Science.gov

Sample records for flow microfluorometric approaches

  1. Flow microfluorometric analysis of phagocyte degranulation in bacteria-infected whole human blood cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.; Kulyash, Youri V.

    2002-07-01

    A quantitative flow microfluorometric method was used to study the intensity of human blood phagocyte degranulation in response to viable staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis cells. Microorganisms were added directly to defibrinated whole blood. Uninfected and infected blood samples were incubated at 37 degrees C to 8 h. The results were recorded in dynamics after the staining of whole blood with acridine orange solution. Lymphocytes with a low azurophilic granule per cell content were discriminated from phagocytes by the measurement of single cell red cytoplasmic granule fluorescence. 30,000 cells in each sample were examined. S. aureus cells caused a dose-dependent decrease in the number of phagocytes having a high red cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity and a corresponding increase in the weakly fluorescence cell population. In the presence of an initial S. aureus-to-phagocyte ratio more than 1:1, degranulation was measured after 3 h of incubation and to 8 h the percentage of degranulated phagocytes was at least 100 percent Y. pestis cells grown for 48 h at 28 degrees C caused at same condition as the degranulation only about 50 percent of cells. Y.pestis EV cells preincubated in broth for 12 h at 37 degrees C did no stimulate the phahocyte degranulation. The results of these studies suggest that analysis of cell populations via flow microfluorimeter technology may be a powerful tool in analysis bacterial infection.

  2. Unified approach for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tyne-Hsien

    1995-01-01

    A unified approach for solving incompressible flows has been investigated in this study. The numerical CTVD (Centered Total Variation Diminishing) scheme used in this study was successfully developed by Sanders and Li for compressible flows, especially for the high speed. The CTVD scheme possesses better mathematical properties to damp out the spurious oscillations while providing high-order accuracy for high speed flows. It leads us to believe that the CTVD scheme can equally well apply to solve incompressible flows. Because of the mathematical difference between the governing equations for incompressible and compressible flows, the scheme can not directly apply to the incompressible flows. However, if one can modify the continuity equation for incompressible flows by introducing pseudo-compressibility, the governing equations for incompressible flows would have the same mathematical characters as compressible flows. The application of the algorithm to incompressible flows thus becomes feasible. In this study, the governing equations for incompressible flows comprise continuity equation and momentum equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. Thus, the CTVD schemes can be implemented. In addition, the physical and numerical boundary conditions are properly implemented by the characteristic boundary conditions. Accordingly, a CFD code has been developed for this research and is currently under testing. Flow past a circular cylinder was chosen for numerical experiments to determine the accuracy and efficiency of the code. The code has shown some promising results.

  3. Unified approach for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tyne-Hsien

    1993-01-01

    An unified approach for solving both compressible and incompressible flows was investigated in this study. The difference in CFD code development between incompressible and compressible flows is due to the mathematical characteristics. However, if one can modify the continuity equation for incompressible flows by introducing pseudocompressibility, the governing equations for incompressible flows would have the same mathematical characters as compressible flows. The application of a compressible flow code to solve incompressible flows becomes feasible. Among numerical algorithms developed for compressible flows, the Centered Total Variation Diminishing (CTVD) schemes possess better mathematical properties to damp out the spurious oscillations while providing high-order accuracy for high speed flows. It leads us to believe that CTVD schemes can equally well solve incompressible flows. In this study, the governing equations for incompressible flows include the continuity equation and momentum equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. The continuity equation is modified by adding a time-derivative of the pressure term containing the artificial compressibility. The modified continuity equation together with the unsteady momentum equations forms a hyperbolic-parabolic type of time-dependent system of equations. Thus, the CTVD schemes can be implemented. In addition, the boundary conditions including physical and numerical boundary conditions must be properly specified to obtain accurate solution. The CFD code for this research is currently in progress. Flow past a circular cylinder will be used for numerical experiments to determine the accuracy and efficiency of the code before applying this code to more specific applications.

  4. Flow Analysis: A Novel Approach For Classification.

    PubMed

    Vakh, Christina; Falkova, Marina; Timofeeva, Irina; Moskvin, Alexey; Moskvin, Leonid; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a novel approach for classification of flow analysis methods according to the conditions under which the mass transfer processes and chemical reactions take place in the flow mode: dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods. The first group includes continuous flow analysis, flow injection analysis, all injection analysis, sequential injection analysis, sequential injection chromatography, cross injection analysis, multi-commutated flow analysis, multi-syringe flow injection analysis, multi-pumping flow systems, loop flow analysis, and simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis. The second group includes segmented flow analysis, zone fluidics, flow batch analysis, sequential injection analysis with a mixing chamber, stepwise injection analysis, and multi-commutated stepwise injection analysis. The offered classification allows systematizing a large number of flow analysis methods. Recent developments and applications of dispersion-convection flow methods and forced-convection flow methods are presented. PMID:26364745

  5. Anisotropic flow in transport + hydrodynamics hybrid approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Hannah

    2014-12-01

    This contribution to the focus issue covers anisotropic flow in hybrid approaches. The historical development of hybrid approaches and their impact on the interpretation of flow measurements is reviewed. The major ingredients of a hybrid approach and the transition criteria between transport and hydrodynamics are discussed. The results for anisotropic flow in (event-by-event) hybrid approaches are presented. Some hybrid approaches rely on hadronic transport for the late stages for the reaction (so called afterburner) and others employ transport approaches for the early non-equilibrium evolution. In addition, there are ‘full’ hybrid calculations where a fluid evolution is dynamically embedded in a transport simulation. After demonstrating the success of hybrid approaches at high Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider energies, existing hybrid caluclations for collective flow observables at lower beam energies are discussed and remaining challenges outlined.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann approach for complex nonequilibrium flows.

    PubMed

    Montessori, A; Prestininzi, P; La Rocca, M; Succi, S

    2015-10-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann realization of Grad's extended hydrodynamic approach to nonequilibrium flows. This is achieved by using higher-order isotropic lattices coupled with a higher-order regularization procedure. The method is assessed for flow across parallel plates and three-dimensional flows in porous media, showing excellent agreement of the mass flow with analytical and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation across the full range of Knudsen numbers, from the hydrodynamic regime to ballistic motion. PMID:26565365

  7. Multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, L.; Chazzi, W.; Veuillot, J. P.; Viviand, H.

    1982-01-01

    A multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows by using unsteady or pseudo-unsteady methods is presented. This approach is based on a general technique of connecting together two domains in which hyperbolic systems (that may differ) are solved with the aid of compatibility relations associated with these systems. Some examples of this approach's application to calculating transonic flows in ideal fluids are shown, particularly the adjustment of shock waves. The approach is then applied to treating a shock/boundary layer interaction problem in a transonic channel.

  8. Multigrid Approach to Incompressible Viscous Cavity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional incompressible viscous driven-cavity flows are computed for Reynolds numbers on the range 100-20,000 using a loosely coupled, implicit, second-order centrally-different scheme. Mesh sequencing and three-level V-cycle multigrid error smoothing are incorporated into the symmetric Gauss-Seidel time-integration algorithm. Parametrics on the numerical parameters are performed, achieving reductions in solution times by more than 60 percent with the full multigrid approach. Details of the circulation patterns are investigated in cavities of 2-to-1, 1-to-1, and 1-to-2 depth to width ratios.

  9. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  10. New flow cytometry approaches in equine andrology.

    PubMed

    Peña, Fernando J; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Martín Muñoz, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Flow cytometry is currently recognized as a robust tool for the evaluation of sperm quality and function. However, within equine reproduction, this technique has not reached the sophistication of other areas of biology and medicine. In recent years, more sophisticated flow cytometers have been introduced in andrology laboratories, and the number of tests that can be potentially used in the evaluation of sperm physiology has increased accordingly. In this review, recent advances in the evaluation of stallion spermatozoa will be discussed. These new techniques in flow cytometry are able to simultaneously measure damage to different sperm regions and/or changes in functionality. PMID:27160445

  11. The pdf approach to turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed discussion of the theory and application of probability density function (pdf) methods, which provide a complete statistical description of turbulent flow fields at a single point or a finite number of points. The basic laws governing the flow of Newtonian fluids are set up in the Eulerian and the Lagrangian frame, and the exact and linear equations for the characteristic functionals in those frames are discussed. Pdf equations in both frames are derived as Fourier transforms of the equations of the characteristic functions. Possible formulations for the nonclosed terms in the pdf equation are discussed, their properties are assessed, and closure modes for the molecular-transport and the fluctuating pressure-gradient terms are reviewed. The application of pdf methods to turbulent combustion flows, supersonic flows, and the interaction of turbulence with shock waves is discussed.

  12. Parametric and experimental analysis using a power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    A structural power flow approach for the analysis of structure-borne transmission of vibrations is used to analyze the influence of structural parameters on transmitted power. The parametric analysis is also performed using the Statistical Energy Analysis approach and the results are compared with those obtained using the power flow approach. The advantages of structural power flow analysis are demonstrated by comparing the type of results that are obtained by the two analytical methods. Also, to demonstrate that the power flow results represent a direct physical parameter that can be measured on a typical structure, an experimental study of structural power flow is presented. This experimental study presents results for an L shaped beam for which an available solution was already obtained. Various methods to measure vibrational power flow are compared to study their advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  14. Annular flow optimization: A new integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maglione, R.; Robotti, G.; Romagnoli, R.

    1997-07-01

    During the drilling stage of an oil and gas well the hydraulic circuit of the mud assumes great importance with respect to most of the numerous and various constituting parts (mostly in the annular sections). Each of them has some points to be satisfied in order to guarantee both the safety of the operations and the performance optimization of each of the single elements of the circuit. The most important tasks for the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit are the following: (1) Maximum available pressure to the last casing shoe; (2) avoid borehole wall erosions; and (3) guarantee the hole cleaning. A new integrated system considering all the elements of the annular part of the drilling hydraulic circuit and the constraints imposed from each of them has been realized. In this way the family of the flow parameters (mud rheology and pump rate) satisfying simultaneously all the variables of the annular section has been found. Finally two examples regarding a standard and narrow annular section (slim hole) will be reported, showing briefly all the steps of the calculations until reaching the optimum flow parameters family (for that operational condition of drilling) that satisfies simultaneous all the flow parameters limitations imposed by the elements of the annular section circuit.

  15. Receptivity in parallel flows: An adjoint approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Linear receptivity studies in parallel flows are aimed at understanding how external forcing couples to the natural unstable motions which a flow can support. The vibrating ribbon problem models the original Schubauer and Skramstad boundary layer experiment and represents the classic boundary layer receptivity problem. The process by which disturbances are initiated in convectively-unstable jets and shear layers has also received attention. Gaster was the first to handle the boundary layer analysis with the recognition that spatial modes, rather than temporal modes, were relevant when studying convectively-unstable flows that are driven by a time-harmonic source. The amplitude of the least stable spatial mode, far downstream of the source, is related to the source strength by a coupling coefficient. The determination of this coefficient is at the heart of this type of linear receptivity study. The first objective of the present study was to determine whether the various wave number derivative factors, appearing in the coupling coefficients for linear receptivity problems, could be reexpressed in a simpler form involving adjoint eigensolutions. Secondly, it was hoped that the general nature of this simplification could be shown; indeed, a rather elegant characterization of the receptivity properties of spatial instabilities does emerge. The analysis is quite distinct from the usual Fourier-inversion procedures, although a detailed knowledge of the spectrum of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation is still required. Since the cylinder wake analysis proved very useful in addressing control considerations, the final objective was to provide a foundation upon which boundary layer control theory may be developed.

  16. A Logical Approach to the Statement of Cash Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Fred; Gean, Farrell

    2014-01-01

    Of the three financial statements in financial reporting, the Statement of Cash Flows (SCF) is perhaps the most challenging. The most difficult aspect of the SCF is in developing an understanding of how previous transactions are finalized in this document. The purpose of this paper is to logically explain the indirect approach of cash flow whereby…

  17. Traffic flow forecasting: Comparison of modeling approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.L.; Demetsky, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    The capability to forecast traffic volume in an operational setting has been identified as a critical need for intelligent transportation systems (ITS). In particular, traffic volume forecasts will support proactive, dynamic traffic control. However, previous attempts to develop traffic volume forecasting models have met with limited success. This research effort focused on developing traffic volume forecasting models for two sites on Northern Virginia`s Capital Beltway. Four models were developed and tested for the freeway traffic flow forecasting problem, which is defined as estimating traffic flow 15 min into the future. They were the historical average, time-series, neural network, and nonparametric regression models. The nonparametric regression model significantly outperformed the other models. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test revealed that the nonparametric regression model experienced significantly lower errors than the other models. In addition, the nonparametric regression model was easy to implement, and proved to be portable, performing well at two distinct sites. Based on its success, research is ongoing to refine the nonparametric regression model and to extend it to produce multiple interval forecasts.

  18. Neural Flows in Hopfield Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Carmen; Panaitescu, Emilian; Stoicescu, Mihai

    2013-12-01

    In most of the applications involving neural networks, the main problem consists in finding an optimal procedure to reduce the real neuron to simpler models which still express the biological complexity but allow highlighting the main characteristics of the system. We effectively investigate a simple reduction procedure which leads from complex models of Hodgkin-Huxley type to very convenient binary models of Hopfield type. The reduction will allow to describe the neuron interconnections in a quite large network and to obtain information concerning its symmetry and stability. Both cases, on homogeneous voltage across the membrane and inhomogeneous voltage along the axon will be tackled out. Few numerical simulations of the neural flow based on the cable-equation will be also presented.

  19. A convex complementarity approach for simulating large granular flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Tasora, A.; Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. degli Studi di Parma

    2010-07-01

    Aiming at the simulation of dense granular flows, we propose and test a numerical method based on successive convex complementarity problems. This approach originates from a multibody description of the granular flow: all the particles are simulated as rigid bodies with arbitrary shapes and frictional contacts. Unlike the discrete element method (DEM), the proposed approach does not require small integration time steps typical of stiff particle interaction; this fact, together with the development of optimized algorithms that can run also on parallel computing architectures, allows an efficient application of the proposed methodology to granular flows with a large number of particles. We present an application to the analysis of the refueling flow in pebble-bed nuclear reactors. Extensive validation of our method against both DEM and physical experiments results indicates that essential collective characteristics of dense granular flow are accurately predicted.

  20. A mechanistic approach to blood flow occlusion.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, J P; Wilson, G J; Wilson, J M

    2010-01-01

    Low-Intensity occlusion training provides a unique beneficial training mode for promoting muscle hypertrophy. Training at intensities as low as 20% 1RM with moderate vascular occlusion results in muscle hypertrophy in as little as three weeks. The primary mechanisms by which occlusion training is thought to stimulate growth include, metabolic accumulation, which stimulates a subsequent increase in anabolic growth factors, fast-twitch fiber recruitment (FT), and increased protein synthesis through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Heat shock proteins, Nitric oxide synthase-1 (NOS-1) and Myostatin have also been shown to be affected by an occlusion stimulus. In conclusion, low-intensity occlusion training appears to work through a variety of mechanisms. The research behind these mechanisms is incomplete thus far, and requires further examination, primarily to identify the actual metabolite responsible for the increase in GH with occlusion, and determine which mechanisms are associated to a greater degree with the hypertrophic/anti-catabolic changes seen with blood flow restriction. PMID:19885776

  1. Parametric and experimental analysis using a power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Having defined and developed a structural power flow approach for the analysis of structure-borne transmission of structural vibrations, the technique is used to perform an analysis of the influence of structural parameters on the transmitted energy. As a base for comparison, the parametric analysis is first performed using a Statistical Energy Analysis approach and the results compared with those obtained using the power flow approach. The advantages of using structural power flow are thus demonstrated by comparing the type of results obtained by the two methods. Additionally, to demonstrate the advantages of using the power flow method and to show that the power flow results represent a direct physical parameter that can be measured on a typical structure, an experimental investigation of structural power flow is also presented. Results are presented for an L-shaped beam for which an analytical solution has already been obtained. Furthermore, the various methods available to measure vibrational power flow are compared to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  2. An engineering based approach for hydraulic computations in river flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, S.; Biscarini, C.; Pierleoni, A.; Manciola, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an engineering based approach for hydraulic risk evaluation. The aim of the research is to identify a criteria for the choice of the simplest and appropriate model to use in different scenarios varying the characteristics of main river channel. The complete flow field, generally expressed in terms of pressure, velocities, accelerations can be described through a three dimensional approach that consider all the flow properties varying in all directions. In many practical applications for river flow studies, however, the greatest changes occur only in two dimensions or even only in one. In these cases the use of simplified approaches can lead to accurate results, with easy to build and faster simulations. The study has been conducted taking in account a dimensionless parameter of channels (ratio of curvature radius and width of the channel (R/B).

  3. Optimal active power dispatch by network flow approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.F. ); Soares, S.; Ohishi, T. )

    1988-11-01

    In this paper the optimal active power dispatch problem is formulated as a nonlinear capacitated network flow problem with additional linear constraints. Transmission flow limits and both Kirchhoff's laws are taken into account. The problem is solved by a Generalized Upper Bounding technique that takes advantage of the network flow structure of the problem. The new approach has potential applications on power systems problems such as economic dispatch, load supplying capability, minimum load shedding, and generation-transmission reliability. The paper also reviews the use of transportation models for power system analysis. A detailed illustrative example is presented.

  4. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula. PMID:27068992

  5. Is the modal approach appropriate for analysis of energy flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavic, Goran

    2002-11-01

    Modal superposition is a most commonly used approach in a numerical analysis of vibration. However, the computation requirements of a typical analysis of energy flow limit the attractiveness of the modal approach because, as a rule, a very large number of modes have to be taken into account in order to produce realistic results. The reason for this particularity is that the energy analysis involves not only vibration displacements but also higher derivatives of these which are contributed by higher modes, the higher the derivative order. More careful analysis of structure-borne vibration shows that the modal truncation is not the only inconvenience where the modal approach is used. An equally important factor limiting its use is the representation of vibration dissipation by modal damping. The paper shows comparisons of computed energy flow in plates using modal and wave approaches. The differences between the two are noticeable, in particular where the vectorial functions of energy flow field, divergence and curl, are concerned. The wave approach to vibration analysis is shown to be more physically consistent than the modal approach.

  6. Partial Averaged Navier-Stokes approach for cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y. N.

    2015-01-01

    Partial Averaged Navier Stokes (PANS) is a numerical approach developed for studying practical engineering problems (e.g. cavitating flow inside hydroturbines) with a resonance cost and accuracy. One of the advantages of PANS is that it is suitable for any filter width, leading a bridging method from traditional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) to direct numerical simulations by choosing appropriate parameters. Comparing with RANS, the PANS model will inherit many physical nature from parent RANS but further resolve more scales of motion in great details, leading to PANS superior to RANS. As an important step for PANS approach, one need to identify appropriate physical filter-width control parameters e.g. ratios of unresolved-to-total kinetic energy and dissipation. In present paper, recent studies of cavitating flow based on PANS approach are introduced with a focus on the influences of filter-width control parameters on the simulation results.

  7. A Galerkin least squares approach to viscoelastic flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Schunk, Peter Randall

    2015-10-01

    A Galerkin/least-squares stabilization technique is applied to a discrete Elastic Viscous Stress Splitting formulation of for viscoelastic flow. From this, a possible viscoelastic stabilization method is proposed. This method is tested with the flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid past a rigid cylinder, where it is found to produce inaccurate drag coefficients. Furthermore, it fails for relatively low Weissenberg number indicating it is not suited for use as a general algorithm. In addition, a decoupled approach is used as a way separating the constitutive equation from the rest of the system. A Pressure Poisson equation is used when the velocity and pressure are sought to be decoupled, but this fails to produce a solution when inflow/outflow boundaries are considered. However, a coupled pressure-velocity equation with a decoupled constitutive equation is successful for the flow past a rigid cylinder and seems to be suitable as a general-use algorithm.

  8. A Shallow Layer Approach for Geo-flow emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Mecedonio, G.

    2009-04-01

    Geophysical flows such as lahars or lava flows severely threat the communities located on or near the volcano flanks. Risks and damages caused by the propagation of this kind of flows require a quantitative description of this phenomenon and reliable tools for forecasting their emplacement. Computational models are a valuable tool for planning risk mitigation countermeasures, such as human intervention to force flow diversion, artificial barriers, and allow for significant economical and social benefits. A FORTRAN 90 code based on a Shallow Layer Approach for Geo-flows (SLAG) for describing transport and emplacement of diluted lahars, water and lava was developed in both serial and parallel version. Three rheological models, such as those describing i) a viscous, ii) a turbulent, and iii) a dilatant flow respectively, were implemented in order to describe transport of lavas, water and diluted lahars. The code was made user-friendly by creating some interfaces that allow the user to easily define the problem, extract and interpolate the topography of the simulation domain. Moreover SLAG outputs can be written in both GRD format (e.g., Surfer), NetCDF format, or visualized directly in GoogleEarth. In SLAG the governing equations were treated using a Godunov splitting method following George (2008) algorithm based on a Riemann solver for the shallow water equations that decomposes an augmented state variable the depth, momentum, momentum flux, and bathymetry into four propagating discontinuities or waves. For our application, the algorithm was generalized for solving the energy equation. For validating the code in simulating real geophysical flows, we performed few simulations the lava flow event of the the 3rd and 4th January 1992 Etna eruption, the July 2001 Etna lava flows, January 2002 Nyragongo lava flows and few test cases for simulating transport of diluted lahars. Ref: George, D.L. (2008), Augmented Riemann Solvers for the Shallow Water Equations over Variable

  9. A conservative approach for flow field calculations on multiple grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flow fields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct body-fitted coordinate systems. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach and its applications are investigated in this study. The method follows the conservative approach and provides conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-state Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Some steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed.

  10. An Efficient Sparse Approach for Core Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, P.; Calkins, M. A.; Aurnou, J. M.; Julien, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally fully spectral simulations for core flows based on Chebyshev series, Fourier series and spherical harmonics do not require the solution of very large linear systems of equations to advance in time. The explicit treatment of the Coriolis term does generally lead to a large number of decoupled equations of moderate size. It is possible in this context to work with dense matrices and dense solvers. On the other hand, an implicit treatment of the Coriolis term or certain sets of asymptotically reduced equations can not be treated in this way. The time marching of these equations requires solving few very large linear systems. Dense matrices and dense solvers become prohibitively expensive due to a very high memory footprint as well as a very slow execution time. We present a numerical approach converting theses dense systems into equivalent sparse systems that can be solved efficiently. We demonstrate our approach on a set of rapidly rotating flow problems in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical geometry and compare it to a standard approach.

  11. A hydrometeorological forecasting approach for basins with complex flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkadoulas, Akis; Mantesi, Konstantina; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koussis, Antonis; Mazi, Aikaterini; Katsanos, Demetris; Koukouvinos, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    The combined use of weather forecasting models and hydrological models in flood risk estimations is an established technique, with several successful applications worldwide. However, most known hydrometeorological forecasting systems have been established in large rivers with perpetual flow. Experience from small- and medium-scale basins, which are often affected by flash floods, is very limited. In this work we investigate the perspectives of hydrometeorological forecasting, by emphasizing two issues: (a) which modelling approach can credibly represent the complex dynamics of basins with highly variable runoff (intermittent or ephemeral); and (b) which transformation of point-precipitation forecasts provides the most reliable estimations of spatially aggregated data, to be used as inputs to semi-distributed hydrological models. Using as case studies the Sarantapotamos river basin, in Eastern Greece (145 km2), and the Nedontas river basin, in SW Peloponnese (120 km2), we demonstrate the advantages of continuous simulation through the HYDROGEIOS model. This employs conjunctive modelling of surface and groundwater flows and their interactions (percolation, infiltration, underground losses), which are key processes in river basins characterized by significantly variability of runoff. The model was calibrated against hourly flow data at two and three hydrometric stations, respectively, for a 3-year period (2011-2014). Next we attempted to reproduce the most intense flood events of that period, by substituting observed rainfall by forecast scenarios. In this respect, we used consecutive point forecasts of a 6-hour lead time, provided by the numerical weather prediction model WRF (Advanced Research version), dynamically downscaled from the ~1° forecast of GSF-NCEP/NOAA successively first to ~18 km, then to ~6 km and ultimately at the horizontal grid resolution of 2x2 km2. We examined alternative spatial integration approaches, using as reference the rainfall stations

  12. Temporal volume flow: an approach to tracking failure recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Subramanian, Kalpathi R.; Yoo, Terry S.

    2011-03-01

    The simultaneous use of pre-segmented CT colonoscopy images and optical colonoscopy images during routine endoscopic procedures provides useful clinical information to the gastroenterologist. Blurry images in the video stream can cause the tracking system to fail during the procedure, due to the endoscope touching the colon wall or a polyp. The ability to recover from such failures is necessary to continually track images, and goes towards building a robust tracking system. Identifying similar images before and after the blurry sequence is central to this task. In this work, we propose a Temporal Volume Flow(TVF) based approach to search for a similar image pair before and after blurry sequences in the optical colonoscopy video. TVF employs nonlinear intensity and gradient constancy models, as well as a discontinuity-preserving smoothness constraint to formulate an energy function; minimizing this function between two temporal volumes before and after the blurry sequence results in an estimate of TVF. A voting approach is then used to determine an image pair with the maximum number of point correspondences. Region flow algorithm10 is applied to the selected image pair to determine camera motion parameters. We applied our algorithm to three optical colonoscopy sequences. The first sequence had 235 images in the ascending colon, and 12 blurry images. The image pair selected by TVF decreases the rotation error of the tracking results using the region flow algorithm. Similar results were observed in the second patient in the descending colon, containing 535 images and 24 blurry images. The third sequence contained 580 images in the descending colon and 172 blurry images. Region flow method failed in this case due to improper image pair selection; using TVF to determine the image pair allowed the system to successfully recover from the blurry sequence.

  13. Approaches to the simulation of unconfined flow and perched groundwater flow in MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Bedekar, Vivek; Niswonger, Richard G; Kipp, Kenneth; Panday, Sorab; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to manage the nonlinearities associated with the unconfined flow equation and to simulate perched groundwater conditions using the MODFLOW family of codes. The approaches comprise a variety of numerical techniques to prevent dry cells from becoming inactive and to achieve a stable solution focused on formulations of the unconfined, partially-saturated, groundwater flow equation. Keeping dry cells active avoids a discontinuous head solution which in turn improves the effectiveness of parameter estimation software that relies on continuous derivatives. Most approaches implement an upstream weighting of intercell conductance and Newton-Raphson linearization to obtain robust convergence. In this study, several published approaches were implemented in a stepwise manner into MODFLOW for comparative analysis. First, a comparative analysis of the methods is presented using synthetic examples that create convergence issues or difficulty in handling perched conditions with the more common dry-cell simulation capabilities of MODFLOW. Next, a field-scale three-dimensional simulation is presented to examine the stability and performance of the discussed approaches in larger, practical, simulation settings. PMID:21635246

  14. Approaches to the simulation of unconfined flow and perched groundwater flow in MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Niswonger, Richard G.; Kipp, Kenneth; Panday, Sorab; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to manage the nonlinearities associated with the unconfined flow equation and to simulate perched groundwater conditions using the MODFLOW family of codes. The approaches comprise a variety of numerical techniques to prevent dry cells from becoming inactive and to achieve a stable solution focused on formulations of the unconfined, partially-saturated, groundwater flow equation. Keeping dry cells active avoids a discontinuous head solution which in turn improves the effectiveness of parameter estimation software that relies on continuous derivatives. Most approaches implement an upstream weighting of intercell conductance and Newton-Raphson linearization to obtain robust convergence. In this study, several published approaches were implemented in a stepwise manner into MODFLOW for comparative analysis. First, a comparative analysis of the methods is presented using synthetic examples that create convergence issues or difficulty in handling perched conditions with the more common dry-cell simulation capabilities of MODFLOW. Next, a field-scale three-dimensional simulation is presented to examine the stability and performance of the discussed approaches in larger, practical, simulation settings.

  15. A methodological approach of estimating resistance to flow under unsteady flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrokowska, M. M.; Rowiński, P. M.; Kalinowska, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation and analysis of resistance parameters: friction slope, friction velocity and Manning coefficient in unsteady flow. The methodology to enhance the evaluation of resistance by relations derived from flow equations is proposed. The main points of the methodology are (1) to choose a resistance relation with regard to a shape of a channel and (2) type of wave, (3) to choose an appropriate method to evaluate slope of water depth, and (4) to assess the uncertainty of result. In addition to a critical analysis of existing methods, new approaches are presented: formulae for resistance parameters for a trapezoidal channel, and a translation method instead of Jones' formula to evaluate the gradient of flow depth. Measurements obtained from artificial dam-break flood waves in a small lowland watercourse have made it possible to apply the method and to analyse to what extent resistance parameters vary in unsteady flow. The study demonstrates that results of friction slope and friction velocity are more sensitive to applying simplified formulae than the Manning coefficient (n). n is adequate as a flood routing parameter but may be misleading when information on trend of resistance with flow rate is crucial. Then friction slope or friction velocity seems to be better choice.

  16. A new simulation approach for modeling inflated pahoehoe lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.; Hamilton, C.

    2013-12-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth indicate that when flow rates are very low and emplacement occurs on very low slopes, the process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. We present a new model that incorporates a simulation approach to quantifying the influence of random and ambient factors on the evolving three-dimensional shape and morphology of pahoehoe lobes. To simulate pahoehoe lava emplacement, we consider the movement of small parcels of lava with a volume equal to the size of a typical toe (70 x 70 x 20 cm3). The model develops a set of probabilistic rules for determining the location and direction of movement for each parcel. Unlike the classical random walk of Brownian motion, many parcels may remain dormant, but fluid, for multiple time steps. The net effect of this approach is that parcels tend to accumulate preferentially within the lobe producing cross-sectional topographic profiles with a medial ridge. The randomness of parcel volume transfers within the lobe interior as well as at the margins qualitatively reflects inflation processes observed in the field. This new model predicts that greater than 75% of pahoehoe lobe volume is contributed through inflation for typical lobes. The influences on planform shape and topographic cross-sectional profiles of total volume, source area and shape, topographic confinement, and sequential breakouts at the lobe margins, have been explored with the stochastic model. The model provides a means for assessing the relative importance of these processes through comparisons with field data. A major conclusion of this work is that sequential breakouts at the lobe margins are an important process controlling the final topographic distribution of observed

  17. Solving the power flow equations: a monotone operator approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Low, Steven; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-07-21

    The AC power flow equations underlie all operational aspects of power systems. They are solved routinely in operational practice using the Newton-Raphson method and its variants. These methods work well given a good initial “guess” for the solution, which is always available in normal system operations. However, with the increase in levels of intermittent generation, the assumption of a good initial guess always being available is no longer valid. In this paper, we solve this problem using the theory of monotone operators. We show that it is possible to compute (using an offline optimization) a “monotonicity domain” in the space of voltage phasors. Given this domain, there is a simple efficient algorithm that will either find a solution in the domain, or provably certify that no solutions exist in it. We validate the approach on several IEEE test cases and demonstrate that the offline optimization can be performed tractably and the computed “monotonicity domain” includes all practically relevant power flow solutions.

  18. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Davit, Yohan; Quintard, Michel; Groupe d'Etude sur les Milieux Poreux Team

    2015-11-01

    Consistent with its distribution and exchange functions, the vascular system of the human brain cortex is a superposition of two components. At small-scale, a homogeneous and space-filling mesh-like capillary network. At large scale, quasi-fractal branched veins and arteries. From a modeling perspective, this is the superposition of: (a) a continuum model resulting from the homogenization of slow transport in the small-scale capillary network; and (b) a discrete network approach describing fast transport in the arteries and veins, which cannot be homogenized because of their fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to fast conducting wells embedded in a reservoir rock in petroleum engineering. An efficient method to reduce the computational cost is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. This makes it difficult to accurately couple both components. We solve this issue by adapting the ``well model'' concept used in petroleum engineering to brain specific 3D situations. We obtain a unique linear system describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model. Results are presented for realistic arterial and venous geometries. The mixed approach is compared with full network models including various idealized capillary networks of known permeability. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102.

  19. A new approach to blood flow simulation in vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Tamaddon, Houman; Behnia, Mehrdad; Behnia, Masud; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    A proper analysis of blood flow is contingent upon accurate modelling of the branching pattern and vascular geometry of the network of interest. It is challenging to reconstruct the entire vascular network of any organ experimentally, in particular the pulmonary vasculature, because of its very high number of vessels, complexity of the branching pattern and poor accessibility in vivo. The objective of our research is to develop an innovative approach for the reconstruction of the full pulmonary vascular tree from available morphometric data. Our method consists of the use of morphometric data on those parts of the pulmonary vascular tree that are too small to reconstruct by medical imaging methods. This method is a three-step technique that reconstructs the entire pulmonary arterial tree down to the capillary bed. Vessels greater than 2 mm are reconstructed from direct volume and surface analysis using contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Vessels smaller than 2 mm are reconstructed from available morphometric and distensibility data and rearranged by applying Murray's laws. Implementation of morphometric data to reconstruct the branching pattern and applying Murray's laws to every vessel bifurcation simultaneously leads to an accurate vascular tree reconstruction. The reconstruction algorithm generates full arterial tree topography down to the first capillary bifurcation. Geometry of each order of the vascular tree is generated separately to minimize the construction and simulation time. The node-to-node connectivity along with the diameter and length of every vessel segment is established and order numbers, according to the diameter-defined Strahler system, are assigned. In conclusion, the present model provides a morphological foundation for future analysis of blood flow in the pulmonary circulation. PMID:26195135

  20. Augmenting the diagnostic power of flow-based approaches to functional reasoning

    SciTech Connect

    Chittaro, L.; Ranon, R.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we consider flow-based approaches to functional diagnosis. First, we contrast the existing approaches, pointing out the major limitations of each. Then, we choose one of them and extend it in order to overcome the identified limitations. Finally, we show how the proposed extension can be introduced into the other flow-based approaches.

  1. Langevin equation approach to granular flow in a narrow pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Riethmueller, T.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Rosenkranz, D.; Poeschel, T.

    1997-01-01

    The gravity-driven flow of granular material through a rough, narrow vertical pipe is described using the Langevin equation formalism. Above a critical particle density the homogeneous flow becomes unstable with respect to short-wave length perturbations. In correspondence with experimental observations, we find clogging and density waves in the flowing material.

  2. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  3. Lattice kinetic approach to non-equilibrium flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montessori, A.; Prestininzi, P.; La Rocca, M.; Falcucci, G.; Succi, S.

    2016-06-01

    We present a Lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of a wide range of Knudsen regimes. The method is assessed in terms of normalised discharge for flow across parallel plates and three-dimensional flows in porous media. Available analytical solutions are well reproduced, supporting the the method as an appealing candidate to bridge the gap between the hydrodynamic regime and free molecular motion.

  4. Effects of gravity on interdendritic flow - An analytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M.; Flemings, M. C.

    1984-11-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide an aid to the understanding of the essence of the gravitational influence on interdendritic flow. An analytic solution of the equations governing interdendritic fluid flow is presented for a simple case, involving a semiinfinite mushy zone whose isotherms are flat, parallel, and inclined at an angle to the force of gravity. It is found that gravity in ingots with narrow mushy zones mainly produces interdendritic flow parallel to the liquidus confined to the vicinity of the liquidus. This flow can be large in comparison to the usual shrinkage-induced flows. Its existence is caused by the rapid increase of permeability with fraction liquid near the liquidus. For this reason, it cannot appear in numerical calculations which ignore the rapid variation of permeability.

  5. Effects of gravity on interdendritic flow - An analytic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, M.; Flemings, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide an aid to the understanding of the essence of the gravitational influence on interdendritic flow. An analytic solution of the equations governing interdendritic fluid flow is presented for a simple case, involving a semiinfinite mushy zone whose isotherms are flat, parallel, and inclined at an angle to the force of gravity. It is found that gravity in ingots with narrow mushy zones mainly produces interdendritic flow parallel to the liquidus confined to the vicinity of the liquidus. This flow can be large in comparison to the usual shrinkage-induced flows. Its existence is caused by the rapid increase of permeability with fraction liquid near the liquidus. For this reason, it cannot appear in numerical calculations which ignore the rapid variation of permeability.

  6. Limiting flows of a viscous fluid with stationary separation zones with Re approaching infinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taganov, G. I.

    1982-01-01

    The limiting flows of a viscous noncondensable fluid, which are approached by flows with stationary separation zones behind planar symmetrical bodies, with an unlimited increase in the Reynolds number are studied. Quantitative results are obtained in the case of a circulation flow inside of a separation zone.

  7. A Riparian Approach to Dendrochronological Flow Reconstruction, Yellowstone River, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schook, D. M.; Rathburn, S. L.; Friedman, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tree ring-based flow reconstructions can reveal river discharge variability over durations far exceeding the gauged record, building perspective for both the measured record and future flows. We use plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) tree rings collected from four rivers to reconstruct flow history of the Yellowstone River near its confluence with the Missouri River. Upland trees in dry regions are typically used in flow reconstruction because their annual growth is controlled by the same precipitation that drives downstream flow, but our study improves flow reconstruction by including floodplain trees that are directly affected by the river. Cores from over 1000 cottonwoods along the Yellowstone, Powder, Little Missouri, and Redwater Rivers were collected from within a 170 km radius to reconstruct flows using the Age Curve Standardization technique in a multiple regression analysis. The large sample from trees spanning many age classes allows us to use only the rings that were produced when each tree was less than 50 years old and growth was most strongly correlated to river discharge. Using trees from a range of rivers improves our ability to differentiate between growth resulting from local precipitation and river flow, and we show that cottonwood growth differs across these neighboring rivers having different watersheds. Using the program Seascorr, tree growth is found to better correlated to seasonal river discharge (R = 0.69) than to local precipitation (R = 0.45). Our flow reconstruction reveals that the most extreme multi-year or multi-decade drought periods of the last 250 years on either the Yellowstone (1817-1821) or Powder (1846-1865) Rivers are missed by the gauged discharge record. Across all sites, we document increased growth in the 20th century compared to the 19th, a finding unattainable with conventional methods but having important implications for flow management.

  8. Three Dimensional Alveolar Flow Phenomena Using a CFD Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznitman, Josue

    2005-11-01

    Respiratory flows in the lung periphery are characterized by low Reynolds numbers (typically Re<1) in sub-millimeter airways marked by the presence of alveoli (gas exchange units). We present for realistic breathing conditions using CFD simulations (CFX-5.7.1), 3D velocity fields and flow patterns induced by the expansion/contraction of alveoli and acinar ducts during oscillatory flow. Based on anatomical data, the alveolus and airway are modeled as a spherical cap connected to a cylindrical duct, both subject to moving wall boundary conditions simulating respiration. The resulting 3D flow patterns are complex and governed by the ratio of the alveolar to ductal flow rates. This ratio describes the interplay between alveolar recirculation, induced by the ductal shear flow over the alveolus opening, and alveolar radial flow, induced by the expansion/contraction motion. Our 3D results are in good agreement with 2D simulations reported in the literature. Although convection mechanisms may transport gas along acinar ducts and deeper into the acinus, velocity fields within alveoli predict that upon gas entering them, transport is then solely dominated by diffusion mechanisms.

  9. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  10. A novel approach to improve operation and performance in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Roesch, Ulrich; Rambaldi, Diana C; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2011-07-01

    A new system design and setup are proposed for the combined use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) within the same instrumentation. To this purpose, three innovations are presented: (a) a new flow control scheme where focusing flow rates are measured in real time allowing to adjust the flow rate ratio as desired; (b) a new HF5 channel design consisting of two sets of ferrule, gasket and cap nut used to mount the fiber inside a tube. This design provides a mechanism for effective and straightforward sealing of the fiber; (c) a new AF4 channel design with only two fluid connections on the upper plate. Only one pump is needed to deliver the necessary flow rates. In the focusing/relaxation step the two parts of the focusing flow and a bypass flow flushing the detectors are created with two splits of the flow from the pump. In the elution mode the cross-flow is measured and controlled with a flow controller device. This leads to reduced pressure pulsations in the channel and improves signal to noise ratio in the detectors. Experimental results of the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and of a mix of four proteins demonstrate a significant improvement in the HF5 separation performance, in terms of efficiency, resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility compared to what has been reported in the literature. Separation performance in HF5 mode is shown to be comparable to the performance in AF4 mode using a channel with two connections in the upper plate. PMID:21227436

  11. A robust and accurate approach to computing compressible multiphase flow: Stratified flow model and AUSM{sup +}-up scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chih-Hao . E-mail: chchang@engineering.ucsb.edu; Liou, Meng-Sing . E-mail: meng-sing.liou@grc.nasa.gov

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach to compute compressible multifluid equations. Firstly, a single-pressure compressible multifluid model based on the stratified flow model is proposed. The stratified flow model, which defines different fluids in separated regions, is shown to be amenable to the finite volume method. We can apply the conservation law to each subregion and obtain a set of balance equations. Secondly, the AUSM{sup +} scheme, which is originally designed for the compressible gas flow, is extended to solve compressible liquid flows. By introducing additional dissipation terms into the numerical flux, the new scheme, called AUSM{sup +}-up, can be applied to both liquid and gas flows. Thirdly, the contribution to the numerical flux due to interactions between different phases is taken into account and solved by the exact Riemann solver. We will show that the proposed approach yields an accurate and robust method for computing compressible multiphase flows involving discontinuities, such as shock waves and fluid interfaces. Several one-dimensional test problems are used to demonstrate the capability of our method, including the Ransom's water faucet problem and the air-water shock tube problem. Finally, several two dimensional problems will show the capability to capture enormous details and complicated wave patterns in flows having large disparities in the fluid density and velocities, such as interactions between water shock wave and air bubble, between air shock wave and water column(s), and underwater explosion.

  12. A new approach to highly resolved measurements of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, J.; Hölling, A.; Peinke, J.; Bhiladvala, R.; Hölling, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present the design and principle of a new anemometer, namely the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA), which has been developed for highly resolved flow speed measurements of two components (2d) under laboratory conditions. We will explain the working principle and demonstrate the sensor’s performance by means of comparison measurements of wake turbulence with a commercial X-wire. In the past we have shown that the 2d-LCA is capable of being applied in liquid and particle-laden domains, but we also believe that other challenging areas of operation such as near-wall flows can become accessible.

  13. A General Approach to Time Periodic Incompressible Viscous Fluid Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissert, Matthias; Hieber, Matthias; Nguyen, Thieu Huy

    2016-06-01

    This article develops a general approach to time periodic incompressible fluid flow problems and semilinear evolution equations. It yields, on the one hand, a unified approach to various classical problems in incompressible fluid flow and, on the other hand, gives new results for periodic solutions to the Navier-Stokes-Oseen flow, the Navier-Stokes flow past rotating obstacles, and, in the geophysical setting, for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck and various diffusion equations with rough coefficients. The method is based on a combination of interpolation and topological arguments, as well as on the smoothing properties of the linearized equation.

  14. Rheological flow laws for multiphase magmas: An empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Mattia; Cordonnier, Benoît; Ulmer, Peter; Caricchi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The physical properties of magmas play a fundamental role in controlling the eruptive dynamics of volcanoes. Magmas are multiphase mixtures of crystals and gas bubbles suspended in a silicate melt and, to date, no flow laws describe their rheological behaviour. In this study we present a set of equations quantifying the flow of high-viscosity (> 105 Pa·s) silica-rich multiphase magmas, containing both crystals (24-65 vol.%) and gas bubbles (9-12 vol.%). Flow laws were obtained using deformation experiments performed at high temperature (673-1023 K) and pressure (200-250 MPa) over a range of strain-rates (5 · 10- 6 s- 1 to 4 · 10- 3 s- 1), conditions that are relevant for volcanic conduit processes of silica-rich systems ranging from crystal-rich lava domes to crystal-poor obsidian flows. We propose flow laws in which stress exponent, activation energy, and pre-exponential factor depend on a parameter that includes the volume fraction of weak phases (i.e. melt and gas bubbles) present in the magma. The bubble volume fraction has opposing effects depending on the relative crystal volume fraction: at low crystallinity bubble deformation generates gas connectivity and permeability pathways, whereas at high crystallinity bubbles do not connect and act as "lubricant" objects during strain localisation within shear bands. We show that such difference in the evolution of texture is mainly controlled by the strain-rate (i.e. the local stress within shear bands) at which the experiments are performed, and affect the empirical parameters used for the flow laws. At low crystallinity (< 44 vol.%) we observe an increase of viscosity with increasing strain-rate, while at high crystallinity (> 44 vol.%) the viscosity decreases with increasing strain-rate. Because these behaviours are also associated with modifications of sample textures during the experiment and, thus, are not purely the result of different deformation rates, we refer to "apparent shear-thickening" and

  15. A Cartesian grid approach with hierarchical refinement for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Many numerical studies of flows that involve complex geometries are limited by the difficulties in generating suitable grids. We present a Cartesian boundary scheme for two-dimensional, compressible flows that is unfettered by the need to generate a computational grid and so it may be used, routinely, even for the most awkward of geometries. In essence, an arbitrary-shaped body is allowed to blank out some region of a background Cartesian mesh and the resultant cut-cells are singled out for special treatment. This is done within a finite-volume framework and so, in principle, any explicit flux-based integration scheme can take advantage of this method for enforcing solid boundary conditions. For best effect, the present Cartesian boundary scheme has been combined with a sophisticated, local mesh refinement scheme, and a number of examples are shown in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the combined algorithm for simulations of shock interaction phenomena.

  16. Hydrodynamical Approach to Vehicular Flow in the Urban Street Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duras, Maciej M.

    2001-06-01

    The vehicular flow in the urban street canyon is considered. The classical field description is used in the modelling of the vehicular movement and of gaseous mixture in generic urban street canyon. The dynamical variables include vehicular densities, velocities, and emissivities: of pollutants, heat and exhaust gases, as well as standard mixture components' variables: densities, velocities, temperature, pressures. The local balances' equations predict the dynamics of the complex system. The automatic control of the vehicular flow is attained by the sets of coordinated traffic lights. The automatic control is aimed at minimization of traffic ecological costs by the application of variational calculus (Lagrange's and Bolz's problems). The theoretical description is accompanied by numerical examples of computer fluid dynamics based on real traffic data.

  17. Adjoint operator approach to shape design for internal incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabuk, H.; Sung, C.-H.; Modi, V.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of determining the profile of a channel or duct that provides the maximum static pressure rise is solved. Incompressible, laminar flow governed by the steady state Navier-Stokes equations is assumed. Recent advances in computational resources and algorithms have made it possible to solve the direct problem of determining such a flow through a body of known geometry. It is possible to obtain a set of adjoint equations, the solution to which permits the calculation of the direction and relative magnitude of change in the diffuser profile that leads to a higher pressure rise. The solution to the adjoint problem can be shown to represent an artificially constructed flow. This interpretation provides a means to construct numerical solutions to the adjoint equations that do not compromise the fully viscous nature of the problem. The algorithmic and computational aspects of solving the adjoint equations are addressed. The form of these set of equations is similar but not identical to the Navier-Stokes equations. In particular some issues related to boundary conditions and stability are discussed.

  18. Triangular flow in relativstic heavy ion collisions in an event-by-event hybrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Hannah; La Placa, Rolando; Bass, Steffen A.

    2012-09-01

    Triangular flow has been shown to be an interesting new observable to gain insights about the properties of hot and dense strongly interacting matter as it is produced in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. The potential of triangular flow for constraining the initial state granularity is explored by performing an explicit calculation of the triangularity and the final state anisotropic flow for initial states that exhibit different amounts of fluctuations. We present triangular flow results for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy calculated in a hybrid approach that includes a non-equilibrium initial evolution and an ideal hydrodynamic expansion with a hadronic afterburner in 3+1 dimensions. Triangular flow results for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energies employing the same parameters that work at RHIC are compared to ALICE data. In addition, by comparing the hybrid approach calculation with a pure transport approach, the influence of viscosity is studied.

  19. Field theoretical approach for bio-membrane coupled with flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Y.; Kawakatsu, T.

    2013-02-01

    Shape deformation of bio-membranes in flow field is well known phenomenon in biological systems, for example red blood cell in blood vessel. To simulate such deformation with use of field theoretical approach, we derived the dynamical equation of phase field for shape of membrane and coupled the equation with Navier-Stokes equation for flow field. In 2-dimensional simulations, we found that a bio-membrane in a Poiseuille flow takes a parachute shape similar to the red blood cells.

  20. Assessment of flow regime alterations over a spectrum of temporal scales using wavelet-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fu-Chun; Chang, Ching-Fu; Shiau, Jenq-Tzong

    2015-05-01

    The full range of natural flow regime is essential for sustaining the riverine ecosystems and biodiversity, yet there are still limited tools available for assessment of flow regime alterations over a spectrum of temporal scales. Wavelet analysis has proven useful for detecting hydrologic alterations at multiple scales via the wavelet power spectrum (WPS) series. The existing approach based on the global WPS (GWPS) ratio tends to be dominated by the rare high-power flows so that alterations of the more frequent low-power flows are often underrepresented. We devise a new approach based on individual deviations between WPS (DWPS) that are root-mean-squared to yield the global DWPS (GDWPS). We test these two approaches on the three reaches of the Feitsui Reservoir system (Taiwan) that are subjected to different classes of anthropogenic interventions. The GDWPS reveal unique features that are not detected with the GWPS ratios. We also segregate the effects of individual subflow components on the overall flow regime alterations using the subflow GDWPS. The results show that the daily hydropeaking waves below the reservoir not only intensified the flow oscillations at daily scale but most significantly eliminated subweekly flow variability. Alterations of flow regime were most severe below the diversion weir, where the residual hydropeaking resulted in a maximum impact at daily scale while the postdiversion null flows led to large hydrologic alterations over submonthly scales. The smallest impacts below the confluence reveal that the hydrologic alterations at scales longer than 2 days were substantially mitigated with the joining of the unregulated tributary flows, whereas the daily-scale hydrologic alteration was retained because of the hydropeaking inherited from the reservoir releases. The proposed DWPS approach unravels for the first time the details of flow regime alterations at these intermediate scales that are overridden by the low-frequency high-power flows when

  1. A new perturbation approach to the laminar fluid flow behind a two-dimensional solid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, T.

    1984-10-01

    Asymptotic solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for the flow field in an incompressible laminar flow around an obstacle are obtained purely from integral representations and by means of matched asymptotic expansions. In the present approach, the principle of rapid decay is automatically satisfied. The approach has the advantage that the asymptotic solutions are obtained without using the integral theorem. It is shown that the Imai's approach is essentially the same as Chang's, and that these earlier approaches do not miss functions in an analysis.

  2. Numerical simulation of polymer flows: A parallel computing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, R.; Keunings, R.; Roux, F.X.

    1993-12-31

    We present a parallel algorithm for the numerical simulation of viscoelastic fluids on distributed memory computers. The algorithm has been implemented within a general-purpose commercial finite element package used in polymer processing applications. Results obtained on the Intel iPSC/860 computer demonstrate high parallel efficiency in complex flow problems. However, since the computational load is unknown a priori, load balancing is a challenging issue. We have developed an adaptive allocation strategy which dynamically reallocates the work load to the processors based upon the history of the computational procedure. We compare the results obtained with the adaptive and static scheduling schemes.

  3. Non-isothermal flow in low permeable porous media: A comparison of Richards' and two-phase flow approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Rutqvist, J.; Gorke, U.-J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Kolditz, O.

    2010-03-15

    The present work compares the performance of two alternative flow models for the simulation of thermal-hydraulic coupled processes in low permeable porous media: non-isothermal Richards and two-phase flow concepts. Both models take vaporization processes into account: however, the Richards model neglects dynamic pressure variations and bulk flow of the gaseous phase. For the comparison of the two approaches first published data from a laboratory experiment is studied involving thermally driven moisture flow in a partially saturated bentonite sample. Then a benchmark test of longer-term thermal-hydraulic behavior in the engineered barrier system of a geological nuclear waste repository is analyzed (DECOVALEX project). It was found that both models can be used to reproduce the vaporization process if the intrinsic permeability is relative high. However, when a thermal-hydraulic coupled problem has the same low intrinsic permeability for both the liquid and the gas phase, only the two-phase flow approach provides reasonable results.

  4. Simulation of platelets suspension flowing through a stenosis model using a dissipative particle dynamics approach

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Joao S.; Gao, Chao; Alemu, Yared; Slepian, Marvin; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Stresses on blood cellular constituents induced by blood flow can be represented by a continuum approach down to the μm level; however, the molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and platelet activation and aggregation are on the order of nm. The coupling of the disparate length and time scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena represent a major computational challenge. In order to bridge the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales with the goal of depicting and predicting flow induced thrombogenicity, multi-scale approaches based on particle methods are better suited. We present a top-scale model to describe bulk flow of platelet suspensions: we employ dissipative particle dynamics to model viscous flow dynamics and present a novel and general no-slip boundary condition that allows the description of three-dimensional viscous flows through complex geometries. Dissipative phenomena associated with boundary layers and recirculation zones are observed and favorably compared to benchmark viscous flow solutions (Poiseuille and Couette flows). Platelets in suspension, modeled as coarse-grained finite-sized ensembles of bound particles constituting an enclosed deformable membrane with flat ellipsoid shape, show self-orbiting motions in shear flows consistent with Jeffery's orbits, and are transported with the flow, flipping and colliding with the walls and interacting with other platelets. PMID:23695489

  5. A kinetic-theory approach to turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the mathematical and physical foundations for the kinetic theory of reactive turbulent flows, discussing the differences and relation between the kinetic and averaged equations, and comparing some solutions of the kinetic equations obtained by the Green's function method with those obtained by the approximate bimodal method. The kinetic method described consists essentially in constructing the probability density functions of the chemical species on the basis of solutions of the Langevin stochastic equation for the influence of eddies on the behavior of fluid elements. When the kinetic equations are solved for the structure of the diffusion flame established in a shear layer by the bimodal method, discontinuities in gradients of the mean concentrations at the two flame edges appear. This is a consequence of the bimodal approximation of all distribution functions by two dissimilar half-Maxwellian functions, which is a very crude approximation. These discontinuities do not appear when the solutions are constructed by the Green's function method described here.

  6. Neural network approach to classification of traffic flow states

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.; Qiao, F.

    1998-11-01

    The classification of traffic flow states in China has traditionally been based on the Highway Capacity Manual, published in the United States. Because traffic conditions are generally different from country to country, though, it is important to develop a practical and useful classification method applicable to Chinese highway traffic. In view of the difficulty and complexity of a mathematical and physical realization, modern pattern recognition methods are considered practical in fulfilling this goal. This study applies a self-organizing neural network pattern recognition method to classify highway traffic states into some distinctive cluster centers. A small scale test with actual data is conducted, and the method is found to be potentially applicable in practice.

  7. A numerical approach for groundwater flow in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, F.; Guarracino, L.; Saliba, R.

    2006-07-01

    In this article, a computational tool to simulate groundwater flow in variably saturated non-deformable fractured porous media is presented, which includes a conceptual model to obtain analytical expressions of water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves for fractured hard rocks and a numerical algorithm to solve the Richards equation. To calculate effective saturation and relative hydraulic conductivity curves we adopt the Brooks-Corey model assuming fractal laws for both aperture and number of fractures. A standard Galerkin formulation was employed to solve the Richards' equation together with a Crank-Nicholson scheme with Richardson extrapolation for the time discretization.The main contribution of this paper is to group an analytical model of the authors with a robust numerical algorithm designed to solve adequately the highly non-linear Richards' equation generating a tool for porous media engineering.

  8. Visual guidance based on optic flow: a biorobotic approach.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses some basic questions as to how vision links up with action and serves to guide locomotion in both biological and artificial creatures. The thorough knowledge gained during the past five decades on insects' sensory-motor abilities and the neuronal substrates involved has provided us with a rich source of inspiration for designing tomorrow's self-guided vehicles and micro-vehicles, which will be able to cope with unforeseen events on the ground, under water, in the air, in space, on other planets, and inside the human body. Insects can teach us some useful tricks for designing agile autonomous robots. Since constructing a "biorobot" first requires exactly formulating the biological principles presumably involved, it gives us a unique opportunity of checking the soundness and robustness of these principles by bringing them face to face with the real physical world. "Biorobotics" therefore goes one step beyond computer simulation. It leads to experimenting with real physical robots which have to pass the stringent test of the real world. Biorobotics provide us with a new tool, which can help neurobiologists and neuroethologists to identify and investigate worthwhile issues in the field of sensory-motor control. Here we describe some of the visually guided terrestrial and aerial robots we have developed since 1985 on the basis of our biological findings. All these robots behave in response to the optic flow, i.e., they work by measuring the slip speed of the retinal image. Optic flow is sensed on-board by miniature electro-optical velocity sensors. The very principle of these sensors was based on studies in which we recorded the responses of single identified neurons to single photoreceptor stimulation in a model visual system: the fly's compound eye. PMID:15477039

  9. Flow Solution for Advanced Separate Flow Nozzles Response A: Structured Grid Navier-Stokes Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenzakowski, D. C.; Shipman, J.; Dash, S. M.; Saiyed, Naseem (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center funded a computational study to investigate the effect of chevrons and tabs on the exhaust plume from separate flow nozzles. Numerical studies were conducted at typical takeoff power with 0.28 M flight speed. Report provides numerical data and insights into the mechanisms responsible for increased mixing.

  10. Spatial dynamics of ecosystem service flows: a comprehensive approach to quantifying actual services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Johnson, Gary W.; Voigt, Brian; Villa, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Recent ecosystem services research has highlighted the importance of spatial connectivity between ecosystems and their beneficiaries. Despite this need, a systematic approach to ecosystem service flow quantification has not yet emerged. In this article, we present such an approach, which we formalize as a class of agent-based models termed “Service Path Attribution Networks” (SPANs). These models, developed as part of the Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) project, expand on ecosystem services classification terminology introduced by other authors. Conceptual elements needed to support flow modeling include a service's rivalness, its flow routing type (e.g., through hydrologic or transportation networks, lines of sight, or other approaches), and whether the benefit is supplied by an ecosystem's provision of a beneficial flow to people or by absorption of a detrimental flow before it reaches them. We describe our implementation of the SPAN framework for five ecosystem services and discuss how to generalize the approach to additional services. SPAN model outputs include maps of ecosystem service provision, use, depletion, and flows under theoretical, possible, actual, inaccessible, and blocked conditions. We highlight how these different ecosystem service flow maps could be used to support various types of decision making for conservation and resource management planning.

  11. PROGRESS REPORT. QUANTIFYING VADOSE ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT UNCERTAINTIES USING A UNIFIED, HIERARCHICAL APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to develop and demonstrate a general approach for modeling flow and transport in the heterogeneous vadose zone. The approach uses similar media scaling, geostatistics, and conditional simulation methods to estimate soil hydraulic parameters at un...

  12. ANNUAL REPORT. QUANTIFYING VADOSE ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT UNCERTAINTIES USING A UNIFIED, HIERARCHICAL APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to develop and demonstrate a general approach for modeling flow and transport in the heterogeneous vadose zone. The approach uses similar media scaling, geostatistics, and conditional simulation methods to estimate soil hydraulic parameters at un...

  13. A SPATIOTEMPORAL APPROACH FOR HIGH RESOLUTION TRAFFIC FLOW IMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lee; Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), traffic data collection technologies have been evolving dramatically. The emergence of innovative data collection technologies such as Remote Traffic Microwave Sensor (RTMS), Bluetooth sensor, GPS-based Floating Car method, automated license plate recognition (ALPR) (1), etc., creates an explosion of traffic data, which brings transportation engineering into the new era of Big Data. However, despite the advance of technologies, the missing data issue is still inevitable and has posed great challenges for research such as traffic forecasting, real-time incident detection and management, dynamic route guidance, and massive evacuation optimization, because the degree of success of these endeavors depends on the timely availability of relatively complete and reasonably accurate traffic data. A thorough literature review suggests most current imputation models, if not all, focus largely on the temporal nature of the traffic data and fail to consider the fact that traffic stream characteristics at a certain location are closely related to those at neighboring locations and utilize these correlations for data imputation. To this end, this paper presents a Kriging based spatiotemporal data imputation approach that is able to fully utilize the spatiotemporal information underlying in traffic data. Imputation performance of the proposed approach was tested using simulated scenarios and achieved stable imputation accuracy. Moreover, the proposed Kriging imputation model is more flexible compared to current models.

  14. A flow cytometric approach to assess phytoplankton respiration.

    PubMed

    Grégori, Gérald; Denis, Michel; Lefèvre, Dominique; Beker, Beatriz

    2002-01-01

    Microbial respiration in the ocean is considered as the major process representative of the organic matter biological oxidation. The corresponding metabolic CO2 production was estimated to be about 22 Pg C y(-1). However, the in situ respiration rate is generally too low (by several orders of magnitude) to be accessible to the available direct measurement methods. Some fluorescent probes, such as DiOC6(3) (Molecular Probes, USA) have been shown to be very sensitive to changes in the proton electrochemical potential difference (DeltamuH+), characterising mitochondrial and plasmic membranes bearing the cell respiratory system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells respectively. In mitochondria, DeltamuH+ is linked to the flux of oxygen uptake by a linear relationship. To our knowledge, no such relationship has been established in the case of whole marine cells. In the present work, we addressed the dark respiration rate of the Chlorophyceae Dunaliella tertiolecta (Butcher) in axenic cultures, both directly by using a highly sensitive oxygraph (Oroboros) and by staining cells with DiOC6(3). We found and standardized a linear relationship between oxygen uptake by D. tertiolecta and its green fluorescence induced by DiOC6(3), enabling the determination by flow cytometry of the respiration rate of D. tertiolecta. PMID:12815298

  15. A fractal approach to low velocity non-Darcy flow in a low permeability porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jian-Chao

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the mechanism for fluid flow at low velocity in a porous medium is analyzed based on plastic flow of oil in a reservoir and the fractal approach. The analytical expressions for flow rate and velocity of non-Newtonian fluid flow in the low permeability porous medium are derived, and the threshold pressure gradient (TPG) is also obtained. It is notable that the TPG (J) and permeability (K) of the porous medium analytically exhibit the scaling behavior J ~ K-DT/(1=DT), where DT is the fractal dimension for tortuous capillaries. The fractal characteristics of tortuosity for capillaries should be considered in analysis of non-Darcy flow in a low permeability porous medium. The model predictions of TPG show good agreement with those obtained by the available expression and experimental data. The proposed model may be conducible to a better understanding of the mechanism for nonlinear flow in the low permeability porous medium.

  16. A dual active-restrictive approach to incorporating environmental flow targets into existing reservoir operation rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2010-08-01

    Environmental flow schemes may be implemented through active or restrictive strategies. The former may be applied via reservoir releases, and the latter can be executed by reducing water demands. We present a dual active-restrictive approach to devising the optimal reservoir operation rules that aim to secure off-stream water supplies while maximizing environmental benefits. For the active part, a multicomponent environmental flow target (including the minimum and monthly flows) is incorporated in the operation rules. For the restrictive counterpart, we use a novel demands partitioning and prioritizing (DPP) approach to reallocating the demands of various sectors. The DPP approach partitions the existing off-stream demand and newly incorporated environmental demand and reassembles the two as the first- and second-priority demands. Water is reallocated to each demand according to the ratios derived from the prioritized demands. The proposed approach is coupled with a multicriteria optimization framework to seek the optimal operation rules for the existing Feitsui Reservoir system (Taiwan) under various scenarios. The best overall performance is achieved by an optimal dual strategy whose operational parameters are all determined by optimization. The optimal environmental flow target may well be a top-priority constant base flow rather than the variable quantities. The active strategy would outperform the restrictive one. For the former, a top-priority base flow target is essential; for the latter, the off-stream demand can become vanishingly small in compensation for the eliminated base flow target, thus promoting the monthly flow target as nearly the top-priority demand. For either the active or restrictive strategy, a prioritized environmental flow demand would provide a path toward the optimal overall performance. A significantly improved overall performance over the existing operation rules is unlikely if the active and restrictive parameters are both favorable

  17. A comparative assessment of two different debris flow propagation approaches - blind simulations on a real debris flow event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancanelli, L. M.; Foti, E.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed comparison between the performances of two different approaches to debris flow modelling was carried out. In particular, the results of a mono-phase Bingham model (FLO-2D) and that of a two-phase model (TRENT-2D) obtained from a blind test were compared. As a benchmark test the catastrophic event of 1 October 2009 which struck Sicily causing several fatalities and damage was chosen. The predicted temporal evolution of several parameters of the debris flow (such as flow depth and propagation velocity) was analysed in order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the two models in reproducing the global dynamics of the event. An analysis between the models' results with survey data have been carried out, not only for the determination of statistical indicators of prediction accuracy, but also for the application of the Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) approach. Provided that the proper rheological parameters and boundary conditions are assigned, both models seem capable of reproducing the inundation areas in a reasonably accurate way. However, the main differences in the application rely on the choice of such rheological parameters. Indeed, within the more user-friendly FLO-2D model the tuning of the parameters must be done empirically, with no evidence of the physics of the phenomena. On the other hand, for the TRENT-2D the parameters are physically based and can be estimated from the properties of the solid material, thus reproducing more reliable results. A second important difference between the two models is that in the first method the debris flow is treated as a homogeneous flow, in which the total mass is kept constant from its initiation in the upper part of the basin to the deposition in a debris fan. In contrast, the second approach is suited to reproduce the erosion and deposition processes and the displaced mass can be directly related to the rainfall event. Application of both models in a highly urbanized area reveals the

  18. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, H.-H.; Haukwa, C.B.; Ahlers, C.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Flint, A.L.; Guertal, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B.; Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Flint, Alan L.; Guertal, William B.

    2002-09-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

  20. Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: an evaluation of the continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B; Ahlers, C Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S; Flint, Alan L; Guertal, William B

    2003-01-01

    Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock. PMID:12714290

  1. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrounette, M.; Sylvie, L.; Davit, Y.; Quintard, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated [1] that the vascular system of the healthy human brain cortex is a superposition of two structural components, each corresponding to a different spatial scale. At small-scale, the vascular network has a capillary structure, which is homogeneous and space-filling over a cut-off length. At larger scale, veins and arteries conform to a quasi-fractal branched structure. This structural duality is consistent with the functional duality of the vasculature, i.e. distribution and exchange. From a modeling perspective, this can be viewed as the superposition of: (a) a continuum model describing slow transport in the small-scale capillary network, characterized by a representative elementary volume and effective properties; and (b) a discrete network approach [2] describing fast transport in the arterial and venous network, which cannot be homogenized because of its fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to modeling problems encountered in geological media, e.g, in petroleum engineering, where fast conducting channels (wells or fractures) are embedded in a porous medium (reservoir rock). An efficient method to reduce the computational cost of fractures/continuum simulations is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. However, this also makes it difficult to accurately couple both structural components. In this work, we solve this issue by adapting the "well model" concept used in petroleum engineering [3] to brain specific 3-D situations. We obtain a unique linear system of equations describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model coupling. Results are presented for realistic geometries and compared with a non-homogenized small-scale network model of an idealized periodic capillary network of known permeability. [1] Lorthois & Cassot, J. Theor. Biol. 262, 614-633, 2010. [2] Lorthois et al., Neuroimage 54 : 1031-1042, 2011. [3] Peaceman, SPE J. 18, 183-194, 1978.

  2. A Hybrid URANS/LES Approach Used for Simulations of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraňa, Karel; Stiller, Jörg

    A hybrid model based on the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes approach represented by the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model and the Large Eddy Simulation called Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) was applied for turbulent flow simulations. This turbulent approach was implemented into the flow solver based on the Finite-Element Method with pressure stabilized and streamlines upwind Petrov-Galerkin stabilization techniques. The effectiveness and robustness of this updated solver is successfully demonstrated at benchmark calculation represented by an unsteady turbulent flow past a cylinder at Reynolds number 3900. Results such as velocity fields and the flow periodicity, Reynolds stress tensor and eddy viscosity and pressure coefficient distributions are discussed and relatively good agreement was found to direct numerical simulations and experiments.

  3. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  4. A study of multiphase flow in fractured porous media using a microscale lattice Boltzmann approach

    SciTech Connect

    Soll, W.E.; Eggert, K.E.; Grunau, D.W.; Schafer-Perini, A.L.

    1994-02-01

    The lattice Boltzmann technique has been shown to be an efficient and reliable approach to modeling single- and multi-fluid flow in porous media systems. The flexibility of this approach in discretizing the pore/solid space means it is particularly well suited to capturing fluid behavior, fluid-fluid interactions, and fluid-solid interactions at the scale of the individual pores. Such flexibility readily lends itself to studying processes occurring at physical interfaces, such as between a fracture and the surrounding porous matrix. Here we present pore-level simulations of fluid flow through a fracture embedded in an unsaturated matrix. Simulations are run on the massively parallel Connection Machine 5 (CM-5) using the two-fluid, two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann flow simulator developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We look at the effect of pressure gradients and initial matrix saturation on infiltration into the matrix and fluid flow along the fracture.

  5. Exploring Inflated Pahohoe Lava Flow Morphologies and the Effects of Cooling Using a New Simulation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth (e.g., Figure 1) indicate that the emplacement process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. Thus, interpretation of emplacement conditions for pahoehoe lava flows on Mars requires fundamentally different models. A new model that implements a simulation approach has recently been developed that allows exploration of a variety of key influences on pahoehoe lobe emplacement (e.g., source shape, confinement, slope). One important factor that has an impact on the final topographic shape and morphology of a pahoehoe lobe is the volumetric flow rate of lava, where cooling of lava on the lobe surface influences the likelihood of subsequent breakouts.

  6. Microfluidic volumetric flow determination using optical coherence tomography speckle: An autocorrelation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pretto, Lucas R.; Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Freitas, Anderson Z.

    2016-04-01

    Functional modalities of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) based on speckle analysis are emerging in the literature. We propose a simple approach to the autocorrelation of OCT signal to enable volumetric flow rate differentiation, based on decorrelation time. Our results show that this technique could distinguish flows separated by 3 μl/min, limited by the acquisition speed of the system. We further perform a B-scan of gradient flow inside a microchannel, enabling the visualization of the drag effect on the walls.

  7. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach in reduced order modeling of a flow with a moving boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, W.; Roszak, R.; Morzyński, M.

    2013-06-01

    Flow-induced deflections of aircraft structures result in oscillations that might turn into such a dangerous phenomena like flutter or buffeting. In this paper the design of an aeroelastic system consisting of Reduced Order Model (ROM) of the flow with a moving boundary is presented. The model is based on Galerkin projection of governing equation onto space spanned by modes obtained from high-fidelity computations. The motion of the boundary and mesh is defined in Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach and results in additional convective term in Galerkin system. The developed system is demonstrated on the example of a flow around an oscillating wing.

  8. Two-Fluid Large-Eddy Simulation Approach for Two-Phase Turbulent Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayek, F.; Pandya, R. V. R.

    2002-11-01

    In recent years, large-eddy simulation (LES) is emerging as a predictive tool for particle/droplet-laden turbulent flows. In common practice, LES of two-phase flows involves tracking a large number of particles in a Lagrangian framework while using the Eulerian flow field generated by LES of the carrier fluid phase and proper forms for various forces acting on the particle. The two-way coupling effects (i.e. the effects of the particles on the LES flow field and subgrid scales motion and vice versa) have yet to be accounted for fully and in rigorous manner in these Eulerian-Lagrangian approaches. Recently, a new Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been proposed(R.V.R. Pandya and F. Mashayek, ``Two-fluid large-eddy simulation approach for particle-laden turbulent flows,'' to appear in Int. J. Heat and Mass Transfer.) in which Eulerian `fluid' equations are derived for the dispersed phase using the kinetic or probability density function (pdf) modeling approach after solving the closure problems arising in the filtered pdf equation. The solution to the closure accounts properly for the effects of the subgrid scales on the particles. The two-way coupling effects are modeled in a rigorous manner and included in the dynamic localization model for the subgrid stresses of the carrier phase. The `fluid' equations are supposed to capture the preferential distribution of the particles.

  9. Turbulent structure of three-dimensional flow behind a model car: 1. Exposed to uniform approach flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaka, Orçun E.; Özkan, Gökhan; Özdemir, Bedii I.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent structure of flow behind a model car is investigated with local velocity measurements with emphasis on large structures and their relevance to aerodynamic forces. Results show that two counter-rotating helical vortices, which are formed within the inner wake region, play a key role in determining the flux of kinetic energy. The turbulence is generated within the outermost shear layers due to the instabilities, which also seem to be the basic drive for these relatively organized structures. The measured terms of the turbulent kinetic energy production, which are only part of the full expression, indicate that vortex centres act similar to the manifolds draining the energy in the streamwise direction. As the approach velocity increases, the streamwise convection becomes the dominant means of turbulent transport and, thus, the acquisition of turbulence by relatively non-turbulent flow around the wake region is suppressed.

  10. Using a mechanical approach to quantify flow resistance by submerged, flexible vegetation - A revisit of Kouwen's approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Acharya, Kumud; Stone, Mark C.

    2014-11-01

    Vegetation-induced flow roughness can result in significant changes in stream hydraulics. This study revisits the well-known empirical equation for submerged flexible vegetation developed by Kouwen and collaborators, which describes the relationships between shear stress, flexural rigidity, and vegetation deflection. Theoretical analysis shows that the theories for the mechanics of large deflection cantilever beams can essentially explain this equation. The results show that for moderate to large deflection (the ratio of deflected height to original height l/L < 0.85 - 0.9) the theoretically derived relationships can be approximated with power-law equations, which have similar exponents to the Kouwen's equation and agree with its empirical relationships, which indicates the consistency of the underlying physics for the two approaches. Direct comparisons under given vegetation-height conditions also show a general agreement between the empirical and the theoretical equations. For small deflections, the theoretical results exhibit a more intuitive trend, which shows that the shear stress approaches zero at infinitesimal deflection. Additionally, theoretical analysis suggests a different non-dimensional parameter for vegetation mechanical properties and a better structure of the equation, which is expected to improve the estimation of vegetation-induced roughness. Finally, theoretical analysis indicates that even though the structure maintains, the specific relationship between vegetation bending and resistance is dependent on the flow velocity profile. Further development of these approaches need to take flow characteristics into consideration.

  11. Multi-compartment approach to identify minimal flow and maximal recreational use of a lowland river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Martin; Lorenz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Most approaches to establish a minimum flow rate for river sections subjected to water abstraction focus on flow requirements of fish and benthic invertebrates. However, artificial reduction of river flow will always affect additional key ecosystem features, as sediment properties and the metabolism of matter in these ecosystems as well, and may even influence adjacent floodplains. Thus, significant effects e.g. on the dissolved oxygen content of river water, on habitat conditions in the benthic zone, and on water levels in the floodplain are to be expected. Thus, we chose a multiple compartment method to identify minimum flow requirements in a lowland River in northern Germany (Spree River), selecting the minimal required flow level out of all compartments studied. Results showed that minimal flow levels necessary to keep key ecosystem features at a 'good' state depended significantly on actual water quality and on river channel morphology. Thereby, water quality of the Spree is potentially influenced by recreational boating activity, which causes mussels to stop filter-feeding, and thus impedes self-purification. Disturbance of mussel feeding was shown to directly depend on boat type and speed, with substantial differences among mussel species. Thus, a maximal recreational boating intensity could be derived that does not significantly affect self purification. We conclude that minimal flow levels should be identified not only based on flow preferences of target species, but also considering channel morphology, ecological functions, and the intensity of other human uses of the river section.

  12. Inverse modeling of the hydraulic properties of fractured media : development of a flow tomography approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bour, O.; Klepikova, M.; Le Borgne, T.; De Dreuzy, J.

    2013-12-01

    Inverse modeling of hydraulic and geometrical properties of fractured media is a very challenging objective due to the spatial heterogeneity of the medium and the scarcity of data. Here we present a flow tomography approach that permits to characterize the location, the connectivity and the hydraulic properties of main flow paths in fractured media. The accurate characterization of the location, hydraulic properties and connectivity of major fracture zones is essential to model flow and solute transport in fractured media. Cross-borehole flowmeter tests, which consist of measuring changes in vertical borehole flows when pumping a neighboring borehole, were shown to be an efficient technique to provide information on the properties of the flow zones that connect borehole pairs [Paillet, 1998; Le Borgne et al., 2006]. The interpretation of such experiments may however be quite uncertain when multiple connections exist. In this study, we explore the potential of flow tomography (i.e., sequential cross-borehole flowmeter tests) for characterizing aquifer heterogeneity. We first propose a framework for inverting flow and drawdown data to infer fracture connectivity and transmissivities. Here we use a simplified discrete fracture network approach that highlights main connectivity structures. This conceptual model attempts to reproduce fracture network connectivity without taking fracture geometry (length, orientation, dip) into account. We then explore the potential of the method for simplified synthetic fracture network models and quantify the sensitivity of drawdown and borehole flow velocities to the transmissivity of the connecting flowpaths. Flow tomography is expected to be most effective if cross-borehole pumping induces large changes in vertical borehole velocities. The uncertainty of the transmissivity estimates increases for small borehole flow velocities. The uncertainty about the transmissivity of fractures that connect the main flowpath but not the boreholes

  13. A Vocabulary Approach to Partial Streamline Matching and Exploratory Flow Visualization.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jun; Wang, Chaoli; Shene, Ching-Kuang; Shaw, Raymond A

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the similarity of integral curves is fundamental to many important flow data analysis and visualization tasks such as feature detection, pattern querying, streamline clustering, and hierarchical exploration. In this paper, we introduce FlowString, a novel vocabulary approach that extracts shape invariant features from streamlines and utilizes a string-based method for exploratory streamline analysis and visualization. Our solution first resamples streamlines by considering their local feature scales. We then classify resampled points along streamlines based on the shape similarity around their local neighborhoods. We encode each streamline into a string of well-selected shape characters, from which we construct meaningful words for querying and retrieval. A unique feature of our approach is that it captures intrinsic streamline similarity that is invariant under translation, rotation and scaling. We design an intuitive interface and user interactions to support flexible querying, allowing exact and approximate searches for partial streamline matching. Users can perform queries at either the character level or the word level, and define their own characters or words conveniently for customized search. We demonstrate the effectiveness of FlowString with several flow field data sets of different sizes and characteristics. We also extend FlowString to handle multiple data sets and perform an empirical expert evaluation to confirm the usefulness of this approach. PMID:27045908

  14. Analyzing Unsatirated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock Using an Integrated Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu; G. Lu; K. Zhang; L. Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-08-03

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. This paper presents an integrated modeling methodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides a much clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain's flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

  15. Combined multi-fluid and drift-flux approaches for analysis of pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, B.; Starostin, A.; Spesivtsev, P.; Shaposhnikov, D.; Osiptsov, A.

    2013-10-01

    We propose an approach for generalization of 1D transient model for multiphase flows. It allows to combine an arbitrary number of phases with interaction defined by multi-fluid and drift-flux models. Commonly a fluid carries a number of components. The model is based on a graph of fluids and components, where on higher level the flow of several fluids is governed by the multi-fluid approach, while on lower level the relative motion of components within each fluid is described by drift-flux relations. The proposed model is applied to flows in oil and gas wells. The model is implemented numerically using a SIMPLE-like iterative scheme with the geometry conservation based algorithm (GCBA). The numerical realization of the algorithm for an arbitrary number of fluids and components is presented. For illustration, particular cases are considered which are relevant to wellbore flows in oil and gas applications. The introduction of drift-flux correlations into the numerical implementation is discussed. The code is validated against experimental flow patterns and stability study of stratified flows. The typical graphs for gas/liquid transport are discussed. The simulation of phase segregation in a vertical pipe demonstrates the flexibility of model.

  16. Analyzing unsaturated flow patterns in fractured rock using an integrated modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2007-05-01

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies due to the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. An integrated modeling methodology has been developed for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada (USA), a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The approach integrates moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain’s highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations through analyzing flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain’s flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

  17. Some Approaches Towards Constructing Optimally Efficient Multigrid Solvers for the Inviscid Flow Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidilkover, David

    1997-01-01

    Some important advances took place during the last several years in the development of genuinely multidimensional upwind schemes for the compressible Euler equations. In particular, a robust, high-resolution genuinely multidimensional scheme which can be used for any of the flow regimes computations was constructed. This paper summarizes briefly these developments and outlines the fundamental advantages of this approach.

  18. A Novel Laboratory Approach for the Demonstration of Hemodynamic Principles: The Arterial Blood Flow Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djelic, Marina; Mazic, Sanja; Zikic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of a laboratory training course for medicine students, a new approach for laboratory exercises has been applied to teach the phenomena of circulation. The exercise program included measurements of radial artery blood flow waveform for different age groups using a noninvasive optical sensor. Arterial wave reflection was identified by…

  19. Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    The “Innovative Approaches for Urban Watershed Wet-Weather Flow Management and Control: State of the Technology” project investigated a range of innovative technology and management strategies emerging outside the normal realm of business within the continental United States, fo...

  20. An algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations using homogeneous mixture approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, A.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.; Marquillie, M.; Dular, M.

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations is developed. The algorithm is based on Kim and Moin projection method form. Homogeneous mixture approach with transport equation for vapour volume fraction is used to model cavitation and various cavitation models can be used. Influence matrix and matrix diagonalisation technique enable fast parallel computations.

  1. Two different approaches for creating a prescribed opposed-flow velocity field for flame spread experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmignani, Luca; Celniker, Greg; Bussett, Kyle; Paolini, Christopher; Bhattacharjee, Subrata

    2015-05-01

    Opposed-flow flame spread over solid fuels is a fundamental area of research in fire science. Typically combustion wind tunnels are used to generate the opposing flow of oxidizer against which a laminar flame spread occurs along the fuel samples. The spreading flame is generally embedded in a laminar boundary layer, which interacts with the strong buoyancy-induced flow to affect the mechanism of flame spread. In this work, two different approaches for creating the opposed-flow are compared. In the first approach, a vertical combustion tunnel is used where a thin fuel sample, thin acrylic or ashless filter paper, is held vertically along the axis of the test-section with the airflow controlled by controlling the duty cycles of four fans. As the sample is ignited, a flame spreads downward in a steady manner along a developing boundary layer. In the second approach, the sample is held in a movable cart placed in an eight-meter tall vertical chamber filled with air. As the sample is ignited, the cart is moved downward (through a remote-controlled mechanism) at a prescribed velocity. The results from the two approaches are compared to establish the boundary layer effect on flame spread over thin fuels.

  2. Two Experiments to Approach the Boltzmann Factor: Chemical Reaction and Viscous Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio R.; Guastella, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a pedagogical approach aimed at pointing out the role played by the Boltzmann factor in describing phenomena usually perceived as regulated by different mechanisms of functioning. Experimental results regarding some aspects of a chemical reaction and of the viscous flow of some liquids are analysed and described in terms…

  3. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of YuccaMountain using an integrated modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

    2003-11-03

    This paper presents a series of modeling investigations to characterize percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The investigations are conducted using a modeling approach that integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model through model calibration. This integrated modeling approach, based on a dual-continuum formulation, takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. In particular, the model results are examined against different types of field-measured data and used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptual models and their effects on flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this work to provide understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, which is a crucial issue in assessing repository performance.

  4. A knowledge-based approach to automated flow-field zoning for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1989-01-01

    An automated three-dimensional zonal grid generation capability for computational fluid dynamics is shown through the development of a demonstration computer program capable of automatically zoning the flow field of representative two-dimensional (2-D) aerodynamic configurations. The applicability of a knowledge-based programming approach to the domain of flow-field zoning is examined. Several aspects of flow-field zoning make the application of knowledge-based techniques challenging: the need for perceptual information, the role of individual bias in the design and evaluation of zonings, and the fact that the zoning process is modeled as a constructive, design-type task (for which there are relatively few examples of successful knowledge-based systems in any domain). Engineering solutions to the problems arising from these aspects are developed, and a demonstration system is implemented which can design, generate, and output flow-field zonings for representative 2-D aerodynamic configurations.

  5. Flow equation approach to one-body and many-body localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quito, Victor; Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Pekker, David; Refael, Gil

    2014-03-01

    We study one-body and many-body localization using the flow equation technique applied to spin-1/2 Hamiltonians. This technique, first introduced by Wegner, allows us to exact diagonalize interacting systems by solving a set of first-order differential equations for coupling constants. Besides, by the flow of individual operators we also compute physical properties, such as correlation and localization lengths, by looking at the flow of probability distributions of couplings in the Hilbert space. As a first example, we analyze the one-body localization problem written in terms of spins, the disordered XY model with a random transverse field. We compare the results obtained in the flow equation approach with the diagonalization in the fermionic language. For the many-body problem, we investigate the physical properties of the disordered XXZ Hamiltonian with a random transverse field in the z-direction.

  6. Deterministic approach for unsteady rarefied flow simulations in complex geometries and its application to gas flows in microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigullapalli, Sruti

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) are widely used in automotive, communications and consumer electronics applications with microactuators, micro gyroscopes and microaccelerometers being just a few examples. However, in areas where high reliability is critical, such as in aerospace and defense applications, very few MEMS technologies have been adopted so far. Further development of high frequency microsystems such as resonators, RF MEMS, microturbines and pulsed-detonation microengines require improved understanding of unsteady gas dynamics at the micro scale. Accurate computational simulation of such flows demands new approaches beyond the conventional formulations based on the macroscopic constitutive laws. This is due to the breakdown of the continuum hypothesis in the presence of significant non-equilibrium and rarefaction because of large gradients and small scales, respectively. More generally, the motion of molecules in a gas is described by the kinetic Boltzmann equation which is valid for arbitrary Knudsen numbers. However, due to the multidimensionality of the phase space and the complex non-linearity of the collision term, numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation is challenging for practical problems. In this thesis a fully deterministic, as opposed to a statistical, finite volume based three-dimensional solution of Boltzmann ES-BGK model kinetic equation is formulated to enable simulations of unsteady rarefied flows. The main goal of this research is to develop an unsteady rarefied solver integrated with finite volume method (FVM) solver in MEMOSA (MEMS Overall Simulation Administrator) developed by PRISM: NNSA center for Prediction of Reliability, Integrity and Survivability of Microsystems (PRISM) at Purdue and apply it to study micro-scale gas damping. Formulation and verification of finite volume method for unsteady rarefied flow solver based on Boltzmann-ESBGK equations in arbitrary three-dimensional geometries are presented. The solver is

  7. A dual flowing continuum approach to model denitrification experiments in porous media colonized by biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delay, Frederick; Porel, Gilles; Chatelier, Marion

    2013-07-01

    We present a modeling exercise of solute transport and biodegradation in a coarse porous medium widely colonized by a biofilm phase. Tracer tests in large laboratory columns using both conservative (fluorescein) and biodegradable (nitrate) solutes are simulated by means of a dual flowing continuum approach. The latter clearly distinguishes concentrations in a flowing porous phase from concentrations conveyed in the biofilm. With this conceptual setting, it becomes possible to simulate the sharp front of concentrations at early times and the flat tail of low concentrations at late times observed on the experimental breakthrough curves. Thanks to the separation of flow in two phases at different velocities, dispersion coefficients in both flowing phases keep reasonable values with some physical meaning. This is not the case with simpler models based on a single continuum (eventually concealing dead-ends), for which inferred dispersivity may reach the unphysical value of twice the size of the columns. We also show that the behavior of the dual flowing continuum is mainly controlled by the relative fractions of flow passing in each phase and the rate of mass transfer between phases. These parameters also condition the efficiency of nitrate degradation, the degradation rate in a well-seeded medium being a weakly sensitive parameter. Even though the concept of dual flowing continuum appears promising for simulating transport in complex porous media, its inversion onto experimental data really benefits from attempts with simpler models providing a rough pre-evaluation of parameters such as porosity and mean fluid velocity in the system.

  8. Issues and approach to develop validated analysis tools for hypersonic flows: One perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Critical issues concerning the modeling of low-density hypervelocity flows where thermochemical nonequilibrium effects are pronounced are discussed. Emphasis is on the development of validated analysis tools. A description of the activity in the Ames Research Center's Aerothermodynamics Branch is also given. Inherent in the process is a strong synergism between ground test and real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Approaches to develop and/or enhance phenomenological models and incorporate them into computational flow-field simulation codes are discussed. These models have been partially validated with experimental data for flows where the gas temperature is raised (compressive flows). Expanding flows, where temperatures drop, however, exhibit somewhat different behavior. Experimental data for these expanding flow conditions are sparse; reliance must be made on intuition and guidance from computational chemistry to model transport processes under these conditions. Ground-based experimental studies used to provide necessary data for model development and validation are described. Included are the performance characteristics of high-enthalpy flow facilities, such as shock tubes and ballistic ranges.

  9. Eulerian Mapping Closure Approach for Probability Density Function of Concentration in Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Eulerian mapping closure approach is developed for uncertainty propagation in computational fluid mechanics. The approach is used to study the Probability Density Function (PDF) for the concentration of species advected by a random shear flow. An analytical argument shows that fluctuation of the concentration field at one point in space is non-Gaussian and exhibits stretched exponential form. An Eulerian mapping approach provides an appropriate approximation to both convection and diffusion terms and leads to a closed mapping equation. The results obtained describe the evolution of the initial Gaussian field, which is in agreement with direct numerical simulations.

  10. Pneumatic and Percussive Penetration Approaches for Heat Flow Probe Emplacement on Robotic Lunar Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K.; Nagihara, S.; Hedlund, M.; Paulsen, G.; Shasho, J.; Mumm, E.; Kumar, N.; Szwarc, T.; Chu, P.; Craft, J.; Taylor, P.; Milam, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the development of heat flow probes for measuring the geothermal gradient and conductivity of lunar regolith are presented. These two measurements are the required information for determining the heat flow of a planetary body. Considering the Moon as an example, heat flow properties are very important information for studying the radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the interior. In order to obtain the best measurements, the sensors must be extended to a depth of at least 3 m, i.e. beyond the depth of significant thermal cycles. Two approaches to heat flow deployment and measurement are discussed in this paper: a percussive approach and a pneumatic approach. The percussive approach utilizes a high frequency hammer to drive a cone penetrometer into the lunar simulant. Ring-like thermal sensors (heaters and temperature sensors) on the penetrometer rod are deployed into the simulant every 30 cm as the penetrometer penetrates to the required 3 m depth. Once the target depth has been achieved, the deployment rod is removed from the simulant, eliminating any thermal path to the lander. The pneumatic approach relies on pressurized gas to excavate, using a cone-shaped nozzle to penetrate the simulant. The nozzle is attached to a coiled stem with thermal sensors embedded along the length of the stem. As the simulant is being lofted out of the hole by the escaping gas, the stem is progressively reeled out from a spool, thus moving the cone deeper into the hole. Thermal conductivity is measured using a needle probe attached to the end of the cone. Breadboard prototypes of these two heat flow probe systems have been constructed and successfully tested under lunar-like conditions to approximately 70 cm, which was the maximum possible depth allowed by the size of the test bin and the chamber.

  11. Comparison of two inlet boundary approaches in numerical simulation of car ventilation outlet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanda, Tomáš; Niedoba, Pavel; Lízal, František; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    The paper is concerned with the comparison of two inlet boundary approaches of numerical simulations. The first approach is based on the simulation of a sufficiently long duct upstream the area of interest with known volumetric flow rate. The second approach rests on the experimental measurement of the section closer to the area of interest. The experimental measurement provides velocity profile and in addition turbulent intensity compared to the first approach where only a velocity profile can be computed according to known volumetric flow rate. A simplified model of car ventilation outlet was chosen as a test case. The model consists of circular and rectangular duct, area of interest (closing flap, vertical slats and horizontal slats) and outlet box. We have compared the two mentioned inlet boundary approaches for two distinct values of volumetric flow rate for which the experimental data of the section upstream of the area of interest are available. The velocity and the turbulent kinetic energy profiles downstream of the area of interest were chosen as comparative characteristics.

  12. Pressure from particle image velocimetry for convective flows: a Taylor’s hypothesis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kat, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2013-02-01

    Taylor’s hypothesis is often applied in turbulent flow analysis to map temporal information into spatial information. Recent efforts in deriving pressure from particle image velocimetry (PIV) have proposed multiple approaches, each with its own weakness and strength. Application of Taylor’s hypothesis allows us to counter the weakness of an Eulerian approach that is described by de Kat and van Oudheusden (2012 Exp. Fluids 52 1089-106). Two different approaches of using Taylor’s hypothesis in determining planar pressure are investigated: one where pressure is determined from volumetric PIV data and one where pressure is determined from time-resolved stereoscopic PIV data. A performance assessment on synthetic data shows that application of Taylor’s hypothesis can improve determination of pressure from PIV data significantly compared with a time-resolved volumetric approach. The technique is then applied to time-resolved PIV data taken in a cross-flow plane of a turbulent jet (Ganapathisubramani et al 2007 Exp. Fluids 42 923-39). Results appear to indicate that pressure can indeed be obtained from PIV data in turbulent convective flows using the Taylor’s hypothesis approach, where there are no other methods to determine pressure. The role of convection velocity in determination of pressure is also discussed.

  13. Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport invariably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2000-08-08

    Reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in unsaturated fractured rocks has received increasing attention for studies of contaminant transport, groundwater quality, waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposits, sedimentary diagenesis, and fluid-rock interactions in hydrothermal systems. This paper presents methods for modeling geochemical systems that emphasize: (1) involvement of the gas phase in addition to liquid and solid phases in fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) treatment of physically and chemically heterogeneous and fractured rocks, (3) the effect of heat on fluid flow and reaction properties and processes, and (4) the kinetics of fluid-rock interaction. The physical and chemical process model is embodied in a system of partial differential equations for flow and transport, coupled to algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations for chemical interactions. For numerical solution, the continuum equations are discretized in space and time. Space discretization is based on a flexible integral finite difference approach that can use irregular gridding to model geologic structure; time is discretized fully implicitly as a first-order finite difference. Heterogeneous and fractured media are treated with a general multiple interacting continua method that includes double-porosity, dual-permeability, and multi-region models as special cases. A sequential iteration approach is used to treat the coupling between fluid flow and mass transport on the one hand, chemical reactions on the other. Applications of the methods developed here to variably saturated geochemical systems are presented in a companion paper (part 2, this issue).

  14. Building Common Ground for Environmental Flows using Traditional Techniques and Novel Engagement Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott Lacroix, Kelly E.; Xiu, Brittany C.; Megdal, Sharon B.

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased understanding of the science of environmental flows, identification and implementation of effective environmental flow policies remains elusive. Perhaps the greatest barrier to implementing flow policies is the framework for water management. An alternative management approach is needed when legal rights for environmental flows do not exist, or are ineffective at protecting ecosystems. The research presented here, conducted in the U.S. state of Arizona, provides an empirical example of engagement to promote social learning as an approach to finding ways to provide water for the environment where legal rights for environmental flows are inadequate. Based on our engagement process we propose that identifying and then building common ground require attention to the process of analyzing qualitative data and the methods for displaying complex information, two aspects not frequently discussed in the social learning or stakeholder engagement literature. The results and methods from this study can help communities develop an engagement process that will find and build common ground, increase stakeholder involvement, and identify innovative solutions to provide water for the environment that reflect the concerns of current water users.

  15. Preferential Water Flow in a Frozen Soil - a Two-Domain Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähli, Manfred; Jansson, Per-Erik; Lundin, Lars-Christer

    1996-10-01

    Earlier modelling studies have shown the difficulty of accurately simulating snowmelt infiltration into frozen soil using the hydraulic model approach. Comparison of model outputs and field measurements have inferred the occurrence of rapid flow even during periods when the soil is still partly frozen. A one-dimensional, physically based soil water and heat model (SOIL) has been complemented with a new two-domain approach option to simulate preferential flow through frozen layers. The ice is assumed to be first formed at the largest water filled pore upon freezing. Infiltrating water may be conducted rapidly through previously air-filled pores which are not occupied by ice. A minor fraction of water is slowly transferred within the liquid water domain, which is absorbed by the solid particles. A model validation with field measurements at a location in the middle-east of Sweden indicated that the two-domain approach was suitable for improving the prediction of drainage during snowmelting. In particular, the correlation between simulated and observed onset of drainage in spring was improved. The validation also showed that the effect of the high flow domain was highly sensitive to the degree of saturation in the topsoil during freezing, as well as to the hydraulic properties at the lower frost boundary regulating the upward water flow to the frozen soil and ice formation.

  16. High-energy ions produced by two approaching flow fronts in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, H.; Ieda, A.; Machida, S.; Imada, S.

    2015-12-01

    During a substorm event in 2009, THEMIS probes observed high-energy (≲ 1MeV) ions and characteristic time evolution of the differential flux. The high-energy ions seem to be produced in the magnetotail, but existing acceleration theories cannot explain the production of such high-energy ions due to the limitation of dawn-dusk (DD) flow scale. We propose that if two approaching flow fronts exist simultaneously in the magnetotail, the production of high-energy ions can be achieved. Namely, some ideal ions are repeatedly reflected by the two fronts and accelerated to high energies, exceeding the energy-limit given by the product of the duskward electric field and DD scale length of the flows. In addition, this acceleration model similar to "first-order Fermi acceleration" can produce the observed differential flux change. We have analytically calculated the energy-gain of each ion between two approaching flow fronts, and roughly estimated the efficiency of the acceleration and the spectrum change. In order to include the DD flow scale, we have further performed a spatially 1-D (2-D in velocity) test particle simulation where a couple of flow fronts approach each other. Using the simulation, we have confirmed the production of high-energy ions as well as the change of the energy spectrum of ions associated with the acceleration. The simulation result shows that high-energy ions can be produced with shorter DD scale length compared to that of the simple acceleration for trapped particles in the flow front. If we assume that the DD scale length of the flow is 10Re, the simulated ion maximum energy near 1MeV and differential flux change are similar to those of the observation. This scale length is less than half of the length needed for the product with the duskward electric field to produce 1MeV ions. This estimated 10Re flow scale in that event does not contradict previous studies.

  17. Sequential approach to joint flow-seismic inversion for improved characterization of fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Peter K.; Zheng, Yingcai; Fang, Xinding; Wojcik, Rafal; McLaughlin, Dennis; Brown, Stephen; Fehler, Michael C.; Burns, Daniel R.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    Seismic interpretation of subsurface structures is traditionally performed without any account of flow behavior. Here we present a methodology for characterizing fractured geologic reservoirs by integrating flow and seismic data. The key element of the proposed approach is the identification—within the inversion—of the intimate relation between fracture compliance and fracture transmissivity, which determine the acoustic and flow responses of a fractured reservoir, respectively. Owing to the strong (but highly uncertain) dependence of fracture transmissivity on fracture compliance, the modeled flow response in a fractured reservoir is highly sensitive to the geophysical interpretation. By means of synthetic models, we show that by incorporating flow data (well pressures and tracer breakthrough curves) into the inversion workflow, we can simultaneously reduce the error in the seismic interpretation and improve predictions of the reservoir flow dynamics. While the inversion results are robust with respect to noise in the data for this synthetic example, the applicability of the methodology remains to be tested for more complex synthetic models and field cases.

  18. A new approach to wall modeling in LES of incompressible flow via function enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krank, Benjamin; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2016-07-01

    A novel approach to wall modeling for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations including flows of moderate and large Reynolds numbers is presented. The basic idea is that a problem-tailored function space allows prediction of turbulent boundary layer gradients with very coarse meshes. The proposed function space consists of a standard polynomial function space plus an enrichment, which is constructed using Spalding's law-of-the-wall. The enrichment function is not enforced but "allowed" in a consistent way and the overall methodology is much more general and also enables other enrichment functions. The proposed method is closely related to detached-eddy simulation as near-wall turbulence is modeled statistically and large eddies are resolved in the bulk flow. Interpreted in terms of a three-scale separation within the variational multiscale method, the standard scale resolves large eddies and the enrichment scale represents boundary layer turbulence in an averaged sense. The potential of the scheme is shown applying it to turbulent channel flow of friction Reynolds numbers from Reτ = 590 and up to 5,000, flow over periodic constrictions at the Reynolds numbers ReH = 10 , 595 and 19,000 as well as backward-facing step flow at Reh = 5 , 000, all with extremely coarse meshes. Excellent agreement with experimental and DNS data is observed with the first grid point located at up to y1+ = 500 and especially under adverse pressure gradients as well as in separated flows.

  19. A Fundamental Approach to the Simulation of Flow and Dispersion in Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1983-12-15

    Fracture systems may be generalized in terms of number and orientation of sets of parallel fractures and the distribution of length, width, thickness and separation. Borehole measurements may be used to particularize these parameters for a specific site. Global flow and dispersion in an aquifer occur in the interconnected fractures and may be related to specific fracture elements. A fluid dynamics code named SALE has been used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for laminar flow in these elemental geometries. A marker particle calculation has been added to characterize longitudinal dispersion due to the velocity profile across the fracture and lateral dispersion due to flow disturbances at junctions. Local flow and dispersion in the matrix occur in the finer fracture structure and are evaluated using porous media approaches. These results or models are integrated in a 2D isothermal reservoir simulator named FRACSL. Discrete fractures are superimposed on the edges or diagnoals of rectangular grid elements. Water may flow from node to node through the matrix or through the fracture. The heads are found by iterating for the distribution which conserves the appropriate local mass. Marker particles are used to monitor the tracer dispersion due to motion in the fractures, in the matrix and between the two. Results are given showing flow and dispersion in an orthogonal junction and in a sample fractured reservoir.

  20. Issues and approach to develop validated analysis tools for hypersonic flows: One perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1993-01-01

    Critical issues concerning the modeling of low density hypervelocity flows where thermochemical nonequilibrium effects are pronounced are discussed. Emphasis is on the development of validated analysis tools, and the activity in the NASA Ames Research Center's Aerothermodynamics Branch is described. Inherent in the process is a strong synergism between ground test and real gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Approaches to develop and/or enhance phenomenological models and incorporate them into computational flowfield simulation codes are discussed. These models were partially validated with experimental data for flows where the gas temperature is raised (compressive flows). Expanding flows, where temperatures drop, however, exhibit somewhat different behavior. Experimental data for these expanding flow conditions is sparse and reliance must be made on intuition and guidance from computational chemistry to model transport processes under these conditions. Ground based experimental studies used to provide necessary data for model development and validation are described. Included are the performance characteristics of high enthalpy flow facilities, such as shock tubes and ballistic ranges.

  1. A modified fluorescent microsphere-based approach for determining resting and hyperemic blood flows in individual murine skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Trevor R.; Hoying, James B.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a modified fluorescent microsphere-based approach for measuring resting and hyperemic blood flows in individual mouse skeletal muscles. Absolute resting blood flow in the left gracilis posterior was 1.04±0.12 ml·min−1·g−1, while functional hyperemia following muscle activity was 5.94±1.33 ml·min−1·g−1. Measuring absolute blood flow requires sampling arterial blood that serves as a flow-rate and concentration reference to the fluorescent microsphere (FMS) content in the tissue-of-interest for calculating the flow value. Because sampling arterial blood can impair cardiovascular function in the mouse, we also modified our FMS approach to determine relative blood flows in the left gracilis posterior by using the contralateral muscle as our reference in blood flow calculations. Absolute and relative hyperemia measurements detect similar increases in blood flow — 521.93±216.76% and 555.24±213.82%, respectively. However, sampling arterial blood during absolute blood flow measurements significantly decreased mean arterial pressure from the beginning to the end of our experiments, from 102.7±2.18 to 75.5±9.71 mm Hg. This decrease was not seen when measuring relative blood flows. This approach provides critical advantages over contemporary blood flow measurement approaches by allowing blood flow measurements in small and non-superficial tissues. PMID:17500044

  2. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's current approach to forecasting lava flow hazards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Hawaiian Volcanoes are best known for their frequent basaltic eruptions, which typically start with fast-moving channelized `a`a flows fed by high eruptions rates. If the flows continue, they generally transition into pahoehoe flows, fed by lower eruption rates, after a few days to weeks. Kilauea Volcano's ongoing eruption illustrates this--since 1986, effusion at Kilauea has mostly produced pahoehoe. The current state of lava flow simulation is quite advanced, but the simplicity of the models mean that they are most appropriately used during the first, most vigorous, days to weeks of an eruption - during the effusion of `a`a flows. Colleagues at INGV in Catania have shown decisively that MAGFLOW simulations utilizing satellite-derived eruption rates can be effective at estimating hazards during the initial periods of an eruption crisis. However, the algorithms do not simulate the complexity of pahoehoe flows. Forecasts of lava flow hazards are the most common form of volcanic hazard assessments made in Hawai`i. Communications with emergency managers over the last decade have relied on simple steepest-descent line maps, coupled with empirical lava flow advance rate information, to portray the imminence of lava flow hazard to nearby communities. Lavasheds, calculated as watersheds, are used as a broader context for the future flow paths and to advise on the utility of diversion efforts, should they be contemplated. The key is to communicate the uncertainty of any approach used to formulate a forecast and, if the forecast uses simple tools, these communications can be fairly straightforward. The calculation of steepest-descent paths and lavasheds relies on the accuracy of the digital elevation model (DEM) used, so the choice of DEM is critical. In Hawai`i, the best choice is not the most recent but is a 1980s-vintage 10-m DEM--more recent LIDAR and satellite radar DEM are referenced to the ellipsoid and include vegetation effects. On low-slope terrain, steepest

  3. Some Approaches to Modeling Diffuse Flow at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Lowell, R. P.; Craft, K.; Germanovich, L. N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain a sound understanding of subsurface temperatures and the extent of the subsurface biosphere in young oceanic crust, one must understand the mechanisms of diffuse flow at oceanic spreading centers. Mathematical modeling of diffuse flow at oceanic spreading centers has received relatively little attention compared to high-temperature black smoker discharge, in part because the temperature and fluid flow data required to constrain the models are scarce. We review a number of different approaches to modelling diffuse flow: (1) The simplest method considers 1-D steady-state uniform upflow from below subject to a heat transfer boundary condition at the surface, which represents the effects of mixing of hydrothermal fluid with seawater. These models, in which the heat transfer coefficient and the velocity of the ascending fluid are constrained by observed diffuse flow vent temperature and heat flux, typically result in a steep temperature gradient near the seafloor and subsurface biological activity may be limited to the upper few cm of the crust. (2) A related method uses data on the partitioning of heat flux between focused and diffuse flow and chemical data from the focused and diffuse flow components in a two-limb single pass modeling approach to determine the fraction of high-temperature fluid that is incorporated in the diffuse flow. Using data available from EPR 950', the Main Endeavour Field, and ASHES vent field at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge in conjunction with Mg as a passive tracer, we find that the mixing ratio of high temperature in diffuse flow is <10%. The high-temperature contribution to the diffuse heat flux remains large, however, and high-temperature vent fluid ultimately contributes ~ 90% of the total heat output from the vent field. In these models mixing between high-temperature fluid and seawater may occur over a considerable depth, and the subsurface biosphere may be ~ 100 m deep beneath diffuse flow sites. (3) Finally, in

  4. The design/analysis of flows through turbomachinery - A viscous/inviscid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. P.; Reddy, D. R.

    1991-06-01

    A new design/analysis system for the flows through turbomachinery is currently being developed for studying turbomachinery problems with an axisymmetric viscous/inviscid 'average-passage' throughflow code. The advantage of this approach, compared to streamline curvature codes, is that the solutions obtained simulate some of the unsteadiness, compressibility and viscous effects of a multistage turbomachine. The design/analysis system consists of three elemental parts, the axisymmetric block grid generator, the blade surface element code, and the axisymmetric flow code. Each element of the system will be discussed and the flow solutions for three axisymmetric geometries will be shown compared to experimental data where available. The computations are shown to be in very good agreement with test data for SR7 spinner body and transonic boattail geometry obtained in the wind tunnels at NASA Lewis Research Center. The VIADAC Rotor 67 Fan results were compared to PARC2D calculated results and shown to be in very good agreement.

  5. Navier-Stokes simulation of transonic wing flow fields using a zonal grid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.

    1988-01-01

    The transonic Navier-Stokes code was used to simulate flow fields about isolated wings for workshop wind-tunnel and free-air cases using the thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit finite-difference scheme based on a diagonal version of the Beam-Warming algorithm was used to integrate the governing equations. A zonal grid approach was used to allow efficient grid refinement near the wing surface. The flow field was sensitive to the turbulent transition model, and flow unsteadiness was observed for a wind-tunnel case but not for the corresponding free-air case. The specification of experimental pressure at the wind-tunnel exit plane is the primary reason for the difference of these two numerical solutions.

  6. The moving boundary approach to modeling gravity-driven stable and unstable flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindt, Naaran; Wallach, Rony

    2016-04-01

    Many field and laboratory studies in the last 40 years have found that water flow in homogeneous soil profiles may occur in preferential flow pathways rather than in a laterally uniform wetting front, as expected from classical soil physics theory and expressed by the Richards equation. The water-content distribution within such gravity-driven fingers was found to be nonmonotonic due to water accumulation behind a sharp wetting front (denoted as saturation overshoot). The unstable flow was first related to soil coarseness. However, its appearance in water-repellent soils led the authors to hypothesize that gravity-driven unstable flow formation is triggered by a non-zero contact angle between water and soil particles. Despite its widespread occurrence, a macroscopic-type model describing the nonmonotonic water distribution and sharp wetting front is still lacking. The moving boundary approach, which divides the flow domain into two well-defined subdomains with a sharp change in fluid saturation between them, is suggested to replace the classical approach of solving the Richards equation for the entire flow domain. The upper subdomain consists of water and air, whose relationship varies with space and time following the imposed boundary condition at the soil surface as calculated by the Richards equation. The lower subdomain also consists of water and air, but their relationship remains constant following the predetermined initial condition. The moving boundary between the two subdomains is the sharp wetting front, whose location is part of the solution. As such, the problem is inherently nonlinear. The wetting front's movement is controlled by the dynamic water-entry pressure of the soil, which depends on soil wettability and the front's propagation rate. A lower soil wettability, which hinders the spontaneous invasion of dry pores and increases the water-entry pressure, induces a sharp wetting front and water accumulation behind it. The wetting front starts to

  7. A hydrogeological conceptual approach to study urban groundwater flow in Bucharest city, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhemacha, Mohamed Amine; Gogu, Constantin Radu; Serpescu, Irina; Gaitanaru, Dragos; Bica, Ioan

    2015-05-01

    Management of groundwater systems in urban areas is necessary and can be reliably performed by means of mathematical modeling combined with geospatial analysis. A conceptual approach for the study of urban hydrogeological systems is presented. The proposed approach is based on the features of Bucharest city (Romania) and can be adapted to other urban areas showing similar characteristics. It takes into account the interaction between groundwater and significant urban infrastructure elements that can be encountered in modern cities such as subway tunnels and water-supply networks, and gives special attention to the sewer system. In this respect, an adaptation of the leakage factor approach is proposed, which uses a sewer-system zoning function related to the conduits' location in the aquifer system and a sewer-conduits classification function related to their structural and/or hydraulic properties. The approach was used to elaborate a single-layered steady state groundwater flow model for a pilot zone of Bucharest city.

  8. A triple-continuum approach for modeling flow and transport processes in fractured rock.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Liu, H H; Bodvarsson, G S

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a triple-continuum conceptual model for simulating flow and transport processes in fractured rock. Field data collected from the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, a repository site of high-level nuclear waste, show a large number of small-scale fractures. The effect of these small fractures has not been considered in previous modeling investigations within the context of a continuum approach. A new triple-continuum model (consisting of matrix, small-fracture, and large-fracture continua) has been developed to investigate the effect of these small fractures. This paper derives the model formulation and discusses the basic triple-continuum behavior of flow and transport processes under different conditions, using both analytical solutions and numerical approaches. The simulation results from the site-scale model of the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain indicate that these small fractures may have an important effect on radionuclide transport within the mountain. PMID:15336793

  9. Approaching a universal scaling relationship between fracture stiffness and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.; Nolte, David D.

    2016-02-01

    A goal of subsurface geophysical monitoring is the detection and characterization of fracture alterations that affect the hydraulic integrity of a site. Achievement of this goal requires a link between the mechanical and hydraulic properties of a fracture. Here we present a scaling relationship between fluid flow and fracture-specific stiffness that approaches universality. Fracture-specific stiffness is a mechanical property dependent on fracture geometry that can be monitored remotely using seismic techniques. A Monte Carlo numerical approach demonstrates that a scaling relationship exists between flow and stiffness for fractures with strongly correlated aperture distributions, and continues to hold for fractures deformed by applied stress and by chemical erosion as well. This new scaling relationship provides a foundation for simulating changes in fracture behaviour as a function of stress or depth in the Earth and will aid risk assessment of the hydraulic integrity of subsurface sites.

  10. Approaching a universal scaling relationship between fracture stiffness and fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J; Nolte, David D

    2016-01-01

    A goal of subsurface geophysical monitoring is the detection and characterization of fracture alterations that affect the hydraulic integrity of a site. Achievement of this goal requires a link between the mechanical and hydraulic properties of a fracture. Here we present a scaling relationship between fluid flow and fracture-specific stiffness that approaches universality. Fracture-specific stiffness is a mechanical property dependent on fracture geometry that can be monitored remotely using seismic techniques. A Monte Carlo numerical approach demonstrates that a scaling relationship exists between flow and stiffness for fractures with strongly correlated aperture distributions, and continues to hold for fractures deformed by applied stress and by chemical erosion as well. This new scaling relationship provides a foundation for simulating changes in fracture behaviour as a function of stress or depth in the Earth and will aid risk assessment of the hydraulic integrity of subsurface sites. PMID:26868649

  11. Approaching a universal scaling relationship between fracture stiffness and fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.; Nolte, David D.

    2016-01-01

    A goal of subsurface geophysical monitoring is the detection and characterization of fracture alterations that affect the hydraulic integrity of a site. Achievement of this goal requires a link between the mechanical and hydraulic properties of a fracture. Here we present a scaling relationship between fluid flow and fracture-specific stiffness that approaches universality. Fracture-specific stiffness is a mechanical property dependent on fracture geometry that can be monitored remotely using seismic techniques. A Monte Carlo numerical approach demonstrates that a scaling relationship exists between flow and stiffness for fractures with strongly correlated aperture distributions, and continues to hold for fractures deformed by applied stress and by chemical erosion as well. This new scaling relationship provides a foundation for simulating changes in fracture behaviour as a function of stress or depth in the Earth and will aid risk assessment of the hydraulic integrity of subsurface sites. PMID:26868649

  12. An approach to the segmentation of multi-page document flow using binary classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agin, Onur; Ulas, Cagdas; Ahat, Mehmet; Bekar, Can

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a method for segmentation of document page flow applied to heterogeneous real bank documents. The approach is based on the content of images and it also incorporates font based features inside the documents. Our method involves a bag of visual words (BoVW) model on the designed image based feature descriptors and a novel approach to combine the consecutive pages of a document into a single feature vector that represents the transition between these pages. The transitions here could be represented by one of the two different classes: continuity of the same document or beginning of a new document. Using the transition feature vectors, we utilize three different binary classifiers to make predictions on the relationship between consecutive pages. Our initial results demonstrate that the proposed method can exhibit promising performance for document flow segmentation at this stage.

  13. The Effect of Manning's Roughness Calibration on Flow and Sediment transport in Wetlands: Vegetation Drag Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, M.; Nalesso, M.; Garcia, R. F.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.

    2013-05-01

    cells in LILA. The constant flowing cell, M2, was selected as the study area. Flow was simulated using FLO2D, a FEMA approved program that simulates flow depth and velocity by using modified manning's roughness coefficient based on vegetation drag approach. The result of this simulation will provide an improved understanding of the effect of vegetation dynamics on hydrology and how different vegetation type and density may change flow velocity and therefore sediment transport over time.

  14. A genetic algorithm-based approach to flexible flow-line scheduling with variable lot sizes.

    PubMed

    Lee, I; Sikora, R; Shaw, M J

    1997-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been used widely for such combinatorial optimization problems as the traveling salesman problem (TSP), the quadratic assignment problem (QAP), and job shop scheduling. In all of these problems there is usually a well defined representation which GA's use to solve the problem. We present a novel approach for solving two related problems-lot sizing and sequencing-concurrently using GAs. The essence of our approach lies in the concept of using a unified representation for the information about both the lot sizes and the sequence and enabling GAs to evolve the chromosome by replacing primitive genes with good building blocks. In addition, a simulated annealing procedure is incorporated to further improve the performance. We evaluate the performance of applying the above approach to flexible flow line scheduling with variable lot sizes for an actual manufacturing facility, comparing it to such alternative approaches as pair wise exchange improvement, tabu search, and simulated annealing procedures. The results show the efficacy of this approach for flexible flow line scheduling. PMID:18255838

  15. A simplified approach for the computation of steady two-phase flow in inverted siphons.

    PubMed

    Diogo, A Freire; Oliveira, Maria C

    2016-01-15

    Hydraulic, sanitary, and sulfide control conditions of inverted siphons, particularly in large wastewater systems, can be substantially improved by continuous air injection in the base of the inclined rising branch. This paper presents a simplified approach that was developed for the two-phase flow of the rising branch using the energy equation for a steady pipe flow, based on the average fluid fraction, observed slippage between phases, and isothermal assumption. As in a conventional siphon design, open channel steady uniform flow is assumed in inlet and outlet chambers, corresponding to the wastewater hydraulic characteristics in the upstream and downstream sewers, and the descending branch operates in steady uniform single-phase pipe flow. The proposed approach is tested and compared with data obtained in an experimental siphon setup with two plastic barrels of different diameters operating separately as in a single-barrel siphon. Although the formulations developed are very simple, the results show a good adjustment for the set of the parameters used and conditions tested and are promising mainly for sanitary siphons with relatively moderate heights of the ascending branch. PMID:26517278

  16. Computation of wall bounded flows with heat transfer in the framework of SRS approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritskevich, M. S.; Garbaruk, A. V.; Menter, F. R.

    2014-12-01

    A detailed assessment of Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) and Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES) is performed for prediction of heat transfer for several wall bounded flow. For that purpose a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, a backward facing step, and a thermal mixing in a T-Junction test cases are considered. The results, obtained with the use of ANSYS-FLUENT, show that both approaches are capable to predict both mean and RMS velocity and temperature with sufficient accuracy.

  17. Advanced digital methods for blood flow flux analysis using µPIV approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Timoshina, Polina A.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    A digital optical system focused on work with laboratory animals for intravital capillaroscopy has been developed. It implements the particle image velocimetry (PIV) based approach for measurements of red blood cells velocity in laboratory rat stomach capillaries. We propose a method of involuntary displacement compensation of the capillary network images. Image stabilization algorithm is based on correlation of feature tracking. The efficiency of designed image stabilization algorithm was experimentally demonstrated. The results of capillary blood flow analysis are demonstrated.

  18. Large-eddy simulation of approaching-flow stratification on dispersion over arrays of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zheng-Tong; Hayden, Paul; Wood, Curtis R.

    2013-06-01

    The study investigates thermal stratification effects of approach flows on dispersion in urban environments. This is in some ways analogous to a well-developed non-neutral flow (e.g. through a large urban area) approaching a neighbourhood-scale urban region, where the effect of the local heat transfer was assumed less important. A generic urban-type geometry, i.e. a group of staggered cubes, was taken as the first test case. The DAPPLE site, which was about a one-km2 region near the intersection of Marylebone Road and Gloucester Place in central London, was taken as the second test case. Only weakly unstable conditions (i.e. bulk Richardson number R≥-0.2) of approach flows were considered, with adiabatic boundary conditions at the ground and building surfaces. A number of numerical experiments were performed. The modelled mean concentration for Rb = -0.1 gave the best agreement with the field data at all DAPPLE stations. This suggests that stratification effects on dispersion in weakly unstable conditions (e.g. in London) are not negligible.

  19. The application of computational fluid dynamics to natural river channels: Eddy resolving versus mean flow approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keylock, C. J.; Constantinescu, G.; Hardy, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    In the last decade, as computing power has increased, there has been an explosion in the use of eddy-resolving numerical methods in the engineering, earth and environmental sciences. For complex geomorphic flows, where accurate field investigations are difficult to perform and where experiments may be difficult to scale, these numerical approaches are beginning to give key insights into the nature of these flows. Eddy-resolving methods such as Large and Detached Eddy Simulation (LES/DES) may be contrasted with the time-averaged, three-dimensional simulations that only really began to be applied seriously in geomorphology fifteen years ago. While the potential of LES for geomorphology has been examined previously, DES is a relatively recent method that deserves further consideration. In this paper, we explain the method and then utilise examples from meander and confluence flows, as well as flow near the bed of a gravel bed river, to highlight the improvements to both the representation of the mean flow, and to the representation of time-varying processes, that result from the use of LES/DES. Some suggestions are provided for the future use of such techniques in geomorphology.

  20. Creating a Simple Single Computational Approach to Modeling Rarefied and Continuum Flow About Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.

    1997-01-01

    We proposed to create a single computational code incorporating methods that can model both rarefied and continuum flow to enable the efficient simulation of flow about space craft and high altitude hypersonic aerospace vehicles. The code was to use a single grid structure that permits a smooth transition between the continuum and rarefied portions of the flow. Developing an appropriate computational boundary between the two regions represented a major challenge. The primary approach chosen involves coupling a four-speed Lattice Boltzmann model for the continuum flow with the DSMC method in the rarefied regime. We also explored the possibility of using a standard finite difference Navier Stokes solver for the continuum flow. With the resulting code we will ultimately investigate three-dimensional plume impingement effects, a subject of critical importance to NASA and related to the work of Drs. Forrest Lumpkin, Steve Fitzgerald and Jay Le Beau at Johnson Space Center. Below is a brief background on the project and a summary of the results as of the end of the grant.

  1. A network theory approach for a better understanding of overland flow connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselink, Rens; Heckmann, Tobias; Temme, Arnaud; Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological connectivity describes the physical coupling, or linkages of different elements within a landscape regarding (sub)surface flows. A firm understanding of hydrological connectivity is important for catchment management applications, for e.g. habitat and species protection, and for flood resistance and resilience improvement. Thinking about (geomorphological) systems as networks can lead to new insights, which has been recognised within the scientific community as well, seeing the recent increase in the use of network (graph) theory within the geosciences. Network theory supports the analysis and understanding of complex systems by providing data structures for modelling objects and their linkages, and a versatile toolbox to quantitatively appraise network structure and properties. The objective of this study was to characterise overland flow connectivity dynamics on hillslopes in a humid sub-Mediterranean environment by using a combination of high-resolution digital-terrain models, overland flow sensors and a network approach. Results showed that there are significant differences between overland flow on agricultural areas and semi-natural shrubs areas. Positive correlations between connectivity and precipitation characteristics were found, while negative correlations between connectivity and soil moisture were found, probably due to soil water repellency. The combination of a structural network to determine potential connectivity with dynamic networks to determine the actual connectivity proved a powerful tool in analysing overland flow connectivity.

  2. Stochastic analysis of bounded unsaturated flow in heterogeneous aquifers: Spectral/perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a stochastic analysis of steady state flow in a bounded, partially saturated heterogeneous porous medium subject to distributed infiltration. The presence of boundary conditions leads to non-uniformity in the mean unsaturated flow, which in turn causes non-stationarity in the statistics of velocity fields. Motivated by this, our aim is to investigate the impact of boundary conditions on the behavior of field-scale unsaturated flow. Within the framework of spectral theory based on Fourier-Stieltjes representations for the perturbed quantities, the general expressions for the pressure head variance, variance of log unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and variance of the specific discharge are presented in the wave number domain. Closed-form expressions are developed for the simplified case of statistical isotropy of the log hydraulic conductivity field with a constant soil pore-size distribution parameter. These expressions allow us to investigate the impact of the boundary conditions, namely the vertical infiltration from the soil surface and a prescribed pressure head at a certain depth below the soil surface. It is found that the boundary conditions are critical in predicting uncertainty in bounded unsaturated flow. Our analytical expression for the pressure head variance in a one-dimensional, heterogeneous flow domain, developed using a nonstationary spectral representation approach [Li S-G, McLaughlin D. A nonstationary spectral method for solving stochastic groundwater problems: unconditional analysis. Water Resour Res 1991;27(7):1589-605; Li S-G, McLaughlin D. Using the nonstationary spectral method to analyze flow through heterogeneous trending media. Water Resour Res 1995; 31(3):541-51], is precisely equivalent to the published result of Lu et al. [Lu Z, Zhang D. Analytical solutions to steady state unsaturated flow in layered, randomly heterogeneous soils via Kirchhoff transformation. Adv Water Resour 2004;27:775-84].

  3. A Stochastic Differential Equation Approach To Multiphase Flow In Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D.; Russell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The motivation for using stochastic differential equations in multiphase flow systems stems from our work in developing an upscaling methodology for single phase flow. The long term goals of this project include: I. Extending this work to a nonlinear upscaling methodology II. Developing a macro-scale stochastic theory of multiphase flow and transport that accounts for micro-scale heterogeneities and interfaces. In this talk, we present a stochastic differential equation approach to multiphase flow, a typical example of which is flow in the unsaturated domain. Specifically, a two phase problem is studied which consists of a wetting phase and a non-wetting phase. The approach given results in a nonlinear stochastic differential equation describing the position of the non-wetting phase fluid particle. Our fundamental assumption is that the flow of fluid particles is described by a stochastic process and that the positions of the fluid particles over time are governed by the law of the process. It is this law which we seek to determine. The nonlinearity in the stochastic differential equation arises because both the drift and diffusion coefficients depend on the volumetric fraction of the phase which in turn depends on the position of the fluid particles in the experimental domain. The concept of a fluid particle is central to the development of the model described in this talk. Expressions for both saturation and volumetric fraction are developed using the fluid particle concept. Darcy's law and the continuity equation are then used to derive a Fokker-Planck equation using these expressions. The Ito calculus is then applied to derive a stochastic differential equation for the non-wetting phase. This equation has both drift and diffusion terms which depend on the volumetric fraction of the non-wetting phase. Standard stochastic theories based on the Ito calculus and the Wiener process and the equivalent Fokker-Planck PDE's are typically used to model dispersion

  4. A scenario neutral approach to assess low flow sensitivity to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauquet, Eric; Prudhomme, Christel

    2015-04-01

    Most impact studies of climate change on river flow regime are performed following top-down approaches, where changes in hydrological characteristics are obtained from rainfall-runoff models forced by downscaled projections provided by GCMs. However, such approaches are not always considered robust enough to bridge the gap between climate research and stake holders needs to develop relevant adaptation strategy (Wilby et al., 2014). Alternatively, 'bottom-up' approaches can be applied to climate change impact studies on water resources to assess the intrinsic vulnerability of the catchments and ultimately help to prioritize adaptation actions for areas highly sensitive to small deviations from the present-day climate conditions. A general framework combining the scenario-neutral methodology developed by Prudhomme et al. (2010) and climate elasticity analyses (Sankarasubramanian et al., 2001) is presented and applied to measure the vulnerability of low flows and droughts on a large dataset of more than 400 French gauged basins. The different steps involved in the suggested framework are: - Calibration of the GR5J rainfall runoff model (Pushpalatha et al., 2011) against observations, - Identification of the main climate factors influencing low flows, - Definition of the sensitivity domain for precipitation (P), temperature (T) and potential evapotranspiration (PE) scenarios consistent with most recent climate change projections, - Derivation of the response surface describing changes in low flow and drought regime in terms of severity, duration and seasonality (Catalogne, 2012), - Uncertainty assessment. Results are the basis for a classification of river basins according to their sensitivity at national scale and for discussions on adaptation requirements with stakeholders. Catalogne C (2012) Amélioration des méthodes de prédétermination des débits de référence d'étiage en sites peu ou pas jaugés. PHD thesis, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, 285 pp

  5. An Aerial-Image Dense Matching Approach Based on Optical Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Chen, Shiyu; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Jianya; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    Dense matching plays an important role in many fields, such as DEM (digital evaluation model) producing, robot navigation and 3D environment reconstruction. Traditional approaches may meet the demand of accuracy. But the calculation time and out puts density is hardly be accepted. Focus on the matching efficiency and complex terrain surface matching feasibility an aerial image dense matching method based on optical flow field is proposed in this paper. First, some high accurate and uniformed control points are extracted by using the feature based matching method. Then the optical flow is calculated by using these control points, so as to determine the similar region between two images. Second, the optical flow field is interpolated by using the multi-level B-spline interpolation in the similar region and accomplished the pixel by pixel coarse matching. Final, the results related to the coarse matching refinement based on the combined constraint, which recognizes the same points between images. The experimental results have shown that our method can achieve per-pixel dense matching points, the matching accuracy achieves sub-pixel level, and fully meet the three-dimensional reconstruction and automatic generation of DSM-intensive matching's requirements. The comparison experiments demonstrated that our approach's matching efficiency is higher than semi-global matching (SGM) and Patch-based multi-view stereo matching (PMVS) which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  6. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  7. An integrated approach to the study of catastrophic debris-flows: geological hazard and human influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ventisette, C.; Garfagnoli, F.; Ciampalini, A.; Battistini, A.; Gigli, G.; Moretti, S.; Casagli, N.

    2012-09-01

    On 1 October 2009, a prolonged and intense rainstorm triggered hundreds of landslides (predominantly debris flows) in an area of about 50 km2 in the north-eastern sector of Sicily (Italy). Debris flows swept the highest parts of many villages and passed over the SS114 state highway and the Messina-Catania railway, causing more than 30 fatalities. This region has a high relief, due to recent uplift. The peculiar geological and geomorphological framework represents one of the most common predisposing causes of rainstorm-triggered debris flows. This paper deals with the geological and hydro-geomorphological studies performed as a part of the post-disaster activities operated in collaboration with Civil Protection Authority, with the aim at examining landslides effects and mechanisms. The data were elaborated into a GIS platform, to evaluate the influence of urbanisation on the drainage pattern, and were correlated with the lithological and structural framework of the area. Our study points at the evaluation of the volume involved, the detection of triggering mechanisms and the precise reconstruction of the influence of urbanisation as fundamental tools for understanding the dynamics of catastrophic landslides. This kind of analysis, including all the desirable approaches for the correct management of debris flow should be the starting point for robust urban planning.

  8. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  9. Exact Solutions for Stokes' Flow of a Non-Newtonian Nanofluid Model: A Lie Similarity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Taha; Aziz, A.; Khalique, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The fully developed time-dependent flow of an incompressible, thermodynamically compatible non-Newtonian third-grade nanofluid is investigated. The classical Stokes model is considered in which the flow is generated due to the motion of the plate in its own plane with an impulsive velocity. The Lie symmetry approach is utilised to convert the governing nonlinear partial differential equation into different linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The reduced ordinary differential equations are then solved by using the compatibility and generalised group method. Exact solutions for the model equation are deduced in the form of closed-form exponential functions which are not available in the literature before. In addition, we also derived the conservation laws associated with the governing model. Finally, the physical features of the pertinent parameters are discussed in detail through several graphs.

  10. Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ababou, R.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs.

  11. Assessing material flows in urban systems: an approach to maximize the use of incomplete data sets.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, G; Otterpohl, R

    2014-01-01

    Data scarcity and uncertainty are the main limiting factors for an integral evaluation of the urban water and wastewater management system (WWMS) in developing countries. The present research shows an approach to use incomplete data sets to analyse the flows of water and nitrogen and to make an integral evaluation of the WWMS at a case study city. By means of data validation and model adaptations the use of literature values is kept at the minimum possible and so the current trends for water consumption and pollution in the city are identified. The material flows were calculated as central values with a certain confidence range and met the selected plausibility criteria. Thus, the first essential step needed to identify the challenges and opportunities of future improvement strategies at the WWMS of the city was possible. PMID:25259505

  12. Emergency department overcrowding and long wait times: taking a corporate approach to improving patient flow.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Glen; Gaunt, Karen; Sinclair, Douglas; Trafford, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding and long wait times are major concerns in health systems the world over. Many ED-focused innovations--such as revising staff mix, improving internal processes and exploiting decision-support software--have been implemented to address these complex problems, often with limited success. Beginning in 2008, St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, which had some of the most challenging ED overcrowding and longest wait times in Ontario, has charted a different course. By taking an organization-wide corporate approach to the challenge of patient flow throughout the hospital, St. Michael's has significantly improved key ED flow metrics for both its admitted and non-admitted patients. PMID:25906463

  13. Application of the mobility power flow approach to structural response from distributed loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the vibration power flow through coupled substructures when one of the substructures is subjected to a distributed load is addressed. In all the work performed thus far, point force excitation was considered. However, in the case of the excitation of an aircraft fuselage, distributed loading on the whole surface of a panel can be as important as the excitation from directly applied forces at defined locations on the structures. Thus using a mobility power flow approach, expressions are developed for the transmission of vibrational power between two coupled plate substructures in an L configuration, with one of the surfaces of one of the plate substructures being subjected to a distributed load. The types of distributed loads that are considered are a force load with an arbitrary function in space and a distributed load similar to that from acoustic excitation.

  14. Numerical solution of transonic wing flows using an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Gundy, K. L.; Thomas, S. D.; Chaderjian, N. M.; Flores, J.

    1985-01-01

    Transonic flow fields about wing geometries are computed using an Euler/Navier-Stokes approach in which the flow field is divided into several zones. The grid zones immediately adjacent to the wing surface are suitably clustered and solved with the Navier-Stokes equations. Grid zones removed from the wing are less finely clustered and are solved with the Euler equations. Wind tunnel wall effects are easily and accurately modeled with the new grid-zoning algorithm because the wind tunnel grid is constructed as an exact subset of the corresponding free-air grid. Solutions are obtained that are in good agreement with experiment, including cases with significant wind tunnel wall effects and shock-induced separation on the upper wing surface.

  15. Computation of transonic separated wing flows using an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaynak, Uenver; Holst, Terry L.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program called Transonic Navier Stokes (TNS) has been developed which solves the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations around wings using a zonal grid approach. In the present zonal scheme, the physical domain of interest is divided into several subdomains called zones and the governing equations are solved interactively. The advantages of the Zonal Grid approach are as follows: (1) the grid for any subdomain can be generated easily; (2) grids can be, in a sense, adapted to the solution; (3) different equation sets can be used in different zones; and, (4) this approach allows for a convenient data base organization scheme. Using this code, separated flows on a NACA 0012 section wing and on the NASA Ames WING C have been computed. First, the effects of turbulence and artificial dissipation models incorporated into the code are assessed by comparing the TNS results with other CFD codes and experiments. Then a series of flow cases is described where data are available. The computed results, including cases with shock-induced separation, are in good agreement with experimental data. Finally, some futuristic cases are presented to demonstrate the abilities of the code for massively separated cases which do not have experimental data.

  16. Solving Stochastic Flexible Flow Shop Scheduling Problems with a Decomposition-Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Choi, S. H.

    2010-06-01

    Real manufacturing is dynamic and tends to suffer a lot of uncertainties. Research on production scheduling under uncertainty has recently received much attention. Although various approaches have been developed for scheduling under uncertainty, this problem is still difficult to tackle by any single approach, because of its inherent difficulties. This chapter describes a decomposition-based approach (DBA) for makespan minimisation of a flexible flow shop (FFS) scheduling problem with stochastic processing times. The DBA decomposes an FFS into several machine clusters which can be solved more easily by different approaches. A neighbouring K-means clustering algorithm is developed to firstly group the machines of an FFS into an appropriate number of machine clusters, based on a weighted cluster validity index. A back propagation network (BPN) is then adopted to assign either the Shortest Processing Time (SPT) Algorithm or the Genetic Algorithm (GA) to generate a sub-schedule for each machine cluster. After machine grouping and approach assignment, an overall schedule is generated by integrating the sub-schedules of the machine clusters. Computation results reveal that the DBA is superior to SPT and GA alone for FFS scheduling under stochastic processing times, and that it can be easily adapted to schedule FFS under other uncertainties.

  17. Experimental and modeling study of unsaturated solute flow in soils: from classical to discrete approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, K.

    2012-04-01

    Most dye staining experiments in natural soils result in highly heterogeneous flow patterns which are usually explained with presence of preferential flow paths or different kinds of flow instabilities. It is quite logic that soil structure is one of the main factors affecting infiltrations regimes, however the degree of flow stochasticity is not studied enough. In this contribution a substantial amount of large scale (2-4 m lateral excavations) field experiment data is considered (including forested hillslopes and agricultural fields) with special attention to sprinkling of two different staining substances with different dyeing mechanisms (common dye is visible both in adsorbed and in solution states; fluorescent dye - only in solution). The latter method allows an estimation of the flow stability (stochasticity). Most staining field experiments are supported by undisturbed sample collections (laboratory measurements for hydraulic conductivity, water retention curves, X-ray microtomography scans, grain size distributions, etc.). Preliminary results strongly support the evidence of stability of flow under similar precipitation and moisture conditions. Infiltration also correlated with soil structure and microproperties. Numerical modeling using classical approach (single-porosity coupled Richard's and advection-dispersion equations, random hydraulic properties based on log-normal experimentally obtained distribution) fails to describe experimentally obtained staining patterns. Multi-porosity models may provide better tools to account for different soil heterogeneities, but their parameters can not be obtained experimentally. Small scale solutions using pore-network or lattice-Botzmann methods based on microtomography scans are accurate, but computationally expensive (volumes around tens of cm3). Based on field observations a simple cellular automata approach to model staining patterns is developed and tested on experimental data. Our results are much better then

  18. Quantification of non-stormwater flow entries into storm drains using a water balance approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zuxin; Yin, Hailong; Li, Huaizheng

    2014-07-15

    To make decisions about correcting illicit or inappropriate connections to storm drains, quantification of non-stormwater entries into storm drains was performed using a water flow balance approach, based on data analysis from 2008 to 2011 in a separate storm drainage system in a Shanghai downtown area of 374 ha. The study revealed severe sewage connections to storm drains; meanwhile, misconnections between surface water and storm drains were found to drive frequent non-stormwater pumping discharges at the outfall, producing a much larger volume of outfall flows in a short period. This paper presented a methodology to estimate quantities of inappropriate sewage flow, groundwater infiltration and river water backflow into the storm drains. It was concluded that inappropriate sewage discharge and groundwater seepage into storm drains were approximately 17,860 m(3)/d (i.e., up to 51% of the total sewage flow in the catchment) and 3,624 m(3)/d, respectively, and surface water backflow was up to an average 28,593 m(3)/d. On the basis of this work, end-of-storm pipe interceptor sewers of 0.25 m(3)/s (i.e., 21,600 m(3)/d) would be effective to tackle the problem of sewage connections and groundwater seepage to storm drains. Under this circumstance, the follow-up non-stormwater outfall pumping events indicate misconnections between surface water and storm drains, featuring pumping discharge equivalent to surface water backflow; hence the misconnections should be repaired. The information provided here is helpful in estimating the magnitude of non-stormwater flow entries into storm drains and designing the necessary pollution control activities, as well as combating city floods in storm events. PMID:24793842

  19. Unified nonlinear approach to both weak and strong-interaction problems. [heat transfer in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Rodkiewicz, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The numerical results are obtained for heat transfer, skin-friction, and viscous interaction induced pressure for a step-wise accelerated flat plate in hypersonic flow. In the unified approach here the results are presented for both weak and strong-interaction problems without employing any linearization scheme. With the help of the numerical method used in this work an accurate prediction of wall shear can be made for the problems with plate velocity changes of 1% or larger. The obtained results indicate that the transient contribution to the induced pressure for helium is greater than that for air.

  20. A Multiblock Approach for Calculating Incompressible Fluid Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Whitfield, David L.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    1997-01-01

    A multiblock approach is presented for solving two-dimensional incompressible turbulent flows on unstructured grids. The artificial compressibility form of the governing equations is solved by a vertex-centered, finite-volume implicit scheme which uses a backward Euler time discretization. Point Gauss-Seidel relaxations are used to solve the linear system of equations at each time step. This work introduces a multiblock strategy to the solution procedure, which greatly improves the efficiency of the algorithm by significantly reducing the memory requirements while not increasing the CPU time. Results presented in this work shows that the current multiblock algorithm requires 70% less memory than the single block algorithm.

  1. Computing 3-D steady supersonic flow via a new Lagrangian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, C. Y.; Liou, M.-S.

    1993-01-01

    The new Lagrangian method introduced by Loh and Hui (1990) is extended for 3-D steady supersonic flow computation. Details of the conservation form, the implementation of the local Riemann solver, and the Godunov and the high resolution TVD schemes are presented. The new approach is robust yet accurate, capable of handling complicated geometry and reactions between discontinuous waves. It keeps all the advantages claimed in the 2-D method of Loh and Hui, e.g., crisp resolution for a slip surface (contact discontinuity) and automatic grid generation along the stream.

  2. Thermodynamically constrained averaging theory approach for modeling flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems: 3. Single-fluid-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2006-11-01

    This work is the third in a series of papers on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) approach to modeling flow and transport phenomena in multiscale porous medium systems. Building upon the general TCAT framework and the mathematical foundation presented in previous works in this series, we demonstrate the TCAT approach for the case of single-fluid-phase flow. The formulated model is based upon conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy and a general entropy inequality constraint, which is developed to guide model closure. A specific example of a closed model is derived under limiting assumptions using a linearization approach and these results are compared and contrasted with the traditional single-phase-flow model. Potential extensions to this work are discussed. Specific advancements in this work beyond previous averaging theory approaches to single-phase flow include use of macroscale thermodynamics that is averaged from the microscale, the use of derived equilibrium conditions to guide a flux-force pair approach to simplification, use of a general Lagrange multiplier approach to connect conservation equation constraints to the entropy inequality, and a focus on producing complete, closed models that are solvable.

  3. Soil Moisture Flow and Nitrate Movement Simulation through Deep and Heterogeneous Vadose Zone using Dual-porosity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, B. K.; Tomar, J.; Harter, T.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate nitrate movement from non-point sources in deep, heterogeneous vadose zones, using multi-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations. We hypothesize that porous media heterogeneity causes saturation variability that leads to preferential flow systems such that a significant portion of the vadose zone does not significantly contribute to flow. We solve Richards' equation and the advection-dispersion equation to simulate soil moisture and nitrate transport regimes in plot-scale experiments conducted in the San Joaquin Valley, California. We compare equilibrium against non-equilibrium (dual-porosity) approaches. In the equilibrium approach we consider each soil layer to have unique hydraulic properties as a whole, while in the dual-porosity approach we assume that large fractions of the porous flow domain are immobile. However we consider exchange of water and solute between mobile and immobile zone using the appropriate mass transfer terms. The results indicate that flow and transport in a nearly 16 m deep stratified vadose zone comprised of eight layers of unconsolidated alluvium experiences highly non-uniform, localized preferential flow and transport patterns leading to accelerated nitrate transfer. The equilibrium approach largely under-predicted the leaching of nitrate to groundwater while the dual-porosity approach showed higher rates of nitrate leaching, consistent with field observations. The dual-porosity approach slightly over-predicted nitrogen storage in the vadose zone, which may be the result of limited matrix flow or denitrification not accounted for in the model. Results of this study may be helpful to better predict fertilizer and pesticide retention times in deep vadose zone, prior to recharge into the groundwater flow system. Keywords: Nitrate, Preferential flow, Heterogeneous vadose zone, Dual-porosity approach

  4. Horizontal annular flow modelling using a compositional based interface capturing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhizhua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Progress on a consistent approach for interface-capturing in which each component represents a different phase/fluid is described. The aim is to develop a general multi-phase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components. The method is compared against experimental results for a collapsing water column test case and a convergence study is performed. A number of numerical test cases are undertaken to demonstrate the method's ability to model arbitrary numbers of phases with arbitrary equations of state. The method is then used to simulate horizontal annular flows. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  5. Exploring the velocity distribution of debris flows: An iteration algorithm based approach for complex cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zheng; Chen, Guangqi; Li, Yange; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of debris-flow velocity in a cross-section is of primary importance due to its correlation to impact force, run up and superelevation. However, previous methods sometimes neglect the observed asymmetric velocity distribution, and consequently underestimate the debris-flow velocity. This paper presents a new approach for exploring the debris-flow velocity distribution in a cross-section. The presented approach uses an iteration algorithm based on the Riemann integral method to search an approximate solution to the unknown flow surface. The established laws for vertical velocity profile are compared and subsequently integrated to analyze the velocity distribution in the cross-section. The major benefit of the presented approach is that natural channels typically with irregular beds and superelevations can be taken into account, and the resulting approximation by the approach well replicates the direct integral solution. The approach is programmed in MATLAB environment, and the code is open to the public. A well-documented debris-flow event in Sichuan Province, China, is used to demonstrate the presented approach. Results show that the solutions of the flow surface and the mean velocity well reproduce the investigated results. Discussion regarding the model sensitivity and the source of errors concludes the paper.

  6. Runoff modelling using radar data and flow measurements in a stochastic state space approach.

    PubMed

    Krämer, S; Grum, M; Verworn, H R; Redder, A

    2005-01-01

    In urban drainage the estimation of runoff with the help of models is a complex task. This is in part due to the fact that rainfall, the most important input to urban drainage modelling, is highly uncertain. Added to the uncertainty of rainfall is the complexity of performing accurate flow measurements. In terms of deterministic modelling techniques these are needed for calibration and evaluation of the applied model. Therefore, the uncertainties of rainfall and flow measurements have a severe impact on the model parameters and results. To overcome these problems a new methodology has been developed which is based on simple rain plane and runoff models that are incorporated into a stochastic state space model approach. The state estimation is done by using the extended Kalman filter in combination with a maximum likelihood criterion and an off-line optimization routine. This paper presents the results of this new methodology with respect to the combined consideration of uncertainties in distributed rainfall derived from radar data and uncertainties in measured flows in an urban catchment within the Emscher river basin, Germany. PMID:16248174

  7. Numerical flow Simulation around a flat plate during heavy rainfall using Lagrangian Eulerian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhir, Gaurav; Suman, Sawan

    2015-11-01

    Experimental evidence shows that aircrafts operating under heavy rainfall conditions face deterioration of lift and increase in drag. This scenario can be a critical design challenge especially for slow moving vehicles such as airships. Effective roughening of airfoil surface caused by an uneven water film, loss of flow momentum and the loss of vehicle momentum due to its collision with the raindrops are the primary reasons causing the drag to increase. Our work focuses primarily on the numerical quantification of boundary layer momentum loss caused due to raindrops. The collision of raindrops with a solid surface leads to formation of an ejecta fog of splashed back droplets with their sizes being of the order of micrometers and their acceleration leads to boundary layer momentum loss. We model the airflow within a flat plate boundary layer using a Lagrangian-Eulerian approach with the raindrops being considered as non-deformable, non-spinning and non-interacting droplets. We employ an inter-phase coupling term to account for the interaction between the boundary layer flow and the droplets. Our presentation will focus on several comparisons (velocity field, lift and drag at various angles of attack) with the results of the standard (rain-free) Prandtl boundary layer flow. Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

  8. Rheology and particle dynamics near the flow-arrest transition: a constant stress and pressure approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mu; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics to investigate the relation between the rheology and the microscopic particle dynamics in dense colloidal dispersions at constant stress and pressure. For each imposed stress/pressure pair, the suspension exhibits distinct strain rate distributions depending on the observation time. We measure the long-time self-diffusivity (LTSD) corresponding to the strain rate (inverse shear viscosity) and find that the LTSD results at different imposed stresses collapse to master curves that depends only on the imposed pressure. For low-pressure suspensions, the stress-scaled LTSD diverges at a finite scaled strain rate due to its liquid-like behavior, while at high pressures the scaled LTSD emerges from zero due to the flow-arrest transition. On the other hand, we discover that the particle friction coefficient--the ratio of the particle shear stress to the particle (osmotic) pressure--is proportional to the strain rate scaled by the LTSD for all flowing suspensions. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the constant stress and pressure approach for dense suspension rheology, and show that, although the flow of amorphous materials is inherently far-from-equilibrium without a linear response regime, a mean-field description should remain valid.

  9. A Lagrangian approach to study flow topology around a flapping flat-plate wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Swathi; Mulleners, Karen; Green, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    The incredible flight performance of insects can be attributed in part to the generation and maintenance of stable regions of vorticity, which is achieved by manipulating the wing kinematics. Along with the prolonged attachment of the leading edge vortex during translation of the wing, the rotational motion at the end of the stroke is critical as it generates large amounts of lift required for the insect to remain air-borne while hovering. The wing reversal entails a change in the flow-field around the wing which is closely tied to variations in force production. Based on phase-averaged particle image velocimetry data we analyze the effect of a shift in the rotational phase of a flapping wing on the flow characteristics. A topological study is conducted using Lagrangian vortex detection techniques in order to characterize the shear layer formation, vortex interactions and flow separation. The Lagrangian analysis includes the calculation of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents based on particle trajectories. An objective approach is employed to trace the location of separation or attachment points as an indication for changes in the strength, stability and shedding frequencies of vortices. These trajectories are correlated with fluctuations in aerodynamic force coefficients.

  10. Extracting energy from a flow: An asymptotic approach using vortex-induced vibrations and feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliga, Philippe; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Gallaire, François

    2011-07-01

    This paper considers vortex-induced vibrations of a cylinder in water streams for renewable energy production. We use an analytical model recently obtained by the authors from the asymptotic analysis of a coupled flow-cylinder system, and assess the ability of a control velocity applied at the cylinder wall to optimize the magnitude of dissipated energy at disposal to be harvested. The retained approach is that of proportional feedback control. When the system evolves on its limit cycle, we show that the control yields an increase in the mean dissipated energy by 3.5%, as well as a significant improvement of the robustness with respect to small inaccuracies of the structural parameters. However, we also show that the system is susceptible to converge to cycles of lower energy when subjected to external disturbances, as a result of the simultaneous existence of multiple stable cycles. Consequently, we propose a transient control algorithm meant to force the return of the system to its optimal cycle. Its efficiency is assessed for two feedback approaches relying on distinct types of measurements: we find significant differences in the time needed to reach convergence to the optimal cycle, which ultimately results in energy being spent when feedback is designed from cylinder measurements, and in energy being harnessed when feedback is designed from flow measurements.

  11. Water flow modeling in the unsaturated zone with imprecise parameters using a fuzzy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, K.; Huwe, B.

    1997-12-01

    An alternative approach, based on fuzzy set theory, is presented to express imprecision of parameters in a non-probabilistic sense. Imprecision may originate from indirect measurements, estimation routines, subjective interpretation and expert judgement of available information. One dimensional, steady state water flow in the unsaturated zone of homogeneous soils, which is described by the Darcy-Buckingham equation, was chosen to evaluate and to incorporate fuzzy soil hydraulic properties and boundary conditions in the modeling procedure. It is here used to describe soil water pressures with depth, as well as to calculate maximum evapotranspiration rates under steady state conditions. Solving the fuzzy equation for steady state water flow results in minimizing/maximizing procedures, from where resulting membership functions of the dependent variable are calculated. A comparison to a more classical stochastic approach points out the main differences between fuzzy and stochastic concepts to account for uncertainties. Finally, a sensitivity analysis shows the strong impact of different shapes of membership functions of the input parameters on the resulting membership functions of maximum evapotranspiration rates and soil water pressures.

  12. Solution-Adaptive Cartesian Cell Approach for Viscous and Inviscid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    A Cartesian cell-based approach for adaptively refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is presented. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by the recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal cut cells are created using modified polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary tree data structure that provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The results of a study comparing the accuracy and positivity of two classes of cell-centered, viscous gradient reconstruction procedures is briefly summarized. Adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are shown using the more robust of these gradient reconstruction procedures, where the results computed by the Cartesian approach are compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  13. A two-dimensional approach to modelling the short timescale zonal flow in Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, C.; Dumberry, M.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructions of flow in Earth's outer core based on surface magnetic data predict mean zonal accelerations on several timescales. Since accelerations in the core couple to the angular momentum of the mantle, their existence has been confirmed by length-of-day observations. Recent studies suggest that free modes of torsional oscillations are responsible for relatively weak signals with a 5-6 year period. The mechanisms responsible for stronger decadal signals are less well understood.To address the problem, we construct a quasi-geostrophic model of magnetoconvection, with thermally-driven flows perturbing a steady, imposed background magnetic field. This approach is justified by the Taylor-Proudman theorem, in which velocities in a rapidly rotating system vary little parallel to the rotational axis. Using only two dimensions allows a much more rapid exploration of parameter space than traditional three-dimensional approaches.Our model is capable of producing mean zonal accelerations similar to those predicted by the geomagnetic reconstructions of Earth. In particular, we see a clear separation in period between the free modes (short) and forced modes (long) of torsional oscillations. We then systematically run the model with a variety of parameters, attempting to extrapolate our results to the conditions found in Earth's core.

  14. Travel time approach to kinetically sorbing solute by diverging radial flows through heterogeneous porous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Gerardo; de Bartolo, Samuele; Toraldo, Gerardo; Srinivasan, Gowri; Viswanathan, Hari

    2012-12-01

    Diverging radial flow takes place in a heterogeneous porous medium where the log conductivity Y = ln K is modeled as a stationary random space function (RSF). The flow is steady, and is generated by a fully penetrating well. A linearly sorbing solute is injected through the well envelope, and we aim at computing the average flux concentration (breakthrough curve). A relatively simple solution for this difficult problem is achieved by adopting, similar to Indelman and Dagan (1999), a few simplifying assumptions: (i) a thick aquifer of large horizontal extent, (ii) mildly heterogeneous medium, (iii) strongly anisotropic formation, and (iv) large Peclet number. By introducing an appropriate Lagrangian framework, three-dimensional transport is mapped onto a one-dimensional domain (τ, t) where τ and t represent the fluid travel and current time, respectively. Central for this approach is the probability density function of the RSF τthat is derived consistently with the adopted assumptions stated above. Based on this, it is shown that the travel time can be regarded as a Gaussian random variable only in the far field. The breakthrough curves are analyzed to assess the impact of the hydraulic as well as reactive parameters. Finally, the travel time approach is tested against a forced-gradient transport experiment and shows good agreement.

  15. Directed flow in heavy-ion collisions from the PHSD transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmese, A.; Cassing, W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent STAR data for the directed flow of protons, antiprotons, charged pions and kaons obtained within the beam energy scan (BES) program are analyzed within the Parton- Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD/HSD) transport models. Both versions of the kinetic approach are used to clarify the role of partonic degrees of freedom. The PHSD results, simulating a partonic phase and its coexistence with a hadronic one, are roughly consistent with the STAR data. Generally, the semi-qualitative agreement between the measured data and model results supports the idea of a crossover type of quark-hadron transition which softens the nuclear EoS but shows no indication of a first-order phase transition. Furthermore, the directed flow of kaons and antikaons is evaluated in the PHSD approach from √sNN ≈ 5-12 GeV which shows a high sensitivity to the hadronic potentials in the FAIR/NICA energy regime √sNN ≤⃒ 8 GeV.

  16. An adaptive level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, M.; Almgren, A.S.; Bell, J.B.

    1997-04-01

    In Sussman, Smereka and Osher, a numerical method using the level set approach was formulated for solving incompressible two-phase flow with surface tension. In the level set approach, the interface is represented as the zero level set of a smooth function; this has the effect of replacing the advection of density, which has steep gradients at the interface, with the advection of the level set function, which is smooth. In addition, the interface can merge or break up with no special treatment. The authors maintain the level set function as the signed distance from the interface in order to robustly compute flows with high density ratios and stiff surface tension effects. In this work, they couple the level set scheme to an adaptive projection method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in order to achieve higher resolution of the interface with a minimum of additional expense. They present two-dimensional axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional results of air bubble and water drop computations.

  17. A Simplified Approach to Modeling Two-phase Flow of Seawater Near a Dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Lowell, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    Magmatic dikes represent the fundamental unit of mass accretion and heat input into the oceanic crust. Dikes also drive hydrothermal circulation that may result in event plumes, but in any case the circulation will carry a pulse of mineral-laden hydrothermal fluids and heat to the seafloor. Two-phase flow and phase segregation are important aspects of hydrothermal circulation following dike emplacement. These processes are confined to narrow regions near the dike margins, and the duration of two-phase flow is brief. Nevertheless, sampling of hydrothermal fluids following dike emplacement has shown the early appearance of low chlorinity vapor phase fluids followed, in some cases (e.g., "F" vent at EPR 9° N), by the appearance of brines. We provide a simplified treatment of two-phase flow of seawater near a dike in an effort to quantify the thickness and duration of the two-phase zone, the amount of brine formed, and its distribution in the subsurface. We first estimate these parameters by considering simple conductive cooling of the dike. This approach shows that for a two-meter wide dike, the width of the two-phase zone is approximately 15 cm and that a zone of halite is deposited near the dike wall. After 10 days, the two-phase zone has disappeared at the base of the dike, and disappears everywhere else after about 15 days. We then use a simplified buoyancy driven convection model to quantify the degree of phase segregation and the distribution of brine. The results of this simplified model are compared with data from "F" vent. This approach provides semi-quantitative and conceptual constraints on numerical models for two-phase convection in NaCl-H2O fluids.

  18. An Eulerian interface sharpening algorithm for compressible two-phase flow: The algebraic THINC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyue, Keh-Ming; Xiao, Feng

    2014-07-01

    We describe a novel interface-sharpening approach for efficient numerical resolution of a compressible homogeneous two-phase flow governed by a quasi-conservative five-equation model of Allaire et al. (2001) [1]. The algorithm uses a semi-discrete wave propagation method to find approximate solution of this model numerically. In the algorithm, in regions near the interfaces where two different fluid components are present within a cell, the THINC (Tangent of Hyperbola for INterface Capturing) scheme is used as a basis for the reconstruction of a sub-grid discontinuity of volume fractions at each cell edge, and it is complemented by a homogeneous-equilibrium-consistent technique that is derived to ensure a consistent modeling of the other interpolated physical variables in the model. In regions away from the interfaces where the flow is single phase, standard reconstruction scheme such as MUSCL or WENO can be used for obtaining high-order interpolated states. These reconstructions are then used as the initial data for Riemann problems, and the resulting fluctuations form the basis for the spatial discretization. Time integration of the algorithm is done by employing a strong stability-preserving Runge-Kutta method. Numerical results are shown for sample problems with the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state for characterizing the materials of interests in both one and two space dimensions that demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for interface-sharpening of compressible two-phase flow. To demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach, we have also included results obtained using the anti-diffusion interface sharpening method.

  19. An objective approach to marginal benefit functions for environmental flows: an example for fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perona, P.; Burlando, P.

    2009-12-01

    Environmental flows can result from the economical competition for water allocation between traditional and non-traditional water uses. This requires the definition of convenient benefit functions (bf) associated with the use of the resource. Since the use of water by the riparian ecosystem is an intangible good, common ways based for instance on the “willingness to pay” have the dramatic weakness of not being objective with regard to the environmental rights. That is, water withdrawal from a given stream environment would depend on the importance and, in turn, on the economical value that people assign to this environment. In this work we discuss a possible objective criterion to establish benefit functions for the environmental uses of the water resource. Our approach is based on studying the optimal water allocation between the users as resulting from marginal economic analysis. That is, we show that the parameters of the marginal demand curve for the riparian ecosystem are intrinsically defined by knowing: (a) the ecological status of the riverine system in pristine conditions, and (b) the marginal benefit function of the potential competitor (e.g., exploitation activity). We solve analytically the water allocation problem for the simple case of water withdrawal from a fluvial system. We show the link between the parameters of the marginal benefit functions and the minimal environmental flow arising from classic engineering analysis, as well as their ecological meaning. This approach allows to restore a more natural variability of the streamflow regime in impounded reaches, to the cost of a profit reduction for the resource exploitation. However, on the long term, the overall idea is that the benefit for having preserved more natural environmental flow conditions since exploitation began would balance the future cost for potential restoration of the riverine corridor and the missing revenues.

  20. A Novel Approach to the Representation of Groundwater Flow and Transport with Epistemic Parameter Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, M. M.; Pinder, G. F.

    2006-12-01

    There is a growing need in hydrologic and environmental modeling and management to segregate uncertainty, whether it occurs in input parameters or in possible alternative models, into aleatory uncertainty (i.e., irreducible or stochastic) and epistemic uncertainty (i.e., reducible or due to lack of knowledge). While aleatory uncertainty has been known and used as the only source of uncertainty in the hydrologic community for a long time, the notion of epistemic uncertainty is relatively new and it can be due several reasons including 1) field and laboratory methods used in the measurement of parameters, 2) techniques used to interpolate measured values at selected locations, and more importantly, 3) subjective expert opinion interpreting data available to augment existing prior parametric information. A natural framework to quantify epistemic uncertainty has been fuzzy set theory. In this paper, we use the extension principle of fuzzy set theory to simulate groundwater flow and transport with fuzzy model parameters. Our novel implementation of the principle involves two major steps: 1) a tessellation of the parameter space that results in simplexes over which the state variable is approximated by means of trial functions, followed by 2) the optimization of degrees of membership for the state variable in each simplex where the trial functions and the fuzzy parameter membership functions are used as the constraints of the optimization algorithm. We compare our approach to other known approaches to using the extension principle to address groundwater flow and transport in the saturated zone, and highlight features of our approach that apply to any physically based model with fuzzy parameter input.

  1. A dual-permeability approach to preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Gerke, Horst H.; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The pore systems in most natural soils is dynamically changing due to alternating swelling and shrinkage processes, which induces changes in pore volume and pore size distribution including deformations in pore geometry. This is a serious difficulty for modeling flow and transport in dual permeability approaches, as it will also require that the geometrical deformation of both the soil matrix and the fracture porous systems be taken into account, as well as the dynamics of soil hydraulic properties in response to the domain deformations. This study follows up a previous work by the same authors extending the classical rigid (RGD) approach formerly proposed by Gerke and van Genuchten, to account for shrinking effects (SHR) in modeling water flow and solute transport in dual-permeability porous media. In this study we considered three SHR scenarios, assuming that aggregate shrinkage may change either: (i) the hydraulic properties of the two pore domains, (ii) their relative fractions, and (iii) both, hydraulic properties and fractions of the two domains. The objective was to compare simulation results obtained under the RGD and the SHR assumptions to illustrate the impact of matrix volume changes on water storage, water fluxes and solute concentrations during: 1) An infiltration process bringing an initially dry soil to saturation, 2) A drainage process starting from an initially saturated soil. For an infiltration process, the simulated wetting front and the solute concentration propagation velocity, as well as the water fluxes, water and solute exchange rates, for the three SHR scenarios significantly deviated from the RGD. By contrast, relatively similar water content profiles evolved under all scenarios during drying. Overall, compared to the RGD approach, the effect of changing the hydraulic properties and the weight of the two domains according to the shrinkage behavior of the soil aggregates induced a much more rapid response in terms of water fluxes and

  2. A nonlinear modeling approach using weighted piecewise series and its applications to predict unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Weigang; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2016-08-01

    To preserve nonlinearity of a full-order system over a range of parameters of interest, we propose an accurate and robust nonlinear modeling approach by assembling a set of piecewise linear local solutions expanded about some sampling states. The work by Rewienski and White [1] on micromachined devices inspired our use of piecewise linear local solutions to study nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics. These local approximations are assembled via nonlinear weights of radial basis functions. The efficacy of the proposed procedure is validated for a two-dimensional airfoil moving with different pitching motions, specifically AGARD's CT2 and CT5 problems [27], in which the flows exhibit different nonlinear behaviors. Furthermore, application of the developed aerodynamic model to a two-dimensional aero-elastic system proves the approach is capable of predicting limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) by using AGARD's CT6 [28] as a benchmark test. All results, based on inviscid solutions, confirm that our nonlinear model is stable and accurate, against the full model solutions and measurements, and for predicting not only aerodynamic forces but also detailed flowfields. Moreover, the model is robust for inputs that considerably depart from the base trajectory in form and magnitude. This modeling provides a very efficient way for predicting unsteady flowfields with varying parameters because it needs only a tiny fraction of the cost of a full-order modeling for each new condition-the more cases studied, the more savings rendered. Hence, the present approach is especially useful for parametric studies, such as in the case of design optimization and exploration of flow phenomena.

  3. Dispositional Flow as a Mediator of the Relationships between Attentional Control and Approaches to Studying during Academic Examination Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cermakova, Lucie; Moneta, Giovanni B.; Spada, Marcantonio M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated how attentional control and study-related dispositional flow influence students' approaches to studying when preparing for academic examinations. Based on information-processing theories, it was hypothesised that attentional control would be positively associated with deep and strategic approaches to studying, and…

  4. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role for the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm

  5. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role formore » the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm), packed with homogeneous and

  6. A theory-based approach to thermal field-flow fractionation of polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Runyon, J Ray; Williams, S Kim Ratanathanawongs

    2011-09-28

    A theory-based approach is presented for the development of thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) of polyacrylates. The use of ThFFF for polymer analysis has been limited by an incomplete understanding of the thermal diffusion which plays an important role in retention and separation. Hence, a tedious trial-and-error approach to method development has been the normal practice when analyzing new materials. In this work, thermal diffusion theories based on temperature dependent osmotic pressure gradient and polymer-solvent interaction parameters were used to estimate thermal diffusion coefficients (D(T)) and retention times (t(r)) for different polymer-solvent pairs. These calculations identified methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent that would cause significant retention of poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) and poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA). Experiments confirmed retention of these two polymers that have not been previously analyzed by ThFFF. Theoretical and experimental D(T)s and t(r)s for PBA, PMA, and polystyrene in different solvents agreed to within 20% and demonstrate the feasibility of this theory-based approach. PMID:21872869

  7. An objective and parsimonious approach for classifying natural flow regimes at a continental scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Kennen, Jonathan G.; Carlisle, Daren M.; Wolock, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydro-ecological stream classification-the process of grouping streams by similar hydrologic responses and, by extension, similar aquatic habitat-has been widely accepted and is considered by some to be one of the first steps towards developing ecological flow targets. A new classification of 1543 streamgauges in the contiguous USA is presented by use of a novel and parsimonious approach to understand similarity in ecological streamflow response. This novel classification approach uses seven fundamental daily streamflow statistics (FDSS) rather than winnowing down an uncorrelated subset from 200 or more ecologically relevant streamflow statistics (ERSS) commonly used in hydro-ecological classification studies. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the distributions of 33 tested ERSS are consistently different among the classification groups derived from the seven FDSS. It is further shown that classification based solely on the 33 ERSS generally does a poorer job in grouping similar streamgauges than the classification based on the seven FDSS. This new classification approach has the additional advantages of overcoming some of the subjectivity associated with the selection of the classification variables and provides a set of robust continental-scale classes of US streamgauges. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. An efficient continuous flow approach to furnish furan-based biaryls.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Trieu N; Hizartzidis, Lacey; Lin, Andrew J S; Harman, David G; McCluskey, Adam; Gordon, Christopher P

    2014-12-21

    Suzuki cross-couplings of 5-formyl-2-furanylboronic acid with activated or neutral aryl bromides were performed under continuous flow conditions in the presence of (Bu)4N(+)F(-) and the immobilised t-butyl based palladium catalyst CatCart™ FC1032™. Deactivated aryl bromides and activated aryl chlorides were cross-coupled with 5-formyl-2-furanylboronic in the presence of (Bu)4N(+)OAc(-) using the bis-triphenylphosphine CatCart™ PdCl2(PPh3)2-DVB. Initial evidence indicates the latter method may serve as a universal approach to conduct Suzuki cross-couplings with the protocol successfully employed in the synthesis of the current gold standard Hedgehog pathway inhibitor LDE225. PMID:25333944

  9. A triple-continuum approach for modeling flow and transportprocesses in fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Liu, H.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S; Zellmer, K .E.

    2001-08-31

    This paper presents a triple-continuum conceptual model forsimulating flow and transport processes in fractured rock. Field datacollected from the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, a repository siteof high-level nuclear waste, show a large number of small-scalefractures. The effect of these small fractures has not been considered inprevious modeling investigations within the context of a continuumapproach. A new triple-continuum model (consisting of matrix,small-fracture, and large-fracture continua) has been developed toinvestigate the effect of these small fractures. This paper derives themodel formulation and discusses the basic triple-continuum behavior offlow and transport processes under different conditions, using bothanalytical solutions and numerical approaches. The simulation resultsfrom the site-scale model of the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountainindicate that these small fractures may have an important effect onradionuclide transport within the mountain

  10. A prescribed wake rotor inflow and flow field prediction analysis, user's manual and technical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A user's manual is provided which includes the technical approach for the Prescribed Wake Rotor Inflow and Flow Field Prediction Analysis. The analysis is used to provide the rotor wake induced velocities at the rotor blades for use in blade airloads and response analyses and to provide induced velocities at arbitrary field points such as at a tail surface. This analysis calculates the distribution of rotor wake induced velocities based on a prescribed wake model. Section operating conditions are prescribed from blade motion and controls determined by a separate blade response analysis. The analysis represents each blade by a segmented lifting line, and the rotor wake by discrete segmented trailing vortex filaments. Blade loading and circulation distributions are calculated based on blade element strip theory including the local induced velocity predicted by the numerical integration of the Biot-Savart Law applied to the vortex wake model.

  11. A Flow Cytometric and Computational Approaches to Carbapenems Affinity to the Different Types of Carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Silva, Ana P; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Teixeira-Santos, Rita; Moura, Daniel; Vieira, Tatiana F; Sousa, Sérgio F; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Cantón, Rafael; Rodrigues, Acácio G

    2016-01-01

    The synergy of carbapenem combinations regarding Enterobacteriaceae producing different types of carbapenemases was study through different approaches: flow cytometry and computational analysis. Ten well characterized Enterobacteriaceae (KPC, verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamases -VIM and OXA-48-like enzymes) were selected for the study. The cells were incubated with a combination of ertapenem with imipenem, meropenem, or doripenem and killing kinetic curves performed with and without reinforcements of the drugs. A cephalosporin was also used in combination with ertapenem. A flow cytometric assay with DiBAC4-(3), a membrane potential dye, was developed in order to evaluate the cellular lesion after 2 h incubation. A chemical computational study was performed to understand the affinity of the different drugs to the different types of enzymes. Flow cytometric analysis and time-kill assays showed a synergic effect against KPC and OXA-48 producing-bacteria with all combinations; only ertapenem with imipenem was synergic against VIM producing-bacteria. A bactericidal effect was observed in OXA-48-like enzymes. Ceftazidime plus ertapenem was synergic against ESBL-negative KPC producing-bacteria. Ertapenem had the highest affinity for those enzymes according to chemical computational study. The synergic effect between ertapenem and others carbapenems against different carbapenemase-producing bacteria, representing a therapeutic choice, was described for the first time. Easier and faster laboratorial methods for carbapenemase characterization are urgently needed. The design of an ertapenem derivative with similar affinity to carbapenemases but exhibiting more stable bonds was demonstrated as highly desirable. PMID:27555844

  12. A Flow Cytometric and Computational Approaches to Carbapenems Affinity to the Different Types of Carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Silva, Ana P.; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Teixeira-Santos, Rita; Moura, Daniel; Vieira, Tatiana F.; Sousa, Sérgio F.; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Cantón, Rafael; Rodrigues, Acácio G.

    2016-01-01

    The synergy of carbapenem combinations regarding Enterobacteriaceae producing different types of carbapenemases was study through different approaches: flow cytometry and computational analysis. Ten well characterized Enterobacteriaceae (KPC, verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamases –VIM and OXA-48-like enzymes) were selected for the study. The cells were incubated with a combination of ertapenem with imipenem, meropenem, or doripenem and killing kinetic curves performed with and without reinforcements of the drugs. A cephalosporin was also used in combination with ertapenem. A flow cytometric assay with DiBAC4-(3), a membrane potential dye, was developed in order to evaluate the cellular lesion after 2 h incubation. A chemical computational study was performed to understand the affinity of the different drugs to the different types of enzymes. Flow cytometric analysis and time-kill assays showed a synergic effect against KPC and OXA-48 producing-bacteria with all combinations; only ertapenem with imipenem was synergic against VIM producing-bacteria. A bactericidal effect was observed in OXA-48-like enzymes. Ceftazidime plus ertapenem was synergic against ESBL-negative KPC producing-bacteria. Ertapenem had the highest affinity for those enzymes according to chemical computational study. The synergic effect between ertapenem and others carbapenems against different carbapenemase-producing bacteria, representing a therapeutic choice, was described for the first time. Easier and faster laboratorial methods for carbapenemase characterization are urgently needed. The design of an ertapenem derivative with similar affinity to carbapenemases but exhibiting more stable bonds was demonstrated as highly desirable. PMID:27555844

  13. Weakly nonlinear stability analysis of magnetohydrodynamic channel flow using an efficient numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Jonathan; Priede, Jānis

    2013-12-01

    We analyze weakly nonlinear stability of a flow of viscous conducting liquid driven by pressure gradient in the channel between two parallel walls subject to a transverse magnetic field. Using a non-standard numerical approach, we compute the linear growth rate correction and the first Landau coefficient, which in a sufficiently strong magnetic field vary with the Hartmann number as μ 1˜ (0.814-i19.8)× 10^{-3}textit {Ha} and μ 2˜ (2.73-i1.50)× 10^{-5}textit {Ha}^{-4}. These coefficients describe a subcritical transverse velocity perturbation with the equilibrium amplitude |A|2=Re [μ 1]/Re [μ 2](textit {Re}c-textit {Re})˜ 29.8textit {Ha}5(textit {Re}c-textit {Re}), which exists at Reynolds numbers below the linear stability threshold textit {Re}c˜ 4.83× 104textit {Ha}. We find that the flow remains subcritically unstable regardless of the magnetic field strength. Our method for computing Landau coefficients differs from the standard one by the application of the solvability condition to the discretized rather than continuous problem. This allows us to bypass both the solution of the adjoint problem and the subsequent evaluation of the integrals defining the inner products, which results in a significant simplification of the method.

  14. Sheath-flow microfluidic approach for combined surface enhanced Raman scattering and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew R; Pentecost, Amber M; Selimovic, Asmira; Martin, R Scott; Schultz, Zachary D

    2015-04-21

    The combination of hydrodynamic focusing with embedded capillaries in a microfluidic device is shown to enable both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and electrochemical characterization of analytes at nanomolar concentrations in flow. The approach utilizes a versatile polystyrene device that contains an encapsulated microelectrode and fluidic tubing, which is shown to enable straightforward hydrodynamic focusing onto the electrode surface to improve detection. A polydimethyslsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel positioned over both the embedded tubing and SERS active electrode (aligned ∼200 μm from each other) generates a sheath flow that confines the analyte molecules eluting from the embedded tubing over the SERS electrode, increasing the interaction between the Riboflavin (vitamin B2) and the SERS active electrode. The microfluidic device was characterized using finite element simulations, amperometry, and Raman experiments. This device shows a SERS and amperometric detection limit near 1 and 100 nM, respectively. This combination of SERS and amperometry in a single device provides an improved method to identify and quantify electroactive analytes over either technique independently. PMID:25815795

  15. Ice flow and precipitation change over the Swiss Alps during the last glaciation, a modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Patrick; Jouvet, Guillaume; Funk, Martin; Seguinot, Julien

    2015-04-01

    About 20,000 years before present at the end of the Würm glaciation, glaciers in Europe have reached their maximum extent and wide parts of the forelands were covered by ice. Our goal is to reconstruct the European alpine ice cap during the last glaciation using numerical simulations of the ice flow. To do that, we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to simulate the ice flow. PISM is capable to simulate the time evolution of a large scale ice sheet for millenniums by accounting for the dynamics of ice, englacial temperature, bedrock temperature, lithosphere deformation and surface mass balance. The latter is computed using a positive degree day model that is forced by climate data. A classical approach consists of applying a constant temperature offset to present-day temperature data, while keeping constant today's precipitation patterns. However, geomorphological hints show that the prevailing precipitation regime during the last glaciation was dominated by a southerly atmospheric circulation pattern, in contrast to today's prevalent westerly airflow. Due to this fact we propose several empirical corrections to the present-day precipitation patterns and select those which yield the best match between modeled ice cap extents and geomorphologically-based margin reconstructions.

  16. Assessing Skin Blood Flow Dynamics in Older Adults Using a Modified Sample Entropy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2015-01-01

    The aging process may result in attenuated microvascular reactivity in response to environmental stimuli, which can be evaluated by analyzing skin blood flow (SBF) signals. Among various methods for analyzing physiological signals, sample entropy (SE) is commonly used to quantify the degree of regularity of time series. However, we found that for temporally correlated data, SE value depends on the sampling rate. When data are oversampled, SE may give misleading results. To address this problem, we propose to modify the definition of SE by using time-lagged vectors in the calculation of the conditional probability that any two vectors of successive data points are within a tolerance r for m points remain within the tolerance at the next point. The lag could be chosen as the first minimum of the auto mutual information function. We tested the performance of modified SE using simulated signals and SBF data. The results showed that modified SE is able to quantify the degree of regularity of the signals regardless of sampling rate. Using this approach, we observed a more regular behavior of blood flow oscillations (BFO) during local heating-induced maximal vasodilation period compared to the baseline in young and older adults and a more regular behavior of BFO in older adults compared to young adults. These results suggest that modified SE may be useful in the study of SBF dynamics. PMID:25570060

  17. Sheath-Flow Microfluidic Approach for Combined Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering and Electrochemical Detection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The combination of hydrodynamic focusing with embedded capillaries in a microfluidic device is shown to enable both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and electrochemical characterization of analytes at nanomolar concentrations in flow. The approach utilizes a versatile polystyrene device that contains an encapsulated microelectrode and fluidic tubing, which is shown to enable straightforward hydrodynamic focusing onto the electrode surface to improve detection. A polydimethyslsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel positioned over both the embedded tubing and SERS active electrode (aligned ∼200 μm from each other) generates a sheath flow that confines the analyte molecules eluting from the embedded tubing over the SERS electrode, increasing the interaction between the Riboflavin (vitamin B2) and the SERS active electrode. The microfluidic device was characterized using finite element simulations, amperometry, and Raman experiments. This device shows a SERS and amperometric detection limit near 1 and 100 nM, respectively. This combination of SERS and amperometry in a single device provides an improved method to identify and quantify electroactive analytes over either technique independently. PMID:25815795

  18. Evaluating the morphology of erythrocyte population: An approach based on atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sayari; Chakraborty, Ishita; Chakraborty, Monojit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Mishra, Raghwendra; Sarkar, Debasish

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is gaining importance as a powerful pathological index in identifying the severity of any blood related disease. However, the existing technique of quantitative microscopy is highly time consuming and prone to personalized bias. On the other hand, relatively unexplored, complementary technique based on flow cytometry has not been standardized till date, particularly due to the lack of a proper morphological scoring scale. In this article, we have presented a new approach to formulate a non-empirical scoring scale based on membrane roughness (R(rms)) data obtained from atomic force microscopy. Subsequently, the respective morphological quantifier of the whole erythrocyte population, commonly known as morphological index, was expressed as a function of highest correlated statistical parameters of scattered signal profiles generated by flow cytometry. Feed forward artificial neural network model with multilayer perceptron architecture was used to develop the intended functional form. High correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.95), even for model-formulation exclusive samples, clearly indicates the universal validity of the proposed model. Moreover, a direct pathological application of the proposed model has been illustrated in relation to patients, diagnosed to be suffering from a wide variety of cancer. PMID:26824317

  19. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation

    PubMed Central

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  20. An Integrated Design approach to Power Systems: from Power Flows to Electricity Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subhonmesh

    Power system is at the brink of change. Engineering needs, economic forces and environmental factors are the main drivers of this change. The vision is to build a smart electrical grid and a smarter market mechanism around it to fulfill mandates on clean energy. Looking at engineering and economic issues in isolation is no longer an option today; it needs an integrated design approach. In this thesis, I shall revisit some of the classical questions on the engineering operation of power systems that deals with the nonconvexity of power flow equations. Then I shall explore some issues of the interaction of these power flow equations on the electricity markets to address the fundamental issue of market power in a deregulated market environment. Finally, motivated by the emergence of new storage technologies, I present an interesting result on the investment decision problem of placing storage over a power network. The goal of this study is to demonstrate that modern optimization and game theory can provide unique insights into this complex system. Some of the ideas carry over to applications beyond power systems.

  1. A Navier-Stokes-Based Approach for Mean Flow Perturbation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Swagata; Gaitonde, Datta; Waindim, Mbu; The Ohio State University Team

    2014-11-01

    The manner in which a basic state, obtained from a time-averaged unsteady flowfield, processes perturbations can provide significant insight into the cause and evolution of instabilities. A widely used approach is based on Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE), which limits streamwise mean flow variation and is often applied to 2-D base flows. To avoid some of these issues, we advance a Navier-Stokes-based method, which can address non-trivial three-dimensional fields. The method stems from that employed by Touber and Sandham (Theor. Comput. Fluid. Dyn., 23, 79, 2009) to analyze global modes in nominally 2-D shock-wave turbulent-boundary layer interactions (STBLI). We first develop its theoretical underpinnings by examining conditions under which it degenerates to traditional methods. We then illustrate the application by considering perturbations to an entropy layer at Mach 6, a turbulent supersonic jet at Mach 1.3 and STBLI at Mach 2.3. For the entropy layer and jet cases, known linear stability and PSE results are successfully reproduced, while global modes are obtained for STBLI. The results not only validate the proposed technique, but also demonstrate its suitability in analyzing instabilities for any general 3D basic state, including impulse response. Sponsored by AFOSR.

  2. Fluid migration in the subduction zone: a coupled fluid flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Huismans, Ritske; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zone are the main entry point of water into earth's mantle and play an important role in the global water cycle. The progressive release of water by metamorphic dehydration induce important physical-chemical process in the subduction zone, such as hydrous melting, hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge, creation of pore fluid pressures that may weaken the subduction interface and induce earthquakes. Most previous studies on the role of fluids in subduction zones assume vertical migration or migration according to the dynamic pressure in the solid matrix without considering the pore fluid pressure effect on the deformation of the solid matrix. Here we investigate this interaction by explicitly modeling two-phase coupled poro-plastic flow during subduction. In this approach, the fluid migrates by compaction and decompaction of the solid matrix and affects the subduction dynamics through pore fluid pressure dependent frictional-plastic yield. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) the rate of fluid migration depends strongly on the permeability and the bulk viscosity of the solid matrix, 2) fluid transfer occurs preferentially along the slab and then propagates into the mantle wedge by viscous compaction driven fluid flow, 3) fluid transport from the surface to depth is a prerequisite for producing high fluid pore pressures and associated hydration induced weakening of the subduction zone interface.

  3. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation.

    PubMed

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  4. Modern approaches to processing large hyperspectral and multispectral aerospace data flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    We consider approaches to processing large hyperspectral and multispectral imaging flows produced in aerospace monitoring for solving a wide range of problems of management of natural resources, environmental security, prevention of natural disasters and technogenic accidents, as well as problems of real economy, and basic and applied sciences. We analyze the specific features of the phases of hyperspectral data analysis and describe a software and hardware system that uses new and improved methods and algorithms for processing large flows of hyperspectral and other aerospace data and has a high-performance computer. This system contains different types of software for identifying the types of given objects by solving inverse problems of remote sensing as well as by analyzing their qualitative and quantitative characteristics, combined multiparameter processing of hyperspectral aerospace data, tracking the local changes including those related to changes in meteorological conditions and vegetation periods, detecting and identifying the types of small objects on the basis of analysis of individual parts of the image, detecting and identifying heat sources, etc. We bring examples of processing of hyperspectral and multispectral satellite images with the help of software and hardware tools developed.

  5. An Airway Network Flow Assignment Approach Based on an Efficient Multiobjective Optimization Framework

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiangmin; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhu, Yanbo; Sun, Dengfeng; Lei, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Considering reducing the airspace congestion and the flight delay simultaneously, this paper formulates the airway network flow assignment (ANFA) problem as a multiobjective optimization model and presents a new multiobjective optimization framework to solve it. Firstly, an effective multi-island parallel evolution algorithm with multiple evolution populations is employed to improve the optimization capability. Secondly, the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II is applied for each population. In addition, a cooperative coevolution algorithm is adapted to divide the ANFA problem into several low-dimensional biobjective optimization problems which are easier to deal with. Finally, in order to maintain the diversity of solutions and to avoid prematurity, a dynamic adjustment operator based on solution congestion degree is specifically designed for the ANFA problem. Simulation results using the real traffic data from China air route network and daily flight plans demonstrate that the proposed approach can improve the solution quality effectively, showing superiority to the existing approaches such as the multiobjective genetic algorithm, the well-known multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition, and a cooperative coevolution multiobjective algorithm as well as other parallel evolution algorithms with different migration topology. PMID:26180840

  6. Comparison of two different approaches for the control of convectively unstable flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet, Fabien; Schmid, Peter; McKeon, Beverley; Huerre, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    The probably most widely used control strategy in the literature is based on the Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) framework. However, this approach seems to be difficult to apply to some fluid systems. In particular, due to their high sensitivity to external noise, amplifier flows are hard to control and the classical LQG compensator may be unable to describe the noise with sufficient accuracy. Another strategy aims at directly measuring these noise sources through a sensor called ``spy.'' The LQG and the spy approaches will be presented and compared using the Ginzburg-Landau equation as a model. It will be shown that the use of a spy is particularly relevant for convectively unstable systems. In addition, the ability of Subspace Identification Methods to provide satisfactory models is demonstrated. Finally, the findings from the Ginzburg-Landau investigation are generalized and applied to a more realistic system, namely a backward-facing step at Re = 350 . Support from Ecole Polytechnique and the Partner University Fund (PUF) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. An Airway Network Flow Assignment Approach Based on an Efficient Multiobjective Optimization Framework.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangmin; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhu, Yanbo; Sun, Dengfeng; Lei, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Considering reducing the airspace congestion and the flight delay simultaneously, this paper formulates the airway network flow assignment (ANFA) problem as a multiobjective optimization model and presents a new multiobjective optimization framework to solve it. Firstly, an effective multi-island parallel evolution algorithm with multiple evolution populations is employed to improve the optimization capability. Secondly, the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II is applied for each population. In addition, a cooperative coevolution algorithm is adapted to divide the ANFA problem into several low-dimensional biobjective optimization problems which are easier to deal with. Finally, in order to maintain the diversity of solutions and to avoid prematurity, a dynamic adjustment operator based on solution congestion degree is specifically designed for the ANFA problem. Simulation results using the real traffic data from China air route network and daily flight plans demonstrate that the proposed approach can improve the solution quality effectively, showing superiority to the existing approaches such as the multiobjective genetic algorithm, the well-known multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition, and a cooperative coevolution multiobjective algorithm as well as other parallel evolution algorithms with different migration topology. PMID:26180840

  8. Cold Flow as Versatile Approach for Stable and Highly Luminescent Quantum Dot-Salt Composites.

    PubMed

    Benad, Albrecht; Guhrenz, Chris; Bauer, Christoph; Eichler, Franziska; Adam, Marcus; Ziegler, Christoph; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-08-24

    Since the beginning of the 1980s, colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs) have been in the focus of interest due to their possible implementation for color conversion, luminescent light concentrators, and lasing. For all these applications, the QDs benefit from being embedded into a host matrix to ensure stability and usability. Many different host materials used for this purpose still have their individual shortcomings. Here, we present a universal, fast, and flexible approach for the direct incorporation of a wide range of QDs into inorganic ionic crystals using cold flow. The QD solution is mixed with a finely milled salt, followed by the removal of the solvent under vacuum. Under high pressure (GPa), the salt powder loaded with QDs transforms into transparent pellets. This effect is well-known for many inorganic salts (e.g., KCl, KBr, KI, NaCl, CsI, AgCl) from, e.g., sample preparation for IR spectroscopy. With this approach, we are able to obtain strongly luminescent QD-salt composites, have precise control over the loading, and provide a chemically robust matrix ensuring long-term stability of the embedded QDs. Furthermore, we show the photo-, chemical, and thermal stability of the composite materials and their use as color conversion layers for a white light-emitting diode (w-LED). The method presented can potentially be used for all kinds of nanoparticles synthesized in organic as well as in aqueous media. PMID:27482755

  9. Teaching Interactions between Foreign Exchange Markets and Balance-of-Payments Flows: An Alternative Graphical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaske, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Provides a graphical framework for presenting interactions among current account flows, capital account flows, and exchange rates. Suggests that the two type of flows must be considered separately in discussions of foreign exchange equilibrium and balance of payments flows. Supplies sample graphs and instructions for applying the framework to real…

  10. Fluid flow paths discrimination in tight sand gas reservoirs using the Hydraulic Flow unit approach with an example from the Algerian Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhal, Abdellah; Bougandoura, Adel; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali

    2015-04-01

    In this work, fluid flow paths are discriminated from standard well logs and core data through the utilization of Hydraulic Flow Units Approach (HFU) and an intelligent network. Firstly, the flow zone indicator (FZI), which is a unique parameter for each hydraulic unit, was used to characterize each rock type. The number of hydraulic flow units and mean values of FZI for each HFU were calculated from porosity and permeability measured from core-rocks. Application to data of a borehole located in the Algerian Sahara shows the existence of three HFUs and a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9 in each HFU was observed. Some FZI were attributed for un-cored wells using the Fuzzy Logic system (FL). Well-logs data that are used as an input to train the fuzzy system are the neutron porosity, the bulk density, the slowness of the P wave, the resistivity of the shallow and the deep zones and the natural gamma ray. The calculated FZI associated to these depths interval are used as an output. The presented methodology was successfully applied to a large data set of laboratory and well logging measurements from the Hassi D'zaabat field. Keywords: Fluid flow; FZI, Hydraulic Flow Unit (HFU); Fuzzy logic.

  11. Ensuring the consistancy of Flow Direction Curve reconstructions: the 'quantile solidarity' approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncelet, Carine; Andreassian, Vazken; Oudin, Ludovic

    2015-04-01

    Flow Duration Curves (FDCs) are a hydrologic tool describing the distribution of streamflows at a catchment outlet. FDCs are usually used for calibration of hydrological models, managing water quality and classifying catchments, among others. For gauged catchments, empirical FDCs can be computed from streamflow records. For ungauged catchments, on the other hand, FDCs cannot be obtained from streamflow records and must therefore be obtained in another manner, for example through reconstructions. Regression-based reconstructions are methods relying on the evaluation of quantiles separately from catchments' attributes (climatic or physical features).The advantage of this category of methods is that it is informative about the processes and it is non-parametric. However, the large number of parameters required can cause unwanted artifacts, typically reconstructions that do not always produce increasing quantiles. In this paper we propose a new approach named Quantile Solidarity (QS), which is applied under strict proxy-basin test conditions (Klemes, 1986) to a set of 600 French catchments. Half of the catchments are considered as gauged and used to calibrate the regression and compute residuals of the regression. The QS approach consists in a three-step regionalization scheme, which first links quantile values to physical descriptors, then reduces the number of regression parameters and finally exploits the spatial correlation of the residuals. The innovation is the utilisation of the parameters continuity across the quantiles to dramatically reduce the number of parameters. The second half of catchment is used as an independent validation set over which we show that the QS approach ensures strictly growing FDC reconstructions in ungauged conditions. Reference: V. KLEMEŠ (1986) Operational testing of hydrological simulation models, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 31:1, 13-24

  12. Lava Flow Hazard Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory: A Probabilistic Approach to Modeling Lava Flow Inundation with MOLASSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.; Connor, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a lava flow hazard assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using a new lava flow code, MOLASSES (MOdular LAva Simulation Software for Earth Science). INL is a nuclear research and development facility located on the eastern Snake River Plain with the potential for lava flow inundation from both monogenetic and polygenetic basaltic eruptions. Previously published inventories of observed surface vents and vents that are buried by younger lava flows and inferred from interpretation of borehole stratigraphy were used to created spatial density maps of vents within the INL region. Monte carlo simulations were run using the MOLASSES code to compare the difference between events initiated using only surface vents and events initiated using both the surface and the buried vents. We find that the inclusion of the buried vent locations drastically increases the number of site inundations and events initiating within INL boundaries. This highlights the need to seek out a more complete eruption record in an area of heavy prehistoric activity to better assess future hazard and associated risk.

  13. Processes, mechanisms, parameters, and modeling approaches for partially saturated flow in soil and rock media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses conceptual models and mathematical equations, analyzes distributions and correlations among hydrological parameters of soils and tuff, introduces new path integration approaches, and outlines scaling procedures to model potential-driven fluid flow in heterogeneous media. To properly model the transition from fracture-dominated flow under saturated conditions to matrix-dominated flow under partially saturated conditions, characteristic curves and permeability functions for fractures and matrix need to be improved and validated. Couplings from two-phase flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and rock deformation to liquid flow are also important. For stochastic modeling of alternating units of welded and nonwelded tuff or formations bounded by fault zones, correlations and constraints on average values of saturated permeability and air entry scaling factor between different units need to be imposed to avoid unlikely combinations of parameters and predictions. Large-scale simulations require efficient and verifiable numerical algorithms. New path integration approaches based on postulates of minimum work and mass conservation to solve flow geometry and potential distribution simultaneously are introduced. This verifiable integral approach, together with fractal scaling procedures to generate statistical realizations with parameter distribution, correlation, and scaling taken into account, can be used to quantify uncertainties and generate the cumulative distribution function for groundwater travel times.

  14. A new approach to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Chang, Kao-Hua; Kao, Hong-Ming

    2014-11-01

    A new approach to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels is proposed by using a Lagrangian meshless method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The Lagrangian form of the Boussinesq equations is solved through SPH to merge the local and convective derivatives as the material derivative. In the numerical SPH procedure, the present study uses a predictor-corrector method, in which the pure space derivative terms (the hydrostatic and source terms) are explicitly solved and the mixed space and time derivatives term (the material term of B1 and B2) is computed with an implicit scheme. It is thus a convenient tool in the processes of the space discretization compared to other Eulerian approaches. Four typical benchmark problems in weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows, including solitary wave propagation, nonlinear interaction of two solitary waves, dambreak flow propagation, and undular bore development, are selected to employ model validation under the closed and open boundary conditions. Numerical results are compared with the analytical solutions or published laboratory and numerical results. It is found that the proposed approach is capable of resolving weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows. Thus, the proposed SPH approach can supplement the lack of the SPH-Boussinesq researches in the literatures, and provide an alternative to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels.

  15. Allocation of river flows for restoration of floodplain forest ecosystems: a review of approaches and their applicability in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francine M R; Rood, Stewart B

    2003-07-01

    Floodplain forests are flood-dependent ecosystems. They rely on well-timed, periodic floods for the provision of regeneration sites and on tapered flood recession curves for the successful establishment of seedlings. These overbank flood events are described as "regeneration flows." Once floodplain forest trees are established, in order to grow they also require adequate, although variable, river stage levels or "maintenance flows" throughout the year. Regeneration flows are often synonymous with flood flows and only occur periodically. There is a disparity between this need for varied interannual flows over the decadal time frame and the usual annual cycle of flow management currently used by most river management agencies. Maintenance flows are often closer to established minimum flows and much easier to provide by current operational practices.A number of environmental flow methodologies, developed in North America, Australia, and South Africa are described in this review. They include the needs of the floodplain environment in the management and allocation of river flows. In North America, these methodologies have been put into practice in a number of river basins specifically to restore floodplain forest ecosystems. In Australia and South Africa, a series of related "holistic approaches" have been developed that include the needs of floodplain ecosystems as well as in-channel ecosystems. In most European countries, restoration of floodplain forests takes place at a few localized restoration sites, more often as part of a flood-defense scheme and usually not coordinated with flow allocation decisions throughout the river basin. The potential to apply existing environmental flow methodologies to the management of European floodplain forests is discussed. PMID:14703910

  16. Minimal sensor count approach to fuzzy logic rotary blood pump flow control.

    PubMed

    Casas, Fernando; Ahmed, Nisar; Reeves, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    A rotary blood pump fuzzy logic flow controller without flow sensors was developed and tested in vitro. The controller, implemented in LabView, was set to maintain a flow set point in the presence of external pressure disturbances. Flow was estimated as a function of measured pump's delta P and speed, using a steady-state, nonlinear approximation. The fuzzy controller used the pump's flow estimate and delta P as feedback variables. The defuzzified control output manipulated the pump speed. Membership functions included flow error, delta P, and pump speed. Experimental runs in a mock loop (water/glycerin 3.5 cPs, 37 degrees C), using the estimated flow, were compared with those using a Transonic flow meter for nine conditions of flow and delta P (4 to 6 L/min, 150 to 350 mm Hg). Pressure disturbances generated by a servo pinch valve ranged from +/-23 to +/-47 mm Hg. Results indicated that the fuzzy controller ably regulated the flow set point to within +/-10% of the baseline even under large swings in pressure. There was no difference in controller performance between the ultrasonic flow measurement and the estimated flow calculation scenarios. These tests demonstrated that the fuzzy controller is capable of rejecting disturbances and regulating flow to acceptable limits while using a flow estimate. PMID:17413551

  17. Optimizing neural networks for river flow forecasting - Evolutionary Computation methods versus the Levenberg-Marquardt approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Napiorkowski, Jarosław J.

    2011-09-01

    SummaryAlthough neural networks have been widely applied to various hydrological problems, including river flow forecasting, for at least 15 years, they have usually been trained by means of gradient-based algorithms. Recently nature inspired Evolutionary Computation algorithms have rapidly developed as optimization methods able to cope not only with non-differentiable functions but also with a great number of local minima. Some of proposed Evolutionary Computation algorithms have been tested for neural networks training, but publications which compare their performance with gradient-based training methods are rare and present contradictory conclusions. The main goal of the present study is to verify the applicability of a number of recently developed Evolutionary Computation optimization methods, mostly from the Differential Evolution family, to multi-layer perceptron neural networks training for daily rainfall-runoff forecasting. In the present paper eight Evolutionary Computation methods, namely the first version of Differential Evolution (DE), Distributed DE with Explorative-Exploitative Population Families, Self-Adaptive DE, DE with Global and Local Neighbors, Grouping DE, JADE, Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization and Efficient Population Utilization Strategy Particle Swarm Optimization are tested against the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - probably the most efficient in terms of speed and success rate among gradient-based methods. The Annapolis River catchment was selected as the area of this study due to its specific climatic conditions, characterized by significant seasonal changes in runoff, rapid floods, dry summers, severe winters with snowfall, snow melting, frequent freeze and thaw, and presence of river ice - conditions which make flow forecasting more troublesome. The overall performance of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and the DE with Global and Local Neighbors method for neural networks training turns out to be superior to other

  18. Balancing practicality and hydrologic realism: a parsimonious approach for simulating rapid groundwater recharge via unsaturated-zone preferential flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of preferential flow on recharge and contaminant transport poses a considerable challenge to water-resources management. Typical hydrologic models require extensive site characterization, but can underestimate fluxes when preferential flow is significant. A recently developed source-responsive model incorporates film-flow theory with conservation of mass to estimate unsaturated-zone preferential fluxes with readily available data. The term source-responsive describes the sensitivity of preferential flow in response to water availability at the source of input. We present the first rigorous tests of a parsimonious formulation for simulating water table fluctuations using two case studies, both in arid regions with thick unsaturated zones of fractured volcanic rock. Diffuse flow theory cannot adequately capture the observed water table responses at both sites; the source-responsive model is a viable alternative. We treat the active area fraction of preferential flow paths as a scaled function of water inputs at the land surface then calibrate the macropore density to fit observed water table rises. Unlike previous applications, we allow the characteristic film-flow velocity to vary, reflecting the lag time between source and deep water table responses. Analysis of model performance and parameter sensitivity for the two case studies underscores the importance of identifying thresholds for initiation of film flow in unsaturated rocks, and suggests that this parsimonious approach is potentially of great practical value.

  19. Computation of viscous flows over airfoils, including separation, with a coupling approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leballeur, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Viscous incompressible flows over single or multiple airfoils, with or without separation, were computed using an inviscid flow calculation, with modified boundary conditions, and by a method providing calculation and coupling for boundary layers and wakes, within conditions of strong viscous interaction. The inviscid flow is calculated with a method of singularities, the numerics of which were improved by using both source and vortex distributions over profiles, associated with regularity conditions for the fictitious flows inside of the airfoils. The viscous calculation estimates the difference between viscous flow and inviscid interacting flow, with a direct or inverse integral method, laminar or turbulent, with or without reverse flow. The numerical method for coupling determines iteratively the boundary conditions for the inviscid flow. For attached viscous layers regions, an underrelaxation is locally calculated to insure stability. For separated or separating regions, a special semi-inverse algorithm is used. Comparisons with experiments are presented.

  20. A Many-Task Parallel Approach for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Yang, Xiaofan; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-16

    Continuum-scale models have long been used to study subsurface flow, transport, and reactions but lack the ability to resolve processes that are governed by pore-scale mixing. Recently, pore-scale models, which explicitly resolve individual pores and soil grains, have been developed to more accurately model pore-scale phenomena, particularly reaction processes that are controlled by local mixing. However, pore-scale models are prohibitively expensive for modeling application-scale domains. This motivates the use of a hybrid multiscale approach in which continuum- and pore-scale codes are coupled either hierarchically or concurrently within an overall simulation domain (time and space). This approach is naturally suited to an adaptive, loosely-coupled many-task methodology with three potential levels of concurrency. Each individual code (pore- and continuum-scale) can be implemented in parallel; multiple semi-independent instances of the pore-scale code are required at each time step providing a second level of concurrency; and Monte Carlo simulations of the overall system to represent uncertainty in material property distributions provide a third level of concurrency. We have developed a hybrid multiscale model of a mixing-controlled reaction in a porous medium wherein the reaction occurs only over a limited portion of the domain. Loose, minimally-invasive coupling of pre-existing parallel continuum- and pore-scale codes has been accomplished by an adaptive script-based workflow implemented in the Swift workflow system. We describe here the methods used to create the model system, adaptively control multiple coupled instances of pore- and continuum-scale simulations, and maximize the scalability of the overall system. We present results of numerical experiments conducted on NERSC supercomputing systems; our results demonstrate that loose many-task coupling provides a scalable solution for multiscale subsurface simulations with minimal overhead.

  1. Space station electrical power distribution analysis using a load flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, Ervin M.

    1987-01-01

    The space station's electrical power system will evolve and grow in a manner much similar to the present terrestrial electrical power system utilities. The initial baseline reference configuration will contain more than 50 nodes or busses, inverters, transformers, overcurrent protection devices, distribution lines, solar arrays, and/or solar dynamic power generating sources. The system is designed to manage and distribute 75 KW of power single phase or three phase at 20 KHz, and grow to a level of 300 KW steady state, and must be capable of operating at a peak of 450 KW for 5 to 10 min. In order to plan far into the future and keep pace with load growth, a load flow power system analysis approach must be developed and utilized. This method is a well known energy assessment and management tool that is widely used throughout the Electrical Power Utility Industry. The results of a comprehensive evaluation and assessment of an Electrical Distribution System Analysis Program (EDSA) is discussed. Its potential use as an analysis and design tool for the 20 KHz space station electrical power system is addressed.

  2. An approximate viscous shock layer approach to calculating hypersonic flows about blunt-nosed bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. MCN.; Dejarnette, F. R.

    1991-01-01

    An approximate axisymmetric method has been developed which can reliably calculate fully viscous hypersonic flows over blunt-nosed bodies. By substituting Maslen's second order pressure expression for the normal momentum equation, a simplified form of the viscous shock layer (VSL) equations is obtained. This approach can solve both the subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer without a starting solution for the shock shape. Since the method is fully viscous, the problems associated with coupling a boundary-layer solution with an inviscid-layer solution are avoided. This procedure is significantly faster than the parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) or VSL solvers and would be useful in a preliminary design environment. Problems associated with a previously developed approximate VSL technique are addressed. Surface heat transfer and pressure predictions are comparable to both VSL results and experimental data. The present technique generates its own shock shape as part of its solution, and therefore could be used to provide more accurate initial shock shapes for higher-order procedures which require starting solutions.

  3. Rockfall and debris flow mitigation : Innovative systems for a new efficient and integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, Nicolas; Robit, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    In the French Alps the latest generation of high performance systems against rockfall and debris flow has been developed by the contractor GTS taking a relatively lightweight approach, developed from decades of experience working with the more traditional catch fence systems. It allows to adapt the solution to the field rather than the opposite. Moreover it offers relevant alternates economically, in a global context of budget restrictions, and environmentally, with lower carbon emissions and impacts. The new barriers and patented systems have minimal anchoring requirements and are effective in difficult ground conditions. They are designed to be as simple, safe and rapid as possible to install in any location, including high on the slope by rope access workers. Barriers can now cost effectively be installed near the failure source, where energies are lower and where shorter fences can mitigate the hazard. System components have been kept as simple as possible to ensure maximum lifetime, minimise maintenance requirements and to facilitate repairs in the field at low cost. GTS has carried out extensive multi-scale analyses of their new systems including full scale testing to meet evolving guidelines.

  4. A Hybrid Statistics/Amplitude Approach to the Theory of Interacting Drift Waves and Zonal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey; Krommes, John

    2012-10-01

    An approach to the theory of drift-wave--zonal-flow systems is adopted in which only the DW statistics but the full ZF amplitude are kept. Any statistical description of turbulence must inevitably face the closure problem. A particular closure, the Stochastic Structural Stability Theory (SSST), has been recently studied in plasmafootnotetextB. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, Phys. Plasmas 16, 112903 (2009). as well as atmospheric-science contexts. First, the predictions of the SSST are examined in the weakly inhomogeneous limit, using the generalized Hasegawa--Mima model as a simple example. It is found that the equations do not admit a complete solution, as the characteristic ZF scale cannot be calculated. To address that deficiency, an analysis is performed of a bifurcation from a DW-only state to a DW--ZF state in the Hasegawa--Wakatani model in order to gain analytical insight into a nonlinear DW--ZF equilibrium, including prediction of the charactistic scale. The calculation permits discussion of the relative importance of eddy shearing and coupling to damped eigenmodes for the saturation of the self-consistently regulated turbulence level.

  5. Material flow analysis of NdFeB magnets for Denmark: a comprehensive waste flow sampling and analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Habib, Komal; Schibye, Peter Klausen; Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Dall, Ole; Wenzel, Henrik

    2014-10-21

    Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become highly desirable for modern hi-tech applications. These magnets, in general, contain two key rare earth elements (REEs), i.e., neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy), which are responsible for the very high strength of these magnets, allowing for considerable size and weight reduction in modern applications. This study aims to explore the current and future potential of a secondary supply of neodymium and dysprosium from recycling of NdFeB magnets. For this purpose, material flow analysis (MFA) has been carried out to perform the detailed mapping of stocks and flows of NdFeB magnets in Denmark. A novel element of this study is the value added to the traditionally practiced MFAs at national and/or global levels by complementing them with a comprehensive sampling and elemental analysis of NdFeB magnets, taken out from a sample of 157 different products representing 18 various product types. The results show that the current amount of neodymium and dysprosium in NdFeB magnets present in the Danish waste stream is only 3 and 0.2 Mg, respectively. However, this number is estimated to increase to 175 Mg of neodymium and 11.4 Mg of dysprosium by 2035. Nevertheless, efficient recovery of these elements from a very diverse electronic waste stream remains a logistic and economic challenge. PMID:25238428

  6. Continuous monitoring of a large active earth flow using an integrated GPS - automatic total station approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, A.

    2009-04-01

    Landslide monitoring has evolved as a crucial tool in civil protection to mitigate and prevent disasters. The research presents an approach to continuous monitoring of a large-scale active earth flow using a system that integrates surface measurements obtained by a GPS and an automatic total station. With the data obtained from the system the landslide can be monitored in near-real-time and surface displacements can be directly utilized to provide early warning of slope movements and to study the behavior of the landslide, e.g. to predict timing and mechanisms of future failure. The Valoria landslide located in the northern Apennines of Italy was reactivated in 2001, 2005 and 2007 damaging roads and endangering houses. A monitoring system was installed in 2007-2008 in the frame of a civil protection plan aimed at risk mitigation. The system consists of an automatic total station measuring about 40 prisms located in the landslide to a maximum distance of 1.800 km; one double-frequency GPS receiver connects in streaming by wireless communication with 4 single-frequency GPS in side the flow. Until December 2007 the monitoring network was operated with periodic static surveying followed by the data post-processing. From September 2007 until March 2008 the landslide deformation was evaluated by periodic surveys with the total station and the GPS system. This first measure showed that the displacements were influenced by the rainfall events and by the snow melting. The total displacements measured vary from centimeter scale in the crown zone, where retrogressive movements were in progress, to over 50 m in the flow track zone. Starting in March 2008 data acquisition by the total station system and GPS were automated in order to allow continuous and near-real-time data processing. The displacement data collected in one and a half year of continuous operation show different acceleration and deceleration phases as a result of the pore water pressure distribution inside the

  7. Flow-Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires: A Novel Approach for Controlled Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Palaniappan, Kumaranand; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan; Smith, Nickolaus A.; Dickerson, Robert M.; Casson, Joanna L.; Baldwin, Jon K.

    2012-06-07

    Semiconductor nanowires (SC-NWs) have potential applications in diverse technologies from nanoelectronics and photonics to energy harvesting and storage due to their quantum-confined opto-electronic properties coupled with their highly anisotropic shape. Here, we explore new approaches to an important solution-based growth method known as solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. In SLS, molecular precursors are reacted in the presence of low-melting metal nanoparticles that serve as molten fluxes to catalyze the growth of the SC-NWs. The mechanism of growth is assumed to be similar to that of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, with the clear distinctions of being conducted in solution in the presence of coordinating ligands and at relatively lower temperatures (<300 C). The resultant SC-NWs are soluble in common organic solvents and solution processable, offering advantages such as simplified processing, scale-up, ultra-small diameters for quantum-confinement effects, and flexible choice of materials from group III-V to groups II-VI, IV-VI, as well as truly ternary I-III-VI semiconductors as we recently demonstrates. Despite these advantages of SLS growth, VLS offers several clear opportunities not allowed by conventional SLS. Namely, VLS allows sequential addition of precursors for facile synthesis of complex axial heterostructures. In addition, growth proceeds relatively slowly compared to SLS, allowing clear assessments of growth kinetics. In order to retain the materials and processing flexibility afforded by SLS, but add the elements of controlled growth afforded by VLS, we transformed SLS into a flow based method by adapting it to synthesis in a microfluidic system. By this new method - so-called 'flow-SLS' (FSLS) - we have now demonstrated unprecedented fabrication of multi-segmented SC-NWs, e.g., 8-segmented CdSe/ZnSe defined by either compositionally abrupt or alloyed interfaces as a function of growth conditions. In addition, we have studied growth rates as a

  8. Regional based modeling approach for rainfall-induced debris flows in the continental-climatic Northern Tien Shan (SE Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Küfmann, Carola; Haas, Florian; Baume, Otfried; Becht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The high mountain systems of Central Asia (Hindukush, Pamir and Tien Shan) are dominated by continental-climatic conditions. Nevertheless, westerly maritime air circulation and convective rainfalls during the summer season result in high rainfall intensities. In combination with a high availability of unconsolidated material rainfall triggered debris flows are prominent and intensive geomorphologic processes in these mountain areas. The presented study aims to figure out a regional based modeling approach for rainfall-induced debris flow processes based on combination of a disposition model for debris flow starting zones with process-flow models. The investigation area has a size of about 700 square kilometers and is situated in the Northern Tien Shan mountains in SE Kazakhstan (investigation areas: valleys of Prochadnaja, Big Almatinka, Little Almatinka and Left Talgar). The area is characterized by mountain forest zone, alpine meadows and high-alpine glaciated areas with the highest peaks at 4500m. In a first step the disposition (point of process triggering) of actual debris flows was analyzed. Due to different triggering mechanisms, the processes were divided into channel-type and slope-type debris flows. Detailed mapping of actual debris flows initiation areas and a GIS-based geostatistical disposition analysis are used to identify the main geofactor-variables and geofactor combinations which enhance the triggering of rainfall-induced debris flows. It can be shown that both, longtime variable geofactors (such as local geomorphology and hydrology) plays a significant role for triggering debris flows, as well as mid- and short time variable geofactors. Especially actual permafrost distribution and degradation plus glacier retreat comes into the focus of interest. This is most notably for rainfall induced slope-type debris flows which primarily are triggered in the discontinuous and continuous permafrost areas eroding younger unconsolidated material from actual

  9. A semi-intrusive deterministic approach to uncertainty quantification in non-linear fluid flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, Rémi; Congedo, Pietro Marco

    2013-02-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of a semi-intrusive (SI) method allowing the computation of statistics of linear and non linear PDEs solutions. This method shows to be very efficient to deal with probability density function of whatsoever form, long-term integration and discontinuities in stochastic space. Given a stochastic PDE where randomness is defined on Ω, starting from (i) a description of the solution in term of a space variables, (ii) a numerical scheme defined for any event ω∈Ω and (iii) a (family) of random variables that may be correlated, the solution is numerically described by its conditional expectancies of point values or cell averages and its evaluation constructed from the deterministic scheme. One of the tools is a tessellation of the random space as in finite volume methods for the space variables. Then, using these conditional expectancies and the geometrical description of the tessellation, a piecewise polynomial approximation in the random variables is computed using a reconstruction method that is standard for high order finite volume space, except that the measure is no longer the standard Lebesgue measure but the probability measure. This reconstruction is then used to formulate a scheme on the numerical approximation of the solution from the deterministic scheme. This new approach is said semi-intrusive because it requires only a limited amount of modification in a deterministic solver to quantify uncertainty on the state when the solver includes uncertain variables. The effectiveness of this method is illustrated for a modified version of Kraichnan-Orszag three-mode problem where a discontinuous pdf is associated to the stochastic variable, and for a nozzle flow with shocks. The results have been analyzed in terms of accuracy and probability measure flexibility. Finally, the importance of the probabilistic reconstruction in the stochastic space is shown up on an example where the exact solution is computable, the viscous

  10. A machine-learning approach for computation of fractional flow reserve from coronary computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Rapaka, Saikiran; Passerini, Tiziano; Georgescu, Bogdan; Schwemmer, Chris; Schoebinger, Max; Flohr, Thomas; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-07-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a functional index quantifying the severity of coronary artery lesions and is clinically obtained using an invasive, catheter-based measurement. Recently, physics-based models have shown great promise in being able to noninvasively estimate FFR from patient-specific anatomical information, e.g., obtained from computed tomography scans of the heart and the coronary arteries. However, these models have high computational demand, limiting their clinical adoption. In this paper, we present a machine-learning-based model for predicting FFR as an alternative to physics-based approaches. The model is trained on a large database of synthetically generated coronary anatomies, where the target values are computed using the physics-based model. The trained model predicts FFR at each point along the centerline of the coronary tree, and its performance was assessed by comparing the predictions against physics-based computations and against invasively measured FFR for 87 patients and 125 lesions in total. Correlation between machine-learning and physics-based predictions was excellent (0.9994, P < 0.001), and no systematic bias was found in Bland-Altman analysis: mean difference was -0.00081 ± 0.0039. Invasive FFR ≤ 0.80 was found in 38 lesions out of 125 and was predicted by the machine-learning algorithm with a sensitivity of 81.6%, a specificity of 83.9%, and an accuracy of 83.2%. The correlation was 0.729 (P < 0.001). Compared with the physics-based computation, average execution time was reduced by more than 80 times, leading to near real-time assessment of FFR. Average execution time went down from 196.3 ± 78.5 s for the CFD model to ∼2.4 ± 0.44 s for the machine-learning model on a workstation with 3.4-GHz Intel i7 8-core processor. PMID:27079692

  11. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  12. A semi-intrusive deterministic approach to uncertainty quantification in non-linear fluid flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, Rémi; Congedo, Pietro Marco

    2013-02-15

    This paper deals with the formulation of a semi-intrusive (SI) method allowing the computation of statistics of linear and non linear PDEs solutions. This method shows to be very efficient to deal with probability density function of whatsoever form, long-term integration and discontinuities in stochastic space. Given a stochastic PDE where randomness is defined on Ω, starting from (i) a description of the solution in term of a space variables, (ii) a numerical scheme defined for any event ω∈Ω and (iii) a (family) of random variables that may be correlated, the solution is numerically described by its conditional expectancies of point values or cell averages and its evaluation constructed from the deterministic scheme. One of the tools is a tessellation of the random space as in finite volume methods for the space variables. Then, using these conditional expectancies and the geometrical description of the tessellation, a piecewise polynomial approximation in the random variables is computed using a reconstruction method that is standard for high order finite volume space, except that the measure is no longer the standard Lebesgue measure but the probability measure. This reconstruction is then used to formulate a scheme on the numerical approximation of the solution from the deterministic scheme. This new approach is said semi-intrusive because it requires only a limited amount of modification in a deterministic solver to quantify uncertainty on the state when the solver includes uncertain variables. The effectiveness of this method is illustrated for a modified version of Kraichnan–Orszag three-mode problem where a discontinuous pdf is associated to the stochastic variable, and for a nozzle flow with shocks. The results have been analyzed in terms of accuracy and probability measure flexibility. Finally, the importance of the probabilistic reconstruction in the stochastic space is shown up on an example where the exact solution is computable, the viscous

  13. Fluidelastic instability in a confined annular flow: An experimental and analytical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Porcher, G.; Langre, E. de

    1996-12-01

    Self excitation of slender structures under axial flow have been reported in a large variety of local flow configurations. This paper reports the result of a research program, both experimental and analytical, aimed at the result of the basic phenomena leading to such instabilities. A cylindrical body with a diffuser is put in a confined annular flow of water. A case of flutter is observed and analyzed with a classical potential flow method and with a friction based model. Closed-form solutions are proposed and the origin of the flutter instability is discussed. This is relevant for nuclear fuel studies.

  14. Modelling subsurface storm flow with the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) approach: application to the Alzette River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. P.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Fenicia, F.; Pfister, L.

    2006-02-01

    A new domain, the macropore domain, for describing subsurface storm flow has been introduced to the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) approach. The mass balance equations have been reformulated and the closure relations associated with subsurface storm flow have been developed. The model code, REWASH, has been revised accordingly. With the revised REWASH, a rainfall-runoff model has been built for the Hesperange catchment, a sub-catchment of the Alzette River Basin. This meso-scale catchment is characterised by fast catchment response to precipitation and subsurface storm flow is one of the dominant runoff generation processes. The model has been evaluated by a multi-criteria approach using both discharge and groundwater table data measured at various locations in the study site. It is demonstrated that subsurface storm flow contributes considerably to stream flow in the study area. Simulation results show that discharges measured along the main river course are well simulated and groundwater dynamics is well captured, suggesting that the model is a useful tool for catchment-scale hydrological analysis.

  15. Modelling subsurface storm flow with the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) approach: application to the Alzette River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. P.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Fenicia, F.; Pfister, L.

    2006-12-01

    A new domain, the macropore domain describing subsurface storm flow, has been introduced to the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) approach. The mass balance equations have been reformulated and the closure relations associated with subsurface storm flow have been developed. The model code, REWASH, has been revised accordingly. With the revised REWASH, a rainfall-runoff model has been built for the Hesperange catchment, a sub-catchment of the Alzette River Basin. This meso-scale catchment is characterised by fast catchment response to precipitation, and subsurface storm flow is one of the dominant runoff generation processes. The model has been evaluated by a multi-criteria approach using both discharge and groundwater table data measured at various locations in the study site. It is demonstrated that subsurface storm flow contributes considerably to stream flow in the study area. Simulation results show that discharges measured along the main river course are well simulated and groundwater dynamics is well captured, suggesting that the model is a useful tool for catchment-scale hydrological analysis.

  16. Sum-of-squares of polynomials approach to nonlinear stability of fluid flows: an example of application

    PubMed Central

    Tutty, O.

    2015-01-01

    With the goal of providing the first example of application of a recently proposed method, thus demonstrating its ability to give results in principle, global stability of a version of the rotating Couette flow is examined. The flow depends on the Reynolds number and a parameter characterizing the magnitude of the Coriolis force. By converting the original Navier–Stokes equations to a finite-dimensional uncertain dynamical system using a partial Galerkin expansion, high-degree polynomial Lyapunov functionals were found by sum-of-squares of polynomials optimization. It is demonstrated that the proposed method allows obtaining the exact global stability limit for this flow in a range of values of the parameter characterizing the Coriolis force. Outside this range a lower bound for the global stability limit was obtained, which is still better than the energy stability limit. In the course of the study, several results meaningful in the context of the method used were also obtained. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate the applicability of the recently proposed approach to global stability of the fluid flows. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case in which global stability of a fluid flow has been proved by a generic method for the value of a Reynolds number greater than that which could be achieved with the energy stability approach. PMID:26730219

  17. Assessment of the Partially Resolved Numerical Simulation (PRNS) Approach in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Turbulent Nonreacting and Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an approach which aims at bridging the gap between the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and the traditional large eddy simulation (LES) approach. It has the characteristics of the very large eddy simulation (VLES) and we call this approach the partially-resolved numerical simulation (PRNS). Systematic simulations using the National Combustion Code (NCC) have been carried out for fully developed turbulent pipe flows at different Reynolds numbers to evaluate the PRNS approach. Also presented are the sample results of two demonstration cases: nonreacting flow in a single injector flame tube and reacting flow in a Lean Direct Injection (LDI) hydrogen combustor.

  18. Topographic controls on overland flow generation in a forest - An ensemble tree approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loos, Martin; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    SummaryOverland flow is an important hydrological pathway in many forests of the humid tropics. Its generation is subject to topographic controls at differing spatial scales. Our objective was to identify such controls on the occurrence of overland flow in a lowland tropical rainforest. To this end, we installed 95 overland flow detectors (OFDs) in four nested subcatchments of the Lutzito catchment on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, and monitored the frequency of overland flow occurrence during 18 rainfall events at each OFD location temporal frequency. For each such location, we derived three non-digital terrain attributes and 17 digital ones, of which 15 were based on Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of three different resolutions. These attributes then served as input into a Random Forest ensemble tree model to elucidate the importance and partial and joint dependencies of topographic controls for overland flow occurrence. Lutzito features a high median temporal frequency in overland flow occurrence of 0.421 among OFD locations. However, spatial temporal frequencies of overland flow occurrence vary strongly among these locations and the subcatchments of Lutzito catchment. This variability is best explained by (1) microtopography, (2) coarse terrain sloping and (3) various measures of distance-to-channel, with the contribution of all other terrain attributes being small. Microtopographic features such as concentrated flowlines and wash areas produce highest temporal frequencies, whereas the occurrence of overland flow drops sharply for flow distances and terrain sloping beyond certain threshold values. Our study contributes to understanding both the spatial controls on overland flow generation and the limitations of terrain attributes for the spatially explicit prediction of overland flow frequencies.

  19. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Margaris, Konstantinos N; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James; Black, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ -PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ -PIV technique in these vessels. PMID:26830061

  20. MODELING AIR FLOW DYNAMICS IN RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS: A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper refines and extends an earlier study--relating to the design of optimal radon mitigation systems based on subslab depressurization-- that suggested that subslab air flow induced by a central suction point be treated as radial air flow through a porous bed contained betw...

  1. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaris, Konstantinos N.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C.; Moore, James; Black, Richard A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ-PIV technique in these vessels.

  2. A new modeling approach for simulating microtopography-dominated, discontinuous overland flow on infiltrating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Chu, Xuefeng

    2015-04-01

    Realistic modeling of discontinuous overland flow on irregular topographic surfaces has been proven to be a challenge. This study is aimed to develop a new modeling framework to simulate the discontinuous puddle-to-puddle (P2P) overland flow dynamics for infiltrating surfaces with various microtopographic characteristics. In the P2P model, puddles were integrated in a well-delineated, cascaded drainage system to facilitate explicit simulation of their dynamic behaviors and interactions. Overland flow and infiltration were respectively simulated by using the diffusion wave model and a modified Green-Ampt model for the DEM-derived flow drainage network that consisted of a series of puddle-based units (PBUs). The P2P model was tested by using a series of data from laboratory overland flow experiments for various microtopography, soil, and rainfall conditions. The modeling results indicated that the hierarchical relationships and microtopographic properties of puddles significantly affected their connectivity, filling-spilling dynamics, and the associated threshold flow. Surface microtopography and rainfall characteristics also exhibited strong influences on the spatio-temporal distributions of infiltration rates, runoff fluxes, and unsaturated flow. The model tests demonstrated its applicability in simulating microtopography-dominated overland flow on infiltrating surfaces.

  3. The Current Status of Unsteady CFD Approaches for Aerodynamic Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Singer, Bart A.; Yamaleev, Nail; Vatsa, Veer N.; Viken, Sally A.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the current status of time dependent algorithms is presented. Special attention is given to algorithms used to predict fluid actuator flows, as well as other active and passive flow control devices. Capabilities for the next decade are predicted, and principal impediments to the progress of time-dependent algorithms are identified.

  4. A multiobjective ant colony optimization approach for scheduling environmental flow management alternatives with application to the River Murray, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szemis, J. M.; Dandy, G. C.; Maier, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    In regulated river systems, such as the River Murray in Australia, the efficient use of water to preserve and restore biota in the river, wetlands, and floodplains is of concern for water managers. Available management options include the timing of river flow releases and operation of wetland flow control structures. However, the optimal scheduling of these environmental flow management alternatives is a difficult task, since there are generally multiple wetlands and floodplains with a range of species, as well as a large number of management options that need to be considered. Consequently, this problem is a multiobjective optimization problem aimed at maximizing ecological benefit while minimizing water allocations within the infrastructure constraints of the system under consideration. This paper presents a multiobjective optimization framework, which is based on a multiobjective ant colony optimization approach, for developing optimal trade-offs between water allocation and ecological benefit. The framework is applied to a reach of the River Murray in South Australia. Two studies are formulated to assess the impact of (i) upstream system flow constraints and (ii) additional regulators on this trade-off. The results indicate that unless the system flow constraints are relaxed, there is limited additional ecological benefit as allocation increases. Furthermore the use of regulators can increase ecological benefits while using less water. The results illustrate the utility of the framework since the impact of flow control infrastructure on the trade-offs between water allocation and ecological benefit can be investigated, thereby providing valuable insight to managers.

  5. An approach to assess the marginal environmental costs for flow regulation: an example in three European rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jalon Diego, Garcia; de Jalon Silvestre, Garcia; Tanago Marta, Gonzalez

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades there has been a growing concern about water environmental costs. 'Polluter should pay' has been a phrase repeated in numerous policy-making processes. Water abstraction for Irrigation, Hydropower or water supply for Domestic or Industrial porpoises alters natural flow regimes impacting severely fluvial Ecosystems. The objective of this paper is to develop an evaluation of the marginal environmental costs for flow regulation. This approach is based on the idea 'who regulates flows should pay' and the amount to be paid should be proportional on the intensity, duration and frequency of the resulting regulated flows. The methodology proposed includes three separated steps: (i) estimating the natural flow regime of a river segment through studying the hydrologic conditions before the river is affected by a determined anthropogenic impact, (ii) assessing the hydrologic alteration of the river segment according to the estimated natural flow regime, and (iii) calculating marginal environmental costs of water supply. The three different case studies where the methodology was applied were the Esla River (Spain), the Upper River Tyne (England) and the Marna River (Norway).

  6. A unified approach for numerical simulation of viscous compressible and incompressible flows over adiabatic and isothermal walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Soliman, M.; White, S.

    1992-01-01

    A new formulation (including the choice of variables, their non-dimensionalization, and the form of the artificial viscosity) is proposed for the numerical solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations for compressible and incompressible flows with heat transfer. With the present approach, the same code can be used for constant as well as variable density flows. The changes of the density due to pressure and temperature variations are identified and it is shown that the low Mach number approximation is a special case. At zero Mach number, the density changes due to the temperature variation are accounted for, mainly through a body force term in the momentum equation. It is also shown that the Boussinesq approximation of the buoyancy effects in an incompressible flow is a special case. To demonstrate the new capability, three examples are tested. Flows in driven cavities with adiabatic and isothermal walls are simulated with the same code as well as incompressible and supersonic flows over a wall with and without a groove. Finally, viscous flow simulations of an oblique shock reflection from a flat plate are shown to be in good agreement with the solutions available in literature.

  7. The gravitational signature of internal flows in giant planets: Comparing the thermal wind approach with barotropic potential-surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Y.; Davighi, J. E.; Galanti, E.; Hubbard, W. B.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming Juno and Cassini gravity measurements of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, will allow probing the internal dynamics of these planets through accurate analysis of their gravity spectra. To date, two general approaches have been suggested for relating the flow velocities and gravity fields. In the first, barotropic potential surface models, which naturally take into account the oblateness of the planet, are used to calculate the gravity field. However, barotropicity restricts the flows to be constant along cylinders parallel to the rotation axis. The second approach, calculated in the reference frame of the rotating planet, assumes that due to the large scale and rapid rotation of these planets, the winds are to leading order in geostrophic balance. Therefore, thermal wind balance relates the wind shear to the density gradients. While this approach can take into account any internal flow structure, it is limited to only calculating the dynamical gravity contributions, and has traditionally assumed spherical symmetry. This study comes to relate the two approaches both from a theoretical perspective, showing that they are analytically identical in the barotropic limit, and numerically, through systematically comparing the different model solutions for the gravity harmonics. For the barotropic potential surface models we employ two independent solution methods - the potential-theory and Maclaurin spheroid methods. We find that despite the sphericity assumption, in the barotropic limit the thermal wind solutions match well the barotropic oblate potential-surface solutions.

  8. AWSCS-A System to Evaluate Different Approaches for the Automatic Composition and Execution of Web Services Flows

    PubMed Central

    Tardiole Kuehne, Bruno; Estrella, Julio Cezar; Nunes, Luiz Henrique; Martins de Oliveira, Edvard; Hideo Nakamura, Luis; Gomes Ferreira, Carlos Henrique; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; Santana, Marcos José

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a system named AWSCS (Automatic Web Service Composition System) to evaluate different approaches for automatic composition of Web services, based on QoS parameters that are measured at execution time. The AWSCS is a system to implement different approaches for automatic composition of Web services and also to execute the resulting flows from these approaches. Aiming at demonstrating the results of this paper, a scenario was developed, where empirical flows were built to demonstrate the operation of AWSCS, since algorithms for automatic composition are not readily available to test. The results allow us to study the behaviour of running composite Web services, when flows with the same functionality but different problem-solving strategies were compared. Furthermore, we observed that the influence of the load applied on the running system as the type of load submitted to the system is an important factor to define which approach for the Web service composition can achieve the best performance in production. PMID:26068216

  9. Dynamics and friction drag behavior of viscoelastic flows in complex geometries: A multiscale simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppol, Anantha Padmanabha Rao

    Flows of viscoelastic polymeric fluids are of great fundamental and practical interest as polymeric materials for commodity and value-added products are processed typically in a fluid state. The nonlinear coupling between fluid motion and microstructure, which results in highly non-Newtonian theology, memory/relaxation and normal stress development or tension along streamlines, greatly complicates the analysis, design and control of such flows. This has posed tremendous challenges to researchers engaged in developing first principles models and simulations that can accurately and robustly predict the dynamical behavior of polymeric flows. Despite this, the past two decades have witnessed several significant advances towards accomplishing this goal. Yet a problem of fundamental and great pragmatic interest has defied solution to years of ardent research by several groups, namely the relationship between friction drag and flow rate in inertialess flows of highly elastic polymer solutions in complex kinematics flows. First principles-based solution of this long-standing problem in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is the goal of this research. To achieve our objective, it is essential to develop the capability to perform large-scale multiscale simulations, which integrate continuum-level finite element solvers for the conservation of mass and momentum with fast integrators of stochastic differential equations that describe the evolution of polymer configuration. Hence, in this research we have focused our attention on development of a parallel, multiscale simulation algorithm that is capable of robustly and efficiently simulating complex kinematics flows of dilute polymeric solutions using the first principles based bead-spring chain description of the polymer molecules. The fidelity and computational efficiency of the algorithm has been demonstrated via three benchmark flow problems, namely, the plane Couette flow, the Poiseuille flow and the 4:1:4 axisymmetric

  10. A hydrogeologic approach to identify land uses that overlie ground-water flow paths, Broward County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogeologic approach that integrates the use of hydrogeologic and spatial tools aids in the identification of land uses that overlie ground- water flow paths and permits a better understanding of ground-water flow systems. A mathematical model was used to simulate the ground-water flow system in Broward County, particle-tracking software was used to determine flow paths leading to the monitor wells in Broward County, and a Geographic Information System was used to identify which land uses overlie the flow paths. A procedure using a geographic information system to evaluate the output from a ground-water flow model has been documented. The ground-water flow model was used to represent steady-state conditions during selected wet- and dry-season months, and an advective flow particle- tracking program was used to simulate the direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer system. Digital spatial data layers were created from the particle pathlines that lead to the vicinity of the open interval of selected wells in the Broward County ground-water quality monitoring network. Buffer zone data layers were created, surrounding the particle pathlines to represent the area of contribution to the water sampled from the monitor wells. Spatial data layers, combined with a land-use data layer, were used to identify the land uses that overlie the ground-water flow paths leading to the monitor wells. The simulation analysis was performed on five Broward County wells with different hydraulic parameters to determine the source of ground-water stress, determine selected particle pathlines, and identify land use in buffer zones in the vicinity of the wells. The flow paths that lead to the grid cells containing wells G-2355, G-2373, and G-2373A did not vary between the wet- and dry-season conditions. Changes in the area of contribution for wells G-2345X and G-2369 were attributed to variations in rainfall patterns, well-field pumpage, and surface-water management practices