity, heat dissipated by the calorimeter and the gas temperature rise across the calorimeter. These parameter values, applied in the general definitions of specific heat capacity and the heat capacity of a gas mixture, produce calculated component flow rates of the mixture being metered. A test program was conducted to evaluate both the steady state and dynamic performance of the device.

  15. Importance of bicarbonate in bile salt independent fraction of bile flow.

    PubMed

    Hardison, W G; Wood, C A

    1978-08-01

    The bile salt independent fraction (BSIF) of canalicular bile flow from the isolated rat liver perfused with bicarbonate-free perfusate is 50% of that from the liver perfused with bicarbonate-containing perfusate. HCO3-excretion is nearly eliminated and Na+ and Cl- excretion is reduced 50%. Replacement of HCO3- into perfusate increased bile flow by 0.3 microliter/g.min without changing bile acid excretion rate. 5.5-Dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione (DMO) produced a similar effect. DMO was passively distributed between bile and plasma. The data indicate that a bicarbonate transport mechanism is responsible for production of up to 50% of the BSIF. Another weak acid, N-5[5-(2-methoxyethoxy)-2-pyrimidinyl]sulfamoylbenzene (glymidine), was rapidly excreted into bile and increased bile flow by over 2.0 microliter/g.min. Glymidine is probably excreted by an independent organic anion transport mechanism, and any effect on the bicarbonate transport mechanism is obscured. Canaliculus-enriched hepatocyte membrane fractions contained no HCO3-stimulated ATPase activity. Either this enzyme is unimportant in hepatocyte bicarbonate transport or transport occurs across membranes other than the bile canalicular membrane. PMID:150796

  16. Comprehensive triblock copolymer analysis by coupled thermal field-flow fractionation-NMR.

    PubMed

    van Aswegen, Werner; Hiller, Wolf; Hehn, Mathias; Pasch, Harald

    2013-07-12

    Thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) is used as a novel fractionation technique to investigate the molecular heterogeneity of PB-b-PVP-b-PtBMA triblock copolymers. Such copolymers cause major problems in liquid chromatography due to very strong polar interactions with the stationary phase. ThFFF separates the copolymers with regard to size and/or chemical composition based on the normal and thermal diffusion coefficients. The separation mechanism in ThFFF and the chemical composition of the separated species is elucidated by online (1) H NMR. Based on the compositional analysis and a calibration of the system with the respective homopolymers, the samples are quantified regarding their molar masses, chemical compositions, and microstructures providing comprehensive information on the complex structure of these block copolymers. PMID:23722993

  17. Application of flow field-flow fractionation for the characterization of macromolecules of biological interest: a review

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Rashid Nazir

    2010-01-01

    An overview is given of the recent literature on (bio) analytical applications of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). FlFFF is a liquid-phase separation technique that can separate macromolecules and particles according to size. The technique is increasingly used on a routine basis in a variety of application fields. In food analysis, FlFFF is applied to determine the molecular size distribution of starches and modified celluloses, or to study protein aggregation during food processing. In industrial analysis, it is applied for the characterization of polysaccharides that are used as thickeners and dispersing agents. In pharmaceutical and biomedical laboratories, FlFFF is used to monitor the refolding of recombinant proteins, to detect aggregates of antibodies, or to determine the size distribution of drug carrier particles. In environmental studies, FlFFF is used to characterize natural colloids in water streams, and especially to study trace metal distributions over colloidal particles. In this review, first a short discussion of the state of the art in instrumentation is given. Developments in the coupling of FlFFF to various detection modes are then highlighted. Finally, application studies are discussed and ordered according to the type of (bio) macromolecules or bioparticles that are fractionated. PMID:20957473

  18. Flow visualization of a non-contact transport device by Coanda effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iki, Norihiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Okada, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    AIST proposes new technology of non-contact transport device utilizing Coanda effect. A proposed non-contact transport device has a cylindrical body and circular slit for air. The air flow around non-contact device is turbulent and its flow pattern depends on the injection condition. Therefore we tried visualization of the air flow around non -contact device as the first step of PIV measurement. Several tracer particles were tried such as TiO2 particles, water droplets, potatoes starch, rice starch, corn starch. Hot-wire anemometer is employed to velocity measurement. TiO2 particles deposit inside of a slit and clogging of a slit occurs frequently. Potato starch particles do not clog a slit but they are too heavy to trace slow flow area. Water droplets by ultrasonic atomization also deposit inside of slit but they are useful to visualize flow pattern around a non-contact transport device by being supplied from circumference. Coanda effect of proposed non-contact transport device was confirmed and injected air flow pattern switches by a work. Air flow around non-contact trance port device is turbulent and its velocity range is wide. Therefore flow measurement by tracer part icle has traceability issue. Suitable tracer and exposure condition depends on target area.

  19. Sparger Effects on Gas Volume Fraction Distributions in Vertical Bubble-Column Flows as Measured by Gamma-Densitometry Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-01-18

    Gamma-densitometry tomography is applied to study the effect of sparger hole geometry, gas flow rate, column pressure, and phase properties on gas volume fraction profiles in bubble columns. Tests are conducted in a column 0.48 m in diameter, using air and mineral oil, superficial gas velocities ranging from 5 to 30 cm s{sup -1}, and absolute column pressures from 103 to 517 kPa. Reconstructed gas volume fraction profiles from two sparger geometries are presented. The development length of the gas volume fraction profile is found to increase with gas flow rate and column pressure. Increases in gas flow rate increase the local gas volume fraction preferentially on the column axis, whereas increases in column pressure produce a uniform rise in gas volume fraction across the column. A comparison of results from the two spargers indicates a significant change in development length with the number and size of sparger holes.

  20. Theory for nanoparticle retention time in the helical channel of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-05-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a separation and characterization technique for magnetic nanoparticles such as those used for cell labeling and for targeted drug therapy. A helical separation channel is used to efficiently exploit the quadrupole magnetic field. The fluid and sample components therefore have angular and longitudinal components to their motion in the thin annular space occupied by the helical channel. The retention ratio is defined as the ratio of the times for non-retained and a retained material to pass through the channel. Equations are derived for the respective angular and longitudinal components to retention ratio.

  1. A geochemical investigation of fragmentation and physical fractionation in pyroclastic flows from the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwell, C. J.; Braña, L. P.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Murphy, M. D.; Hards, V. L.

    2001-09-01

    Geochemical analysis is used to investigate fragmentation and physical fractionation in pyroclastic flows. Bulk analyses of the matrices (<4 mm) and individual size fractions in pyroclastic flow deposits formed in the eruption of the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, West Indies are compared with analyses of associated ash fall deposits formed from lofting plumes above the flows, and with bulk lava analyses. Within the flow matrices intermediate grain size fractions (<4 mm to 125 μm) are depleted in the groundmass component of the lava (principally glass and micro-crystalline silica) and enriched in phenocryst components. Fine-grained size fractions (<125 μm) are enriched in groundmass components. Crushing of the lava in the laboratory with analysis of grain size fractions shows the same relationship, but enrichment and depletions are less pronounced. Comparison of the bulk compositions of matrices, ash fall deposits and lava show that the finest fractions, enriched in the groundmass component, have been selectively removed from the flows into the lofting ash plumes. Mass balance calculations indicate that typically about 10% of the mass of the pyroclastic flows are elutriated into lofting ash plumes to form ash fall deposits, which is consistent with data on relative volumes of the deposits. Three factors influence fragmentation and fractionation. First, the initial size distribution of crystals influences fragmentation with phenocrysts resisting break up, whereas fine groundmass minerals (mostly feldspar, glass and micro-crystalline silica) are preferentially fragmented to form the finest ash fractions. Second, the mineral phases and groundmass glass vary in strength so that vesicular glass fragments more rapidly than other silicate minerals. This interpretation is supported by crushing experiments on different rock types. Third, only the finest fractions are elutriated into the lofting ash plume from the pyroclastic flows. Description of the natural size

  2. Validation of free flow electrophoresis as a novel plasma and serum processing and fractionation method in biobanking.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Gwenaelle; Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Betsou, Fotini

    2012-08-01

    Free flow electrophoresis (FFE) is a fractionation method, based on isoelectric focusing (IEF). We validate the reproducibility of the method and show that it can be applied by biobanks in order to fractionate fluid biospecimens efficiently and reproducibly and to facilitate downstream proteomic applications. We also propose a simple method allowing researchers to assess the reproducibility of each FFE run. PMID:24849883

  3. Quantification of error associated with stormwater and wastewater flow measurement devices

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel flow testbed has been designed to evaluate the performance of flumes as flow measurement devices. The newly constructed testbed produces both steady and unsteady flows ranging from 10 to 1500 gpm. Two types of flumes (Parshall and trapezoidal) are evaluated under differen...

  4. Study on steric transition in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and application to characterization of high-energy material.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Lee, Yong-Ju; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Seungho

    2013-08-23

    In field-flow fractionation (FFF), there is the 'steric transition' phenomenon where the sample elution mode changes from the normal to steric/hyperlayer mode. Accurate analysis by FFF requires understanding of the steric transition phenomenon, particularly when the sample has a broad size distribution, for which the effect by combination of different modes may become complicated to interpret. In this study, the steric transition phenomenon in asymmetrical flow FFF (AF4) was studied using polystyrene (PS) latex beads. The retention ratio (R) gradually decreases as the particle size increases (normal mode) and reaches a minimum (Ri) at diameter around 0.5μm, after which R increases with increasing diameter (steric/hyperlayer mode). It was found that the size-based selectivity (Sd) tends to increase as the channel thickness (w) increases. The retention behavior of cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (commonly called 'research department explosive' (RDX)) particles in AF4 was investigated by varying experimental parameters including w and flow rates. AF4 showed a good reproducibility in size determination of RDX particles with the relative standard deviation of 4.1%. The reliability of separation obtained by AF4 was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PMID:23871284

  5. Fractional flow reserve-guided percutaneous coronary intervention: where to after FAME 2?

    PubMed

    van de Hoef, Tim P; Meuwissen, Martijn; Piek, Jan J

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a well-validated clinical coronary physiological parameter derived from the measurement of coronary pressures and has drastically changed revascularization decision-making in clinical practice. Nonetheless, it is important to realize that FFR is a coronary pressure-derived estimate of coronary blood flow impairment. It is thereby not the same as direct measures of coronary flow impairment that determine the occurrence of signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This consideration is important, since the FAME 2 study documented a limited discriminatory power of FFR to identify stenoses that require revascularization to prevent adverse events. The physiological difference between FFR and direct measures of coronary flow impairment may well explain the findings in FAME 2. This review aims to address the physiological background of FFR, its ambiguities, and its consequences for the application of FFR in clinical practice, as well as to reinterpret the diagnostic and prognostic characteristics of FFR in the light of the recent FAME 2 trial outcomes. PMID:26673639

  6. Fractional flow reserve: Current applications and overview of the available data.

    PubMed

    Tebaldi, Matteo; Campo, Gianluca; Biscaglia, Simone

    2015-08-16

    Flow fractional reserve (FFR) allows to evaluate the functional significance of coronary artery lesions, through the ratio of the mean coronary artery pressure after the stenosis to the mean aortic pressure during maximum hyperemia. The actual widely accepted cut-off value is 0.80. Below this value a coronary lesion is considered significant and therefore it requires invasive revascularization. Several studies [in particular Fractional Flow Reserve vs Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation 1 (FAME-1) and FAME-2] have shown the relationship between FFR measurement and hard end-points (death, myocardial infarction, and urgent revascularization). Consequently, FFR evaluation represents the cornerstone in the decision-making in intermediate coronary lesions. Recent studies paved the way for further applications of FFR evaluation in complex and tricky clinical settings. In this paper, we perform an overview of the data regarding contemporary application of FFR. In particular, we review the use of FFR in: left main intermediate stenoses, serial stenoses, evaluation after stenting, guidance in coronary artery bypass surgery, and acute coronary syndrome. All the data presented in our overview confirm the essential role of FFR assessment in the daily clinical practice. The shift from "operator-dependent" to "FFR-dependent" evaluation in intermediate coronary artery stenosis is of paramount importance in order to improve the prognosis of our patients, through the discrimination of the functional role of every single coronary stenosis. PMID:26301228

  7. Fractional flow reserve: Current applications and overview of the available data

    PubMed Central

    Tebaldi, Matteo; Campo, Gianluca; Biscaglia, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Flow fractional reserve (FFR) allows to evaluate the functional significance of coronary artery lesions, through the ratio of the mean coronary artery pressure after the stenosis to the mean aortic pressure during maximum hyperemia. The actual widely accepted cut-off value is 0.80. Below this value a coronary lesion is considered significant and therefore it requires invasive revascularization. Several studies [in particular Fractional Flow Reserve vs Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation 1 (FAME-1) and FAME-2] have shown the relationship between FFR measurement and hard end-points (death, myocardial infarction, and urgent revascularization). Consequently, FFR evaluation represents the cornerstone in the decision-making in intermediate coronary lesions. Recent studies paved the way for further applications of FFR evaluation in complex and tricky clinical settings. In this paper, we perform an overview of the data regarding contemporary application of FFR. In particular, we review the use of FFR in: left main intermediate stenoses, serial stenoses, evaluation after stenting, guidance in coronary artery bypass surgery, and acute coronary syndrome. All the data presented in our overview confirm the essential role of FFR assessment in the daily clinical practice. The shift from “operator-dependent” to “FFR-dependent” evaluation in intermediate coronary artery stenosis is of paramount importance in order to improve the prognosis of our patients, through the discrimination of the functional role of every single coronary stenosis. PMID:26301228

  8. Experimental and numerical studies of a microfluidic device with compliant chambers for flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, V.; Raj, A.; Annabattula, R. K.; Sen, A. K.

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports experimental and numerical studies of a passive microfluidic device that stabilizes a pulsating incoming flow and delivers a steady flow at the outlet. The device employs a series of chambers along the flow direction with a thin polymeric membrane (of thickness 75-250 µm) serving as the compliant boundary. The deformation of the membrane allows accumulation of fluid during an overflow and discharge of fluid during an underflow for flow stabilization. Coupled fluid-structure simulations are performed using Mooney-Rivlin formulations to account for a thin hyperelastic membrane material undergoing large deformations to accurately predict the device performance. The device was fabricated with PDMS as the substrate material and thin PDMS membrane as the compliant boundary. The performance of the device is defined in terms of a parameter called ‘Attenuation Factor (AF)’. The effect of various design parameters including membrane thickness, elastic modulus, chamber size and number of chambers in series as well as operating conditions including the outlet pressure, mean input flow rate, fluctuation amplitude and frequency on the device performance were studied using experiments and simulations. The simulation results successfully confront the experimental data (within 10%) which validates the numerical simulations. The device was used at the exit of a PZT actuated valveless micropump to take pulsating flow at the upstream and deliver steady flow downstream. The amplitude of the pulsating flow delivered by the micropump was significantly reduced (AF = 0.05 for a device with three 4 mm chambers) but at the expense of a reduction in the pressure capability (<20%). The proposed device could potentially be used for reducing flow pulsations in practical microfluidic circuits.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Gjersing, E; Herberg, J L; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2008-10-29

    Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

  10. Comparison of Fractional Flow Reserve Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Using Coronary Angiographic Vessel Morphology Versus Invasively Measured Fractional Flow Reserve.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Achenbach, Stephan; Röther, Jens; Redel, Thomas; Scheuering, Michael; Winneberger, David; Klingenbeck, Klaus; Itu, Lucian; Passerini, Tiziano; Kamen, Ali; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin; Schlundt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fractional flow reserve (FFRinvasive), although gold standard to identify hemodynamically relevant coronary stenoses, is time consuming and potentially associated with complications. We developed and evaluated a new approach to determine lesion-specific FFR on the basis of coronary anatomy as visualized by invasive coronary angiography (FFRangio): 100 coronary lesions (50% to 90% diameter stenosis) in 73 patients (48 men, 25 women; mean age 67 ± 9 years) were studied. On the basis of coronary angiograms acquired at rest from 2 views at angulations at least 30° apart, a PC-based computational fluid dynamics modeling software used personalized boundary conditions determined from 3-dimensional reconstructed angiography, heart rate, and blood pressure to derive FFRangio. The results were compared with FFRinvasive. Interobserver variability was determined in a subset of 25 narrowings. Twenty-nine of 100 coronary lesions were hemodynamically significant (FFRinvasive ≤ 0.80). FFRangio identified these with an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 94%, positive predictive value of 85%, and negative predictive value of 92%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.93. Correlation between FFRinvasive (mean: 0.84 ± 0.11) and FFRangio (mean: 0.85 ± 0.12) was r = 0.85. Interobserver variability of FFRangio was low, with a correlation of r = 0.88. In conclusion, estimation of coronary FFR with PC-based computational fluid dynamics modeling on the basis of lesion morphology as determined by invasive angiography is possible with high diagnostic accuracy compared to invasive measurements. PMID:26596195

  11. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min-Hee; Lee, Seungho; Hwang, Yu Sik

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods to monitor manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is one of the crucial areas for the assessment of their risk. More specifically, particle size analysis is a key element, because many properties of nanomaterial are size dependent. The sizing of nanomaterials in real environments is challenging due to their heterogeneity and reactivity with other environmental components. In this study, the fractionation and characterization of a mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) of three different sizes were investigated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In particular, the effects of electrolyte composition and natural organic matter (NOM) on the particle size and stability were evaluated. The fractogram peaks (i.e., stability) of three different AgNPs decreased in the presence of both 10 mM NaCl and 10mM CaCl2, while increased with increasing concentration of humic acid (HA). In addition, the hydrodynamic diameters of AgNPs in both electrolytes slightly increased with an increase of HA concentration, suggesting the adsorption (coating) of HA onto the particle surface. It is also interesting to note that an increase in the particle size depended on the types of electrolyte, which could be explained by the conformational characteristics of the adsorbed HA layers. Consistent these results, AgNPs suspended in lake water containing relatively high concentration of organic carbon (TOC) showed higher particle stability and larger particle size (i.e., by approximately 4nm) than those in river water. In conclusion, the application of AF4 coupled with highly sensitive detectors could be a powerful method to characterize nanoparticles in natural waters. PMID:26575993

  12. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4).

    PubMed

    Jang, Min-Hee; Lee, Seungho; Hwang, Yu Sik

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods to monitor manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is one of the crucial areas for the assessment of their risk. More specifically, particle size analysis is a key element, because many properties of nanomaterial are size dependent. The sizing of nanomaterials in real environments is challenging due to their heterogeneity and reactivity with other environmental components. In this study, the fractionation and characterization of a mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) of three different sizes were investigated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In particular, the effects of electrolyte composition and natural organic matter (NOM) on the particle size and stability were evaluated. The fractogram peaks (i.e., stability) of three different AgNPs decreased in the presence of both 10 mM NaCl and 10 mM CaCl2, while increased with increasing concentration of humic acid (HA). In addition, the hydrodynamic diameters of AgNPs in both electrolytes slightly increased with an increase of HA concentration, suggesting the adsorption (coating) of HA onto the particle surface. It is also interesting to note that an increase in the particle size depended on the types of electrolyte, which could be explained by the conformational characteristics of the adsorbed HA layers. Consistent these results, AgNPs suspended in lake water containing relatively high concentration of organic carbon (TOC) showed higher particle stability and larger particle size (i.e., by approximately 4 nm) than those in river water. In conclusion, the application of AF4 coupled with highly sensitive detectors could be a powerful method to characterize nanoparticles in natural waters. PMID:26575993

  13. Self-contained Tubular Compressed-flow Generation Device for Use in Making Differential Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John D. (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A device used in making differential measurements of a flow includes an open-ended tubular flow obstruction and a support arm. The flow obstruction has an outer annular wall and an inner annular wall. The support arm has a first end coupled to an exterior wall of a conduit and a second end coupled to the flow obstruction. The support arm positions the flow obstruction in the conduit such that a first flow region is defined around the flow obstruction's outer annular wall and a second flow region is defined by the flow obstruction's inner annular wall. The support arm's first end and second end are separated from one another with respect to a length dimension of the conduit. Measurement ports provided in the flow obstruction are coupled to points at the exterior wall of the conduit by manifolds extending through the flow obstruction and support arm.

  14. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  15. Effect of particle size, air flow and inhaler device on the aerosolisation of disodium cromoglycate powders.

    PubMed

    Chew, N Y; Bagster, D F; Chan, H K

    2000-09-25

    Recently, the dispersion of mannitol powders has demonstrated the importance of particle size, air flow and inhaler device (Chew and Chan, 1999). The aim of the present study is to extend our investigation to a different compound, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) powders. Solid state characteristics of the powders were assessed by particle sizing, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, moisture content, particle density determination and freeze fracture. The aerosol behaviour of the powders was studied by dispersion using Rotahaler(R) and Dinkihaler(R), connected to a four-stage liquid impinger operating at 30-120 l/min. Three amorphous powders with a mass median diameter (MMD) of 2.3, 3.7, 5.2 microm and a similar polydispersity were prepared. The particles were nearly spherical with a particle density of 1.6 g/cm(3) and moisture content of 6.6 wt.%. Using Rotahaler(R), the maximum fine particle fraction (FPF(max)) for all three powders was only 15 wt.%, attained at the highest flow of 120 l/min. Using Dinkihaler(R), the FPF(max) was two to four times higher, being 36 and 29 wt.% for the 2.3 and 3.7 microm powder, respectively, at 60 l/min; and 18 wt.% for the 5.2 microm powder at 120 l/min. Hence, the study shows that the FPF in the DSCG powder aerosols was determined by the interaction of the particle size, air flow and inhaler design. The attribution of the amorphous nature and the different physico-chemical properties of the powder may explain the incomplete and low dispersibility of DSCG. PMID:11058812

  16. A flow-transfer device with nonmetallic diaphragms for propulsion wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Price, Barry L.

    1988-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has developed a new flow-transfer device for powered wind tunnel models in which the traditional metal bellows have been replaced with nonmetallic diaphragms. Two complete flow transfer assemblies have been fabricated and installed within a twin-jet propulsion simulation system. Calibrations of the force balance have been performed over a range of nozzle mass flow rates up to 15 lbs/sec in order to validate the nonmetallic diaphragm design concept. Results from these calibrations are compared to those obtained with flow-transfer devices utilizing metal bellows.

  17. Characterization of sodium hyaluronate blends using frit inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Hwang, Euijin; Cho, Il-Hwan; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2012-01-01

    We characterized ultrahigh molecular weight sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) and blended pharmaceutical products containing NaHA using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering-differential refractive index (FlFFF-MALS-DRI). NaHA is a water-soluble polysaccharide with a range of molecular weights (MW; 10(5)~10(8) Da) that is found in body fluids and tissues. NaHA is also used commercially in pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. We used a frit inlet asymmetrical FlFFF channel to separate aqueous polymers according to their hydrodynamic size, and we used on-line measurements of light scattering to obtain the MW distribution (MWD) as well as structural information about NaHA in aqueous solution. In this study, we investigated NaHA and anti-adhesive blend mixtures of NaHA (a commercial NaHA blend mixture containing sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and a new blend with hydroxyethyl starch (HES)) to determine the molecular weight distribution MWD of NaHA and the blend mixtures and to obtain structural information about these compounds in aqueous solution. We also examined the characteristics of NaHA-HES-polylactic-co-glycolic acid film products exposed to gamma radiation for sterilization purposes. PMID:22101460

  18. Complementary use of flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques for size characterizing biodegradable poly(lactic acid) nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Contado, Catia; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana; Zborowski, Maciej; Williams, P. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles were synthesized using a modified evaporation method, testing two different surfactants (sodium cholate and Pluronic F68) for the process. During their formulation the prodrug 5′-octanoyl-CPA (Oct-CPA) of the antiischemic N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) was encapsulated. Three different purification methods were compared with respect to the influence of surfactant on the size characteristics of the final nanoparticle product. Flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques (FlFFF and SdFFF, respectively) were used to size characterize the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. Two different combinations of carrier solution (mobile phase) were employed in the FlFFF analyses, while a solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) was used as mobile phase for the SdFFF runs. The separation performances of the two techniques were compared and the particle size distributions, derived from the fractograms, were interpreted with the support of observations by scanning electron microscopy. Some critical aspects, such as the carrier choice and the channel thickness determination for the FlFFF, have been investigated. This is the first comprehensive comparison of the two FFF techniques for characterizing non standard particulate materials. The two FFF techniques proved to be complementary and gave good, congruent and very useful information on the size distributions of the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. PMID:17482199

  19. Aggregation behavior of fullerenes in aqueous solutions: a capillary electrophoresis and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Kok, Wim Th; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the electrophoretic behavior of hydrophobic fullerenes [buckminsterfullerene (C60), C70, and N-methyl-fulleropyrrolidine (C60-pyrr)] and water-soluble fullerenes [fullerol (C60(OH)24); polyhydroxy small gap fullerene, hydrated (C120(OH)30); C60 pyrrolidine tris acid (C60-pyrr tris acid); and (1,2-methanofullerene C60)-61-carboxylic acid (C60CHCOOH)] in micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) was evaluated. The aggregation behavior of the water-soluble compounds in MECC at different buffer and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentrations and pH values of the background electrolyte (BGE) was studied by monitoring the changes observed in the electrophoretic pattern of the peaks. Broad and distorted peaks that can be attributed to fullerene aggregation were obtained in MECC which became narrower and more symmetric by working at low buffer and SDS concentrations (below the critical micelle concentration, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) conditions). For the characterization of the suspected aggregates formed (size and shape), asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used. The results showed that the increase in the buffer concentration promoted the aggregation of the particles, while the presence of SDS micelles revealed multiple peaks corresponding to particles of different aggregation degrees. Furthermore, MECC has been applied for the first time for the analysis of C60 in two different cosmetic products (i.e., anti-aging serum and facial mask). PMID:26314484

  20. Study on aggregation behavior of Cytochrome C-conjugated silver nanoparticles using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Yong-Ju; Hwang, Yu-Sik; Lee, Seungho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 40 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using the citrate reduction method and then the surface of AgNPs was modified by conjugating Cytochrome C (Cyto C) to improve stability and to enhance bioactivity and biocompatibility of AgNPs. It is known that Cyto C may undergo conformational changes under various conditions of pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc., resulting in aggregation of the particles. These parameters also affect the size and size distribution of Cyto C-conjugated AgNPs (Cyto C-AgNP). ζ-potential measurement revealed that the adsorption of Cyto C on the surface of AgNPs is saturated at the molar ratio [Cyto C]/[AgNPs] above about 300. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) analysis showed that hydrodynamic diameter of AgNPs increases by about 4 nm when the particle is saturated by Cyto C. The aggregation behavior of Cyto C-AgNP at various conditions of pH, temperature and ionic strength were investigated using AsFlFFF and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was found that the aggregation of Cyto C-AgNP increases with decreasing pH, increasing temperature and ionic strength due to denaturation of Cyto C on AgNPs and reduction in the thickness of electrostatic double layer on the surface of Cyto C-AgNP. PMID:25476400

  1. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part II: Dissolution of amylose.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether dissolution in water under autoclaving conditions (140 °C, 20 min) or in dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO (100 °C, 1 h), is preferable for characterization of amylose. Two types of amylose, potato and maize, were dissolved either in water using an autoclave or in DMSO. On the aqueous solutions obtained, the extent of molecular dissolution of the sample (referred to as the dissolution yield) was determined by enzymatic analysis as well as the molecular properties, such as molar mass and root-mean-square radius, obtained with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index detection (AF4-MALS-dRI). The results showed that both dissolution methods are efficient at dissolving amylose. However, AF4-MALS-dRI analysis revealed substantial differences. Amylose aqueous solutions obtained by dissolution in DMSO were relatively stable over time, but the dissolution method in autoclave caused some degradation of the molecules, and their solutions display a high tendency to retrograde. PMID:26232931

  2. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: Dissolution of amylopectin.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated methods of starch dissolution with the aim of finding an optimum method to completely dissolve starch granules to form a molecularly dissolved starch solution without degradation of the polymers. Glycogen was used as a model molecule for amylopectin, to identify the dissolution conditions under which the degradation of the polymers was limited or not present. Dissolution was performed in water with temperatures up to 200 °C, facilitated by the use of heating in an autoclave or a microwave oven, or in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 100 °C. Waxy maize starch was chosen due to its high content of amylopectin and very low content of amylose. The degree of starch dissolution under different conditions was determined enzymatically. The effect of different dissolution conditions on the molar mass and root-mean-square radius of the polymers was determined with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index (AF4-MALS-dRI) detectors under aqueous conditions. The results suggest that reliable and accurate size separation and characterization of amylopectin can be obtained by dissolution of starch granules in an aqueous environment at 140 °C by autoclaving or in DMSO at 100 °C. The results also clearly show an upper limit for heat treatment of starch, above which degradation cannot be avoided. PMID:25925852

  3. Thermal Response of In Vivo Human Skin to Fractional Radiofrequency Microneedle Device

    PubMed Central

    Manuskiatti, Woraphong; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Inthasotti, Siriluk; Sitthinamsuwan, Panitta; Hanamornroongruang, Suchanan; Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Chu-ongsakol, Sorawuth

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fractional radiofrequency microneedle system (FRMS) is a novel fractional skin resurfacing system. Data on thermal response to this fractional resurfacing technique is limited. Objectives. To investigate histologic response of in vivo human skin to varying energy settings and pulse stacking of a FRMS in dark-skinned subjects. Methods. Two female volunteers who were scheduled for abdominoplasty received treatment with a FRMS with varying energy settings at 6 time periods including 3 months, 1 month, 1 week, 3 days, 1 day, and the time immediately before abdominoplasty. Biopsy specimens were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Verhoeff-Van Gieson (VVG), colloidal iron, and Fontana-Masson stain. Immunohistochemical study was performed by using Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) antibody and collagen III monoclonal antibody. Results. The average depth of radiofrequency thermal zone (RFTZ) ranged from 100 to 300 μm, correlating with energy levels. Columns of cell necrosis and collagen denaturation followed by inflammatory response were initially demonstrated, with subsequent increasing of mucin at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Immunohistochemical study showed positive stain with HSP70. Conclusion. A single treatment with a FRMS using appropriate energy setting induces neocollagenesis. This wound healing response may serve as a mean to improve the appearance of photodamaged skin and atrophic scars. PMID:27247943

  4. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  5. Extensional flow of blood analog solutions in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, P. C.; Pinho, F. T.; Oliveira, M. S. N.; Alves, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we show the importance of extensional rheology, in addition to the shear rheology, in the choice of blood analog solutions intended to be used in vitro for mimicking the microcirculatory system. For this purpose, we compare the flow of a Newtonian fluid and two well-established viscoelastic blood analog polymer solutions through microfluidic channels containing both hyperbolic and abrupt contractions∕expansions. The hyperbolic shape was selected in order to impose a nearly constant strain rate at the centerline of the microchannels and achieve a quasihomogeneous and strong extensional flow often found in features of the human microcirculatory system such as stenoses. The two blood analog fluids used are aqueous solutions of a polyacrylamide (125 ppm w∕w) and of a xanthan gum (500 ppm w∕w), which were characterized rheologically in steady-shear flow using a rotational rheometer and in extension using a capillary breakup extensional rheometer (CaBER). Both blood analogs exhibit a shear-thinning behavior similar to that of whole human blood, but their relaxation times, obtained from CaBER experiments, are substantially different (by one order of magnitude). Visualizations of the flow patterns using streak photography, measurements of the velocity field using microparticle image velocimetry, and pressure-drop measurements were carried out experimentally for a wide range of flow rates. The experimental results were also compared with the numerical simulations of the flow of a Newtonian fluid and a generalized Newtonian fluid with shear-thinning behavior. Our results show that the flow patterns of the two blood analog solutions are considerably different, despite their similar shear rheology. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the elastic properties of the fluid have a major impact on the flow characteristics, with the polyacrylamide solution exhibiting a much stronger elastic character. As such, these properties must be taken into account in the

  6. Flow and Geometry Control the Onset of Jamming in Fractures with High Solid-Fraction Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, R.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Shannon, L. J.; Detwiler, R. L.; Morris, J.; Prioul, R.; Desroches, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fluids containing a large fraction of suspended solids are common in the subsurface. Examples include fluids used for environmental remediation, hydraulic fracturing fluids and magma. These fluid-solid mixtures behave as non-Newtonian fluids where interactions between fluid, suspended solids, and pore walls can lead to jamming of the suspended solids. Jamming causes the velocity of the solid to decrease locally to zero causing a rapid decrease in permeability as the fluid is forced to flow through the pore space within the immobilized solid. Here we present results from experiments that quantify the flow of non-Newtonian suspensions in an analog parallel-plate fracture (transparent 15cm x 15cm with ~3-mm aperture) and explore the dependence of jamming on flow conditions, fracture geometry, and the action of gravity. We used guar gum mixed with water (0.75%) as the fluid and added 50% by volume of crushed silica (< 300μm). Flow rates ranged from 0.2ml/min to 6.0ml/min, cell orientation varied from horizontal to vertical (bottom to top) flow and a transducer provided continuous measurement of differential pressure across the cell. A strobed LED panel backlit the cell and a high-resolution CCD camera captured frequent (0.2 Hz) images during all experiments. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) yielded measurements of the evolving velocity field during experiments (see Figure). In the vertical orientation during the initial period of high flow rate, outflow decreased rapidly and the differential pressure increased indicating jamming within the cell. Subsequent efforts to flush solids from the cell suggested that jamming occurred at the inlet of the cell. This was likely due to settling of solids within the flow field indicating that the time scale associated with settling was shorter than the time scale of advection through the cell. In the horizontal orientation, localized jamming occurred at the lowest flow rate in a region near the outlet. This suggests that when

  7. Device for Measuring Low Flow Speed in a Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Frank; Magee, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-throat venturi system has been invented for measuring laminar flow of air or other gas at low speed (1 to 30 cm/s) in a duct while preserving the laminar nature of the flow and keeping the velocity profile across the duct as nearly flat as possible. While means for measuring flows at higher speeds are well established, heretofore, there have been no reliable means for making consistent, accurate measurements in this speed range. In the original application for which this system was invented, the duct leads into the test section of a low-speed wind tunnel wherein uniform, low-speed, laminar flow is required for scientific experiments. The system could also be used to monitor a slow flow of gas in an industrial process like chemical vapor deposition. In the original application, the multiple- throat venturi system is mounted at the inlet end of the duct having a rectangular cross section of 19 by 14 cm, just upstream of an assembly of inlet screens and flow straighteners that help to suppress undesired flow fluctuations (see Figure 1). The basic venturi measurement principle is well established: One measures the difference in pressure between (1) a point just outside the inlet, where the pressure is highest and the kinetic energy lowest; and (2) the narrowest part (the throat) of the venturi passage, where the kinetic energy is highest and the pressure is lowest. Then by use of Bernoulli s equation for the relationship between pressure and kinetic energy, the volumetric flow speed in the duct can be calculated from the pressure difference and the inlet and throat widths. The design of this system represents a compromise among length, pressure recovery, uniformity of flow, and complexity of assembly. Traditionally, venturis are used to measure faster flows in narrower cross sections, with longer upstream and downstream passages to maintain accuracy. The dimensions of the passages of the present venturi system are sized to provide a readily measurable

  8. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  9. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    1982-01-01

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  10. Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation Is Preserved After Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masahiro; Joshi, Brijen; Brady, Kenneth; Easley, R. Blaine; Kibler, Kathy; Conte, John; Shah, Ashish; Russell, Stuart D.; Hogue, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation in patients undergoing continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation with that in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Design Prospective, observational, controlled study. Setting Academic medical center. Participants Fifteen patients undergoing LVAD insertion and 10 patients undergoing CABG surgery. Measurements and Main Results Cerebral autoregulation was monitored with transcranial Doppler and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A continuous, Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and CBF velocity, and between MAP and NIRS data rendering the variables mean velocity index (Mx) and cerebral oximetry index (COx), respectively. Mx and COx approach zero when autoregulation is intact (no correlation between CBF and MAP), but approach 1 when autoregulation is impaired. Mx was lower during and immediately after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in the LVAD group than it was in the CABG surgery patients, indicating better preserved autoregulation. Based on COx monitoring, autoregulation tended to be better preserved in the LVAD group than in the CABG group immediately after surgery (p=0.0906). On postoperative day 1, COx was lower in LVAD patients than in CABG surgery patients, again indicating preserved CBF autoregulation (p=0.0410). Based on COx monitoring, 3 (30%) of the CABG patients had abnormal autoregulation (COx ≥ 0.3) on the first postoperative day but none of the LVAD patients had this abnormality (p=0.037). Conclusion These data suggest that CBF autoregulation is preserved during and immediately after surgery in patients undergoing LVAD insertion. PMID:23122299

  11. Water selenium speciation and sediment fractionation in a California flow-through wetland system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gao, S.; Tanii, K.K.; Peters, D.W.; Herbel, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    A flow-through wetland system was established in the Tulare Lake Drainage District (TLDD) in California to determine if selenium (Se) from saline irrigation drainage can be removed prior to impoundment in evaporation basins to reduce potential toxicity to waterbirds. The objective of this research was to evaluate Se speciation, accumulation, and fractionation in the waters and sediments of the newly developed wetland system. The inlet water was dominated by selenate [Se(VI), 92%], with smaller percentages of selenite [Se(IV), 5%] and organic Se [org-Se(-II), 3%]. For the outflow water, the average percentage of Se(VI) was 72% in November 1997 and 59% in February 1999. This change may be due to an increase in either residence time and/or accumulation of organic detrital matter, which may enhance Se(VI) reduction processes. Selenium accumulation, transformation, and incorporation with the solid phase were all intensified in the surface sediment (<20 cm). The highest total Se concentrations in the sediments were found in the top 5 cm and concentrations dramatically decreased with depth. Elemental Se [Se(0)], as extracted by Na2SO3, was the largest fraction (average of 46%) of the total sediment Se, followed by organic matter-associated Se (OM-Se) extracted by NaOH (average of 34%). Soluble, adsorbed, and carbonate-associated Se, as extracted by KCl, K2HPO4 (pH 8.0), and NaOAc (pH 5.0), were about 3, 10, and 3% of the total sediment Se, respectively. After establishing the wetland for 2 yr, significant Se removal from the flowing water was observed. The major sink mechanisms in the sediment are reduction to Se(0) and immobilization into the organic phase.A flow-through wetland system was established in the Tulare Lake Drainage District (TLDD) in California to determine if selenium (Se) from saline irrigation drainage can be removed prior to impoundment in evaporation basins to reduce potential toxicity to waterbirds. The objective of this research was to evaluate Se

  12. Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Fractional Flow Reserve.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Doyeon; Lee, Joo Myung; Koo, Bon-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    The presence of myocardial ischemia is the most important prognostic factor in patients with ischemic heart disease. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a gold standard invasive method used to detect the stenosis-specific myocardial ischemia. FFR-guided revascularization strategy is superior to angiography-guided strategy. The recently developed hyperemia-free index, instantaneous wave free ratio is being actively investigated. A non-invasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography is now used in clinical practice. Due to rapid expansion of invasive and non-invasive physiologic assessment, comprehensive understanding of the role and potential pitfalls of each modality are required for its application. In this review, we focus on the basic and clinical aspects of physiologic assessment in ischemic heart disease. PMID:27134520

  13. Storage of Fractional Flow Reserve Hemodynamic Waveforms Using Semantic Extension of the DICOM Standard.

    PubMed

    Kakouros, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    Visual assessment of coronary stenoses by coronary angiography remains widely used but correlates poorly with ischemia, particularly for moderate lesions. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a cardiac catheterization procedure that aims to provide objective measures of coronary lesion hemodynamic significance and involves the acquisition of phasic pressure and electrocardiographic waveforms. The dataset from these procedures currently remains in proprietary systems with restricted data access, inability for data exchange, and often inadequate archiving. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) includes a waveform information object definition. We describe the method of encapsulating FFR procedural information into a DICOM waveform file. We define private data elements to capture modality-specific data that is not represented by standard DICOM data elements. We propose the adoption of this semantic extension of the DICOM waveform information object for exchange and archiving of data from studies of pressure-derived indices of coronary stenoses. PMID:26527469

  14. Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Fractional Flow Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Doyeon; Lee, Joo Myung

    2016-01-01

    The presence of myocardial ischemia is the most important prognostic factor in patients with ischemic heart disease. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a gold standard invasive method used to detect the stenosis-specific myocardial ischemia. FFR-guided revascularization strategy is superior to angiography-guided strategy. The recently developed hyperemia-free index, instantaneous wave free ratio is being actively investigated. A non-invasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography is now used in clinical practice. Due to rapid expansion of invasive and non-invasive physiologic assessment, comprehensive understanding of the role and potential pitfalls of each modality are required for its application. In this review, we focus on the basic and clinical aspects of physiologic assessment in ischemic heart disease. PMID:27134520

  15. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liang, David Y.; Tentori, Augusto M.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Lee, Luke P.

    2011-01-01

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics ofmore » degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.« less

  16. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, David Y.; Tentori, Augusto M.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Lee, Luke P.

    2011-01-01

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics of degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticle Drug Carriers and their Study by Quadrupole Magnetic Field-Flow Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancers and other pathological conditions. The efficient delivery of therapeutic levels of drug to a target site while limiting nonspecific, systemic toxicity requires optimization of the drug delivery materials, the applied magnetic field, and the treatment protocol. The history and current state of magnetic drug targeting is reviewed. While initial studies involved micron-sized and larger carriers, and work with these microcarriers continues, it is the sub-micron carriers or nanocarriers that are of increasing interest. An aspect of magnetic drug targeting using nanoparticle carriers that has not been considered is then addressed. This aspect involves the variation in the magnetic properties of the nanocarriers. Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a relatively new technique for characterizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is unique in its capability of determining the distribution in magnetic properties of a nanoparticle sample in suspension. The development and current state of this technique is also reviewed. Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers have been found by QMgFFF analysis to be highly polydisperse in their magnetic properties, and the strength of response of the particles to magnetic field gradients is predicted to vary by orders of magnitude. It is expected that the least magnetic fraction of a formulation will contribute the most to systemic toxicity, and the depletion of this fraction will result in a more effective drug carrying material. A material that has a reduced systemic toxicity will allow higher doses of cytotoxic drugs to be delivered to the tumor with reduced side effects. Preliminary experiments involving a novel method of refining a magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier to achieve this result are described. QMgFFF is used to characterize the refined and unrefined material. PMID:19591456

  18. Fractional analysis of arsenic in subsurface-flow constructed wetlands with different length to depth ratios.

    PubMed

    Singhakant, C; Koottatep, T; Satayavivad, J

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic (As) removal in subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (CW) planting with vetiver grasses was experimented by comparing between two different configurations; (i) deep-bed units (dpCW) with length to depth (L:D) ratio=2 and (ii) shallow-bed units (shCW) with L:D ratio=8; operating at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6, 9, and 12 days. The tracer study of CW units revealed that no effect of L:D ratio on dispersion number could be determined, but affecting to the effective volume ratio. Based on the data obtained from the pilot-scale experiments of CW units for 117 days, it is apparent that the dpCW could achieve relatively high As removals (52.9%, 59.2%, and 72.1% at HRT of 6, 9, and 12 days, respectively). Analysis of As mass balance showed that only 0.2-0.4% of As input was uptaken by vetiver grasses whereas the major portion was retained in the CW media (38.9-77.6%). Forms of the retained As was determined by sequential fractionation which could indicate As complexation with iron and manganese on the media surface of 31-38% and As trapping into the media of 42-52% of the total. No obvious difference of As fractions in bed of between dpCW and shCW units was observable. PMID:19809139

  19. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes. Progress report, July 1, 1989--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The work done on this project is divided into two principal areas. The first involves the application of sedimentation/steric FFF to metaphase chromosomes in an attempt to fractionate the chromosomes according to their size. The preparation of chromosomes from a number of organisms was attempted; procedures were finally worked out in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory for the preparation of metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. After extensive experimental work was done to identify suitable operating conditions, the partial fractionation of the Chinese hamster chromosomes was achieved. In the second component of the project, flow FFF was applied to the separation of DNA fragments. Figures are provided that show considerable success in the separation of plasmid digests and in the separation of single from double stranded DNA under 10{sup 4} base pairs. Preliminary work was done on DNA fragments having a size greater than 10{sup 4} base pairs. This work has served to establish the inversion point for DNA.

  20. Iron-rich colloids as carriers of phosphorus in streams: A field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Regelink, Inge C; Comans, Rob N J; Smolders, Erik; Koopmans, Gerwin F

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal phosphorus (P) may represent an important fraction of the P in natural waters, but these colloids remain poorly characterized. In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high resolution ICP-MS for the characterization of low concentrations of P-bearing colloids. Colloids from five streams draining catchments with contrasting properties were characterized by AF4-ICP-MS and by membrane filtration. All streams contain free humic substances (2-3 nm) and Fe-bearing colloids (3-1200 nm). Two soft water streams contain primary Fe oxyhydroxide-humic nanoparticles (3-6 nm) and aggregates thereof (up to 150 nm). In contrast, three harder water streams contain larger aggregates (40-1200 nm) which consist of diverse associations between Fe oxyhydroxides, humic substances, clay minerals, and possibly ferric phosphate minerals. Despite the diversity of colloids encountered in these contrasting streams, P is in most of the samples predominantly associated with Fe-bearing colloids (mostly Fe oxyhydroxides) at molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 1.5. The molar P:Fe ratio of the waters explains the partitioning of P between colloids and truly dissolved species. Waters with a high P:Fe ratio predominantly contain truly dissolved species because the Fe-rich colloids are saturated with P, whereas waters with a low P:Fe ratio mostly contain colloidal P species. Overall, AF4-ICP-MS is a suitable technique to characterize the diverse P-binding colloids in natural waters. Such colloids may increase the mobility or decrease the bioavailability of P, and they therefore need to be considered when addressing the transport and environmental effects of P in catchments. PMID:27140905

  1. Ladle Shroud as a Flow Control Device for Tundish Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Higa, Ken; Guthrie, R. I. L.; Isac, M.; Morales, R. D.

    2013-02-01

    The performance characteristics of a tundish, such as the flotation of inclusions and slag entrainment, are largely influenced by the fluid-flow phenomena. Physical modeling in water is widely used to understand the fluid flows in a tundish and as a tool to improve, control, and design procedures for high-quality steel processing operations. These approaches were used to study the performance of fluid flow for a new design of ladle shroud. The new design for a dissipative ladle shroud (DLS) was studied, using a one-third scale, delta shaped, four-strand tundish. The results were compared with those achieved with the conventional ladle shroud. Different cases have been analyzed, including a conventional ladle shroud (LS) with a bare tundish and a tundish furnished with an impact pad. Similarly, the new design of the shroud (DLS) was studied under equivalent conditions. The physical experiments included the use of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and conductivity tracer techniques. The PIV measured the instantaneous velocities at the outlet of the DLS and the LS at different flow rates, showing the detailed jetting characteristics of water leaving the two types of ladle shroud. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves were also obtained for the different flow arrangements previously mentioned, and the dispersion of a colored dye tracer was observed at different intervals of time during tundish operation and analyzed using the video visualization technique.

  2. Unsteady flow analysis of an axial flow hydraulic turbine with collection devices comprising a different number of blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Hirama, Sou; Kikuchi, Norio

    2015-06-01

    We previously devised a new type of portable hydraulic turbine that uses the kinetic energy of an open-channel flow to improve output power by catching and accelerating the flow. The turbine contains an axial flow runner with an appended collection device and a diffuser section that is not axisymmetric. The objective of this study is to determine how interference between the collection device and the runner influences performance characteristics of the turbine. We investigated the performance characteristics of the turbine and flow field for different numbers of blades during both unsteady and steady flow. During an unsteady flow, the maximum values of power coefficients for three and two blades increased by approximately 8.8% and 21.4%, respectively, compared to those during a steady flow. For the three-blade runner, the power coefficient showed small fluctuations, but for the two-blade runner, the power coefficient showed large fluctuations. These fluctuations in the power coefficient are attributed to fluctuations in the loading coefficient, which were generated by interference between the runner and the diffuser section of the collection device.

  3. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  4. Chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel coupled with mass spectrometry for top-down protein identification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2011-11-15

    A chip-type design asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel has been developed for high-speed separation of proteins and top-down proteomic analysis using online coupled electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The new miniaturized AF4 channel was assembled by stacking multilayer thin stainless steel (SS, 1.5 mm each) plates embedded with an SS frit in such a way that the total thickness of the channel assembly was about 6 mm. The efficiency of the miniaturized AF4 channel at different channel lengths was examined with the separation of protein standards by adjusting flow rates in which an identical effective channel flow rate or an identical void time can be maintained at different channels. Detection limit, overloading effect, reproducibility, and influence of channel membrane materials on separation efficiency were investigated. Desalting and purification of proteins achieved during the AF4 operation by the action of an exiting crossflow and the use of aqueous mass-spectrometry-compatible (MS-compatible) buffer were advantageous for online coupling of the chip-type AF4 with ESI-MS. The direct coupling of AF4 and ESI-MS capabilities was demonstrated for the high-speed separation and identification of carbonic anhydrase (29 kDa) and transferrin (78 kDa) by full scan MS and for the first top-down identification of proteins with AF4-ESI-MS-MS using collision-induced fragmentation (CID). The presence of intact dimers (156 kDa) of transferrin was confirmed by AF4-ESI-MS via size separation of the dimers from monomers, followed by multiply charged ion spectral analysis of the dimers and molecular mass determinations. It was also found from these experiments that AF4-ESI-MS analysis of transferrin exhibited an increased signal-to-noise ratio compared to that of direct ESI-MS analysis due to online purification of the protein sample and size separation of dimers with AF4. PMID:21981549

  5. Self-Contained Compressed-Flow Generation Device for Use in Making Differential Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A device used in making differential measurements of a flow includes a flow obstruction and a support arm. The flow obstruction's forward portion is a nose cone. The flow obstruction's aft portion is coupled to the nose cone. The support arm's first end is coupled to an exterior wall of a conduit, and its second end is coupled to the forward portion of the flow obstruction. The support arm positions the flow obstruction in the conduit such that a flow region is defined around its nose cone, and such that the support arm's first and second end are separated from one another with respect to a length dimension of the conduit. Measurement ports are provided in the support arm and flow obstruction. Manifolds extending through the flow obstruction and support arm couple the ports to points at the exterior wall of the conduit.

  6. The obstacle block as a device to measure turbulent skin friction in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfstrom, G. M.; Kostopoulos, C.; Peake, D. J.; Fisher, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    The obstacle block, developed as an alternative to the Preston tube for indirectly measuring skin friction on smooth surfaces in incompressible flows, is examined as a device for compressible flows as well. The block, which is congruent with a surface static pressure orifice, has a geometry which is easily specified and thus has a universal calibration. Data from two independent studies are used to establish such a calibration using 'wall' variables, valid for Mach numbers up to about 3. Various aspects concerning practical application of the device are examined, such as sensitivity to yaw and the minimum permissible axial spacing between blocks. Several examples showing the utility of the device are given.

  7. Student-Fabricated Microfluidic Devices as Flow Reactors for Organic and Inorganic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Z. Vivian; Edelman, Kate R.; Swanson, Benjamin P.

    2015-01-01

    Flow synthesis in microfluidic devices has been rapidly adapted in the pharmaceutical industry and in many research laboratories. Yet, the cost of commercial flow reactors is a major factor limiting the dissemination of this technology in the undergraduate curriculum. Here, we present a laboratory activity where students design and fabricate…

  8. A Device to Emulate Diffusion and Thermal Conductivity Using Water Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2005-01-01

    A device designed to emulate diffusion and thermal conductivity using flowing water is reviewed. Water flowing through a series of cells connected by a small tube in each partition in this plastic model is capable of emulating diffusion and thermal conductivity that occurs in variety of systems described by several mathematical equations.

  9. Dielectrophoretic Field-Flow Fractionation System for Detection of Aquatic Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Pui-ock, Sittisak; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Gascoyne, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (dFFF) was applied as a contact-free way to sense changes in the plasma membrane capacitances and conductivities of cultured human HL-60 cells in response to toxicant exposure. A micropatterned electrode imposed electric forces on cells in suspension in a parabolic flow profile as they moved through a thin chamber. Relative changes in the dFFF peak elution time, reflecting changes in cell membrane area and ion permeability, were measured as indices of response during the first 150 min of exposure to eight toxicants having different single or mixed modes of action (acrylonitrile, actinomycin D, carbon tetrachloride, endosulfan, N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU), paraquat dichloride, puromycin, and styrene oxide). The dFFF method was compared with the cell viability assay for all toxicants and with the mitochondrial potentiometric dye assay or DNA alkaline comet assay according to the mode of action of the specific agents. Except for low doses of nucleic acid-targeting agents (actinomycin D and NMU), the dFFF method detected all toxicants more sensitively than other assays, in some cases up to 105 times more sensitively than the viability approach. The results suggest the dFFF method merits additional study for possible applicability in toxicology. PMID:18788754

  10. Fractional flow reserve: physiological basis, advantages and limitations, and potential gender differences.

    PubMed

    Crystal, George J; Klein, Lloyd W

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a physiological index of the severity of a stenosis in an epicardial coronary artery, based on the pressure differential across the stenosis. Clinicians are increasingly relying on this method because it is independent of baseline flow, relatively simple, and cost effective. The accurate measurement of FFR is predicated on maximal hyperemia being achieved by pharmacological dilation of the downstream resistance vessels (arterioles). When the stenosis causes FFR to be impaired by > 20%, it is considered to be significant and to justify revascularization. A diminished hyperemic response due to microvascular dysfunction can lead to a false normal FFR value, and a misguided clinical decision. The blunted vasodilation could be the result of defects in the signaling pathways modulated (activated or inhibited) by the drug. This might involve a downregulation or reduced number of vascular receptors, endothelial impairment, or an increased activity of an opposing vasoconstricting mechanism, such as the coronary sympathetic nerves or endothelin. There are data to suggest that microvascular dysfunction is more prevalent in post-menopausal women, perhaps due to reduced estrogen levels. The current review discusses the historical background and physiological basis for FFR, its advantages and limitations, and the phenomenon of microvascular dysfunction and its impact on FFR measurements. The question of whether it is warranted to apply gender-specific guidelines in interpreting FFR measurements is addressed. PMID:25329922

  11. Fractional Flow Reserve: Physiological Basis, Advantages and Limitations, and Potential Gender Differences

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, George J.; Klein, Lloyd W.

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a physiological index of the severity of a stenosis in an epicardial coronary artery, based on the pressure differential across the stenosis. Clinicians are increasingly relying on this method because it is independent of baseline flow, relatively simple, and cost effective. The accurate measurement of FFR is predicated on maximal hyperemia being achieved by pharmacological dilation of the downstream resistance vessels (arterioles). When the stenosis causes FFR to be impaired by > 20%, it is considered to be significant and to justify revascularization. A diminished hyperemic response due to microvascular dysfunction can lead to a false normal FFR value, and a misguided clinical decision. The blunted vasodilation could be the result of defects in the signaling pathways modulated (activated or inhibited) by the drug. This might involve a downregulation or reduced number of vascular receptors, endothelial impairment, or an increased activity of an opposing vasoconstricting mechanism, such as the coronary sympathetic nerves or endothelin. There are data to suggest that microvascular dysfunction is more prevalent in post-menopausal women, perhaps due to reduced estrogen levels. The current review discusses the historical background and physiological basis for FFR, its advantages and limitations, and the phenomenon of microvascular dysfunction and its impact on FFR measurements. The question of whether it is warranted to apply gender-specific guidelines in interpreting FFR measurements is addressed. PMID:25329922

  12. Hybrid flow system for automatic dynamic fractionation and speciation of inorganic arsenic in environmental solids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlin; Miró, Manuel; Kolev, Spas D

    2015-03-01

    An integrated flow analysis system and protocol are proposed for the first time for automatic dynamic flow-through fractionation of inorganic arsenic (arsenite and arsenate) in environmental solids in combination with its real-time speciation. Four extractants (i.e., (1) 0.05 M ammonium sulfate, (2) 0.05 M ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, (3) 0.2 M ammonium oxalate, and (4) a mixture of 0.2 M ammonium oxalate and 0.1 M ascorbic acid at 96 °C) are applied sequentially to the sample to measure bioaccessible inorganic arsenic associated with (1) nonspecifically sorbed phases, (2) specifically sorbed phases, (3) amorphous plus poorly crystalline hydrous oxides of iron and aluminum, and (4) well-crystallized hydrous oxides of Fe and Al, respectively. The kinetic extraction profiles of arsenite and total inorganic arsenic are obtained for each extractant by automatic collection of a given number of its aliquots (subfractions) exposed to the solid sample. Arsenite and total inorganic arsenic in each subfraction are converted to arsine sequentially by hydride generation at pH 4.50 and in 1.14 M hydrochloric acid, respectively. Arsine is absorbed into a potassium permanganate solution, the discoloration of which is related to the concentration of the corresponding arsenic species. The proposed method is successfully validated by analyzing a soil reference material (NIST 2710a) and a sediment sample. PMID:25649028

  13. From medical imaging to computer simulation of fractional flow reserve in four coronary artery trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchionna, Simone; Fortini, Stefania; Bernaschi, Massimo; Bisson, Mauro; Kang, Nahyup; Lee, Hyong-Euk

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of a computational study of coronary trees obtained from CT acquisition at resolution of 0.35mm x 0.35mm x 0.4mm and presenting significant stenotic plaques. We analyze the cardiovascular implications of stenotic plaques for a sizeable number of patients and show that the standard clinical criterion for surgical or percutaneous intervention, based on the Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR), is well reproduced by simulations in a range of inflow conditions that can be finely controlled. The relevance of the present study is related to the reproducibility of FFR data by simulating the coronary trees at global level via high performance simulation methods together with an independent assessment based on in vitro hemodynamics. The data show that controlling the flow Reynolds number is a viable procedure to account for FFR as heart-cycle time averages and maximal hyperemia, as measured in vivo. The reproducibility of the clinical data with simulation offers a systematic approach to measuring the functional implications of stenotic plaques.

  14. Multiphase flowmeter successfully measures three-phase flow at extremely high gas-volume fractions -- Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.B.; Borling, D.C.; Powers, B.S.; Shehata, K.; Halvorsen, M.

    1998-02-01

    A multiphase flowmeter (MPFM) installed in offshore Egypt has accurately measured three-phase flow in extremely gassy flow conditions. The meter is completely nonintrusive, with no moving parts, requires no flow mixing before measurement, and has no bypass loop to remove gas before multiphase measurement. Flow regimes observed during the field test of this meter ranged from severe slugging to annular flow caused by the dynamics of gas-lift gas in the production stream. Average gas-volume fraction ranged from 93 to 98% during tests conducted on seven wells. The meter was installed in the Gulf of Suez on a well protector platform in the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co. (Gupco) October field, and was placed in series with a test separator located on a nearby production platform. Wells were individually tested with flow conditions ranging from 1,300 to 4,700 B/D fluid, 2.4 to 3.9 MMscf/D of gas, and water cuts from 1 to 52%. The meter is capable of measuring water cuts up to 100%. Production was routed through both the MPFM and the test separator simultaneously as wells flowed with the assistance of gas-lift gas. The MPFM measured gas and liquid rates to within {+-} 10% of test-separator reference measurement flow rates, and accomplished this at gas-volume fractions from 93 to 96%. At higher gas-volume fractions up to 98%, accuracy deteriorated but the meter continued to provide repeatable results.

  15. Development of a flow rate monitoring method for the wearable ventricular assist device driver.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kentaro; Homma, Akihiko; Sumikura, Hirohito; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Toshihide; Mukaibayashi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Koichi; Katano, Kazuo; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    Our research institute has been working on the development of a compact wearable drive unit for an extracorporeal ventricular assist device (VAD) with a pneumatically driven pump. A method for checking the pump blood flow on the side of the drive unit without modifying the existing blood pump and impairing the portability of it will be useful. In this study, to calculate the pump flow rate indirectly from measuring the flow rate of the driving air of the VAD air chamber, we conducted experiments using a mock circuit to investigate the correlation between the air flow rate and the pump flow rate as well as its accuracy and error factors. The pump flow rate was measured using an ultrasonic flow meter at the inflow and outflow tube, and the air flow was measured using a thermal mass flow meter at the driveline. Similarity in the instantaneous waveform was confirmed between the air flow rate in the driveline and the pump flow rate. Some limitations of this technique were indicated by consideration of the error factors. A significant correlation was found between the average pump flow rate in the ejecting direction and the average air flow rate in the ejecting direction (R2 = 0.704-0.856), and the air flow rate in the filling direction (R2 = 0.947-0.971). It was demonstrated that the average pump flow rate was estimated exactly in a wide range of drive conditions using the air flow of the filling phase. PMID:25500948

  16. Chemical speciation studies on DU contaminated soils using flow field flow fractionation linked to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FlFFF-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Brittain, S R; Cox, A G; Tomos, A D; Paterson, E; Siripinyanond, A; McLeod, C W

    2012-03-01

    Flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to study the chemical speciation of U and trace metals in depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils. A chemical extraction procedure using sodium pyrophosphate, followed by isolation of humic and fulvic substances was applied to two dissimilar DU contaminated sample types (a sandy soil and a clay-rich soil), in addition to a control soil. The sodium pyrophosphate fractions of the firing range soils (Eskmeals and Kirkcudbright) were found to contain over 50% of the total U (measured after aqua regia digestion), compared to approximately 10% for the control soil. This implies that the soils from the contaminated sites contained a large proportion of the U within more easily mobile soil fractions. Humic and fulvic acid fractions each gave characteristic peak maxima for analytes of interest (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and U), with the fulvic acid fraction eluting at a smaller diameter (approximately 2.1 nm on average) than the humic fraction (approximately 2.4 nm on average). DU in the fulvic acid fraction gave a bimodal peak, not apparent for other trace elements investigated, including natural U. This implies that DU interacts with the fulvic acid fraction in a different way to all other elements studied. PMID:22237634

  17. A study of heat and mass transfer in a fractional MHD flow over an infinite oscillating plate.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N

    2015-01-01

    Exact expressions of velocity, temperature and mass concentration have been calculated for free convective flow of fractional MHD viscous fluid over an oscillating plate. Expressions of velocity have been obtained both for sine and cosine oscillations of plate. Corresponding fractional differential equations have been solved by using Laplace transform and inverse Laplace transform. The expression of temperature and mass concentration have been presented in the form of Fox-H function and in the form of general Wright function, respectively and velocity is presented in the form of integral solutions using Generalized function. Some limiting cases of fluid and fractional parameters have been discussed to retrieve some solutions present in literature. The influence of thermal radiation, mass diffusion and fractional parameters on fluid flow has been analyzed through graphical illustrations. PMID:26543774

  18. Ionic strength effect on molecular structure of hyaluronic acid investigated by flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bitnara; Woo, Sohee; Park, Young-Soo; Hwang, Euijin; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the effect of ionic strength on the molecular structure of hyaluronic acid (HA) in an aqueous solution using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FlFFF-MALS). Sodium salts of HA (NaHA) raw materials (∼2 × 10(6) Da) dispersed in different concentrations of NaCl prepared by repeated dilution/ultrafiltration procedures were examined in order to study conformational changes in terms of the relationship between the radius of gyration and molecular weight (MW) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of NaHA in solution. This was achieved by varying the ionic strength of the carrier solution used in a frit-inlet asymmetrical FlFFF (FIAF4) channel. Experiments showed that the average MW of NaHA increased as the ionic strength of the NaHA solution decreased due to enhanced entanglement or aggregation of HA molecules. Relatively large molecules (greater than ∼5 MDa) did not show a large increase in RMS radius value as the NaCl concentration decreased. Conversely, smaller species showed larger changes, suggesting molecular expansion at lower ionic strengths. When the ionic strength of the FlFFF carrier solution was decreased, the HA species in a salt-rich solution (0.2 M NaCl) underwent rapid molecular aggregation during FlFFF separation. However, when salt-depleted HA samples (I = 4.66∼0.38 mM) were analyzed with FFF carrier solutions of a high ionic strength, the changes in both molecular structure and size were somewhat reversible, although there was a delay in correction of the molecular structure. PMID:25542570

  19. Does Coronary Stenting Following Balloon Angioplasty Improve Myocardial Fractional Flow Reserve?

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Himeno, Etsuro

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: Suboptimal distal coronary flow reserve after successful balloon angioplasty has been attributed to angiographically unrecognized inadequate lumen expansion, and adjunct coronary stenting has been shown to improve coronary flow reserve. The aim of this study was to investigate whether myocardial fractional flow reserve (FFRmyo) would increase further after coronary stenting compared with balloon angioplasty alone in the same patient group. Methods: FFRmyo and quantitative coronary angiography were obtained before and after pre-stent balloon dilation, and again after stent placement in 11 patients (7 left anterior descending artery, 3 right coronary artery and 1 left circumflex artery). FFRmyo was calculated as the ratio of Pd/Pa during intracoronary adenosine 5'-triphosphate (50 {mu}g and 20 {mu}g in the left and right coronary arteries, respectively)-induced maximum hyperemia, where Pd represents mean distal coronary pressure measured by a 2.1 Fr infusion catheter and Pa represents mean aortic pressure measured by the guiding catheter. Results: Percent diameter stenosis significantly decreased after balloon angioplasty (74% {+-} 15% vs 37% {+-} 17%, p < 0.001), and decreased further after stent placement (18% {+-} 10%, p < 0.001 vs baseline and balloon angioplasty). FFRmyo after coronary stenting (0.85 {+-} 0.09) was significantly higher than that at baseline (0.51 {+-} 0.16, p < 0.001) and after balloon angioplasty (0.77 {+-} 0.11, p < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between angiographic variables and FFRmyo. The increase in lumen dimensions after coronary stenting was followed by a further significant improvement of FFRmyo. Conclusion: These results suggest that coronary stenting may provide a more favorable functional status and lumen geometry of residual coronary stenosis compared with balloon angioplasty alone.

  20. A novel 1565 nm non-ablative fractional device for stretch marks: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Tretti Clementoni, Matteo; Lavagno, Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Striae Distensae (SD) is a very common dermatologic condition. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of a novel non-ablative fractional 1565 nm laser (ResurFX) on the appearance of SD. Materials and methods: Twelve Caucasian subjects with various stages of SD received three non-ablative laser treatments. Each treatment consisted of two different laser settings, in order to achieve a demarcated dense impact together with a diffused deep impact. Three months after the last treatment, SD improvement was assessed by blinded and non-blinded reviewers using clinical images and 3D image analyses. Results: Good clinical improvement (between 51% and 75%) was observed in all patients. Most patients showed improvement of > 50% in the volume of depressions and in lesion color (91.7% and 83.3% of patients, respectively). The average pain during treatment was generally defined as tolerable and the average downtime was 4 days. Transient erythema and severe edema were noted immediately after the procedure, but long-lasting or severe adverse effects were not observed. All patients noted a good improvement and were satisfied with the treatment and the results. Conclusions: The treatment with the 1565 nm ResurFX laser resulted in improved pigmentation, volume, and textural appearance of SD. PMID:25633176

  1. Characterizing the correlations between local phase fractions of gas-liquid two-phase flow with wire-mesh sensor.

    PubMed

    Tan, C; Liu, W L; Dong, F

    2016-06-28

    Understanding of flow patterns and their transitions is significant to uncover the flow mechanics of two-phase flow. The local phase distribution and its fluctuations contain rich information regarding the flow structures. A wire-mesh sensor (WMS) was used to study the local phase fluctuations of horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow, which was verified through comparing the reconstructed three-dimensional flow structure with photographs taken during the experiments. Each crossing point of the WMS is treated as a node, so the measurement on each node is the phase fraction in this local area. An undirected and unweighted flow pattern network was established based on connections that are formed by cross-correlating the time series of each node under different flow patterns. The structure of the flow pattern network reveals the relationship of the phase fluctuations at each node during flow pattern transition, which is then quantified by introducing the topological index of the complex network. The proposed analysis method using the WMS not only provides three-dimensional visualizations of the gas-liquid two-phase flow, but is also a thorough analysis for the structure of flow patterns and the characteristics of flow pattern transition. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185959

  2. Numerical simulation of unsteady cavitating flows using a fractional step method preserving the minimum/maximum principle for the void fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebli, R.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.; Audebert, B.

    2013-12-01

    Cavitation is one of the most demanding physical phenomena influencing the performance of hydraulic machines. It is therefore important to predict correctly its inception and development, in order to quantify the performance drop it induces, and also to characterize the resulting flow instabilities. The aim of this work is to develop an algorithm for the numerical simulation of cavitation in an industrial CFD code (Code_saturne). It is based on a fractional step method which preserves the minimum/maximum principle of the void fraction. An implicit solver, based on a transport equation of the void fraction coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations is proposed. A specific numerical treatment of the cavitation source term provides physical values of the void fraction (between 0 and 1) without including any artificial numerical limitation. The influence of RANS turbulence models on the simulation of cavitation on a 2D Venturi type geometry is then studied. It confirms the capability of the k-ε model and the k-ω SST model with the modification proposed by Reboud et al. (1998) to reproduce the main features of the unsteady sheet cavity behaviour.

  3. Osmolarity effects on red blood cell elution in sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Assidjo, N E; Chianéa, T; Clarot, I; Dreyfuss, M F; Cardot, P J

    1999-07-01

    Field-flow fractionation (FFF) is an analytical technique particularly suitable for the separation, isolation, and characterization of macromolecules and micrometer- or submicrometer-sized particles. This chromatographic-like methodology can modulate the retention of micron-sized species according to an elution mode described to date as "steric hyperlayer". In such a model, differences in sample species size, density, or other physical parameters make particle selective elution possible depending on the configuration and the operating conditions of the FFF system. Elution characteristics of micron-sized particles of biological origin, such as cells, can be modified using media and carrier phases of different osmolarities. In these media, a cells average size, density, and shape are modified. Therefore, systematic studies of a single reference cell population, red blood cells (RBCs), are performed with 2 sedimentation FFF systems using either gravity (GrFFF) or a centrifugational field (SdFFF). However, in all cases, normal erythrocyte in isotonic suspension elutes as a single peak when fractionated in these systems. With carrier phases of different osmolarities, FFF elution characteristics of RBCs are modified. Retention modifications are qualitatively consistent with the "steric-hyperlayer" model. Such systematic studies confirm the key role of size, density, and shape in the elution mode of RBCs in sedimentation FFF for living, micronsized biological species. Using polymers as an analogy, the RBC population is described as highly "polydisperse". However, this definition must be reconsidered depending on the parameters under concern, leading to a matricial concept: multipolydispersity. It is observed that multipolydispersity modifications of a given RBC population are qualitatively correlated to the eluted sample band width. PMID:10422264

  4. Optimization of carbon dioxide supply in raceway reactors: Influence of carbon dioxide molar fraction and gas flow rate.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Santos, T; Mendoza-Martín, J L; Acién Fernández, F G; Molina, E; Vieira-Costa, J A; Heaven, S

    2016-07-01

    Influence of CO2 composition and gas flow rate to control pH in a pilot-scale raceway producing Scenedesmus sp. was studied. Light and temperature determined the biomass productivity whereas neither the CO2 molar fraction nor the gas flow rate used influenced it; because pH was always controlled and carbon limitation did not take place. The CO2 molar fraction and the gas flow rate influenced carbon loss in the system. At low CO2 molar fraction (2-6%) or gas flow rate (75-100l·min(-1)) the carbon efficiency in the sump was higher than 95%, 85% of the injected carbon being transformed into biomass. Conversely, at high CO2 molar fraction (14%) or gas flow rate (150l·min(-1)) the carbon efficiency in the sump was lower than 67%, 32% of the carbon being fixed as biomass. Analysis here reported allows the pH control to be optimized and production costs to be reduced by optimizing CO2 efficiency. PMID:27085148

  5. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure affects measurement of fractional flow reserve

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Robert A.; Townsend, Jacob C.; Patel, Chetan A.; Wolf, Bethany J.; Todoran, Thomas M.; Fernandes, Valerian L.; Nielsen, Christopher D.; Steinberg, Daniel H.; Powers, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fractional flow reserve (FFR), the hyperemic ratio of distal (Pd) to proximal (Pa) coronary pressure, is used to identify the need for coronary revascularization. Changes in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) might affect measurements of FFR. Methods and Materials LVEDP was recorded simultaneously with Pd and Pa during conventional FFR measurement as well as during additional infusion of nitroprusside. The relationship between LVEDP, Pa, and FFR was assessed using linear mixed models. Results Prospectively collected data for 528 cardiac cycles from 20 coronary arteries in 17 patients were analyzed. Baseline median Pa, Pd, FFR, and LVEDP were 73 mmHg, 49 mmHg, 0.69, and 18 mmHg, respectively. FFR < 0.80 was present in 14 arteries (70%). With nitroprusside median Pa, Pd, FFR, and LVEDP were 61 mmHg, 42 mmHg, 0.68, and 12 mmHg, respectively. In a multivariable model for the entire population LVEDP was positively associated with FFR such that FFR increased by 0.008 for every 1-mmHg increase in LVEDP (beta = 0.008; P < 0.001), an association that was greater in obstructed arteries with FFR < 0.80 (beta = 0.01; P < 0.001). Pa did not directly affect FFR in the multivariable model, but an interaction between LVEDP and Pa determined that LVEDP’s effect on FFR is greater at lower Pa. Conclusions LVEDP was positively associated with FFR. The association was greater in obstructive disease (FFR < 0.80) and at lower Pa. These findings have implications for the use of FFR to guide revascularization in patients with heart failure. Summary for Annotated Table of Contents The impact of left ventricular diastolic pressure on measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) is not well described. We present a hemodynamic study of the issue, concluding that increasing left ventricular diastolic pressure can increase measurements of FFR, particularly in patients with FFR < 0.80 and lower blood pressure. PMID:23886870

  6. Flow-Field Measurement of Device-Induced Embedded Streamwise Vortex on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Allan, Brian G.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed flow-field measurements were performed downstream of a single vortex generator (VG) using an advanced Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry system. Thc passive flow-control devices examined consisted of a low-profile VG with a device height, h, approximately equal to 20 percent of the boundary-layer thickness, sigma, and a conventional VG with h is approximately sigma. Flow-field data were taken at twelve cross-flow planes downstream of the VG to document and quantify the evolution of embedded streamwise vortex. The effects of device angle of attack on vortex development downstream were compared between the low-profile VG and the conventional VG. Key parameters including vorticity, circulation, trajectory, and half-life radius - describing concentration, strength, path, and size, respectively--of the device-induced streamwise vortex were extracted from the flow-field data. The magnitude of maximum vorticity increases as angle of attack increases for the low-profile VG, but the trend is reversed for the conventional VG, probably due to flow stalling around the larger device at higher angles of attack. Peak vorticity and circulation for the low-profile VG decays exponentially and inversely proportional to the distance downstream from the device. The device-height normalized vortex trajectories for the low-profile VG, especially in the lateral direction, follow the general trends of the conventional VG. The experimental database was used to validate the predictive capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD accurately predicts the vortex circulation and path; however, improvements are needed for predicting the vorticity strength and vortex size.

  7. Nanoscale surface modifications to control capillary flow characteristics in PMMA microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhadeep; Roy, Susanta S; D'Sa, Raechelle A; Mathur, Ashish; Holmes, Richard J; McLaughlin, James A

    2011-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microfluidic devices have been fabricated using a hot embossing technique to incorporate micro-pillar features on the bottom wall of the device which when combined with either a plasma treatment or the coating of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film presents a range of surface modification profiles. Experimental results presented in detail the surface modifications in the form of distinct changes in the static water contact angle across a range from 44.3 to 81.2 when compared to pristine PMMA surfaces. Additionally, capillary flow of water (dyed to aid visualization) through the microfluidic devices was recorded and analyzed to provide comparison data between filling time of a microfluidic chamber and surface modification characteristics, including the effects of surface energy and surface roughness on the microfluidic flow. We have experimentally demonstrated that fluid flow and thus filling time for the microfluidic device was significantly faster for the device with surface modifications that resulted in a lower static contact angle, and also that the incorporation of micro-pillars into a fluidic device increases the filling time when compared to comparative devices. PMID:21711936

  8. Blood trauma testing of CentriMag and RotaFlow centrifugal flow devices: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sobieski, Michael A; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Ising, Mickey; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical circulatory assist devices that provide temporary support in heart failure patients are needed to enable recovery or provide a bridge to decision. Minimizing risk of blood damage (i.e., hemolysis) with these devices is critical, especially if the length of support needs to be extended. Hematologic responses of the RotaFlow (Maquet) and CentriMag (Thoratec) temporary support devices were characterized in an in vitro feasibility study. Paired static mock flow loops primed with fresh bovine blood (700 mL, hematocrit [Hct] = 25 ± 3%, heparin titrated for activated clotting time >300 s) pooled from a single-source donor were used to test hematologic responses to RotaFlow (n = 2) and CentriMag (n = 2) simultaneously. Pump differential pressures, temperature, and flow were maintained at 250 ± 10 mm Hg, 25 ± 2°C, and 4.2 ± 0.25 L/min, respectively. Blood samples (3 mL) were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300, and 360 min after starting pumps in accordance with recommended Food and Drug Administration and American Society for Testing and Materials guidelines. The CentriMag operated at a higher average pump speed (3425 rpm) than the RotaFlow (3000 rpm) while maintaining similar constant flow rates (4.2 L/min). Hematologic indicators of blood trauma (hemoglobin, Hct, platelet count, plasma free hemoglobin, and white blood cell) for all measured time points as well as normalized and modified indices of hemolysis were similar (RotaFlow: normalized index of hemolysis [NIH] =  0.021 ± 0.003 g/100 L, modified index of hemolysis [MIH] = 3.28 ± 0.52 mg/mg compared to CentriMag: NIH =  0.041 ± 0.010 g/100 L, MIH = 6.08 ± 1.45 mg/mg). In this feasibility study, the blood trauma performance of the RotaFlow was similar or better than the CentriMag device under clinically equivalent, worst-case test conditions. The RotaFlow device may be a more cost-effective alternative to

  9. The Influence of Device Position on the Flow within the Penn State 12 cc Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Schönberger, Markus; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B.

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices are a commonly used heart failure therapy for adult patients as bridge-to-transplant or bridge-to-recovery tool. The application of adult ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients has led to increased thrombotic events. Therefore, we have been developing a pediatric ventricular assist device, the Penn State 12 cc PVAD. It is designed for patients with a body weight of 5 to 15 kg and has a stroke volume of 12 cc. Clot formation is the major concern. It is correlated to the coagulability of blood, the blood contacting materials and the fluid dynamics within the system. The intent is for the PVAD to be a long term therapy. Therefore, the system may be oriented in different positions according to the patient’s behavior. This study evaluates for the first time the impact of position on the flow patterns within the Penn State 12 cc PVAD, which may help to improve the PVAD design concerning chamber and ports geometries. The fluid dynamics are visualized by particle image velocimetry. The evaluation is based on inlet jet behavior and calculated wall shear rates. Vertical and horizontal model orientations are compared, both with a beat rate of 75, outlet pressures of 90/60 mmHg and a flow rate of 1.3 l/min. The results show a significant change of the inlet jet behavior and the development of a rotational flow pattern. Vertically, the inlet jet is strong along the wall. It initiates a rotational flow pattern with a wandering axis of rotation. In contrast, the horizontal model orientation results show a weaker inlet jet along the wall with a nearly constant center of rotation location, which can be correlated to a higher risk of thrombotic events. In addition high speed videography illustrates differences in the diaphragm motion during diastole. Diaphragm opening trajectories measurements determine no significant impact of the density of the blood analog fluids. Hence, the results correlate to human blood. PMID:22929894

  10. Neurocognitive function in patients with ventricular assist devices: a comparison of pulsatile and continuous blood flow devices.

    PubMed

    Zimpfer, Daniel; Wieselthaler, Georg; Czerny, Martin; Fakin, Richard; Haider, Dominik; Zrunek, Philipp; Roethy, Wilfried; Schima, Heinz; Wolner, Ernst; Grimm, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The effect of successful ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation on neurocognitive function in terminal heart failure is uncertain. Additionally, the different impact of continuous versus pulsatile blood flow devices is unknown. A total of 29 patients (mean age 53 years), surviving implantation of a ventricular assist device as bridge to transplantation were prospectively followed (continuous flow: Micromed DeBakey, n = 11; pulsatile flow: Thoratec and Novacor, n = 18). Normative data were obtained in 40 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (mean age 54 years). Neurocognitive function was objectively measured by means of cognitive P300 auditory evoked potentials before operation (baseline), at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, and at the 8-week and 12-week follow-up. Before implantation of the VAD, cognitive P300 evoked potentials were impaired (prolonged) compared with age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (p < 0.001). After successful VAD implantation, P300 evoked potentials markedly improved compared with before operation (ICU discharge, p = 0.007; 8-week follow-up, p = 0.022; 12-week follow-up, p < 0.0001). Importantly, there was no difference between continuous and pulsatile VADs (before operation, p = 0.676; ICU discharge, p = 0.736; 8-week follow-up, p = 0.911 and 12-week follow-up, p = 0.397; respectively). Nevertheless, P300 peak latencies did not fully normalize at 12-week follow-up compared with healthy subjects (p = 0.012). Successful VAD implantation improves neurocognitive impairment in patients with terminal heart failure. Importantly, this effect is independent of the type of VAD (pulsatile vs. continuous blood flow). PMID:16436886

  11. Characterizing changes in levan physicochemical properties in different pH environments using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Runyon, J Ray; Nilsson, Lars; Ulmius, Matilda; Castro, Alejandra; Ionescu, Ruxandra; Andersson, Claes; Schmidt, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the stability of the polyfructan levan under different pH solution conditions by monitoring changes in the levan physicochemical properties, such as molar mass (M), root mean square radius (r(rms)), hydrodynamic radius (r(h)), structure factor (r(rms)/r(h)), and aggregation state with respect to solution pH and hydrolysis time. A commercial levan produced from Z. Mobilis was characterized using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with online multiangle light scattering (MALS) and differential refractive index (dRI) detection. Under neutral pH solution conditions the levan was found to have a M ranging from 10(5) to 5 × 10(7) g/mol, a r(rms) ranging from ~25 to 100 nm and a r(h) from ~3 to 151 nm. Two populations were observed in the sample. One population with a M less than 106 g/mol which represented ~60 % of the sample and a second population with an ultrahigh M up to 5 × 10(7) g/mol, which comprised ~40 % of the sample. The measured r(rms)/r(h) structure factor decreased from 1.8 to 0.65 across the AF4 fractogram indicating that early eluting low M levan species had a random coil configuration and late eluting high M species had more homogeneous spherical structures. The measured apparent density values decreased from 80 to 10 kg/m(3) across the elution profile and suggest that the observed second population also contains aggregates. The stability of levan in different pH conditions ranging from 1.3 to 8.5 was assessed by tracking changes in the average M and r(h), and monitoring the formation of fructose over 1 week. The onset of levan acid hydrolysis was observed to occur sooner at lower pH conditions and no hydrolysis was observed for pH 5.5 and higher. PMID:24121433

  12. Use of secondary equilibria for the separation of small solutes by field-flow fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Berthod, A.; Armstrong, D.W.; Myers, M.N.; Giddings, J.C.

    1988-10-01

    The dynamic range and selectivity of field-flow fractionation (FFF) can be increased by using secondary chemical equilibria (SCE). SCE are established by adding a macromolecular additive or aggregate, which strongly interacts with the field, to the carrier solution. In this study an oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion was used as the carrier solution in a sedimentation FFF apparatus. The microemulsion droplets (referred to as the support) interact with the field and are retained relative to the bulk water. Small solutes that partition or bind to the microemulsion droplets are also retained relative to solutes that do not interact with the support. In this way it is possible to separate somewhat polar compounds, such as ascorbic acid and sodium benzoate, which prefer bulk water, from apolar solutes, such as toluene, which prefers the support. In addition, the study of retention times in this system allows one to calculate the average microemulsion droplet radius. It appears that SCE-FFF could be a useful way to obtain important information on the physicochemical properties of a variety of colloidal supports.

  13. A theory-based approach to thermal field-flow fractionation of polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Runyon, J Ray; Williams, S Kim Ratanathanawongs

    2011-09-28

    A theory-based approach is presented for the development of thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) of polyacrylates. The use of ThFFF for polymer analysis has been limited by an incomplete understanding of the thermal diffusion which plays an important role in retention and separation. Hence, a tedious trial-and-error approach to method development has been the normal practice when analyzing new materials. In this work, thermal diffusion theories based on temperature dependent osmotic pressure gradient and polymer-solvent interaction parameters were used to estimate thermal diffusion coefficients (D(T)) and retention times (t(r)) for different polymer-solvent pairs. These calculations identified methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent that would cause significant retention of poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) and poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA). Experiments confirmed retention of these two polymers that have not been previously analyzed by ThFFF. Theoretical and experimental D(T)s and t(r)s for PBA, PMA, and polystyrene in different solvents agreed to within 20% and demonstrate the feasibility of this theory-based approach. PMID:21872869

  14. Dynamic damping of the aortic pressure trace during hyperemia: the impact on fractional flow reserve measurement.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Tim; Rolandi, M Cristina; Piek, Jan J

    2013-10-01

    We report on two cases that illustrate an important caveat in the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) in coronary arteries. To obtain accurate FFR measurements, two fundamental requirements must be fulfilled. One is to minimize microvascular resistance; the other is that there is no damping of the proximal aortic pressure trace. A problem with either of these requirements can be a source of serious error in the measurement of FFR. In each case we present here, despite a good aortic pressure trace at the start of the procedure, there is dynamic damping of the pressure trace during hyperemia, secondary to axial migration of the guiding catheter into the left main stem (LMS). In both cases, a normal aortic pressure trace (Pa) is present at baseline. After intracoronary adenosine injection, there was a fall in both mean Pa and distal coronary pressure (Pd) concomitant with damping of Pa, evidenced by loss of the dicrotic notch and ventricularization of the pressure trace. The resultant FFR value is underestimated. As hyperemia wears off, both pressure traces return to normal with good articulation of the dicrotic notch. When the procedure was repeated taking care to ensure that the guide did not move into the LMS during hyperemia, the Pa trace remained stable following intracoronary adenosine, while mean Pd decreased as before. In both cases, hemodynamically significant lesions were demonstrated that had been masked by the artifactual drop in Pa during the first attempt. PMID:24088431

  15. Continuous-flow fractionation of selenium in contaminated sediment and soil samples using rotating coiled column and microcolumn extraction.

    PubMed

    Savonina, Elena Yu; Fedotov, Petr S; Wennrich, Rainer

    2012-01-15

    Dynamic fractionation is considered to be an attractive alternative to conventional batch sequential extraction procedures for partitioning of trace metals and metalloids in environmental solid samples. This paper reports the first results on the continuous-flow dynamic fractionation of selenium using two different extraction systems, a microcolumn (MC) packed with the solid sample and a rotating coiled column (RCC) in which the particulate matter is retained under the action of centrifugal forces. The eluents (leachants) were applied in correspondence with a four-step sequential extraction scheme for selenium addressing "soluble", "adsorbed", "organically bound", and "elemental" Se fractions extractable by distilled water, phosphate buffer, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, and sodium sulphite solutions, respectively. Selenium was determined in the effluent by using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Contaminated creek sediment and dumped waste (soil) samples from the abandoned mining area were used to evaluate resemblances and discrepancies of two continuous-flow methods for Se fractionation. In general, similar trends were found for Se distribution between extractable and residual fractions. However, for the dumped waste sample which is rich in organic matter, the extraction in RCC provided more effective recovery of environmentally relevant Se forms (the first three leachable fractions). The most evident deviation was observed for "adsorbed" Se (recoveries by RCC and MC are 43 and 7 mg kg(-1), respectively). The data obtained were correlated with peculiarities of samples under investigation and operational principles of RCC and MC. PMID:22265512

  16. The distributed-order fractional diffusion-wave equation of groundwater flow: Theory and application to pumping and slug tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ninghu; Nelson, Paul N.; Connor, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    We present a distributed-order fractional diffusion-wave equation (dofDWE) to describe radial groundwater flow to or from a well, and three sets of solutions of the dofDWE for flow from a well for aquifer tests: one for pumping tests, and two for slug tests. The dofDWE is featured by two temporal orders of fractional derivatives, β1 and β2, which characterise small and large pores, respectively. By fitting the approximate solutions of the dofDWE to data from slug tests in the field, we determined the effective saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ke, transmissivity, Tf, and the order of fractional derivatives, β2 in one test and β2 and β1 in the second test. We found that the patterns of groundwater flow from a well during the slug tests at this site belong to the class of sub-diffusion with β2 < 1 and β1 < 1 using both the short-time and large-time solutions. We introduce the concept of the critical time to link Ke as a function of β2 and β1. The importance of the orders of fractional derivatives is obvious in the approximate solutions: for short time slug tests only the parameter β2 for flow in large pores is present while for long time slug tests the parameters β2 and β1 are present indicating both large and small pores are functioning.

  17. Multiple stirred-flow chamber assembly for simultaneous automatic fractionation of trace elements in fly ash samples using a multisyringe-based flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Boonjob, W.; Miro, M.; Cerda, V.

    2008-10-01

    There is a current trend in automation of leaching tests for trace elements in solid matrixes by use of flow injection based column approaches. However, as a result of the downscaled dimensions of the analytical manifold and execution of a single extraction at a time, miniaturized flow-through column approaches have merely found applications for periodic investigations of trace element mobility in highly homogeneous environmental solids. A novel flow-based configuration capitalized on stirred-flow cell extraction is proposed in this work for simultaneous fractionation of trace elements in three solid wastes with no limitation of sample amount up to 1.0 g. A two-step sequential extraction scheme involving water and acetic acid (or acetic acid/acetate buffer) is utilized for accurate assessment of readily mobilizable fractions of trace elements in fly ash samples. The W automated extraction system features high tolerance to flow rates ({<=} 6 mL min{sup -1}) and, as opposed to operationally defined batchwise methods, the solid to liquid ratio is not a critical parameter for, determination of overall readily leachable trace elements provided that exhaustive extraction is ensured. Analytical performance of the dynamic extractor is evaluated for fractionation analysis of a real coal fly ash and BCR-176R fly ash certified reference material. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level between summation of leached concentrations in each fraction plus residue and concentration values of BCR-176R, thus revealing the accuracy of the automated method. Overall extractable pools of trace metals in three samples are separated in less than 115 min, even for highly contaminated ashes, versus 18-24 h per fraction in equilibrium leaching tests. The multiple stirred-flow cell assembly is thus suitable for routine risk assessment studies of industrial solid byproduct.

  18. Integrated elastomeric components for autonomous regulation of sequential and oscillatory flow switching in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Tung, Yi-Chung; Torisawa, Yu-Suke; Bersano-Begey, Tommaso; Tavana, Hossein; Takayama, Shuichi

    2010-06-01

    A critical need for enhancing the usability and capabilities of microfluidic technologies is the development of standardized, scalable and versatile control systems. Electronically controlled valves and pumps typically used for dynamic flow regulation, although useful, can limit convenience, scalability and robustness. This shortcoming has motivated the development of device-embedded non-electrical flow-control systems. Existing approaches to regulate operation timing on-chip, however, still require external signals such as timed generation of fluid flow, bubbles, liquid plugs or droplets or an alteration of chemical compositions or temperature. Here, we describe a strategy to provide device-embedded flow switching and clocking functions. Physical gaps and cavities interconnected by holes are fabricated into a three-layer elastomer structure to form networks of fluidic gates that can spontaneously generate cascading and oscillatory flow output using only a constant flow of Newtonian fluids as the device input. The resulting microfluidic substrate architecture is simple, scalable and should be applicable to various materials. This flow-powered fluidic gating scheme brings the autonomous signal processing ability of microelectronic circuits to microfluidics where there is the added diversity in current information of having distinct chemical or particulate species and richness in current operation of having chemical reactions and physical interactions.

  19. Flow valve” microfluidic devices for simple, detectorless and label-free analyte quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Debolina; Mansfield, Danielle S.; Anderson, Neil G.; Subedi, Sudeep; Woolley, Adam T.

    2012-01-01

    Simplified analysis systems that offer the performance of benchtop instruments but the convenience of portability are highly desirable. We have developed novel, miniature devices that feature visual inspection readout of a target’s concentration from a ~1 μL volume of solution introduced into a microfluidic channel. Microchannels are constructed within an elastomeric material, and channel surfaces are coated with receptors to the target. When a solution is flowed into the channel, the target crosslinks multiple receptors on the surface, resulting in constriction of the first few millimeters of the channel and stopping of flow. Quantitation is performed by measuring the distance traveled by the target solution in the channel before flow stops. A key advantage of our approach is that quantitation is accomplished by simple visual inspection of the channel, without the need for complex detection instrumentation. We have tested these devices using the model system of biotin as a receptor and streptavidin as the target. We have also characterized three factors that influence flow distance: solution viscosity, device thickness, and channel height. We found that solution capillary flow distance scales with the negative logarithm of target concentration and have detected streptavidin concentrations as low as 1 ng/mL. Finally, we have identified and evaluated a plausible mechanism wherein time-dependent channel constriction in the first few millimeters leads to concentration-dependent flow distances. Their simplicity coupled with performance makes these “flow valve” systems especially attractive for a host of analysis applications. PMID:22881075

  20. Comprehensive design and process flow configuration for micro and nano tech devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Kai; Schmidt, Thilo; Mielke, Matthias; Ortloff, Dirk; Popp, Jens; Brück, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    The development of micro and nano tech devices based on semiconductor manufacturing processes comprises the structural design as well as the definition of the manufacturing process flow. The approach is characterized by application specific fabrication flows, i.e. fabrication processes (built up by a large variety of process steps and materials) depending on the later product. Technology constraints have a great impact on the device design and vice-versa. In this paper we introduce a comprehensive methodology and based on that an environment for customer-oriented product engineering of MEMS products. The development is currently carried out in an international multi-site research project.

  1. Bubble Formation in Yield Stress Fluids Using Flow-Focusing and T -Junction Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborie, Benoit; Rouyer, Florence; Angelescu, Dan E.; Lorenceau, Elise

    2015-05-01

    We study the production of bubbles inside yield stress fluids (YSFs) in axisymmetric T -junction and flow-focusing devices. Taking advantage of yield stress over capillary stress, we exhibit a robust break-up mechanism reminiscent of the geometrical operating regime in 2D flow-focusing devices for Newtonian fluids. We report that when the gas is pressure driven, the dynamics is unsteady due to hydrodynamic feedback and YSF deposition on the walls of the channels. However, the present study also identifies pathways for potential steady-state production of bubbly YSFs at large scale.

  2. Measurement and control of pressure driven flows in microfluidic devices using an optofluidic flow sensor

    PubMed Central

    Cheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Shahraki, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Jalal; Moghaddam, Mohammadreza Salehi; Latifi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Measurement and control of pressure-driven flow (PDF) has a great potential to enhance the performance of chemical and biological experiments in Lab on a Chip technology. In this paper, we present an optofluidic flow sensor for real-time measurement and control of PDF. The optofluidic flow sensor consists of an on-chip micro Venturi and two optical Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometers. Flow rate was measured from the fringe shift of FP interferometers resulted from movement fluid in the on-chip micro Venturi. The experimental results show that the optofluidic flow sensor has a minimum detectable flow change of 5 nl/min that is suitable for real time monitoring and control of fluids in many chemical and biological experiments. A Finite Element Method is used to solve the three dimensional (3D) Navier–Stokes and continuity equations to validate the experimental results. PMID:25584118

  3. A microfluidic device for uniform-sized cell spheroids formation, culture, harvesting and flow cytometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Chen, Ying-Hua; Peng, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Culture of cells as three-dimensional (3D) aggregates, named spheroids, possesses great potential to improve in vitro cell models for basic biomedical research. However, such cell spheroid models are often complicated, cumbersome, and expensive compared to conventional Petri-dish cell cultures. In this work, we developed a simple microfluidic device for cell spheroid formation, culture, and harvesting. Using this device, cells could form uniformly sized spheroids due to strong cell-cell interactions and the spatial confinement of microfluidic culture chambers. We demonstrated cell spheroid formation and culture in the designed devices using embryonic stem cells, carcinoma cells, and fibroblasts. We further scaled up the device capable of simultaneously forming and culturing 5000 spheroids in a single chip. Finally, we demonstrated harvesting of the cultured spheroids from the device with a simple setup. The harvested spheroids possess great integrity, and the cells can be exploited for further flow cytometry assays due to the ample cell numbers. PMID:24396525

  4. Separating Beads and Cells in Multi-channel Microfluidic Devices Using Dielectrophoresis and Laminar Flow

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Larry J.; Park, Kidong; Watkins, Nicholas N.; Hsia, K. Jimmy; Bashir, Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have advanced cell studies by providing a dynamic fluidic environment on the scale of the cell for studying, manipulating, sorting and counting cells. However, manipulating the cell within the fluidic domain remains a challenge and requires complicated fabrication protocols for forming valves and electrodes, or demands specialty equipment like optical tweezers. Here, we demonstrate that conventional printed circuit boards (PCB) can be used for the non-contact manipulation of cells by employing dielectrophoresis (DEP) for bead and cell manipulation in laminar flow fields for bioactuation, and for cell and bead separation in multichannel microfluidic devices. First, we present the protocol for assembling the DEP electrodes and microfluidic devices, and preparing the cells for DEP. Then, we characterize the DEP operation with polystyrene beads. Lastly, we show representative results of bead and cell separation in a multichannel microfluidic device. In summary, DEP is an effective method for manipulating particles (beads or cells) within microfluidic devices. PMID:21339720

  5. Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for complex plasma experiments with flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2015-11-01

    A versatile table-top dusty plasma experimental device to study flow induced excitations of linear and nonlinear waves/structures in a complex plasma is presented. In this Π-shaped apparatus, a DC glow discharge plasma is produced between a disc shaped anode and a grounded long cathode tray by applying a high voltage DC in the background of a neutral gas (argon) and subsequently a dusty plasma is created by introducing micron sized dust particles that get charged and levitated in the sheath region. A flow of the dust particles is induced in a controlled manner by adjusting the pumping speed and the gas flow rate into the device. A full characterisation of the plasma, using Langmuir and emissive probe data, and that of the dusty plasma using particle tracking data with the help of an idl based (super) Particle Identification and Tracking (sPIT) code is reported. Experimental results on the variation of the dust flow velocity as a function of the neutral pressure and the gas flow rate are given. The neutral drag force acting on the particles and the Epstein coefficient are estimated from the initial acceleration of the particles. The potential experimental capabilities of the device for conducting fundamental studies of flow induced instabilities are discussed.

  6. Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for complex plasma experiments with flow.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, S; Bandyopadhyay, P; Sen, A

    2015-11-01

    A versatile table-top dusty plasma experimental device to study flow induced excitations of linear and nonlinear waves/structures in a complex plasma is presented. In this Π-shaped apparatus, a DC glow discharge plasma is produced between a disc shaped anode and a grounded long cathode tray by applying a high voltage DC in the background of a neutral gas (argon) and subsequently a dusty plasma is created by introducing micron sized dust particles that get charged and levitated in the sheath region. A flow of the dust particles is induced in a controlled manner by adjusting the pumping speed and the gas flow rate into the device. A full characterisation of the plasma, using Langmuir and emissive probe data, and that of the dusty plasma using particle tracking data with the help of an idl based (super) Particle Identification and Tracking (sPIT) code is reported. Experimental results on the variation of the dust flow velocity as a function of the neutral pressure and the gas flow rate are given. The neutral drag force acting on the particles and the Epstein coefficient are estimated from the initial acceleration of the particles. The potential experimental capabilities of the device for conducting fundamental studies of flow induced instabilities are discussed. PMID:26628131

  7. Simplified Models of Non-Invasive Fractional Flow Reserve Based on CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-Mei; Zhong, Liang; Luo, Tong; Lomarda, Aileen Mae; Huo, Yunlong; Yap, Jonathan; Lim, Soo Teik; Tan, Ru San; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Tan, Jack Wei Chieh; Yeo, Khung Keong; Fam, Jiang Ming; Keng, Felix Yung Jih; Wan, Min; Su, Boyang; Zhao, Xiaodan; Allen, John Carson; Kassab, Ghassan S.; Chua, Terrance Siang Jin; Tan, Swee Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) is the gold standard to assess the functional coronary stenosis. The non-invasive assessment of diameter stenosis (DS) using coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) has high false positive rate in contrast to FFR. Combining CTA with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), recent studies have shown promising predictions of FFRCT for superior assessment of lesion severity over CTA alone. The CFD models tend to be computationally expensive, however, and require several hours for completing analysis. Here, we introduce simplified models to predict noninvasive FFR at substantially less computational time. In this retrospective pilot study, 21 patients received coronary CTA. Subsequently a total of 32 vessels underwent invasive FFR measurement. For each vessel, FFR based on steady-state and analytical models (FFRSS and FFRAM, respectively) were calculated non-invasively based on CTA and compared with FFR. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 90.6% (87.5%), 80.0% (80.0%), 95.5% (90.9%), 88.9% (80.0%) and 91.3% (90.9%) respectively for FFRSS (and FFRAM) on a per-vessel basis, and were 75.0%, 50.0%, 86.4%, 62.5% and 79.2% respectively for DS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.963, 0.954 and 0.741 for FFRSS, FFRAM and DS respectively, on a per-patient level. The results suggest that the CTA-derived FFRSS performed well in contrast to invasive FFR and they had better diagnostic performance than DS from CTA in the identification of functionally significant lesions. In contrast to FFRCT, FFRSS requires much less computational time. PMID:27187726

  8. A machine-learning approach for computation of fractional flow reserve from coronary computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Rapaka, Saikiran; Passerini, Tiziano; Georgescu, Bogdan; Schwemmer, Chris; Schoebinger, Max; Flohr, Thomas; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-07-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a functional index quantifying the severity of coronary artery lesions and is clinically obtained using an invasive, catheter-based measurement. Recently, physics-based models have shown great promise in being able to noninvasively estimate FFR from patient-specific anatomical information, e.g., obtained from computed tomography scans of the heart and the coronary arteries. However, these models have high computational demand, limiting their clinical adoption. In this paper, we present a machine-learning-based model for predicting FFR as an alternative to physics-based approaches. The model is trained on a large database of synthetically generated coronary anatomies, where the target values are computed using the physics-based model. The trained model predicts FFR at each point along the centerline of the coronary tree, and its performance was assessed by comparing the predictions against physics-based computations and against invasively measured FFR for 87 patients and 125 lesions in total. Correlation between machine-learning and physics-based predictions was excellent (0.9994, P < 0.001), and no systematic bias was found in Bland-Altman analysis: mean difference was -0.00081 ± 0.0039. Invasive FFR ≤ 0.80 was found in 38 lesions out of 125 and was predicted by the machine-learning algorithm with a sensitivity of 81.6%, a specificity of 83.9%, and an accuracy of 83.2%. The correlation was 0.729 (P < 0.001). Compared with the physics-based computation, average execution time was reduced by more than 80 times, leading to near real-time assessment of FFR. Average execution time went down from 196.3 ± 78.5 s for the CFD model to ∼2.4 ± 0.44 s for the machine-learning model on a workstation with 3.4-GHz Intel i7 8-core processor. PMID:27079692

  9. Efficacy of coronary fractional flow reserve using contrast medium compared to adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Tanboğa, Ibrahim Halil; Aksakal, Enbiya; Aksu, Uğur; Gulcu, Oktay; Birdal, Oğuzhan; Arısoy, Arif; Kalaycı, Arzu; Ulusoy, Fatih Rifat; Sevimli, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Coronary fractional flow reserve (FFR) is recommended as the gold standard method in evaluating intermediate coronary stenoses. However, there are significant debates concerning the agents and the timing of the measurement. Aim To compare the contrast medium induced Pd/Pa ratio (CMR) with the FFR. Material and methods We enrolled 28 consecutive patients with 34 intermediate lesions who underwent coronary FFR measurement by intracoronary (i.c.) adenosine. After baseline Pd/Pa was calculated, a single contrast medium (Iomeron) injection of 6 ml (3 ml/s) was performed manually. Within 10 s after the contrast medium injection, the CMR was calculated. Bolus injection of i.c. adenosine was performed to induce maximal hyperemia (from 60 µg to 600 µg), and when it was ≤ 0.80, the intermediate lesion was considered as significant. Results After bolus i.c. adenosine, 12 lesions of 34 (35.3%) were identified as significant. The CMR value was 0.86 ±0.06 (range: 0.71–0.97). There were no significant differences between FFR and CMR values (p = 0.108). A substantial positive correlation between adenosine and contrast values was detected (0.886 and p < 0.001). Good agreement in Bland-Altman analysis was revealed (mean bias was 0.027, 95% confidence interval 0.038–0.092). Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed 90.9% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity for a cut-off value of 0.85 for the CMR compared to FFR (≤ 0.80). Conclusions Our study showed that measuring the CMR is a feasible method compared to FFR. The CMR may be used in situations where adenosine cannot be administered. PMID:27625683

  10. LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSSYNCHRONY IN PATIENTS WITH MODERATE CORONARY STENOSIS AND BORDER LINE FRACTIONAL FLOW RESERVE

    PubMed Central

    SHIBATA, YOHEI; SONE, TAKAHITO; TSUBOI, HIDEYUKI; ISOBE, SATOSHI; ISHII, HIDEKI; SUZUKI, SUSUMU; HAYASHI, MUTSUHARU; MUROHARA, TOYOAKI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cutoff values of fractional flow reserve (FFR) to detect physiological myocardial ischemia are still controversial. Some studies have reported that left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony occurs in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate LV dyssynchrony in patients with moderate coronary stenosis and borderline FFR, using stress electrocardiographically-gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The study population comprised 10 patients with moderate (50–75% diameter) stenosis and an FFR in the range 0.75–0.90, who were compared to 10 control subjects. All underwent stress myocardial 99mTc-sestamibi (MIBI) or tetrofosmin SPECT imaging. The regional time to end systole (TES), time to peak ejection (TPE), and time to peak filling (TPF) were obtained as indexes of perfusion and function, using gated SPECT (pFAST) in combination with Cardio Gated SPECT Regional Assessment for LV Function (cardioGRAF). The dyssynchrony index (DI) was also calculated. The DI of post-stress TES was significantly greater than that of rest in patients with moderate CAD (4.8 ± 2.8 vs. 2.7 ± 1.5, P = 0.01), but there were no significant differences in the control subjects (3.0 ± 1.7 vs. 2.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.99). There were no significant differences in TPE and TPF between the groups. In conclusion, LV dyssynchrony may occur after stress in patients with coronary stenosis and borderline FFR, even without a significant reduction in perfusion. PMID:25797980

  11. Fractional Flow Reserve and Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography: A Review and Critical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Harvey S; Narula, Jagat; Fearon, William F

    2016-07-01

    Invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) is now the gold standard for intervention. Noninvasive functional imaging analyses derived from coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) offer alternatives for evaluating lesion-specific ischemia. CT-FFR, CT myocardial perfusion imaging, and transluminal attenuation gradient/corrected contrast opacification have been studied using invasive FFR as the gold standard. CT-FFR has demonstrated significant improvement in specificity and positive predictive value compared with CTA alone for predicting FFR of ≤0.80, as well as decreasing the frequency of nonobstructive invasive coronary angiography. High-risk plaque characteristics have also been strongly implicated in abnormal FFR. Myocardial computed tomographic perfusion is an alternative method with promising results; it involves more radiation and contrast. Transluminal attenuation gradient/corrected contrast opacification is more controversial and may be more related to vessel diameter than stenosis. Important considerations remain: (1) improvement of CTA quality to decrease unevaluable studies, (2) is the diagnostic accuracy of CT-FFR sufficient? (3) can CT-FFR guide intervention without invasive FFR confirmation? (4) what are the long-term outcomes of CT-FFR-guided treatment and how do they compare with other functional imaging-guided paradigms? (5) what degree of stenosis on CTA warrants CT-FFR? (6) how should high-risk plaque be incorporated into treatment decisions? (7) how will CT-FFR influence other functional imaging test utilization, and what will be the effect on the practice of cardiology? (8) will a workstation-based CT-FFR be mandatory? Rapid progress to date suggests that CTA-based lesion-specific ischemia will be the gatekeeper to the cardiac catheterization laboratory and will transform the world of intervention. PMID:27390333

  12. Left ventricular dyssynchrony in patients with moderate coronary stenosis and border line fractional flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yohei; Sone, Takahito; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Isobe, Satoshi; Ishii, Hideki; Suzuki, Susumu; Hayashi, Mutsuharu; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-02-01

    The cutoff values of fractional flow reserve (FFR) to detect physiological myocardial ischemia are still controversial. Some studies have reported that left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony occurs in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate LV dyssynchrony in patients with moderate coronary stenosis and borderline FFR, using stress electrocardiographically-gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The study population comprised 10 patients with moderate (50-75% diameter) stenosis and an FFR in the range 0.75-0.90, who were compared to 10 control subjects. All underwent stress myocardial (99m)Tc-sestamibi (MIBI) or tetrofosmin SPECT imaging. The regional time to end systole (TES), time to peak ejection (TPE), and time to peak filling (TPF) were obtained as indexes of perfusion and function, using gated SPECT (pFAST) in combination with Cardio Gated SPECT Regional Assessment for LV Function (cardioGRAF). The dyssynchrony index (DI) was also calculated. The DI of post-stress TES was significantly greater than that of rest in patients with moderate CAD (4.8 ± 2.8 vs. 2.7 ± 1.5, P = 0.01), but there were no significant differences in the control subjects (3.0 ± 1.7 vs. 2.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.99). There were no significant differences in TPE and TPF between the groups. In conclusion, LV dyssynchrony may occur after stress in patients with coronary stenosis and borderline FFR, even without a significant reduction in perfusion. PMID:25797980

  13. Three-dimensional modeling and numerical analysis of fractional flow reserve in human coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Neng; Lv, Hui-Jie; Xiang, Ya-Fei; Fan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) computed from CT (FFRCT) is a novel method for determining the physiologic significance of coronary artery disease (CAD). Several clinical trials have been conducted, but its diagnostic performance varied among different trials. Aim To determine the cut-off value of FFRCT and its correlation with the gold standard used to diagnose CAD in clinical practice. Material and methods Forty patients with single vessel disease were included in our study. Computed tomography scan and coronary angiography with FFR were conducted for these patients. Three-dimensional geometric reconstruction and numerical analysis based on the computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) of coronary arteries were applied to obtain the values of FFRCT. The correlation between FFRCT and the gold standard used in clinical practice was tested. Results For FFRCT, the best cut-off value was 0.76, with the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values of 84.6%, 92.9%, 88% and 73.3%, respectively. The area under the receiver-operator characteristics curve was 0.945 (p < 0.0001). There was a good correlation of FFRCT values with FFR values (r = 0.94, p < 0.0001), with a slight overestimation of FFRCT as compared with measured FFR (mean difference 0.01 ±0.11, p < 0.05). For inter-observer agreement, the mean κ value was 0.69 (0.61 to 0.78) and for intra-observer agreement the mean κ value was 0.61 (0.50 to 0.72). Conclusions FFRCT derived from CT of the coronary artery is a reliable non-invasive way providing reliable functional information of coronary artery stenosis. PMID:26966446

  14. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids: Structural Analysis by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation/Multiangle Laser Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim; Hens, Bart; Augustijns, Patrick; Brandl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about colloidal assemblies present in human intestinal fluids (HIFs), such as bile salt micelles and phospholipid vesicles, is regarded of importance for a better understanding of the in vivo dissolution and absorption behavior of poorly soluble drugs (Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II/IV drugs) because of their drug-solubilizing ability. The characterization of these potential drug-solubilizing compartments is a prerequisite for further studies of the mechanistic interplays between drug molecules and colloidal structures within HIFs. The aim of the present study was to apply asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with multiangle laser light scattering in an attempt to reveal coexistence of colloidal particles in both artificial and aspirated HIFs and to determine their sizes. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle laser light scattering analysis of the colloidal phase of intestinal fluids allowed for a detailed insight into the whole spectrum of submicron- to micrometer-sized particles. With respect to the simulated intestinal fluids mimicking fasted and fed state (FaSSIF-V1 and FeSSIF-V1, respectively), FaSSIF contained one distinct size fraction of colloidal assemblies, whereas FeSSIF contained 2 fractions of colloidal species with significantly different sizes. These size fractions likely represent (1) mixed taurocholate-phospholipid-micelles, as indicated by a size range up to 70 nm (in diameter) and a strong UV absorption and (2) small phospholipid vesicles of 90-210 nm diameter. In contrast, within the colloidal phase of the fasted state aspirate of a human volunteer, 4 different size fractions were separated from each other in a consistent and reproducible manner. The 2 fractions containing large particles showed mean sizes of approximately 50 and 200 nm, respectively (intensity-weighted mean diameter, Dz), likely representing mixed cholate/phospholipid micelles and phospholipid vesicles

  15. Evaluation of EIT systems and algorithms for handling full void fraction range in two-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jiabin; Wang, Mi; Faraj, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    In the aqueous-based two-phase flow, if the void fraction of dispersed phase exceeds 0.25, conventional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) produces a considerable error due to the linear approximation of the sensitivity back-projection (SBP) method, which limits the EIT’s wider application in the process industry. In this paper, an EIT sensing system which is able to handle full void fraction range in two-phase flow is reported. This EIT system employs a voltage source, conducts true mutual impedance measurement and reconstructs an online image with the modified sensitivity back-projection (MSBP) algorithm. The capability of the Maxwell relationship to convey full void fraction is investigated. The limitation of the linear sensitivity back-projection method is analysed. The MSBP algorithm is used to derive relative conductivity change in the evaluation. A series of static and dynamic experiments demonstrating the mean void fraction obtained using this EIT system has a good agreement with reference void fractions over the range from 0 to 1. The combination of the new EIT system and MSBP algorithm would significantly extend the applications of EIT in industrial process measurement.

  16. Polysaccharide characterization by hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with on-line multi-angle static light scattering and differential refractometry.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Striegel, André M

    2015-02-01

    Accurate characterization of the molar mass and size of polysaccharides is an ongoing challenge, oftentimes due to architectural diversity but also to the broad molar mass (M) range over which a single polysaccharide can exist and to the ultra-high M of many polysaccharides. Because of the latter, many of these biomacromolecules experience on-column, flow-induced degradation during analysis by size-exclusion and, even, hydrodynamic chromatography (SEC and HDC, respectively). The necessity for gentler fractionation methods has, to date, been addressed employing asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Here, we introduce the coupling of hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) to multi-angle static light scattering (MALS) and differential refractometry (DRI) detection for the analysis of polysaccharides. In HF5, less stresses are placed on the macromolecules during separation than in SEC or HDC, and HF5 can offer a higher sensitivity, with less propensity for system overloading and analyte aggregation, than generally found in AF4. The coupling to MALS and DRI affords the determination of absolute, calibration-curve-independent molar mass averages and dispersities. Results from the present HF5/MALS/DRI experiments with dextrans, pullulans, and larch arabinogalactan were augmented with hydrodynamic radius (RH) measurements from off-line quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and by RH distribution calculations and fractogram simulations obtained via a finite element analysis implementation of field-flow fractionation theory by commercially available software. As part of this study, we have investigated analyte recovery in HF5 and also possible reasons for discrepancies between calculated and simulated results vis-à-vis experimentally determined data. PMID:25578045

  17. Initial experience with implantation of novel dual layer flow-diverter device FRED

    PubMed Central

    Sagan, Leszek; Safranow, Krzysztof; Rać, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Flow-diverting stents can help treat complex and wide-necked cerebral aneurysms. The aim of the study was to evaluate initial experiences related to the safety and effectiveness of eight aneurysms treated with a new dual layer coverage designed flow-diverter device. In 2012 Fred flow-diverter devices were used to treat 8 unruptured wide neck (dome-neck ratio ≤ 1.5) and sidewall aneurysms in 6 patients. All aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation on the internal carotid artery (ICA). In 4 larger aneurysms (> 10 mm) one 3D coil in association with Fred was used to reduce potential incidence of postoperative subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Dual antiplatelet therapy was administered before the procedure and continued for 3 months after it. Clinical parameters, aneurysm features and 3-month follow-up angiograms are presented. All 6 patients with 8 aneurysms were successfully stented with the Fred flow-diverter device and were discharged in generally good condition on dual-antiplatelet therapy. No complications were related to the procedure. In 5 cases digital subtraction angiography (DSA) control examination was performed after 3 months, showing complete occlusion of the aneurysms with patency of the parent artery. In 1 case thrombosis of the Fred occurred but without any clinical consequences because of cross-flow from the other side. Use of the Fred flow-diverter device was efficacious in all 8 treated cerebral aneurysms. The system seems to be promising as a flow diverter with certain characteristics, which allow for easy delivery and implantation. Further clinical evaluation with a larger group of patients is needed. PMID:24130644

  18. Initial experience with implantation of novel dual layer flow-diverter device FRED.

    PubMed

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Sagan, Leszek; Safranow, Krzysztof; Rać, Monika

    2013-09-01

    Flow-diverting stents can help treat complex and wide-necked cerebral aneurysms. The aim of the study was to evaluate initial experiences related to the safety and effectiveness of eight aneurysms treated with a new dual layer coverage designed flow-diverter device. In 2012 Fred flow-diverter devices were used to treat 8 unruptured wide neck (dome-neck ratio ≤ 1.5) and sidewall aneurysms in 6 patients. All aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation on the internal carotid artery (ICA). In 4 larger aneurysms (> 10 mm) one 3D coil in association with Fred was used to reduce potential incidence of postoperative subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Dual antiplatelet therapy was administered before the procedure and continued for 3 months after it. Clinical parameters, aneurysm features and 3-month follow-up angiograms are presented. All 6 patients with 8 aneurysms were successfully stented with the Fred flow-diverter device and were discharged in generally good condition on dual-antiplatelet therapy. No complications were related to the procedure. In 5 cases digital subtraction angiography (DSA) control examination was performed after 3 months, showing complete occlusion of the aneurysms with patency of the parent artery. In 1 case thrombosis of the Fred occurred but without any clinical consequences because of cross-flow from the other side. Use of the Fred flow-diverter device was efficacious in all 8 treated cerebral aneurysms. The system seems to be promising as a flow diverter with certain characteristics, which allow for easy delivery and implantation. Further clinical evaluation with a larger group of patients is needed. PMID:24130644

  19. 3D-printed devices for continuous-flow organic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Rosnes, Mali H; Kitson, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present a study in which the versatility of 3D-printing is combined with the processing advantages of flow chemistry for the synthesis of organic compounds. Robust and inexpensive 3D-printed reactionware devices are easily connected using standard fittings resulting in complex, custom-made flow systems, including multiple reactors in a series with in-line, real-time analysis using an ATR-IR flow cell. As a proof of concept, we utilized two types of organic reactions, imine syntheses and imine reductions, to show how different reactor configurations and substrates give different products. PMID:23766811

  20. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOEpatents

    Apley, Walter J.; Cliff, William C.; Creer, James M.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  1. The performance characteristics of lateral flow devices with 2 strains of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lateral flow devices (LFD) are commercially available and provide a fast, highly specific, on-site test for avian influenza. Because of the low analytic sensitivity of LFD tests at low virus concentrations, targeted sampling of sick and dead birds has been proposed in order to increase detection pr...

  2. Experimental Research on the Performance of Exhaust Steam Reclaim Device With a Swirling Flow Vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. L.; Yan, J. J.; Zhang, P. F.; Yang, J. J.; Liu, J. P.

    2010-03-01

    This paper experimentally studied the performance of exhaust steam reclaim device with a swirling flow vane at different inlet water pressures, temperatures, different inlet steam pressures and different distances between the throat and spout. The results indicated that the injection coefficient decreased as the inlet water pressure and temperature increased, respectively. There is a best distance between the throat and spout which makes the injection coefficient reached to its maximal value at the same experimental pressure and temperature, and the value equals to 130 mm in our experimental system. The resistance coefficient has a minimum value which makes the device have the highest outlet water pressure. Compared with the device without a swirling flow vane, it improves the heating performance for higher injection coefficient and exergy efficiency.

  3. Cell stimulus and lysis in a microfluidic device with segmented gas-liquid flow.

    PubMed

    El-Ali, Jamil; Gaudet, Suzanne; Günther, Axel; Sorger, Peter K; Jensen, Klavs F

    2005-06-01

    We describe a microfluidic device with rapid stimulus and lysis of mammalian cells for resolving fast transient responses in cell signaling networks. The device uses segmented gas-liquid flow to enhance mixing and has integrated thermoelectric heaters and coolers to control the temperature during cell stimulus and lysis. Potential negative effects of segmented flow on cell responses are investigated in three different cell types, with no morphological changes and no activation of the cell stress-sensitive mitogen activated protein kinases observed. Jurkat E6-1 cells are stimulated in the device using alpha-CD3, and the resulting activations of ERK and JNK are presented for different time points. Stimulation of cells performed on chip results in pathway activation identical to that of conventionally treated cells under the same conditions. PMID:15924398

  4. Double Emulsion Generation Using a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Co-axial Flow Focus Device.

    PubMed

    Cole, Russell H; Tran, Tuan M; Abate, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Double emulsions are useful in a number of biological and industrial applications in which it is important to have an aqueous carrier fluid. This paper presents a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device capable of generating water/oil/water double emulsions using a coaxial flow focusing geometry that can be fabricated entirely using soft lithography. Similar to emulsion devices using glass capillaries, double emulsions can be formed in channels with uniform wettability and with dimensions much smaller than the channel sizes. Three dimensional flow focusing geometry is achieved by casting a pair of PDMS slabs using two layer soft lithography, then mating the slabs together in a clamshell configuration. Complementary locking features molded into the PDMS slabs enable the accurate registration of features on each of the slab surfaces. Device testing demonstrates formation of double emulsions from 14 µm to 50 µm in diameter while using large channels that are robust against fouling and clogging. PMID:26780079

  5. A simple and highly stable free-flow electrophoresis device with thermoelectric cooling system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Guo, Cheng-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Shen, Qiao-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Zhang; Li, Jun; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Jin, Xin-Qiao

    2013-12-20

    Complex assembly, inconvenient operations, poor control of Joule heating and leakage of solution are still fundamental issues greatly hindering application of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) for preparative purpose in bio-separation. To address these issues, a novel FFE device was developed based on our previous work. Firstly, a new mechanical structure was designed for compact assembly of separation chamber, fast removal of air bubble, and good anti-leakage performance. Secondly, a highly efficient thermoelectric cooling system was used for dispersing Joule heating for the first time. The systemic experiments revealed the three merits: (i) 3min assembly without any liquid leakage, 80 times faster than pervious FFE device designed by us or commercial device (4h); (ii) 5s removing of air bubble in chamber, 1000-fold faster than a normal one (2h or more) and (iii) good control of Joule heating by the cooling system. These merits endowed the device high stable thermo- and hydro-dynamic flow for long-term separation even under high electric field of 63V/cm. Finally, the developed device was used for up to 8h continuous separation of 5mg/mL fuchsin acid and purification of three model proteins of phycocyanin, myoglobin and cytochrome C, demonstrating the applicability of FFE. The developed FFE device has evident significance to the studies on stem cell, cell or organelle proteomics, and protein complex as well as micro- or nano-particles. PMID:24246174

  6. Acoustic Characterization of Axial Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Operation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner L; Royston, Thomas J; Bhat, Geetha; Tatooles, Antone J

    2016-01-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), implantable pumps used to supplement cardiac output, has become an increasingly common and effective treatment for advanced heart failure. Although modern continuous-flow LVADs improve quality of life and survival more than medical management of heart failure, device malfunction remains a common concern. Improved noninvasive methods for assessment of LVAD function are needed to detect device complications. An electronic stethoscope was used to record sounds from the HeartMate II axial flow pump in vitro and in vivo. The data were then uploaded to a computer and analyzed using two types of acoustic analysis software. Left ventricular assist device acoustics were quantified and were related to pump speed, acoustic environment, and inflow and outflow graft patency. Peak frequency values measured in vivo were found to correlate strongly with both predicted values and in vitro measurements (r > 0.999). Plots of the area under the acoustic spectrum curve, obtained by integrating over 50 Hz increments, showed strong correlations between in vivo and in vitro measurements (r > 0.966). Device thrombosis was found to be associated with reduced LVAD acoustic amplitude in two patients who underwent surgical device exchange. PMID:26536535

  7. Liquid hydrogen mass flow through a multiple orifice Joule-Thomson device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. Stephen; Nyland, Ted W.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen mass flow rate, pressure drop, and temperature drop data were obtained for a number of multiple orifice Joule-Thomas devices known as visco jets. The present investigation continues a study to develop an equation for predicting two phase flow of cryogens through these devices. The test apparatus design allowed isenthalpic expansion of the cryogen through the visco jets. The data covered a range of inlet and outlet operating conditions. The mass flow rate range single phase or two phase was 0.015 to 0.98 lbm/hr. The manufacturer's equation was found to overpredict the single phase hydrogen data by 10 percent and the two phase data by as much as 27 percent. Two modifications of the equation resulted in a data correlation that predicts both the single and two phase flow across the visco jet. The first modification was of a theoretical nature, and the second strictly empirical. The former reduced the spread in the two phase data. It was a multiplication factor of 1 - X applied to the manufacturer's equation. The parameter X is the flow quality downstream of the visco jet based on isenthalpic expansion across the device. The latter modification was a 10 percent correction term that correlated 90 percent of the single and two phase data to within +/- 10 percent scatter band.

  8. Liquid hydrogen mass flow through a multiple orifice Joule-Thomson device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Nyland, Ted W.; Saiyed, Naseem H.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen mass flow rate, pressure drop, and temperature drop data were obtained for a number of multiple orifice Joule-Thomson devices known as visco jets. The present investigation continues a study to develop an equation for predicting two phase flow of cryogens through these devices. The test apparatus design allowed isenthalpic expansion of the cryogen through the visco jets. The data covered a range of inlet and outlet operating conditions. The mass flow rate range single phase or two phase was 0.015 to 0.98 lbm/hr. The manufacturer's equation was found to overpredict the single phase hydrogen data by 10 percent and the two phase data by as much as 27 percent. Two modifications of the equation resulted in a data correlation that predicts both the single and two phase flow across the visco jet. The first modification was of a theoretical nature, and the second strictly empirical. The former reduced the spread in the two phase data. It was a multiplication factor of 1-X applied to the manufacturer's equation. The parameter X is the flow quality downstream of the visco jet based on isenthalpic expansion across the device. The latter modification was a 10 percent correction term that correlated 90 percent of the single and two phase data to within +/- 10 percent scatter band.

  9. Velocity Vector Field Visualization of Flow in Liquid Acquisition Device Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Chao, David F.; Hall, Nancy R.; Zhang, Nengli

    2012-01-01

    A capillary flow liquid acquisition device (LAD) for cryogenic propellants has been developed and tested in NASA Glenn Research Center to meet the requirements of transferring cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks to an engine in reduced gravity environments. The prototypical mesh screen channel LAD was fabricated with a mesh screen, covering a rectangular flow channel with a cylindrical outlet tube, and was tested with liquid oxygen (LOX). In order to better understand the performance in various gravity environments and orientations at different liquid submersion depths of the screen channel LAD, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of LOX flow through the LAD screen channel was undertaken. The resulting velocity vector field visualization for the flow in the channel has been used to reveal the gravity effects on the flow in the screen channel.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent flow over a heavy vehicle with drag reduction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangseung; Kim, Myeongkyun; You, Donghyun

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic drag contributes to a considerable amount of energy loss of heavy vehicles. To reduce the energy loss, drag reduction devices such as side skirts and boat tails, are often installed to the side and the rear of a heavy vehicle. In the present study, turbulent flow around a heavy vehicle with realistic geometric details is simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES), which is capable of providing unsteady flow physics responsible for aerodynamic in sufficient detail. Flow over a heavy vehicle with and without a boat tail and side skirts as drag reduction devices is simulated. The simulation results are validated against accompanying in-house experimental measurements. Effects of a boat tail and side skirts on drag reduction are discussed in detail. Supported by the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) Grant NTIS 1615007940.

  11. Device and method for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1998-11-10

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  12. Device and method for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German; Boucher, Timothy J

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow.

  13. Efficient simulation of blood flow past complex endovascular devices using an adaptive embedding technique.

    PubMed

    Cebral, Juan R; Löhner, Rainald

    2005-04-01

    The simulation of blood flow past endovascular devices such as coils and stents is a challenging problem due to the complex geometry of the devices. Traditional unstructured grid computational fluid dynamics relies on the generation of finite element grids that conform to the boundary of the computational domain. However, the generation of such grids for patient-specific modeling of cerebral aneurysm treatment with coils or stents is extremely difficult and time consuming. This paper describes the application of an adaptive grid embedding technique previously developed for complex fluid structure interaction problems to the simulation of endovascular devices. A hybrid approach is used: the vessel walls are treated with body conforming grids and the endovascular devices with an adaptive mesh embedding technique. This methodology fits naturally in the framework of image-based computational fluid dynamics and opens the door for exploration of different therapeutic options and personalization of endovascular procedures. PMID:15822805

  14. Unsteady flow of generalized Casson fluid with fractional derivative due to an infinite plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ilyas; Ali Shah, Nehad; Vieru, Dumitru

    2016-06-01

    The Caputo time-fractional derivative is introduced in the constitutive model of a generalized Casson fluid which is moving over an infinite, oscillating flat plate. Exact solutions for the fluid velocity and shear stress are obtained using the Laplace transform method. Closed forms of solutions are written in terms of Wright functions. The obtained solutions can be easily particularized for ordinary Casson fluid, viscous fluid with fractional derivative and ordinary viscous fluid. Numerical simulations are carried out for fractional parameter and Casson fluid parameter and results are shown in graphical illustrations.

  15. Fractional boundary layer flow and radiation heat transfer of MHD viscoelastic fluid over an unsteady stretching surface

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bingyu; Zheng, Liancun Chen, Shengting

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents an investigation for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) viscoelastic fluid boundary layer flow and radiation heat transfer over an unsteady stretching sheet in presence of heat source. Time dependent fractional derivative is first introduced in formulating the boundary layer equations. Numerical solutions are obtained by using the finite difference scheme and L1-algorithm approximation. Results indicate that the proposed model describes a basic delaying times framework for viscoelastic flow and radiation heat transfer. The effects of involved parameters on velocity and temperature fields are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  16. Measurement of two-phase refrigerant liquid-vapor mass flow rate. Part 1: Venturi and void fraction meters

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Razzak, A.; Shoukri, M.; Chang, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The use of a venturi meter for the measurement of refrigerant liquid-vapor mass flow rate in a horizontal pipe is presented. Various models that utilize the output of the venturi flowmeter and the measured void fraction and/or quality to calculate the two-phase mass flow rate were examined. It was found that the applicability of the various models is dependent on the quality range. When the quality is less than 50%, the use of the momentum density model provides the best accuracy. For higher qualities, the use of the homogeneous equilibrium model is recommended.

  17. sedFlow - a tool for simulating fractional bedload transport and longitudinal profile evolution in mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, F. U. M.; Rickenmann, D.; Turowski, J. M.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Especially in mountainous environments, the prediction of sediment dynamics is important for managing natural hazards, assessing in-stream habitats and understanding geomorphic evolution. We present the new modelling tool {sedFlow} for simulating fractional bedload transport dynamics in mountain streams. sedFlow is a one-dimensional model that aims to realistically reproduce the total transport volumes and overall morphodynamic changes resulting from sediment transport events such as major floods. The model is intended for temporal scales from the individual event (several hours to few days) up to longer-term evolution of stream channels (several years). The envisaged spatial scale covers complete catchments at a spatial discretisation of several tens of metres to a few hundreds of metres. sedFlow can deal with the effects of streambeds that slope uphill in a downstream direction and uses recently proposed and tested approaches for quantifying macro-roughness effects in steep channels. sedFlow offers different options for bedload transport equations, flow-resistance relationships and other elements which can be selected to fit the current application in a particular catchment. Local grain-size distributions are dynamically adjusted according to the transport dynamics of each grain-size fraction. sedFlow features fast calculations and straightforward pre- and postprocessing of simulation data. The high simulation speed allows for simulations of several years, which can be used, e.g., to assess the long-term impact of river engineering works or climate change effects. In combination with the straightforward pre- and postprocessing, the fast calculations facilitate efficient workflows for the simulation of individual flood events, because the modeller gets the immediate results as direct feedback to the selected parameter inputs. The model is provided together with its complete source code free of charge under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) (www.wsl.ch/sedFlow

  18. Assessment of Flow Control Devices for Transonic Cavity Flows Using DES and LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakos, G. N.; Lawson, S. J.; Steijl, R.; Nayyar, P.

    Since the implementation of internal carriage of stores on military aircraft, transonic flows in cavities were put forward as a model problem for validation of CFD methods before design studies of weapon bays can be undertaken. Depending on the free-stream Mach number and the cavity dimensions, the flow inside the cavity can become very unsteady. Below a critical length-to-depth ratio (L/D), the flow has enough energy to span across the cavity opening and a shear layer develops. When the shear layer impacts the downstream cavity corner, acoustical disturbances are generated and propagated upstream, which in turn causes further instabilities at the cavity front and a feedback loop is maintained. The acoustic environment in the cavity is so harsh in these circumstances that the noise level at the cavity rear has been found to approach 170 dB and frequencies near 1 kHz are created. The effect of this unsteady environment on the structural integrity of the contents of the cavity (e.g. stores, avionics, etc.) can be serious. Above the critical L/D ratio, the shear layer no longer has enough energy to span across the cavity and dips into it. Although this does not produce as high noise levels and frequencies as shorter cavities, the differential pressure along the cavity produces large pitching moments making store release difficult. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cavity flows, based on the Reynolds-Averaged Navier—Stokes equations was only able to capture some of the flow physics present. On the other hand, results obtained with Large-Eddy Simulation or Detached-Eddy Simulation methods fared much better and for the cases computed, quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data has been obtained.

  19. A disposable, continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction device: design, fabrication and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Victoria; Li, Huizhong; Sant, Himanshu; Ameel, Tim; Gale, Bruce K

    2016-08-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is used to amplify a specific segment of DNA through a thermal cycling protocol. The PCR industry is shifting its focus away from macro-scale systems and towards micro-scale devices because: micro-scale sample sizes require less blood from patients, total reaction times are on the order of minutes opposed to hours, and there are cost advantages as many microfluidic devices are manufactured from inexpensive polymers. Some of the fastest PCR devices use continuous flow, but they have all been built of silicon or glass to allow sufficient heat transfer. This article presents a disposable polycarbonate (PC) device that is capable of achieving real-time, continuous flow PCR in a completely disposable polymer device in less than 13 minutes by thermally cycling the sample through an established temperature gradient in a serpentine channel. The desired temperature gradient was determined through simulations and validated by experiments which showed that PCR was achieved. Practical demonstration included amplification of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) derived cDNA. PMID:27393216

  20. Multiplexed Fluid Flow Device to Study Cellular Response to Tunable Shear Stress Gradients.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maggie A; Huang, Eva Y; Surya, Vinay N; Poplawski, Charlotte; Barakat, Joseph M; Lin, Gigi L; Fuller, Gerald G; Dunn, Alexander R

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) line the interior of blood and lymphatic vessels and experience spatially varying wall shear stress (WSS) as an intrinsic part of their physiological function. How ECs, and mammalian cells generally, sense spatially varying WSS remains poorly understood, due in part to a lack of convenient tools for exposing cells to spatially varying flow patterns. We built a multiplexed device, termed a 6-well impinging flow chamber, that imparts controlled WSS gradients to a six-well tissue culture plate. Using this device, we investigated the migratory response of lymphatic microvascular ECs, umbilical vein ECs, primary fibroblasts, and epithelial cells to WSS gradients on hours to days timescales. We observed that lymphatic microvascular ECs migrate upstream, against the direction of flow, a response that was unique among all the cells types investigated here. Time-lapse, live cell imaging revealed that the microtubule organizing center relocated to the upstream side of the nucleus in response to the applied WSS gradient. To further demonstrate the utility of our device, we screened for the involvement of canonical signaling pathways in mediating this upstream migratory response. These data highlight the importance of WSS magnitude and WSS spatial gradients in dictating the cellular response to fluid flow. PMID:26589597

  1. Top-down and bottom-up lipidomic analysis of rabbit lipoproteins under different metabolic conditions using flow field-flow fractionation, nanoflow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Ju Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-07-31

    This study demonstrated the performances of top-down and bottom-up approaches in lipidomic analysis of lipoproteins from rabbits raised under different metabolic conditions: healthy controls, carrageenan-induced inflammation, dehydration, high cholesterol (HC) diet, and highest cholesterol diet with inflammation (HCI). In the bottom-up approach, the high density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low density lipoproteins (LDL) were size-sorted and collected on a semi-preparative scale using a multiplexed hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (MxHF5), followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-ESI-MS/MS (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis of the lipids extracted from each lipoprotein fraction. In the top-down method, size-fractionated lipoproteins were directly infused to MS for quantitative analysis of targeted lipids using chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (cAF4-ESI-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The comprehensive bottom-up analysis yielded 122 and 104 lipids from HDL and LDL, respectively. Rabbits within the HC and HCI groups had lipid patterns that contrasted most substantially from those of controls, suggesting that HC diet significantly alters the lipid composition of lipoproteins. Among the identified lipids, 20 lipid species that exhibited large differences (>10-fold) were selected as targets for the top-down quantitative analysis in order to compare the results with those from the bottom-up method. Statistical comparison of the results from the two methods revealed that the results were not significantly different for most of the selected species, except for those species with only small differences in concentration between groups. The current study demonstrated that top-down lipid analysis using cAF4-ESI-MS/MS is a powerful high-speed analytical platform for targeted lipidomic analysis that does not require the extraction of lipids from blood samples. PMID:26087967

  2. One-heater flow-through polymerase chain reaction device by heat pipes cooling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Liao, Ming Huei; Li, Kun Tze; Shen, Chia Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a novel microfluidic reactor capable of flow-through polymerase chain reactions (PCR). For one-heater PCR devices in previous studies, comprehensive simulations and experiments for the chip geometry and the heater arrangement were usually needed before the fabrication of the device. In order to improve the flexibility of the one-heater PCR device, two heat pipes with one fan are used to create the requisite temperature regions in our device. With the integration of one heater onto the chip, the high temperature required for the denaturation stage can be generated at the chip center. By arranging the heat pipes on the opposite sides of the chip, the low temperature needed for the annealing stage is easy to regulate. Numerical calculations and thermal measurements have shown that the temperature distribution in the five-temperature-region PCR chip would be suitable for DNA amplification. In order to ensure temperature uniformity at specific reaction regions, the Re of the sample flow is less than 1. When the microchannel width increases and then decreases gradually between the denaturation and annealing regions, the extension region located in the enlarged part of the channel can be observed numerically and experimentally. From the simulations, the residence time at the extension region with the enlarged channel is 4.25 times longer than that without an enlarged channel at a flow rate of 2 μl/min. The treated surfaces of the flow-through microchannel are characterized using the water contact angle, while the effects of the hydrophilicity of the treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels on PCR efficiency are determined using gel electrophoresis. By increasing the hydrophilicity of the channel surface after immersing the PDMS substrates into Tween 20 (20%) or BSA (1 mg/ml) solutions, efficient amplifications of DNA segments were proved to occur in our chip device. To our knowledge, our group is the first to introduce heat pipes into

  3. Cross-flow microfiltration of blood through an extracorporeal device: a study in parameterization.

    PubMed

    Gautam, S K; Pandya, R V

    1997-06-01

    This paper develops a new approach for the general description of membrane plasma separator performance by using dimensional analysis. Experiments involved cross-flow microfiltration of goats' blood across flatsheet polyvinylidene fluoride durapore membranes of pore size 0.65, 0.45 and 0.22 microns in a thin-channel device. Certain non-dimensional numbers are evolved which represent the grouping of relevant filtration parameters and which contribute to the global characterization of membrane-based plasmapheresis devices. PMID:10174682

  4. Plasma flow in peripheral region of detached plasma in linear plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Tanaka, H.

    2016-01-01

    A plasma flow structure is investigated using a Mach probe under detached plasma condition in a linear plasma device NAGDIS-II. A reverse flow along the magnetic field is observed in a steady-state at far-peripheral region of the plasma column in the upstream side from the recombination front. These experimental results indicate that plasma near the recombination front should strongly diffuse across the magnetic field, and it should be transported along the magnetic field in the reverse flow direction. Furthermore, bursty plasma density fluctuations associated with intermittent convective plasma transport are observed in the far-peripheral region of the plasma column in both upstream and downstream sides from the recombination front. Such a nondiffusive transport can contribute to the intermittent reverse plasma flow, and the experimental results indicate that intermittent transports are frequently produced near the recombination front.

  5. Transient integral boundary layer method to calculate the translesional pressure drop and the fractional flow reserve in myocardial bridges

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Stefan; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Tilgner, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Background The pressure drop – flow relations in myocardial bridges and the assessment of vascular heart disease via fractional flow reserve (FFR) have motivated many researchers the last decades. The aim of this study is to simulate several clinical conditions present in myocardial bridges to determine the flow reserve and consequently the clinical relevance of the disease. From a fluid mechanical point of view the pathophysiological situation in myocardial bridges involves fluid flow in a time dependent flow geometry, caused by contracting cardiac muscles overlying an intramural segment of the coronary artery. These flows mostly involve flow separation and secondary motions, which are difficult to calculate and analyse. Methods Because a three dimensional simulation of the haemodynamic conditions in myocardial bridges in a network of coronary arteries is time-consuming, we present a boundary layer model for the calculation of the pressure drop and flow separation. The approach is based on the assumption that the flow can be sufficiently well described by the interaction of an inviscid core and a viscous boundary layer. Under the assumption that the idealised flow through a constriction is given by near-equilibrium velocity profiles of the Falkner-Skan-Cooke (FSC) family, the evolution of the boundary layer is obtained by the simultaneous solution of the Falkner-Skan equation and the transient von-Kármán integral momentum equation. Results The model was used to investigate the relative importance of several physical parameters present in myocardial bridges. Results have been obtained for steady and unsteady flow through vessels with 0 – 85% diameter stenosis. We compare two clinical relevant cases of a myocardial bridge in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The pressure derived FFR of fixed and dynamic lesions has shown that the flow is less affected in the dynamic case, because the distal pressure partially recovers

  6. Analyzing the influence of PEG molecular weight on the separation of PEGylated gold nanoparticles by asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Matthew; Smith, Mackensie C; Crist, Rachael M; Clogston, Jeffrey D; McNeil, Scott E

    2015-11-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is an important tool for increasing the biocompatibility of nanoparticle therapeutics. Understanding how these potential nanomedicines will react after they have been introduced into the bloodstream is a critical component of the preclinical evaluation process. Hence, it is paramount that better methods for separating, characterizing, and analyzing these complex and polydisperse formulations are developed. We present a method for separating nominal 30-nm gold nanoparticles coated with various molecular weight PEG moieties that uses only phosphate-buffered saline as the mobile phase, without the need for stabilizing surfactants. The optimized asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation technique using in-line multiangle light scattering, dynamic light scattering, refractive index, and UV-vis detectors allowed successful separation and detection of a mixture of nanoparticles coated with 2-, 5-, 10-, and 20-kDa PEG. The particles coated with the larger PEG species (10 and 20 kDa) were eluted at times significantly earlier than predicted by field-flow fractionation theory. This was attributed to a lower-density PEG shell for the higher molecular weight PEGylated nanoparticles, which allows a more fluid PEG surface that can be greater influenced by external forces. Hence, the apparent particle hydrodynamic size may fluctuate significantly depending on the overall density of the stabilizing surface coating when an external force is applied. This has considerable implications for PEGylated nanoparticles intended for in vivo application, as nanoparticle size is important for determining circulation times, accumulation sites, and routes of excretion, and highlights the importance and value of the use of secondary size detectors when one is working with complex samples in asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation. PMID:26449845

  7. Electrophoresis device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, P. H.; Snyder, R. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for separating cellular particles of a sample substance into fractionated streams of different cellular species includes a casing having a distribution chamber, a separation chamber, and a collection chamber. The electrode chambers are separated from the separation chamber interior by means of passages such that flow variations and membrane variations around the slotted portion of the electrode chamber do not enduce flow perturbations into the laminar buffer curtain flowing in the separation chamber. The cellular particles of the sample are separated under the influence of the electrical field and the separation chamber into streams of different cellular species. The streams of separated cells enter a partition array in the collection chamber where they are fractionated and collected.

  8. Silicon microfabricated device for non-sheath-flow cytometer-based chemical analysis and microchannel flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Chieh

    This dissertation presents a method and apparatus for rapid measurement of fluid pH value in a microscale volume. The fluorescence of indicators immobilized on polymer microbeads is a function of the concentration of an analyte. This was determined in a silicon microfabricated flow channel. The sizes of microbeads can be determined by the scattering signal, so this system could be used to analyze several analytes at the same time by using beads of different sizes which are sensitive to different analytes. The fluorescent indicator Carboxy-SNAFL I was immobilized by Molecular Probes on amino-functionalized polystyrene beads of 5 mum diameter. These pH-sensitive microbeads were used in this apparatus to measure the pH of sample solutions. The intensities of two fluorescent peaks (at 560 nm and at 620 run) were measured, their ratio was dependent on the pH value of the analyte. We discriminated bead diameter by monitoring the intensity of the scattered excitation signal. In the measurement of the light scattering signal, the standard deviation/bead diameter (SD/D) for the 10.3 mum beads was ˜26%. The major error is caused by varying positions of the beads in the microchannel. In order to decrease the SD/D of scattering signal and thus increase the number of distinct bead types that can be identified, a low Reynolds number silicon/pyrex microfluidic device that forces particles flowing in a microchannel to a tightly-focused equilibrium position was designed and fabricated. When scattering signals from 10 mum polymer beads were measured, we observed that the tight equilibrium position attained by the particles resulted in a much smaller standard deviation of the scattering signal than was observed in other microflow channel devices that did not focus the particles to equilibrium positions. Another applications of this device is also discussed. We show that this particle-focusing channel may be used in a micro-fluidic flow sensor.

  9. A Novel Intra-aortic Device Designed for Coronary Blood Flow Amplification in Unrevascularizable Patients.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, Udi; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Roguin, Ariel; Feld, Yair

    2016-08-01

    Patients with unrevascularizable coronary artery disease represent a substantial number of all patients with coronary disease. However, their therapeutic options are limited; they endure recurrent hospitalizations, a poor quality of life and prognosis. We aim to investigate a novel alternative approach to the treatment of this common medical condition by using a specialized intra-aortic device with coiling properties capable of enhancing diastolic coronary flow. Both a mathematical analysis and in vitro study presented in the current study have yielded enhanced coronary diastolic blood flow and energetic advantages. We suggest that this original approach might be implicated in severely symptomatic unrevascularizable patients. PMID:27260505

  10. Hybrid stent device of flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization formed by fractal structure.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masahiro; Irie, Keiko; Masunaga, Kouhei; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio; Arai, Fumihito; Negoro, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid medical stent device. This hybrid stent device formed by fractal mesh structures provides a flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverter stents decrease blood flow into an aneurysm to prevent its rupture. In general, the mesh size of a flow-diverter stent needs to be small enough to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. Conventional flow-diverter stents are not available for stent-assisted coil embolization, which is an effective method for aneurysm occlusion, because the mesh size is too small to insert a micro-catheter for coil embolization. The proposed hybrid stent device is capable of stent-assisted coil embolization while simultaneously providing a flow-diverting effect. The fractal stent device is composed of mesh structures with fine and rough mesh areas. The rough mesh area can be used to insert a micro-catheter for stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverting effects of two fractal stent designs were composed to three commercially available stent designs. Flow-diverting effects were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment. Based on the CFD and PIV results, the fractal stent devices reduce the flow velocity inside an aneurism just as much as the commercially available flow-diverting stents while allowing stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:26438390

  11. Study of liquid and vapor flow into a Centaur capillary device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blatt, M. H.; Risberg, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The following areas of liquid and vapor flow were analyzed and experimentally evaluated; 1) the refilling of capillary devices with settled liquid, and 2) vapor flow across wetted screens. These investigations resulted in: 1) the development of a versatile computer program that was successfully correlated with test data and used to predict Centaur D-1S LO2 and LH2 start basket refilling; 2) the development of a semi-empirical model that was only partially correlated with data due to difficulties in obtaining repeatable test results. Also, a comparison was made to determine the best propellant management system for the Centaur D-1S vehicle. The comparison identified the basline Centaur D-1S system (using pressurization, boost pumps and propellant settling) as the best candidate based on payload weight penalty. However, other comparison criteria and advanced mission condition were identified where pressure fed systems, thermally subcooled boost pumps and capillary devices would be selected as attractive alternatives.

  12. Safety and efficacy of the Aperio thrombectomy device when compared to the Solitaire AB/FR and the Revive devices in a pulsatile flow system

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mahdi; Spence, John Nathan; Nayak, Sanjeev; Pearce, Gillian; Tennuci, Christopher; Roffe, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: There are a limited number of studies comparing the Aperio mechanical thrombectomy device to other stent-based devices. In this paper, we compared the Aperio thrombectomy device to the Solitaire AB, FR and Revive devices in a model of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a modified pulsatile flow system. Methods: Thrombi made of lamb’s blood were placed into a pulsatile flow system perfused with Hartmann’s solution at 80 bpm with a mean pressure of 90 mm Hg. 30 experiments were run with each device. Results: Recanalization rates were similar for all three devices (90% with the Solitaire AB, FR, 80% with the Revive, and 90% with the Aperio). The mean number of attempts to retrieve the thrombus was also similar for all three devices (1.7 with the Solitaire AB, FR, 2.1 with the Revive, 1.6 with the Aperio). Clot fragmentation and embolization rates revealed no statistical significance but there was a trend towards lower embolization rates with the Aperio (23% compared to 40% with the Solitaire AB, FR and 47% with the Revive). The Aperio was the fastest to recanalize the MCA (mean of 66 seconds compared to 186 seconds for the Solitaire AB, FR and 169 seconds for the Revive). Conclusions: In this in vitro setting, the Aperio device seems to be an efficacious and safe device when compared to other similar clinically used mechanical thrombectomy devices. Larger clinical trials are warranted. PMID:23173104

  13. Apparatus for measuring the local void fraction in a flowing liquid containing a gas

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Patrick F.

    1981-01-01

    The local void fraction in liquid containing a gas is measured by placing an impedance-variation probe in the liquid, applying a controlled voltage or current to the probe, and measuring the probe current or voltage. A circuit for applying the one electrical parameter and measuring the other includes a feedback amplifier that minimizes the effect of probe capacitance and a digitizer to provide a clean signal. Time integration of the signal provides a measure of the void fraction, and an oscilloscope display also shows bubble size and distribution.

  14. Apparatus for measuring the local void fraction in a flowing liquid containing a gas

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, P.F.

    1979-07-17

    The local void fraction in liquid containing a gas is measured by placing an impedance-variation probe in the liquid, applying a controlled voltage or current to the probe, and measuring the probe current or voltage. A circuit for applying the one electrical parameter and measuring the other includes a feedback amplifier that minimizes the effect of probe capacitance and a digitizer to provide a clean signal. Time integration of the signal provides a measure of the void fraction, and an oscilloscope display also shows bubble size and distribution.

  15. Flow field of a novel implantable valveless counterpulsation heart assist device.

    PubMed

    Berthe, A; Gärtlein, S; Lederer, Ch; Kertzscher, U; Affeld, K; Goubergrits, L

    2012-09-01

    Flow fields are one of the key factors associated with the life threatening formation of thrombi in artificial organs. Therefore, knowledge of flow field is crucial for the design and optimization of a long-term blood pump performance. The blood chamber flow of a novel counterpulsation heart assist device (CPD) has been investigated using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and near-wall PIV (wall-PIV). The wall-PIV is an in-house developed technique assessing wall shear rates (WSR). These experimental techniques analyzed complex transient three-dimensional (3D) flow fields including major and secondary structures during the whole CPD cycle (ejection, filling, and hold time). PIV measurements in the central plane investigated an evolution (development and destruction) of the blood chamber fully filling vortex as the major CPD flow structure. The wall-PIV measurements identified areas of blood stagnation (vortex center and jet impingements) and quantified WSR at the front housing. Maximal mean WSR of 2,045 ± 605 s(-1) were found at the end of the filling. The LDV, which identified helical flow structure at the outer region of the pump, was used to complete 3D flow analysis and to combine PIV and wall-PIV results. The results suggest good washing behavior of the CPD regarding thrombus formation. PMID:22527012

  16. Fluid flow release regulating device, ERIP {number_sign}624: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    DOE/ERIP project {number_sign}624 ``Fluid Flow Release Regulating Device`` designed, constructed, tested, and installed a rubber crest gate for regulating water levels at an impoundment such as a hydroelectric dam. A 92 foot long by 27 inch high rubber panel was installed in January 1997. Initial results were good until fabric degradation internal to the rubber caused loss of stiffness. Substitutes for the failed fabric are being tested. The project will continue after DOE participation terminates.

  17. In vitro characterization of a magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Kim, H C; Bearnson, G B; Khanwilkar, P S; Olsen, D B; Maslen, E H; Allaire, P E

    1995-01-01

    A magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device using magnetic bearings was developed aiming at an implantable ventricular assist device. The main advantage of this device includes no mechanical wear and minimal chance of blood trauma such, as thrombosis and hemolysis, because there is no mechanical contact between the stationary and rotating parts. The total system consists of two subsystems: the centrifugal pump and the magnetic bearing. The centrifugal pump is comprised of a 4 vane logarithmic spiral radial flow impeller and a brushless DC motor with slotless stator, driven by the back emf commutation scheme. Two radial and one thrust magnetic bearing that dynamically controls the position of the rotor in a radial and axial direction, respectively, contains magnetic coils, the rotor's position sensors, and feedback electronic control system. The magnetic bearing system was able to successfully suspend a 365.5g rotating part in space and sustain it for up to 5000 rpm of rotation. Average force-current square factor of the magnetic bearing was measured as 0.48 and 0.44 (kg-f/Amp2) for radial and thrust bearing, respectively. The integrated system demonstrated adequate performance in mock circulation tests by providing a 6 L/min flow rate against 100 mmHg differential pressure at 2300 rpm. Based on these in vitro performance test results, long-term clinical application of the magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device is very promising after system optimization with a hybrid system using both active (electromagnet) and passive (permanent magnets) magnet bearings. PMID:8573825

  18. Measurement of the Doppler power of flowing blood using ultrasound Doppler devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Pay-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of the Doppler power of signals backscattered from flowing blood (henceforth referred to as the Doppler power of flowing blood) and the echogenicity of flowing blood have been used widely to assess the degree of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation for more than 20 y. Many studies have used Doppler flowmeters based on an analogue circuit design to obtain the Doppler shifts in the signals backscattered from flowing blood; however, some recent studies have mentioned that the analogue Doppler flowmeter exhibits a frequency-response problem whereby the backscattered energy is lost at higher Doppler shift frequencies. Therefore, the measured Doppler power of flowing blood and evaluations of RBC aggregation obtained using an analogue Doppler device may be inaccurate. To overcome this problem, the present study implemented a field-programmable gate array-based digital pulsed-wave Doppler flowmeter to measure the Doppler power of flowing blood, in the aim of providing more accurate assessments of RBC aggregation. A clinical duplex ultrasound imaging system that can acquire pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms is now available, but its usefulness for estimating the ultrasound scattering properties of blood is still in doubt. Therefore, the echogenicity and Doppler power of flowing blood under the same flow conditions were measured using a laboratory pulser-receiver system and a clinical ultrasound system, respectively, for comparisons. The experiments were carried out using porcine blood under steady laminar flow with both RBC suspensions and whole blood. The experimental results indicated that a clinical ultrasound system used to measure the Doppler spectrograms is not suitable for quantifying Doppler power. However, the Doppler power measured using a digital Doppler flowmeter can reveal the relationship between backscattering signals and the properties of blood cells because the effects of frequency response are eliminated. The measurements of the Doppler power and

  19. Subsonic Aerodynamic Assessment of Vortex Flow Management Devices on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of leading-edge vortex management devices on the subsonic performance of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) configuration was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.14 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 3.08 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.47 x 10 (sup 6). The test model was designed for a cruise Mach number of 2.7. During the subsonic high-lift phase of flight, vortical flow dominates the upper surface flow structure, and during vortex breakdown, this flow causes adverse pitch-up and a reduction of usable lift. The experimental results showed that the beneficial effects of small leading-edge vortex management devices located near the model reference center were insufficient to substantially affect the resulting aerodynamic forces and moments. However, devices located at or near the wiring apex region demonstrated potential for pitch control with little effect on overall lift.

  20. A microfluidic device to apply shear stresses to polarizing ciliated airway epithelium using air flow

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2014-01-01

    Organization of airway epithelium determines ciliary beat direction and coordination for proper mucociliary clearance. Fluidic shear stresses have the potential to influence ciliary organization. Here, an in vitro fluidic flow system was developed for inducing long-term airflow shear stresses on airway epithelium with a view to influencing epithelial organization. Our system consists of a fluidic device for cell culture, integrated into a humidified airflow circuit. The fluidic device has a modular design and is made from a combination of polystyrene and adhesive components incorporated into a 6-well filter membrane insert. We demonstrate the system operates within physiologically relevant shear and pressure ranges and estimate the shear stress exerted on the epithelial cell layer as a result of air flow using a computational model. For both the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS2B and primary human tracheal airway epithelial cells, we demonstrate that cells remain viable within the device when exposed to airflow for 24 h and that normal differentiation and cilia formation occurs. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of our device for exploring the impact of exposing cells to airflow: our tool enables quantification of cytoskeletal organization, and is compatible with in situ bead assays to assess the orientation of cilia beating. PMID:25553181

  1. Applying a low-flow CO2 removal device in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay S; Weerwind, Patrick W; Strauch, Uli; van Belle, Arne; Maessen, Jos G; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2016-03-01

    A novel and portable extracorporeal CO2-removal device was evaluated to provide additional gas transfer, auxiliary to standard therapy in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. A dual-lumen catheter was inserted percutaneously in five subjects (mean age 55 ± 0.4 years) and, subsequently, connected to the CO2-removal device. The median duration on support was 45 hours (interquartile range 26-156), with a blood flow rate of approximately 500 mL/min. The mean PaCO2 decreased from 95.8 ± 21.9 mmHg to 63.9 ± 19.6 mmHg with the pH improving from 7.11 ± 0.1 to 7.26 ± 0.1 in the initial 4 hours of support. Three subjects were directly weaned from the CO2-removal device and mechanical ventilation, one subject was converted to ECMO and one subject died following withdrawal of support. No systemic bleeding or device complications were observed. Low-flow CO2 removal adjuvant to standard therapy was effective in steadily removing CO2, limiting the progression of acidosis in subjects with severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. PMID:26040584

  2. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  3. Size determination and quantification of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles by flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, L; Bolea, E; Laborda, F; Cubel, C; Ferrer, P; Gianolio, D; da Silva, I; Castillo, J R

    2016-03-18

    Facing the lack of studies on characterization and quantification of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs), whose consumption and release is greatly increasing, this work proposes a method for their sizing and quantification by Flow Field-flow Fractionation (FFFF) coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two modalities of FFFF (Asymmetric Flow- and Hollow Fiber-Flow Field Flow Fractionation, AF4 and HF5, respectively) are compared, and their advantages and limitations discussed. Experimental conditions (carrier composition, pH, ionic strength, crossflow and carrier flow rates) are studied in detail in terms of NP separation, recovery, and repeatability. Size characterization of CeO2 NPs was addressed by different approaches. In the absence of feasible size standards of CeO2 NPs, suspensions of Ag, Au, and SiO2 NPs of known size were investigated. Ag and Au NPs failed to show a comparable behavior to that of the CeO2 NPs, whereas the use of SiO2 NPs provided size estimations in agreement to those predicted by the theory. The latter approach was thus used for characterizing the size of CeO2 NPs in a commercial suspension. Results were in adequate concordance with those achieved by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and dynamic light scattering. The quantification of CeO2 NPs in the commercial suspension by AF4-ICP-MS required the use of a CeO2 NPs standards, since the use of ionic cerium resulted in low recoveries (99±9% vs. 73±7%, respectively). A limit of detection of 0.9μgL(-1) CeO2 corresponding to a number concentration of 1.8×1012L(-1) for NPs of 5nm was achieved for an injection volume of 100μL. PMID:26903472

  4. Durability of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ashleigh; Phan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are becoming an increasingly viable alternative therapy for heart failure, either as a bridge to heart transplantation (BTT) or destination therapy (DT). The latter has become increasingly popular in recent years, in the face of a donor organ shortage and a rise in elderly patients ineligible for heart transplants. For these patients in particular, device durability is a key contributor to survival, morbidity, and quality of life. This systematic review aimed to assess the long-term durability of current continuous-flow LVADs. Methods Six electronic databases were searched from their dates of inception to August 2014 for original studies reporting on patients receiving continuous-flow LVADs. LVAD failure was defined as device malfunction necessitating exchange or explantation, or causing patient mortality. Pooled averages were calculated for outcomes and rates of device failure were reconstructed from digitized graph curves using the software, WebPlotDigitizer v3.3. Results Twelve retrospective observational studies with a total of 5,471 patients were included for analysis. The mean duration of LVAD support was 504.7 (range, 303-568) days, and the overall weighted incidence of device failure was 3.9% (range, 1-11.3%). On average, pump thrombosis was the most common cause of device failure (50.5%), followed by lead or cable damage (21.7%), mechanical pump failure (11.6%), device-related infection (11.1%), and surgical complications from implantation (2.5%). Long-term device failure rates at 2-, 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-months post-implantation were 0.5%, 1.8%, 2.9%, 4.5% and 6.5%, respectively. Conclusions With the expected rise in LVAD usage for end-stage heart failure, particularly as a DT, the steady minority of patients experiencing device failure is likely to increase. Further investigation is required into the incidence and mechanism of major causes of failure, as well as design improvements that may address these

  5. New Method for Sorting Endothelial and Neural Progenitors from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Faye, Pierre-Antoine; Vedrenne, Nicolas; De la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel A; Barrot, Claire-Cécile; Richard, Laurence; Bourthoumieu, Sylvie; Sturtz, Franck; Funalot, Benoît; Lia, Anne-Sophie; Battu, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSc) are a very useful solution to create and observe the behavior of specific and usually inaccessible cells, such as human motor neurons. Obtained from a patient biopsy by reprograming dermal fibroblasts (DF), hiPSc present the same properties as embryonic stem cells and can generate any cell type after several weeks of differentiation. Today, there are numerus protocols which aim to control hiPSC differentiation. The principal challenge is to obtain a sufficiently enriched specific cell population to study disease pathophysiology and to provide a good model for further investigation and drug screening. The differentiation process is very costly and time-consuming, because many specific factors and different culture media must be used. In this study, we used Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF) to prepare enriched populations derived from hiPSc after only 10 days of culture in a classical medium. Based on phenotypic and proteomic characterization, "hyperlayer" elution resulted in a fraction expressing markers of endothelial progenitors while another fraction expressed markers of neural progenitors. The isolation of subpopulations representing various differentiation lineages is of major interest for the production of specialized, cell-enriched fractions and in the preparation of increasingly complex models for the development of new therapeutic tools. PMID:27263863

  6. Study on aggregation behavior of low density lipoprotein in hen egg yolk plasma by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multiple detectors.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Magnusson, Emma; Choi, Jaeyeong; Duan, Fei; Nilsson, Lars; Lee, Seungho

    2016-02-01

    In this study, asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled online with UV, multiangle light scattering (MALS), and fluorescence (FS) detectors (AF4-UV-MALS-FS) was employed for separation and characterization of egg yolk plasma. AF4 provided separation of three major components of the egg yolk plasma i.e. soluble proteins, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their aggregates, based on their respective hydrodynamic sizes. Identification of LDL was confirmed by staining the sample with a fluorescent dye, Nile Red. The effect of carrier liquids on aggregation of LDL was investigated. Collected fractions of soluble proteins were characterized using sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Moreover, the effect of heat and enzymatic treatment on egg yolk plasma was investigated. The results suggest that enzymatic treatment with phospholipase A2 (PLA2) significantly enhances the heat stability of LDL. The results show that AF4-UV-MALS-FS is a powerful tool for the fractionation and characterization of egg yolk plasma components. PMID:26304341

  7. Modeling and simulation of blood flow in a sac-type left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Najarian, Siamak; Firouzi, Faramarz; Fatouraee, Nasser; Dargahi, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are among the most important mechanical artificial hearts in medical equipment industry. Since the need for heart transplantation is on the rise, there is a requirement for implantable LVADs, which can be safely used for long-term purposes. One of the most promising kinds of these devices is the sac-type LVAD (ST-LVAD) that has the ability to generate pulsatile flow. In this study and for the first time, three different models of ST-LVAD are analyzed numerically. In the first model, the motion of the elastic membrane wall is simplified, while in the second model, the motion is assumed to be wavy. The pressure boundary conditions are added to the second model to allocate for the effect of pressure on the flow pattern, and hence, form the third model. The simulation results of the analyzed models show that in this particular type of LVAD, the viscous term of the applied stress from the fluid on the moving wall is negligible, compared with the pressure term. Additionally, it can be concluded that the motion pattern of the moving wall does not affect the blood flow pattern in a great deal. Furthermore, the inclusion of the fluid pressure in the boundary conditions does not have a major influence on the blood flow pattern. PMID:17611298

  8. In vivo quantification of intraventricular flow during left ventricular assist device support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Vi; Wong, Kin; Del Alamo, Juan; Aguilo, Pablo M. L.; May-Newman, Karen; Department of Bioengineering, San Diego State University Collaboration; Department of Mechanical; Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego Collaboration; Mechanical Assist Device Program, Sharp Memorial Hospital Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are mechanical pumps that are surgically connected to the left ventricle (LV) and aorta to increase aortic flow and end-organ perfusion. Clinical studies have demonstrated that LVADs improve patient health and quality of life and significantly reduce the mortality of cardiac failure. However, In the presence of left ventricular assisted devices (LVAD), abnormal flow patterns and stagnation regions are often linked to thrombosis. The aim of our study is to evaluate the flow patterns in the left ventricle of the LVAD-assisted heart, with a focus on alterations in vortex development and blood stasis. To this aim, we applied color Doppler echocardiography to measure 2D, time resolved velocity fields in patients before and after implantation of LVADs. In agreement with our previous in vitro studies (Wong et al., Journal of Biomechanics 47, 2014), LVAD implantation resulted in decreased flow velocities and increased blood residence time near the outflow tract. The variation of residence time changes with LVAD operational speed was characterized for each patient.

  9. A simple microfluidic device for the deformability assessment of blood cells in a continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raquel O; Pinho, Diana; Faustino, Vera; Lima, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Blood flow presents several interesting phenomena in microcirculation that can be used to develop microfluidic devices capable to promote blood cells separation and analysis in continuous flow. In the last decade there have been numerous microfluidic studies focused on the deformation of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing through geometries mimicking microvessels. In contrast, studies focusing on the deformation of white blood cells (WBCs) are scarce despite this phenomenon often happens in the microcirculation. In this work, we present a novel integrative microfluidic device able to perform continuous separation of a desired amount of blood cells, without clogging or jamming, and at the same time, capable to assess the deformation index (DI) of both WBCs and RBCs. To determine the DI of both WBCs and RBCs, a hyperbolic converging microchannel was used, as well as a suitable image analysis technique to measure the DIs of these blood cells along the regions of interest. The results show that the WBCs have a much lower deformability than RBCs when subjected to the same in vitro flow conditions, which is directly related to their cytoskeleton and nucleus contents. The proposed strategy can be easily transformed into a simple and inexpensive diagnostic microfluidic system to simultaneously separate and assess blood cells deformability. PMID:26482154

  10. Flow analysis of human chromosome sets by means of mixing-stirring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenin, Valeri V.; Aksenov, Nicolay D.; Shatrova, Alla N.; Klopov, Nicolay V.; Cram, L. Scott; Poletaev, Andrey I.

    1997-05-01

    A new mixing and stirring device (MSD) was used to perform flow karyotype analysis of single human mitotic chromosomes analyzed so as to maintain the identity of chromosomes derived from the same cell. An improved method for cell preparation and intracellular staining of chromosomes was developed. The method includes enzyme treatment, incubation with saponin and separation of prestained cells from debris on a sucrose gradient. Mitotic cells are injected one by one in the MSD which is located inside the flow chamber where cells are ruptured, thereby releasing chromosomes. The set of chromosomes proceeds to flow in single file fashion to the point of analysis. The device works in a stepwise manner. The concentration of cells in the sample must be kept low to ensure that only one cell at a time enters the breaking chamber. Time-gated accumulation of data in listmode files makes it possible to separate chromosome sets comprising of single cells. The software that was developed classifies chromosome sets according to different criteria: total number of chromosomes, overall DNA content in the set, and the number of chromosomes of certain types. This approach combines the high performance of flow cytometry with the advantages of image analysis. Examples obtained with different human cell lines are presented.

  11. Nematic Director Reorientation at Solid and Liquid Interfaces under Flow: SAXS Studies in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the interplay between flow and boundary condition effects on the orientation field of a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal under flow and confinement in a microfluidic device. Two types of experiments were performed using synchrotron small-angle X-ray-scattering (SAXS). In the first, a nematic liquid crystal flows through a square-channel cross section at varying flow rates, while the nematic director orientation projected onto the velocity/velocity gradient plane is measured using a 2D detector. At moderate-to-high flow rates, the nematic director is predominantly aligned in the flow direction, but with a small tilt angle of ∼±11° in the velocity gradient direction. The director tilt angle is constant throughout most of the channel width but switches sign when crossing the center of the channel, in agreement with the Ericksen–Leslie–Parodi (ELP) theory. At low flow rates, boundary conditions begin to dominate, and a flow profile resembling the escaped radial director configuration is observed, where the director is seen to vary more smoothly from the edges (with homeotropic alignment) to the center of the channel. In the second experiment, hydrodynamic focusing is employed to confine the nematic phase into a sheet of liquid sandwiched between two layers of Triton X-100 aqueous solutions. The average nematic director orientation shifts to some extent from the flow direction toward the liquid boundaries, although it remains unclear if one tilt angle is dominant through most of the nematic sheet (with abrupt jumps near the boundaries) or if the tilt angle varies smoothly between two extreme values (∼90 and 0°). The technique presented here could be applied to perform high-throughput measurements for assessing the influence of different surfactants on the orientation of nematic phases and may lead to further improvements in areas such as boundary lubrication and clarifying the nature of defect structures in LC displays. PMID

  12. Nematic director reorientation at solid and liquid interfaces under flow: SAXS studies in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno F B; Zepeda-Rosales, Miguel; Venkateswaran, Neeraja; Fletcher, Bretton J; Carter, Lester G; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Han, Jun; Li, Youli; Olsson, Ulf; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2015-04-14

    In this work we investigate the interplay between flow and boundary condition effects on the orientation field of a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal under flow and confinement in a microfluidic device. Two types of experiments were performed using synchrotron small-angle X-ray-scattering (SAXS). In the first, a nematic liquid crystal flows through a square-channel cross section at varying flow rates, while the nematic director orientation projected onto the velocity/velocity gradient plane is measured using a 2D detector. At moderate-to-high flow rates, the nematic director is predominantly aligned in the flow direction, but with a small tilt angle of ∼±11° in the velocity gradient direction. The director tilt angle is constant throughout most of the channel width but switches sign when crossing the center of the channel, in agreement with the Ericksen-Leslie-Parodi (ELP) theory. At low flow rates, boundary conditions begin to dominate, and a flow profile resembling the escaped radial director configuration is observed, where the director is seen to vary more smoothly from the edges (with homeotropic alignment) to the center of the channel. In the second experiment, hydrodynamic focusing is employed to confine the nematic phase into a sheet of liquid sandwiched between two layers of Triton X-100 aqueous solutions. The average nematic director orientation shifts to some extent from the flow direction toward the liquid boundaries, although it remains unclear if one tilt angle is dominant through most of the nematic sheet (with abrupt jumps near the boundaries) or if the tilt angle varies smoothly between two extreme values (∼90 and 0°). The technique presented here could be applied to perform high-throughput measurements for assessing the influence of different surfactants on the orientation of nematic phases and may lead to further improvements in areas such as boundary lubrication and clarifying the nature of defect structures in LC displays. PMID

  13. Assessment of urinary tract biomaterial encrustation using a modified Robbins device continuous flow model.

    PubMed

    Tunney, M M; Keane, P F; Gorman, S P

    1997-01-01

    Encrustation of biomaterials employed in the urinary tract remains a major problem resulting in obstruction or blockage of catheters and stents. Therefore, resistance to encrustation is a desirable feature of biomaterials employed in such devices. The novel assessment of biomaterial encrustation employing a continuous flow model based on a modified Robbins device is described. Artificial urine was used in conjunction with 5% CO2 to simulate the physiological environment within the upper urinary tract. The widely used urinary device biomaterials, silicone and polyurethane, were investigated in the model for hydroxyapatite and struvite encrustation. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and atomic absorption spectroscopy all showed that silicone was less prone to encrustation than polyurethane and that hydroxyapatite deposition was predominant on both surfaces. The model has the advantage that a large number of biomaterials may be investigated simultaneously because several Robbins devices may be placed in parallel. The model is recommended for comparative evaluation of biomaterial candidates for use in urinary tract devices. PMID:9178735

  14. Comparison of continuous-flow and pulsatile-flow left ventricular assist devices: is there an advantage to pulsatility?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Allen; Williamitis, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CFVAD) are currently the most widely used type of mechanical circulatory support as bridge-to-transplant and destination therapy for end-stage congestive heart failure (HF). Compared to the first generation pulsatile-flow left ventricular assist devices (PFVADs), CFVADs have demonstrated improved reliability and durability. However, CFVADs have also been associated with certain complications thought to be linked with decreased arterial pulsatility. Previous studies comparing CFVADs and PFVADs have presented conflicting results. It is important to understand the outcome differences between CFVAD and PFVAD in order to further advance the current VAD technology. Methods In this review, we compared the outcomes of CFVADs and PFVADs and examined the need for arterial pulsatility for the future generation of mechanical circulatory support. Results CVADs offer advantages of smaller size, increased reliability and durability, and subsequent improvements in survival. However, with the increasing duration of long-term support, it appears that CFVADs may have specific complications and a lower rate of left ventricular recovery associated with diminished pulsatility, increased pressure gradients on the aortic valve and decreased compliance in smaller arterial vessels. PFVAD support or pulsatility control algorithms in CFVADs could be beneficial and potentially necessary for long term support. Conclusions Given the relative advantages and disadvantages of CFVADs and PFVADs, the ultimate solution may lie in incorporating pulsatility into current and emerging CFVADs whilst retaining their existing benefits. Future studies examining physiologic responses, end-organ function and LV remodeling at varying degrees of pulsatility and device support levels are needed. PMID:25512897

  15. High-performance computing-based exploration of flow control with micro devices.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kozo

    2014-08-13

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator that controls flow separation is one of the promising technologies to realize energy savings and noise reduction of fluid dynamic systems. However, the mechanism for controlling flow separation is not clearly defined, and this lack of knowledge prevents practical use of this technology. Therefore, large-scale computations for the study of the DBD plasma actuator have been conducted using the Japanese Petaflops supercomputer 'K' for three different Reynolds numbers. Numbers of new findings on the control of flow separation by the DBD plasma actuator have been obtained from the simulations, and some of them are presented in this study. Knowledge of suitable device parameters is also obtained. The DBD plasma actuator is clearly shown to be very effective for controlling flow separation at a Reynolds number of around 10(5), and several times larger lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved at higher angles of attack after stall. For higher Reynolds numbers, separated flow is partially controlled. Flow analysis shows key features towards better control. DBD plasma actuators are a promising technology, which could reduce fuel consumption and contribute to a green environment by achieving high aerodynamic performance. The knowledge described above can be obtained only with high-end computers such as the supercomputer 'K'. PMID:25024414

  16. Measurement of flow velocity profiles in tank structures using the prototype device OCM Pro LR.

    PubMed

    Klepiszewski, K; Teufel, M; Seiffert, S; Henry, E

    2011-01-01

    Generally, studies investigating the treatment efficiency of tank structures for storm water or waste water treatment observe pollutant flows in connection with conditions of hydraulic loading. Further investigations evaluate internal processes in tank structures using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling or lab scale tests. As flow paths inside of tank structures have a considerable influence on the treatment efficiency, flow velocity profile (FVP) measurements can provide a possibility to calibrate CFD models and contribute to a better understanding of pollutant transport processes in these structures. This study focuses on tests carried out with the prototype FVP measurement device OCM Pro LR by NIVUS in a sedimentation tank with combined sewer overflow (CSO) situated in Petange, Luxembourg. The OCM Pro LR measurement system analyses the echo of ultrasonic signals of different flow depths to get a detailed FVP. A comparison of flow velocity measured by OCM Pro LR with a vane measurement showed good conformity. The FVPs measured by OCM Pro LR point out shortcut flows within the tank structure during CSO events, which could cause a reduction of the cleaning efficiency of the structure. The results prove the applicability of FVP measurements in large-scale structures. PMID:22053484

  17. High-performance computing-based exploration of flow control with micro devices

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator that controls flow separation is one of the promising technologies to realize energy savings and noise reduction of fluid dynamic systems. However, the mechanism for controlling flow separation is not clearly defined, and this lack of knowledge prevents practical use of this technology. Therefore, large-scale computations for the study of the DBD plasma actuator have been conducted using the Japanese Petaflops supercomputer ‘K’ for three different Reynolds numbers. Numbers of new findings on the control of flow separation by the DBD plasma actuator have been obtained from the simulations, and some of them are presented in this study. Knowledge of suitable device parameters is also obtained. The DBD plasma actuator is clearly shown to be very effective for controlling flow separation at a Reynolds number of around 105, and several times larger lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved at higher angles of attack after stall. For higher Reynolds numbers, separated flow is partially controlled. Flow analysis shows key features towards better control. DBD plasma actuators are a promising technology, which could reduce fuel consumption and contribute to a green environment by achieving high aerodynamic performance. The knowledge described above can be obtained only with high-end computers such as the supercomputer ‘K’. PMID:25024414

  18. On the mixture flow problem in lubrication of hydrodynamic bearings - Small solid volume fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khonsari, M. M.; Dai, Fuling

    1992-01-01

    The lubrication problem of infinitely long slider bearings with a mixture of fluid and particulate solid at small volume fraction level is studied. Closed-form analytical solutions for pressure and shear stress are obtained for a class of solid aggregates. The results reduce to those of pure fluid in the limiting case. A parametric study of the bearing performance with particulate solid is presented.

  19. On the mixture flow problem in lubrication of hydrodynamic bearings - Small solid volume fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Khonsari, M.M.; Dai, Fuling )

    1992-01-01

    The lubrication problem of infinitely long slider bearings with a mixture of fluid and particulate solid at small volume fraction level is studied. Closed-form analytical solutions for pressure and shear stress are obtained for a class of solid aggregates. The results reduce to those of pure fluid in the limiting case. A parametric study of the bearing performance with particulate solid is presented. 5 refs.

  20. Direct sequencing of human gut virome fractions obtained by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Džunková, Mária; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Moya, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The sequence assembly of the human gut virome encounters several difficulties. A high proportion of human and bacterial matches is detected in purified viral samples. Viral DNA extraction results in a low DNA concentration, which does not reach the minimal limit required for sequencing library preparation. Therefore, the viromes are usually enriched by whole genome amplification (WGA), which is, however, prone to the development of chimeras and amplification bias. In addition, as there is a very wide diversity of gut viral species, very extensive sequencing efforts must be made for the assembling of whole viral genomes. We present an approach to improve human gut virome assembly by employing a more precise preparation of a viral sample before sequencing. Particles present in a virome previously filtered through 0.2 μm pores were further divided into groups in accordance with their size and DNA content by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). One selected viral fraction was sequenced excluding the WGA step, so that unbiased sequences with high reliability were obtained. The DNA extracted from the 314 viral particles of the selected fraction was assembled into 34 contigs longer than 1,000 bp. This represents an increase to the number of assembled long contigs per sequenced Gb in comparison with other studies where non-fractioned viromes are sequenced. Seven of these contigs contained open reading frames (ORFs) with explicit matches to proteins related to bacteriophages. The remaining contigs also possessed uncharacterized ORFs with bacteriophage-related domains. When the particles that are present in the filtered viromes are sorted into smaller groups by FACS, large pieces of viral genomes can be recovered easily. This approach has several advantages over the conventional sequencing of non-fractioned viromes: non-viral contamination is reduced and the sequencing efforts required for viral assembly are minimized. PMID:26441889

  1. Direct sequencing of human gut virome fractions obtained by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Džunková, Mária; D’Auria, Giuseppe; Moya, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The sequence assembly of the human gut virome encounters several difficulties. A high proportion of human and bacterial matches is detected in purified viral samples. Viral DNA extraction results in a low DNA concentration, which does not reach the minimal limit required for sequencing library preparation. Therefore, the viromes are usually enriched by whole genome amplification (WGA), which is, however, prone to the development of chimeras and amplification bias. In addition, as there is a very wide diversity of gut viral species, very extensive sequencing efforts must be made for the assembling of whole viral genomes. We present an approach to improve human gut virome assembly by employing a more precise preparation of a viral sample before sequencing. Particles present in a virome previously filtered through 0.2 μm pores were further divided into groups in accordance with their size and DNA content by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). One selected viral fraction was sequenced excluding the WGA step, so that unbiased sequences with high reliability were obtained. The DNA extracted from the 314 viral particles of the selected fraction was assembled into 34 contigs longer than 1,000 bp. This represents an increase to the number of assembled long contigs per sequenced Gb in comparison with other studies where non-fractioned viromes are sequenced. Seven of these contigs contained open reading frames (ORFs) with explicit matches to proteins related to bacteriophages. The remaining contigs also possessed uncharacterized ORFs with bacteriophage-related domains. When the particles that are present in the filtered viromes are sorted into smaller groups by FACS, large pieces of viral genomes can be recovered easily. This approach has several advantages over the conventional sequencing of non-fractioned viromes: non-viral contamination is reduced and the sequencing efforts required for viral assembly are minimized. PMID:26441889

  2. Subscale Ship Airwake Studies Using Novel Vortex Flow Devices with Smoke, Laser-Vapor-Screen and Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Landman, Drew; Swift, Russell S.; Parikh, Paresh C.

    2007-01-01

    Ships produce vortices and air-wakes while either underway or stationary in a wind. These flow fields can be detrimental to the conduction of air operations in that they can adversely impact the air vehicles and flight crews. There are potential solutions to these problems for both frigates/destroyers and carriers through the use of novel vortex flow or flow control devices. This appendix highlights several devices which may have application and points out that traditional wind-tunnel testing using smoke, laser-vapor screen, and Particle Image Velocimetry can be useful in sorting out the effectiveness of different devices.

  3. Hypertension: An Unstudied Potential Risk Factor for Adverse Outcomes during Continuous Flow Ventricular Assist Device Support

    PubMed Central

    Wasson, Lauren T.; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Wakabayashi, Michiyori; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Uriel, Nir; Jorde, Ulrich P.; Demmer, Ryan T.; Colombo, Paolo C.

    2014-01-01

    In end-stage heart failure, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) represent an exciting new frontier in which post-device-implantation survival approaches that of heart transplant. However, expansion of this technology is still limited by complications that impact morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is essential to identify and optimize modifiable predictors of poor outcomes. One such predictor may be hypertension (HTN). Not only may chronic HTN as a traditional cardiovascular risk factor be present during long-term LVAD support, but HTN may also contribute to device malfunction or device-associated complications. Although current guidelines identify blood pressure (BP) control as important to outpatient continuous flow (CF) LVAD management, there is no evidence base to support these guidelines. Indeed, our comprehensive literature search did not identify any studies that evaluated post-device-implantation HTN as a potential predictor of adverse CF-LVAD outcomes. Hypertension among CF-LVAD patients is likely a relatively unstudied factor because of difficulties using standard non-invasive techniques to measure BP in the setting of reduced pulsatile flow. Fortunately, recent research has elucidated the meaning of Doppler BP measurements and validated a slow-deflation cuff system for BP measurements in the setting of CF-LVAD support. Therefore, CF-LVAD researchers and clinicians may i) consider potential mechanisms relating HTN to poor outcomes, ii) realize that HTN management is a stated goal despite scarce evidence, and iii) utilize the new reliable and valid methods for outpatient BP measurement that make research and management possible. It is critical and now feasible that research on HTN in the CF-LVAD patient population move forward. PMID:25283767

  4. Hypertension: an unstudied potential risk factor for adverse outcomes during continuous flow ventricular assist device support.

    PubMed

    Wasson, Lauren T; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Wakabayashi, Michiyori; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Uriel, Nir; Jorde, Ulrich P; Demmer, Ryan T; Colombo, Paolo C

    2015-05-01

    In end-stage heart failure, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) represent an exciting new frontier in which post-device implantation survival approaches that of heart transplant. However, expansion of this technology is still limited by complications that impact morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is essential to identify and optimize modifiable predictors of poor outcomes. One such predictor may be hypertension (HTN). Not only may chronic HTN as a traditional cardiovascular risk factor be present during long-term LVAD support, but HTN may also contribute to device malfunction or device-associated complications. Although current guidelines identify blood pressure (BP) control as important to outpatient continuous flow (CF) LVAD management, there is no evidence base to support these guidelines. Indeed, our comprehensive literature search did not identify any studies that evaluated post-device implantation HTN as a potential predictor of adverse CF-LVAD outcomes. HTN among CF-LVAD patients is likely a relatively unstudied factor because of difficulties using standard noninvasive techniques to measure BP in the setting of reduced pulsatile flow. Fortunately, recent research has elucidated the meaning of Doppler BP measurements and validated a slow-cuff deflation system for BP measurements in the setting of CF-LVAD support. Therefore, CF-LVAD researchers and clinicians may (1) consider potential mechanisms relating HTN to poor outcomes, (2) realize that HTN management is a stated goal despite scarce evidence, and (3) utilize the new reliable and valid methods for outpatient BP measurement that make research and management possible. It is critical and now feasible that research on HTN in the CF-LVAD patient population move forward. PMID:25283767

  5. An improved method for simultaneous determination of frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in vertical flow boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, J. F.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in the vertical boiling and adiabatic flow of the refrigerant, R11, have been simultaneously measured by a liquid balancing column and differential magnetic reluctance pressure transducers. An account is given of the experimental apparatus and procedure, data acquisition and analysis, and error estimation employed. All values of two-phase multipliers evaluated on the basis of the measured frictional pressure drop data in vertical upflow fall in the range bounded by the predictions of the Chisholm correlation and the homogeneous model.

  6. Combining asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with on- and off-line fluorescence detection to examine biodegradation of riverine dissolved and particulate organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Tak; Yang, Boram; Kim, Jin-Yong; Park, Ji-Hyung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-08-28

    This study demonstrated that asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with on-line UV and fluorescence detection (FLD) and off-line excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy can be employed to analyze the influence of microbial metabolic activity on the consumption and production of freshwater organic matter. With the AF4 system, organic matter is on-line enriched during a focusing/relaxation period, which is an essential process prior to separation. Size-fractionated chromophoric and fluorophoric organic materials were simultaneously monitored during the 30-min AF4 separation process. Two fractions of different sizes (dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM)) of freshwater samples from three locations (up-, mid-, and downstream) along the Han River basin of Korea were incubated with the same inoculum for 14 days to analyze fraction-specific alterations in optical properties using AF4-UV-FLD. A comparison of AF4 fractograms obtained from pre- and post-incubation samples revealed that POM-derived DOM were more susceptible to microbial metabolic activity than was DOM. Preferential microbial consumption of protein-like DOM components concurred with enhanced peaks of chromophoric and humic-like fluorescent components, presumably formed as by-products of microbial processing. AF4-UV-FLD combined with off-line identification of microbially processed components using EEM fluorescence spectroscopy provides a powerful tool to study the relationship between microbial activity and composition as well as biodegradability of DOM and POM-derived DOM from different origins, especially for the analysis of chromophoric and fluorophoric organic matter that are consumed and produced by microbial metabolic activity. The proposed AF4 system can be applied to organic matter in freshwater samples having low concentration range (0.3-2.5ppm of total organic carbon) without a pre-concentration procedure. PMID:26233252

  7. An experimental study of the size effect on adiabatic gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns and void fraction in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Renqiang; Chung, J. N.

    2007-03-01

    Adiabatic gas-liquid flow patterns and void fractions in microchannels were experimentally investigated. Using nitrogen and water, experiments were conducted in rectangular microchannels with hydraulic diameters of 0.209mm, 0.412mm and 0.622mm, respectively. Gas and liquid superficial velocities were varied from 0.06-72.3m/s and 0.02-7.13m/s, respectively. The main objective is focused on the effects of microscale channel sizes on the flow regime map and void fraction. The instability of flow patterns was observed. Four groups of flow patterns including bubbly slug flow, slug-ring flow, dispersed-churn flow, and annular flow were observed in microchannels of 0.412mm and, 0.622mm. In the microchannel of 0.209mm, the bubbly slug flow became the slug flow and the dispersed-churn flow disappeared. The current flow regime maps showed the transition lines shifted to higher gas superficial velocity due to a dominant surface tension effect as the channel size was reduced. The regime maps presented by other authors for minichannels were found to not be applicable for microchannels. Time-averaged void fractions were measured by analyzing 8000 high speed video images for each flow condition. The void fractions hold a nonlinear relationship with the homogeneous void fraction as opposed to the relatively linear trend for the minichannels. A new correlation was developed to predict the nonlinear relationship that fits most of the current experimental data and those of the 0.1mm diameter tube reported by Kawahara et al. [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 28, 1411 (2002)] within ±15%.

  8. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. III. Field programming by flow-rate gradient generated by a programmable pump.

    PubMed

    Plocková, J; Chmelík, J

    2001-05-25

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) utilizes the Earth's gravitational field as an external force that causes the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Hydrodynamic lift forces oppose this action by elevating particles away from the channel accumulation wall. These two counteracting forces enable modulation of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. In this work, force-field programming based on modulating the magnitude of hydrodynamic lift forces was implemented via changes of flow-rate, which was accomplished by a programmable pump. Several flow-rate gradients (step gradients, linear gradients, parabolic, and combined gradients) were tested and evaluated as tools for optimization of the separation of a silica gel particle mixture. The influence of increasing amount of sample injected on the peak resolution under flow-rate gradient conditions was also investigated. This is the first time that flow-rate gradients have been implemented for programming of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. PMID:11407583

  9. Prediction of Flow-Limiting Fractional Flow Reserve in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease Based on Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Haruki; Takahashi, Teruyuki; Kozono, Nami; Tanakamaru, Yoshiki; Ohashi, Norihiko; Yasunobu, Yuji; Tanaka, Koichi; Okada, Takenori; Kaseda, Shunichi; Nakanishi, Toshio; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-05-01

    Although fractional flow reserve (FFR) and myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) findings fundamentally differ, several cohort studies have revealed that these findings correlate. Here, we investigated whether flow-limiting FFR could be predicted from adenosine stress thallium-201 MPI with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings derived from 84 consecutive, prospectively identified patients with stable coronary artery disease and 212 diseased vessels. Among them, FFR was measured in 136 diseased vessels (64%). The findings were compared with regional perfusion abnormalities including stress total perfusion defect (TPD) - rest TPD determined using quantitative perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography software. The FFR inversely correlated the most accurately with stress TPD - rest TPD (r = -0.552, p <0.001). Predictors of major vessels of interest comprising FFR <0.80, included stress TPD - rest TPD, the transient ischemic dilation ratio, left ventricular ejection fraction at rest and beta blockers for left anterior descending artery (LAD) regions, and stress TPD - rest TPD, left ventricular mass, left ventricular ejection fraction at rest, right coronary artery lesions, the transient ischemic dilation ratio, and age for non-LAD regions. The diagnostic accuracy of formulas to predict major vessels of interest with FFR <0.80 was high (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for LAD and non-LAD: 84%, 87% and 86%, and 75%, 93% and 87%, respectively). In conclusion, although somewhat limited by a sample size and a single-center design, flow-limiting FFR could be predicted from MPI findings with a defined probability. A cohort study might validate our results and provide a novel adjunctive tool with which to diagnose functionally significant coronary artery disease from MPI findings. PMID:26970815

  10. Study of Flow, Turbulence and Transport on the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, David Andrew

    The relationships amongst azimuthal flow, radial particle transport and turbulence on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) are explored through the use of biasable limiters which continuously modify the rotation of the plasma column. Four quarter annulus plates serve as an iris-like boundary between the cathode source and the main plasma chamber. Application of a voltage to the plates using a capacitor bank drives cross-field current which rotates the plasma azimuthally in the electron diamagnetic direction (EDD). With the limiters inserted, a spontaneous rotation in the ion diamagnetic direction is observed; thus, increasing biasing tends to first slow rotation, null it out, then reverse it. This experiment builds on previous LAPD biasing experiments which used the chamber wall as the biasing electrode rather than inserted limiter plates. The use of inserted limiter biasing rather than chamber wall biasing allows for better cross-field current penetration between the plasma source and the electrodes which in turn allow for a finer variation of applied torque on the plasma. The modification of plasma parameter profiles, turbulent characteristics, and radial transport are tracked through these varying flow states. Azimuthal flow radial profiles are peaked at the limiter edge. Consequently, the variation in flow states also results in variation of sheared flow. Improved radial particle confinement is observed in states with sheared flow regardless of the direction of rotation. This improvement is indicated by both steepened density profiles and decreased radial particle flux. Conversely, a confinement degradation is seen in the minimum sheared flow state. Comparison of density fluctuation power and crossphase between density and radial velocity fluctuations show that both quantities are suppressed by sheared flow, but that the density fluctuation suppression is dominant and contributes most to the decrease in radial particle flux. Also, some observed changes to density and

  11. Entrained liquid fraction calculation in adiabatic disperse-annular flows at low rate in film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagov, V. V.; Minko, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we continue our study [1] and extend further an approach to low reduced pressures. An approximate model of droplets entrainment from the laminar film surface and an equation for calculating entrainment intensity are proposed. To carry out direct verification of this equation using experimental data is extremely difficult because the integral effect—liquid flow rate in a film at a dynamic equilibrium between entrainment and deposition—is usually measured in the experiments. The balance between flows of droplets entrainment and deposition corresponds to the dynamic equilibrium because of turbulent diffusion. The transcendental equation, which was obtained on the basis of this balance, contains one unknown numerical factor and allows one to calculate the liquid rate. Comparing calculation results with the experimental data for the water-air and water-helium flows at low reduced pressures (less than 0.03) has shown their good agreement at the universal value of a numerical constant, if an additional dimensionless parameter, a fourth root of vaporliquid densities ratio, is introduced. The criterion that determines the boundary of using methods of this work and that of [1] in calculations and that reflects effect of pressure and state of film surface on distribution of the liquid in the annular flow is proposed; the numerical value of this criterion has been determined.

  12. Compatibility of Electroanatomical Mapping Systems with a Concurrent Percutaneous Axial Flow Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Vaibhav R.; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Madhavan, Malini; Noheria, Amit; Shahid, Mohammed; Walters, Jacob; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Mikell, Susan B.; Johnson, Susan B.; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic instability hinders activation and entrainment mapping during ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation. The Impella 2.5 microaxial flow device (MFD) (Abiomed Inc., Danvers, MA, USA) is used to prevent hemodynamic instability during electrophysiologic study. However, electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated by this device can preclude accurate electroanatomic mapping. Methods Impella was placed in the left ventricle of 7 canines for circulatory support. Electroanatomic mapping during sinus rhythm, ventricular pacing, and ventricular fibrillation (VF) was performed using magnet- (Carto3, Biosense Webster Inc., Diamond Bar, CA, USA) and impedance- (EnSite Velocity System/EnSite NavX, St. Jude Medical Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) based systems. Distance from device to points with severe EMI precluding acquisition was compared to points with mild/no EMI. Two methods were used to reduce EMI: 1) titration of MFD performance, and 2) impedance-only mapping combined with manual annotation of activation. Results Severe EMI did not occur during impedance-based mapping. Severe EMI was observed using Carto3 at 9.4% of all points attempted at maximum performance level (P8) of device. Severe EMI occurred at points closer to device (40.1 ± 16.8 mm) vs. (55.5 ± 20.0 mm) for mild/no EMI, p<0.0001. Severe EMI using Carto3 was resolved by either 1) reduction of performance from P8 to P6 or 2) impedance-only mapping with manual annotation Conclusion Concurrent use of MFD caused EMI to prevent acquisition of points with magnet-based mapping. Predictors for EMI were distance from device and performance level. Temporary reductions to P6 or impedance-only mapping are two methods to resolve EMI. PMID:24758340

  13. Dynamic bioprocessing and microfluidic transport control with smart magnetic nanoparticles in laminar-flow devices.

    PubMed

    Lai, James J; Nelson, Kjell E; Nash, Michael A; Hoffman, Allan S; Yager, Paul; Stayton, Patrick S

    2009-07-21

    In the absence of applied forces, the transport of molecules and particulate reagents across laminar flowstreams in microfluidic devices is dominated by the diffusivities of the transported species. While the differential diffusional properties between smaller and larger diagnostic targets and reagents have been exploited for bioseparation and assay applications, there are limitations to methods that depend on these intrinsic size differences. Here a new strategy is described for exploiting the sharply reversible change in size and magnetophoretic mobility of "smart" magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) to perform bioseparation and target isolation under continuous flow processing conditions. The isolated 5 nm mNPs do not exhibit significant magnetophoretic velocities, but do exhibit high magnetophoretic velocities when aggregated by the action of a pH-responsive polymer coating. A simple external magnet is used to magnetophorese the aggregated mNPs that have captured a diagnostic target from a lower pH laminar flowstream (pH 7.3) to a second higher pH flowstream (pH 8.4) that induces rapid mNP disaggregation. In this second dis-aggregated state and flowstream, the mNPs continue to flow past the magnet rather than being immobilized at the channel surface near the magnet. This stimuli-responsive reagent system has been shown to transfer 81% of a model protein target from an input flowstream to a second flowstream in a continuous flow H-filter device. PMID:19568666

  14. Study of ion flow dynamics in an inertial electrostatic confinement device through sequential grid construction

    SciTech Connect

    Murali, S. Krupakar; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2008-12-15

    Experiments were performed to understand the dynamics of the ion flow in an inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device. This was done by monitoring the fusion rate as the symmetry of the grid was increased starting with a single loop all the way until the entire grid is constructed. The fusion rate was observed to increase with grid symmetry and eventually saturate. A single loop grid was observed to generate a cylindrical ({approx}line) fusion source. The ion flow distribution was measured by introducing fine wires across a single loop of the grid in the form of a chord of a circle (chord wires). This study revealed that with increased symmetry of the cathode grid wires the convergence of the ions improves. The chord wires provided electrons for ionization even at low pressures ({approx}6.67 mPa) and helped sustain the plasma. The impinging ions heat these wires locally and the temperature of the wires was measured using an infrared thermometer that was used to understand the ion flow distribution across the cathode grid. The presence of the grid wires seems to affect the fusion rate more drastically than previously thought (was assumed to be uniform around the central grid). Most of the fusion reactions were observed to occur in the ion microchannels that form in gaps between the cathode wires. This work helps understand the fusion source regimes and calibrate the IEC device.

  15. Development of a polymer-based easy-to-fabricate micro-free-flow electrophoresis device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Takanori; Kubota, Ryosuke; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-06-01

    Since 1990s, micro-free-flow electrophoresis (µFFE) devices have been developed to allow for smaller sample volume and reagent consumption. To solve several technical problems involving the generation of electrolysis gas on the electrodes, most of the µFFE devices reported in the past were fabricated using elaborate micromachining process on silicon or glass substrates. However, high-cost micromachining processes were required and these were not suitable for mass production. In this paper, we report a polymer-based easy-to-fabricate µFFE device using a poly(methyl methacrylate-co-styrene), P(MMA-co-S), substrate and tetra-PEG gel for preventing the invasion of electrolysis gas into the separation chamber. In the separation experiment using a mixture of rhodamine B and sulforhodamine B, the resolution increased linearly with the increase of the applied voltages up to 50 V, whereas a deviation from the linear relation was observed above 50 V, which is possibly the Joule heating. These results indicate that this device could be applicable to separation of biological samples.

  16. Effects of comprehensive function of factors on retention behavior of microparticles in gravitational field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang; Qiu, Bai-Ling; Zhu, Chen-Qi; Yang, Ya-Ya Gao; Wu, Di; Liang, Qi-Hui; Han, Nan-Yin

    2016-09-15

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) is a useful technique for separation and characterization for micrometer-sized particles. Elution behavior of micrometer-sized particles in GrFFF was researched in this study. Particles in GrFFF channel are subject to hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF), fluid inertial forces and gravity, which drive them to different velocities by carrier flow, resulting in a size-based separation. Effects of ionic strength, flow rate and viscosity as well as methanol were investigated using polystyrene latex beads as model particles. This study is devoted to experimental verification of the effect of every factor and their comprehensive function. All experiments were performed to show isolated influence of every variable factor. The orthogonal design test was used to evaluate various factors comprehensively. Results suggested that retention ratio of particles increases with increasing flow rate or the viscosity of carrier liquid by adjusting external forces acting on particles. In addition, retention ratio increases as ionic strength decreases because of decreased electrostatic repulsion between particles and channel accumulation wall. As far as methanol, there is no general trend due to the change of both density and viscosity. On the basis of orthogonal design test it was found that viscosity of carrier liquid plays a significant role in determining resolution of micrometer-sized particles in GrFFF. PMID:27447927

  17. Fractionation and characterization of natural organic matter from certain rivers and soils by free-flow electrophoresis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1973-01-01

    Soluble river organic matter and soil fulvic acids from a variety of environments were compared by examining the free-flow electrophoretic fractionation curves of organic carbon, color, and polysaccharides. Significant amounts of virtually colorless organic material were found in both the soil and the river preparations. Polysaccharides comprised 20-75 percent of the colorless material in the soil fulvic acids but only 3.2-7.0 percent of the colorless material in the river preparations. A significant amount of polysaccharides was complexed with organic materials having negative charges. Amounts of polysaccharides were greater in the Fairbanks soil from Alaska than in the soils from North Carolina or Iowa, and they were greater in the Tahquamenon River in Michigan than in the two rivers in Florida; this suggests that polysaccharide degradation is slower in cooler environments. For all of the organic preparations which were fractionated, the intensity of the yellow color increased as the charge on the organic anion increased. Highly colored, negatively charged organic material was found to be present in greater amounts in the subsurface spodic soil horizon of the Lakewood and Fairbanks soils than in the surface mollic horizon of the Macksburg soil. Infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis of four pooled fractions of the Fairbanks fulvic acid indicated increasing aromatic character with increasing negative charge. An increase in the carboxyl content with negative charge suggests the carboxyl group as the primary source of the negative charge.

  18. Molecular characterization of solution styrene-butadiene rubber: thermal field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Choi, You Jin; Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Seung Hwa; Kim, A-Ju; Kwag, Gwanghoon; Lee, Seungho

    2013-11-01

    Solution styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR) is mainly constituted of a random copolymer of styrene and butadiene. SSBR usually contains microgels, having ultrahigh molecular weight (M>10(7)g/mol), affecting rheological properties of the rubber. Thus, determinations of M and size distribution of these microgels are critical in performance evaluation and control for SSBR. We employ thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF), combined with online multi-angle light scattering (MALS), as most suited for characterization of solutions containing the microgels since they can be characterized in toto without removing the microgels from the solution. ThFFF-MALS was applied for characterization of linear and branched SBR materials from various commercial sources, and the results were compared to those from size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). ThFFF provides higher resolution than SEC for high molecular fractions and allowed gel content to be measured. The gel content was determined by subtracting the amount of sol from total injection mass, and was measured to be 10-15%. We infer from the characterization results that the microgel content may not be correlated to the microstructure, the styrene and vinyl content of butadiene but to the fraction of high molecular weight in SSBR. Finally, the macromolecular structure and the content of microgel (larger than about 100nm) were found to significantly affect various rheological parameters such as viscosity, mechanical and dynamic properties. PMID:24063984

  19. Hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation and size-exclusion chromatography with MALS detection: A complementary approach in biopharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Marassi, V; Roda, B; Zattoni, A; Tanase, M; Reschiglian, P

    2014-10-30

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are promising reagents both for the manufacture of drug substances and for their employment as a drug themselves, but to be approved for utilization, according to FDA recommendations and WHO guidelines, they have to undergo verifications regarding their purity, stability and percentage of aggregates. Moreover, stability tests of lots have to be performed in order to verify molecular size distribution over time and lot-to-lot consistency. Recent works in literature have highlighted the need for suitable, sensitive and reliable complementary analytical techniques for the characterization of mAbs and quantification of aggregates. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is the reference technique in the biopharmaceutical industry for its robustness, high performance and simple use; however it presents some limitations especially toward the separation and detection of aggregates with high molecular weight. On the other hand, flow field-flow fractionation (F4) in its miniaturized version (hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation, HF5) shows comparable performances with interesting additional advantages: a broad size range, gentle separation mechanism with low dilution factor and higher sensitivity. To propose HF5 as a complementary technique for evaluating aggregates' content in mAbs samples, a comparative study of both SEC and HF5 performances has been made. In this work, SEC and HF5 were coupled with UV and multi-angle light scattering detection and employed first in separating standard samples of proteins mixture used as a sample model. Then, a screening of mobile phases and an evaluation of separation performances was performed on a therapeutic mAbs formulation, demonstrating the complementarities between SEC and HF5 and their possible use as a separative platform approach for the characterization and quality control of protein drugs. PMID:25468501

  20. Design and numeric evaluation of a novel axial-flow left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Toptop, Koral; Kadipasaoglu, Kamuran A

    2013-01-01

    Virtual design characteristics and performance of the first Turkish axial-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are presented, with emphasis on rotor geometry. The patented rotor design includes a central flow channel carved inside the main block, which carries permanent magnets. A concentric rotor-stator gap minimizes the distance between respective magnets, improving electromagnetic efficiency and creating a second blood pathway. Dual sets of three helical blades, placed on the shaft and external surface of the rotor block, ensure unidirectionality. Hemodynamic performance was tested with computational fluid dynamics (CFD); and rotor-blade geometry was optimized, to maximize overall efficiency d and minimize backflow and wall shear stresses. For a shaft radius of 4.5 mm, rotor blade height of 2.5 mm, and blade inlet and exit metal angles of 67° and 32°, pump operation at the nominal head-flow combination (5 L/min and 100.4 mm Hg) was achieved at a rotor speed of 10,313 rpm. At the nominal point, backflow as percent of total flow was 7.29 and 29.87% at rotor inlet and exit, respectively; overall hydraulic efficiency reached 21.59%; and maximum area-averaged shroud shear was 520 Pa. Overall efficiency peaked at 24.07% for a pump flow of 6.90 L/min, and averaged at 22.57% within the flow range of 4-8 L/min. We concluded that the design satisfies initial rotor design criteria, and that continued studies with diffuser optimization and transient flow analysis are warranted. PMID:23644609

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  2. Silver and gold nanoparticle separation using asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation: Influence of run conditions and of particle and membrane charges.

    PubMed

    Meisterjahn, Boris; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Hennecke, Dieter; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (Flow-FFF), coupled with online detection systems is one of the most promising tools available for the separation and quantification of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in complex matrices. To correctly relate the retention of nanoparticles in the Flow-FFF-channel to the particle size, ideal separation conditions must be met. This requires optimization of the parameters that influence the separation behavior. The aim of this study was therefore to systematically investigate and evaluate the influence of parameters such as the carrier liquid, the cross flow, and the membrane material, on the separation behavior of two metallic ENPs. For this purpose the retention, recovery, and separation efficiency of sterically stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and electrostatically stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which represent two materials widely used in investigations on environmental fate and ecotoxicology, were investigated against a parameter matrix of three different cross-flow densities, four representative carrier solutions, and two membrane materials. The use of a complex mixture of buffers, ionic and non-ionic surfactants (FL-70 solution) together with a medium cross-flow density provided an acceptable compromise in peak quality and recovery for both types of ENPs. However, these separation conditions do not represent a perfect match for both particle types at the same time (maximized recovery at maximized retention). It could be shown that the behavior of particles within Flow-FFF channels cannot be predicted or explained purely in terms of electrostatic interactions. Particles were irreversibly lost under conditions where the measured zeta potentials suggested that there should have been sufficient electrostatic repulsion to ensure stabilization of the particles in the Flow-FFF channel resulting in good recoveries. The wide variations that we observed in ENP behavior under different conditions, together with the different

  3. Photoresponsive microvalve for remote actuation and flow control in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Amol D.; Yan, Bao; Luo, Rong-Cong; Wei, Li; Zhen, Xu; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Microvalves with different actuation methods offer great integrability and flexibility in operation of lab-on-chip devices. In this work, we demonstrate a hydrogel-based and optically controlled modular microvalve that can be easily integrated within a microfluidic device and actuated by an off-chip laser source. The microvalve is based on in-channel trapping of microgel particles, which are composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polypyrrole nanoparticles. Upon irradiation by a near-infrared (NIR) laser, the microgel undergoes volumetric change and enables precisely localized fluid on/off switching. The response rate and the “open” duration of the microvalve can be simply controlled by adjusting the laser power and exposure time. We showed that the trapped microgel can be triggered to shrink sufficiently to open a channel within as low as ∼1–2 s; while the microgel swells to re-seal the channel within ∼6–8 s. This is so far one of the fastest optically controlled and hydrogel-based microvalves, thus permitting speedy fluidic switching applications. In this study, we successfully employed this technique to control fluidic interface between laminar flow streams within a Y-junction device. The optically triggered microvalve permits flexible and remote fluidic handling, and enables pulsatile in situ chemical treatment to cell culture in an automatic and programmed manner, which is exemplified by studies of chemotherapeutic drug induced cell apoptosis under different drug treatment strategies. We find that cisplatin induced apoptosis is significantly higher in cancer cells treated with a pulsed dose, as compared to continuous flow with a sustained dose. It is expected that our NIR-controlled valving strategy will provide a simple, versatile, and powerful alternative for liquid handling in microfluidic devices. PMID:26180571

  4. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  5. A Numerical Simulation of Cell Separation by Simplified Asymmetric Pinched Flow Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing-Tao; Xu, Yuan-Qing; Tang, Xiao-Ying

    2016-01-01

    As a typical microfluidic cell sorting technique, the size-dependent cell sorting has attracted much interest in recent years. In this paper, a size-dependent cell sorting scheme is presented based on a controllable asymmetric pinched flow by employing an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM). The geometry of channels consists of 2 upstream branches, 1 transitional channel, and 4 downstream branches (D-branches). Simulations are conducted by varying inlet flow ratio, the cell size, and the ratio of flux of outlet 4 to the total flux. It is found that, after being randomly released in one upstream branch, the cells are aligned in a line close to one sidewall of the transitional channel due to the hydrodynamic forces of the asymmetric pinched flow. Cells with different sizes can be fed into different downstream D-branches just by regulating the flux of one D-branch. A principle governing D-branch choice of a cell is obtained, with which a series of numerical cases are performed to sort the cell mixture involving two, three, or four classes of diameters. Results show that, for each case, an adaptive regulating flux can be determined to sort the cell mixture effectively. PMID:27597877

  6. A Numerical Simulation of Cell Separation by Simplified Asymmetric Pinched Flow Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing-Tao; Tang, Xiao-Ying

    2016-01-01

    As a typical microfluidic cell sorting technique, the size-dependent cell sorting has attracted much interest in recent years. In this paper, a size-dependent cell sorting scheme is presented based on a controllable asymmetric pinched flow by employing an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM). The geometry of channels consists of 2 upstream branches, 1 transitional channel, and 4 downstream branches (D-branches). Simulations are conducted by varying inlet flow ratio, the cell size, and the ratio of flux of outlet 4 to the total flux. It is found that, after being randomly released in one upstream branch, the cells are aligned in a line close to one sidewall of the transitional channel due to the hydrodynamic forces of the asymmetric pinched flow. Cells with different sizes can be fed into different downstream D-branches just by regulating the flux of one D-branch. A principle governing D-branch choice of a cell is obtained, with which a series of numerical cases are performed to sort the cell mixture involving two, three, or four classes of diameters. Results show that, for each case, an adaptive regulating flux can be determined to sort the cell mixture effectively. PMID:27597877

  7. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    A research program to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly, is discussed. Freon 11 is the working fluid involved. The specific objectives are: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls, (2) examine the effect channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel, and (3) develop an improved data reduction analysis.

  8. A hybrid axisymmetric flow-focusing device for monodisperse picoliter droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Kuribayashi-Shigetomi, Kaori; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2011-05-01

    A combination of photolithography and stereolithography was successfully used to fabricate a hybrid axisymmetric flow-focusing device (h-AFFD) that produces monodisperse picoliter droplets. The h-AFFD achieved the same level of hydrodynamic performance as a monolithic AFFD produced by only stereolithography from acrylic resin. Since the h-AFFD had a narrower orifice (50 or 100 µm in diameter), created in an SU-8 sheet by photolithography, than the monolithic AFFD, we were able to produce picoliter droplets. We also succeeded in producing monodisperse droplets encapsulating a single cell without any surface modification.

  9. An alternative treatment of heat flow for charge transport in semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Matt

    2009-12-15

    A unique thermodynamic model of Fermi gases suitable for semiconductor device simulation is presented. Like other models, such as drift diffusion and hydrodynamics, it employs moments of the Boltzmann transport equation derived using the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. However, unlike other approaches, it replaces the concept of an electron thermal conductivity with the heat capacity of an ideal Fermi gas to determine heat flow. The model is used to simulate a field-effect transistor and show that the external current-voltage characteristics are strong functions of the state space available to the heated Fermi distribution.

  10. Computer Modeling of Flow, Thermal Condition and Ash Deposition in a Hot-Gas Filtration Device

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.; Mazaheri, A.; Liu, C.; Gamwo, I.K.

    2002-09-19

    The objective of the present study is to develop a computational model for simulating the gas flow, thermal condition and ash transport and deposition pattern in the hot-gas filtration systems. The computational model is to provide a virtual tool for design and operation modifications. Particular attention is given to the Particle Control Device (PCD) at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama. For evaluation of gas velocity and temperature field in the vessel, the FLUENT commercial CFD computer code is used. Ash particle transport and deposition pattern was analyzed with the Lagrangian particle tracking approach.

  11. Continuous-flow Ferrohydrodynamic Sorting of Particles and Cells in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Taotao; Cheng, Rui; Lee, Sarah A.; Rajaraman, Eashwar; Eiteman, Mark A.; Querec, Troy D.; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Mao, Leidong

    2015-01-01

    A new sorting scheme based on ferrofluid hydrodynamics (ferrohydrodynamics) was used to separate mixtures of particles and live cells simultaneously. Two species of cells, including Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as fluorescent polystyrene microparticles were studied for their sorting throughput and efficiency. Ferrofluids are stable magnetic nanoparticles suspensions. Under external magnetic fields, magnetic buoyancy forces exerted on particles and cells lead to size-dependent deflections from their laminar flow paths and result in spatial separation. We report the design, modeling, fabrication and characterization of the sorting device. This scheme is simple, low-cost and label-free compared to other existing techniques. PMID:26430394

  12. Size fractionation and size characterization of nanoemulsions of lipid droplets and large unilamellar lipid vesicles by asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Vezočnik, Valerija; Rebolj, Katja; Sitar, Simona; Ota, Katja; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Štrus, Jasna; Sepčić, Kristina; Pahovnik, David; Maček, Peter; Žagar, Ema

    2015-10-30

    Asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation technique coupled to a multi-angle light-scattering detector (AF4-MALS) was used together with dynamic light-scattering (DLS) in batch mode and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the size characteristics of the trioleoylglycerol lipid droplets covered by a monolayer of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, in water phase. These lipid droplet nanoemulsions (LD) were formed by ultrasonication. In parallel, the size characteristics of large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUV) prepared by extrusion and composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol were determined. LD and LUV were prepared at two different molar ratios (1/1, 4/1) of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. In AF4-MALS, various cross-flow conditions and mobile phase compositions were tested to optimize the separation of LD or LUV particles. The particle radii, R, as well as the root-mean-square radii, Rrms, of LD and LUV were determined by AF4-MALS, whereas the hydrodynamic radii, Rh, were obtained by DLS. TEM visualization revealed round shape particles of LD and LUV. PMID:26409772

  13. An Educational Device for a Hands-on Activity to Visualize the Effect of Atherosclerosis on Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida, J. P. P. G. L.; de Lima, J. L. M. P.

    2013-01-01

    An educational device was created to develop a hands-on activity to illustrate how atherosclerosis can dramatically reduce blood flow in human vessels. The device was conceived, designed, and built at the University of Coimbra, in response to a request from the Exploratorio Infante D. Henrique Science Centre Museum, where it is presently…

  14. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  15. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  16. WTFM, software for well test analysis in fractured media combining fractional flow with double porosity and leakance approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lods, Gerard; Gouze, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    The identification of the hydraulic characteristics and transport properties of fractured reservoirs requires the development of specific models that account for (i) the medium heterogeneity, e.g. the presence of major conductive fractures that delimit capacitive matrix blocks, with weakly open, dead end or isolated fractures , and (ii) for the geometrical arrangement of the major conductive fractures network, which dominates the flow at the scale of the well tests. Well Tests in Fractured Media (WTFM) software takes into account these two main features by combining radial flow generalized to fractional dimension, with the theory of double-porosity, including diffusivity in the second porosity, transient inter-porosity flow and inter-porosity skin effect, and with leakance. The implementation of this nD model, with n fractional, extends usefully the domain of application of the usual 1D/2D/3D double-porosity/leakance models for a large range of connection levels of fracture networks. Although the fractures geometry and properties are not considered one by one, or by directional families, they are taken into account by averaged properties and by the impact that the whole network has on the hydrodynamic behaviour. The accuracy of the coupled transient behaviours analysis is augmented by taking into account wellbore storage and skin effects. All together, the use of these different options allows matching a wide range of pumping test curves, characteristics of distinctive behaviours, with a limited number of parameters. Distinctive well test experiments, in both sedimentary and crystalline rocks, are presented for enlightening how the pertinent use of the model options improves predictions.

  17. Applicability of acoustic Doppler devices for flow velocity measurements and discharge estimation in flows with sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Guillaume; Gallart, Francesc; Gratiot, Nicolas; Soler, Montserrat; Reid, Ian; Vachtman, Dina; Latron, Jérôme; Martín-Vide, Juan Pedro; Laronne, Jonathan B.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic Doppler devices (Unidata Starflow) have been deployed for velocity measurements and discharge estimates in five contrasted open-channel flow environments, with particular attention given to the influence of sediment transport on instrument performance. The analysis is based on both field observations and flume experiments. These confirm the ability of the Starflow to provide reliable discharge time-series, but point out its limitations when sediment is being transported. (i) After calibration of the instrument by the Index Velocity Method, the deviation from reference discharge measurements was < 20% at the 95% confidence level. (ii) In ungauged conditions at high flows, the Starflow was particularly useful in providing velocity data for approximating measurements of discharge. (iii) However, channel and flume experiments revealed the effects of mobilised sediment on velocity estimates: coarse particles (⩾ 150 μm) transported by way of saltation or as bedload caused a significant underestimation of velocity by as much as 50%; a slight underestimation (10-15%) was also observed when significant quantities of fine particles (⩽150 μm) were transported in suspension; this underestimation was shown to reach 20-30% when suspended sediment concentrations were very high (c. 50-100 g L-1).

  18. Development of a flow system for studying biofilm formation on medical devices with microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Said, Jawal; Walker, Michael; Parsons, David; Stapleton, Paul; Beezer, Anthony E; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) is particularly suited to the study of microbiological samples in complex or heterogeneous environments because it does not require optical clarity of the sample and can detect metabolic activity from as few as 10(4) CFU/mL cells. While the use of IMC for studying planktonic cultures is well established, in the clinical environment bacteria are most likely to be present as biofilms. Biofilm prevention and eradication present a number of challenges to designers and users of medical devices and implants, since bacteria in biofilm colonies are usually more resistant to antimicrobial agents. Analytical tools that facilitate investigation of biofilm formation are therefore extremely useful. While it is possible to study pre-prepared biofilms in closed ampoules, better correlation with in vivo behaviour can be achieved using a system in which the bacterial suspension is flowing. Here, we discuss the potential of flow microcalorimetry for studying biofilms and report the development of a simple flow system that can be housed in a microcalorimeter. The use of the flow system is demonstrated with biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25498003

  19. An instrument for gravimetric calibration of flow devices with corrosive gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenyik, Carl J.; Hylton, James O.

    An instrument was developed for the calibration of mass flow controllers primarily used in the production of semiconductor wafers. Almost all other types of such calibrators require measurement of temperature, pressure, and volume. This instrument measures the weight of gas collected in a container and makes measuring those thermodynamic variables unnecessary. The need to measure the weight of the gas container is eliminated by submerging it in a liquid (presently water) and balancing its weight with the force of buoyancy. The accuracy of this gravimetric calibrator is unaffected by the pressure and temperature of the gas. The calibrator can also measure reactive, corrosive, and nonideal gases. The container remains connected to the process by a torsion capillary, and a load cell measures the changing gas weight continuously throughout the measuring process. A prototype was designed for gas flows ranging from 1 sccm of hydrogen to 10,000 sccm of tungsten hexafluoride, constructed, tested, and used to calibrate flow devices. Experience with the prototype and results are presented, and plans for further developments are discussed. Design of a version for the flow range from 0.1 sccm to 100 sccm is in progress.

  20. Effects of Sevoflurane and Propofol on Organ Blood Flow in Left Ventricular Assist Devices in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Morillas-Sendín, Paloma; Delgado-Baeza, Emilio; Delgado-Martos, María Jesús; Barranco, Mónica; del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Ruíz, Manuel; Quintana-Villamandos, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of sevoflurane and propofol on organ blood flow in a porcine model with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Ten healthy minipigs were divided into 2 groups (5 per group) according to the anesthetic received (sevoflurane or propofol). A Biomedicus centrifugal pump was implanted. Organ blood flow (measured using colored microspheres), markers of tissue injury, and hemodynamic parameters were assessed at baseline (pump off) and after 30 minutes of partial support. Blood flow was significantly higher in the brain (both frontal lobes), heart (both ventricles), and liver after 30 minutes in the sevoflurane group, although no significant differences were recorded for the lung, kidney, or ileum. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin were significantly higher after 30 minutes in the propofol group, although no significant differences were detected between the groups for other parameters of liver function, kidney function, or lactic acid levels. The hemodynamic parameters were similar in both groups. We demonstrated that, compared with propofol, sevoflurane increases blood flow in the brain, liver, and heart after implantation of an LVAD under conditions of partial support. PMID:26583144

  1. Long-term continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) as bridge to heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Matteo; Giraud, Raphaël; Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Bendjelid, Karim; Robin, Jacques; Meyer, Philippe; Obadia, Jean François

    2015-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the treatment of choice for end-stage heart failure but the limited availability of heart’s donors still represents a major issue. So long-term mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has been proposed as an alternative treatment option to assist patients scheduled on HTx waiting list bridging them for a variable time period to cardiac transplantation—the so-called bridge-to-transplantation (BTT) strategy. Nowadays approximately 90% of patients being considered for MCS receive a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). In fact, LVAD experienced several improvements in the last decade and the predominance of continuous-flow over pulsatile-flow technology has been evident since 2008. The aim of the present report is to give an overview of continuous-flow LVAD utilization in the specific setting of the BTT strategy taking into consideration the most representative articles of the scientific literature and focusing the attention on the evolution, clinical outcomes, relevant implications on the HTx strategy and future perspectives of the continuous-flow LVAD technology. PMID:25922736

  2. Effects of Sevoflurane and Propofol on Organ Blood Flow in Left Ventricular Assist Devices in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Morillas-Sendín, Paloma; Delgado-Baeza, Emilio; Delgado-Martos, María Jesús; Barranco, Mónica; del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Ruíz, Manuel; Quintana-Villamandos, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of sevoflurane and propofol on organ blood flow in a porcine model with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Ten healthy minipigs were divided into 2 groups (5 per group) according to the anesthetic received (sevoflurane or propofol). A Biomedicus centrifugal pump was implanted. Organ blood flow (measured using colored microspheres), markers of tissue injury, and hemodynamic parameters were assessed at baseline (pump off) and after 30 minutes of partial support. Blood flow was significantly higher in the brain (both frontal lobes), heart (both ventricles), and liver after 30 minutes in the sevoflurane group, although no significant differences were recorded for the lung, kidney, or ileum. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin were significantly higher after 30 minutes in the propofol group, although no significant differences were detected between the groups for other parameters of liver function, kidney function, or lactic acid levels. The hemodynamic parameters were similar in both groups. We demonstrated that, compared with propofol, sevoflurane increases blood flow in the brain, liver, and heart after implantation of an LVAD under conditions of partial support. PMID:26583144

  3. The effect of ventricular assist devices on cerebral blood flow and blood pressure fractality.

    PubMed

    Bellapart, Judith; Chan, Gregory S H; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Ainslie, Philip N; Dunster, Kimble R; Barnett, Adrian G; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F

    2011-09-01

    Biological signals often exhibit self-similar or fractal scaling characteristics which may reflect intrinsic adaptability to their underlying physiological system. This study analysed fractal dynamics of cerebral blood flow in patients supported with ventricular assist devices (VAD) to ascertain if sustained modifications of blood pressure waveform affect cerebral blood flow fractality. Simultaneous recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity using transcranial Doppler were obtained from five cardiogenic shock patients supported by VAD, five matched control patients and five healthy subjects. Computation of a fractal scaling exponent (α) at the low-frequency time scale by detrended fluctuation analysis showed that cerebral blood flow velocity exhibited 1/f fractal scaling in both patient groups (α = 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.97 ± 0.12, respectively) as well as in the healthy subjects (α = 0.86 ± 0.07). In contrast, fluctuation in blood pressure was similar to non-fractal white noise in both patient groups (α = 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.52 ± 0.09, respectively) but exhibited 1/f scaling in the healthy subjects (α = 0.87 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 compared with the patient groups). The preservation of fractality in cerebral blood flow of VAD patients suggests that normal cardiac pulsation and central perfusion pressure changes are not the integral sources of cerebral blood flow fractality and that intrinsic vascular properties such as cerebral autoregulation may be involved. However, there is a clear difference in the fractal scaling properties of arterial blood pressure between the cardiogenic shock patients and the healthy subjects. PMID:21775798

  4. Biocompatibility Assessment of the First Generation PediaFlow Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl A.; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Daly, Amanda R.; Woolley, Joshua R.; Snyder, Shaun T.; Verkaik, Josiah E.; Ye, Sang-Ho; Borovetz, Harvey S.; Antaki, James F.; Wearden, Peter D.; Kameneva, Marina V.; Wagner, William R.

    2011-01-01

    The PediaFlow pediatric ventricular assist device is a miniature magnetically levitated mixed flow pump under development for circulatory support of newborns and infants (3–15 kg) with a targeted flow range of 0.3–1.5 L/min. The first generation design of the PediaFlow (PF1) was manufactured with a weight of approximately 100 g, priming volume less than 2 mL, length of 51 mm, outer diameter of 28 mm, and with 5-mm blood ports. PF1 was evaluated in an in vitro flow loop for 6 h and implanted in ovines for three chronic experiments of 6, 17, and 10 days. In the in vitro test, normalized index of hemolysis was 0.0087 ± 0.0024 g/100L. Hemodynamic performance and blood biocompatibility of PF1 were characterized in vivo by measurements of plasma free hemoglobin, plasma fibrinogen, total plasma protein, and with novel flow cytometric assays to quantify circulating activated ovine platelets. The mean plasma free hemoglobin values for the three chronic studies were 4.6 ± 2.7, 13.3 ± 7.9, and 8.8 ± 3.3 mg/dL, respectively. Platelet activation was low for portions of several studies but consistently rose along with observed animal and pump complications. The PF1 prototype generated promising results in terms of low hemolysis and platelet activation in the absence of complications. Hemodynamic results validated the magnetic bearing design and provided the platform for design iterations to meet the objective of providing circulatory support for young children with exceptional biocompatibility. PMID:20626737

  5. 30 CFR 57.22314 - Flow-control devices (V-A and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flow-control devices (V-A and V-B mines). 57.22314 Section 57.22314 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22314 Flow-control...

  6. Management of aortic insufficiency in the continuous flow left ventricular assist device population.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Jonathan; Teuteberg, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    With the current generation of continuous-flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), patients are able to be supported for longer periods of time. As a result, there has been increasing focus on long-term complications from prolonged mechanical circulatory support, such as acquired aortic insufficiency (AI). In the presence of an LVAD, AI leads to a blind circulatory loop, with a portion of LVAD output regurgitating through the aortic valve (AV) into the left ventricle and back again through the device, limiting effective forward flow and ultimately leading to organ malperfusion and increased left ventricular diastolic pressures. The AV also experiences abnormal biomechanics as a result of limited valve opening in the presence of a CF LVAD. Increased shear stress, elevated transvalvular pressure gradients, and decreased valve open time all contribute to acquired AI. The prognosis of moderate to severe AI in LVAD patients is generally poor and leads to a higher rate of AV replacement and potentially reduced survival. However, there are no evidence-based guidelines for management of this challenging population. In severe AI, experts generally advocate AV replacement or repair, while lesser degrees of AI can be managed medically and/or with adjustments in pump parameters. PMID:24193452

  7. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Mirasol, Raymond V; Tholany, Jason J; Reddy, Hasini; Fyfe-Kirschner, Billie S; Cheng, Christina L; Moubarak, Issam F; Nosher, John L

    2016-01-01

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized. However, the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices (CF-BIVADs) and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood. We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD. The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan. The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology. The intensity of bleeding, reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin, as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation, are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs. While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein, pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa, vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27158430

  8. From Lateral Flow Devices to a Novel Nano-Color Microfluidic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Assadollahi, Saied; Reininger, Christiane; Palkovits, Roland; Pointl, Peter; Schalkhammer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Improving the performance of traditional diagnostic lateral flow assays combined with new manufacturing technologies is a primary goal in the research and development plans of diagnostic companies. Taking into consideration the components of lateral flow diagnostic test kits; innovation can include modification of labels, materials and device design. In recent years, Resonance-Enhanced Absorption (REA) of metal nano-particles has shown excellent applicability in bio-sensing for the detection of a variety of bio-molecular binding interactions. In a novel approach, we have now integrated REA-assays in a diagnostic microfluidic setup thus resolving the bottleneck of long incubation times inherent in previously existing REA-assays and simultaneously integrated automated fabrication techniques for diagnostics manufacture. Due to the roller-coating based technology and chemical resistance, we used PET-co-polyester as a substrate and a CO2 laser ablation system as a fast, highly precise and contactless alternative to classical micro-milling. It was possible to detect biological binding within three minutes – visible to the eye as colored text readout within the REA-fluidic device. A two-minute in-situ silver enhancement was able to enhance the resonant color additionally, if required. PMID:22454573

  9. From lateral flow devices to a novel nano-color microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Assadollahi, Saied; Reininger, Christiane; Palkovits, Roland; Pointl, Peter; Schalkhammer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Improving the performance of traditional diagnostic lateral flow assays combined with new manufacturing technologies is a primary goal in the research and development plans of diagnostic companies. Taking into consideration the components of lateral flow diagnostic test kits; innovation can include modification of labels, materials and device design. In recent years, Resonance-Enhanced Absorption (REA) of metal nano-particles has shown excellent applicability in bio-sensing for the detection of a variety of bio-molecular binding interactions. In a novel approach, we have now integrated REA-assays in a diagnostic microfluidic setup thus resolving the bottleneck of long incubation times inherent in previously existing REA-assays and simultaneously integrated automated fabrication techniques for diagnostics manufacture. Due to the roller-coating based technology and chemical resistance, we used PET-co-polyester as a substrate and a CO(2) laser ablation system as a fast, highly precise and contactless alternative to classical micro-milling. It was possible to detect biological binding within three minutes - visible to the eye as colored text readout within the REA-fluidic device. A two-minute in-situ silver enhancement was able to enhance the resonant color additionally, if required. PMID:22454573

  10. Use of Surface Enhanced Blocking (SEB) Electrodes for Microbial Cell Lysis in Flow-Through Devices

    PubMed Central

    Talebpour, Abdossamad; Maaskant, Robert; Khine, Aye Aye; Alavie, Tino

    2014-01-01

    By simultaneously subjecting microbial cells to high amplitude pulsed electric fields and flash heating of the cell suspension fluid, effective release of intracellular contents was achieved. The synergistic effect of the applied electric field and elevated temperature on cell lysis in a flow-through device was demonstrated for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and Mycobacterium species. The resulting lysate is suitable for downstream nucleic acid amplification and detection without requiring further preparation. The lysis chamber employs surface enhanced blocking electrodes which possess an etched micro-structured surface and a thin layer of dielectric metal oxide which provides a large effective area and blocks transmission of electrical current. The surface enhanced blocking electrodes enable simultaneous suppression of the rapid onset of electric field screening in the bulk of the cell suspension medium and avoidance of undesired electrochemical processes at the electrode-electrolyte interface. In addition the blocking layer ensures the robustness of the cell lysis device in applications involving prolonged flow-through processing of the microbial cells. PMID:25033080

  11. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Mirasol, Raymond V; Tholany, Jason J; Reddy, Hasini; Fyfe-Kirschner, Billie S; Cheng, Christina L; Moubarak, Issam F; Nosher, John L

    2016-04-28

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized. However, the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices (CF-BIVADs) and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood. We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD. The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan. The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology. The intensity of bleeding, reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin, as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation, are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs. While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein, pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa, vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27158430

  12. Thermal Analysis of the PediaFlow pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jeffrey M; Wu, Jingchun; Noh, Myounggyu D; Antaki, James F; Snyder, Trevor A; Paden, David B; Paden, Brad E

    2007-01-01

    Accurate modeling of heat dissipation in pediatric intracorporeal devices is crucial in avoiding tissue and blood thermotrauma. Thermal models of new Maglev ventricular assist device (VAD) concepts for the PediaFlow VAD are developed by incorporating empirical heat transfer equations with thermal finite element analysis (FEA). The models assume three main sources of waste heat generation: copper motor windings, active magnetic thrust bearing windings, and eddy currents generated within the titanium housing due to the two-pole motor. Waste heat leaves the pump by convection into blood passing through the pump and conduction through surrounding tissue. Coefficients of convection are calculated and assigned locally along fluid path surfaces of the three-dimensional pump housing model. FEA thermal analysis yields a three-dimensional temperature distribution for each of the three candidate pump models. Thermal impedances from the motor and thrust bearing windings to tissue and blood contacting surfaces are estimated based on maximum temperature rise at respective surfaces. A new updated model for the chosen pump topology is created incorporating computational fluid dynamics with empirical fluid and heat transfer equations. This model represents the final geometry of the first generation prototype, incorporates eddy current heating, and has 60 discrete convection regions. Thermal analysis is performed at nominal and maximum flow rates, and temperature distributions are plotted. Results suggest that the pump will not exceed a temperature rise of 2 degrees C during normal operation. PMID:17237651

  13. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates. PMID:27375826

  14. Surgical Considerations and Challenges for Bilateral Continuous-Flow Durable Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Simon; Womack, Sara; Davis, Mary E; Danter, Matthew R; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Stulak, John M; Haglund, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The concept of biventricular support with durable centrifugal pumps is evolving, and the surgical strategy and best practice guidelines for implantation of right-sided devices are still unknown. We present optimal strategy for bilateral HeartWare continuous-flow ventricular assist device (HVAD) implantation in a series of four patients. Patients were implanted with the HVAD pumps simultaneously or sequentially. This report offers a perspective on surgical considerations such as right ventricular positioning, implications related to potential risks of obstruction from the tricuspid apparatus, the role if any of downsizing the outflow anastomosis, and considerations for speed adjustments. In this series, one patient died on support and three patients experienced pump thrombosis requiring device revision. All other patients survived until orthotopic heart transplantation, although one of these patients died from perioperative complications, 2 days posttransplantation. Surgical management of patients with medically refractory biventricular heart failure remains challenging and associated with a high incidence of pump thrombosis. Best practice guidelines from experts' consensus are still needed to address this challenging population. PMID:26479465

  15. Microfluidic device to control interstitial flow-mediated homotypic and heterotypic cellular communication.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, Luis F; Moya, Monica L; Shirure, Venktesh S; George, Steven C

    2015-09-01

    Tissue engineering can potentially recreate in vivo cellular microenvironments in vitro for an array of applications such as biological inquiry and drug discovery. However, the majority of current in vitro systems still neglect many biological, chemical, and mechanical cues that are known to impact cellular functions such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation. To address this gap, we have developed a novel microfluidic device that precisely controls the spatial and temporal interactions between adjacent three-dimensional cellular environments. The device consists of four interconnected microtissue compartments (~0.1 mm(3)) arranged in a square. The top and bottom pairs of compartments can be sequentially loaded with discrete cellularized hydrogels creating the opportunity to investigate homotypic (left to right or x-direction) and heterotypic (top to bottom or y-direction) cell-cell communication. A controlled hydrostatic pressure difference across the tissue compartments in both x and y direction induces interstitial flow and modulates communication via soluble factors. To validate the biological significance of this novel platform, we examined the role of stromal cells in the process of vasculogenesis. Our device confirms previous observations that soluble mediators derived from normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLFs) are necessary to form a vascular network derived from endothelial colony forming cell-derived endothelial cells (ECFC-ECs). We conclude that this platform could be used to study important physiological and pathological processes that rely on homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell communication. PMID:26190172

  16. In vitro perfusion of hybrid artificial pancreas devices at low flow rates.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, C A; López, M; Stephens, C L

    1992-01-01

    Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin insufficiency due to lack of functional beta cells. To replace injection therapy, schemes such as the Hybrid Artificial Pancreas (HAP) were developed. This consists of an acrylic housing enclosing a semipermeable hollow fiber membrane. Donor islets can be seeded in the annular space through a port in the housing, and thus are separated from the recipient's bloodstream or perfusate. Before scaling the HAP to human size, the dynamics of its insulin response to a perfusion glucose challenge must be better understood. In this study, the HAP's insulin response after a step increase in the lumenal glucose concentration was determined as a function of the radial thickness of the annular space (0.173-0.973 mm) and islet distribution at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. Devices containing a single, 65 mm long fiber were used. Rat islets were isolated using standard collagenase digestion techniques. In unseeded HAP perfusions, the washout time for glucose and insulin from the annular space was dependent on flow rate and radial thickness. Both solutes were removed in < 3 min from the smallest devices when perfused at 10 ml/min. Thus, solute transport within the HAP is very fast. In the seeded HAP perfusions, the devices were subjected to a step increase in the lumenal glucose concentration. Sequential samples of the HAP effluent were collected and assayed for glucose and insulin. The spatial distribution of the islets in the annular space was one of the most important factors in determining the HAP's insulin response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1457899

  17. Development of a novel echocardiography ramp test for speed optimization and diagnosis of device thrombosis in continuous flow left ventricular assist devices: The Columbia Ramp Study

    PubMed Central

    Uriel, Nir; Morrison, Kerry A; Garan, Arthur R; Kato, Tomoko; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Latif, Farhana; Restaino, Susan W; Mancini, Donna M; Flannery, Margaret; Takayama, Hiroo; John, Ranjit; Colombo, Paolo C; Naka, Yoshifumi; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2012-01-01

    Objective Develop a novel approach of optimizing continuous flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) function and diagnosing device malfunctions. Background In CF-LVAD patients, the dynamic interaction of device speed, left and right ventricular decompression, and valve function can be assessed during an echocardiography-monitored speed ramp-test. Methods We devised a unique ramp-test protocol to be routinely done at the time of discharge for speed optimization and/or if device malfunction was suspected. The patient’s left ventricular end diastolic dimension (LVEDD), frequency of aortic valve (AV) opening, valvular insufficiency, blood pressure, and CF-LVAD parameters were recorded at increments of 400 rpm from 8,000 rpm to 12,000 rpm. The results of the speed designations were plotted, and linear function slopes for LVEDD, PI, and power were calculated. Results Fifty-two ramp-tests from 39 patients were prospectively collected and analyzed. Twenty-eight ramp-tests were performed for speed optimization, and speed was changed in 17 (61%) with a mean absolute value adjustment of 424±211 rpm. Seventeen patients had ramp-tests performed for suspected device thrombosis and 10 tests were suspicious for device thrombosis; these patients were then treated with intensified anticoagulation and/or device exchange/emergent transplant. Device thrombosis was confirmed in 8/10 cases at the time of emergent device exchange or transplant. All patients with device thrombosis, but none of the remaining patients, had a LVEDD slope > −0.16. Conclusion Ramp-tests facilitated optimal speed changes and device malfunction detection, and may be used to monitor the effects of therapeutic interventions and need for surgical intervention in CF-LVAD patients. PMID:23040584

  18. Numerical investigation of oxygen impurity distribution during multicrystalline silicon crystal growth using a gas flow guidance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Ying-Yang; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Lu, Chung-Wei; Chen, Chi-Yung

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen is one of the most important types of impurities that can cause thermal donor or light-induced degradation in mc-Si solar cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect that installing a gas flow guidance device in a mc-Si crystal-growth furnace would have on the oxygen impurity distribution in the melt during the growth process. The installation of such a gas flow guidance device can enhance the gas flow near the free surface, which would allow the argon to carry a greater amount of evaporated SiO gas outside the furnace. Furthermore, the enhanced motion of the gas flow also improves heat transfer near the free surface, which would make the melt vortex separate more easily. The separated melt vortex, which is located near the central region of the melt-crystal interface, directs any oxygen impurity towards the central region of the melt-crystal interface. This is why the oxygen concentration can be reduced by installing the gas flow guidance device. The effectiveness of the gas flow guidance device depends on the vertical distance between it and the free surface (h) as well as the gap between the crucible sidewall and the tip of the device (d). The effect on the oxygen concentration in the melt is significant when smaller values for h and d are adopted.

  19. Development of an axial flow ventricular assist device: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, K; Damm, G; Benkowsky, R; Aber, G; Bacak, J; Svjkovsky, P; Glueck, J; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y; Noon, G P

    1995-07-01

    A collaborative effort between Baylor College of Medicine and NASA/Johnson Space Center is underway to develop an axial flow ventricular assist device (VAD). We evaluated inducer/impeller component designs in a series of in vitro hemolysis tests. As a result of computational fluid dynamic analysis, a flow inducer was added to the front of the pump impeller. According to the surface pressure distribution, the flow inducer blades were connected to the impeller long blades. This modification eliminated high negative pressure areas at the leading edge of the impeller. Comparative studies were performed between inducer blade sections that flowed smoothly into the impeller blades (continuous blades) and those that formed discrete separate pumping sections (discontinuous blades). The inducer/impeller with continuous blades showed significantly (p < 0.003) lower hemolysis with a normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of 0.018 +/- 0.007 g/100 L (n = 3), compared with the discontinuous model, which demonstrated an NIH of 0.050 +/- 0.007 g/100 L (n = 3). The continuous blade model was evaluated in vivo for 2 days with no problems. One of the pumps evaluated ran for 5 days in vivo although thrombus formation was recognized on the flow straightener and the inducer/impeller. As a result of this study, the pump material was changed from polyether polyurethane to polycarbonate. The fabrication method was also changed to a computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling process with a final vapor polish. These changes resulted in an NIH of 0.0029 +/- 0.0009 g/100 L (n = 4), which is a significant (p < .0001) value 6 times less than that of the previous model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8572968

  20. Application of a hollow-fiber, tangential-flow device for sampling suspended bacteria and particles from natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    The design and application of a hollow-fiber tangential-flow filtration device has been used to concentrate bacteria and suspended particles from large volume surface water and groundwater samples (i.e., hundreds of liters). Filtrate tlux rates (4–8 L min−1) are equal to or faster than those of other devices that are based on continuous flow centrifugation and plate and frame filtration. Particle recovery efficiencies for inorganic particles (approximately 90%) were similar to other dewatering devices, but microbial cell recoveries (30–90%) were greatly improved by this technique relative to other currently available methods. Although requirements for operation and maintenance of the device are minimal, its size, as with other dewatering devices, limits its applicability at remote sample sites. Nevertheless, it has proven useful for sample collection in studies involving microbial transport and analysis of particle-associated trace inorganic solutes.

  1. Effectiveness of an inlet flow turbulence control device to simulate flight noise fan in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A hemispherical inlet flow control device was tested on a 50.8 cm. (20-inch) diameter fan stage in the NASA-Lewis anechoic chamber. The control device used honeycomb and wire mesh to reduce turbulence intensities entering the fan. Far field acoustic power level results show about a 5 db reduction in blade passing tone and about 10 dB reduction in multiple pure tone sound power at 90% design fan speed with the inlet device in place. Hot film cross probes were inserted in the inlet to obtain data for two components of the turbulence at 65 and 90% design fan speed. Without the flow control device, the axial intensities were below 1.0%, while the circumferential intensities were almost twice this value. The inflow control device significantly reduced the circumferential turbulence intensities and also reduced the axial length scale.

  2. Life under flow: A novel microfluidic device for the assessment of anti-biofilm technologies

    PubMed Central

    Salta, Maria; Capretto, Lorenzo; Carugo, Dario; Wharton, Julian A.; Stokes, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we have developed and fabricated a novel lab-on-a-chip device for the investigation of biofilm responses, such as attachment kinetics and initial biofilm formation, to different hydrodynamic conditions. The microfluidic flow channels are designed using computational fluid dynamic simulations so as to have a pre-defined, homogeneous wall shear stress in the channels, ranging from 0.03 to 4.30 Pa, which are relevant to in-service conditions on a ship hull, as well as other man-made marine platforms. Temporal variations of biofilm formation in the microfluidic device were assessed using time-lapse microscopy, nucleic acid staining, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Differences in attachment kinetics were observed with increasing shear stress, i.e., with increasing shear stress there appeared to be a delay in bacterial attachment, i.e., at 55, 120, 150, and 155 min for 0.03, 0.60, 2.15, and 4.30 Pa, respectively. CLSM confirmed marked variations in colony architecture, i.e.,: (i) lower shear stresses resulted in biofilms with distinctive morphologies mainly characterised by mushroom-like structures, interstitial channels, and internal voids, and (ii) for the higher shear stresses compact clusters with large interspaces between them were formed. The key advantage of the developed microfluidic device is the combination of three architectural features in one device, i.e., an open-system design, channel replication, and multiple fully developed shear stresses. PMID:24454610

  3. Efficacy of Micromobile Foot Compression Device in Increasing Lower Limb Venous Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Weatherall, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background. A novel, micromobile foot compression device (MMC) has been developed to reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with prolonged seated immobility. Objective. To compare the efficacy of the MMC with graduated compression stockings in augmenting lower limb venous blood flow. Patients/Methods. Twenty participants were randomised to wear the MMC or a graduated compression stocking (GCS) on either the left or right leg while seated. Doppler ultrasound measurements of popliteal vein blood flow and leg circumference measurements were made −30 and −10 minutes (baseline) and +30 and +60 minutes following application of the interventions. The primary outcome variable was peak systolic velocity. A mixed linear model was used, with covariates including baseline measurement, randomised side, time, and a time by interaction term. Results. The mean popliteal vein peak systolic velocity at 60 minutes with the MMC was 20.1 cm/s which was significantly higher than with the GCS (difference 14.1 cm/s 95% CI 12.1–16.2), representing a 3.8-fold increase from baseline. Conclusion. The MMC resulted in a marked increase in lower limb venous blood flow which suggests that it may have efficacy in reducing the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with prolonged seated immobility, such as long distance air travel. PMID:24319596

  4. Gene transcript amplification from cell lysates in continuous-flow microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Asensio; Ciobanu, Doina; Sayers, Michael; Sirr, Noel; Dalton, Tara; Davies, Mark

    2007-10-01

    Continuous-flow analysis, where samples circulate encapsulated in a carrier fluid is an attractive alternative to batch processing for high-throughput devices that use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Challenges of continuous-flow prototypes include the hydrodynamic and biological incompatibility of the carrier fluid, microchannel fouling, sample carryover and the integration of a nucleic acid extraction and reverse transcription step. We tested two homemade, continuous-flow thermocycler microdevices for amplification of reverse-transcribed messages from cell lysates without nucleic acid extraction. Amplification yield and specificity were assessed with state-of-the-art, real-time quantitative equipment. Carryover contamination between consecutive samples was absent. Amplification specificity and interference by genomic DNA were optimized by primer design. Robust detection of the low-copy transcript CLIC5 from 18 cells per microliter is demonstrated in cultured lymphoblasts. The results prove the concept that the development of micro-total analysis systems (micro-TAS) for continuous gene expression directly from cell suspensions is viable with current technology. PMID:17492382

  5. Continuous flow real-time PCR device using multi-channel fluorescence excitation and detection.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Andrew C; Ray, Tathagata; Lintecum, Kelly; Youngbull, Cody

    2014-02-01

    High throughput automation is greatly enhanced using techniques that employ conveyor belt strategies with un-interrupted streams of flow. We have developed a 'conveyor belt' analog for high throughput real-time quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) using droplet emulsion technology. We developed a low power, portable device that employs LED and fiber optic fluorescence excitation in conjunction with a continuous flow thermal cycler to achieve multi-channel fluorescence detection for real-time fluorescence measurements. Continuously streaming fluid plugs or droplets pass through tubing wrapped around a two-temperature zone thermal block with each wrap of tubing fluorescently coupled to a 64-channel multi-anode PMT. This work demonstrates real-time qPCR of 0.1-10 μL droplets or fluid plugs over a range of 7 orders of magnitude concentration from 1 × 10(1) to 1 × 10(7). The real-time qPCR analysis allows dynamic range quantification as high as 1 × 10(7) copies per 10 μL reaction, with PCR efficiencies within the range of 90-110% based on serial dilution assays and a limit of detection of 10 copies per rxn. The combined functionality of continuous flow, low power thermal cycling, high throughput sample processing, and real-time qPCR improves the rates at which biological or environmental samples can be continuously sampled and analyzed. PMID:24297040

  6. Flow injection based microfluidic device with carbon nanotube electrode for rapid salbutamol detection.

    PubMed

    Karuwan, Chanpen; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Maturos, Thitima; Phokharatkul, Disayut; Sappat, Assawapong; Jaruwongrungsee, Kata; Lomas, Tanom; Tuantranont, Adisorn

    2009-09-15

    A microfabicated flow injection device has been developed for in-channel electrochemical detection (ECD) of a beta-agonist, namely salbutamol. The microfluidic system consists of PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchannel and electrochemical electrodes formed on glass substrate. The carbon nanotube (CNT) on gold layer as working electrode, silver as reference electrode and platinum as auxiliary electrode were deposited on a glass substrate. Silver, platinum, gold and stainless steel catalyst layers were coated by DC-sputtering. CNTs were then grown on the glass substance by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with gravity effect and water-assisted etching. 100-microm-deep and 500-microm-wide PDMS microchannels fabricated by SU-8 molding and casting were then bonded on glass substrate by oxygen plasma treatment. Flow injection and ECD of salbutamol was performed with the amperometric detection mode for in-channel detection of salbutamol. The influences of flow rate, injection volume, and detection potential on the response of current signal were optimized. Analytical characteristics, such as sensitivity, repeatability and dynamic range have been evaluated. Fast and highly sensitive detection of salbutamol have been achieved. Thus, the proposed combination of the efficient CNT electrode and miniaturized lab-on-a-chip is a powerful platform for beta-agonists detection. PMID:19615498

  7. Turbulence and transport suppression scaling with flow shear on the Large Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner, D. A.; Carter, T. A.; Rossi, G. D.; Guice, D. S.; Maggs, J. E.; Vincena, S.; Friedman, B.

    2013-05-15

    Continuous control over azimuthal flow and shear in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 62, 2875 (1991)] has been achieved using a biasable limiter. This flow control has allowed a careful study of the effect of flow shear on pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and particle transport in LAPD. The combination of externally controllable shear in a turbulent plasma along with the detailed spatial diagnostic capabilities on LAPD makes the experiment a useful testbed for validation of shear suppression models. Motivated by these models, power-law fits are made to the density and radial velocity fluctuation amplitudes, particle flux, density-potential crossphase, and radial correlation length. The data show a break in the trend of these quantities when the shearing rate (γ{sub s}=∂V{sub θ}/∂r) is comparable to the turbulent decorrelation rate (1/τ{sub ac}). No one model captures the trends in the all turbulent quantities for all values of the shearing rate, but some models successfully match the trend in either the weak (γ{sub s}τ{sub ac}<1) or strong (γ{sub s}τ{sub ac}>1) shear limits.

  8. An experimental study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow dynamics in a ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Mann, K A; Deutsch, S; Tarbell, J M; Geselowitz, D B; Rosenberg, G; Pierce, W S

    1987-05-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior of a Newtonian water/glycerol solution, a non-Newtonian polymer (separan) solution, and bovine blood were compared in the Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device (EVAD). Pulsed doppler ultrasound velocimetry was used to measure velocities in the near wall region (0.95-2.7 mm) along the perimeter of the pump. Mean velocity, turbulence intensity, local and convective acceleration, and shear rate were calculated from the PDU velocity measurements. Flow visualization provided qualitative information about the general flow patterns in the EVAD. Results indicate that water/glycerol does not accurately model the flow characteristics of bovine blood in the EVAD. The non-Newtonian separan solution produced results closer to those of the bovine blood than did the water/glycerol solution. Near wall velocity magnitudes for the separan were similar to those of the bovine blood, but the profile shapes differed for portions of the pump cycle. All three fluids exhibited periods of stagnation. Bovine blood results indicated the presence of a desired rotational washout pattern at midsystole, while results with the other fluids did not show this feature. PMID:3599939

  9. Shear flow and drift wave turbulence dynamics in a cylindrical plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-03-15

    The experimental observations of the dynamics of the coupled drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device using a combination of Langmuir probe and fast-framing imaging measurements are reported. The results show the presence of an azimuthal ZF that exhibits low frequency (approx250 Hz) fluctuations. The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5 kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulent-driven shear flow sustained against the collisional and viscous damping. The radial turbulence correlation length and cross-field particle transport are reduced during periods of strong flow shear. The results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations for coupled DWT-ZF dynamics.

  10. Characterization of aggregates of surface modified fullerenes by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Kok, Wim Th; Bäuerlein, Patrick; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; de Voogt, Pim; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-08-21

    Fullerenes are carbon nanoparticles with widespread biomedical, commercial and industrial applications. Attributes such as their tendency to aggregate and aggregate size and shape impact their ability to be transported into and through the environment and living tissues. Knowledge of these properties is therefore valuable for their human and environmental risk assessment as well as to control their synthesis and manufacture. In this work, asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used for the first time to study the size distribution of surface modified fullerenes with both polyhydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups in aqueous solutions having different pH (6.5-11) and ionic strength values (0-200mM) of environmental relevance. Fractionation key parameters such as flow rates, flow programming, and membrane material were optimized for the selected fullerenes. The aggregation of the compounds studied appeared to be indifferent to changes in solution pH, but was affected by changes in the ionic strength. Polyhydroxy-fullerenes were found to be present mostly as 4nm aggregates in water without added salt, but showed more aggregation at high ionic strength, with an up to 10-fold increase in their mean hydrodynamic radii (200mM), due to a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticles. Carboxy-fullerenes showed a much stronger aggregation degree in water (50-100nm). Their average size and recoveries decreased with the increase in the salt concentration. This behavior can be due to enhanced adsorption of the large particles to the membrane at high ionic strength, because of their higher hydrophobicity and much larger particle sizes compared to polyhydroxy-fullerenes. The method performance was evaluated by calculating the run-to-run precision of the retention time (hydrodynamic radii), and the obtained RSD values were lower than 1%. MALS measurements showed aggregate sizes that were in good

  11. Detection and Quantification of Silver Nanoparticles at Environmentally Relevant Concentrations Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation Online with Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Khanh An; Siska, Emily; Heithmar, Edward; Tadjiki, Soheyl; Pergantis, Spiros A

    2016-05-01

    The presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aquatic environments could potentially cause adverse impacts on ecosystems and human health. However, current understanding of the environmental fate and transport of AgNPs is still limited because their properties in complex environmental samples cannot be accurately determined. In this study, the feasibility of using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) connected online with single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICPMS) to detect and quantify AgNPs at environmentally relevant concentrations was investigated. The AF4 channel had a thickness of 350 μm and its accumulation wall was a 10 kDa regenerated cellulose membrane. A 0.02% FL-70 surfactant solution was used as an AF4 carrier. With 1.2 mL/min AF4 cross-flow rate, 1.5 mL/min AF4 channel flow rate, and 5 ms spICPMS dwell time, the AF4-spICPMS can detect and quantify 40-80 nm AgNPs, as well as Ag-SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles (51.0 nm diameter Ag core and 21.6 nm SiO2 shell), with good recovery within 30 min. This system was not only effective in differentiating and quantifying different types of AgNPs with similar hydrodynamic diameters, such as in mixtures containing Ag-SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles and 40-80 nm AgNPs, but also suitable for differentiating between 40 nm AgNPs and elevated Ag(+) content. The study results indicate that AF4-spICPMS is capable of detecting and quantifying AgNPs and other engineered metal nanomaterials in environmental samples. Nevertheless, further studies are needed before AF4-spICPMS can become a routine analytical technique. PMID:27104795

  12. Separation of silver nanoparticles by hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation: Addition of tannic acid into carrier liquid as a modifier.

    PubMed

    Saenmuangchin, Rattaporn; Mettakoonpitak, Jaruwan; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2015-10-01

    A homemade hollow fiber flow-field fractionation (Hf-FlFFF) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was set-up for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) separation by using polysulfone hollow fiber membrane (30,000 MW cutoff) as a separation channel. Tannic acid and citrate stabilized AgNPs were synthesized and introduced into Hf-FlFFF. The effects of carrier liquid and stabilizing agent on retention behavior of AgNPs were investigated. Different elution behaviors were observed as follows: with 0.02% (w/v) FL-70, all of AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF but differences in retention behaviors were observed for AgNPs with tannic acid and citrate stabilizing agents; and with 30mM TRIS buffer, only tannic acid stabilized AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF, whereas citrate stabilized AgNPs were not eluted. In this work, tannic acid addition into carrier liquid was proposed to modify the surface of AgNPs and the surface of the membrane, and thereby adjusting the retention behaviors of AgNPs. Various concentrations of tannic acid were added into FL-70 and TRIS buffer. With the use of 0.1mM tannic acid in 30mM TRIS buffer as the carrier liquid, retention behaviors of both tannic acid stabilized- and citrate stabilized-AgNPs were similar and with similar fractionation recovery. PMID:26341593

  13. Characterization of ultrahigh-molecular weight cationic polyacrylamide using frit-inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sohee; Lee, Ju Yong; Choi, Woonjin; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-01-15

    In this study, frit inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) with multi-angle light scattering (MALS) and differential refractive index (DRI) detection is utilized for size separation, determination of molecular weight (MW), and conformation of ultrahigh-MW (10(7)-10(9) g/mol) cationic polyacrylamides (C-PAMs), a class of water-soluble copolymers based on acrylamide and vinyl-type comonomers with quaternary ammonium cations that are widely used in wastewater treatment and in paper industries. Linear and branched C-PAM copolymers prepared in two different polymerization methods (solution and emulsion) from varying amounts of crosslinking agent and initiator were size fractionated by FlFFF with field-programming. It was found experimentally that the linear copolymers from both polymerization methods were less than 10(8) g/mol in MW with compact, nearly spherical structures, while the branched C-PAM copolymers from the emulsion polymerization showed a significant increase in average MW up to ∼ 10(9)g/mol, which was about 20-fold greater than those from the solution method, and the branched copolymers had more compact or shrunken conformations. While both linear and branched copolymers less than 10(8) g/mol MW were well resolved in an increasing order of MW (normal mode), it was noted that branched copolymers prepared through emulsion polymerization exhibited significantly larger MWs of 10(8-)10(9) g/mol and eluted in the steric/hyperlayer mode, in which the elution order is reversed in an extreme run condition (strong initial field strength followed by a fast field decay during programming). PMID:26724894

  14. Feasibility of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation as a method for detecting protective antigen by direct recognition of size-increased target-captured nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kayeong; Choi, Jaeyeong; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Yoon, Moon-Young; Lee, Seungho; Chung, Hoeil

    2015-11-27

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) was evaluated as a potential analytical method for detection of a protective antigen (PA), an Anthrax biomarker. The scheme was based on the recognition of altered AF4 retention through the generation of the size-increased Au nanoparticle probes as a result of PA binding, in which a PA-selective peptide was conjugated on the probe surface. In the visible absorption-based AF4 fractograms, the band position shifted to a longer retention time as the PA concentration increased due to the presence of probe bound with PAs. The shift was insignificant when the concentration was relatively low at 84.3pM. To improve sensitivity, two separate probes conjugated with two different peptides able to bind on different PA epitopes were used together. The band shift then became distinguishable even at 84.3pM of PA sample. The formation of larger PA-probe inter-connected species using the dual-probe system was responsible for the enhanced band shift. In parallel, the feasibility of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a potential AF4 detection method was also evaluated. In the off-line SERS fractogram constructed using fractions collected during AF4 separation, a band shift was also observed for the 84.3pM PA sample, and the band intensity was higher when using the dual-probe system. The combination of AF4 and SERS is promising for the detection of PA and will become a potential tool if the reproducibility of SERS measurement is improved. PMID:26482872

  15. New Device to Determine the Permeability of Strongly Permeable Homogeneous Porous Media using the Measurement of the Flow Velocity into a "Capture Flow Cell"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henon, F.; Debenest, G.

    2012-12-01

    We present a method and a device to determine the permeability of strongly permeable homogeneous porous media using the measurement of the flow velocity into a "capture flow cell". The basic idea is to impose a flow rate at the inlet of the medium and to measure the velocity in the direction parallel of the flow at the centre of a special cell directing partially the flow and previously placed in the porous medium. The cell shape is specially designed to "capture" the streamlines and accelerate the flow within the porous medium, thereby making available the velocity measurement by conventional means such as hot wire anemometry. This is due to the higher permeability in the "pumping cell". An inversion method using a numerical simulator allows to match the velocity into the "capture flow cell" and to determine the corresponding permeability of the porous medium. This device allows to determine the effective permeability without the difficult measurement of very small pressure drop for a certain class of porous media, but using a numerical inversion method. A random packing of sphere was used for an experimental validation of the method. The experimentally determined velocities agree very well with the predicted values by the model. The effective permeability of the random packing of spheres measured by the device is in good agreement with the literature (Coelho et al., 1997).

  16. Theoretical analysis of multiple quantum-well, slow-light devices under applied external fields using a fully analytical model in fractional dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Kohandani, R; Kaatuzian, H

    2015-01-31

    We report a theoretical study of optical properties of AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum-well (MQW), slow-light devices based on excitonic population oscillations under applied external magnetic and electric fields using an analytical model for complex dielectric constant of Wannier excitons in fractional dimension. The results are shown for quantum wells (QWs) of different width. The significant characteristics of the exciton in QWs such as exciton energy and exciton oscillator strength (EOS) can be varied by application of external magnetic and electric fields. It is found that a higher bandwidth and an appropriate slow-down factor (SDF) can be achieved by changing the QW width during the fabrication process and by applying magnetic and electric fields during device functioning, respectively. It is shown that a SDF of 10{sup 5} is obtained at best. (slowing of light)

  17. An educational device for a hands-on activity to visualize the effect of atherosclerosis on blood flow.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, J P P G L; de Lima, J L M P

    2013-12-01

    An educational device was created to develop a hands-on activity to illustrate how atherosclerosis can dramatically reduce blood flow in human vessels. The device was conceived, designed, and built at the University of Coimbra, in response to a request from the Exploratório Infante D. Henrique Science Centre Museum, where it is presently installed. The device was designed to allow lay audience to operate it, including school-age youngsters. The two blood flow reduction mechanisms that can be visualized are 1) thickening of the artery wall and 2) hardening of the artery wall. The main objective is to promote the understanding of atherosclerotic cardiovascular physiology by simple and direct experiments. This original educational interactive device was constructed using, in the conceptual and design stages of the project, a Newtonian theoretical flow model based on Poiseuille's equation. This device is driven by human force and provides a visualization of the effect of atherosclerosis on flow. The main aspects relating to its design and construction are described here to explain and disseminate this approach. Throughout more than 4 yr of real operation, this educational device proved to be a simple and attractive way of understanding atherosclerosis, especially among young people. PMID:24292922

  18. Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Reid H; Jain, Rahil; Browning, Yoni; Shah, Rachana; Kauffman, Peter; Dinh, Doan; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-08-16

    Fluid control remains a challenge in development of portable lab-on-a-chip devices. Here, we show that microfluidic networks driven by single-frequency audio tones create resonant oscillating flow that is predicted by equivalent electrical circuit models. We fabricated microfluidic devices with fluidic resistors (R), inductors (L), and capacitors (C) to create RLC networks with band-pass resonance in the audible frequency range available on portable audio devices. Microfluidic devices were fabricated from laser-cut adhesive plastic, and a "buzzer" was glued to a diaphragm (capacitor) to integrate the actuator on the device. The AC flowrate magnitude was measured by imaging oscillation of bead tracers to allow direct comparison to the RLC circuit model across the frequency range. We present a systematic build-up from single-channel systems to multi-channel (3-channel) networks, and show that RLC circuit models predict complex frequency-dependent interactions within multi-channel networks. Finally, we show that adding flow rectifying valves to the network creates pumps that can be driven by amplified and non-amplified audio tones from common audio devices (iPod and iPhone). This work shows that RLC circuit models predict resonant flow responses in multi-channel fluidic networks as a step towards microfluidic devices controlled by audio tones. PMID:27416111

  19. Melt fractionation during pāhoehoe flow lobe emplacement, Heiðin há lava, SW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, Paavo; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2016-04-01

    Melt segregations are vesicular formations of evolved melts generated by in situ closed system fractionation of a host lava. Although they are common in p¯a hoehoe flows, pillow basalts, lava lakes and shallow intrusions, their development is not fully understood. In addition, as the melt segregations are often confined to the scale of a single outcrop, they can be seen as an easily approachable analogue to the crystal-melt fractionation processes generating evolved magmas in the Earth's crust. An eight meter high p¯a hoehoe flow lobe in Heiðin há lava, SW Iceland, was sampled in order to understand the development of the elaborate segregation structures within. The sampled outcrop is a cross-section of a typical Icelandic p¯a hoehoe lava, belonging to a large post-glacial lava shield on Reykjanes Peninsula. The lava core is striped by melt segregations in the form of vertical vesicle cylinders 1-7 cm in diameter, which feed horizontal vesicle sheets higher up in the upper lava core and lower crust. Whole-rock major and trace element results for the 20 samples from the Heiðin há lava reveal a homogenous olivine tholeiitic host lava intersected by segregations of varying composition. The vesicle cylinders in the flow core are only mildly differentiated, but the segregated melt evolves upwards to horizontal vesicle sheets, from which some have experienced an additional enrichment possibly by a gas filter-pressing of the residual liquid in the horizontal sheet. The most evolved segregations are extremely Fe-rich with 19.5 % FeOtot in comparison to the average of 12.4 % FeOtot in the host lava. Consequently, MgO drops from the host lava's 9.5 % to 4.4 % in the segregation sheets. In addition, segregations are enriched by a factor of ˜2-2.5 in TiO2, K2O, P2O5 and incompatible elements Zr, Nb, Y and V. As a consequence of the closed system behavior, geochemical trends are evident between the host lava, vesicle cylinders, and vesicle sheets of different types.

  20. Dissolution and nanoparticle generation behavior of Be-associated materials in synthetic lung fluid using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjie; Fernandez, Diego; Rudd, Abigail; Johnson, William P; Deubner, David; Sabey, Philip; Storrs, Jason; Larsen, Rod

    2011-07-01

    Various Be-containing micro-particle suspensions were equilibrated with simulated lung fluid (SLF) to examine their dissolution behavior as well as the potential generation of nanoparticles. The motivation for this study was to explore the relationship between dissolution/particle generation behaviors of Be-containing materials relevant to Be-ore processing, and their epidemiologically indicated inhalation toxicities. Limited data suggest that BeO is associated with higher rates of beryllium sensitization (BS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) relative to the other five relevant materials studied: bertrandite-containing ore, beryl-containing ore, frit (a processing intermediate), Be(OH)₂ (a processing intermediate), and silica (control). These materials were equilibrated with SLF at two pH values (4.5 and 7.2) to reflect inter- and intra-cellular environments in lung tissue. Concentrations of Be, Al, and Si in SLF increased linearly during the first 20 days of equilibration, and then rose slowly, or in some cases reached a maximum, and subsequently decreased. Relative to the other materials, BeO produced relatively low Be concentration in solution at pH 7.2; and relatively high Be concentration in solution at pH 4.5 during the first 20 days of equilibration. For both pH values, however, the Be concentration in SLF normalized to Be content of the material was lowest for BeO, demonstrating that BeO was distinct among the four other Be-containing materials in terms of its persistence as a source of Be to the SLF solution. Following 149 days of equilibration, the SLF solutions were fractionated using flow-field flow fractionation (FlFFF) with detection via ICP-MS. For all materials, nanoparticles (which were formed during equilibration) were dominantly distributed in the 10-100 nm size range. Notably, BeO produced the least nanoparticle-associated Be mass (other than silica) at both pH values. Furthermore, BeO produced the highest Be concentrations in the size

  1. Quantitative characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation of IgG thermal aggregation with and without polymer protective agents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dewang; Martin, Nicolas; Tribet, Christophe; Winnik, Françoise M

    2014-11-01

    Complexes formed between poly(acrylates) and polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) in its native conformation and after heat stress were characterized using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with on-line UV-Vis spectroscopy and multi-angle light-scattering detection (MALS). Mixtures of IgG and poly(acrylates) of increasing structural complexity, sodium poly(acrylate) (PAA), a sodium poly(acrylate) bearing at random 3 mol % n-octadecyl groups, and a random copolymer of sodium acrylate (35 mol%), N-n-octylacrylamide (25 mol%) and N-isopropylacrylamide (40 mol%), were fractionated in a sodium phosphate buffer (0.02 M, pH 6.8) in the presence, or not, of 0.1 M NaCl. The AF4 protocol developed allowed the fractionation of solutions containing free poly(acrylates), native IgG monomer and dimer, poly(acrylates)/IgG complexes made up of one IgG molecule and a few polymer chains, and/or larger poly(acrylates)/IgG aggregates. The molar mass and recovery of the soluble analytes were obtained for mixed solutions of poly(acrylates) and native IgG and for the same solutions incubated at 65 °C for 10 min. From the combined AF4 results, we concluded that in solutions of low ionic strength, the presence of PAA increased the recovery ratio of IgG after thermal stress because of the formation of electrostatically-driven PAA/IgG complexes, but PAA had no protective effect in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl. Poly(acrylates) bearing hydrophobic groups significantly increased IgG recovery after stress, independently of NaCl concentration, because of the synergistic effect of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The AF4 results corroborate conclusions drawn from a previous study combining four analytical techniques. This study demonstrates that AF4 is an efficient tool for the analysis of protein formulations subjected to stress, an important achievement given the anticipated important role of proteins in near-future human therapies. PMID:25323742

  2. Design of a pulsatile flow facility to evaluate thrombogenic potential of implantable cardiac devices.

    PubMed

    Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Ardana, Pablo Hidalgo; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Madhani, Shalv; Foster, Brent; Glezer, Ari; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-04-01

    Due to expensive nature of clinical trials, implantable cardiac devices should first be extensively characterized in vitro. Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs), an important class of these devices, have been shown to be associated with thromboembolic complications. Although various in vitro systems have been designed to quantify blood-cell damage and platelet activation caused by nonphysiological hemodynamic shear stresses in these PHVs, very few systems attempt to characterize both blood damage and fluid dynamics aspects of PHVs in the same test system. Various numerical modeling methodologies are also evolving to simulate the structural mechanics, fluid mechanics, and blood damage aspects of these devices. This article presents a completely hemocompatible small-volume test-platform that can be used for thrombogenicity studies and experimental fluid mechanics characterization. Using a programmable piston pump to drive freshly drawn human blood inside a cylindrical column, the presented system can simulate various physiological and pathophysiological conditions in testing PHVs. The system includes a modular device-mounting chamber, and in this presented case, a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regents® mechanical heart valve (MHV) in aortic position was used as the test device. The system was validated for its capability to quantify blood damage by measuring blood damage induced by the tester itself (using freshly drawn whole human blood). Blood damage levels were ascertained through clinically relevant assays on human blood while fluid dynamics were characterized using time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a blood-mimicking fluid. Blood damage induced by the tester itself, assessed through Thrombin-anti-Thrombin (TAT), Prothrombin factor 1.2 (PF1.2), and hemolysis (Drabkins assay), was within clinically accepted levels. The hydrodynamic performance of the tester showed consistent, repeatable physiological pressure and flow conditions. In addition, the

  3. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantification of quantum dots bioconjugation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Miranda, Mario; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernández, José M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2015-11-27

    Hyphenation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) to an on-line elemental detection (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ICP-MS) is proposed as a powerful diagnostic tool for quantum dots bioconjugation studies. In particular, conjugation effectiveness between a "model" monoclonal IgG antibody (Ab) and CdSe/ZnS core-shell Quantum Dots (QDs), surface-coated with an amphiphilic polymer, has been monitored here by such hybrid AF4-ICP-MS technique. Experimental conditions have been optimized searching for a proper separation between the sought bioconjugates from the eventual free reagents excesses employed during the bioconjugation (QDs and antibodies). Composition and pH of the carrier have been found to be critical parameters to ensure an efficient separation while ensuring high species recovery from the AF4 channel. An ICP-MS equipped with a triple quadropole was selected as elemental detector to enable sensitive and reliable simultaneous quantification of the elemental constituents, including sulfur, of the nanoparticulated species and the antibody. The hyphenated technique used provided nanoparticle size-based separation, elemental detection, and composition analysis capabilities that turned out to be instrumental in order to investigate in depth the Ab-QDs bioconjugation process. Moreover, the analytical strategy here proposed allowed us not only to clearly identify the bioconjugation reaction products but also to quantify nanoparticle:antibodies bioconjugation efficiency. This is a key issue in future development of analytical and bioanalytical photoluminescent QDs applications. PMID:26493473

  4. Sensitive biomolecule detection in lateral flow assay with a portable temperature-humidity control device.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Feng, Shangsheng; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-15

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have currently attracted broad interest for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, but their application has been restricted by poor quantification and limited sensitivity. While the former has been currently solved to some extent by the development of handheld or smartphone-based readers, the latter has not been addressed fully, particularly the potential influences of environmental conditions (e.g., temperature and relative humidity (RH)), which have not yet received serious attention. The present study reports the use of a portable temperature-humidity control device to provide an optimum environmental requirement for sensitivity improvement in LFAs, followed by quantification by using a smartphone. We found that a RH beyond 60% with temperatures of 55-60°C and 37-40°C produced optimum nucleic acid hybridization and antigen-antibody interaction in LFAs, respectively representing a 10-fold and 3-fold signal enhancement over ambient conditions (25°C, 60% RH). We envision that in the future the portable device could be coupled with a fully integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for sensitive detection of various target analytes in POC settings. PMID:26700582

  5. Suction-recirculation device for stabilizing particle flows within a solar powered solid particle receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kolb, Gregory J.

    2012-02-07

    A suction-recirculation device for stabilizing the flow of a curtain of blackened heat absorption particles falling inside of a solar receiver with an open aperture. The curtain of particles absorbs the concentrated heat from a solar mirror array reflected up to the receiver on a solar power tower. External winds entering the receiver at an oblique angle can destabilize the particle curtain and eject particles. A fan and ductwork is located behind the back wall of the receiver and sucks air out through an array of small holes in the back wall. Any entrained particles are separated out by a conventional cyclone device. Then, the air is recirculated back to the top of the receiver by injecting the recycled air through an array of small holes in the receiver's ceiling and upper aperture front wall. Since internal air is recirculated, heat losses are minimized and high receiver efficiency is maintained. Suction-recirculation velocities in the range of 1-5 m/s are sufficient to stabilize the particle curtain against external wind speeds in excess of 10 m/s.

  6. A passive-flow microfluidic device for imaging latent HIV activation dynamics in single T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Larisa M.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying cell-to-cell variability in drug response dynamics is important when evaluating therapeutic efficacy. For example, optimizing latency reversing agents (LRAs) for use in a clinical “activate-and-kill” strategy to purge the latent HIV reservoir in patients requires minimizing heterogeneous viral activation dynamics. To evaluate how heterogeneity in latent HIV activation varies across a range of LRAs, we tracked drug-induced response dynamics in single cells via live-cell imaging using a latent HIV–GFP reporter virus in a clonal Jurkat T cell line. To enable these studies in suspension cells, we designed a simple method to capture an array of single Jurkat T cells using a passive-flow microfluidic device. Our device, which does not require external pumps or tubing, can trap hundreds of cells within minutes with a high retention rate over 12 hours of imaging. Using this device, we quantified heterogeneity in viral activation stimulated by transcription factor (TF) activators and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Generally, TF activators resulted in both faster onset of viral activation and faster rates of production, while HDAC inhibitors resulted in more uniform onset times, but more heterogeneous rates of production. Finally, we demonstrated that while onset time of viral gene expression and rate of viral production together predict total HIV activation, rate and onset time were not correlated within the same individual cell, suggesting that these features are regulated independently. Overall, our results reveal drug-specific patterns of noisy HIV activation dynamics not previously identified in static single-cell assays, which may require consideration for the most effective activate-and-kill regime. PMID:26138068

  7. Fractional flow reserve or optical coherence tomography guidance to revascularize intermediate coronary stenosis using angioplasty (FORZA) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The management of patients with angiographically intermediate coronary lesions is a major clinical issue. Fractional flow reserve provides validated functional insights while optical coherence tomography provides high resolution anatomic imaging. Both techniques may be applied to guide management in case of angiographically intermediate coronary lesions. Moreover, these techniques may be used to optimize the result of percutaneous coronary intervention. We aim to compare the clinical and economic impact of fractional flow reserve versus optical coherence tomography guidance in patients with angiographically intermediate coronary lesions. Methods/Design Patients with at least one angiographically intermediate coronary lesion will be randomized (ratio 1:1) to fractional flow reserve or optical coherence tomography guidance. In the fractional flow reserve arm, percutaneous coronary intervention will be performed if fractional flow reserve value is ≤0.80, and will be conducted with the aim of achieving a post-percutaneous coronary intervention fractional flow reserve target value of ≥0.90. In the optical coherence tomography arm, percutaneous coronary intervention will be performed if percentage of area stenosis (AS%) is ≥75% or 50 to 75% with minimal lumen area <2.5 mm2, or if a major plaque ulceration is detected. In case of percutaneous coronary intervention, optical coherence tomography will guide the procedure in order to minimize under-expansion, malapposition, and edge dissections. Cost load and clinical outcome will be prospectively assessed at one and thirteen months. The assessed clinical outcome measures will be: major cardiovascular events and occurrence of significant angina defined as a Seattle Angina Questionnaire score <90 in the angina frequency scale. Discussion The FORZA trial will provide useful guidance for the management of patients with coronary artery disease by prospectively assessing the use of two techniques representing the

  8. The acute effects of low flow oxygen and isosorbide dinitrate on left and right ventricular ejection fractions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.; Caldwell, J.; Lakshminaryan, S.; Ritchie, J.L.; Kennedy, J.W.

    1983-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of low flow oxygen and isosorbide dinitrate on rest and exercise biventricular ejection fractions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and to relate these ejection fraction responses to changes in pressure and flow. Nine patients with stable, moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who had no prior history of heart failure performed supine exercise with simultaneous hemodynamic and radionuclide ventriculographic monitoring. Eight patients performed a second exercise during low flow oxygen breathing and five performed a third exercise after ingesting 10 mg oral isosorbide. Oxygen led to a decrease in exercise pulmonary artery pressure in all subjects and a decline in total pulmonary resistance in five of the seven in whom it was measured. Right ventricular ejection fraction increased 0.05 or more only in subjects who had a decrease in total pulmonary resistance. Isosorbide led to an increase in rest and exercise right and left ventricular ejection fractions with simultaneous decreases in pulmonary artery pressure, total pulmonary resistance, blood pressure and arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but without a history of right heart failure, the right ventricular systolic functional response to low flow oxygen and isosorbide at rest and exercise is, in part, determined by changes in total pulmonary resistance. The chronic relation between right ventricular ejection fraction and pulmonary hemodynamics in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains to be evaluated.

  9. An enhanced bacterial foraging algorithm approach for optimal power flow problem including FACTS devices considering system loadability.

    PubMed

    Belwin Edward, J; Rajasekar, N; Sathiyasekar, K; Senthilnathan, N; Sarjila, R

    2013-09-01

    Obtaining optimal power flow solution is a strenuous task for any power system engineer. The inclusion of FACTS devices in the power system network adds to its complexity. The dual objective of OPF with fuel cost minimization along with FACTS device location for IEEE 30 bus is considered and solved using proposed Enhanced Bacterial Foraging algorithm (EBFA). The conventional Bacterial Foraging Algorithm (BFA) has the difficulty of optimal parameter selection. Hence, in this paper, BFA is enhanced by including Nelder-Mead (NM) algorithm for better performance. A MATLAB code for EBFA is developed and the problem of optimal power flow with inclusion of FACTS devices is solved. After several run with different initial values, it is found that the inclusion of FACTS devices such as SVC and TCSC in the network reduces the generation cost along with increased voltage stability limits. It is also observed that, the proposed algorithm requires lesser computational time compared to earlier proposed algorithms. PMID:23759251

  10. Liquid Flooded Flow-Focusing Microfluidic Device for in situ Generation of Monodisperse Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Dhanaliwala, Ali Haider; Chen, Johnny L; Wang, Shiying; Hossack, John A

    2012-01-01

    Current microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agents are administered intravenously resulting in large losses of contrast agent, systemic distribution, and strict requirements for microbubble longevity and diameter size. Instead we propose in situ production of microbubbles directly within the vasculature to avoid these limitations. Flow focusing microfluidic devices (FFMDs) are a promising technology for enabling in situ production as they can produce microbubbles with precisely controlled diameters in real-time. While the microfluidic chips are small, the addition of inlets and interconnects to supply the gas and liquid phase greatly increases the footprint of these devices preventing the miniaturization of FFMDs to sizes compatible with medium and small vessels. To overcome this challenge, we introduce a new method for supplying the liquid (shell) phase to an FFMD that eliminates bulky interconnects. A pressurized liquid-filled chamber is coupled to the liquid inlets of an FFMD, which we term a flooded FFMD. The microbubble diameter and production rate of flooded FFMDs were measured optically over a range of gas pressures and liquid flow rates. The smallest FFMD manufactured measured 14.5 × 2.8 × 2.3 mm. A minimum microbubble diameter of 8.1 ± 0.3 μm was achieved at a production rate of 450,000 microbubbles/s (MB/s). This represents a significant improvement with respect to any previously reported result. The flooded design also simplifies parallelization and production rates of up to 670,000 MB/s were achieved using a parallelized version of the flooded FFMD. In addition, an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheter was coupled to the flooded FFMD to produce an integrated ultrasound contrast imaging device. B-mode and IVUS images of microbubbles produced from a flooded FFMD in a gelatin phantom vessel were acquired to demonstrate the potential of in situ microbubble production and real-time imaging. Microbubble production rates of 222,000 MB/s from a flooded

  11. Fully automatic flow-based device for monitoring of drug permeation across a cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Zelená, Lucie; Marques, Sara S; Segundo, Marcela A; Miró, Manuel; Pávek, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr

    2016-01-01

    A novel flow-programming setup based on the sequential injection principle is herein proposed for on-line monitoring of temporal events in cell permeation studies. The permeation unit consists of a Franz cell with its basolateral compartment mixed under mechanical agitation and thermostated at 37 °C. The apical compartment is replaced by commercially available Transwell inserts with a precultivated cell monolayer. The transport of drug substances across epithelial cells genetically modified with the P-glycoprotein membrane transporter (MDCKII-MDR1) is monitored on-line using rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent marker. The permeation kinetics of the marker is obtained in a fully automated mode by sampling minute volumes of solution from the basolateral compartment in short intervals (10 min) up to 4 h. The effect of a P-glycoprotein transporter inhibitor, verapamil as a model drug, on the efficiency of the marker transport across the cell monolayer is thoroughly investigated. The analytical features of the proposed flow method for cell permeation studies in real time are critically compared against conventional batch-wise procedures and microfluidic devices. PMID:26615589

  12. On the use of area-averaged void fraction and local bubble chord length entropies as two-phase flow regime indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Leonor; Juliá, J. Enrique; Paranjape, Sidharth; Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the use of the area-averaged void fraction and bubble chord length entropies is introduced as flow regime indicators in two-phase flow systems. The entropy provides quantitative information about the disorder in the area-averaged void fraction or bubble chord length distributions. The CPDF (cumulative probability distribution function) of void fractions and bubble chord lengths obtained by means of impedance meters and conductivity probes are used to calculate both entropies. Entropy values for 242 flow conditions in upward two-phase flows in 25.4 and 50.8-mm pipes have been calculated. The measured conditions cover ranges from 0.13 to 5 m/s in the superficial liquid velocity j f and ranges from 0.01 to 25 m/s in the superficial gas velocity j g. The physical meaning of both entropies has been interpreted using the visual flow regime map information. The area-averaged void fraction and bubble chord length entropies capability as flow regime indicators have been checked with other statistical parameters and also with different input signals durations. The area-averaged void fraction and the bubble chord length entropies provide better or at least similar results than those obtained with other indicators that include more than one parameter. The entropy is capable to reduce the relevant information of the flow regimes in only one significant and useful parameter. In addition, the entropy computation time is shorter than the majority of the other indicators. The use of one parameter as input also represents faster predictions.

  13. Liquid crystal-on-organic field-effect transistor sensory devices for perceptive sensing of ultralow intensity gas flow touch.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jooyeok; Park, Soohyeong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate liquid crystal-on-organic field-effect transistor (LC-on-OFET) sensory devices that can perceptively sense ultralow level gas flows. The LC-on-OFET devices were fabricated by mounting LC molecules (4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl - 5CB) on the polymer channel layer of OFET. Results showed that the presence of LC molecules on the channel layer resulted in enhanced drain currents due to a strong dipole effect of LC molecules. Upon applying low intensity nitrogen gas flows, the drain current was sensitively increased depending on the intensity and time of nitrogen flows. The present LC-on-OFET devices could detect extremely low level nitrogen flows (0.7 sccm-11 μl/s), which could not be felt by human skins, thanks to a synergy effect between collective behavior of LC molecules and charge-sensitive channel layer of OFET. The similar sensation was also achieved using the LC-on-OFET devices with a polymer film skin, suggesting viable practical applications of the present LC-on-OFET sensory devices. PMID:23948946

  14. Liquid Crystal-on-Organic Field-Effect Transistor Sensory Devices for Perceptive Sensing of Ultralow Intensity Gas Flow Touch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jooyeok; Park, Soohyeong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate liquid crystal-on-organic field-effect transistor (LC-on-OFET) sensory devices that can perceptively sense ultralow level gas flows. The LC-on-OFET devices were fabricated by mounting LC molecules (4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl - 5CB) on the polymer channel layer of OFET. Results showed that the presence of LC molecules on the channel layer resulted in enhanced drain currents due to a strong dipole effect of LC molecules. Upon applying low intensity nitrogen gas flows, the drain current was sensitively increased depending on the intensity and time of nitrogen flows. The present LC-on-OFET devices could detect extremely low level nitrogen flows (0.7 sccm-11 μl/s), which could not be felt by human skins, thanks to a synergy effect between collective behavior of LC molecules and charge-sensitive channel layer of OFET. The similar sensation was also achieved using the LC-on-OFET devices with a polymer film skin, suggesting viable practical applications of the present LC-on-OFET sensory devices.

  15. Liquid Crystal-on-Organic Field-Effect Transistor Sensory Devices for Perceptive Sensing of Ultralow Intensity Gas Flow Touch

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jooyeok; Park, Soohyeong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate liquid crystal-on-organic field-effect transistor (LC-on-OFET) sensory devices that can perceptively sense ultralow level gas flows. The LC-on-OFET devices were fabricated by mounting LC molecules (4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl – 5CB) on the polymer channel layer of OFET. Results showed that the presence of LC molecules on the channel layer resulted in enhanced drain currents due to a strong dipole effect of LC molecules. Upon applying low intensity nitrogen gas flows, the drain current was sensitively increased depending on the intensity and time of nitrogen flows. The present LC-on-OFET devices could detect extremely low level nitrogen flows (0.7 sccm–11 μl/s), which could not be felt by human skins, thanks to a synergy effect between collective behavior of LC molecules and charge-sensitive channel layer of OFET. The similar sensation was also achieved using the LC-on-OFET devices with a polymer film skin, suggesting viable practical applications of the present LC-on-OFET sensory devices. PMID:23948946

  16. The use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with on-line detection in the study of drug retention within liposomal nanocarriers and drug transfer kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hinna, Askell Hvid; Hupfeld, Stefan; Kuntsche, Judith; Brandl, Martin

    2016-05-30

    Due to their solubilizing capabilities, liposomes (phospholipid vesicles) are suited for designing formulations for intravenous administration of drug compounds which are poorly water-soluble. Despite the good in-vitro stability of such formulations with minimal drug leakage, upon i.v. injection there is a risk of premature drug loss due to drug transfer to plasma proteins and cell membranes. Here we report on the refinement of a recently introduced simple in vitro predictive tool by Hinna and colleagues in 2014, which brings small drug loaded (donor) liposomes in contact with large acceptor liposomes, the latter serving as a model mimicking biological sinks in the body. The donor- and acceptor-liposomes were subsequently separated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4), during which the sample is exposed to a large volume of eluent which corresponds to a dilution factor of approximately 600. The model drug content in the donor- and acceptor fraction was quantified by on-line UV/VIS extinction measurements with correction for turbidity and by off-line HPLC measurements of collected fractions. The refined method allowed for (near) baseline separation of donor and acceptor vesicles as well as reliable quantification of the drug content not only of the donor- but now also of the acceptor-liposomes due to their improved size-homogeneity, colloidal stability and reduced turbidity. This improvement over the previously reported approach allowed for simultaneous quantification of both drug transfer and drug release to the aqueous phase. By sampling at specific incubation times, the release and transfer kinetics of the model compound p-THPP (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)21H,23H-porphine) was determined. p-THPP is structurally closely related to the photosensitizer temoporfin, which is in clinical use and under evaluation in liposomal formulations. The transfer of p-THPP to the acceptor vesicles followed 1st order kinetics with a half-life of

  17. First results of the use of a continuously flowing lithium limiter in high performance discharges in the EAST device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. S.; Zuo, G. Z.; Ren, J.; Yang, Q. X.; Chen, Z. X.; Xu, H.; Zakharov, L. E.; Maingi, R.; Gentile, C.; Meng, X. C.; Sun, Z.; Xu, W.; Chen, Y.; Fan, D.; Yan, N.; Duan, Y. M.; Yang, Z. D.; Zhao, H. L.; Song, Y. T.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; EAST Team

    2016-04-01

    As an alternative choice of solid plasma facing components (PFCs), flowing liquid lithium can serve as a limiter or divertor PFC and offers a self-healing surface with acceptable heat removal and good impurity control. Such a system could improve plasma performance, and therefore be attractive for future fusion devices. Recently, a continuously flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter has been successfully designed and tested in the EAST superconducting tokamak. A circulating lithium layer with a thickness of  <0.1 mm and a flow rate ~2 cm3 s-1 was achieved. A novel in-vessel electro-magnetic pump, working with the toroidal magnetic field of the EAST device, was reliable to control the lithium flow speed. The flowing liquid limiter was found to be fully compatible with various plasma scenarios, including high confinement mode plasmas heated by lower hybrid waves or by neutral beam injection. It was also found that the controllable lithium emission from the limiter was beneficial for the reduction of recycling and impurities, for the reduction of divertor heat flux, and in certain cases, for the improvement of plasma stored energy, which bodes well application for the use of flowing liquid lithium PFCs in future fusion devices.

  18. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T < 10 s). For performance demonstrations, the proposed method was applied to evaluate blood viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a

  19. Correlations between the Dielectric Properties and Exterior Morphology of Cells Revealed by Dielectrophoretic Field-Flow Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Shim, Sangjo; Noshari, Jamileh; Becker, Frederick F.; Stemke-Hale, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Although dielectrophoresis (DEP) has great potential for addressing clinical cell isolation problems based on cell dielectric differences, a biological basis for predicting the DEP behavior of cells has been lacking. Here, the dielectric properties of the NCI-60 panel of tumor cell types have been measured by dielectrophoretic (DEP) field-flow fractionation, correlated with the exterior morphologies of the cells during growth, and compared with the dielectric and morphological characteristics of the subpopulations of peripheral blood. In agreement with earlier findings, cell total capacitance varied with both cell size and plasma membrane folding and the dielectric properties of the NCI-60 cell types in suspension reflected the plasma membrane area and volume of the cells at their growth sites. Therefore, the behavior of cells in DEP-based manipulations is largely determined by their exterior morphological characteristics prior to release into suspension. As a consequence, DEP is able to discriminate between cells of similar size having different morphological origins, offering a significant advantage over size-based filtering for isolating circulating tumor cells, for example. The findings provide a framework for anticipating cell dielectric behavior on the basis of structure-function relationships and suggest that DEP should be widely applicable as a surface marker-independent method for sorting cells. PMID:23172680

  20. Physiologic evaluation of ischemia using cardiac CT: current status of CT myocardial perfusion and CT fractional flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew D; Joly, Joanna M; Chen, Marcus Y; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac CT, specifically coronary CT angiography (CTA), is an established technology which detects anatomically significant coronary artery disease with a high sensitivity and negative predictive value compared with invasive coronary angiography. However, the limited ability of CTA to determine the physiologic significance of intermediate coronary stenoses remains a shortcoming compared with other noninvasive methods such as single-photon emission CT, stress echocardiography, and stress cardiac magnetic resonance. Two methods have been investigated recently: (1) myocardial CT perfusion and (2) fractional flow reserve (FFR) computed from CT (FFRCT). Improving diagnostic accuracy by combining the anatomic aspects of coronary CTA with a physiologic assessment via CT perfusion or FFRCT may reduce the need for additional testing to evaluate for ischemia, reduce downstream costs and risks associated with an invasive procedure, and lead to improved patient outcomes. Given a rapidly expanding body of research in this field, this comparative review summarizes the present literature while contrasting the benefits, limitations, and future directions in myocardial CT perfusion and FFRCT imaging. PMID:25151919

  1. Direct numerical simulation of horizontal open channel flow with finite-size, heavy particles at low solid volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidanemariam, Aman G.; Chan-Braun, Clemens; Doychev, Todor; Uhlmann, Markus

    2013-02-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulation of turbulent open channel flow over a smooth horizontal wall in the presence of finite-size, heavy particles. The spherical particles have a diameter of approximately 7 wall units, a density of 1.7 times the fluid density and a solid volume fraction of 5 × 10-4. The value of the Galileo number is set to 16.5, while the Shields parameter measures approximately 0.2. Under these conditions, the particles are predominantly located in the vicinity of the bottom wall, where they exhibit strong preferential concentration which we quantify by means of Voronoi analysis and by computing the particle-conditioned concentration field. As observed in previous studies with similar parameter values, the mean streamwise particle velocity is smaller than that of the fluid. We propose a new definition of the fluid velocity ‘seen’ by finite-size particles based on an average over a spherical surface segment, from which we deduce in the present case that the particles are instantaneously lagging the fluid only by a small amount. The particle-conditioned fluid velocity field shows that the particles preferentially reside in the low-speed streaks, leading to the observed apparent lag. Finally, a vortex eduction study reveals that spanwise particle motion is significantly correlated with the presence of vortices with the corresponding sense of rotation which are located in the immediate vicinity of the near-wall particles.

  2. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Andreini, Daniele; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Guaricci, Andrea Igoren; Pepi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach. PMID:25692133

  3. Physicochemical characterization of titanium dioxide pigments using various techniques for size determination and asymmetric flow field flow fractionation hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Helsper, Johannes P F G; Peters, Ruud J B; van Bemmel, Margaretha E M; Rivera, Zahira E Herrera; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Tromp, Peter C; Hofmann, Thilo; Weigel, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Seven commercial titanium dioxide pigments and two other well-defined TiO2 materials (TiMs) were physicochemically characterised using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (aF4) for separation, various techniques to determine size distribution and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for chemical characterization. The aF4-ICPMS conditions were optimised and validated for linearity, limit of detection, recovery, repeatability and reproducibility, all indicating good performance. Multi-element detection with aF4-ICPMS showed that some commercial pigments contained zirconium co-eluting with titanium in aF4. The other two TiMs, NM103 and NM104, contained aluminium as integral part of the titanium peak eluting in aF4. The materials were characterised using various size determination techniques: retention time in aF4, aF4 hyphenated with multi-angle laser light spectrometry (MALS), single particle ICPMS (spICPMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particle tracking analysis (PTA). PTA appeared inappropriate. For the other techniques, size distribution patterns were quite similar, i.e. high polydispersity with diameters from 20 to >700 nm, a modal peak between 200 and 500 nm and a shoulder at 600 nm. Number-based size distribution techniques as spICPMS and SEM showed smaller modal diameters than aF4-UV, from which mass-based diameters are calculated. With aF4-MALS calculated, light-scattering-based "diameters of gyration" (Øg) are similar to hydrodynamic diameters (Øh) from aF4-UV analyses and diameters observed with SEM, but much larger than with spICPMS. A Øg/Øh ratio of about 1 indicates that the TiMs are oblate spheres or fractal aggregates. SEM observations confirm the latter structure. The rationale for differences in modal peak diameter is discussed. PMID:27469116

  4. Comparison of the molecular mass and optical properties of colored dissolved organic material in two rivers and coastal waters by flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zanardi-Lamardo, Eliete; Clark, Catherine D; Moore, Cynthia A; Zika, Rod G

    2002-07-01

    Colored dissolved organic material (CDOM) is an important sunlight absorbing substance affecting the optical properties of natural waters. However, little is known about its structural and optical properties mainly due to its complex matrix and the limitation of the techniques available. A comparison of two southwestern Florida rivers [the Caloosahatchee River (CR) and the Shark River (SR)] was done in terms of molecular mass (MM) and diffusion coefficients (D). The novel technique Frit inlet/frit outlet-flow field-flow fractionation (FIFO-FIFFF) with absorbance and fluorescence detectors was used to determine these properties. The SR receives organic material from the Everglades. By contrast, the CR arises from Lake Okeechobee in central Florida, receiving anthropogenic inputs, farming runoff, and natural organics. Both rivers discharge to the Gulf of Mexico. Fluorescence identified, for both rivers, two different MM distributions in low salinity water samples: the first was centered at approximately 1.7 kDa (CR) and approximately 2 kDa (SR); the second centered at approximately 13 kDa for both rivers, which disappeared gradually in the river plumes to below detection limit in coastal waters. Absorbance detected only one MM distribution centered at approximately 2 kDa (CR) and 2.2-2.4 kDa (SR). Fluorescence in general peaked at a lower MM than absorbance, suggesting a different size distribution for fluorophores vs chromophores. A photochemical study showed that, after sunlight, irradiated freshwater samples have similar characteristics to more marine waters, including a shift in MM distribution of chromophores. The differences observed between the rivers in the optical characteristics, MM distributions, and D values suggest that the CDOM sources, physical, and photochemical degradation processes are different for these two rivers. PMID:12144250

  5. Real-Time Noise Removal for Line-Scanning Hyperspectral Devices Using a Minimum Noise Fraction-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bjorgan, Asgeir; Randeberg, Lise Lyngsnes

    2015-01-01

    Processing line-by-line and in real-time can be convenient for some applications of line-scanning hyperspectral imaging technology. Some types of processing, like inverse modeling and spectral analysis, can be sensitive to noise. The MNF (minimum noise fraction) transform provides suitable denoising performance, but requires full image availability for the estimation of image and noise statistics. In this work, a modified algorithm is proposed. Incrementally-updated statistics enables the algorithm to denoise the image line-by-line. The denoising performance has been compared to conventional MNF and found to be equal. With a satisfying denoising performance and real-time implementation, the developed algorithm can denoise line-scanned hyperspectral images in real-time. The elimination of waiting time before denoised data are available is an important step towards real-time visualization of processed hyperspectral data. The source code can be found at http://www.github.com/ntnu-bioopt/mnf. This includes an implementation of conventional MNF denoising. PMID:25654717

  6. Cross-sectional void fraction distribution measurements in a vertical annulus two-phase flow by high speed X-ray computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Harvel, G.D. |; Hori, K.; Kawanishi, K.

    1995-09-01

    A Real-Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR) system and a high speed X-ray Computed tomography (X-CT) system are compared for measurement of two-phase flow. Each system is used to determine the flow regime, and the void fraction distribution in a vertical annulus flow channel. A standard optical video system is also used to observe the flow regime. The annulus flow channel is operated as a bubble column and measurements obtained for gas flow rates from 0.0 to 30.01/min. The flow regimes observed by all three measurement systems through image analysis shows that the two-dimensional void fraction distribution can be obtained. The X-CT system is shown to have a superior temporal resolution capable of resolving the void fraction distribution in an (r,{theta}) plane in 33.0 ms. Void fraction distribution for bubbly flow and slug flow is determined.

  7. Uncertainty of canal seepage losses estimated using flowing water balance with acoustic Doppler devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Chad A.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2014-09-01

    Seepage losses from unlined irrigation canals amount to a large fraction of the total volume of water diverted for agricultural use, posing problems to both water conservation and water quality. Quantifying these losses and identifying areas where they are most prominent are crucial for determining the severity of seepage-related complications and for assessing the potential benefits of seepage reduction technologies and materials. A relatively easy and inexpensive way to estimate losses over an extensive segment of a canal is the flowing water balance, or inflow-outflow, method. Such estimates, however, have long been considered fraught with ambiguity due both to measurement error and to spatial and temporal variability. This paper presents a water balance analysis that evaluates uncertainty in 60 tests on two typical earthen irrigation canals. Monte Carlo simulation is used to account for a number of different sources of uncertainty. Issues of errors in acoustic Doppler flow measurement, in water level readings, and in evaporation estimates are considered. Storage change and canal wetted perimeter area, affected by variability in the canal prism, as well as lagged vs. simultaneous measurements of discharge at the inflow and outflow ends also are addressed. Mean estimated seepage loss rates for the tested canal reaches ranged from about -0.005 (gain) to 0.110 m3 s-1 per hectare of canal wetted perimeter (or -0.043 to 0.95 m d-1) with estimated probability distributions revealing substantial uncertainty. Across the tests, the average coefficient of variation was about 240% and the average 90th inter-percentile range was 0.143 m3 s-1 per hectare (1.24 m d-1). Sensitivity analysis indicates that while the predominant influence on seepage uncertainty is error in measured discharge at the upstream and downstream ends of the canal test reach, the magnitude and uncertainty of storage change due to unsteady flow also is a significant influence. Recommendations are

  8. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos G.; Boucher, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit.

  9. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1997-06-24

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit. 2 figs.

  10. Structured Biodegradable Polymeric Microparticles for Drug Delivery Produced Using Flow Focusing Glass Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Ekanem, Ekanem E; Nabavi, Seyed Ali; Vladisavljević, Goran T; Gu, Sai

    2015-10-21

    Biodegradable poly(DL-lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles with tunable size, shape, internal structure and surface morphology were produced by counter-current flow focusing in axisymmetric (3D) glass capillary devices. The dispersed phase was composed of 0.5-2 wt % polymer solution in a volatile organic solvent (ethyl acetate or dichloromethane) and the continuous phase was 5 wt % aqueous poly(vinyl alcohol) solution. The droplets with a coefficient of variation in dripping regime below 2.5% were evaporated to form polymeric particles with uniform sizes ranging between 4 and 30 μm. The particle microstructure and surface roughness were modified by adding nanofiller (montmorillonite nanoclay) or porogen (2-methylpentane) in the dispersed phase to form less porous polymer matrix or porous particles with golf-ball-like dimpled surface, respectively. The presence of 2-4 wt % nanoclay in the host polymer significantly reduced the release rate of paracetamol and prevented the early burst release, as a result of reduced polymer porosity and tortuous path for the diffusing drug molecules. Numerical modeling results using the volume of fluid-continuum surface force model agreed well with experimental behavior and revealed trapping of nanoclay particles in the dispersed phase upstream of the orifice at low dispersed phase flow rates and for 4 wt % nanoclay content, due to vortex formation. Janus PLA/PCL (polycaprolactone) particles were produced by solvent evaporation-induced phase separation within organic phase droplets containing 3% (v/v) PLA/PCL (30/70 or 70/30) mixture in dichloromethane. A strong preferential adsorption of Rhodamine 6G dye onto PLA was utilized to identify PLA portions of the Janus particles by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Uniform hemispherical PCL particles were produced by dissolution of PLA domes with acetone. PMID:26423218

  11. Triboelectric effect as a new strategy for sealing and controlling the flow in paper-based devices.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Everson T S G; Santhiago, Murilo; de Souza, Fabrício R; Coltro, Wendell K T; Kubota, Lauro T

    2015-04-01

    We reported here for the first time that triboelectric charges on PET sheets can be used to seal and control the flow rate in paper-based devices. The proposed method exhibits simplicity and low cost, provides reversible sealing and minimizes the effect of sample evaporation. PMID:25686364

  12. Examining the link between cash flow, market value, and research and development investment spending in the medical device industry.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Bryan P; Santerre, Rexford E

    2013-02-01

    Unlike the pharmaceutical industry, no empirical research has focused on the factors influencing research and development (R&D) spending in the medical device industry. To fill that gap, this study examines how R&D spending is influenced by prior year cash flow and corporate market value using multiple regression analysis and a panel data set of medical device companies over the period 1962-2008. The empirical findings suggest that the elasticities of R&D spending with respect to cash flow and corporate market value equal 0.58 and 0.31, respectively. Moreover, based upon these estimates, simulations show that the recently enacted excise tax on medical devices, taken alone, will reduce R&D spending by approximately $4 billion and thereby lead to a minimum loss of $20 billion worth of human life years over the first 10 years of its enactment. PMID:23303706

  13. Fractional flow reserve vs. angiography in guiding management to optimize outcomes in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: the British Heart Foundation FAMOUS–NSTEMI randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Layland, Jamie; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Curzen, Nick; Sood, Arvind; Balachandran, Kanarath; Das, Raj; Junejo, Shahid; Ahmed, Nadeem; Lee, Matthew M.Y.; Shaukat, Aadil; O'Donnell, Anna; Nam, Julian; Briggs, Andrew; Henderson, Robert; McConnachie, Alex; Berry, Colin; Hannah, Andrew; Stewart, Andrew; Metcalfe, Malcolm; Norrie, John; Chowdhary, Saqib; Clark, Andrew; Henderson, Robert; Balachandran, Kanarath; Berry, Colin; Baird, Gordon; O'Donnell, Anna; Sood, Arvind; Curzen, Nick; Das, Raj; Ford, Ian; Layland, Jamie; Junejo, Shahid; Oldroyd, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Aim We assessed the management and outcomes of non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients randomly assigned to fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided management or angiography-guided standard care. Methods and results We conducted a prospective, multicentre, parallel group, 1 : 1 randomized, controlled trial in 350 NSTEMI patients with ≥1 coronary stenosis ≥30% of the lumen diameter assessed visually (threshold for FFR measurement) (NCT01764334). Enrolment took place in six UK hospitals from October 2011 to May 2013. Fractional flow reserve was disclosed to the operator in the FFR-guided group (n = 176). Fractional flow reserve was measured but not disclosed in the angiography-guided group (n = 174). Fractional flow reserve ≤0.80 was an indication for revascularization by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). The median (IQR) time from the index episode of myocardial ischaemia to angiography was 3 (2, 5) days. For the primary outcome, the proportion of patients treated initially by medical therapy was higher in the FFR-guided group than in the angiography-guided group [40 (22.7%) vs. 23 (13.2%), difference 95% (95% CI: 1.4%, 17.7%), P = 0.022]. Fractional flow reserve disclosure resulted in a change in treatment between medical therapy, PCI or CABG in 38 (21.6%) patients. At 12 months, revascularization remained lower in the FFR-guided group [79.0 vs. 86.8%, difference 7.8% (−0.2%, 15.8%), P = 0.054]. There were no statistically significant differences in health outcomes and quality of life between the groups. Conclusion In NSTEMI patients, angiography-guided management was associated with higher rates of coronary revascularization compared with FFR-guided management. A larger trial is necessary to assess health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. PMID:25179764

  14. Long-term outcomes of fractional flow reserve-guided vs. angiography-guided percutaneous coronary intervention in contemporary practice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Elrashidi, Muhamad Y.; Flammer, Andreas J.; Lennon, Ryan J.; Bell, Malcolm R.; Holmes, David R.; Bresnahan, John F.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Aims Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is the reference standard for the assessment of the functional significance of coronary artery stenoses, but is underutilized in daily clinical practice. We aimed to study long-term outcomes of FFR-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the general clinical practice. Methods and results In this retrospective study, consecutive patients (n = 7358), referred for PCI at the Mayo Clinic between October 2002 and December 2009, were divided in two groups: those undergoing PCI without (PCI-only, n = 6268) or with FFR measurements (FFR-guided, n = 1090). The latter group was further classified as the FFR-Perform group (n = 369) if followed by PCI, and the FFR-Defer group (n = 721) if PCI was deferred. Clinical events were compared during a median follow-up of 50.9 months. The Kaplan–Meier fraction of major adverse cardiac events at 7 years was 57.0% in the PCI-only vs. 50.0% in the FFR-guided group (P = 0.016). Patients with FFR-guided interventions had a non-significantly lower rate of death or myocardial infarction compared with those with angiography-guided interventions [hazard ratio (HR): 0.85, 95% CI: 0.71–1.01, P = 0.06]; the FFR-guided deferred-PCI strategy was independently associated with reduced rate of myocardial infarction (HR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.26–0.82, P = 0.008). After excluding patients with FFR of 0.75–0.80 and deferring PCI, the use of FFR was significantly associated with reduced rate of death or myocardial infarction (HR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.66–0.96, P = 0.02). Conclusion In the contemporary practice, an FFR-guided treatment strategy is associated with a favourable long-term outcome. The current study supports the use of the FFR for decision-making in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. PMID:23344979

  15. A microfluidic device with integrated fluorimetric detection for flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Alexandre; Raimundo, Ivo M; Rohwedder, Jarbas J R; Lima, Renato S; Araújo, Mário C Ugulino

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the development of flow analysis microsystems with integrated fluorimetric detection cells. Channels (width of 300-540 microm and depth of 200-590 microm) were manufactured by deep-UV lithography in urethane-acrylate (UA) resin. Plastic optical fibers (diameter of 250 microm) were coupled to a 2.0-mm-long detection channel in order to guide the excitation radiation from an LED (470 nm) and collect the emitted radiation at a right angle towards a photomultiplier. A single-line miniaturized system, with a total internal volume of 10.4 microL, was evaluated by means of standard fluorescein solutions (0.53-2.66 micromol L(-1), pH 8.5). The analytical signals presented a linear relationship in the concentration range studied, with a relative standard deviation of 1.9% (n = 5), providing a detection limit of 0.37 micromol L(-1) and an analytical frequency of 60 samples/h, using a flow rate of 60 microL min(-1). Optical microscopy images and videos acquired in real time for the hydrodynamic injection of 130 and 320 nL of sample solutions indicated the good performance of the proposed sampling strategy. Another microsystem with a total internal volume of 38 microL was developed, incorporating a confluence point for two solutions. This device was applied to the determination of the total concentration of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in commercial mineral waters using the calcein method. Microscopy images and videos demonstrated the mixing efficiency of the solutions in the microchannels. A linear relationship was observed for the analytical signal in the Ca(2+) concentration range from 25 to 125 micromol L(-1), with relative standard deviations of 3.5%. The analysis of mineral waters with the proposed system provided results that did not differ significantly from those obtained by the EDTA titration method at a confidence level of 95%. These results demonstrate the viability of developing micro flow injection systems with an integrated fluorimetric detection cell

  16. Catheter ablation for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients supported by continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Garan, Arthur R; Iyer, Vivek; Whang, William; Mody, Kanika P; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Colombo, Paolo C; Te-Frey, Rosie; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Garan, Hasan; Jorde, Ulrich P; Uriel, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are common after implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and in a subset of patients may be refractory to medication. Morbidity from VA in this population includes right ventricular failure (RVF). We sought to evaluate the efficacy of catheter ablation for VA in patients with LVAD. A retrospective analysis of patients supported by continuous-flow LVAD referred for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) between 2008 and the present was performed. Seven patients were referred for VT ablation an average of 236 ± 292 days after LVAD implantation. Three patients (42.9%) developed RVF in the setting of intractable arrhythmias. A transfemoral approach was used for six patients (85.7%) and an epicardial for one patient (14.3%). The clinical VT was inducible and successfully ablated in six patients (85.7%). The location of these arrhythmias was apical in three cases (42.9%). A total of 13 VTs were ablated in seven patients. Although the majority had reduction in VA frequency, recurrent VAs were observed in six patients (85.7%). One patient (14.3%) experienced a bleeding complication after the procedure. For patients with a high VA burden after LVAD implantation, VT ablation is safe and feasible, but VA frequently recurs. PMID:24614361

  17. Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices: Shared Care Goals of Monitoring and Treating Patients

    PubMed Central

    Estep, Jerry D.; Trachtenberg, Barry H.; Loza, Laurie P.; Bruckner, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have been clinically adopted as a long-term standard of care therapy option for patients with end-stage heart failure. For many patients, shared care between the care providers at the implanting center and care providers in the community in which the patient resides is a clinical necessity. The aims of this review are to (1) provide a rationale for the outpatient follow-up exam and surveillance testing used at our center to monitor patients supported by the HeartMate II® CF-LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) and (2) provide the protocol/algorithms we use for blood pressure, driveline exit site, LVAD alarm history, surveillance blood work, and echocardiography monitoring in this patient population. In addition, we define our partnership outpatient follow-up protocol and the “shared care” specific responsibilities we use with referring health care providers to best manage many of our patients. PMID:25793028

  18. Automatic calibration of the inlet pressure sensor for the implantable continuous-flow ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Saito, Itsuro; Isoyama, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Inoue, Yusuke; Ono, Toshiya; Kouno, Akimasa; Imachi, Kou; Abe, Yusuke

    2011-06-01

    Significant progress in the development of implantable ventricular assist devices using continuous-flow blood pumps has been made recently. However, a control method has not been established. The blood pressure in the inflow cannula (inlet pressure) is one of the candidates for performing an adequate control. This could also provide important information about ventricle sucking. However, no calibration method for an inlet pressure sensor exists. In this study, an automatic calibration algorithm of the inlet pressure sensor from the pressure waveform at the condition of ventricle sucking was proposed. The calibration algorithm was constructed based on the consideration that intrathoracic pressure could be substituted for atmospheric pressure because the lung is open to air. We assumed that the inlet pressure at the releasing point of the sucking would represent the intrathoracic pressure, because the atrial pressure would be low owing to the sucking condition. A special mock circulation system that can reproduce ventricle sucking was developed to validate the calibration algorithm. The calibration algorithm worked well with a maximum SD of 2.1 mmHg for 3-min measurement in the mock circulation system. While the deviation was slightly large for an elaborate calibration, it would still be useful as a primitive calibration. The influence of the respiratory change and other factors as well as the reliability of the calibration value should be investigated with an animal experiment as a next step. PMID:21373781

  19. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1998-02-10

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  20. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow.

  1. Integration of continuous-flow sampling with microchip electrophoresis using poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based valves in a reversibly sealed device.

    PubMed

    Li, Michelle W; Martin, R Scott

    2007-07-01

    Here we describe a reversibly sealed microchip device that incorporates poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based valves for the rapid injection of analytes from a continuously flowing stream into a channel network for analysis with microchip electrophoresis. The microchip was reversibly sealed to a PDMS-coated glass substrate and microbore tubing was used for the introduction of gas and fluids to the microchip device. Two pneumatic valves were incorporated into the design and actuated on the order of hundreds of milliseconds, allowing analyte from a continuously flowing sampling stream to be injected into an electrophoresis separation channel. The device was characterized in terms of the valve actuation time and pushback voltage. It was also found that the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the buffer system greatly increased the reproducibility of the injection scheme and enabled the analysis of amino acids derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde/cyanide. Results from continuous injections of a 0.39 nL fluorescein plug into the optimized system showed that the injection process was reproducible (RSD of 0.7%, n = 10). Studies also showed that the device was capable of monitoring off-chip changes in concentration with a device lag time of 90 s. Finally, the ability of the device to rapidly monitor on-chip concentration changes was demonstrated by continually sampling from an analyte plug that was derivatized upstream from the electrophoresis/continuous flow interface. A reversibly sealed device of this type will be useful for the continuous monitoring and analysis of processes that occur either off-chip (such as microdialysis sampling) or on-chip from other integrated functions. PMID:17577199

  2. Investigation of the Effects of Cathode Flow Fraction and Position on the Performance and Operation of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate In- Space Propulsion Technology office is sponsoring NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop a 4 kW-class Hall thruster propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. Tests were performed within NASA GRC Vacuum Facility 5 at background pressure levels that were six times lower than what has previously been attained in other vacuum facilities. A study was conducted to assess the impact of varying the cathode-to-anode flow fraction and cathode position on the performance and operational characteristics of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster. In addition, the impact of injecting additional xenon propellant in the vicinity of the cathode was also assessed. Cathode-to-anode flow fraction sensitivity tests were performed for power levels between 1.0 and 3.9 kW. It was found that varying the cathode flow fraction from 5 to approximately 10% of the anode flow resulted in the cathode-to-ground voltage becoming more positive. For an operating condition of 3.8 kW and 500 V, varying the cathode position from a distance of closest approach to 600 mm away did not result in any substantial variation in thrust but resulted in the cathode-to-ground changing from -17 to -4 V. The change in the cathode-to-ground voltage along with visual observations indicated a change in how the cathode plume was coupling to the thruster discharge. Finally, the injection of secondary xenon flow in the vicinity of the cathode had an impact similar to increasing the cathode-to-anode flow fraction, where the cathode-to-ground voltage became more positive and discharge current and thrust increased slightly. Future tests of the HiVHAc thruster are planned with a centrally mounted cathode in order to further assess the impact of cathode position on thruster performance.

  3. Coronary plaque quantification and fractional flow reserve by coronary computed tomography angiography identify ischaemia-causing lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Sara; Øvrehus, Kristian Altern; Dey, Damini; Leipsic, Jonathon; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Jensen, Jesper Møller; Narula, Jagat; Ahmadi, Amir; Achenbach, Stephan; Ko, Brian S.; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Kaltoft, Anne Kjer; Berman, Daniel S.; Bezerra, Hiram; Lassen, Jens Flensted; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde

    2016-01-01

    Aims Coronary plaque characteristics are associated with ischaemia. Differences in plaque volumes and composition may explain the discordance between coronary stenosis severity and ischaemia. We evaluated the association between coronary stenosis severity, plaque characteristics, coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA)-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT), and lesion-specific ischaemia identified by FFR in a substudy of the NXT trial (Analysis of Coronary Blood Flow Using CT Angiography: Next Steps). Methods and results Coronary CTA stenosis, plaque volumes, FFRCT, and FFR were assessed in 484 vessels from 254 patients. Stenosis >50% was considered obstructive. Plaque volumes (non-calcified plaque [NCP], low-density NCP [LD-NCP], and calcified plaque [CP]) were quantified using semi-automated software. Optimal thresholds of quantitative plaque variables were defined by area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC) analysis. Ischaemia was defined by FFR or FFRCT ≤0.80. Plaque volumes were inversely related to FFR irrespective of stenosis severity. Relative risk (95% confidence interval) for prediction of ischaemia for stenosis >50%, NCP ≥185 mm3, LD-NCP ≥30 mm3, CP ≥9 mm3, and FFRCT ≤0.80 were 5.0 (3.0–8.3), 3.7 (2.4–5.6), 4.6 (2.9–7.4), 1.4 (1.0–2.0), and 13.6 (8.4–21.9), respectively. Low-density NCP predicted ischaemia independent of other plaque characteristics. Low-density NCP and FFRCT yielded diagnostic improvement over stenosis assessment with AUCs increasing from 0.71 by stenosis >50% to 0.79 and 0.90 when adding LD-NCP ≥30 mm3 and LD-NCP ≥30 mm3 + FFRCT ≤0.80, respectively. Conclusion Stenosis severity, plaque characteristics, and FFRCT predict lesion-specific ischaemia. Plaque assessment and FFRCT provide improved discrimination of ischaemia compared with stenosis assessment alone. PMID:26763790

  4. Feasibility and safety of intracoronary nicorandil infusion as a novel hyperemic agent for fractional flow reserve measurements.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daiki; Takashima, Hiroaki; Waseda, Katsuhisa; Kurita, Akiyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuo; Kosaka, Takashi; Kuhara, Yasushi; Ando, Hirohiko; Maeda, Kazuyuki; Kumagai, Soichiro; Sakurai, Shinichiro; Suzuki, Akihiro; Toda, Yukiko; Watanabe, Atsushi; Sato, Shigeko; Fujimoto, Masanobu; Mizuno, Tomofumi; Amano, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a useful modality to assess the functional significance of coronary stenoses. Although adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is generally used as the hyperemic stimulus, we sometimes encounter adverse events like hypotension during FFR measurement. Nicorandil, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, recognized as an epicardial and resistance vessel dilator, has not been fully evaluated as a possible alternative hyperemic agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intracoronary nicorandil infusion compared to intravenous ATP for FFR measurement in patients with coronary artery disease. A total of 102 patients with 124 intermediate lesions (diameter stenosis >40 and <70% by visual assessment) were enrolled. All vessels underwent FFR measurements with both ATP (150 μg/kg/min) and nicorandil (2.0 mg) stimulus. FFR, hemodynamic values, and periprocedural adverse events between the two groups were evaluated. A strong correlation was observed between FFR with ATP and FFR with nicorandil (r = 0.954, p < 0.001). The agreement between the two sets of measurements was also high, with a mean difference of 0.01 ± 0.03. The mean aortic pressure drop during pharmacological stimulus was significantly larger with ATP compared to nicorandil (9.6 ± 9.6 vs. 5.5 ± 5.8 mmHg, p < 0.001). During FFR measurement, transient atrioventricular block was frequently observed with ATP compared to nicorandil (4.0 vs. 0%, p = 0.024). This study suggests that intracoronary nicorandil infusion is associated with clinical utility and safety compared to ATP as an alternative hyperemic agent for FFR measurement. PMID:24748047

  5. An investigation of a model of the flow pattern transition mechanism in relation to the identification of annular flow of R134a in a vertical tube using various void fraction models and flow regime maps

    SciTech Connect

    Dalkilic, A.S.; Wongwises, S.

    2010-09-15

    In the present study, new experimental data are presented for literature on the prediction of film thickness and identification of flow regime during the co-current downward condensation in a vertical smooth copper tube having an inner diameter of 8.1 mm and a length of 500 mm. R134a and water are used as working fluids in the tube side and annular side of a double tube heat exchanger, respectively. Condensation experiments are done at mass fluxes of 300 and 515 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The condensing temperatures are between 40 and 50 C; heat fluxes are between 12.65 and 66.61 kW m{sup -2}. The average experimental heat transfer coefficient of the refrigerant HFC-134a is calculated by applying an energy balance based on the energy transferred from the test section. A mathematical model by Barnea et al. based on the momentum balance of liquid and vapor phases is used to determine the condensation film thickness of R134a. The comparative film thickness values are determined indirectly using relevant measured data together with various void fraction models and correlations reported in the open literature. The effects of heat flux, mass flux, and condensation temperature on the film thickness and condensation heat transfer coefficient are also discussed for the laminar and turbulent flow conditions. There is a good agreement between the film thickness results obtained from the theoretical model and those obtained from six of 35 void fraction models in the high mass flux region of R134a. In spite of their different valid conditions, six well-known flow regime maps from the literature are found to be predictive for the annular flow conditions in the test tube in spite of their different operating conditions. (author)

  6. Feasibility of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ICP-MS for the characterization of wear metal particles and metalloproteins in biofluids from hip replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Harrington, Chris F; Kearney, Jacque-Lucca; Langton, David J; Larsen, Erik H

    2015-06-01

    Hip replacements are used to improve the quality of life of people with orthopaedic conditions, but the use of metal-on-metal (MoM) arthroplasty has led to poor outcomes for some patients. These problems are related to the generation of micro- to nanosized metal wear particles containing Cr, Co or other elements, but the current analytical methods used to investigate the processes involved do not provide sufficient information to understand the size or composition of the wear particles generated in vivo. In this qualitative feasibility study, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to investigate metal protein binding and the size and composition of wear metal particles present in serum and hip aspirates from MoM hip replacement patients. A well-established HPLC anion exchange chromatography (AEC) separation system coupled to ICP-MS was used to confirm the metal-protein associations in the serum samples. Off-line single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) analysis was used to confirm the approximate size distribution indicated by AF(4) of the wear particles in hip aspirates. In the serum samples, AF(4) -ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with transferrin (Tf) and Co with albumin (Alb) and an unidentified species; AEC-ICP-MS confirmed these associations and also indicated an association of Cr with Alb. In the hip aspirate sample, AF(4)-ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with Alb and Tf and that Co was associated with Alb and two unidentified compounds; AEC analysis confirmed the Cr results and the association of Co with Alb and a second compound. Enzymatic digestion of the hip aspirate sample, followed by separation using AF(4) with detection by UV absorption (280 nm), multi-angle light scattering and ICP-MS, suggested that the sizes of the Cr-, Co- and Mo-containing wear particles in a hip aspirate sample were in the range 40-150 nm. Off-line spICP-MS was used to confirm these

  7. Interaction of bentonite colloids with Cs, Eu, Th and U in presence of humic acid: A flow field-flow fractionation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Mihai, Silvia; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of Cs(I), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) with montmorillonite colloids was investigated in natural Grimsel Test Site groundwater over a 3 years period. The asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation combined with various detectors was applied to study size variations of colloids and to monitor colloid association of trace metals. The colloids suspended directly in the low ionic strength ( I), slightly alkaline granitic groundwater ( I = 10 -3 mol/L, pH 9.6) showed a gradual agglomeration with a size distribution shift from initially 10-200 nm to 50-400 nm within over 3 years. The Ca 2+ concentration of 2.1 × 10 -4 mol/L in the ground water is believed to be responsible for the slow agglomeration due to Ca 2+ ion exchange against Li + and Na + at the permanently charged basal clay planes. Furthermore, the Ca 2+ concentration lies close to the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of 10 -3 mol L -1 for clay colloids. Slow destabilization may delimit clay colloid migration in this specific groundwater over long time scales. Eu(III) and Th(IV) are found predominantly bound to clay colloids, while U(VI) prevails as the UO 2(OH) 3- complex and Cs(I) remains mainly as aquo ion under our experimental conditions. Speciation calculations qualitatively represent the experimental data. A focus was set on the reversibility of metal ion-colloid binding. Addition of humic acid as a competing ligand induces rapid metal ion dissociation from clay colloids in the case of Eu(III) even after previous aging for about 3 years. Interestingly only partial dissociation occurs in the case of Th(IV). Experiments and calculations prove that the humate complexes dominate the speciation of all metal ions under given conditions. The partial irreversibility of clay bound Th(IV) is presently not understood but might play an important role for the colloid-mediated transport of polyvalent actinides over wide distances in natural groundwater.

  8. Hybrid flow system integrating a miniaturized optoelectronic detector for on-line dynamic fractionation and fluorometric determination of bioaccessible orthophosphate in soils.

    PubMed

    Fiedoruk, Marta; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Tymecki, Łukasz; Koncki, Robert; Miró, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    An integrated Sequential Injection (SI)/Flow Injection (FI) system furnished with a miniaturized LED-based fluorometric detector is presented in this work for expedient bioaccessibility tests of orthophosphate in soils. Equipped with a microcolumn of conical shape containing 50 mg of soil, the hybrid flow system was resorted to on-line dynamic leaching and real-time quantification of pools of mobilizable orthophosphate using a bi-directional syringe pump and multiposition valve. The flexibility of the flow manifold was harnessed to explore both bi-directional and uni-directional flow extraction modes with the added degree of freedom of on-line dilution of extracts whenever needed. Bioaccessible orthophosphate was split in three fractions, the so-called NH4Cl fraction containing labile exchangeable phosphates, the alkaline fraction with Fe and Al-bound phosphates and the acidic fraction containing Ca-bound phosphates. The prevailing molybdenum blue photometric detection method is replaced by spectrofluorometric detection based on the ion pair formation between the phosphomolybdate heteropolyacid and rhodamine B with the subsequent quenching of the dye fluorescence. The dedicated optoelectronic detector was integrated in a secondary FI manifold and operated according to the fluorometric paired emitter-detector diode (FPEDD) principle involving two light emitting diodes as fluorescence inductors and one as detector of LED-induced fluorescence. Demonstrated with the analysis of a standard reference material (SRM 2711) and a real agricultural soil, the developed FI/SI fractionation system with FPEDD detection is proven reliable against the standard molybdenum blue method (p>0.05), and useful for investigation of the leaching kinetics of orthophosphate in bioaccessibility tests through in-line recording of the extraction profiles. PMID:25435227

  9. Hydrodesulfurization of Qaiyarah 80-205 sup 0 C naphtha fraction of alumina supported Co-Mo-oxides; Part 2: Using stopped flow gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, L.H.; Sulaiman, S.T.; AlTamer, M.Y. )

    1990-04-01

    The authors report the effective desulfurization of Qaiyarah 80-205{sup 0}C, naphtha fraction on alumina supported Co-Mo oxides, assembled in a GC column using H{sub 2} as a carrier gas and the stopped-flow technique. Over 90% of sulfur was removed from this partially cracked naphtha and a similar result (Ca 90%) was obtained when hydrodesulfurizing an acid-base treated naphtha. /sup 1/H nmr studies on the chromatographically separated hydrodesulfurized fractions revealed interesting structural parameters which leads to suggestions related to the occurrence of a reforming reaction and the liberation of fresh H{sub 2} gases which further promotes hydrodesulfurization.

  10. Study of Periodic Forcing with a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Device for the Control of Flow Separation on a NACA 0012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, Joseph P.

    The continued high global demand for passenger and freight air traffic as well as increased use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), in spite of rising fuel costs and several tragic cases involving loss-of-control events, has resulted in researchers examining alternative technologies, which would result in safer, more reliable, and superior performing aircraft. Aerodynamic flow control may be the most promising approach to this problem having already proven its ability to enable higher flow efficiency while also simultaneously improving overall flow control. Recent research in the area of aerodynamic control is transitioning from traditional mechanical flow control devices such as slats and flaps to plasma actuators. Plasma actuators offer an inexpensive and energy efficient method of flow control. In addition, plasma actuator technology has the potential of application to a host of other aircraft performance parameters including applications in radar mitigation and in situ wing deicing. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD), one of the most widely studied forms of plasma actuation, employs an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) device, which uses dominant electric fields and the respective electrically related body forces for actuation. Unlike momentum jets or other traditional flow control methods used on wings and tail surfaces, a DBD device operates without moving components or injecting any mass into the flow stream. Work performed focuses on qualitatively investigating experimentally the use of DBD devices for flow separation control on a NACA 0012-based 2D wing model. Flow visualization techniques illuminated flow seed particles around the model to determine the state of the flow (i.e., attached or separated) for various actuator cases. The DBD was operated in a steady-on mode as well as for three different pulsing frequencies (only for low power testing) based on the Strouhal frequency for each flight condition and compared to the clean (i.e., plasma off) case. Some of

  11. A full automatic device for sampling small solution volumes in photometric titration procedure based on multicommuted flow system.

    PubMed

    Borges, Sivanildo S; Vieira, Gláucia P; Reis, Boaventura F

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an automatic device to deliver titrant solution into a titration chamber with the ability to determine the dispensed volume of solution, with good precision independent of both elapsed time and flow rate, is proposed. A glass tube maintained at the vertical position was employed as a container for the titrant solution. Electronic devices were coupled to the glass tube in order to control its filling with titrant solution, as well as the stepwise solution delivering into the titration chamber. The detection of the titration end point was performed employing a photometer designed using a green LED (lambda=545 nm) and a phototransistor. The titration flow system comprised three-way solenoid valves, which were assembled to allow that the steps comprising the solution container loading and the titration run were carried out automatically. The device for the solution volume determination was designed employing an infrared LED (lambda=930 nm) and a photodiode. When solution volume delivered from proposed device was within the range of 5 to 105 mul, a linear relationship (R = 0.999) between the delivered volumes and the generated potential difference was achieved. The usefulness of the proposed device was proved performing photometric titration of hydrochloric acid solution with a standardized sodium hydroxide solution and using phenolphthalein as an external indicator. The achieved results presented relative standard deviation of 1.5%. PMID:18317510

  12. A Full Automatic Device for Sampling Small Solution Volumes in Photometric Titration Procedure Based on Multicommuted Flow System

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sivanildo S.; Vieira, Gláucia P.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an automatic device to deliver titrant solution into a titration chamber with the ability to determine the dispensed volume of solution, with good precision independent of both elapsed time and flow rate, is proposed. A glass tube maintained at the vertical position was employed as a container for the titrant solution. Electronic devices were coupled to the glass tube in order to control its filling with titrant solution, as well as the stepwise solution delivering into the titration chamber. The detection of the titration end point was performed employing a photometer designed using a green LED (λ=545 nm) and a phototransistor. The titration flow system comprised three-way solenoid valves, which were assembled to allow that the steps comprising the solution container loading and the titration run were carried out automatically. The device for the solution volume determination was designed employing an infrared LED (λ=930 nm) and a photodiode. When solution volume delivered from proposed device was within the range of 5 to 105 μl, a linear relationship (R = 0.999) between the delivered volumes and the generated potential difference was achieved. The usefulness of the proposed device was proved performing photometric titration of hydrochloric acid solution with a standardized sodium hydroxide solution and using phenolphthalein as an external indicator. The achieved results presented relative standard deviation of 1.5%. PMID:18317510

  13. Analytical solutions for wall slip effects on magnetohydrodynamic oscillatory rotating plate and channel flows in porous media using a fractional Burgers viscoelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqbool, Khadija; Anwar Bég, O.; Sohail, Ayesha; Idreesa, Shafaq

    2016-05-01

    The theoretical analysis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) incompressible flows of a Burgers fluid through a porous medium in a rotating frame of reference is presented. The constitutive model of a Burgers fluid is used based on a fractional calculus formulation. Hydrodynamic slip at the wall (plate) is incorporated and the fractional generalized Darcy model deployed to simulate porous medium drag force effects. Three different cases are considered: namely, the flow induced by a general periodic oscillation at a rigid plate, the periodic flow in a parallel plate channel and, finally, the Poiseuille flow. In all cases the plate(s) boundary(ies) are electrically non-conducting and a small magnetic Reynolds number is assumed, negating magnetic induction effects. The well-posed boundary value problems associated with each case are solved via Fourier transforms. Comparisons are made between the results derived with and without slip conditions. Four special cases are retrieved from the general fractional Burgers model, viz. Newtonian fluid, general Maxwell viscoelastic fluid, generalized Oldroyd-B fluid and the conventional Burgers viscoelastic model. Extensive interpretation of graphical plots is included. We study explicitly the influence of the wall slip on primary and secondary velocity evolution. The model is relevant to MHD rotating energy generators employing rheological working fluids.

  14. Application of a saw device for measuring rate of gas flow. Final report, April 1991-July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S.G.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of the program is the development of a compact, high performance flow meter that will meet the specifications developed by the Gas Research Institute for the next generation of residential gas meters. A solid-state flow meter based on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is considered for the application. Attractive features of SAW sensors include high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, direct digital output, small size, and low cost. In the exploratory research phase, a theoretical analysis of the operation of the SAW flow sensor was carried out. This was then used to design a SAW device for the proposed application. Experimental measurements confirm that a single device can measure flow rates over the entire operating range of 118 ml/min. to 95 l/min. The accuracy of the sensor is better than the requirements by at least a factor of 10. Further work that needs to be done in order to reduce power consumption, improve speed of response, and reduce sensitivity to ambient temperature changes is discussed. Work done to date indicates that the SAW technique has good promise for realizing the next generation of residential gas meters.

  15. Method for the quantification of vanadyl porphyrins in fractions of crude oils by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Flow Injection-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandekoken, Flávia G.; Duyck, Christiane B.; Fonseca, Teresa C. O.; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D.

    2016-05-01

    High performance liquid chromatography hyphenated by flow injection to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-FI-ICP-MS) was used to investigate V linked to porphyrins present in fractions of crude oil. First, the crude oil sample was submitted to fractionation by preparative liquid chromatography with UV detection, at the porphyrin Soret band wavelength (400 nm). The obtained porphyrin fractions were then separated in a 250 mm single column, in the HPLC, and eluted with different mobile phases (methanol or methanol:toluene (80:20; v:v)). The quantification of V-porphyrins in the fractions eluted from HPLC was carried out by online measuring the 51V isotope in the ICP-MS, against vanadyl octaethylporphine standard solutions (VO-OEP), prepared in the same solvent as the mobile phase, and injected post-column directly into the plasma. A 20 μg L- 1 Ge in methanol was used as internal standard for minimizing non-spectral interference, such as short-term variations due to injection. The mathematical treatment of the signal based on Fast Fourier Transform smoothing algorithm was employed to improve the precision. The concentrations of V as V-porphyrins were between 2.7 and 11 mg kg- 1 in the fractions, which were close to the total concentration of V in the porphyrin fractions of the studied crude oil.

  16. Clinical Outcomes Following Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McIlvennan, Colleen K.; Magid, Kate H.; Ambardekar, Amrut V.; Thompson, Jocelyn S.; Matlock, Daniel D.; Allen, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Conveying the complex trade-offs of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF LVAD) is challenging, and made more difficult by absence of an evidence summary for the full range of possible outcomes. We aimed to summarize the current evidence on outcomes of CF LVAD. Methods and Results PubMed and Cochrane Library were searched from January 2007–December 2013, supplemented with manual review. Three reviewers independently assessed each study for saliency regarding patient-centered outcomes. Data were summarized in tabular form. Overall study characteristics encouraged inclusion of all indications (destination therapy and bridge to transplant) and prevented meta-analysis. The electronic search identified 465 abstracts, of which 50 met inclusion criteria; manual review added 2 articles in press. The articles included 10 industry-funded trials and registries, 10 multi-center reports, and the remainder single-center observational experiences. Estimated actuarial survival after CF LVAD ranged from 56–87% at 1-year, 43–84% at 2-years, and 47% at 4-years. Improvements in functional class and quality of life were reported, but missing data complicated interpretation. Adverse events were experienced by the majority of patients, but estimates for bleeding, stroke, infection, right heart failure, arrhythmias, and rehospitalizations varied greatly. Conclusions The totality of data for CF LVADs show consistent improvements in survival and quality of life counterbalanced by a range of common complications. While this summary should provide a practical resource for health care provider-led discussions with patients, it highlights the critical need for high-quality patient-centered data collected with standard definitions. PMID:25294625

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of the 4th generation prototype of a continuous flow Ventricular Assist Device (VAD).

    PubMed

    Song, Xinwei; Wood, Houston G; Olsen, Don

    2004-04-01

    The continuous flow ventricular assist device (VAD) is a miniature centrifugal pump, fully suspended by magnetic bearings, which is being developed for implantation in humans. The CF4 model is the first actual prototype of the final design product. The overall performances of blood flow in CF4 have been simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software: CFX, which is commercially available from ANSYS Inc. The flow regions modeled in CF4 include the inlet elbow, the five-blade impeller, the clearance gap below the impeller, and the exit volute. According to different needs from patients, a wide range of flow rates and revolutions per minute (RPM) have been studied. The flow rate-pressure curves are given. The streamlines in the flow field are drawn to detect stagnation points and vortices that could lead to thrombosis. The stress is calculated in the fluid field to estimate potential hemolysis. The stress is elevated to the decreased size of the blood flow paths through the smaller pump, but is still within the safe range. The thermal study on the pump, the blood and the surrounding tissue shows the temperature rise due to magnetoelectric heat sources and thermal dissipation is insignificant. CFD simulation proved valuable to demonstrate and to improve the performance of fluid flow in the design of a small size pump. PMID:15179847

  18. In-situ temperature-controllable shear flow device for neutron scattering measurement—An example of aligned bicellar mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Kučerka, Norbert; Li, Shutao; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2015-02-15

    We have designed and constructed a temperature-controllable shear flow cell for in-situ study on flow alignable systems. The device has been tested in the neutron diffraction and has the potential to be applied in the small angle neutron scattering configuration to characterize the nanostructures of the materials under flow. The required sample amount is as small as 1 ml. The sh