Science.gov

Sample records for flow model study

  1. The Pilot Training Study: Personnel Flow and the PILOT Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, W. E.

    The results of the Rand study of pilot flows and the computer-operated decision model, called the PILOT model, are described. The flows of pilots within the Air Force are caused by policies that require the career-development rotation of pilots from cockpit jobs to desk jobs, the maintenance of a supplement of pilots in excess of cockpit-related…

  2. Effect of blood flow parameters on flow patterns at arterial bifurcations--studies in models.

    PubMed

    Liepsch, D W

    1990-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are found primarily at arterial bends and bifurcations. Flow disturbances at these anatomic sites play a major role in atherogenesis. How hemodynamic factors such as vessel geometry, the pulsatile nature of blood flow, vessel wall elasticity and the non-Newtonian flow behavior of blood influence the flow field at these sites must be clarified. We have performed fundamental studies using a birefringent solution in a simplified rigid 90 degree T-bifurcation and pulsatile flow. The velocity distribution was measured with a laser Doppler anemometer. Flow in an elastic abdominal aorta model has been visualized using magnetic resonance imaging. In both flow studies, zones with negative velocity were found. These model measurements demonstrate that no flow parameter can be neglected. Further detailed studies are necessary to examine the interaction between fluid dynamic and cellular surface properties. PMID:2404201

  3. A preliminary study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Oliver Delchini; Jean C. Ragusa

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the impact of various flow models for a simplified primary coolant loop of a light water nuclear reactor. The various fluid flow models are based on the Euler equations with an additional friction term, gravity term, momentum source, and energy source. The geometric model is purposefully chosen simple and consists of a one-dimensional (1D) loop system in order to focus the study on the validity of various fluid flow approximations. The 1D loop system is represented by a rectangle; the fluid is heated up along one of the vertical legs and cooled down along the opposite leg. A pressurizer and a pump are included in the horizontal legs. The amount of energy transferred and removed from the system is equal in absolute value along the two vertical legs. The various fluid flow approximations are compressible vs. incompressible, and complete momentum equation vs. Darcy’s approximation. The ultimate goal is to compute the fluid flow models’ uncertainties and, if possible, to generate validity ranges for these models when applied to reactor analysis. We also limit this study to single phase flows with low-Mach numbers. As a result, sound waves carry a very small amount of energy in this particular case. A standard finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the system.

  4. Evaluation of uncertainties due to hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis: Steady flow, transient flow, and thermal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine; Karasaki, Kenzi

    2002-12-11

    Starting with regional geographic, geologic, surface and subsurface hydrologic, and geophysical data for the Tono area in Gifu, Japan, we develop an effective continuum model to simulate subsurface flow and transport in a 4 km by 6 km by 3 km thick fractured granite rock mass overlain by sedimentary layers. Individual fractures are not modeled explicitly. Rather, continuum permeability and porosity distributions are assigned stochastically, based on well-test data and fracture density measurements. Lithologic layering and one major fault, the Tsukiyoshi Fault, are assigned deterministically. We conduct three different studies: (1) the so-called base case, in which the model simulates the steady-state groundwater flow through the site, and then stream trace analysis is used to calculate travel times to the model boundary from specified release points; (2) simulations of transient flow during long term pump tests (LTPT) using the base-case model; and (3) thermal studies in which coupled heat flow and fluid flow are modeled, to examine the effects of the geothermal gradient on groundwater flow. The base-case study indicates that the choice of open or closed lateral boundaries has a strong influence on the regional groundwater flow patterns produced by the models, but no field data exist that can be used to determine which boundary conditions are more realistic. The LTPT study cannot be used to distinguish between the alternative boundary conditions, because the pumping rate is too small to produce an analyzable pressure response at the model boundaries. In contrast, the thermal study shows that the temperature distributions produced by the open and closed models differ greatly. Comparison with borehole temperature data may be used to eliminate the closed model from further consideration.

  5. Study of flow through a bowl mill model

    SciTech Connect

    Murty, G.V.R.; Babu, U.S.

    1998-07-01

    Bowl Mills are used in Thermal Power plants for pulverizing the raw coal, while drying, to the required fineness and achieve the desired combustion efficiency in the boiler. The Indian coals contain high ash content (some times as high as 60%) and as such the primary air has to handle media of different density namely the coal and the quartz. In this context, the distribution of air in the mill plays a significant role in the lifting of particles from the mill. The wear on the rotating components is increased through repetitive grinding because of improper distribution of air within the mill. Reduction of wear and enhancement of life of mill internals including the rotating components is a continuing goal and few more studies have been carried out in this direction. One such study is the replacement of rotating vane wheel and deflector in the separator body with an air guide ring and air diversion plate. Model studies have been carried out by traversing a five hole prove at different locations within the mill to study the distribution of flow as a result of this modification. The variation of absolute velocity and the associated flow direction has been calculated to describe the flow structure within the mill. The results are presented in non dimensional form to draw suitable conclusions. The present study indicated the possibility of improvement in the distribution of flow within the mill with increased magnitude of velocity at different locations.

  6. Study of axisymmetric flow problems by Hele-Shaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, P. V.; Sachan, J. S.

    1980-05-01

    Hele-Shaw models have been applied for solving two-dimensional, irrotational flow problems such as flow past bodies or radial seepage flow. The gap between the two plates is varied as a cubic parabola in the radial direction. Results are presented for seven axisymmetric models, including a cylindrical body with 60-deg conical head forms, an axisymmetric sluice entrance with a compound elliptical transition and radial flow to a well with a free surface. Pressure distributions were computed and compared with water-tunnel data, wind-tunnel data, finite-differential solutions and exact solutions.

  7. Modeling study of terminal transients of blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiukhina, Elena S.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2016-04-01

    In spite of growing body of experimental and theoretical results on blood flow (BF) patterns under the continuously sustained circulation, much less is known about BF dynamics under the exceptional, but still important cases of venous or arterial occlusion used in medical probes. Since these conditions finally lead to complete or nearly complete stop of red blood cells (RBC) motion, we term it as TTBF, being the Terminal Transients of Blood Flow. An extreme case of such transients is the ultimate extinction of BF after the stopping of heart contractions, during which it is governed by gravitation, some vascular-originated propulsion mechanisms, and, possibly, by RBC aggregation. Quite little is known about this process, while reports the detectable post-mortal motion of mice RBC during at least 2 hours. In our work we present the modeling study of TTBF patterns due to gravitational forces. We present the minimalistic model configuration of vasculature in order to simulate what happens immediately after the pumping of blood has been stopped. Our main findings are concerned to reversal of arterial BF, as well as to duration and non-monotonicity of transients.

  8. Performance of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models in Predicting Separated Flows: Study of the Hump Flow Model Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Daniele; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2012-01-01

    Separation can be seen in most aerodynamic flows, but accurate prediction of separated flows is still a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The behavior of several Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models in predicting the separated ow over a wall-mounted hump is studied. The strengths and weaknesses of the most popular RANS models (Spalart-Allmaras, k-epsilon, k-omega, k-omega-SST) are evaluated using the open source software OpenFOAM. The hump ow modeled in this work has been documented in the 2004 CFD Validation Workshop on Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control. Only the baseline case is treated; the slot flow control cases are not considered in this paper. Particular attention is given to predicting the size of the recirculation bubble, the position of the reattachment point, and the velocity profiles downstream of the hump.

  9. Experimental study of time-dependent flows in laboratory atmospheric flow models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Baroclinic waves in a rotating, differentially-heated annulus of liquid were studied in support of the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment. Specific objectives were to determine: (1) the nature of the flow at shallow depths, (2) the effect of a rigid lid vs. free surface, and (3) the nature of fluctuations in the waves as a function of rotation rate, depth, and type of surface. It is found that flows with a rigid lid are basically the same as those with a free surface, except for a decrease in flow rate. At shallow depths steady flows are found in essentially the same form, but the incidence of unsteady flows is greatly diminished.

  10. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared very well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  11. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared wery well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  12. Enhanced global mathematical model for studying cerebral venous blood flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lucas O; Toro, Eleuterio F

    2014-10-17

    Here we extend the global, closed-loop, mathematical model for the cardiovascular system in Müller and Toro (2014) to account for fundamental mechanisms affecting cerebral venous haemodynamics: the interaction between intracranial pressure and cerebral vasculature and the Starling-resistor like behaviour of intracranial veins. Computational results are compared with flow measurements obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), showing overall satisfactory agreement. The role played by each model component in shaping cerebral venous flow waveforms is investigated. Our results are discussed in light of current physiological concepts and model-driven considerations, indicating that the Starling-resistor like behaviour of intracranial veins at the point where they join dural sinuses is the leading mechanism. Moreover, we present preliminary results on the impact of neck vein strictures on cerebral venous hemodynamics. These results show that such anomalies cause a pressure increment in intracranial cerebral veins, even if the shielding effect of the Starling-resistor like behaviour of cerebral veins is taken into account. PMID:25169660

  13. Development, testing and application of DrainFlow: A fully distributed integrated surface-subsurface flow model for drainage study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2016-06-01

    Hydrological and hydrogeological investigation of drained land is a complex and integrated procedure. The scale of drainage studies may vary from a high-resolution small scale project through to comprehensive catchment or regional scale investigations. This wide range of scales and integrated system behaviour poses a significant challenge for the development of suitable drainage models. Toward meeting these requirements, a fully distributed coupled surface-subsurface flow model titled DrainFlow has been developed and is described. DrainFlow includes both the diffusive wave equation for surface flow components (overland flow, open drain, tile drain) and Richard's equation for saturated/unsaturated zones. To overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between wet and dry boundaries, a smooth transitioning technique is introduced to buffer the model at tile drains and at interfaces between surface and subsurface flow boundaries. This gives a continuous transition between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. DrainFlow is tested against five well-known integrated surface-subsurface flow benchmarks. DrainFlow as applied to some synthetic drainage study examples is quite flexible for changing all or part of the model dimensions as required by problem complexity, problem scale, and data availability. This flexibility enables DrainFlow to be modified to allow for changes in both scale and boundary conditions, as often encountered in real-world drainage studies. Compared to existing drainage models, DrainFlow has the advantage of estimating actual infiltration directly from the partial differential form of Richard's equation rather than through analytical or empirical infiltration approaches like the Green and Ampt equation.

  14. Modelling and analytic studies of sheared flow effects on tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, D.; Thyagaraja, A.; Sen, A.; Ham, C. J.; Hender, T. C.; Hastie, R. J.; Connor, J. W.; Kaw, P.; Mendonca, J.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of flow shear on the stability of a (2,1) tearing mode are examined using numerical and analytic studies on a number of model systems. For a cylindrical reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, linear computations using the CUTIE code show that sheared axial flows have a destabilizing effect, while sheared poloidal flows tend to reduce the growth rate of the mode. These effects are independent of the direction of the flow. For helical flows the sign of the shear in the flow matters. This symmetry breaking is also seen in the nonlinear regime where the island saturation level is found to depend on the sign of the flows. In the absence of flow, the CUTIE simulations show that the linear mode is more stable in a two fluid as compared to a single fluid model. However, in the presence of sheared axial flows a negative sheared flow is more destabilizing while a positive sheared flow is more stabilizing, compared to the single fluid model. In contrast to the cylindrical model, simulations in a toroidal model, using the MHD code NEAR, always show a stabilizing effect in the presence of a sheared toroidal flow. This is understood analytically in terms of a flow induced ‘Shafranov’ like shift in the profiles of the equilibrium current that results in a stabilizing change in Δ‧ and the saturated island size.

  15. Bifurcation study of a model of flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, A.M.E.; Corless, R.M.

    1996-12-01

    Here the mathematical model proposed by Tamura and Shimada (1987) which involves the interaction of vortex-induced vibration and galloping for a cylinder of square cross-section is considered. Their model agrees well with experiment with respect to two-dimensional nonresonant conditions which they showed numerically and the present authors showed analytically (Allison and Corless, 1995). Here the previous analytical investigation extending the solution to the resonance region is continued, again using the perturbation technique, the method of multiple scales. Using the computer algebra language MAPLE, Groebner bases are used in the bifurcation studies of the nonzero equilibria solutions to examine the response of the model. The results of the symbolic computation are verified by using MATLAB to independently examine the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix along the solution curves. This study is relevant to wind induced vibrations in power transmission lines.

  16. Flow Visualization Study of a 1/48-Scale AFTI/F111 Model to Investigate Horizontal Tail Flow Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    During flight testing of the AFTI/F111 aircraft, horizontal tail buffet was observed. Flutter analysis ruled out any aeroelastic instability, so a water-tunnel flow visualization study was conducted to investigate possible flow disturbances on the horizontal tail which might cause buffet. For this study, a 1/48-scale model was used. Four different wing cambers and one horizontal tail setting were tested between 0 and 20 deg angle of attack. These wing cambers corresponded to the following leading training edge deflections: 0/2, 10/10, 10/2, and 0/10. Flow visualization results in the form of still photographs are presented for each of the four wing cambers between 8 and 12 deg angle of attack. In general, the horizontal tail experiences flow disturbances which become more pronounced with angle of attack or wing trailing-edge deflection.

  17. Velocity profiles and plug zones in a free surface viscoplastic flow : experimental study and comparison to shallow flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freydier, Perrine; Chambon, Guillaume; Naaim, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Rheological studies concerning natural muddy debris flows have shown that these materials can be modelled as non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluids. These complex flows are generally represented using models based on a depth-integrated approach (Shallow Water) that take into account closure terms depending on the shape of the velocity profile. But to date, there is poor knowledge about the shape of velocity profiles and the position of the interface between sheared and unsheared regions (plug) in these flows, especially in the vicinity of the front. In this research, the internal dynamics of a free-surface viscoplastic flow down an inclined channel is investigated and compared to the predictions of a Shallow Water model based on the lubrication approximation. Experiments are conducted in an inclined channel whose bottom is constituted by an upward-moving conveyor belt with controlled velocity, which allows generating and observing gravity-driven stationary surges in the laboratory frame. Carbopol microgel has been used as a homogeneous and transparent viscoplastic fluid. High-resolution measurements of velocity field is performed through optical velocimetry techniques both in the uniform zone and within the front zone where flow thickness is variable and where recirculation takes place. Specific analyses have been developed to determine the position of the plug within the surge. Flow height is accessible through image processing and ultrasonic sensors. Sufficiently far from the front, experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions regarding the velocity profiles and the flow height evolution. In the vicinity of the front, however, analysis of measured velocity profiles shows an evolution of the plug different from that predicted by lubrication approximation. Accordingly, the free surface shape also deviates from the predictions of the classical Shallow Water model. These results highlight the necessity to take into account higher

  18. Parametric study of a corrosion model applied to lead-bismuth flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinsuo; Li, Ning

    2003-09-01

    The corrosion of steels exposed to flowing liquid metals is influenced by local and axial conditions of the flow systems. Despite of this, most existing corrosion models only consider the mean values based on local conditions. The present study refines a model for flowing liquid metal under non-isothermal conditions. The model is based on solving the mass transport equation in the boundary layer. Two kinds of flows are investigated: through an open pipe system and through a closed loop system. The model is applied to a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) test loop. A parametric study illustrates the effects of the axial temperature profile on corrosion. The study provides important insight to the design, operation and testing of such loop systems.

  19. Modeling blood flow heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    King, R B; Raymond, G M; Bassingthwaighte, J B

    1996-01-01

    analyzed. The separation between the distributions was further reduced when tissue content curves were analyzed. It is concluded that multipath models accounting for flow heterogeneity are a vehicle for assessing the effects of flow heterogeneity under the conditions applicable to specific laboratory protocols, that efforts should be made to assess the actual level of flow heterogeneity in the organ being studied, and that the errors in parameter estimates are generally smaller when the input function is known rather than estimated by deconvolution. PMID:8734057

  20. Parallelisation study of a three-dimensional environmental flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donncha, Fearghal; Ragnoli, Emanuele; Suits, Frank

    2014-03-01

    There are many simulation codes in the geosciences that are serial and cannot take advantage of the parallel computational resources commonly available today. One model important for our work in coastal ocean current modelling is EFDC, a Fortran 77 code configured for optimal deployment on vector computers. In order to take advantage of our cache-based, blade computing system we restructured EFDC from serial to parallel, thereby allowing us to run existing models more quickly, and to simulate larger and more detailed models that were previously impractical. Since the source code for EFDC is extensive and involves detailed computation, it is important to do such a port in a manner that limits changes to the files, while achieving the desired speedup. We describe a parallelisation strategy involving surgical changes to the source files to minimise error-prone alteration of the underlying computations, while allowing load-balanced domain decomposition for efficient execution on a commodity cluster. The use of conjugate gradient posed particular challenges due to implicit non-local communication posing a hindrance to standard domain partitioning schemes; a number of techniques are discussed to address this in a feasible, computationally efficient manner. The parallel implementation demonstrates good scalability in combination with a novel domain partitioning scheme that specifically handles mixed water/land regions commonly found in coastal simulations. The approach presented here represents a practical methodology to rejuvenate legacy code on a commodity blade cluster with reasonable effort; our solution has direct application to other similar codes in the geosciences.

  1. Turbulence Model Sensitivity and Scour Gap Effect of Unsteady Flow around Pipe: A CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abbod; Sharma, R. K.; Ganesan, P.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical investigation of incompressible and transient flow around circular pipe has been carried out at different five gap phases. Flow equations such as Navier-Stokes and continuity equations have been solved using finite volume method. Unsteady horizontal velocity and kinetic energy square root profiles are plotted using different turbulence models and their sensitivity is checked against published experimental results. Flow parameters such as horizontal velocity under pipe, pressure coefficient, wall shear stress, drag coefficient, and lift coefficient are studied and presented graphically to investigate the flow behavior around an immovable pipe and scoured bed. PMID:25136666

  2. Study of an engine flow diverter system for a large scale ejector powered aircraft model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, R. J.; Langley, B.; Plant, T.; Hunter, L.; Brock, O.

    1981-01-01

    Requirements were established for a conceptual design study to analyze and design an engine flow diverter system and to include accommodations for an ejector system in an existing 3/4 scale fighter model equipped with YJ-79 engines. Model constraints were identified and cost-effective limited modification was proposed to accept the ejectors, ducting and flow diverter valves. Complete system performance was calculated and a versatile computer program capable of analyzing any ejector system was developed.

  3. Passive urban ventilation by combined buoyancy-driven slope flow and wall flow: Parametric CFD studies on idealized city models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhiwen; Li, Yuguo

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a parametric CFD study on idealized city models to investigate the potential of slope flow in ventilating a city located in a mountainous region when the background synoptic wind is absent. Examples of such a city include Tokyo in Japan, Los Angeles and Phoenix in the US, and Hong Kong. Two types of buoyancy-driven flow are considered, i.e., slope flow from the mountain slope (katabatic wind at night and anabatic wind in the daytime), and wall flow due to heated/cooled urban surfaces. The combined buoyancy-driven flow system can serve the purpose of dispersing the accumulated urban air pollutants when the background wind is weak or absent. The microscopic picture of ventilation performance within the urban structures was evaluated in terms of air change rate (ACH) and age of air. The simulation results reveal that the slope flow plays an important role in ventilating the urban area, especially in calm conditions. Katabatic flow at night is conducive to mitigating the nocturnal urban heat island. In the present parametric study, the mountain slope angle and mountain height are assumed to be constant, and the changing variables are heating/cooling intensity and building height. For a typical mountain of 500 m inclined at an angle of 20° to the horizontal level, the interactive structure is very much dependent on the ratio of heating/cooling intensity as well as building height. When the building is lower than 60 m, the slope wind dominates. When the building is as high as 100 m, the contribution from the urban wall flow cannot be ignored. It is found that katabatic wind can be very beneficial to the thermal environment as well as air quality at the pedestrian level. The air change rate for the pedestrian volume can be as high as 300 ACH.

  4. Random-walk model studies of the transport and diffusion of pollutants in katabatic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhar, Ashok K.; Rao, K. Shankar

    1993-12-01

    The flow and turbulence quantities governing dispersion in katabatic flows vary with both height and downslope distance. This variation cannot be accounted for in conventional plume dispersion models. In this study, three random-walk models of varying complexity are formulated to simulate dispersion in katabatic flows, and their strengths and weaknesses are discussed. The flow and turbulence parameters required by these models are determined from a high-resolution two-dimensional katabatic flow model based on a turbulent kinetic energy closure. Random-walk model calculations have been performed for several values of source height and slope angle to examine the influence of these parameters on dispersion. Finally, we simulated the perfluorocarbon and heavy methane tracer releases for Night 4 of the 1980 ASCOT field study over a nearly two-dimensional slope in Anderson Creek Valley, California. The observed peak concentrations are generally well-predicted. The effects of the pooling of the drainage air could not be taken into account in our katabatic flow model and, consequently, the predicted concentrations decay much more rapidly with time than the observed values.

  5. Model gases for the detailed study of microscopic chemical nonequilibrium in diatomic gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.; Muntz, E. Phillip; Weaver, David P.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that chlorine (Cl2) and iodine (I2) are suitable model diatomic gases to use in theoretical studies of chemical nonequilibrium that account for rotational and vibrational as well as electronic processes in a gas. Because of the low temperature at which significant dissociation can be achieved in iodine, it is a particularly attractive candidate for the study of relatively low temperature chemically reacting flows, permitting detailed knowledge of the nonequilibrium populations of translational, rotational, vibrational and electronic energy levels. A preliminary investigation indicates that a useful iodine flow facility can be constructed and that diagnostic techniques are available to validate in detail prediction techniques for nonequilibrium flows.

  6. Simulation studies of flow and sediment transport using a mathematical model, Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, M.E.; Land, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    Simulation studies were made of flow and sediment transport for the Atchafalaya River basin, Louisiana using a mathematical model calibrated and supplied by the Hydrologic Engineering Center and the New Orleans District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study results are based on three, 50-year computer simulations for the following alternatives: (1) no-action alternative, (2) channelization with a center-channel flow area of 80,000 sq ft, and (3) channelization with a center-channel flow area of 100,000 sq ft. Analyses of the simulated data base for depth-frequency, inundated-area, floodway cross-section and water-surface profile relationships were made for 10 flow rates. The analyses indicate a general trend of aggradation in the lower part of the floodway with a consequent trend toward increasing the inundated area, especially at higher flood flows. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. μPIV methodology using model systems for flow studies in heterogeneous biopolymer gel microstructures.

    PubMed

    Sott, Kristin; Gebäck, Tobias; Pihl, Maria; Lorén, Niklas; Hermansson, Anne-Marie; Heintz, Alexei; Rasmuson, Anders

    2013-05-15

    A methodology for studying flow in heterogeneous soft microstructures has been developed. The methodology includes: (1) model fractal or random heterogeneous microstructures fabricated in PDMS and characterised using CLSM; (2) μPIV measurements; (3) Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of flow. It has been found that the flow behaviour in these model materials is highly dependent on pore size as well as on the connectivity and occurrence of dead ends. The experimental flow results show good agreement with predictions from the Lattice-Boltzmann modelling. These simulations were performed in geometries constructed from 3D CLSM images of the actual PDMS structures. Given these results, mass transport behaviour may be predicted for even more complex structures, like gels or composite material in, e.g., food or biomaterials. This is a step in the direction towards predictive science with regards to tailoring soft biomaterials for specific mass transport properties. PMID:23489610

  8. Physics-driven CFD modeling of complex anatomical cardiovascular flows-a TCPC case study.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Kerem; de Zélicourt, Diane; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Frakes, David; Fogel, Mark A; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2005-03-01

    Recent developments in medical image acquisition combined with the latest advancements in numerical methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations have created unprecedented opportunities for developing simple and reliable computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools for meeting patient-specific surgical planning objectives. However, for CFD to reach its full potential and gain the trust and confidence of medical practitioners, physics-driven numerical modeling is required. This study reports on the experience gained from an ongoing integrated CFD modeling effort aimed at developing an advanced numerical simulation tool capable of accurately predicting flow characteristics in an anatomically correct total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). An anatomical intra-atrial TCPC model is reconstructed from a stack of magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired in vivo. An exact replica of the computational geometry was built using transparent rapid prototyping. Following the same approach as in earlier studies on idealized models, flow structures, pressure drops, and energy losses were assessed both numerically and experimentally, then compared. Numerical studies were performed with both a first-order accurate commercial software and a recently developed, second-order accurate, in-house flow solver. The commercial CFD model could, with reasonable accuracy, capture global flow quantities of interest such as control volume power losses and pressure drops and time-averaged flow patterns. However, for steady inflow conditions, both flow visualization experiments and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements revealed unsteady, complex, and highly 3D flow structures, which could not be captured by this numerical model with the available computational resources and additional modeling efforts that are described. Preliminary time-accurate computations with the in-house flow solver were shown to capture for the first time these complex flow features and yielded solutions in good

  9. Modeling studies of the coastal circulation off northern California: Statistics and patterns of wintertime flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Julie; Allen, J. S.

    2001-11-01

    We conduct modeling studies of the coastal circulation off northern California in the vicinity of the Eel River (40.6°N, the site of the 1995-2000 Strata Formation on Margins (STRATAFORM) marine geology observational program) using a series of nested hydrostatic primitive equation models to aid in the understanding of the shelf flow field that receives and transports sediments during the winter floods. The basic objectives of our numerical studies are to model the continental shelf and slope flow and to understand the dominant dynamical processes. We simulate the shelf and slope flow surrounding Cape Mendocino during 100 days in winter 1996-1997 using a 3 km resolution model embedded in a 9 km resolution regional model of the North Pacific Ocean (the Naval Research Laboratory's Pacific West Coast (PWC) model). The validity of the model simulations is assessed by comparison with current measurements from a STRATAFORM shelf tripod outfitted with an acoustic Doppler current profiler and with satellite altimetry. Good agreement is found between the amplitude and time variability of the 3 km resolution modeled and observed alongshore currents on the shelf. The 3 km resolution model outperforms the 9 km resolution PWC model. Using statistical maps of flow variables, strong alongshore variability in wintertime flow is documented. The role of the forcing supplied by wind and river runoff in establishing this flow asymmetry between regions north and south of Cape Mendocino is examined using empirical orthogonal functions. The evolution of a robust anticyclonic eddy over the shelf and slope adjacent to Cape Mendocino is described. The eddy forms when strong poleward winds weaken and reverse direction during winter storms. The important role of alongshore pressure gradients in the shelf circulation is documented.

  10. The performance & flow visualization studies of three-dimensional (3-D) wind turbine blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Prajitno, Purnomo, W., Setyawan B.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, studies on the design of 3-D wind turbine blades have a less attention even though 3-D blade products are widely sold. In contrary, advanced studies in 3-D helicopter blade tip have been studied rigorously. Studies in wind turbine blade modeling are mostly assumed that blade spanwise sections behave as independent two-dimensional airfoils, implying that there is no exchange of momentum in the spanwise direction. Moreover, flow visualization experiments are infrequently conducted. Therefore, a modeling study of wind turbine blade with visualization experiment is needed to be improved to obtain a better understanding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of 3-D wind turbine blade models with backward-forward swept and verify the flow patterns using flow visualization. In this research, the blade models are constructed based on the twist and chord distributions following Schmitz's formula. Forward and backward swept are added to the rotating blades. Based on this, the additional swept would enhance or diminish outward flow disturbance or stall development propagation on the spanwise blade surfaces to give better blade design. Some combinations, i. e., b lades with backward swept, provide a better 3-D favorable rotational force of the rotor system. The performance of the 3-D wind turbine system model is measured by a torque meter, employing Prony's braking system. Furthermore, the 3-D flow patterns around the rotating blade models are investigated by applying "tuft-visualization technique", to study the appearance of laminar, separated, and boundary layer flow patterns surrounding the 3-dimentional blade system.

  11. A Comparative Study of Material Flow Behavior in Friction Stir Welding Using Laminar and Turbulent Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadian, Arun Kumar; Biswas, Pankaj

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding has been quite successful in joining aluminum alloy which has gained importance in almost all industrial sectors over the past two decades. It is a newer technique and therefore needs more attention in many sectors, flow of material being one among them. The material flow pattern actually helps in deciding the parameters required for particular tool geometry. The knowledge of material flow is very significant in removing defects from the weldment. In the work presented in this paper, the flow behavior of AA6061 under a threaded tool has been studied. The convective heat loss has been considered from all the surfaces, and a comparative study has been made with and without the use of temperature-dependent properties and their significance in the finite volume method model. The two types of models that have been implemented are turbulent and laminar models. Their thermal histories have been studied for all the cases. The material flow velocity has been analyzed to predict the flow of material. A swirl inside the weld material has been observed in all the simulations.

  12. Flow visualization studies of VTOL aircraft models during Hover in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourtos, Nikos J.; Couillaud, Stephane; Carter, Dale; Hange, Craig; Wardwell, Doug; Margason, Richard J.

    1995-01-01

    A flow visualization study of several configurations of a jet-powered vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft model during hover in ground effect was conducted. A surface oil flow technique was used to observe the flow patterns on the lower surfaces of the model. There were significant configuration effects. Wing height with respect to fuselage, the presence of an engine inlet duct beside the fuselage, and nozzle pressure ratio are seen to have strong effects on the surface flow angles on the lower surface of the wing. This test was part of a program to improve the methods for predicting the hot gas ingestion (HGI) for jet-powered vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft. The tests were performed at the Jet Calibration and Hover Test (JCAHT) Facility at Ames Research Center.

  13. Study of Gas Flow Characteristics in Tight Porous Media with a Microscale Lattice Boltzmann Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianlin; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yongfei; Sun, Hai; An, Senyou; Li, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the gas flow characteristics in tight porous media, a microscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with the regularization procedure is firstly adopted to simulate gas flow in three-dimensional (3D) digital rocks. A shale digital rock and a sandstone digital rock are reconstructed to study the effects of pressure, temperature and pore size on microscale gas flow. The simulation results show that because of the microscale effect in tight porous media, the apparent permeability is always higher than the intrinsic permeability, and with the decrease of pressure or pore size, or with the increase of temperature, the difference between apparent permeability and intrinsic permeability increases. In addition, the Knudsen numbers under different conditions are calculated and the results show that gas flow characteristics in the digital rocks under different Knudsen numbers are quite different. With the increase of Knudsen number, gas flow in the digital rocks becomes more uniform and the effect of heterogeneity of the porous media on gas flow decreases. Finally, two commonly used apparent permeability calculation models are evaluated by the simulation results and the Klinkenberg model shows better accuracy. In addition, a better proportionality factor in Klinkenberg model is proposed according to the simulation results. PMID:27587293

  14. Study of Gas Flow Characteristics in Tight Porous Media with a Microscale Lattice Boltzmann Model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianlin; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yongfei; Sun, Hai; An, Senyou; Li, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the gas flow characteristics in tight porous media, a microscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with the regularization procedure is firstly adopted to simulate gas flow in three-dimensional (3D) digital rocks. A shale digital rock and a sandstone digital rock are reconstructed to study the effects of pressure, temperature and pore size on microscale gas flow. The simulation results show that because of the microscale effect in tight porous media, the apparent permeability is always higher than the intrinsic permeability, and with the decrease of pressure or pore size, or with the increase of temperature, the difference between apparent permeability and intrinsic permeability increases. In addition, the Knudsen numbers under different conditions are calculated and the results show that gas flow characteristics in the digital rocks under different Knudsen numbers are quite different. With the increase of Knudsen number, gas flow in the digital rocks becomes more uniform and the effect of heterogeneity of the porous media on gas flow decreases. Finally, two commonly used apparent permeability calculation models are evaluated by the simulation results and the Klinkenberg model shows better accuracy. In addition, a better proportionality factor in Klinkenberg model is proposed according to the simulation results. PMID:27587293

  15. Numerical modeling of carrier gas flow in atomic layer deposition vacuum reactor: A comparative study of lattice Boltzmann models

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Chien Jen, Tien; Li, Tao; Yuan, Chris

    2014-01-15

    This paper characterizes the carrier gas flow in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) vacuum reactor by introducing Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to the ALD simulation through a comparative study of two LBM models. Numerical models of gas flow are constructed and implemented in two-dimensional geometry based on lattice Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (LBGK)-D2Q9 model and two-relaxation-time (TRT) model. Both incompressible and compressible scenarios are simulated and the two models are compared in the aspects of flow features, stability, and efficiency. Our simulation outcome reveals that, for our specific ALD vacuum reactor, TRT model generates better steady laminar flow features all over the domain with better stability and reliability than LBGK-D2Q9 model especially when considering the compressible effects of the gas flow. The LBM-TRT is verified indirectly by comparing the numerical result with conventional continuum-based computational fluid dynamics solvers, and it shows very good agreement with these conventional methods. The velocity field of carrier gas flow through ALD vacuum reactor was characterized by LBM-TRT model finally. The flow in ALD is in a laminar steady state with velocity concentrated at the corners and around the wafer. The effects of flow fields on precursor distributions, surface absorptions, and surface reactions are discussed in detail. Steady and evenly distributed velocity field contribute to higher precursor concentration near the wafer and relatively lower particle velocities help to achieve better surface adsorption and deposition. The ALD reactor geometry needs to be considered carefully if a steady and laminar flow field around the wafer and better surface deposition are desired.

  16. Model studies of blood flow in basilar artery with 3D laser Doppler anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. V.; Sindeev, S. V.; Liepsch, D.; Balasso, A.; Proskurin, S. G.; Potlov, A. Y.

    2015-03-01

    It is proposed an integrated approach to the study of basilar artery blood flow using 3D laser Doppler anemometer for identifying the causes of the formation and development of cerebral aneurysms. Feature of the work is the combined usage of both mathematical modeling and experimental methods. Described the experimental setup and the method of measurement of basilar artery blood flow, carried out in an interdisciplinary laboratory of Hospital Rechts der Isar of Technical University of Munich. The experimental setup used to simulate the blood flow in the basilar artery and to measure blood flow characteristics using 3D laser Doppler anemometer (3D LDA). Described a method of numerical studies carried out in Tambov State Technical University and the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery. Proposed an approach for sharing experimental and numerical methods of research to identify the causes of the basilar artery aneurysms.

  17. An in vitro hemodynamic tissue model to study the variations in flow using near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranga, Raghavender; Kashyap, Dheerendra; Behbehani, Khosrow; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    Determination of blood flow changes will be helpful for evaluation of tumor prognosis and therapy. Our study is to develop an in vitro hemodynamic phantom model, which allows us to show the feasibility of using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine flow changes as a dynamic imaging modality to monitor tumor responses to therapy. In the hemodynamic phantom model, both single and multiple, transparent, plastic tubes were used to pass through a cylindral glass chamber. The chamber was filled with either an Intralipid solution or a soft gelatin phantom, while the tube or tubes were pumped with either an Intralipid-ink mixture or animal whole blood to simulate the tumor vasculature. The Intralipid solutions that were filled in the chamber and tubes had optical scattering and absorption properties similar to those of tumor tissues and tumor vasculature. A single-channel, broadband, NIRS system with a tungsten light source and a CCD-array spectrometer was used to quantify the changes in optical density (OD) of the intralipid-ink mixture with variations in flow rate and concentration. A single-exponential curve fit has been used to determine the time constant (τ) from the change in OD to estimate the flow rate. The obtained preliminary results show a strong correlation between changing rates of concentration and flow; a multivariable dynamic mathematical model may be also established to relate changes of Hb, HbO and blood volume with blood flow.

  18. Modeling transient tracing in plug-flow reactors: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, E. . Lab. des Signaux et Systemes); Pronzato, L. . Lab. Informatique); Soong, Y. . Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center); Otarod, M. . Dept. of Mathematics); Happel, J. )

    1995-02-01

    For heterogeneous catalysis, ordinary differential equations in time can be used to interpret transient tracer data obtained in a continuous stirred tank reactor or gradientless reactor in which a steady-state reaction is occurring. The same procedure is often used for plug-flow reactor modeling. However, for transient tracing data obtained with a plug-flow reactor operating under differential conversion, it is necessary to use a set of partial differential equations involving distance through the reactor as well as time. In this paper, the authors present a case study of methanation on a nickel catalyst to illustrate the modeling procedure needed to estimate the desired parameters.

  19. A comparative study of two-phase flow models relevant to bubble column dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, P. D.; Lange, U.; Nandakumar, K.

    1999-09-01

    Multiphase flow modelling is still a major challenge in fluid dynamics and, although many different models have been derived, there is no clear evidence of their relevance to certain flow situations. That is particularly valid for bubbly flows, because most of the studies have considered the case of fluidized beds. In the present study we give a general formulation to five existing models and study their relevance to bubbly flows. The results of the linear analysis of those models clearly show that only two of them are applicable to that case. They both show a very similar qualitative linear stability behaviour. In the subsequent asymptotic analysis we derive an equation hierarchy which describes the weakly nonlinear stability of the models. Their qualitative behaviour up to first order with respect to the small parameter is again identical. A permanent-wave solution of the first two equations of the hierarchy is found. It is shown, however, that the permanent-wave (soliton) solution is very unlikely to occur for the most common case of gas bubbles in water. The reason is that the weakly nonlinear equations are unstable due to the low magnitude of the bulk modulus of elasticity. Physically relevant stabilization can eventually be achieved using some available experimental data. Finally, a necessary condition for existence of a fully nonlinear soliton is derived.

  20. Numerical modelling study of gully recharge and debris flows in Haida Gwaii, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Yvonne; Johnson, Edward; Chaikina, Olga

    2015-04-01

    In high mountains, debris flows are a major process responsible for transferring sediment to more downstream fluvial reaches. This sediment transfer begins on mountain hillslopes where various mass wasting processes move sediment from hillslopes to uppermost reaches of the channel system (these reaches are herein referred to as gullies and only experience water flow during high intensity precipitation events). Sediment recharge into gullies, which has received minimal attention in the scientific literature, refers to the transfer of sediment and other debris from surrounding hillslopes into gullies (Jakob and Oden, 2005). Debris flow occurrence and debris flow volumes depend on some precipitation threshold as well as volumes of material contained in the particular gully. For example, if one debris flow has removed all of the accumulated material from the gully, then any subsequent debris flow will be smaller if enough time has not yet passed for notable sediment recharge. Herein, we utilize the numerical model of landscape development, LandMod (Martin, 1998; Dadson and Church, 2005; Martin, 2007), to explore connections between hillslope processes, gully recharge rates, and transfer of sediment to downstream channel reaches in the Haida Gwaii, British Columbia. Hillslope processes in the model include shallow landsliding, bedrock failures and weathering. The updated debris flow algorithm is based on extensive field data available for debris flows in Haida Gwaii (e.g., Rood, 1984; Oden, 1994; Jakob and Oden, 2005), as well as theoretical considerations based on debris flow studies. The most significant model extension is the calculation of gully recharge rates; for each gully, the total accumulated sediment in gullies at each time step is determined using a power-law relation for area-normalized recharge rate versus elapsed time since the last debris flow. Thus, when the stochastic driver for debris flow occurrence triggers an event, the amount of stored material is

  1. Experimental and computational studies of active flow control on a model truck-trailer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Alti, Mohammad; Chernoray, Valery; Jahanmiri, Mohsen; Davidson, Lars

    2012-04-01

    Active flow control is probably the most challenging research area in vehicle aerodynamics. Being able to manipulate a flow field in order to achieve desired results beneficial to engineering is the only way to meet today's demands for competitive and efficient solutions in the automotive industry. The current work studies the flow control on a semi detailed model truck by using detached-eddy simulations and wind tunnel experiments aiming at reducing the aerodynamic drag. This study combines both passive and active flow control applied on the rear end of the trailer. An indigenous fluidic actuator (loudspeaker in cavity with slots) is used as a synthetic jet in the experiment. Both experiments and computations demonstrate that the active flow control works successfully and results in flow reattachment to the flaps. The numerical simulations show that the drag coefficient, CD decreased by 3.9% when AFC was activated compared to the baseline case without flaps. The corresponding decrease when AFC was deactivated (with flaps) was only 0.7%. The experimental results show a decrease of CD by 3.1% for the case with activated AFC compared to the baseline case. When AFC was deactivated the corresponding decrease in CD was 1.8%. A detailed flow analysis made in computations and experiments is used to explain these results.

  2. Studying Faculty Flows Using an Interactive Spreadsheet Model. AIR 1997 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Wayne

    This paper describes a spreadsheet-based faculty flow model developed and implemented at the University of Calgary (Canada) to analyze faculty retirement, turnover, and salary issues. The study examined whether, given expected faculty turnover, the current salary increment system was sustainable in a stable or declining funding environment, and…

  3. Drainflow: a fully distributed integrated surface/subsurface flow model for drainage studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2015-04-01

    The scale of drainage studies may vary from high-resolution small scale investigations through to comprehensive catchment or regional-scale studies. This wide range of scales poses a significant challenge for the development of a suitable drainage model. To meet this demand, a fully distributed surface/subsurface interactive flow model named henceforth Drainflow has been developed. Drainflow includes both the Saint Venant equations for surface flow components and the Richards equation for saturated and unsaturated zones. To develop the model, surface and subsurface flow modules are formulated separately, then each component is connected to the other parts. All modules simultaneously interact to calculate water level and discharge in tile drains, channel networks, and overland flow. In the subsurface domain, the model also yields soil moisture and water table elevation. A smoothed Heaviside function is introduced to give a continuous transition of the model between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for tile drains and surface/subsurface flow interface boundaries. Compared to traditional drainage studies, Drainflow has the advantage of estimating the land surface recharge (LSR) directly from the partial differential Richards equation rather than via an analytical or empirical drainage method like the Green and Ampt equation. To test the model's accuracy, comparisons are made between Drainflow and a range of surface/subsurface flow models for five published integrated surface and subsurface problems. The comparison indicates Drainflow has a reasonably good agreement with the other integrated models. Furthermore, it is shown that the smoothed Heaviside functions technique is a very effective method to overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between dry and wet boundary conditions. In addition, Drainflow was run for some drainage study examples and was found to be fairly flexible in terms of changing all or part of the model dimensions as

  4. Cross-flow turbines: physical and numerical model studies towards improved array simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cross-flow, or vertical-axis turbines, show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow turbines. Numerical simulations are generally better suited to explore the turbine array design parameter space, as physical model studies of large arrays at large model scale would be expensive. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries, the turbines' interaction with the energy resource needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Most models in use today, e.g. actuator disk, are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. Experiments were carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier--Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An

  5. Numerical Study on a Detailed Air Flows in an Urban Area Using a CFD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, detailed air flows in an urban area were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this model buildings used as the surface boundary in the model were constructed using Los Angeles Region Imagery Acquisition Consortium 2 Geographic Information System (LARIAC2 GIS) data. Three target areas centered at the cross roads of Broadway & 7th St., Olive & 12th St., and Wilshire blvd. & Carondelet, Los Angeles, California were considered. The size of each numerical domain is 400 m, 400 m, and 200 m in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions, respectively. The grid sizes in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions are 2 m, 2 m, and 2 m, respectively. Based on the inflow wind data provided by California Air Resources Board, detailed flow characteristics were investigated for each target area. Descending air flow were developed at the leeward area of tall building and ascending air current were occurred on the windward area of tall building. Vertically rotating vortices were formed in spaces between buildings, so-called, street canyons and horizontally rotating vortices appeared near cross roads. When flows came into narrow street canyon from wide street canyon, channeling effects appeared and flow speed increased for satisfying mass continuity.

  6. Bypass Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  7. Parametric Study of Synthetic-Jet-Based Flow Control on a Vertical Tail Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastero, Marianne; Lindstrom, Annika; Beyar, Michael; Amitay, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Separation control over the rudder of the vertical tail of a commercial airplane using synthetic-jet-based flow control can lead to a reduction in tail size, with an associated decrease in drag and increase in fuel savings. A parametric, experimental study was undertaken using an array of finite span synthetic jets to investigate the sensitivity of the enhanced vertical tail side force to jet parameters, such as jet spanwise spacing and jet momentum coefficient. A generic wind tunnel model was designed and fabricated to fundamentally study the effects of the jet parameters at varying rudder deflection and model sideslip angles. Wind tunnel results obtained from pressure measurements and tuft flow visualization in the Rensselaer Polytechnic Subsonic Wind Tunnel show a decrease in separation severity and increase in model performance in comparison to the baseline, non-actuated case. The sensitivity to various parameters will be presented.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of flow past urban-like surfaces: A model validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wai Chi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow and its interaction with urban surfaces is critical for understanding the transport of momentum and scalars within and above cities. This, in turn, is essential for predicting the local climate and pollutant dispersion patterns in urban areas. Large-eddy simulation (LES) explicitly resolves the large-scale turbulent eddy motions and, therefore, can potentially provide improved understanding and prediction of flows inside and above urban canopies. This study focuses on developing and validating an LES framework to simulate flow past urban-like surfaces. In particular, large-eddy simulations were performed of flow past an infinite long two-dimensional (2D) building and an array of 3D cubic buildings. An immersed boundary (IB) method was employed to simulate both 2D and 3D buildings. Four subgrid-scale (SGS) models, including (i) the traditional Smagorinsky model, (ii) the Lagrangian dynamic model, (iii) the Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic model, and (iv) the modulated gradient model, were evaluated using the 2D building case. The simulated velocity streamlines and the vertical profiles of the mean velocities and variances were compared with experimental results. The modulated gradient model shows the best overall agreement with the experimental results among the four SGS models. In particular, the flow recirculation, the reattachment position and the vertical profiles are accurately reproduced with a grid resolution of (Nx)x(Ny)x(Nz) =160x40x160 ((nx)x(nz) =13x16 covering the block). After validating the LES framework with the 2D building case, it was further applied to simulate a boundary-layer flow past a 3D building array. A regular aligned building array with seven rows of cubic buildings was simulated. The building spacings in the streamwise and spanwise directions were both equal to the building height. A developed turbulent boundary-layer flow was used as the incoming flow. The results were

  9. Experimental study on unsteady open channel flow and bedload transport based on a physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, W.

    2015-12-01

    Flow in a nature river are usually unsteady, while nearly all the theories about bedload transport are on the basis of steady, uniform flow, and also with supposed equilibrium state of sediment transport. This is may be one of the main reasons why the bedload transport formulas are notoriously poor accuracy to predict the bedload. The aim of this research is to shed light on the effect of unsteadiness on the bedload transport based on experimental studies. The novel of this study is that the experiments were not carried out in a conventional flume but in a physical model, which are more similar to the actual river. On the other hand, in our experiments, multiple consecutive flood wave were reproduced in the physical model, and all the flow and sediment parameters are based on a large number of data obtained from many of identical flood waves. This method allow us to get more data for one flood, efficiently avoids the uncertainty of bedload rate only for one single flood wave, due to the stochastic fluctuation of the bedload transport. Three different flood waves were selected in the experiments. During each run of experiment, the water level of five different positions along the model were measured by ultrasonic water level gauge, flow velocity at the middle of the channel were measured by two dimensional electromagnetic current meter. Moreover, the bedload transport rate was measured by a unique automatic trap collecting and weighing system at the end of the physical model. The results shows that the celerity of flood wave propagate varies for different flow conditions. The velocity distribution was approximately accord with log-law profile during the entire rising and falling limb of flood. The bedload transport rate show intensity fluctuation in all the experiments, moreover, for different flood waves, the moment when the shear stress reaches its maximum value is not the exact moment when the sediment transport rate reaches its maximum value, which indicates

  10. Simulation and Experimental Studies of Jamming for Model Two-Dimensional Particles Under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guariguata, A.; Wu, D. T.; Koh, C. A.; Sum, A. K.; Sloan, E. D.

    2009-06-01

    Jamming and plugging of flowlines with gas hydrates is the most critical issue in the flow assurance of oil and gas production lines. Because solid hydrate particles are often suspended in a fluid, the pipeline jamming and flow constriction formed by hydrates depend not only on particle/wall properties, such as friction, binding forces and mechanical characteristics, but also on the concentration of particles upstream of the restriction, flow velocity, fluid viscosity, and forces between the particles. Therefore, to gain insight into the jamming phenomena, both experiments and computer simulations on two-dimensional model systems have been carried out to characterize the flow of particles in a channel, with the eventual goal of applying that knowledge to gas hydrates jamming. Using the simulation software PFC2d®, we studied the effect of restriction geometry and flow velocity on the jamming process of particles. Results from the simulations were compared to experimental measurements on polyethylene discs floating on water flowing in an open channel.

  11. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  12. Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Wang, G J; Hubbard, S L; Reger, S I; Miller, E D; Stamp, W G

    1983-12-01

    Using a rabbit model, previous studies showed steroid-induced hyperlipidemia with subsequent fatty embolization of the subchondral arteries and hypertrophy of the marrow fat cells, followed by elevation of femoral head pressure from the normal level of 25 cm to nearly 60 cm H2O after eight weeks of treatment. This has led us to believe that pressure changes lead to decreased blood flow in the femoral head. In our study of 22 New Zealand white adult rabbits, weighing an average of 4.0 kg, 14 received a weekly dose of 12.45 mg of methylprednisolone (Depo-Medrol), and eight served as control. Femoral head blood flow was established using the radioactive microsphere technique. Control and cortisone-treated rabbits had femoral head blood flow measured 6, 8 and 10 weeks after treatment. The average blood flow in the control femoral heads averaged 0.2039 +/- 0.076 ml/min/gm, with no difference in the left side and the right side. In the treated group, the average blood flow at ten weeks was 0.162 +/- 0.039 ml/min/gm on the right and 0.164 +/- 0.037 ml/min/gm on the left, which was significantly different. This is parallel to unpredictable clinical findings in human beings. PMID:6648615

  13. Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Hubbard, S.L.; Reger, S.I.; Miller, E.D.; Stamp, W.G.

    1983-12-01

    Using a rabbit model, previous studies showed steroid-induced hyperlipidemia with subsequent fatty embolization of the subchondral arteries and hypertrophy of the marrow fat cells, followed by elevation of femoral head pressure from the normal level of 25 cm to nearly 60 cm H2O after eight weeks of treatment. This has led us to believe that pressure changes lead to decreased blood flow in the femoral head. In our study of 22 New Zealand white adult rabbits, weighing an average of 4.0 kg, 14 received a weekly dose of 12.45 mg of methylprednisolone (Depo-Medrol), and eight served as control. Femoral head blood flow was established using the radioactive microsphere technique. Control and cortisone-treated rabbits had femoral head blood flow measured 6, 8 and 10 weeks after treatment. The average blood flow in the control femoral heads averaged 0.2039 +/- 0.076 ml/min/gm, with no difference in the left side and the right side. In the treated group, the average blood flow at ten weeks was 0.162 +/- 0.039 ml/min/gm on the right and 0.164 +/- 0.037 ml/min/gm on the left, which was significantly different. This is parallel to unpredictable clinical findings in human beings.

  14. Micromodel foam flow study

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, K.T.; Radke, C.J.

    1990-10-01

    Foams are often utilized as part of enhanced oil recovery techniques. This report presents the results of a micromodel foam flow study. Micromodels are valuable tools in uncovering capillary phenomena responsible for lamellae generation and coalescence during foam flow in porous media. Among the mechanisms observed are snap-off, weeping-flow breakup, and lamella division and leave behind. Coalescence mechanisms include dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage and gas diffusion. These phenomena are sensitive to the mode of injection, the local capillary environment, and the geometry of the pore structure. An important consideration in presenting a tractable model of foam flow behavior is the ability to identify the pore-level mechanisms having the greatest impact on foam texture. The predominant mechanisms will vary depending upon the application for foam as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fluid. Both simultaneous gas and surfactant injection and surfactant alternating with gas injection (SAG) have been used to create foam for mobility control in EOR projects. The model developed is based on simultaneous gas and surfactant injection during steady-state conditions into a Berea sandstone core. The lamellae generation and coalescence mechanisms included in this model are snap-off, lamella division, and dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage. This simplified steady-state model serves as a foundation for developing more complete rate expressions and for extending the population balance to handle transient foam flow behavior. 70 refs., 30 figs.

  15. Modelling the effect of buried valleys on groundwater flow: case study in Ventspils vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads; Bikse, Janis; Retike, Inga; Babre, Alise; Kalvane, Gunta

    2015-04-01

    Buried subglacial valleys are widely distributed in glaciated regions and they can have great influence on groundwater flow and hence on groundwater resources. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the buried valleys on groundwater flow in a confined aquifer (Middle Devonian Eifelian stage Arukila aquifer, D2ar) applying numerical modelling. The study area is located at vicinity of Ventspils Town, near wellfield Ogsils where number of the buried valleys with different depth and filling material are present. Area is located close to the Baltic Sea at Piejūra lowland Rinda plain and regional groundwater flow is towards sea. Territory is covered by thin layer of Quaternary sediments in thicknesses of 10 to 20 meters although Prequaternary sediments are exposed at some places. Buried valleys are characterized as narrow, elongated and deep formations that is be filled with various, mainly Pleistocene glacigene sediments - either till loam of different ages or sand and gravel or interbedding of both above mentioned. The filling material of the valleys influences groundwater flow in the confined aquifers which is intercepted by the valleys. It is supposed that glacial till loam filled valleys serves as a barrier to groundwater flow and as a recharge conduit when filled with sand and gravel deposits. Numerical model was built within MOSYS modelling system (Virbulis et al. 2012) using finite element method in order to investigate buried valley influence on groundwater flow in the study area. Several conceptual models were tested in numerical model depending on buried valley filling material: sand and gravel, till loam or mixture of them. Groundwater flow paths and travel times were studied. Results suggested that valley filled with glacial till is acting as barrier and it causes sharp drop of piezometric head and downward flow. Valley filled with sand and gravel have almost no effect on piezometric head distribution, however it this case buried valleys

  16. Development of an entrained flow gasifier model for process optimization study

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, E.; Bardi, A.; Pannocchia, G.; Tognotti, L.

    2009-10-15

    Coal gasification is a versatile process to convert a solid fuel in syngas, which can be further converted and separated in hydrogen, which is a valuable and environmentally acceptable energy carrier. Different technologies (fixed beds, fluidized beds, entrained flow reactors) are used, operating under different conditions of temperature, pressure, and residence time. Process studies should be performed for defining the best plant configurations and operating conditions. Although 'gasification models' can be found in the literature simulating equilibrium reactors, a more detailed approach is required for process analysis and optimization procedures. In this work, a gasifier model is developed by using AspenPlus as a tool to be implemented in a comprehensive process model for the production of hydrogen via coal gasification. It is developed as a multizonal model by interconnecting each step of gasification (preheating, devolatilization, combustion, gasification, quench) according to the reactor configuration, that is in entrained flow reactor. The model removes the hypothesis of equilibrium by introducing the kinetics of all steps and solves the heat balance by relating the gasification temperature to the operating conditions. The model allows to predict the syngas composition as well as quantity the heat recovery (for calculating the plant efficiency), 'byproducts', and residual char. Finally, in view of future works, the development of a 'gasifier model' instead of a 'gasification model' will allow different reactor configurations to be compared.

  17. A case study of fluid flow in fractured rock mass based on 2-D DFN modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jisu; Noh, Young-Hwan; Um, Jeong-Gi; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A two dimensional steady-state fluid flow through fractured rock mass of an abandoned copper mine in Korea is addressed based on discrete fracture network modeling. An injection well and three observation wells were installed at the field site to monitor the variations of total heads induced by injection of fresh water. A series of packer tests were performed to estimate the rock mass permeability. First, the two dimensional stochastic fracture network model was built and validated for a granitic rock mass using the geometrical and statistical data obtained from surface exposures and borehole logs. This validated fracture network model was combined with the fracture data observed on boreholes to generate a stochastic-deterministic fracture network system. Estimated apertures for each of the fracture sets using permeability data obtained from borehole packer tests were discussed next. Finally, a systematic procedure for fluid flow modeling in fractured rock mass in two dimensional domain was presented to estimate the conductance, flow quantity and nodal head in 2-D conceptual linear pipe channel network. The results obtained in this study clearly show that fracture geometry parameters (orientation, density and size) play an important role in the hydraulic behavior of fractured rock masses.

  18. Assessing cement injection behaviour in cancellous bone: an in vitro study using flow models.

    PubMed

    Bou-Francis, Antony; López, Alejandro; Persson, Cecilia; Hall, Richard M; Kapur, Nikil

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the cement injection behaviour during vertebroplasty and accurately predicting the cement placement within the vertebral body is extremely challenging. As there is no standardized methodology, we propose a novel method using reproducible and pathologically representative flow models to study the influence of cement properties on injection behaviour. The models, confined between an upper glass window and a lower aluminium plate, were filled with bone marrow substitute and then injected (4, 6 and 8 min after cement mixing) with commercially available bone cements (SimplexP, Opacity+, OsteopalV and Parallax) at a constant flow rate (3 mL/min). A load cell was used to measure the force applied on the syringe plunger and calculate the peak pressure. A camera was used to monitor the cement flow during injection and calculate the following parameters when the cement had reached the boundary of the models: the time to reach the boundary, the filled area and the roundness. The peak pressure was comparable to that reported during clinical vertebroplasty and showed a similar increase with injection time. The study highlighted the influence of cement formulations and model structure on the injection behaviour and showed that cements with similar composition/particle size had similar flow behaviour, while the introduction of defects reduced the time to reach the boundary, the filled area and the roundness. The proposed method provides a novel tool for quick, robust differentiation between various cement formulations through the visualization and quantitative analysis of the cement spreading at various time intervals. PMID:24913614

  19. Experimental and modeling study of unsaturated solute flow in soils: from classical to discrete approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, K.

    2012-04-01

    Most dye staining experiments in natural soils result in highly heterogeneous flow patterns which are usually explained with presence of preferential flow paths or different kinds of flow instabilities. It is quite logic that soil structure is one of the main factors affecting infiltrations regimes, however the degree of flow stochasticity is not studied enough. In this contribution a substantial amount of large scale (2-4 m lateral excavations) field experiment data is considered (including forested hillslopes and agricultural fields) with special attention to sprinkling of two different staining substances with different dyeing mechanisms (common dye is visible both in adsorbed and in solution states; fluorescent dye - only in solution). The latter method allows an estimation of the flow stability (stochasticity). Most staining field experiments are supported by undisturbed sample collections (laboratory measurements for hydraulic conductivity, water retention curves, X-ray microtomography scans, grain size distributions, etc.). Preliminary results strongly support the evidence of stability of flow under similar precipitation and moisture conditions. Infiltration also correlated with soil structure and microproperties. Numerical modeling using classical approach (single-porosity coupled Richard's and advection-dispersion equations, random hydraulic properties based on log-normal experimentally obtained distribution) fails to describe experimentally obtained staining patterns. Multi-porosity models may provide better tools to account for different soil heterogeneities, but their parameters can not be obtained experimentally. Small scale solutions using pore-network or lattice-Botzmann methods based on microtomography scans are accurate, but computationally expensive (volumes around tens of cm3). Based on field observations a simple cellular automata approach to model staining patterns is developed and tested on experimental data. Our results are much better then

  20. Base Flow Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Neeraj; Brinckman, Kevin; Jansen, Bernard; Seiner, John

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed of obtaining propulsive base flow data in both hot and cold jet environments, at Mach numbers and altitude of relevance to NASA launcher designs. The base flow data was used to perform computational fluid dynamics (CFD) turbulence model assessments of base flow predictive capabilities in order to provide increased confidence in base thermal and pressure load predictions obtained from computational modeling efforts. Predictive CFD analyses were used in the design of the experiments, available propulsive models were used to reduce program costs and increase success, and a wind tunnel facility was used. The data obtained allowed assessment of CFD/turbulence models in a complex flow environment, working within a building-block procedure to validation, where cold, non-reacting test data was first used for validation, followed by more complex reacting base flow validation.

  1. Hydrodynamic modelling and global datasets: Flow connectivity and SRTM data, a Bangkok case study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, M. A.; Bates, P. B.; Michaelides, K.

    2012-04-01

    The rise in the global interconnected manufacturing supply chains requires an understanding and consistent quantification of flood risk at a global scale. Flood risk is often better quantified (or at least more precisely defined) in regions where there has been an investment in comprehensive topographical data collection such as LiDAR coupled with detailed hydrodynamic modelling. Yet in regions where these data and modelling are unavailable, the implications of flooding and the knock on effects for global industries can be dramatic, as evidenced by the recent floods in Bangkok, Thailand. There is a growing momentum in terms of global modelling initiatives to address this lack of a consistent understanding of flood risk and they will rely heavily on the application of available global datasets relevant to hydrodynamic modelling, such as Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data and its derivatives. These global datasets bring opportunities to apply consistent methodologies on an automated basis in all regions, while the use of coarser scale datasets also brings many challenges such as sub-grid process representation and downscaled hydrology data from global climate models. There are significant opportunities for hydrological science in helping define new, realistic and physically based methodologies that can be applied globally as well as the possibility of gaining new insights into flood risk through analysis of the many large datasets that will be derived from this work. We use Bangkok as a case study to explore some of the issues related to using these available global datasets for hydrodynamic modelling, with particular focus on using SRTM data to represent topography. Research has shown that flow connectivity on the floodplain is an important component in the dynamics of flood flows on to and off the floodplain, and indeed within different areas of the floodplain. A lack of representation of flow connectivity, often due to data resolution limitations, means

  2. A Comparative Study of Foreign Direct Investment Flow Using Diffusion Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiming; Chiang, Yi-Hui; Yu, Shao-Ming; Chiang, Su-Yun; Hung, C.-H.

    2007-12-01

    In this work, we apply an improvement dynamic model of the foreign direct investment (FDI) flow to analyze the evolution of FDI flow. In comparison with the fundamental growth model of FDI, the simulation result is further accurate if the asymmetric growth pattern and heterogeneity of the potential adopters are considered. According to the result, the internal influence dominates the growth of FDI flow from Taiwan to China during 2001-2006, taking the electronics industry for example.

  3. Computer-Generated, Three-Dimensional Models of Student Flow Characteristics in Kentucky: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alan D.

    The use of computer graphic techniques with basic student enrollment statistics is examined to promote understanding of changes in student flow as a function of spatial distribution. Basic initial student enrollment data that serve as input into predictive flow models were modeled at Eastern Kentucky University. The following commercially…

  4. Discriminative variable subsets in Bayesian classification with mixture models, with application in flow cytometry studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; West, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the evaluation of subsets of variables for the discriminative evidence they provide in multivariate mixture modeling for classification. The novel development of Bayesian classification analysis presented is partly motivated by problems of design and selection of variables in biomolecular studies, particularly involving widely used assays of large-scale single-cell data generated using flow cytometry technology. For such studies and for mixture modeling generally, we define discriminative analysis that overlays fitted mixture models using a natural measure of concordance between mixture component densities, and define an effective and computationally feasible method for assessing and prioritizing subsets of variables according to their roles in discrimination of one or more mixture components. We relate the new discriminative information measures to Bayesian classification probabilities and error rates, and exemplify their use in Bayesian analysis of Dirichlet process mixture models fitted via Markov chain Monte Carlo methods as well as using a novel Bayesian expectation-maximization algorithm. We present a series of theoretical and simulated data examples to fix concepts and exhibit the utility of the approach, and compare with prior approaches. We demonstrate application in the context of automatic classification and discriminative variable selection in high-throughput systems biology using large flow cytometry datasets. PMID:26040910

  5. A benchmark study of numerical schemes for one-dimensional arterial blood flow modelling.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Etienne; Nithiarasu, Perumal; Blanco, Pablo J; Müller, Lucas O; Fossan, Fredrik Eikeland; Hellevik, Leif Rune; Donders, Wouter P; Huberts, Wouter; Willemet, Marie; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-10-01

    Haemodynamical simulations using one-dimensional (1D) computational models exhibit many of the features of the systemic circulation under normal and diseased conditions. Recent interest in verifying 1D numerical schemes has led to the development of alternative experimental setups and the use of three-dimensional numerical models to acquire data not easily measured in vivo. In most studies to date, only one particular 1D scheme is tested. In this paper, we present a systematic comparison of six commonly used numerical schemes for 1D blood flow modelling: discontinuous Galerkin, locally conservative Galerkin, Galerkin least-squares finite element method, finite volume method, finite difference MacCormack method and a simplified trapezium rule method. Comparisons are made in a series of six benchmark test cases with an increasing degree of complexity. The accuracy of the numerical schemes is assessed by comparison with theoretical results, three-dimensional numerical data in compatible domains with distensible walls or experimental data in a network of silicone tubes. Results show a good agreement among all numerical schemes and their ability to capture the main features of pressure, flow and area waveforms in large arteries. All the information used in this study, including the input data for all benchmark cases, experimental data where available and numerical solutions for each scheme, is made publicly available online, providing a comprehensive reference data set to support the development of 1D models and numerical schemes. PMID:26100764

  6. The role of diagenetic studies in flow-unit modeling: San Andres formation, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, S. )

    1994-03-01

    The Permian San Andres Formation represents one of the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing intervals of the Permian basin. Dolostone lithofacies intercalated with thin evaporites accommodate highly compartmentalized reservoirs resulting from complex depositional and diagenetic histories. This compartmentalization often facilitates the use of these reservoirs in flow-unit studies. Perhaps more important than the relationship of productive intervals to depositional facies is the degree to which diagenetic processes have influenced reservoir properties. Detailed petrographic evaluation of the reservoir in question, though often overlooked, should be an integral part of flow-unit studies. Once a diagenetic sequence is established, the information may be incorporated in to the facies model to better understand how to subdivide the reservoir. Such an investigation has been conducted on the San Andres Formation in Reeves field of southeastern Yoakum County, Texas. Here, multistage diagenetic overprints are superimposed on depositional facies that vary in degree of lateral extent, thereby complicating the geometries of individual productive zones within the reservoir. Analysis of the reservoir reveals that Reeves San Andres sediments were subjected to dominant diagenetic processes, including dolomitization and sulfate implacement, both of which are major factors in porosity preservation, and a variety of minor processes that have had little effect on reservoir quality. The recognition of diagenetic facies, and understanding of the processes that have created them, and identification of the implications of these processes on reservoir properties is a vital part of any flow-unit study.

  7. Numerical study of hypersonic flows over reentry configurations with different chemical nonequilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jiaao; Wang, Jingying; Lee, Chunhian

    2016-09-01

    Effects of two different 11-species chemical reaction models on hypersonic reentry flow simulations are numerically investigated. These two models were proposed by Gupta (1990) and Park (1990) [12,15], respectively. In this study, two typical configurations, the RAM-C II vehicle and FIRE II capsule, are selected as test cases, whose thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flowfields are computed by a multi-block finite volume code using a two-temperature model (a translational-rotational temperature and a vibrational-electron-electronic temperature). In the RAM-C II case, it is indicated that although electron number density distributions of the two reaction models appear in a similar trend, their values are distinctively different. Results of the Gupta's model show a better agreement with the electrostatic probe data, while those of the Park's model are more consistent with the reflectometers data. Both models give similar temperature distributions. In the FIRE II case, the two models yield significantly different distribution profiles of ions and electrons, whose differences could reach an order of magnitude. In addition, an abnormal nonequilibrium relaxation process in the shock layer is found in the FIRE II flowfield simulated by the Gupta's model, which proves to be a consequence of electron impact ionization reactions.

  8. A comparative study on the flow over an airfoil using transitional turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mou; Sarlak, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    This work addresses the simulation of the flow over NREL S826 airfoil under a relatively low Reynolds number (Re = 1 × 105) using the CFD solvers OpenFoam and ANSYS Fluent. The flow is simulated using two different transition models, γ-Reθ and k - kL - ω model, and the results are examined against the k - ω SST model without transitional formulations. By comparing the simulations with the available experimental data, we find that the using the transitional model can effectively improve the flow prediction, especially the drag coefficient results, before the stall.

  9. A Study of Two-Equation Turbulence Models on the Elliptic Streamline Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, Gregory A.; Qin, Jim H.; Shariff, Karim; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Several two-equation turbulence models are compared to data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the homogeneous elliptic streamline flow, which combines rotation and strain. The models considered include standard two-equation models and models with corrections for rotational effects. Most of the rotational corrections modify the dissipation rate equation to account for the reduced dissipation rate in rotating turbulent flows, however, the DNS data shows that the production term in the turbulent kinetic energy equation is not modeled correctly by these models. Nonlinear relations for the Reynolds stresses are considered as a means of modifying the production term. Implications for the modeling of turbulent vortices will be discussed.

  10. Simple models for embayment flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, F.; Dalziel, S.

    2003-04-01

    The flow structure in an embayment with a mean external flow has been investigated. The embayment is a relatively quiescent environment separated from the external mean flow by a mixing layer, in a manner analogous to the ventilation of a street canyon in an urban environment. This study aims to improve our knowledge of the exchange between the embayment and the external flow, which is an important mechanism for the transport and dispersion of substances such as nutrients, sediments, heat and pollutants. Understanding of flow in an embayment is therefore vital to the explanation and preservation of its ecology. In an experimental study, a model rectangular embayment was placed in a recirculating flume tank. The aspect ratio and bathymetry of the embayment was varied and the effect on the flow and mixing layer recorded. A neutrally buoyant tracer was added to the flow at various locations to visualise the eddies and the mixing layer. Field experiments in a coastal embayment used an accoustic Doppler current profiler to measure the flow velocities. These measurements demonstrate the existance of a gyre within the bay and support a shear-driven cavity model. In parallel with the experiments and fieldwork, a hierarchy of computer models was used to gain further understanding of the flow. Results from these models are presented alongside the experimental measurements.

  11. Using Mechanistic Studies to Model Riparian Tree Establishment Under Environmental Flow Scenarios on Regulated Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, J. C.; Battles, J. J.; McBride, J. R.; Orr, B. K.

    2007-12-01

    In the Central Valley of California, pioneer cottonwood and willow species dominate the near-river forests. Historically, seedling recruitment for these disturbance-adapted species coincided with spring floods. Changes in flow timing and magnitude due to river regulation have decreased the success of seedling cohorts and contributed to the decline of these riparian tree populations. In order to address gaps in our understanding of these species and potential restoration strategies, we field-calibrated a conceptual model of seedling recruitment for the dominant pioneer woody species, Populus fremontii, Salix gooddingii, and S. exigua. We conducted experiments to identify seedling desiccation thresholds and seed longevity, used field studies to measure seedling competition and seasonal seed release patterns, and modeled interannual differences in dispersal timing using a degree-day model. These studies were integrated into a recruitment model that generates annual estimates of seedling density and bank elevation based on inputs of seasonal river discharge, seed dispersal timing, and seedling mortality from desiccation. The model predictions successfully captured interannual and species-level patterns in recruitment observed independently throughout a 20-km reach of the lower Tuolumne River from 2002-04. The model correctly predicted that seedling densities were highest in 2004 and lowest in 2003, and that S. exigua recruitment would be less extensive than for the two tree species. This work shows promise as both a quantitative approach linking hydrology, climate and plant community dynamics, and as a process-based framework for guiding flow releases and other management actions to restore riparian tree population along Central Valley rivers.

  12. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  13. Little Earth Experiment: A model to study the flow in the Earth's Tangent Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aujogue, Kelig; Potherat, Alban; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-04-01

    We present a new experimental set-up developed to model the flow in the Earth's Tangent Cylinder (TC). This flow is known to have important consequences for the Earth's magnetic field and the drift of its north pole. For the first time, our experiment allows to reproduce the interplay between the magnetic, Coriolis and buoyancy forces inside a transparent electrically conducting liquid in an Earth-like geometry. The novelty of our experiment lies in the study of convection in a hemisphere heated on the inside and cooled on the outside, filled with sulphuric acid and permeated by a large magnetic field. The experimental apparatus can provide data at Ekman number E (ratio of the viscous force to the Coriolis force) of the order of 10‑4 to 10‑5, Elsasser number Λ (ratio of the Lorentz force to the Coriolis force) of the order of 0.1 to 1 and Rayleigh number (ratio of buoyancy to viscous forces) in the range of the critical Rayleigh number Rac to 20 × Rac. With the help of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and thermal measurement, we compare the onset of convection and supercritical flow regimes between a purely hydrodynamic system and a magnetohydrodynamic system. For cases without magnetic field, we recover well-established scaling for the onset of convection under rotation; moreover, we obtain thermal wind scalings for supercritical flows. With magnetic field, we study the thermal behaviour by measurement of the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number as well as magnetoconvective patterns inside the TC.

  14. Perspective - Systematic study of Reynolds stress closure models in the computations of plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Sarkar, S.

    1993-01-01

    The roles of pressure-strain and turbulent diffusion models in the numerical calculation of turbulent plane channel flows with second-moment closure models are investigated. Three turbulent diffusion and five pressure-strain models are utilized in the computations. The main characteristics of the mean flow and the turbulent fields are compared against experimental data. All the features of the mean flow are correctly predicted by all but one of the Reynolds stress closure models. The Reynolds stress anisotropies in the log layer are predicted to varying degrees of accuracy (good to fair) by the models. None of the models could predict correctly the extent of relaxation towards isotropy in the wake region near the center of the channel. Results from the directional numerical simulation are used to further clarify this behavior of the models.

  15. Systematic study of Reynolds stress closure models in the computations of plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Sarkar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The roles of pressure-strain and turbulent diffusion models in the numerical calculation of turbulent plane channel flows with second-moment closure models are investigated. Three turbulent diffusion and five pressure-strain models are utilized in the computations. The main characteristics of the mean flow and the turbulent fields are compared against experimental data. All the features of the mean flow are correctly predicted by all but one of the Reynolds stress closure models. The Reynolds stress anisotropies in the log layer are predicted to varying degrees of accuracy (good to fair) by the models. None of the models could predict correctly the extent of relaxation towards isotropy in the wake region near the center of the channel. Results from the directional numerical simulation are used to further clarify this behavior of the models.

  16. Turbulence modeling for separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Two projects are described in this report. The first involves assessing turbulence models in separated flow. The second addresses the anomalous behavior of certain turbulence models in stagnation point flow. The primary motivation for developing turbulent transport models is to provide tools for computing non-equilibrium, or complex, turbulent flows. Simple flows can be analyzed using data correlations or algebraic eddy viscosities, but in more complicated flows such as a massively separated boundary layer, a more elaborate level of modeling is required. It is widely believed that at least a two-equation transport model is required in such cases. The transport equations determine the evolution of suitable velocity and time-scales of the turbulence. The present study included assessment of second-moment closures in several separated flows, including sharp edge separation; smooth wall, pressure driven separation; and unsteady vortex shedding. Flows with mean swirl are of interest for their role in enhancing mixing both by turbulent and mean motion. The swirl can have a stabilizing effect on the turbulence. An axi-symmetric extension to the INS-2D computer program was written adding the capability of computing swirling flow. High swirl can produce vortex breakdown on the centerline of the jet and it occurs in various combustors.

  17. Measurement and mathematical modelling of elastic and resistive lung mechanical properties studied at sinusoidal expiratory flow.

    PubMed

    Bitzén, Ulrika; Niklason, Lisbet; Göransson, Ingegerd; Jonson, Björn

    2010-11-01

    Elastic pressure/volume (P(el) /V) and elastic pressure/resistance (P(el) /R) diagrams reflect parenchymal and bronchial properties, respectively. The objective was to develop a method for determination and mathematical characterization of P(el) /V and P(el) /R relationships, simultaneously studied at sinusoidal flow-modulated vital capacity expirations in a body plethysmograph. Analysis was carried out by iterative parameter estimation based on a composite mathematical model describing a three-segment P(el) /V curve and a hyperbolic P(el) /R curve. The hypothesis was tested that the sigmoid P(el) /V curve is non-symmetric. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. The hypothesis of a non-symmetric P(el) /V curve was verified. Its upper volume asymptote was nearly equal to total lung capacity (TLC), indicating lung stiffness increasing at high lung volume as the main factor limiting TLC at health. The asymptotic minimal resistance of the hyperbolic P(el) /R relationship reflected lung size. A detailed description of both P(el) /V and P(el) /R relationships was simultaneously derived from sinusoidal flow-modulated vital capacity expirations. The nature of the P(el) /V curve merits the use of a non-symmetric P(el) /V model. PMID:20726995

  18. Field and modelling studies of immiscible fluid flow above a contaminated water-table aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkelrath, W.N.; Essaid, H.I.; Hess, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    A method was developed for measuring the spatial distribution of immiscible liquid contaminants in the subsurface. Fluid saturation distributions measured at a crude-oil spill site were used to test a numerical multiphase flow model.

  19. Distant downstream steady-state flow studies of a mechanical heart valve: PIV study of secondary flow in a model aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Brandon R.; Popma, Christopher J.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Each year, hundreds of thousands of aortic and mitral heart valves are replaced with prosthetic valves. In efforts to develop a valve that does not require lifelong anticoagulation therapy, previous experimental research has been devoted to analyzing the hemodynamics of various heart valve designs, limited to the flow up to only 2 diameters downstream of the valve. Two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used in this study to examine secondary flow velocity fields in a curved tube modeling an aorta at five locations (0-, 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-degrees). A bileaflet valve, opened to 30-, 45-, and 59-degrees, and one (no-valve) baseline condition were examined under three steady flow inflows (Re = 218, 429, 634). In particular, variations in the two-dimensional turbulent shear stresses at each cross sectional plane were analyzed. The results suggest that bileaflet valves in the aortic model produce significant turbulence and vorticity up to 5.5 downstream diameters, i.e. up to the 90-degrees location. Expanding this research towards aortic heart valve hemodynamics highlights a need for additional studies extending beyond the typical few diameters downstream to fully characterize valvular function. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  20. Unsaturated flow dynamics during irrigation with wastewater: field and modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Hernandez, V.; de Miguel, A.; Meffe, R.; Leal, M.; González-Naranjo, V.; de Bustamante, I.

    2012-04-01

    To deal with water scarcity combined with a growing water demand, the reuse of wastewater effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) for industrial and agricultural purposes is considered as a technically and economically feasible solution. In agriculture, irrigation with wastewater emerges as a sustainable practice that should be considered in such scenarios. Water infiltration, soil moisture storage and evapotranspiration occurring in the unsaturated zone are fundamental processes that play an important role in soil water balance. An accurate estimation of unsaturated flow dynamics (during and after irrigation) is essential to improve wastewater management (i.e. estimating groundwater recharge or maximizing irrigation efficiency) and to avoid possible soil and groundwater affections (i.e. predicting contaminant transport). The study site is located in the Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes (Seville, Spain). Here, treated wastewater is irrigated over the soil to enhance plants growth. To obtain physical characteristics of the soil (granulometry, bulk density and water retention curve), soil samples were collected at different depths. A drain gauge passive capillary lysimeter was installed to determine the volume of water draining from the vadose zone. Volumetric water content of the soil was monitored by measuring the dielectric constant using capacitance/frequency domain technology. Three soil moisture probes were located at different depths (20, 50 and 70 cm below the ground surface) to control the variation of the volumetric water content during infiltration. The main aim of this study is to understand water flow dynamics through the unsaturated zone during irrigation by using the finite element model Hydrus-1D. The experimental conditions were simulated by a 90 cm long, one dimensional solution domain. Specific climatic conditions, wastewater irrigation rates and physical properties of the soil were introduced in the model as input parameters

  1. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-06-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events.

  2. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events. PMID:27255968

  3. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events. PMID:27255968

  4. Experimental Study of Overtopping Induced Landslide Dam Break Flow and Two Layer Two Phase Mixture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Duan, J. G.; Zhong, D.; Zhang, H.

    2013-12-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to investigate flood flow generated by the failure of landslide dams due to overtopping. These experiments aim to quantify the influences of inflow discharge, downstream slope, width of dam crest, dam height, and dam material on the flood flow. Images from high-speed cameras are used to determine the profiles of dam body and flow discharge during the failure processes. Results showed that the water level in the upstream reservoir and the erosion of dam body are the dominant factors affecting the downstream flood flow. A physical-based model is established to calculate the arriving time and the peak discharge of dam break flow using two phase mixture model. Both analytical and numerical solutions were derived for the model. The modelling results were verified using data from this and several other laboratory experimental datasets. The agreement between the calculated and measured data showed the applicability of the proposed model for predicting the peak discharge of overtopping induced dam break flow.

  5. Numerical study of high-frequency oscillatory air flow and convective mixing in a CT-based human airway model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiwoong; Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-12-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is considered an efficient and safe respiratory technique to ventilate neonates and patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. HFOV has very different characteristics from normal breathing physiology, with a much smaller tidal volume and a higher breathing frequency. In this study, the high-frequency oscillatory flow is studied using a computational fluid dynamics analysis in three different geometrical models with increasing complexity: a straight tube, a single-bifurcation tube model, and a computed tomography (CT)-based human airway model of up to seven generations. We aim to understand the counter-flow phenomenon at flow reversal and its role in convective mixing in these models using sinusoidal waveforms of different frequencies and Reynolds (Re) numbers. Mixing is quantified by the stretch rate analysis. In the straight-tube model, coaxial counter flow with opposing fluid streams is formed around flow reversal, agreeing with an analytical Womersley solution. However, counter flow yields no net convective mixing at end cycle. In the single-bifurcation model, counter flow at high Re is intervened with secondary vortices in the parent (child) branch at end expiration (inspiration), resulting in an irreversible mixing process. For the CT-based airway model three cases are considered, consisting of the normal breathing case, the high-frequency-normal-Re (HFNR) case, and the HFOV case. The counter-flow structure is more evident in the HFNR case than the HFOV case. The instantaneous and time-averaged stretch rates at the end of two breathing cycles and in the vicinity of flow reversal are computed. It is found that counter flow contributes about 20% to mixing in HFOV. PMID:20614248

  6. Receptor-mediated adhesion phenomena. Model studies with the Radical-Flow Detachment Assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenberger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion phenomena play a vital role in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. To investigate the physical and chemical factors that influence the cell/surface interaction, we have used a radial flow device, a so-called Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA). The RFDA allows us to make direct observations of the detachment process under specified experimental conditions. In results reported here, we have studied the detachment of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) from ligand-coated glass surfaces. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine several aspects of the adhesion process with particles having uniform properties that can be varied systematically. Advantages of the RFDA are many, especially direct observation of cell detachment over a range of shear stresses with quantitative measurement of the adhesive force. We focus our studies on the effects of ligand and receptor densities, along with the influence of pH and ionic strength of the medium. These data are analyzed with a mathematical model based on the theoretical framework of Bell, G. I. (1978. Science [Wash. DC]. 200:618-627) and Hammer, D. A. and D. A. Lauffenburger (1987. Biophys. J. 52:475-487). We demonstrate experimental validation of a theoretical expression for the critical shear stress for particle detachment, and show that it is consistent with reasonable estimates for the receptor-ligand bond affinity. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2166596

  7. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  8. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  9. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  10. Numerical study of high frequency oscillatory air flow and convective mixing in a CT-based human airway model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jiwoong; Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    High frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is considered an efficient and safe respiratory technique to ventilate neonates and patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. HFOV has very different characteristics from normal breathing physiology, with a much smaller tidal volume and a higher breathing frequency. In this work, the high frequency oscillatory flow is studied using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis in three different geometrical models with increasing complexity: a straight tube, a single-bifurcation tube model, and a computed-tomography (CT)-based human airway model of up to seven generations. We aim to understand the counter-flow phenomenon at flow reversal and its role in convective mixing in these models using sinusoidal waveforms of different frequencies and Reynolds numbers. Mixing is quantified by the stretch rate analysis. In the straight-tube model, coaxial counter flow with opposing fluid streams is formed around flow reversal, agreeing with an analytical Womersley solution. However, counter flow yields no net convective mixing at end cycle. In the single-bifurcation model, counter flow at high Re is intervened with secondary vortices in the parent (child) branch at end expiration (inspiration), resulting in an irreversible mixing process. For the CT-based airway model three cases are considered, consisting of the normal breathing case, the high-frequency-normal-Re case, and the HFOV case. The counter-flow structure is more evident in the high-frequency-normal-Re case than the HFOV case. The instantaneous and time-averaged stretch rates at the end of two breathing cycles and in the vicinity of flow reversal are computed. It is found that counter flow contributes about 20% to mixing in HFOV. PMID:20614248

  11. Vortical flow in human elbow joints: a three-dimensional computed tomography modeling study.

    PubMed

    Adikrishna, Arnold; Kekatpure, Aashay L; Tan, Jun; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Deslivia, Maria Florencia; Jeon, In-Ho

    2014-10-01

    The human elbow joint has been regarded as a loose hinge joint, with a unique helical motion of the axis during extension-flexion. This study was designed to identify the helical axis in the ulnohumeral joint during elbow extension-flexion by tracking the midpoint between the coronoid tip and the olecranon tip of the proximal ulna in a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) image model. The elbows of four volunteers were CT-scanned at four flexion angles (0°, 45°, 90°, and 130°) at neutral rotation with a custom-made holding device to control any motion during scanning. Three-dimensional models of each elbow were reconstructed and a 3D ulnohumeral joint at 45°, 90°, and 130° was superimposed onto a fully extended joint (0°) by rotating and translating each 3D ulnohumeral joint along the axes. The midpoints of the olecranon and coronoid tips were interpolated using cubic spline technique and the dynamic elbow motion was plotted to determine the motion of the helical axis. The means and standard deviations were subsequently calculated. The average midpoint pattern of joint motion from extension to flexion was elliptical-orbit-like when projected onto a sagittal plane and continuously translated a mean 2.14 ± 0.34 mm (range, 1.83-2.52 mm) to the lateral side during elbow extension-flexion. In 3D space, the average midpoint pattern of the ulnohumeral joint resembles a vortical flow, spinning along an imaginary axis, with an inconsistent radius from 0° to 130° flexion. The ulnohumeral joint axis both rotates and translates during elbow extension-flexion, with a vortex-flow motion occurring during flexion in 3D model analysis. This motion should be considered when performing hinged external fixation, total elbow replacement and medial collateral ligament reconstruction surgery. PMID:25100632

  12. A Computational Model of Coupled Multiphase Flow and Geomechanics to Study Fault Slip and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Jha, B.

    2014-12-01

    The coupling between subsurface flow and geomechanical deformation is critical in the assessment of the environmental impacts of groundwater use, underground liquid waste disposal, geologic storage of carbon dioxide, and exploitation of shale gas reserves. In particular, seismicity induced by fluid injection and withdrawal has emerged as a central element of the scientific discussion around subsurface technologies that tap into water and energy resources. Here we present a new computational approach to model coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics of faulted reservoirs. We represent faults as surfaces embedded in a three-dimensional medium by using zero-thickness interface elements to accurately model fault slip under dynamically evolving fluid pressure and fault strength. We incorporate the effect of fluid pressures from multiphase flow in the mechanical stability of faults and employ a rigorous formulation of nonlinear multiphase geomechanics that is capable of handling strong capillary effects. We develop a numerical simulation tool by coupling a multiphase flow simulator with a mechanics simulator, using the unconditionally stable fixed-stress scheme for the sequential solution of two-way coupling between flow and geomechanics. We validate our modeling approach using several synthetic, but realistic, test cases that illustrate the onset and evolution of earthquakes from fluid injection and withdrawal. We also present the application of the coupled flow-geomechanics simulation technology to the post mortem analysis of the Mw=5.1, May 2011 Lorca earthquake in south-east Spain, and assess the potential that the earthquake was induced by groundwater extraction.

  13. Basic studies of baroclinic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Tim L.; Chou, S.-H.; Leslie, Fred W.; Lu, H.-I.; Butler, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    Computations were completed of transition curves in the conventional annulus, including hysteresis effect. The model GEOSIM was used to compute the transition between axisymmetric flow and baroclinic wave flow in the conventional annulus experiments. Thorough testing and documentation of the GEOSIM code were also completed. The Spacelab 3 results from the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) were reviewed and numerical modeling was performed of many of the cases with horizontal temperature gradients as well as heating from below, with different rates of rotation. A numerical study of the lower transition to axisymmetric flow in the baroclinic annulus was performed using GEOSIM.

  14. Modeling jets in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Various approaches to the modeling of jets in cross flow are reviewed. These are grouped into four classes, namely: empirical models, integral models, perturbation models, and numerical models. Empirical models depend largely on the correlation of experimental data and are mostly useful for first-order estimates of global properties such as jet trajectory and velocity and temperature decay rates. Integral models are based on some ordinary-differential form of the conservation laws, but require substantial empirical calibration. They allow more details of the flow field to be obtained; simpler versions have to assume similarity of velocity and temperature profiles, but more sophisticated ones can actually calculate these profiles. Perturbation models require little empirical input, but the need for small parameters to ensure convergent expansions limits their application to either the near-field or the far-field. Therefore, they are mostly useful for the study of flow physics. Numerical models are based on conservation laws in partial-differential form. They require little empirical input and have the widest range of applicability. They also require the most computational resources. Although many qualitative and quantitative features of jets in cross flow have been predicted with numerical models, many issues affecting accuracy such as grid resolution and turbulence model are not completely resolved.

  15. Low flow forecasting with data driven models that include and models that do not include hydrological knowledge - a comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stravs, L.; Brilly, M.

    2009-04-01

    Good and accurate long-term low flow forecasting is important in the fields of sustainable water management, water rights, water supply management, industrial use of freshwater, optimization of the reservoir operations for the production of electric energy and other water-related disciplines. Today, low flow forecasting is usually performed as an integrated part of calibrated rainfall-runoff models, but in our research we developed two types of simple empirical 7-day ahead low flow forecasting models by using the M5 machine learning method for the generation of regression and model trees. Development of the first type of models was based solely on the application of the M5 machine learning method (1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-and 7-day lead time low flow forecasting model trees were developed from using only past flow data and then combined to produce 7-day ahead forecast curve), while the development of the other type of models included the conceptual knowledge of linear reservoir recession functions AND application of the M5 machine learning method (we modelled the streamflow recession coefficient k as a function of the flow rate at which the 7-day low flow forecast is made and the decrease in the flow rate from the previous day). Both types of 7-day ahead low flow forecasting models were developed by using the same type and amount of data and were built for the Podhom gauging station on the Radovna River and the Medvode gauging station on the Sora River (both are Slovenian tributaries of the Sava River, which itself is a Danube River tributary). The results were compared and tested both visually and numerically.

  16. Comparative study of hybrid RANS-LES models for separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, G.; Lakshmanan, S. K.; Gopalan, H.; De, A.

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid RANS-LES models are proven to be capable of predicting massively separated flows with reasonable computation cost. In this paper, Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) based detached eddy simulation (DES) model and three SST based hybrid models with different RANS to LES switching criteriaare investigated. The flow over periodic hill at Re = 10,595 is chosen as the benchmark for comparing the performance of the different models due to the complex flow physics and reasonablecomputational cost. The model performances are evaluated based on their prediction capabilities of velocity and stress profiles, and separation and reattachment point. The simulated results are validatedagainst experimental and numerical results available in literature. The S-A DES model predicted separation bubble accurately at the top of the hill, as reported earlier in experiments and other numerical results. This model also correctly predicted velocity and stress profiles in recirculation region. However, the performance of this model was poor in the post reattachment region. On the other hand, the k-ω SST based hybrid models performed poorly in recirculation region, but it fairly predicted stress profiles in post reattachment region.

  17. Mean surface temperature prediction models for broiler chickens—a study of sensible heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; da Silva, Iran José Oliveira; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; de Castro, Ariane Cristina; Vieira, Frederico Marcio Corrêa

    2014-03-01

    Body surface temperature can be used to evaluate thermal equilibrium in animals. The bodies of broiler chickens, like those of all birds, are partially covered by feathers. Thus, the heat flow at the boundary layer between broilers' bodies and the environment differs between feathered and featherless areas. The aim of this investigation was to use linear regression models incorporating environmental parameters and age to predict the surface temperatures of the feathered and featherless areas of broiler chickens. The trial was conducted in a climate chamber, and 576 broilers were distributed in two groups. In the first trial, 288 broilers were monitored after exposure to comfortable or stressful conditions during a 6-week rearing period. Another 288 broilers were measured under the same conditions to test the predictive power of the models. Sensible heat flow was calculated, and for the regions covered by feathers, sensible heat flow was predicted based on the estimated surface temperatures. The surface temperatures of the feathered and featherless areas can be predicted based on air, black globe or operative temperatures. According to the sensible heat flow model, the broilers' ability to maintain thermal equilibrium by convection and radiation decreased during the rearing period. Sensible heat flow estimated based on estimated surface temperatures can be used to predict animal responses to comfortable and stressful conditions.

  18. Comparison study of the reactive and predictive dynamic models for pedestrian flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Qun; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Shu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    This paper formulates the reactive and predictive dynamic models for pedestrian flow and presents a comparison of the two models. The path-choice behavior of pedestrians in the reactive dynamic model is described that pedestrians tend to walk along a path with the lowest instantaneous cost. The desired walking direction of pedestrians in the predictive dynamic model is chosen to minimize the actual cost based on predictive traffic conditions. An algorithm used to solve the two models encompasses a cell-centered finite volume method for a hyperbolic system of conservation laws and a time-dependent Hamilton-Jacobi equation, a fast sweeping method for an Eikonal-type equation, and a self-adaptive method of successive averages for an arisen discrete fixed point problem. The two models and their algorithm are applied to investigate the spatio-temporal patterns of flux or density and path-choice behaviors of pedestrian flow marching in a facility scattered with an obstacle. Numerical results show that the two models are able to capture macroscopic features of pedestrian flow, traffic instability and other complex nonlinear phenomena in pedestrian traffic, such as the formation of stop-and-go waves and clogging at bottlenecks. Different path-choice strategies of pedestrians cause different spatial distributions of pedestrian density specially in the high-density regions (near the obstacle and exits).

  19. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  20. GROUND-WATER FLOW MODELING STUDY OF THE LOVE CANAL AREA, NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the overall Love Canal monitoring effort an assessment of the ground water hydrology of the Love Canal area, New York was performed. As part of this assessment, ground-water flow models were used to aid in well siting, data analysis and reduction, and prediction of gro...

  1. Modeling blood flow circulation in intracranial arterial networks: a comparative 3D/1D simulation study.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, L; Cheever, E; Anor, T; Madsen, J R; Karniadakis, G E

    2011-01-01

    We compare results from numerical simulations of pulsatile blood flow in two patient-specific intracranial arterial networks using one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) models. Specifically, we focus on the pressure and flowrate distribution at different segments of the network computed by the two models. Results obtained with 1D and 3D models with rigid walls show good agreement in massflow distribution at tens of arterial junctions and also in pressure drop along the arteries. The 3D simulations with the rigid walls predict higher amplitude of the flowrate and pressure temporal oscillations than the 1D simulations with compliant walls at various segments even for small time-variations in the arterial cross-sectional areas. Sensitivity of the flow and pressure with respect to variation in the elasticity parameters is investigated with the 1D model. PMID:20661645

  2. Numerical modeling of species transport in turbulent flow and experimental study on aerosol sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

    Numerical simulations were performed to study the turbulent mixing of a scalar species in straight tube, single and double elbow flow configurations. Different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models were used to model the turbulence in the flow. Conventional and dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid scale models were used for the LES simulations. Wall functions were used to resolve the near wall boundary layer. These simulations were run with both two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometries. The velocity and tracer gas concentration Coefficient of Variations were compared with experimental results. The results from the LES simulations compared better with experimental results than the results from the RANS simulations. The level of mixing downstream of a S-shaped double elbow was higher than either the single elbow or the U-shaped double elbow due to the presence of counter rotating vortices. Penetration of neutralized and non-neutralized aerosol particles through three different types of tubing was studied. The tubing used included standard PVC pipes, aluminum conduit and flexible vacuum hose. Penetration through the aluminum conduit was unaffected by the presence or absence of charge neutralization, whereas particle penetrations through the PVC pipe and the flexible hosing were affected by the amount of particle charge. The electric field in a space enclosed by a solid conductor is zero. Therefore charged particles within the conducting aluminum conduit do not experience any force due to ambient electric fields, whereas the charged particles within the non-conducting PVC pipe and flexible hose experience forces due to the ambient electric fields. This increases the deposition of charged particles compared to neutralized particles within the 1.5" PVC tube and 1.5" flexible hose. Deposition 2001a (McFarland et al. 2001) software was used to predict the penetration through transport lines. The prediction from the software compared

  3. A modelling study of the multiphase leakage flow from pressurised CO2 pipeline.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuejin; Li, Kang; Tu, Ran; Yi, Jianxin; Xie, Qiyuan; Jiang, Xi

    2016-04-01

    The accidental leakage is one of the main risks during the pipeline transportation of high pressure CO2. The decompression process of high pressure CO2 involves complex phase transition and large variations of the pressure and temperature fields. A mathematical method based on the homogeneous equilibrium mixture assumption is presented for simulating the leakage flow through a nozzle in a pressurised CO2 pipeline. The decompression process is represented by two sub-models: the flow in the pipe is represented by the blowdown model, while the leakage flow through the nozzle is calculated with the capillary tube assumption. In the simulation, two kinds of real gas equations of state were employed in this model instead of the ideal gas equation of state. Moreover, results of the flow through the nozzle and measurement data obtained from laboratory experiments of pressurised CO2 pipeline leakage were compared for the purpose of validation. The thermodynamic processes of the fluid both in the pipeline and the nozzle were described and analysed. PMID:26774983

  4. MININR: a geochemical computer program for inclusion in water flow models - an application study

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, A.R.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Zachara, J.M.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-02-01

    MININR is a reduced form of the computer program MINTEQ which calculates equilibrium precipitation/dissolution of solid phases, aqueous speciation, adsorption, and gas phase equilibrium. The user-oriented features in MINTEQ were removed to reduce the size and increase the computational speed. MININR closely resembles the MINEQL computer program developed by Westall (1976). The main differences between MININR and MINEQL involve modifications to accept an initial starting mass of solid and necessary changes for linking with a water flow model. MININR in combination with a simple water flow model which considers only dilution was applied to a laboratory column packed with retorted oil shale and percolated with distilled water. Experimental and preliminary model simulation results are presented for the constituents K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ and pH.

  5. A High-Resolution Modeling Study of the Bosphorus Strait Dynamics and Exchange Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sözer, Adil; Sannino, Gianmaria; Özsoy, Emin

    2013-04-01

    An all-time modelling challenge aims to establish a sound understanding of the high energy environment of the Turkish Straits System, relating to inter-basin water and material transports and their influence on the sensitive ecosystems of the adjacent seas. As a first step in this direction, well resolved, high level, physically representative predictive models of the Bosphorus Strait exchange flow hydrodynamics are developed, adequately representing its complex topography, hydraulic controls, dissipative hydraulic jumps, mixing and turbulence mechanisms, with the application of appropriate basin boundary and initial conditions and judiciously selected numerical and physical model options. Both the ROMS and MITgcm models are used and compared for performance. Idealized and real case model results successfully reproduce observed flow features. The unique maximal exchange regime of the Bosphorus Strait, with hydraulic controls are demonstrated, although frictional effects, especially of the highly irregular lateral boundaries, are found to be extremely important, associated with mixing and entrainment and nonlinear dynamics determining the two-way fluxes as a function of sea-level changes across the strait. The intercomparison of ROMS and MITgcm results are extremely satisfactory in the basic elements of the flow, except for some small differences.

  6. Multilaboratory study of flow-induced hemolysis using the FDA benchmark nozzle model.

    PubMed

    Herbertson, Luke H; Olia, Salim E; Daly, Amanda; Noatch, Christopher P; Smith, William A; Kameneva, Marina V; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    Multilaboratory in vitro blood damage testing was performed on a simple nozzle model to determine how different flow parameters and blood properties affect device-induced hemolysis and to generate data for comparison with computational fluid dynamics-based predictions of blood damage as part of an FDA initiative for assessing medical device safety. Three independent laboratories evaluated hemolysis as a function of nozzle entrance geometry, flow rate, and blood properties. Bovine blood anticoagulated with acid citrate dextrose solution (2-80 h post-draw) was recirculated through nozzle-containing and paired nozzle-free control loops for 2 h. Controlled parameters included hematocrit (36 ± 1.5%), temperature (25 °C), blood volume, flow rate, and pressure. Three nozzle test conditions were evaluated (n = 26-36 trials each): (i) sudden contraction at the entrance with a blood flow rate of 5 L/min, (ii) gradual cone at the entrance with a 6-L/min blood flow rate, and (iii) sudden-contraction inlet at 6 L/min. The blood damage caused only by the nozzle model was calculated by subtracting the hemolysis generated by the paired control loop test. Despite high intralaboratory variability, significant differences among the three test conditions were observed, with the sharp nozzle entrance causing the most hemolysis. Modified index of hemolysis (MIHnozzle ) values were 0.292 ± 0.249, 0.021 ± 0.128, and 1.239 ± 0.667 for conditions i-iii, respectively. Porcine blood generated hemolysis results similar to those obtained with bovine blood. Although the interlaboratory hemolysis results are only applicable for the specific blood parameters and nozzle model used here, these empirical data may help to advance computational fluid dynamics models for predicting blood damage. PMID:25180887

  7. MULTI-LABORATORY STUDY OF FLOW-INDUCED HEMOLYSIS USING THE FDA BENCHMARK NOZZLE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Herbertson, Luke H.; Olia, Salim E.; Daly, Amanda; Noatch, Christopher P.; Smith, William A.; Kameneva, Marina V.; Malinauskas, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Multilaboratory in vitro blood damage testing was performed on a simple nozzle model to determine how different flow parameters and blood properties affect device-induced hemolysis and to generate data for comparison with computational fluid dynamics-based predictions of blood damage as part of an FDA initiative for assessing medical device safety. Three independent laboratories evaluated hemolysis as a function of nozzle entrance geometry, flow rate, and blood properties. Bovine blood anticoagulated with acid citrate dextrose solution (2–80 h post-draw) was recirculated through nozzle-containing and paired nozzle-free control loops for 2 h. Controlled parameters included hematocrit (36 ± 1.5%), temperature (25°C), blood volume, flow rate, and pressure. Three nozzle test conditions were evaluated (n = 26–36 trials each): (i) sudden contraction at the entrance with a blood flow rate of 5 L/min, (ii) gradual cone at the entrance with a 6-L/min blood flow rate, and (iii) sudden-contraction inlet at 6 L/min. The blood damage caused only by the nozzle model was calculated by subtracting the hemolysis generated by the paired control loop test. Despite high intralaboratory variability, significant differences among the three test conditions were observed, with the sharp nozzle entrance causing the most hemolysis. Modified index of hemolysis (MIHnozzle) values were 0.292 ± 0.249, 0.021 ± 0.128, and 1.239 ± 0.667 for conditions i–iii, respectively. Porcine blood generated hemolysis results similar to those obtained with bovine blood. Although the interlaboratory hemolysis results are only applicable for the specific blood parameters and nozzle model used here, these empirical data may help to advance computational fluid dynamics models for predicting blood damage. PMID:25180887

  8. On-line updating of a distributed flow routing model - River Vistula case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamuz, Emilia; Romanowicz, Renata; Napiorkowski, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an application of methods of on-line updating in the River Vistula flow forecasting system. All flow-routing codes make simplifying assumptions and consider only a reduced set of the processes known to occur during a flood. Hence, all models are subject to a degree of structural error that is typically compensated for by calibration of the friction parameters. Calibrated parameter values are not, therefore, physically realistic, as in estimating them we also make allowance for a number of distinctly non-physical effects, such as model structural error and any energy losses or flow processes which occur at sub-grid scales. Calibrated model parameters are therefore area-effective, scale-dependent values which are not drawn from the same underlying statistical distribution as the equivalent at-a-point parameter of the same name. The aim of this paper is the derivation of real-time updated, on-line flow forecasts at certain strategic locations along the river, over a specified time horizon into the future, based on information on the behaviour of the flood wave upstream and available on-line measurements at a site. Depending on the length of the river reach and the slope of the river bed, a realistic forecast lead time, obtained in this manner, may range from hours to days. The information upstream can include observations of river levels and/or rainfall measurements. The proposed forecasting system will integrate distributed modelling, acting as a spatial interpolator with lumped parameter Stochastic Transfer Function models. Daily stage data from gauging stations are typically available at sites 10-60 km apart and test only the average routing performance of hydraulic models and not their ability to produce spatial predictions. Application of a distributed flow routing model makes it possible to interpolate forecasts both in time and space. This work was partly supported by the project "Stochastic flood forecasting system (The River Vistula reach

  9. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  10. Construction, Modeling and Testing of a Low-Flow, Large-Diameter Aerosol Flow System for the Study of the Formation and Reactions of Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezell, M. J.; Johnson, S. N.; Yu, Y.; Pokkunuri, P.; Perraud, V.; Bruns, E.; Alexander, M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Dabdub, D.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A unique, high-volume, low-flow, stainless steel aerosol flow system for the study of the formation and reactions of aerosols relevant to the troposphere has been constructed, modeled and experimentally tested. The total flow tube length is 7.3 m which includes a 1.2 m section used for mixing. The flow tube is equipped with ultraviolet lamps for photolysis. The diameter of 0.45 m results in a smaller surface to volume ratio than is found in many other flow systems and reduces the contribution of wall reactions. The latter is also reduced by frequent cleaning of the flow tube walls which is feasible due to the ease of disassembly of the flow tube. Flow systems present a major advantage over chamber studies in that continuous sampling under stable conditions over long periods of time is possible, increasing the amount of sample available for analysis and permitting a wide variety of analytical techniques to be applied simultaneously. In this system, the large volume (1000 L) and low flow speed (2 cm/minute) result in a residence time of nearly an hour; and equally spaced sampling ports allow for time-resolved measurements of aerosol and gas-phase products. The central features of this system have been modeled using computational fluid dynamics software and experimentally probed using inert gases and aerosols. Instrumentation attached directly to this flow system includes a NOx analyzer, an ozone analyzer, relative humidity and temperature probes, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) spectrometer, an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer, GC-MS, integrating nephelometer, and FTIR. Particles are collected using impactors and filters, and analyzed by a variety of techniques including FTIR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS), GC-MS, HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS. In addition, for selected studies, an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) and

  11. Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs): overview of recent field and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Palm, Brett B.; Peng, Zhe; Hu, Weiwei; Ortega, Amber M.; Li, Rui; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Stark, Harald; Brune, William H.; de Gouw, Joost; Schroder, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) are popular tools for studying SOA formation and aging in both laboratory and field experiments. In an OFR, the concentration of an oxidant (OH, O3, or NO3) can be increased, leading to hours-months of equivalent atmospheric oxidation during the several-minute OFR residence time. Using gas- and particle-phase measurements from several recent field campaigns, we demonstrate SOA formation after oxidation of ambient air in an OFR. Typically, more SOA formation is observed from nighttime air than daytime air. This indicates that the concentration of SOA-forming gases in ambient air is relatively higher at night. Measured ambient VOCs are not able to explain the magnitude of SOA formation in the OFR, suggesting that typically unmeasured S/IVOCs (possibly VOC oxidation products or direct emissions) play a substantial intermediary role in ambient SOA formation. We also present highlights from recent OFR oxidant chemistry modeling studies. HOx, Ox, and photolysis chemistry was modeled for two common OH production methods (utilizing 185+254 nm UV light, or 254 nm only). OH exposure (OHexp) can be estimated within a factor of ~2 using model-derived equations, and can be verified in situ using VOC decay measurements. OHexp is strongly dependent on external OH reactivity, which may cause significant OH suppression in some circumstances (e.g., lab/source studies with high precursor concentrations). UV light photolysis and reaction with oxygen atoms are typically not major reaction pathways. Modeling the fate of condensable low-volatility organic gases (LVOCs) formed in an OFR suggests that LVOC fate is dependent on particle condensational sink. E.g., for the range of particle condensational sink at a remote pine forest, anywhere from 20-80% of produced LVOCs were predicted to condense onto aerosols for an OHexp of ~1 day, with the remainder lost to OFR or sampling line walls. Similar to large chamber wall loss corrections, a correction is needed

  12. Inclusion of TCAF model in XSPEC to study accretion flow dynamics around black hole candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Santanu

    Spectral and Temporal properties of black hole candidates can be well understood with the Chakrabarti-Titarchuk solution of two component advective flow (TCAF). This model requires two accretion rates, namely, the Keplerian disk accretion rate and the sub-Keplerian halo accretion rate, the latter being composed of a low angular momentum flow which may or may not develop a shock. In this solution, the relevant parameter is the relative importance of the halo (which creates the Compton cloud region) rate with respect to the Keplerian disk rate (soft photon source). Though this model has been used earlier to manually fit data of several black hole candidates quite satisfactorily, for the first time we are able to create a user friendly version by implementing additive Table model FITS file into GSFC/NASA's spectral analysis software package XSPEC. This enables any user to extract physical parameters of accretion flows, such as two accretion rates, shock location, shock strength etc. for any black hole candidate. Most importantly, unlike any other theoretical model, we show that TCAF is capable of predicting timing properties from spectral fits, since in TCAF, a shock is responsible for deciding spectral slopes as well as QPO frequencies.

  13. A numerical study of the alpha model for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mininni, Pablo D.; Montgomery, David C.; Pouquet, Annick G.

    2005-03-01

    We explore some consequences of the "alpha model," also called the "Lagrangian-averaged" model, for two-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. This model is an extension of the smoothing procedure in fluid dynamics, which filters velocity fields locally while leaving their associated vorticities unsmoothed, and has proved useful for high Reynolds number turbulence computations. We consider several known effects (selective decay, dynamic alignment, inverse cascades, and the probability distribution functions of fluctuating turbulent quantities) in magnetofluid turbulence and compare the results of numerical solutions of the primitive MHD equations with their alpha-model counterparts' performance for the same flows, in regimes where available resolution is adequate to explore both. The hope is to justify the use of the alpha model in regimes that lie outside currently available resolution, as will be the case in particular in three-dimensional geometry or for magnetic Prandtl numbers differing significantly from unity. We focus our investigation, using direct numerical simulations with a standard and fully parallelized pseudospectral method and periodic boundary conditions in two space dimensions, on the role that such a modeling of the small scales using the Lagrangian-averaged framework plays in the large-scale dynamics of MHD turbulence. Several flows are examined, and for all of them one can conclude that the statistical properties of the large-scale spectra are recovered, whereas small-scale detailed phase information (such as, e.g., the location of structures) is lost.

  14. Comparative study of regionalization methods for simulating low-flows from a small number of model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Florine; Folton, Nathalie; Oudin, Ludovic; Arnaud, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Issues with water resource management result from both an increasing demand and climate changes. The situations of low-flows, droughts and more generally lack of water are critically scrutinized. In this context, there is a need for tools to assist water agencies in the prediction and management of reference low-flows at gauged and ungauged catchment locations. IRSTEA developed GR2M-LoiEau, a conceptual distributed rainfall-runoff model, which is combined with a regionalized model of snow storage and melt. GR2M-LoiEau relies on two parameters which are regionalized and mapped throughout France. This model allows to cartography annual and monthly reference low-flows. The input meteorological data come from the distributed mesoscale atmospheric analysis system SAFRAN, which provides daily solid and liquid precipitations and temperatures data from everywhere in the French territory. In order to fully exploit these daily meteorological data to estimate daily statistics on low flows, a new version of GR2M-LoiEau is being developed at a daily time step, yet keeping only a few regionalized parameters. The aim of this study is to design a comprehensive set of tests to allow comparing low-flows obtained with different regionalization methods used to estimate low-flow model parameters. The new version of GR2M-LoiEau being not yet operational, the tests are made with GR4J (Perrin, 2002), a conceptual rainfall-runoff model, which already provides daily estimations, but involves four parameters that cannot easily be regionalized. Many studies showed the good prediction performances of this model. This work includes two parts. On the one hand, good criteria must be identified to evaluate and compare model results, good predictions of the model being expected about low flows and reference low flows, but also annual means and high flows. On the other hand, two methods of regionalization will have to be compared to estimate model parameters. The first one is rough, all the

  15. Characterization and modeling of multiphase flow in structured microreactors: a post microreactor case study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Shi, Yanxiang; Abolhasani, Milad; Jensen, Klavs F

    2015-08-01

    We study microreactors with internal fields of posts as typical examples of structured microreactors to elucidate flow fields and their implications for mass transfer. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) visualization combined with image analysis is used to systematically quantify key features such as interfacial area, phase holdup and the characteristics of the post-wetting layer. The subsequent mass transport analysis yields insight into how the posts contribute to the overall enhanced mass transfer performance compared to open channels, and provides predictions of mass transfer performance under varying operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of multiphase flow using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method are in good agreement with experimentally observed multiphase flows. PMID:26126496

  16. Flow stress and material model study at high strain rate and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Brar, N. S.

    1994-07-01

    The flow stress of M200 maraging steel, C1008 steel, and 6061-T6 aluminum at low temperatures to 123 K and at a strain rate of about 103 s-1 is measured using split Hopkinson bar (SHB). Liquid nitrogen is used to cool the specimen to the desired temperature. The flow stress of M200 increased to 1.93 GPa at 123 K, an increase of 22 percent compared to 1.58 GPa at room temperature. In the case of 6061-T6 aluminum the flow stress remains at about 390 MPa at temperatures in the range 293 to 123 K. For C1008 steel, the flow stress increased to 860 MPa at 123 K from its room temperature value of 610 MPa. The failure strain for C1008 steel at 123 K was 0.02, compared to 0.2 at room temperature, suggesting a ductile to brittle transition. The Johnson-Cook material model constant ``m'', which accounts for temperature effect, is 0.5 for C1008 at temperatures in the range 123 K to 950 K.

  17. A comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh

    1993-01-01

    A computational study has been conducted to evaluate the performance of various turbulence models. The NASA P8 inlet, which represents cruise condition of a typical hypersonic air-breathing vehicle, was selected as a test case for the study; the PARC2D code, which solves the full two dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, was used. Results are presented for a total of six versions of zero- and two-equation turbulence models. Zero-equation models tested are the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the two. Two-equation models tested are low-Reynolds number models (the Chien model and the Speziale model) and a high-Reynolds number model (the Launder and Spalding model).

  18. (FRANCE) USING THE QUIC MODEL (QUICK URBAN AND INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX) TO STUDY AIR FLOW AND DISPERSION PATTERNS IN DESERTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its continuing development and evaluation, the QUIC model (Quick Urban & Industrial Complex) was used to study flow and dispersion in complex terrain for two cases. First, for a small area of lower Manhattan near the World Trade Center site, comparisons were made bet...

  19. USING THE QUIC MODEL (QUICK URBAN AND INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX) TO STUDY AIR FLOW AND DISPERSION PATTERNS IN DESERTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its continuing development and evaluation, the QUIC model (Quick Urban & Industrial Complex) was used to study flow and dispersion in complex terrain for two cases. First, for a small area of lower Manhattan near the World Trade Center site, comparisons were made bet...

  20. Swirl flow turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.; Jackson, T. W.; Lilley, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Confined turbulent swirling flow data obtained from a single hot-wire using a six-orientation technique are analyzed numerically. The effects of swirl strength and the presence of a strong contraction nozzle further downstream on deduced parameters is also presented and discussed for the case of chamber-to-inlet diameter ratio D/d = 2. Three swirl strengths are considered with inlet swirl vane angles of 0, 45 and 70 deg. A strong contraction nozzle with an area ratio of 4 is located two chamber-diameters downstream of the inlet to the flowfield. It is found that both the swirl strength and the contraction have strong effects on the turbulence parameters. Generally, the most dramatic effect of increase of swirl strength is the considerable increase in values of all the parameters considered, (rx-viscosity, kinetic energy of turbulence, length scales, and degree of nonisotropy). The presence of a strong contraction nozzle tends to increase the turbulence parameter values in regions of acceleration and to reduce them in deceleration regions. Based on similarity of viscosity and length scale profiles, a C sub mu formulation is deduced which is shown to improve the predictive capability of the standard k-epsilon turbulence model in swirling recirculating flows.

  1. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wu

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

  2. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  3. Study of Flow Over Oscillating Airfoil Models at a Mach Number of 7.0 in Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arman, Ali

    1961-01-01

    A wind-tunnel study of unsteady flow at a Mach number of 7 in helium has been conducted on several sting-mounted wedge, double-wedge, and flat-plate airfoil models with three different leading-edge radii. The data were obtained by taking high-speed schlieren motion pictures of the decaying motion of the model as it was released from an initial deflection. The shock-wave position observed on the sharp-leading-edge models during the oscillation was compared with that obtained by use of unsteady flow theory as well as steady-state theory. Comparison of theoretical results indicated that no unsteady-flow effects exist over the range of reduced frequencies k, 0.007 less than equal than k less than or equal 0.030, studied experimentally. The experimental results confirmed this finding as no unsteady-flow effects were detected in this reduced-frequency range. Comparison of shock-wave positions measured for the blunt models with those calculated by steady-state methods indicated fair agreement.

  4. A flow reactor study of neopentane oxidation at 8 atmospheres: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Miller, D.L.; Cernansky, N.P.; Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    An existing detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for neopentane oxidation is applied to new experimental measurements, taken in a flow reactor operating at a pressure of 8 atm. The reactor temperature ranged from 620 K to 810 K and flow rates of the reactant gases neopentane, oxygen, and nitrogen were 0.285, 7.6, and 137.1 standard liter per minute (SLM), respectively, producing an equivalence ratio of 0.3. Initial simulations identified some deficiencies in the existing model and the paper presents modifications which included upgrading the thermodynamic parameters of alkyl radical and alkylperoxy radical species, adding an alternative isomerization reaction of hydroperoxy-neopentyl-peroxy, and a multistep reaction sequence for 2-methylpropan-2-yl radical with molecular oxygen. These changes improved the calculation for the overall reactivity and the concentration profiles of the following primary products: formaldehyde, acetone, isobutene; 3,3-dimethyloxetane, methacrolein, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. Experiments indicate that neopentane shows negative temperature coefficient behavior similar to other alkanes, though it is not as pronounced as that shown by n-pentane for example. Modeling results indicate that this behavior is caused by the {beta}-scission of the neopentyl radical and the chain propagation reactions of the hydroperoxyl-neopentyl radical.

  5. Stochastic power flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The stochastic nature of customer demand and equipment failure on large interconnected electric power networks has produced a keen interest in the accurate modeling and analysis of the effects of probabilistic behavior on steady state power system operation. The principle avenue of approach has been to obtain a solution to the steady state network flow equations which adhere both to Kirchhoff's Laws and probabilistic laws, using either combinatorial or functional approximation techniques. Clearly the need of the present is to develop sound techniques for producing meaningful data to serve as input. This research has addressed this end and serves to bridge the gap between electric demand modeling, equipment failure analysis, etc., and the area of algorithm development. Therefore, the scope of this work lies squarely on developing an efficient means of producing sensible input information in the form of probability distributions for the many types of solution algorithms that have been developed. Two major areas of development are described in detail: a decomposition of stochastic processes which gives hope of stationarity, ergodicity, and perhaps even normality; and a powerful surrogate probability approach using proportions of time which allows the calculation of joint events from one dimensional probability spaces.

  6. Assessing hydrological model behaviors by intercomparison of the simulated stream flow compositions: case study in a steep forest watershed in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.-C.; Lee, T.-Y.; Lee, J.-Y.; Hsu, S.-C.; Kao, S.-J.; Chang, F.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The accurate stream flow composition simulated by different models is rarely discussed, and few studies addressed the model behaviors affected by the model structures. This study compared the simulated stream flow composition derived from two models, namely HBV and TOPMODEL. A total of 23 storms with a wide rainfall spectrum were utilized and independent geochemical data (to derive the stream composition using end-member mixing analysis, EMMA) were introduced. Results showed that both hydrological models generally perform stream discharge satisfactory in terms of the Nash efficiency coefficient, correlation coefficient, and discharge volume. However, the three simulated flows (surface flow, interflow, and base flow) derived from the two models were different with the change of storm intensity and duration. Both simulated surface flows showed the same patterns. The HBV simulated base flow dramatically increased with the increase of storm duration. However, the TOP-derived base flow remained stable. Meanwhile, the two models showed contrasting behaviors in the interflow. HBV prefers to generate less interflow but percolates more to the base flow to match the stream flow, which implies that this model might be suited for thin soil layer. The use of the models should consider more environmental background data into account. Compared with the EMMA-derived flows, both models showed a significant 2 to 4 h time lag, indicating that the base-flow responses were faster than the models represented. Our study suggested that model intercomparison under a wide spectrum of rainstorms and with independent validation data (geochemical data) is a good means of studying the model behaviors. Rethinking the characterization of the model structure and the watershed characteristics is necessary in selecting the more appropriate hydrological model.

  7. Modeling studies of electrolyte flow and bubble behavior in advanced Hall cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, R.; Evans, J. W.

    Much research was performed in recent years by corporations and university/government labs on materials for use in advanced Hall-Heroult cells. Attention has focussed on materials for use as wettable cathodes and inert anodes and much was achieved in terms of material development. Comparatively less attention was devoted to how these materials might be incorporated in new or existing cells, i.e., to how the cells should be designed and redesigned, to take full advantage of these materials. The effort, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, to address this issue, is described. The primary objectives are cell design where electrolyte flow can be managed to promote both the removal of the anode gas bubbles and the convection of dissolved alumina in the inter-electrode region, under conditions where the anode-cathode distance is small. The principal experimental tool was a water model consisting of a large tank in which simulated anodes can be suspended in either the horizontal or vertical configurations. Gas generation was by forcing compressed air through porous graphite and the fine bubbles characteristic of inert anodes were produced by adding butanol to the water. Velocities were measured using a laser Doppler velocimeter. Velocity measurements with two different anode designs (one that is flat and the other that has grooves) are presented. The results show that the electrode configuration has a significant effect on the fluid flow pattern in the inter-electrode region. Furthermore, it is shown that rapid fluid flow is obtained when the cell is operated with a submerged anode.

  8. Reduced Order Modeling Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    The details: a) Need stable numerical methods; b) Round off error can be considerable; c) Not convinced modes are correct for incompressible flow. Nonetheless, can derive compact and accurate reduced-order models. Can be used to generate actuator models or full flow-field models

  9. DNS studies of bubbly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Esmaeeli, Asghar; Biswas, Souvik

    2004-11-01

    Recent stuies of bubbly flows, using direct numerical simulations, are discussed. The goal of this study is to examine the collective behavior of many bubbles as the rise Reynolds number is increased and and a single bubble rises unsteadily, as well as to examine the motion of bubbles in channels. A front-tracking/finite volume method is used to fully resolve all flow scales, including the bubbles and the flow around them. Two cases are simulated, for one the bubbles remain nearly spherical and for the other case the bubbles are deformable and wobble. The wobbly bubbles remains relatively uniformly distributed and are not susceptible to the streaming instability found by Bunner and Tryggvason (2003) for deformable bubbles at lower rise Reynolds numbers. The more spherical bubbles, on the other hand, form transients ``rafts'' somewhat similar to those seen in potential flow simulation of many bubbles. For channel flow we compare results from direct numerical simulations of bubbly flow with prediction of the steady-state two-fluid model of Antal, Lahey, and Flaherty (1991). The simulations are done assuming a two-dimensional system and the model coefficients are adjusted slightly to match the data for upflow. The results generally agree reasonably well, even though the simulated void fraction is considerably higher than the one assumed in the derivation of the model. Research supported by DOE.

  10. Parametric Study of Flow Control Over a Hump Model Using an Unsteady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Greenblatt, David

    2007-01-01

    This is an expanded version of a limited-length paper that appeared at the 5th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena by the same authors. A computational study was performed for steady and oscillatory flow control over a hump model with flow separation to assess how well the steady and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations predict trends due to Reynolds number, control magnitude, and control frequency. As demonstrated in earlier studies, the hump model case is useful because it clearly demonstrates a failing in all known turbulence models: they under-predict the turbulent shear stress in the separated region and consequently reattachment occurs too far downstream. In spite of this known failing, three different turbulence models were employed to determine if trends can be captured even though absolute levels are not. Overall the three turbulence models showed very similar trends as experiment for steady suction, but only agreed qualitatively with some of the trends for oscillatory control.

  11. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  12. Thermal effects of groundwater flow through subarctic fens: A case study based on field observations and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Ylva; Coon, Ethan; Sannel, A. Britta K.; Pannetier, Romain; Harp, Dylan; Frampton, Andrew; Painter, Scott L.; Lyon, Steve W.

    2016-03-01

    Modeling and observation of ground temperature dynamics are the main tools for understanding current permafrost thermal regimes and projecting future thaw. Until recently, most studies on permafrost have focused on vertical ground heat fluxes. Groundwater can transport heat in both lateral and vertical directions but its influence on ground temperatures at local scales in permafrost environments is not well understood. In this study we combine field observations from a subarctic fen in the sporadic permafrost zone with numerical simulations of coupled water and thermal fluxes. At the Tavvavuoma study site in northern Sweden, ground temperature profiles and groundwater levels were observed in boreholes. These observations were used to set up one- and two-dimensional simulations down to 2 m depth across a gradient of permafrost conditions within and surrounding the fen. Two-dimensional scenarios representing the fen under various hydraulic gradients were developed to quantify the influence of groundwater flow on ground temperature. Our observations suggest that lateral groundwater flow significantly affects ground temperatures. This is corroborated by modeling results that show seasonal ground ice melts 1 month earlier when a lateral groundwater flux is present. Further, although the thermal regime may be dominated by vertically conducted heat fluxes during most of the year, isolated high groundwater flow rate events such as the spring freshet are potentially important for ground temperatures. As sporadic permafrost environments often contain substantial portions of unfrozen ground with active groundwater flow paths, knowledge of this heat transport mechanism is important for understanding permafrost dynamics in these environments.

  13. Manganin Gauge and Reactive Flow Modeling Study of the Shock Initiation of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M; Forbes, J W; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A

    2001-06-05

    A series of 101mm diameter gas gun experiments was fired using manganin pressure gauges embedded in the HMX-based explosive PBX 9501 at initial temperatures of 20 C and 50 C. Flyer plate impact velocities were chosen to produce impact pressure levels in PBX 9501 at which the growth of explosive reaction preceding detonation was measured on most of the gauges and detonation pressure profiles were recorded on some of the gauges placed deepest into the explosive targets. All measured pressure histories for initial temperatures of 25 C and 50 C were essentially identical. Measured run distances to detonation at several input shock pressures agreed with previous results. An existing ignition and growth reactive flow computer model for shock initiation and detonation of PBX 9501, which was developed based on LANL embedded particle velocity gauge data, was tested on these pressure gauge results. The agreement was excellent, indicating that the embedded pressure and particle velocity gauge techniques yielded consistent results.

  14. Study on Flow Stress Model and Processing Map of Homogenized Mg-Gd-Y-Zn-Zr Alloy During Thermomechanical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yong; Zhang, Zhimin; Lu, Guang; Xie, Zhiping; Yang, Yongbiao; Cui, Ya

    2015-02-01

    Quantities of billets were compressed with 50% height reduction on a hot process simulator to study the plastic flow behaviors of homogenized as-cast Mg-13Gd-4Y-2Zn-0.6Zr alloy. The test alloy was heat treated at 520 °C for 12 h before thermomechanical experiments. The temperature of the processes ranged from 300 to 480 °C. The strain rate was varied between 0.001 and 0.5 s-1. According to the Arrhenius type equation, a flow stress model was established. In this model, flow stress was regarded as the function of the stress peak, strain peak, and the strain. A softening factor was used to characterize the dynamic softening phenomenon that occurred in the deformation process. Meanwhile, the processing maps based on the dynamic material modeling were constructed. The optimum temperature and strain rate for hot working of the test alloy were 480 °C and 0.01 s-1, respectively. Furthermore, the flow instability occurred in the two areas where the temperature ranged from 350 to 480 °C at strain rate of 0.01-0.1 s-1, and the temperature ranged from 450 to 480 °C with a strain rate of 0.1 s-1. According to the determined hot deformation parameters, four components were successfully formed, and the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation of the component were 386 MPa, 331 MPa, and 6.3%, respectively.

  15. The presence of arachnoiditis affects the characteristics of CSF flow in the spinal subarachnoid space: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaokoon; Stoodley, Marcus A; Wong, Johnny; Hemley, Sarah; Fletcher, David F; Bilston, Lynne E

    2012-04-30

    Syringomyelia is a neurological disorder characterised by high pressure fluid-filled cysts within the spinal cord. As syringomyelia is associated with abnormalities of the central nervous system that obstruct cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, it is thought that changes in CSF dynamics play an important role in its pathogenesis. Using three-dimensional computational models of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), this study aims to determine SAS obstructions, such as arachnoiditis, change in CSF dynamics in the SAS. The geometry of the SAS was reconstructed from a series of MRI images. CSF is modelled as an incompressible Newtonian fluid with a dynamic viscosity of 1 mPa s. Three computational models simulated CSF flow in either the unobstructed SAS, or with the SAS obstructed by a porous region simulating dorsal or circumferential arachnoiditis. The permeability of this porous obstruction was varied for the model with dorsal arachnoiditis. The results show that arachnoiditis increases flow resistance in the SAS and this is accompanied by a modest increase in magnitude and/or shift in timing (with respect to the cardiac cycle) of the CSF pressure drop across the region of arachnoiditis. This study suggests that syrinx formation may be related to a change in temporal CSF pulse pressure dynamics. PMID:22386041

  16. Shock loading and reactive flow modeling studies of void induced AP/AL/HTPB propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P. J.; Lindfors, A. J.

    1998-07-01

    The unreactive Hugoniot of a class 1.3 propellant has been investigated by shock compression experiments. The results are analyzed in terms of an ignition and growth reactive flow model using the DYNA2D hydrocode. The calculated shock ignition parameters of the model show a linear dependence on measured void volume which appears to reproduce the observed gauge records well. Shock waves were generated by impact in a 75 mm single stage powder gun. Manganin and PVDF pressure gauges provided pressure-time histories to 140 kbar. The propellants were of similar formulation differing only in AP particle size and the addition of a burn rate modifer (Fe2O3) from that of previous investigations. Results show neglible effect of AP particle size on shock response in contrast to the addition of Fe2O3 which appears to `stiffen' the unreactive Hugoniot and enhances significantly the reactive rates under shock. The unreactive Hugoniot, within experimental error, compares favorably to the solid AP Hugoniot. Shock experiments were performed on propellant samples strained to induce insitu voids. The material state was quantified by uniaxial tension dialatometry. The experimental records show a direct correlation between void volume (0 to 1.7%) and chemical reactivity behind the shock front. These results are discussed in terms of `hot spot' ignition resulting from the shock collapse of the voids.

  17. On the blocking flow patterns in the Euro-Atlantic sector: A simple model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dehai; Yao, Yao

    2014-09-01

    The flow patterns of Euro-Atlantic blocking events in winter are investigated by dividing the sector into three subregions: 60°-30°W (Greenland region); 20°W-30°E [eastern Atlantic-Europe (EAE) region]; and 50°-90°E (Ural region). It is shown that blocking events in winter are extremely frequent in the three sub-regions. Composite 500-mb geopotential height fields for intense and long-lived blocking events demonstrate that the blocking fields over Greenland and Ural regions exhibit southwest-northeast (SW-NE) and southeast-northwest (SE-NW) oriented dipole-type patterns, respectively, while the composite field over the EAE region exhibits an Ω-type pattern. The type of composite blocking pattern seems to be related to the position of the blocking region relative to the positive center of the climatological stationary wave (CSW) anomaly existing near 10°W. The physical cause of why there are different composite blocking types in the three sub-regions is identified using a nonlinear multiscale interaction model. It is found that when the blocking event is in almost the same position as the positive CSW anomaly, the planetary-scale field can exhibit an Ω-type pattern due to the enhanced positive CSW anomaly. Nevertheless, a SW-NE (SE-NW) oriented dipole-type block can occur due to the reduced positive CSW anomaly as it is farther in the west (east) of the positive CSW anomaly. The total fields of blocking in the three regions may exhibit a meandering flow comprised of several isolated anticyclonic and cyclonic vortices, which resembles the Berggren-Bolin-Rossby meandering jet type.

  18. Modeling of Turbulent Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Liou, William; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Liu, Nan-Suey; Lumley, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine combustors generally involve turbulent swirling flows in order to enhance fuel-air mixing and flame stabilization. It has long been recognized that eddy viscosity turbulence models are unable to appropriately model swirling flows. Therefore, it has been suggested that, for the modeling of these flows, a second order closure scheme should be considered because of its ability in the modeling of rotational and curvature effects. However, this scheme will require solution of many complicated second moment transport equations (six Reynolds stresses plus other scalar fluxes and variances), which is a difficult task for any CFD implementations. Also, this scheme will require a large amount of computer resources for a general combustor swirling flow. This report is devoted to the development of a cubic Reynolds stress-strain model for turbulent swirling flows, and was inspired by the work of Launder's group at UMIST. Using this type of model, one only needs to solve two turbulence equations, one for the turbulent kinetic energy k and the other for the dissipation rate epsilon. The cubic model developed in this report is based on a general Reynolds stress-strain relationship. Two flows have been chosen for model evaluation. One is a fully developed rotating pipe flow, and the other is a more complex flow with swirl and recirculation.

  19. Gas-liquid Two Phase Flow Modelling of Incompressible Fluid and Experimental Validation Studies in Vertical Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. X.; Shen, X.; Yin, Y. J.; Guo, Z.; Wang, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, Gas-liquid two phase flow mathematic models of incompressible fluid were proposed to explore the feature of fluid under certain centrifugal force in vertical centrifugal casting (VCC). Modified projection-level-set method was introduced to solve the mathematic models. To validate the simulation results, two methods were used in this study. In the first method, the simulation result of basic VCC flow process was compared with its analytic solution. The relationship between the numerical solution and deterministic analytic solution was presented to verify the correctness of numerical algorithms. In the second method, systematic water simulation experiments were developed. In this initial experiment, special experimental vertical centrifugal device and casting shapes were designed to describe typical mold-filling processes in VCC. High speed camera system and data collection devices were used to capture flow shape during the mold-filling process. Moreover, fluid characteristic at different rotation speed (from 40rpm, 60rpmand 80rpm) was discussed to provide comparative resource for simulation results. As compared with the simulation results, the proposed mathematical models could be proven and the experimental design could help us advance the accuracy of simulation and further studies for VCC.

  20. Experimental Flow Models for SSME Flowfield Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, L. C.; Ramsey, P. E.

    1989-01-01

    Full scale flow models with extensive instrumentation were designed and manufactured to provide data necessary for flow field characterization in rocket engines of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) type. These models include accurate flow path geometries from the pre-burner outlet through the throat of the main combustion chamber. The turbines are simulated with static models designed to provide the correct pressure drop and swirl for specific power levels. The correct turbopump-hot gas manifold interfaces were designed into the flow models to permit parametric/integration studies for new turbine designs. These experimental flow models provide a vehicle for understanding the fluid dynamics associated with specific engine issues and also fill the more general need for establishing a more detailed fluid dynamic base to support development and verification of advanced math models.

  1. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  2. Bleed Hole Flow Phenomena Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed is an invaluable tool for controlling the airflow in supersonic aircraft engine inlets. Incoming air is decelerated to subsonic speeds prior to entering the compressor via a series of oblique shocks. The low momentum flow in the boundary layer interacts with these shocks, growing in thickness and, under some conditions, leading to flow separation. To remedy this, bleed holes are strategically located to remove mass from the boundary layer, reducing its thickness and helping to maintain uniform flow to the compressor. The bleed requirements for any inlet design are unique and must be validated by extensive wind tunnel testing to optimize performance and efficiency. To accelerate this process and reduce cost, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated an experimental program to study the flow phenomena associated with bleed holes. Knowledge of these flow properties will be incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that will aid engine inlet designers in optimizing bleed configurations before any hardware is fabricated. This ongoing investigation is currently examining two hole geometries, 90 and 20 (both with 5-mm diameters), and various flow features.

  3. Global scale groundwater flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  4. Documentation of a groundwater flow model (SJRRPGW) for the San Joaquin River Restoration Program study area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Traum, Jonathan A.; Phillips, Steven P.; Bennett, George Luther; Zamora, Celia; Metzger, Loren F.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the potential effects of restoration flows on existing drainage problems, anticipated as a result of the San Joaquin River Restoration Program (SJRRP), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), developed a groundwater flow model (SJRRPGW) of the SJRRP study area that is within 5 miles of the San Joaquin River and adjacent bypass system from Friant Dam to the Merced River. The primary goal of the SJRRP is to reestablish the natural ecology of the river to a degree that restores salmon and other fish populations. Increased flows in the river, particularly during the spring salmon run, are a key component of the restoration effort. A potential consequence of these increased river flows is the exacerbation of existing irrigation drainage problems along a section of the river between Mendota and the confluence with the Merced River. Historically, this reach typically was underlain by a water table within 10 feet of the land surface, thus requiring careful irrigation management and (or) artificial drainage to maintain crop health. The SJRRPGW is designed to meet the short-term needs of the SJRRP; future versions of the model may incorporate potential enhancements, several of which are identified in this report. The SJRRPGW was constructed using the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW and was built on the framework of the USGS Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) within which the SJRRPGW model domain is embedded. The Farm Process (FMP2) was used to simulate the supply and demand components of irrigated agriculture. The Streamflow-Routing Package (SFR2) was used to simulate the streams and bypasses and their interaction with the aquifer system. The 1,300-square mile study area was subdivided into 0.25-mile by 0.25-mile cells. The sediment texture of the aquifer system, which was used to distribute hydraulic properties by model cell, was refined from that used in the CVHM to better represent

  5. Modeling Size Polydisperse Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Isner, Austin B.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2014-11-01

    Modeling size segregation of granular materials has important applications in many industrial processes and geophysical phenomena. We have developed a continuum model for granular multi- and polydisperse size segregation based on flow kinematics, which we obtain from discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The segregation depends on dimensionless control parameters that are functions of flow rate, particle sizes, collisional diffusion coefficient, shear rate, and flowing layer depth. To test the theoretical approach, we model segregation in tri-disperse quasi-2D heap flow and log-normally distributed polydisperse quasi-2D chute flow. In both cases, the segregated particle size distributions match results from full-scale DEM simulations and experiments. While the theory was applied to size segregation in steady quasi-2D flows here, the approach can be readily generalized to include additional drivers of segregation such as density and shape as well as other geometries where the flow field can be characterized including rotating tumbler flow and three-dimensional bounded heap flow. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  6. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Extinction and Ignition of Methyl Decanoate in Laminar Nonpremixed Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, K; Lu, T; Herbinet, O; Humer, S; Niemann, U; Pitz, W J; Law, C K

    2008-01-09

    Methyl decanoate is a large methyl ester that can be used as a surrogate for biodiesel. In this experimental and computational study, the combustion of methyl decanoate is investigated in nonpremixed, nonuniform flows. Experiments are performed employing the counterflow configuration with a fuel stream made up of vaporized methyl decanoate and nitrogen, and an oxidizer stream of air. The mass fraction of fuel in the fuel stream is measured as a function of the strain rate at extinction, and critical conditions of ignition are measured in terms of the temperature of the oxidizer stream as a function of the strain rate. It is not possible to use a fully detailed mechanism for methyl decanoate to simulate the counterflow flames because the number of species and reactions is too large to employ with current flame codes and computer resources. Therefore a skeletal mechanism was deduced from a detailed mechanism of 8555 elementary reactions and 3036 species using 'directed relation graph' method. This skeletal mechanism has only 713 elementary reactions and 125 species. Critical conditions of ignition were calculated using this skeletal mechanism and are found to agree well with experimental data. The predicted strain rate at extinction is found to be lower than the measurements. In general, the methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  7. Online Learner's "Flow" Experience: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Namin

    2006-01-01

    This study is concerned with online learners' "low" experiences. On the basis of Csikszentmihalyi's theory of flow, flow was conceptualised as a complex, multimentional, reflective construct composing of "enjoyment", "telepresence", "focused attention", "engagement" and "time distortion" on the part of learners. A flow model was put forward with…

  8. Flow Behavior Modeling of a Nitrogen-Alloyed Ultralow Carbon Stainless Steel During Hot Deformation: A Comparative Study of Constitutive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xuekun; He, An; Wang, Yanli; Yang, Xiaoya; Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Xitao

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on comparison of accuracy of Johnson-Cook, modified Johnson-Cook, and modified Zerilli-Armstrong constitutive models to predict flow behavior of a nitrogen-alloyed ultralow carbon stainless steel at evaluated temperature. True strain-true stress data obtained from hot compression experiments performed with temperatures of 1223-1423 K and strain rates of 0.001-10 s-1 on a Gleeble-3500 thermal-simulator were employed to develop these three models. Furthermore, the ability of the three models to predict the outcomes was evaluated by comparing the correlation coefficient, absolute average related error, ability to track the experimental flow stress, numbers of material constants, and computational time required to develop models. The results show that the modified Johnson-Cook has a better description of the flow behaviors of the studied steel than the other two models. However, under certain conditions, the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model has accuracy comparable to the modified Johnson-Cook model.

  9. Groundwater flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Mercer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Deterministic, distributed-parameter, numerical simulation models for analyzing groundwater flow and transport problems have come to be used almost routinely during the past decade. A review of the theoretical basis and practical use of groundwater flow and solute transport models is used to illustrate the state-of-the-art. Because of errors and uncertainty in defining model parameters, models must be calibrated to obtain a best estimate of the parameters. For flow modeling, data generally are sufficient to allow calibration. For solute-transport modeling, lack of data not only limits calibration, but also causes uncertainty in process description. Where data are available, model reliability should be assessed on the basis of sensitivity tests and measures of goodness-of-fit. Some of these concepts are demonstrated by using two case histories. ?? 1988.

  10. HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M

    2006-09-28

    The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

  11. Kinetic model for dilute traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana A.

    The flow of traffic represents a many-particle non-equilibrium problem with important practical consequences. Traffic behavior has been studied using a variety of approaches, including fluid dynamics models, Boltzmann equation, and recently cellular automata (CA). The CA model for traffic flow that Nagel and Schreckenberg (NS) introduced can successfully mimic many of the known features of the traffic flow. We show that in the dilute limit of the NS model, where vehicles exhibit free flow, cars show significant nearest neighbor correlation primarily via a short-range repulsion. introduce an approximate analytic model to describe this dilute limit. We show that the distribution of the distance between consecutive vehicles obeys a drift-diffusion equation. We compared this model with direct simulations. The steady state solution and relaxation of this model agrees well with direct simulations. We explore how this model breaks down as the transition to jams occurs.

  12. Thermal effects of groundwater flow through subarctic fens: A case study based on field observations and numerical modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sjöberg, Ylva; Coon, Ethan; K. Sannel, A. Britta; Pannetier, Romain; Harp, Dylan; Frampton, Andrew; Painter, Scott L.; Lyon, Steve W.

    2016-02-05

    Modeling and observation of ground temperature dynamics are the main tools for understanding current permafrost thermal regimes and projecting future thaw. Until recently, most studies on permafrost have focused on vertical ground heat fluxes. Groundwater can transport heat in both lateral and vertical directions but its influence on ground temperatures at local scales in permafrost environments is not well understood. In this paper, we combine field observations from a subarctic fen in the sporadic permafrost zone with numerical simulations of coupled water and thermal fluxes. At the Tavvavuoma study site in northern Sweden, ground temperature profiles and groundwater levels weremore » observed in boreholes. These observations were used to set up one- and two-dimensional simulations down to 2 m depth across a gradient of permafrost conditions within and surrounding the fen. Two-dimensional scenarios representing the fen under various hydraulic gradients were developed to quantify the influence of groundwater flow on ground temperature. Our observations suggest that lateral groundwater flow significantly affects ground temperatures. This is corroborated by modeling results that show seasonal ground ice melts 1 month earlier when a lateral groundwater flux is present. Further, although the thermal regime may be dominated by vertically conducted heat fluxes during most of the year, isolated high groundwater flow rate events such as the spring freshet are potentially important for ground temperatures. Finally, as sporadic permafrost environments often contain substantial portions of unfrozen ground with active groundwater flow paths, knowledge of this heat transport mechanism is important for understanding permafrost dynamics in these environments.« less

  13. Modeling Changing Morphology and Density Dependent Groundwater Flow in a Dynamic Environment: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Bierkens, Marc; Oude Essink, Gualbert

    2015-04-01

    The prospect of sea level rise and increase in extreme weather conditions has led to a new focus on coastal defense in the Netherlands. As an innovative solution for coastal erosion a mega-nourishment named the Sand Motor (or Sand Engine) has been constructed at the Dutch coast. This body of sand will be distributed slowly along the coastline by wind, waves and currents; keeping the coastal defense structures in place and creating a unique, dynamic environment with changing morphology over time. The large size and position of the Sand Motor might lead to a substantial increase of fresh ground water resources. This creates an opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh water resources in coastal regions. With a three dimensional, density dependent, groundwater model the effects of changing morphology over time and the potential increase in fresh water availability have been studied. The preliminary model calculations show that in a period of 20 years volume of fresh water gradually increases to ca. 12 Mm3. In the nearby dune area 7-8 Mm3 is abstracted yearly, therefore the first results are promising in increasing fresh groundwater resources. More model calculations will be performed to investigate the sensitivity of the change in the fresh, brackish and salt water distribution.

  14. Calibration of a large-scale groundwater flow model using GRACE data: a case study in the Qaidam Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Litang; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2015-11-01

    Traditional numerical models usually use extensive observed hydraulic-head data as calibration targets. However, this calibration process is not applicable in remote areas with limited or no monitoring data. This study presents an approach to calibrate a large-scale groundwater flow model using the monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data, which have been available globally on a spatial grid of 1° in the geographic coordinate system since 2002. A groundwater storage anomaly isolated from the terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomaly is converted into hydraulic head at the center of the grid, which is then used as observed data to calibrate a numerical model to estimate aquifer hydraulic conductivity. The aquifer system in the remote and hyperarid Qaidam Basin, China, is used as a case study to demonstrate the applicability of this approach. A groundwater model using FEFLOW is constructed for the Qaidam Basin and the GRACE-derived groundwater storage anomaly over the period 2003-2012 is included to calibrate the model, which is done using an automatic estimation method (PEST). The calibrated model is then run to output hydraulic heads at three sites where long-term hydraulic head data are available. The reasonably good fit between the calculated and observed hydraulic heads, together with the very similar groundwater storage anomalies from the numerical model and GRACE data, demonstrate that this approach is generally applicable in regions of groundwater data scarcity.

  15. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  16. Hierarchical Bayesian mixture modelling for antigen-specific T-cell subtyping in combinatorially encoded flow cytometry studies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Chan, Cliburn; Hadrup, Sine R.; Froesig, Thomas M.; Wang, Quanli; West, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Novel uses of automated flow cytometry technology for measuring levels of protein markers on thousands to millions of cells are promoting increasing need for relevant, customized Bayesian mixture modelling approaches in many areas of biomedical research and application. In studies of immune profiling in many biological areas, traditional flow cytometry measures relative levels of abundance of marker proteins using fluorescently labeled tags that identify specific markers by a single-color. One specific and important recent development in this area is the use of combinatorial marker assays in which each marker is targeted with a probe that is labeled with two or more fluorescent tags. The use of several colors enables the identification of, in principle, combinatorially increasingly numbers of subtypes of cells, each identified by a subset of colors. This represents a major advance in the ability to characterize variation in immune responses involving larger numbers of functionally differentiated cell subtypes. We describe novel classes of Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for model fitting that exploit distributed GPU (graphics processing unit) implementation. We discuss issues of cellular subtype identification in this novel, general model framework, and provide a detailed example using simulated data. We then describe application to a data set from an experimental study of antigen-specific T-cell subtyping using combinatorially encoded assays in human blood samples. Summary comments discuss broader questions in applications in immunology, and aspects of statistical computation. PMID:23629459

  17. FlowSim/FlowRisk: A code system for studying risk associated with material process flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    The need to study and assess life-cycle risks of Pu release by nuclear warheads during peace time lead to the development of a code suite which could model day to day operations involving nuclear weapons and calculate the associated risk involved in these proceedings. The life-cycle study called LIONSHARE is described in Reference 1. The code that models the flow is called FlowSim. The code that evaluates the associated risk is called FlowRisk. We shall concentrate here on the methodology used by FlowSim in modeling material flows. FlowRisk, mainly a postprocessor of FlowSim runs, will be dealt with in less detail.

  18. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet Flows with Shock Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Morr, Donald E.; Durston, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern aircraft designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty remains in the aft signatures due to boundary layer and nozzle exhaust jet effects. Wind tunnel testing without inlet and nozzle exhaust jet effects at lower Reynolds numbers than in-flight make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is planned for February 2016 to address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. The experiment will provide pressure signatures of test articles that replicate waveforms from aircraft wings, tails, and aft fuselage (deck) components after passing through cold nozzle jet plumes. The data will provide a variety of nozzle plume and shock interactions for comparison with computational results. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of a variety of shock generators were evaluated to define a reduced collection of suitable test models. The computational results of the candidate wind tunnel test models as they evolved are summarized, and pre-test computations of the final designs are provided.

  19. Experimental and modeling study of global circulation by bent rod precession in low Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassa, Roberto; Martindale, J. D.; McLaughlin, Richard; Vicci, Leandra; Zhao, Longhua; UNC Joint Fluids Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    The precessing motion of a bent rod over a plane in viscous dominated regimes can generate global fluid flow structures in the form of recirculating tori. Such motion can play an important role in the development of multicellular organisms, where primary cilia are the main agent for the embryonic forms of nutrient circulation. Results from an experimental investigation using PIV techniques to analyze the flow field will be presented and compared with a first principle theory based on slender body approximations. While good qualitative agreement can be achieved with Blake images enforcing the no-slip condition at the plane, quantitative agreement requires a more sophisticated approach, which will be outlined. We acknowledge funding received from the following NSF grants: RTG DMS-0943851 and DMS-1009750.

  20. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  1. Modeling Combustion in Supersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Danehy, Paul M.; Bivolaru, Daniel; Gaffney, Richard L.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress of work to model high-speed supersonic reacting flow. The purpose of the work is to improve the state of the art of CFD capabilities for predicting the flow in high-speed propulsion systems, particularly combustor flow-paths. The program has several components including the development of advanced algorithms and models for simulating engine flowpaths as well as a fundamental experimental and diagnostic development effort to support the formulation and validation of the mathematical models. The paper will provide details of current work on experiments that will provide data for the modeling efforts along with with the associated nonintrusive diagnostics used to collect the data from the experimental flowfield. Simulation of a recent experiment to partially validate the accuracy of a combustion code is also described.

  2. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  3. Debris flows: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Barbara; Bowman, Elisabeth T.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-01-01

    Debris flows and debris avalanches are complex, gravity-driven currents of rock, water and sediments that can be highly mobile. This combination of component materials leads to a rich morphology and unusual dynamics, exhibiting features of both granular materials and viscous gravity currents. Although extreme events such as those at Kolka Karmadon in North Ossetia (2002) [1] and Huascarán (1970) [2] strongly motivate us to understand how such high levels of mobility can occur, smaller events are ubiquitous and capable of endangering infrastructure and life, requiring mitigation. Recent progress in modelling debris flows has seen the development of multiphase models that can start to provide clues of the origins of the unique phenomenology of debris flows. However, the spatial and temporal variations that debris flows exhibit make this task challenging and laboratory experiments, where boundary and initial conditions can be controlled and reproduced, are crucial both to validate models and to inspire new modelling approaches. This paper discusses recent laboratory experiments on debris flows and the state of the art in numerical models.

  4. Preserving Flow Variability in Watershed Model Calibrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Although watershed modeling flow calibration techniques often emphasize a specific flow mode, ecological conditions that depend on flow-ecology relationships often emphasize a range of flow conditions. We used informal likelihood methods to investig...

  5. Aerodynamic Modeling of Oscillating Wing in Hypersonic Flow: a Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Hou, Ying-Yu; Ji, Chen; Liu, Zi-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Various approximations to unsteady aerodynamics are examined for the unsteady aerodynamic force of a pitching thin double wedge airfoil in hypersonic flow. Results of piston theory, Van Dyke’s second-order theory, Newtonian impact theory, and CFD method are compared in the same motion and Mach number effects. The results indicate that, for this thin double wedge airfoil, Newtonian impact theory is not suitable for these Mach number, while piston theory and Van Dyke’s second-order theory are in good agreement with CFD method for Ma<7.

  6. Fundamental studies of materials, designs, and models development for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell flow field distributors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikam, Vaibhav Vilas

    Fuel cells are becoming a popular source of energy due to their promising performance and availability. However, the high cost of fuel cell stack forbids its deployment to end user. Moreover, bipolar plate is one of the critical components in current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system, causing severe increase in manufacturing cost. The objective of this research work is to develop new materials, design and manufacturing process for bipolar plates. The materials proposed for use were tested for corrosion resistance in simulated fuel cell conditions. After corrosion studies copper alloy (C17200) and Low Temperature Carburized (LTC) SS 316 were selected as an alternative material for bipolar plate. It was observed that though the copper alloy offered good resistance in corrosive atmosphere, the major advantage of using the alloys was good conductivity even after formation of corrosion layer compared to SS 316. However, LTC SS 316 achieved the best corrosion resistance (ever reported in current open literature at relatively low cost) with decreased contact resistance, as compared to SS 316. Due to the expensive and tedious machining for bipolar plate manufacturing, the conventional machining process was not used. Bipolar plates were manufactured from thin corrugated sheets formed of the alloy. This research also proposed a novel single channel convoluted flow field design which was developed by increasing the tortuosity of conventional serpentine design. The CFD model for novel single channel convoluted design showed uniform distribution of velocity over the entire three dimensional domain. The novel design was further studied using pressure drop and permeability models. These modeling calculations showed substantial benefit in using corrugated sheet design and novel single channel convoluted flow field design. All the concepts of materials (except for LTC SS 316), manufacturing and design are validated using various tests like long term stability

  7. Numerical study of two classes of cellular automaton models for traffic flow on a two-lane roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, N.; Daoudia, A. K.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we present computer simulation results of traffic flow on a two-lane roadway with different types of vehicles, cars and trucks for example. We consider two classes of two-lane traffic cellular automaton models, namely the well known Nagel-Schreckenberg model and an extension of the Fukui-Ishibashi model. These two models, which differ in their acceleration limits, show an important differences in their fundamental diagrams, lane-changing and ping-pong behaviors. Moreover, we investigate the importance of braking noise and the proportion of trucks on the traffic flow of a two-lane roadway.

  8. SURFACE WATER FLOW IN LANDSCAPE MODELS: 2. PATUXENT WATERSHED CASE STUDY. (R824766)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    We developed a system for modeling regional, spatially explicit hydrology in a way that allows integration with broader plant, nutrient, and socio-economic model components. The relatively coarse spatial and temporal resolution of these broader components rela...

  9. Turbulent motion of mass flows. Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglit, Margarita; Yakubenko, Alexander; Yakubenko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    New mathematical models for unsteady turbulent mass flows, e.g., dense snow avalanches and landslides, are presented. Such models are important since most of large scale flows are turbulent. In addition to turbulence, the two other important points are taken into account: the entrainment of the underlying material by the flow and the nonlinear rheology of moving material. The majority of existing models are based on the depth-averaged equations and the turbulent character of the flow is accounted by inclusion of drag proportional to the velocity squared. In this paper full (not depth-averaged) equations are used. It is assumed that basal entrainment takes place if the bed friction equals the shear strength of the underlying layer (Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011). The turbulent characteristics of the flow are calculated using a three-parameter differential model (Lushchik et al., 1978). The rheological properties of moving material are modeled by one of the three types of equations: 1) Newtonian fluid with high viscosity, 2) power-law fluid and 3) Bingham fluid. Unsteady turbulent flows down long homogeneous slope are considered. The flow dynamical parameters and entrainment rate behavior in time as well as their dependence on properties of moving and underlying materials are studied numerically. REFERENCES M.E. Eglit and A.E. Yakubenko, 2014. Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., 108, 139-148 Margarita E. Eglit and Alexander E. Yakubenko, 2016. The effect of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on dynamics of turbulent slope flows. Fluid Dynamics, 51(3) Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), 143-147 Lushchik, V.G., Paveliev, A.A. , and Yakubenko, A.E., 1978. Three-parameter model of shear turbulence. Fluid Dynamics, 13, (3), 350-362

  10. Humidification of base flow gas during adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: an experimental study using a lung model.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Naoki; Nagano, Osamu; Hirayama, Takahiro; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito

    2012-01-01

    In adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) with an R100 artificial ventilator, exhaled gas from patient's lung may warm the temperature probe and thereby disturb the humidification of base flow (BF) gas. We measured the humidity of BF gas during HFOV with frequencies of 6, 8 and 10 Hz, maximum stroke volumes (SV) of 285, 205, and 160 ml at the respective frequencies, and, BFs of 20, 30, 40 l/min using an original lung model. The R100 device was equipped with a heated humidifier, Hummax Ⅱ, consisting of a porous hollow fiber in circuit. A 50-cm length of circuit was added between temperature probe (located at 50 cm proximal from Y-piece) and the hollow fiber. The lung model was made of a plastic container and a circuit equipped with another Hummax Ⅱ. The lung model temperature was controlled at 37℃. The Hummax Ⅱ of the R100 was inactivated in study-1 and was set at 35℃ or 37℃ in study-2. The humidity was measured at the distal end of the added circuit in study-1 and at the proximal end in study-2. In study-1, humidity was detected at 6 Hz (SV 285 ml) and BF 20 l/min, indicating the direct reach of the exhaled gas from the lung model to the temperature probe. In study-2 the absolute humidity of the BF gas decreased by increasing SV and by increasing BF and it was low with setting of 35℃. In this study setting, increasing the SV induced significant reduction of humidification of the BF gas during HFOV with R100. PMID:22918206

  11. Mathematical Models of Continuous Flow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.; Snyder, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Development of high resolution continuous flow electrophoresis devices ultimately requires comprehensive understanding of the ways various phenomena and processes facilitate or hinder separation. A comprehensive model of the actual three dimensional flow, temperature and electric fields was developed to provide guidance in the design of electrophoresis chambers for specific tasks and means of interpreting test data on a given chamber. Part of the process of model development includes experimental and theoretical studies of hydrodynamic stability. This is necessary to understand the origin of mixing flows observed with wide gap gravitational effects. To insure that the model accurately reflects the flow field and particle motion requires extensive experimental work. Another part of the investigation is concerned with the behavior of concentrated sample suspensions with regard to sample stream stability particle-particle interactions which might affect separation in an electric field, especially at high field strengths. Mathematical models will be developed and tested to establish the roles of the various interactions.

  12. Experimental Modelling of Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleo Cageao, P.; Turnbull, B.; Bartelt, P.

    2012-04-01

    Debris flows are gravity-driven mass movements typically containing water, sediments, soil and rocks. These elements combine to give a flow complex phenomenology that exhibits characteristics common to diverse geophysical flows from dry granular media (e.g. levee formation) to viscous gravity currents (viscous fingering and surge instabilities). The exceptional speeds and range debris flows can achieve motivate the need for a co-ordinated modelling approach that can provide insight into the key physical processes that dictate the hazard associated with the flows. There has been recent progress in theoretical modelling approaches that capture the details of the multi-component nature of debris flows. The promise of such models is underlined by their qualitatively successful comparison with field-scale experimental data. The aim of the present work is to address the technical difficulties in achieving a controlled and repeatable laboratory-scale experiment for robust testing of these multi-component models. A laboratory experiment has been designed and tested that can provide detailed information of the internal structure of debris flows. This constitutes a narrow Perspex chute that can be tilted to any angle between 0° and ≈ 60°. A mixture of glycerine and glass balls was initially held behind a lock-gate, before being released down the chute. The evolving flow was captured through high speed video, analysed with a Particle Image Velocimetry algorithm to provide the changing velocity field. A wide parameter space has been tested, allowing variations in particle size, dispersity, surface roughness, fluid viscosity, slope angle and solid volume fraction. While matching key similarity criteria, such as Froude number, with a typical field event, these experiments allow close examination of a wide range of physical scenarios for the robust testing of new multi-component flow models. Further diagnostics include force plate and pore pressure measurements, with a view

  13. School Mathematics Study Group, Unit Number Two. Chapter 3 - Informal Algorithms and Flow Charts. Chapter 4 - Applications and Mathematics Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    This is the second unit of a 15-unit School Mathematics Study Group (SMSG) mathematics text for high school students. Topics presented in the first chapter (Informal Algorithms and Flow Charts) include: changing a flat tire; algorithms, flow charts, and computers; assignment and variables; input and output; using a variable as a counter; decisions…

  14. SURFACE WATER FLOW IN LANDSCAPE MODELS: 1. EVERGLADES CASE STUDY. (R824766)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many landscape models require extensive computational effort using a large array of grid cells that represent the landscape. The number of spatial cells may be in the thousands and millions, while the ecological component run in each of the cells to account for landscape dynamics...

  15. Groundwater flow and transport modeling: A case study of alluvial aquifer in the Tuul River Basin, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandar, Enkhbayar; Carrera, Jesús; Nemer, Buyankhishig

    2016-04-01

    The Tuul River basin is located northern Mongolia. It includes Ulaanbaatar city, which hosts 48% of Mongolian population. Water supply to the city relies exclusively on groundwater withdrawn from alluvial aquifers along the Tuul River Basin. Water demand of the city has increased recently as a result of rapid industrial development and population growth due to migration from rural areas. The aim of this study is to characterize the aquifer by integrating existing data in a flow model. Unfortunately, existing data are not sufficient for unequivocal identification of model parameters (groundwater recharge, permeability, lateral inflow, etc.). Fluctuations of water temperature have been recognized as a natural tracer that may be used for hydrogeological characterization and model calibration. Temperatures within the aquifer are affected by the temperature of inflowing water as well as by conduction from the soil surface, which we suspect may control aquifer temperatures. Properly acknowledging these fluctuations would require a three dimensional model. Instead, we propose a semianalytical solution based on the use of memory and influence functions.

  16. Characterizing and Modelling Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock Aquifer: A Case Study at Shuangliou Fractured Rock Hydrogeology Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shih-Meng; Ke, Chien-Chung; Lo, Hung-Chieh; Lin, Yen-Tsu; Huang, Chi-Chao

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of a relatively sparse data set, fractured aquifers are difficult to be characterized and modelled. The three-dimensional configuration of transmissive fractures and fracture zones is needed to be understood flow heterogeneity in the aquifer. Innovative technologies for the improved interpretation are necessary to facilitate the development of accurate predictive models of ground-water flow and solute transport or to precisely estimate groundwater potential. To this end, this paper presents a procedure for characterizing and modelling preferential flow path in the fractured rock aquifer carried out at Fractured Rock Hydrogeology Research Site in Shuangliou Forest Recreation Area, Pingtung County, Southern Taiwan. The Shuangliou well field is a 40 by 30-meter area consisting of 6 wells (one geological well, one pumping well and four hydrogeological testing wells). The bedrock at the site is mainly composed of slate and intercalated by meta-sandstone. The overburden consists of about 5.6 m of gravel deposits. Based on results of 100 m geological borehole with borehole televiewer logging, vertical flow logging and full-wave sonic logging, high transmissivity zones in the bedrock underlying the well field were identified. One of transmissivity zone (at the depths of 30~32 m) and its fracture orientation(N56/54) selected for devising a multiple well system with 4 boreholes (borehole depths :45m, 35m, 35m and 25m, respectively), which were utilized to perform cross-borehole flow velocity data under the ambient flow and pumped flow conditions to identify preferential flow paths. Results from the cross-borehole test show the preferential flow pathways are corresponding to the predicted ones. Subsequently, a 3-D discrete fracture network model based on outcrop data was generated by the FracMan code. A validation between observed and simulated data has proved that the present model can accurately predict the hydrogeological properties (e.g., number of fractures

  17. Aneurysm flow characteristics in realistic carotid artery aneurysm models induced by proximal virtual stenotic plaques: a computational hemodynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Peloc, Nora L.; Chien, Aichi; Goldberg, Ezequiel; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysms may rarely coexist with a proximal artery stenosis. In that small percent of patients, such coexistence poses a challenge for interventional neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons to make the best treatment decision. According to previous studies, the incidence of cerebral aneurysms in patients with internal carotid artery stenosis is no greater than five percent, where the aneurysm is usually incidentally detected, being about two percent for aneurysms and stenoses in the same cerebral circulation. Those cases pose a difficult management decision for the physician. Case reports showed patients who died due to aneurysm rupture months after endarterectomy but before aneurysm clipping, while others did not show any change in the aneurysm after plaque removal, having optimum outcome after aneurysm coiling. The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic changes before and after treatment of stenotic plaque. Virtually created moderate stenoses in vascular models of internal carotid artery aneurysm patients were considered in a number of cases reconstructed from three dimensional rotational angiography images. The strategy to create those plaques was based on parameters analyzed in a previous work where idealized models were considered, including relative distance and stenosis grade. Ipsilateral and contralateral plaques were modeled. Wall shear stress and velocity pattern were computed from finite element pulsatile blood flow simulations. The results may suggest that wall shear stress changes depend on relative angular position between the aneurysm and the plaque.

  18. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  19. Modeling groundwater flow on MPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Smith, S.G.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1993-10-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media is examined. To enable detailed modeling of large contaminated sites, preconditioned iterative methods and massively parallel computing power are combined in a simulator called PARFLOW. After describing this portable and modular code, some numerical results are given, including one that demonstrates the code`s scalability.

  20. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  1. Turbulence modeling for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Material prepared for a course on Applications and Fundamentals of Turbulence given at the University of Tennessee Space Institute, January 10 and 11, 1977, is presented. A complete concept of turbulence modeling is described, and examples of progess for its use in computational aerodynimics are given. Modeling concepts, experiments, and computations using the concepts are reviewed in a manner that provides an up-to-date statement on the status of this problem for compressible flows.

  2. Development of a model of entrained flow coal gasification and study of aerodynamic mechanisms of action on gasifier operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaimov, N. A.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    Problems requiring solution in development of modern highly efficient gasification reactor of a promising high power integrated gasification combined-cycle plant are formulated. The task of creating and testing a numerical model of an entrained-flow reactor for thermochemical conversion of pulverized coal is solved. The basic method of investigation is computational fluid dynamics. The submodel of thermochemical processes, including a single-stage scheme of volatile substances outlet and three heterogeneous reactions of carbon residue conversion (complete carbon oxidation, Boudouard reaction and hydrogasification), is given. The mass loss rate is determined according to the basic assumptions of the diffusion-kinetic theory. The equations applied for calculation of the process of outlet of volatile substances and three stages of fuel gasifi-cation (diffusion of reagent gas toward the surface of the coal particle, heterogeneous reactions of gas with carbon on its surface, and homogeneous reactions beyond the particle surface) are presented. The universal combined submodel Eddy Dissipation/Finite Rate Chemistry with standard (built-in) constants is used for numerical estimates. Aerodynamic mechanisms of action on thermochemical processes of solid fuel gasification are studied, as exemplified by the design upgrade of a cyclone reactor of preliminary thermal fuel preparation. Volume concentrations of combustible gases and products of complete combustion in the syngas before and after primary air and pulverized coal flows' redistribution are given. Volume concentrations of CO in syngas at different positions of tangential secondary air inlet nozzle are compared.

  3. Numerical flow modeling of power plant windboxes

    SciTech Connect

    LaRose, J.A.; Hopkins, M.W.

    1995-12-31

    Numerical flow modeling has become an increasingly important design and analysis tool for improving the air distribution to power plant burners. Uniform air distribution allows the burners to perform as designed to achieve the lowest possible emissions and best fuel burn-out. Modifications can be made internal to the existing windbox to improve the burner-to-burner and burner peripheral air distributions. These modifications can include turning vanes, flow splitters, perforated plate, and burner shrouding. Numerical modeling allows the analysis of design trade-offs between adding flow resistance, fan power, and windbox modification construction cost. Numerical modeling has advantages over physical modeling in that actual geometric scales and air temperatures are used. Advantages over a field data based study include the ability to quickly and cheaply analyze a variety of design options without actually modifying the windbox, and the availability of significantly more data with which to interpret the results. Costs to perform a numerical study are generally one-half to one-third of the cost to perform a physical flow model and can be one-forth of the cost to perform a field study. The continued development of affordable, high speed, large memory workstations and reliable, commercially available computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software allows practical analyses of power plant windboxes. This paper discusses (1) the impact of air distribution on burner performance, (2) the methodology used to perform numerical flow modeling of power plant windboxes, and (3) the results from several windbox analyses including available post-modification observations.

  4. Image-Based Flow Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillard, Seth; Mousel, John; Buchholz, James; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2009-11-01

    A preliminary method has been developed to model complex moving boundaries interacting with fluids in two dimensions using video files. Image segmentation techniques are employed to generate sharp object interfaces which are cast as level sets embedded in a Cartesian flow domain. In this way, boundary evolution is effected directly through imagery rather than by way of functional approximation. Videos of an American eel swimming in a water tunnel apparatus and a guinea pig duodenum undergoing peristaltic contractions in vitro serve as external and internal flow examples, which are evaluated for wake structure and mixing efficacy, respectively.

  5. A wind tunnel study of air flow near model swine confinement buildings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most significant and persistent environmental concerns regarding swine production is the transport of odor constituents, trace gases, and particulates from animal production and manure storage facilities. The objectives of this study were to determine how swine housing unit orientation af...

  6. An experimental study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow dynamics in an axial blood pump model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi-Hui; Li, Jing-Yin; Zhang, Ming-Yuan; Zhu, Xian-Ran

    2012-04-01

    The head curves of a 1.5:1 new axial blood pump model were measured using five working fluids at five rotational speeds. The working fluids were water, a 39wt% aqueous glycerin solution (GS), and three aqueous xanthan gum solutions (XGSs) with different concentrations. The flow velocities and shear stresses in the mechanical clearance between the casing and rotor were investigated using a laser Doppler velocimeter and hot-film sensor. At every rotational speed, the experiment in which viscous GS was used in the pump model showed a head curve lower than that obtained using water, whereas the head obtained using viscoelastic XGS was higher than that generated using water. A maximum difference of 65.8% between the heads measured in the 0.06% XGS and GS experiments was detected. The higher head produced by the XGS may have originated from the drag-reduction effect of XGS viscoelasticity. The measurements showed that a reverse washout flow at a velocity of 0.05-0.11m/s occurs in the clearance. This reverse washout flow is crucial to preventing flow stagnation and accompanying thrombus formation. The wall shear stress and the Taylor number of the rotating Couette-like flow in the clearance both indicated that it is a turbulent flow. PMID:21995643

  7. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  8. Flow field mapping in data rack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoch, L.; Matěcha, J.; Pohan, P.

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to map the flow field inside the data rack model, fitted with three 1U server models. The server model is based on the common four-processor 1U server. The main dimensions of the data rack model geometry are taken fully from the real geometry. Only the model was simplified with respect to the greatest possibility in the experimental measurements. The flow field mapping was carried out both experimentally and numerically. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) method was used for the experimental flow field mapping, when the flow field has been mapped for defined regions within the 2D/3D data rack model. Ansys CFX and OpenFOAM software were used for the numerical solution. Boundary conditions for numerical model were based on data obtained from experimental measurement of velocity profile at the output of the server mockup. This velocity profile was used as the input boundary condition in the calculation. In order to achieve greater consistency of the numerical model with experimental data, the numerical model was modified with regard to the results of experimental measurements. Results from the experimental and numerical measurements were compared and the areas of disparateness were identified. In further steps the obtained proven numerical model will be utilized for the real geometry of data racks and data.

  9. A study of the second and third order closure models of turbulence for prediction of separated shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The hybrid model of the Reynolds-stress turbulence closure is tested for the computation of the flows over a step and disk. Here it is attempted to improve the redistributive action of the turbulence energy among the Reynolds stresses. By evaluating the existing models for the pressure-strain correlation, better coefficients are obtained for the prediction of separating shear flows. Furthermore, the diffusion rate of the Reynolds stresses is reevaluated adopting several algebraic correlations for the triple-velocity products. The models of Cormack et al., Daly-Harlow, Hanjalic-Launder, and Shir were tested for the reattaching shear flows. It was generally observed that all these algebraic models give considerably low values of the triple-velocity products. This is attributed to the fact that none of the algebraic models can take the convective effect of the triple-velocity products into account in the separating shear flows, thus resulting in much lower diffusion rate than Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the evaluation of these quantities correction factors are introduced based on the comparison with some experimental data.

  10. Thermodynamic study of β-cyclodextrin-dye inclusion complexes using gradient flow injection technique and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Izadmanesh, Y; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-08-01

    Gradient flow injection technique-diode array spectrophotometry was applied for β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-dye inclusion complex studies. A single injection of a small amount of mixed β-CD-dye solution (100μl) into the carrier solution of the dye and recording the spectra gave the titration data. The mole ratio data were calculated by calibrating the dispersion pattern using a calibrator dye (rose bengal). Model-based multivariate methods were used to analyze the spectral-mole ratio data and, as a result, estimate stability constants and concentration-spectral profiles. Reliability was tested by applying this method to study the β-CD host-guest complexes with several dyes as guest molecules. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to select the chemical model and reduce noise. Molecular modeling provided the ability to predict the guest conformation-orientation (posing) within the cavity of β-CD and the nature of the involved interactions. Among those dyes showing observable spectral variation, the stoichiometric ratio of β-CD: dye (and log Kf) of methyl orange, fluorescein, phenol red, 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR), and crystal violet were calculated to be 1:1 (4.26±0.01), 1:1 (1.53±0.08), 1:1 (3.11±0.04), 1:1 (1.06±0.12), and 2:1 (5.27±0.03), respectively. Compared with the classical method of titration, this method is simple and fast and has the advantage of needing reduced human interference. Molecular modeling facilitates a better understanding of the type of interactions and conformation of guest molecules in the β-CD cavity. The details of the proposed method are discussed in this paper. PMID:27111153

  11. Thermodynamic study of β-cyclodextrin-dye inclusion complexes using gradient flow injection technique and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadmanesh, Y.; Ghasemi, Jahan B.

    2016-08-01

    Gradient flow injection technique-diode array spectrophotometry was applied for β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-dye inclusion complex studies. A single injection of a small amount of mixed β-CD-dye solution (100 μl) into the carrier solution of the dye and recording the spectra gave the titration data. The mole ratio data were calculated by calibrating the dispersion pattern using a calibrator dye (rose bengal). Model-based multivariate methods were used to analyze the spectral-mole ratio data and, as a result, estimate stability constants and concentration-spectral profiles. Reliability was tested by applying this method to study the β-CD host-guest complexes with several dyes as guest molecules. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to select the chemical model and reduce noise. Molecular modeling provided the ability to predict the guest conformation-orientation (posing) within the cavity of β-CD and the nature of the involved interactions. Among those dyes showing observable spectral variation, the stoichiometric ratio of β-CD: dye (and log Kf) of methyl orange, fluorescein, phenol red, 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR), and crystal violet were calculated to be 1:1 (4.26 ± 0.01), 1:1 (1.53 ± 0.08), 1:1 (3.11 ± 0.04), 1:1 (1.06 ± 0.12), and 2:1 (5.27 ± 0.03), respectively. Compared with the classical method of titration, this method is simple and fast and has the advantage of needing reduced human interference. Molecular modeling facilitates a better understanding of the type of interactions and conformation of guest molecules in the β-CD cavity. The details of the proposed method are discussed in this paper.

  12. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    SciTech Connect

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  13. A combined field and modeling study of groundwater flow in a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y. Q.; Li, H. L.

    2012-03-01

    Bald mud beaches were found among the mangrove marshes in Dongzhaigang National Nature Reserve, Hainan, China. To investigate the possible reasons for this phenomenon, the intertidal zones of a mangrove transect and a bald beach transect with similar topography and tidal actions were selected for comparison study. Along both transects, observed water table variations were significant in the high and low intertidal zones and negligible in the middle intertidal zones. Despite the same tidal actions and above-mentioned similarities, observed groundwater salinity was significantly smaller along the mangrove transect (average 23.0 ppt) than along the bald beach transect (average 28.5 ppt). These observations invite one hypothesis: the hydraulic structure of tidal marsh and freshwater availability may be the main hydrogeological factors critical to mangrove development. Two-dimensional numerical simulations corroborated the speculation and gave results in line with the observed water table. The two transects investigated were found to have a mud-sand two-layered structure: a surface zone of low-permeability mud and an underlying high-permeability zone that outcrops at the high and low tide lines. The freshwater recharge from inland is considerable along the mangrove transect but negligible along the bald beach transect. The high-permeability zone may provide opportunity for the plants in the mangrove marsh to uptake freshwater and oxygen through their roots extending downward into the high-permeability zone, which may help limit the buildup of salt in the root zone caused by evapotranspiration and enhance salt removal, which may further increase the production of marsh grasses and influence their spatial distribution. The bald beach is most probably due to the lack of enough freshwater for generating a brackish beach soil condition essential to mangrove growth. It is also indicated that seawater infiltrated the high-permeability zone through its outcrop near the high

  14. A combined field and modeling study of groundwater flow in a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yuqiang; Li, Hailong

    2011-05-01

    Bald mud beaches were found among the mangrove marshes in Dongzhaigang National Nature Reserve, Hainan, China. To investigate the possible reasons for this phenomenon, the intertidal zones of a mangrove transect and a bald beach transect with similar topography and same tidal actions were selected for comparison study. Along both transects, observed water table variations were significant in the high and low intertidal zones and negligible in the middle intertidal zones. Field investigations and observations invite two speculations: (1) existence of a high-permeability zone on each transect which underlies the low-permeability surface mud sediments and outcrops in the high intertidal zone, and (2) considerable inland freshwater recharge along the mangrove transect but negligible freshwater recharge along the bald beach transect. Two-dimensional numerical simulations based on these speculations gave results in line with the observed water table. The bald beach is most probably due to the lack of enough freshwater for generating a brackish beach soil condition essential to mangrove growth. It is also indicated that seawater infiltrated the high-permeability zone through its outcrop near the high intertidal zone, and discharged from the tidal river bank in the vicinity of the low tide line, thereby forming a tide-induced seawater-groundwater circulation which may provide considerable contribution to the total submarine groundwater discharge.

  15. Development of a flow visualization apparatus. [to study convection flow patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The use of an optical flow visualization device for studying convection flow patterns was investigated. The investigation considered use of a shadowgraph, schlieren and other means for visualizing the flow. A laboratory model was set up to provide data on the proper optics and photography procedures to best visualize the flow. A preliminary design of a flow visualization system is provided as a result of the study. Recommendations are given for a flight test program utilizing the flow visualization apparatus.

  16. Model the nonlinear instability of wall-bounded shear flows as a rare event: a study on two-dimensional Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoliang; Yu, Haijun; Weinan, E.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we study the nonlinear instability of two-dimensional (2D) wall-bounded shear flows from the large deviation point of view. The main idea is to consider the Navier-Stokes equations perturbed by small noise in force and then examine the noise-induced transitions between the two coexisting stable solutions due to the subcritical bifurcation. When the amplitude of the noise goes to zero, the Freidlin-Wentzell (F-W) theory of large deviations defines the most probable transition path in the phase space, which is the minimizer of the F-W action functional and characterizes the development of the nonlinear instability subject to small random perturbations. Based on such a transition path we can define a critical Reynolds number for the nonlinear instability in the probabilistic sense. Then the action-based stability theory is applied to study the 2D Poiseuille flow in a short channel.

  17. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  18. Flow Velocities After Carotid Artery Stenting: Impact of Stent Design. A Fluid Dynamics Study in a Carotid Artery Model with Laser Doppler Anemometry

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, Oliver Kleinschmidt, Thomas; Weiss, Wolfgang; Wolf, Oliver; Heider, Peter; Schaffner, Silvio; Gianotti, Marc; Schmid, Thomas; Liepsch, Dieter; Berger, Hermann

    2005-01-15

    Purpose. To study the influence of a newly developed membrane stent design on flow patterns in a physiologic carotid artery model. Methods. Three different stents were positioned in silicone models of the carotid artery: a stainless steel stent (Wall-stent), a nitinol stent (SelfX), and a nitinol stent with a semipermeable membrane (MembraX). To increase the contact area of the membrane with the vessel wall, another MembranX model was modified at the outflow tract. The membrane consists of a biocompatible silicone-polyurethane copolymer (Elast-Eon) with a pore size of 100 {mu}m. All stents were deployed across the bifurcation and the external carotid artery origin. Flow velocity measurements were performed with laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), using pulsatile flow conditions (Re = 220; flow 0.39 l/min; flow rate ratio ICA:ECA = 70:30) in hemodynamically relevant cross-sections. The hemodynamic changes were analyzed by comparing velocity fluctuations of corresponding flow profiles. Results. The flow rate ratio ICA:ECA shifted significantly from 70/30 to 73.9/26.1 in the MembraX and remained nearly unchanged in the SelfX and Wallstent. There were no changes in the flow patterns at the inflow proximal to the stents. In the stent no relevant changes were found in the SelfX. In the Wallstent the separation zone shifted from the orifice of the ICA to the distal end of the stent. Four millimeters distal to the SelfX and the Wallstent the flow profile returned to normal. In the MembraX an increase in the central slipstreams was found with creation of a flow separation distal to the stent. With a modification of the membrane this flow separation vanished. In the ECA flow disturbances were seen at the inner wall distal to the stent struts in the SelfX and the Wallstent. With the MembraX a calming of flow could be observed in the ECA with a slight loss of flow volume. Conclusions. Stent placement across the carotid artery bifurcation induces alterations of the physiologic flow

  19. Gas-phase chemistry in Oxidation Flow Reactors for the study of secondary organic aerosols systematically examined by modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Li, R.; De Gouw, J. A.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation Flow Reactors (OFRs) using OH produced from low-pressure Hg lamps at 254 nm (OFR254) or both 185 and 254 nm (OFR185) are commonly used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. OFR254 requires addition of externally formed O3 since OH is formed mainly from O3 photolysis, while OFR185 does not since OH can also be formed from H2O photolysis. In this study we use a plug-flow kinetic model to investigate OFR properties under a very wide range of conditions applicable to both field and laboratory studies. We show that radical chemistry in OFRs can be characterized as a function of 3 main parameters: UV light intensity, H2O concentration, and total external OH reactivity (e.g. from VOCs, NOx, and SO2). In OFR185, OH exposure is more sensitive to external OH reactivity than in OFR254, because injected O3 in OFR254 greatly promotes the recycling of HO2 to OH, making external perturbations to the radical chemistry less significant. The uncertainties of modeled OH, O3, and H2O2 due to uncertain kinetic parameters are within 40% in most cases. Sensitivity analysis shows that most of the uncertainty is contributed by photolysis and reactions involving OH and HO2, e.g. 2HO2→H2O2+O2 and OH+O3→HO2+O2. Reactants of atmospheric interest are dominantly consumed by OH, except some biogenics that can have substantial contributions from O3. Other highly reactive species (UV photons, O(1D), and O(3P)) only contribute for some species under conditions low H2O concentration and/or high external OH reactivity, which can be avoided by experimental planning. OFR185 and OFR254 are comparable in terms of non-OH oxidants' influence. In OFRs NO is fast oxidized. RO2 fate is similar to that in the atmosphere under low NO conditions. A comprehensive comparison of OFRs with typical environmental chamber studies with UV blacklights and with the atmosphere is also performed. OFRs' key advantages are their short experimental time scales, portability to field sites, and generally good

  20. Lower Three Runs Instream Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    del Carmen, B.R.; Paller, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    An Instream Flow Study was conducted to identify the minimum discharge from PAR Pond that will support a balanced biological fish community in Lower Three Runs. Hydraulic and habitat models of the Physical Habitat simulation System (PHABSIM), the major component of the US Fish and Wildlife Service`s Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) were applied. Following calibration of the Water Surface Profile (WSP)Model for three study reaches, hydraulic data was input to the AVDEPTH habitat model to develop relationships between discharge and reaches, hydraulic data was input to the AVDEPTH habitat model to development relationship between discharge and available habitat.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Molten Steel Flow Patterns and Particle-Wall Interactions Inside a Slide-Gate Nozzle by a Hybrid Turbulent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi-Ghaleni, Mahdi; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Smith, Jeffrey D.; O'Malley, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    Melt flow patterns and turbulence inside a slide-gate throttled submerged entry nozzle (SEN) were studied using Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) model, which is a combination of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models. The DES switching criterion between RANS and LES was investigated to closely reproduce the flow structures of low and high turbulence regions similar to RANS and LES simulations, respectively. The melt flow patterns inside the nozzle were determined by k-ɛ (a RANS model), LES, and DES turbulent models, and convergence studies were performed to ensure reliability of the results. Results showed that the DES model has significant advantages over the standard k-ɛ model in transient simulations and in regions containing flow separation from the nozzle surface. Moreover, due to applying a hybrid approach, DES uses a RANS model at wall boundaries which resolves the extremely fine mesh requirement of LES simulations, and therefore it is computationally more efficient. Investigation of particle distribution inside the nozzle and particle adhesion to the nozzle wall also reveals that the DES model simulations predict more particle-wall interactions compared to LES model.

  2. Groundwater Flow Model for Taos, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burck, P. W.; Barroll, P. W.; Core, A. B.; Rappuhn, D.

    2003-12-01

    The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer - Hydrology Bureau (OSE) has developed a regional groundwater flow model for Taos, New Mexico. The MODFLOW 2000 model will serve as a tool to evaluate alternatives in settlement negotiations in an on-going water rights adjudication. If current settlement negotiations fail, it is conceivable that the model might be used in support of litigation. OSE produced the model in cooperation with technical representatives of the various parties to the adjudication. Regional hydrogeologic data including well records, aquifer test results, stream flow measurements and seepage studies have been shared relatively freely among the parties. A recent deep drilling program conducted in conjunction with the negotiation effort has added substantially to the hydrogeologic data set. Among the hydrologic processes simulated by the model are mountain front recharge; areal recharge from precipitation; evapotranspiration; discharge from springs; river and stream flow; accretions to groundwater from irrigation return flow, seepage from acequias, canals, and ditches, and deep percolation; and pumping by municipal entities and mutual domestic water users associations. The resulting model files are available for all parties to review and evaluate. Comments are assessed and many have resulted in significant improvements to the model. At this stage, however, it is unclear whether adopting this cooperative approach will increase the likelihood of model acceptance by the parties.

  3. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott, H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features. PMID:21666881

  4. Unsaturated zone flow modeling for GWTT-95

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; McKenna, S.A.; Arnold, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    In accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation regarding groundwater travel times at geologic repositories, various models of unsaturated flow in fractured tuff have been developed and implemented to assess groundwater travel times at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Kaplan used one-dimensional models to describe the uncertainty and sensitivity of travel times to various processes at Yucca Mountain. Robey and Arnold et al. used a two-dimensional equivalent continuum model (ECM) with inter- and intra-unit heterogeneity in an attempt to assess fast-flow paths through the unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain (GWTT-94). However, significant flow through the fractures in previous models was not simulated due to the characteristics of the ECM, which requires the matrix to be nearly saturated before flow through the fractures is initiated. In the current study (GWTT-95), four two-dimensional cross-sections at Yucca Mountain are simulated using both the ECM and dual-permeability (DK) models. The properties of both the fracture and matrix domains are geostatistically simulated, yielding completely heterogeneous continua. Then, simulations of flow through the four cross-sections are performed using spatially nonuniform infiltration boundary conditions. Steady-state groundwater travel times from the potential repository to the water table are calculated.

  5. Preliminary Saturated-Zone Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-10

    This milestone consists of an updated fully 3D model of ground-water flow within the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. All electronic files pertaining to this deliverable have been transferred via ftp transmission to Steve Bodnar (M and O) and the technical data base. The model was developed using a flow and transport simulator, FEHMN, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and represents a collaborative effort between staff from the US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model contained in this deliverable is minimally calibrated and represents work in progress. The flow model developed for this milestone is designed to feed subsequent transport modeling studies at Los Alamos which also use the FEHMN software. In addition, a general-application parameter estimation routine, PEST, was used in conjunction with FEHMN to reduce the difference between observed and simulated values of hydraulic head through the adjustment of model variables. This deliverable in large part consists of the electronic files for Yucca Mountain Site saturated-zone flow model as it existed as of 6/6/97, including the executable version of FEHMN (accession no. MOL.19970610.0204) used to run the code on a Sun Ultrasparc I workstation. It is expected that users of the contents of this deliverable be knowledgeable about the oration of FEHMN.

  6. Analytical studies on an extended car following model for mixed traffic flow with slow and fast vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhipeng; Xu, Xun; Xu, Shangzhi; Qian, Yeqing; Xu, Juan

    2016-07-01

    The car-following model is extended to take into account the characteristics of mixed traffic flow containing fast and slow vehicles. We conduct the linear stability analysis to the extended model with finding that the traffic flow can be stabilized with the increase of the percentage of the slow vehicle. It also can be concluded that the stabilization of the traffic flow closely depends on not only the average value of two maximum velocities characterizing two vehicle types, but also the standard deviation of the maximum velocities among all vehicles, when the percentage of the slow vehicles is the same as that of the fast ones. With increase of the average maximum velocity, the traffic flow becomes more and more unstable, while the increase of the standard deviation takes negative effect in stabilizing the traffic system. The direct numerical results are in good agreement with those of theoretical analysis. Moreover, the relation between the flux and the traffic density is investigated to simulate the effects of the percentage of slow vehicles on traffic flux in the whole density regions.

  7. Motivation, Instructional Design, Flow, and Academic Achievement at a Korean Online University: A Structural Equation Modeling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Young Ju; Oh, Eunjung; Kim, Su Mi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the structural relationships among self-efficacy, intrinsic value, test anxiety, instructional design, flow, and achievement among students at a Korean online university. To address research questions, the researchers administered online surveys to 963 college students at an online university in Korea…

  8. Model Related Estimates of time dependent quantiles of peak flows - case study for selected catchments in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupczewski, Witold G.; Bogdanowich, Ewa; Debele, Sisay

    2016-04-01

    Under Polish climate conditions the series of Annual Maxima (AM) flows are usually a mixture of peak flows of thaw- and rainfall- originated floods. The northern, lowland regions are dominated by snowmelt floods whilst in mountainous regions the proportion of rainfall floods is predominant. In many stations the majority of AM can be of snowmelt origin, but the greatest peak flows come from rainfall floods or vice versa. In a warming climate, precipitation is less likely to occur as snowfall. A shift from a snow- towards a rain-dominated regime results in a decreasing trend in mean and standard deviations of winter peak flows whilst rainfall floods do not exhibit any trace of non-stationarity. That is why a simple form of trends (i.e. linear trends) are more difficult to identify in AM time-series than in Seasonal Maxima (SM), usually winter season time-series. Hence it is recommended to analyse trends in SM, where a trend in standard deviation strongly influences the time -dependent upper quantiles. The uncertainty associated with the extrapolation of the trend makes it necessary to apply a relationship for trend which has time derivative tending to zero, e.g. we can assume a new climate equilibrium epoch approaching, or a time horizon is limited by the validity of the trend model. For both winter and summer SM time series, at least three distributions functions with trend model in the location, scale and shape parameters are estimated by means of the GAMLSS package using the ML-techniques. The resulting trend estimates in mean and standard deviation are mutually compared to the observed trends. Then, using AIC measures as weights, a multi-model distribution is constructed for each of two seasons separately. Further, assuming a mutual independence of the seasonal maxima, an AM model with time-dependent parameters can be obtained. The use of a multi-model approach can alleviate the effects of different and often contradictory trends obtained by using and identifying

  9. How does gully recharge affect sediment transfers by debris flows? A numerical modelling study in steep mountainous terrain, coastal British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Y. E.; Johnson, E. A.; Chaikina, O.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are a major process responsible for transferring sediment from high mountain locations to more downstream fluvial reaches. This sediment transfer begins on mountain hillslopes where various mass wasting processes move sediment from hillslopes to uppermost reaches of the channel system (these reaches are herein referred to as gullies and only experience water flow during high intensity precipitation events). Sediment recharge into gullies, which has received minimal attention in the scientific literature, refers to the transfer of sediment and other debris from surrounding hillslopes into gullies (Jakob and Oden, 2005). Debris flow occurrence and debris flow volumes depend on some precipitation threshold as well as volumes of material contained in the particular gully. For example, if one debris flow has removed all of the accumulated material from the gully, then any subsequent debris flow will be smaller if enough time has not yet passed for notable sediment recharge. Herein, we utilize the numerical model of landscape development, LandMod (Martin, 1998; Dadson and Church, 2005; Martin, 2007), to explore connections between hillslope processes, gully recharge rates, and transfer of sediment to downstream channel reaches in the Haida Gwaii, British Columbia. Hillslope processes in the model include shallow landsliding, bedrock failures and weathering. The updated debris flow algorithm is based on extensive field data available for debris flows in Haida Gwaii (e.g., Rood, 1984; Oden, 1994; Jakob and Oden, 2005), as well as theoretical considerations based on debris flow studies. The most significant model extension is the calculation of gully recharge rates; for each gully, the total accumulated sediment in gullies at each time step is determined using a power-law relation for area-normalized recharge rate versus elapsed time since the last debris flow. Thus, when the stochastic driver for debris flow occurrence triggers an event, the amount of stored

  10. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Palm, B. B.; Hu, W. W.; Stark, H.; Li, R.; Tsigaridis, K.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D), O(3P), and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to relative humidity (RH) and external OH reactivity (OHRext), as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportional to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D), O(3P), and O3 have relative contributions to VOC consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. Under "pathological OFR conditions" of low RH and/or high OHRext, the importance of non-OH reactants is enhanced because OH is suppressed. Some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3, and photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm) may also play a significant role in the degradation of some aromatics under pathological conditions. Working under low O2 with the OFR185 mode allows OH to completely dominate over O3 reactions even for the biogenic species most reactive with O3. Non-tropospheric VOC photolysis may have been a problem in some laboratory and source studies, but can be avoided or lessened in future studies by diluting source emissions and working at lower precursor concentrations in lab studies, and

  11. Turbulence and modeling in transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, Morris W.; Viegas, John R.

    1989-01-01

    A review is made of the performance of a variety of turbulence models in the evaluation of a particular well documented transonic flow. This is done to supplement a previous attempt to calibrate and verify transonic airfoil codes by including many more turbulence models than used in the earlier work and applying the calculations to an experiment that did not suffer from uncertainties in angle of attack and was free of wind tunnel interference. It is found from this work, as well as in the earlier study, that the Johnson-King turbulence model is superior for transonic flows over simple aerodynamic surfaces, including moderate separation. It is also shown that some field equation models with wall function boundary conditions can be competitive with it.

  12. Modelling of Tsunami Flow and Impact in Inundation Zone, Case Study for 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, C.; Yalciner, A. C.; Zaytsev, A.

    2011-12-01

    It has been clarified by 2004 Indian Ocean and 2001 Great East Japan tsunami events that the major reasons of impacts and damage of tsunamis depend on the flow parameters in nearshore and inundation zone. Hence the determination of impact level or tsunami drag force becomes essential. The square of Froude number (Fr2) which depends on the relation between current velocity and flow depth at any instant and any location is one of the effective parameters that represents the level of drag force exerted by the flow. Current velocity and flow depth change spatially and instantaneously in inundation zone. Therefore, maximum values of Fr2 occur in relation to the instantaneous values of current and flow depth. In this study, a series of fine grid simulations of tsunami inundation are performed using the numerical code NAMI DANCE which is modified in the frame of Joint Research Project MORAT between Russia and Turkey. A study domain having 1:20 beach slope is selected. At the coastal area, specially arranged rectangular coastal structures are located. The coastal area is selected as unprotected or protected by a seawall with different heights and/or a breakwater. The maximum values of Fr2 are computed at each grid node during the simulations of different incoming tsunami amplitudes. Furthermore the current velocities and flow depth at the time of maximum Fr2 are also computed. The spatial changes of these parameters along the lines perpendicular to the shore are plotted and the results are compared. A scale of Fr2 values for the assessment of the spatial change of damage level is developed. Damage level is also evaluated and discussed considering i) the presence of the coastal protection structures (i.e. tsunami walls etc.), ii) the presence of breakwaters, iii) the layout of the structures and roads, iv) type of the structures (R/C, timber, half-timbered, truss etc). The results are used to discuss the coastal damage by 2011 Japan tsunami event. In the case study, the

  13. Comparing turbulence models for flow through a rigid glottal model.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jungsoo; Frankel, Steven H

    2008-03-01

    Flow through a rigid model of the human vocal tract featuring a divergent glottis was numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach. A number of different turbulence models, available in a widely used commercial computational fluid dynamics code, were tested to determine their ability to capture various flow features recently observed in laboratory experiments and large eddy simulation studies. The study reveals that results from unsteady simulations employing the k-omega shear stress transport model were in much better agreement with previous measurements and predictions with regard to the ability to predict glottal jet skewing due to the Coanda effect and the intraglottal pressure distribution or related skin friction coefficient, than either steady or unsteady simulations using the Spalart-Allmaras model or any other two-equation turbulence model investigated in this study. PMID:18345812

  14. Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Turbulence modeling for complex hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculations for a range of 2D turbulent hypersonic flows using two-equation models. The baseline models and the model corrections required for good hypersonic-flow predictions will be illustrated. Three experimental data sets were chosen for comparison. They are: (1) the hypersonic flare flows of Kussoy and Horstman, (2) a 2D hypersonic compression corner flow of Coleman and Stollery, and (3) the ogive-cylinder impinging shock-expansion flows of Kussoy and Horstman. Comparisons with the experimental data have shown that baseline models under-predict the extent of flow separation but over-predict the heat transfer rate near flow reattachment. Modifications to the models are described which remove the above-mentioned deficiencies. Although we have restricted the discussion only to the selected baseline models in this paper, the modifications proposed are universal and can in principle be transferred to any existing two-equation model formulation.

  16. Numerical study of flow turning phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, J. D.; Levine, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    A research project is currently being conducted that is to provide an understanding of the physical mechanisms by which energy is exchanged between the mean and acoustic flowfields in resonant combustion chambers, giving particular attention to solid rocket motors. The present paper is concerned with progress which has been made toward the understanding of the 'flow turning' phenomenon. This term is used to describe the loss of acoustic energy by the acoustic field in the combustor resulting from the inflow of combustion products through the lateral boundary of a combustion chamber containing longitudinal acoustic waves. Attention is given to the modeling of flow turning, acoustic refraction, the numerical solution, numerical results, acoustic wave propagation with no mean flow, and a flow turning study. The discussed research verifies the existence of the flow turning loss phenomenon.

  17. In Vitro MRV-based Hemodynamic Study of Complex Helical Flow in a Patient-specific Jugular Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Haraldsson, Henrik; Saloner, David

    2014-11-01

    Neurointerventional Radiologists are frequently requested to evaluate the venous side of the intracranial circulation for a variety of conditions including: Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency thought to play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis; sigmoid sinus diverticulum which has been linked to the presence of pulsatile tinnitus; and jugular vein distension which is related to cardiac dysfunction. Most approaches to evaluating these conditions rely on structural assessment or two dimensional flow analyses. This study was designed to investigate the highly complex jugular flow conditions using magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV). A jugular phantom was fabricated based on the geometry of the dominant jugular in a tinnitus patient. Volumetric three-component time-resolved velocity fields were obtained using 4D PC-MRI -with the protocol enabling turbulence acquisition- and the patient-specific pulsatile waveform. Flow was highly complex exhibiting regions of jet, high swirling strength, and strong helical pattern with the core originating from the focal point of the jugular bulb. Specifically, flow was analyzed for helicity and the level of turbulence kinetic energy elevated in the core of helix and distally, in the post-narrowing region.

  18. Modelling Local Sea-Breeze Flow and Associated Dispersion Patterns Over a Coastal Area in North-East Spain: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, M. R.; Arasa, R.; Merino, M.; Olid, M.; Ortega, S.

    2011-07-01

    The structure and evolution of the sea breeze in the north-west part of the Mediterranean (Catalonia, north-east Spain) is studied both experimentally and, predominantly, using numerical models to increase understanding of sea-breeze structure and three-dimensional (3D) pollution distributions in coastal environments. Sea-breeze components are modelled and analyzed using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University-National Centre for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5). The results show that the growth and structure of the sea-breeze circulation is modulated by the synoptic flow and especially by the complex topography of the area. 3D pollution transport in a sea breeze is modelled by coupling the MM5 to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, with results indicating that topography and synoptic flow are the main factors modulating horizontal and vertical pollutant transport in sea-breeze episodes. In this way, horizontal dispersion is limited by the complex topography of the area, whilst the sea-breeze flow is intensified by anabatic upslope winds that contribute to vertical pollutant transport. The numerical model results also indicate that the sea-breeze circulation with a weak return flow at upper levels grows due to a synoptic onshore wind component. However, such a sea-breeze circulation is capable of transporting pollutants towards the coast.

  19. How can rainfall-runoff models handle intercatchment groundwater flows? Theoretical study based on 1040 French catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moine, Nicolas; AndréAssian, Vazken; Perrin, Charles; Michel, Claude

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines the possible solutions that may allow a rainfall-runoff model to cope with the existence of unknown intercatchment groundwater flows over a given catchment. On the basis of a large catchment set we compare four versions of the GR4J and the SMAR rainfall-runoff models that differ in the way they use one of their parameters to adjust catchment-scale water balance. We show that from both the hydrological likelihood and the modeling efficiency point of view it is preferable to explicitly represent intercatchment groundwater transfers. The surrogate corrective solutions tested in this paper (correcting or scaling factors applied to the climatic input data or to the catchment area) that are sometimes used in practice could be used on the sole grounds of streamflow simulation efficiency, but we show that they should be avoided since they may lead to obviously unrealistic corrections and consequently yield a similarly unrealistic distribution between evaporation streamflow and underground fluxes.

  20. Estimating Preferential Flow in Karstic Aquifers Using Statistical Mixed Models

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Angel A.; Padilla, Ingrid; Macchiavelli, Raul; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Meeker, John D.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2013-01-01

    Karst aquifers are highly productive groundwater systems often associated with conduit flow. These systems can be highly vulnerable to contamination, resulting in a high potential for contaminant exposure to humans and ecosystems. This work develops statistical models to spatially characterize flow and transport patterns in karstified limestone and determines the effect of aquifer flow rates on these patterns. A laboratory-scale Geo-HydroBed model is used to simulate flow and transport processes in a karstic limestone unit. The model consists of stainless-steel tanks containing a karstified limestone block collected from a karst aquifer formation in northern Puerto Rico. Experimental work involves making a series of flow and tracer injections, while monitoring hydraulic and tracer response spatially and temporally. Statistical mixed models are applied to hydraulic data to determine likely pathways of preferential flow in the limestone units. The models indicate a highly heterogeneous system with dominant, flow-dependent preferential flow regions. Results indicate that regions of preferential flow tend to expand at higher groundwater flow rates, suggesting a greater volume of the system being flushed by flowing water at higher rates. Spatial and temporal distribution of tracer concentrations indicates the presence of conduit-like and diffuse flow transport in the system, supporting the notion of both combined transport mechanisms in the limestone unit. The temporal response of tracer concentrations at different locations in the model coincide with, and confirms the preferential flow distribution generated with the statistical mixed models used in the study. PMID:23802921

  1. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  2. Hawaii Island Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Hawaii Island. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume II – Island of Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.

  3. East Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for East Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  4. Fractional-order variational optical flow model for motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dali; Sheng, Hu; Chen, YangQuan; Xue, Dingyü

    2013-05-13

    A new class of fractional-order variational optical flow models, which generalizes the differential of optical flow from integer order to fractional order, is proposed for motion estimation in this paper. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are derived by solving a typical fractional variational problem, and the numerical implementation based on the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional derivative definition is proposed to solve these complicated fractional partial differential equations. Theoretical analysis reveals that the proposed fractional-order variational optical flow model is the generalization of the typical Horn and Schunck (first-order) variational optical flow model and the second-order variational optical flow model, which provides a new idea for us to study the optical flow model and has an important theoretical implication in optical flow model research. The experiments demonstrate the validity of the generalization of differential order. PMID:23547225

  5. Characterization of Turbulent Flows for Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, W. C.; Haire, S. L.

    1998-11-01

    A diagram for the characterization of turbulent flows using the invariants of the mean velocity gradient tensor is introduced. All mean flows, from irrotationally strained flows to shearing flows, to purely rotational flows, can be identified on this diagram. Different flow fields which occupy the same region on the diagram are said to be comprised of the same topological features. The current state of turbulence modeling can be identified on the diagram based on the type of mean flow fields which can be accurately computed. Regions on the diagram can be shown for which current capabilities in turbulence modeling fail to accurately resolve the turbulent structures. Relevant mean field topology is identified for future work in turbulence modeling. Using this analysis, we suggest a number of flows to be computed by DNS or LES and used as testing cases for new models.

  6. Estimation of instantaneous peak flow from simulated maximum daily flow using the HBV model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Instantaneous peak flow (IPF) data are the foundation of the design of hydraulic structures and flood frequency analysis. However, the long discharge records published by hydrological agencies contain usually only average daily flows which are of little value for design in small catchments. In former research, statistical analysis using observed peak and daily flow data was carried out to explore the link between instantaneous peak flow (IPF) and maximum daily flow (MDF) where the multiple regression model is proved to have the best performance. The objective of this study is to further investigate the acceptability of the multiple regression model for post-processing simulated daily flows from hydrological modeling. The model based flood frequency analysis allows to consider change in the condition of the catchments and in climate for design. Here, the HBV model is calibrated on peak flow distributions and flow duration curves using two approaches. In a two -step approach the simulated MDF are corrected with a priory established regressions. In a one-step procedure the regression coefficients are calibrated together with the parameters of the model. For the analysis data from 18 mesoscale catchments in the Aller-Leine river basin in Northern Germany are used. The results show that: (1) the multiple regression model is capable to predict the peak flows with the simulated MDF data; (2) the calibrated hydrological model reproduces well the magnitude and frequency distribution of peak flows; (3) the one-step procedure outperforms the two-step procedure regarding the estimation of peak flows.

  7. Modeling of Building Scale Flow and Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R L; Calhoun, R J; Chan, S T; Leone, J; Stevens, D E

    2001-07-10

    Predictions of airflows around buildings and the associated thermal and dispersion phenomena continue to be challenging because of the presence of extremely heterogeneous surface structures within urban areas. Atmospheric conditions can induce local winds to flow around structures rather than over them. Thus pollutants that are released at or near the ground tend to persist at relatively low levels with only minimal ventilation of the airborne material away from the ground surface. While flow and dispersion phenomena can be studied within wind tunnel settings, recent advances in numerical modeling have enabled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to evolve into an important tool in the simulation of building scale flows. They are developing numerical models to simulate the flow and dispersion of releases around multi-building complexes. These models will be used to assess the transport and fate of releases of hazardous agents within urban areas and to support emergency response activities. There are already a number of models that have been developed to simulate flow and dispersion around urban settings. A recent collection of these papers can be found in the Proceedings of the International Workshop on CFD for Wind Climate in Cities. Most of the simulation studies presented in the literature are based on single buildings with a few of these results compared with wind tunnel experiments. As the applications become more advanced, the influence of multiple buildings, vegetation, surface heating and atmospheric stability on flow and dispersion has begun to be incorporated into recent CFD models. The focus of this paper is to describe LLNL's effort in the development of a high-performance CFD model for simulating transport and diffusion of hazardous releases around buildings and building complexes. A number of new physics features have been implemented in order to customize the CFD model for the urban application. These include surface heating, vegetation canopy, heat

  8. Geophysical Methods, Tracer Leakage, and Flow Modeling Studies at the West Pearl Queen Carbon Sequestration/EOR Pilot Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromhal, G. S.; Wilson, T. H.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Smith, D. H.

    2003-12-01

    Recently, a few thousand tons of CO2 were injected into the West Pearl Queen field, a depleted oil reservoir in southeastern New Mexico, for a pilot carbon sequestration project. Small amounts of 3 different perfluorocarbon tracers were injected with the CO2. Approximately 50 capillary absorption tube samplers (CATS) were located across the field within 2m of the grounds surface to detect the tracers in extremely small (~10-13L) quantities. After only several days, the CATS detected quantities of tracers at distances of up to 350m from the injection well. Greater amounts of tracers were detected in the different directions. The underground transport mechanism(s) are uncertain; however, appearance of tracer in the CATS after only a 6 day period suggests that CO2 movement may have occurred through near-surface processes. Subsequent tracer measurements made over 10 and 54 day time periods revealed continued tracer leakage. To try to understand the tracer information, we conducted lineament interpretations of the area using a black and white aerial photo taken in 1949, digital orthophotos, and Landsat TM imagery. Lineament interpretations revealed distinct northeast and northwest trending lineament sets. These directions coincided roughly with the direction of tracer-leakage into areas northwest and southwest of the injection well. The near-surface geology consists of a few-feet thick veneer of late Pleistocene and Holocene sand dunes covering the middle Pleistocene Mescalero caliche. A survey of the caliche was made using ground penetrating radar (GPR) to attempt to identify any preferential migration pathways. Modeling studies also were performed to identify the potential leakage pathways at the site. Because of the relatively fast appearance of tracers at large distances from the injection well, simple diffusion through the surface layers was ruled out. Wind patterns in the area have also made transport through the atmosphere and back into the ground highly unlikely

  9. Analytical studies on a new lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model with consideration of traffic current cooperation among three consecutive sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhipeng; Zhong, Chenjie; Chen, Lizhu; Xu, Shangzhi; Qian, Yeqing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the original lattice hydrodynamic model of traffic flow is extended to take into account the traffic current cooperation among three consecutive sites. The basic idea of the new consideration is that the cooperative traffic current of the considered site is determined by the traffic currents of the site itself, the immediately preceding site and the immediately following one. The stability criterion of the extended model is obtained by applying the linear stability analysis. The result reveals the traffic current cooperation of the immediately preceding site is positive correlation with the stability of traffic system, while negative correlation is found between the traffic stability and the traffic current cooperation of the nearest follow site. To describe the phase transition, the modified KdV equation near the critical point is derived by using the reductive perturbation method, with obtaining the dependence of the propagation kink solution for traffic jams on the traffic current cooperation among three consecutive sites. The direct numerical are conducted to verify the results of theoretical analysis, and explore the effects of the traffic current cooperation on the traffic flux of the vehicle flow system.

  10. Analytical study of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for a boundary layer flow of Oldroyd-B fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, M. Abbasi; M, Mustafa; S, A. Shehzad; M, S. Alhuthali; T, Hayat

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for a two-dimensional laminar boundary layer flow of an incompressible Oldroyd-B fluid over a linearly stretching sheet. Mathematical formulation of the boundary layer problems is given. The nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are obtained through optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM). The influences of the physical parameters on the velocity and the temperature are pointed out. The results show that the temperature and the thermal boundary layer thickness are smaller in the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model than those in the Fourier’s law of heat conduction. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research (DSR) King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (Grant No. 32-130-36-HiCi).

  11. Numerical Study of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for Viscoelastic Flow Due to an Exponentially Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Khan, Junaid; Mustafa, M.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the flow and heat transfer in upper-convected Maxwell fluid above an exponentially stretching surface. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is employed for the formulation of the energy equation. This model can predict the effects of thermal relaxation time on the boundary layer. Similarity approach is utilized to normalize the governing boundary layer equations. Local similarity solutions are achieved by shooting approach together with fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique and Newton’s method. Our computations reveal that fluid temperature has inverse relationship with the thermal relaxation time. Further the fluid velocity is a decreasing function of the fluid relaxation time. A comparison of Fourier’s law and the Cattaneo-Christov’s law is also presented. Present attempt even in the case of Newtonian fluid is not yet available in the literature. PMID:26325426

  12. Numerical Study of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for Viscoelastic Flow Due to an Exponentially Stretching Surface.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Khan, Junaid; Mustafa, M; Hayat, T; Alsaedi, A

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the flow and heat transfer in upper-convected Maxwell fluid above an exponentially stretching surface. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is employed for the formulation of the energy equation. This model can predict the effects of thermal relaxation time on the boundary layer. Similarity approach is utilized to normalize the governing boundary layer equations. Local similarity solutions are achieved by shooting approach together with fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique and Newton's method. Our computations reveal that fluid temperature has inverse relationship with the thermal relaxation time. Further the fluid velocity is a decreasing function of the fluid relaxation time. A comparison of Fourier's law and the Cattaneo-Christov's law is also presented. Present attempt even in the case of Newtonian fluid is not yet available in the literature. PMID:26325426

  13. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  14. A Two-dimensional finite-element model study of backwater and flow distribution at the I-10 crossing of the Pearl River near Slidell, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.K.; Froelich, D.C.; Gilbert, J.J.; Wiche, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-element surface-water flow modeling system was used to study the effect of Interstate Highway 10 on water-surface elevations and flow distribution during the flood on the Pearl River on April 2, 1980, near Slidell, La. A finite-element network was designed to represent the topography and vegetative cover of the study reach. Hydrographic data collected for the 1980 flood were used to calibrate the flow model. The finite-element network was then modified to represent conditions prior to roadway construction, and the hydraulic impact of I-10 was determined by comparing ' before ' and ' after ' results. Upstream from the roadway, maximum backwater at the west edge of the flood plain (1.5 ft) is greater than maximum backwater at the east edge (1.1 ft). Backwater ranging from 0.6 to 0.2 ft. extends more than a mile downstream from the Pearl River bridge opening in I-10 at the east edge of the flood plain, and drawdown of 0.2 ft. or more occurs along approximately 2 miles of the west edge of the flood plain downstream from I-10. The capability of the modeling system to simulate the significant features of steady-state flow in a complicated multi-channel river-flood-plain system with variable topography and vegetative was successfully demonstrated in this study. (USGS)

  15. Viscoelastic Flow Modelling for Polymer Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Shauvik; Padding, Johan; Peters, Frank; Kuipers, Hans; Multi-scale Modelling of Multi-phase Flows Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymer liquids are used in the oil industry to improve the volumetric sweep and displacement efficiency of oil from a reservoir. Surprisingly, it is not only the viscosity but also the elasticity of the displacing fluid that determine the displacement efficiency. The main aim of our work is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effect of fluid elasticity, by developing an advanced computer simulation methodology for the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media. We simulate a 3D unsteady viscoelastic flow through a converging diverging geometry of realistic pore dimension using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).The primitive variables velocity, pressure and extra stresses are used in the formulation of models. The viscoelastic stress part is formulated using a FENE-P type of constitutive equation, which can predict both shear and elongational stress properties during this flow. A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach using Finite volume method (FVM) with staggered grid has been applied. A novel second order Immersed boundary method (IBM) has been incorporated to mimic porous media. The effect of rheological parameters on flow characteristics has also been studied. The simulations provide an insight into 3D flow asymmetry at higher Deborah numbers. Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry experiments are carried out to obtain further insights. These simulations present, for the first time, a detailed computational study of the effects of fluid elasticity on the imbibition of an oil phase.

  16. Numerical modeling of fluid flow with rafts: An application to lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsepelev, Igor; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Although volcanic lava flows do not significantly affect the life of people, its hazard is not negligible as hot lava kills vegetation, destroys infrastructure, and may trigger a flood due to melting of snow/ice. The lava flow hazard can be reduced if the flow patterns are known, and the complexity of the flow with debris is analyzed to assist in disaster risk mitigation. In this paper we develop three-dimensional numerical models of a gravitational flow of multi-phase fluid with rafts (mimicking rigid lava-crust fragments) on a horizontal and topographic surfaces to explore the dynamics and the interaction of lava flows. We have obtained various flow patterns and spatial distribution of rafts depending on conditions at the surface of fluid spreading, obstacles on the way of a fluid flow, raft landing scenarios, and the size of rafts. Furthermore, we analyze two numerical models related to specific lava flows: (i) a model of fluid flow with rafts inside an inclined channel, and (ii) a model of fluid flow from a single vent on an artificial topography, when the fluid density, its viscosity, and the effusion rate vary with time. Although the studied models do not account for lava solidification, crust formation, and its rupture, the results of the modeling may be used for understanding of flows with breccias before a significant lava cooling.

  17. FLOW STRUCTURE AND TURBULENT DIFFUSION AROUND A THREE-DIMENSIONAL HILL. FLUID MODELING STUDY ON EFFECTS OF STRATIFICATION. PART I. FLOW STRUCTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was initiated with the overall objective of gaining understanding of the flow and diffusion of pollutants in complex terrain under both neutral and stably stratified conditions. This report covers the first phase of the project; it describes the flow structu...

  18. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peng, Zhe; Day, Douglas A.; Ortega, Amber M.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Stark, Harald; Li, Rui; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-06

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D), O(3P), and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling.more » The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to water vapor mixing ratio (H2O) and external OH reactivity (OHRext), as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportionally to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D), O(3P), and O3 have relative contributions to volatile organic compound (VOC) consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. We define “riskier OFR conditions” as those with either low H2O (< 0.1 %) or high OHRext ( ≥  100 s−1 in OFR185 and > 200 s−1 in OFR254). We strongly suggest avoiding such conditions as the importance of non-OH reactants can be substantial for the most sensitive species, although OH may still dominate under some riskier conditions, depending on the species present. Photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm) may play a significant (> 20 %) role in the degradation of some aromatics, as well as some oxidation intermediates, under riskier reactor conditions, if the quantum yields are high. Under riskier conditions, some biogenics can have

  19. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peng, Zhe; Day, Douglas A.; Ortega, Amber M.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Stark, Harald; Li, Rui; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-06

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D), O(3P), and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling.more » The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to water vapor mixing ratio (H2O) and external OH reactivity (OHRext), as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportionally to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D), O(3P), and O3 have relative contributions to volatile organic compound (VOC) consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. We define “riskier OFR conditions” as those with either low H2O (< 0.1%) or high OHRext (≥ 100s–1 in OFR185 and > 200s–1 in OFR254). We strongly suggest avoiding such conditions as the importance of non-OH reactants can be substantial for the most sensitive species, although OH may still dominate under some riskier conditions, depending on the species present. Photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm) may play a significant (> 20%) role in the degradation of some aromatics, as well as some oxidation intermediates, under riskier reactor conditions, if the quantum yields are high. Under riskier conditions, some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3

  20. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhe; Day, Douglas A.; Ortega, Amber M.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Stark, Harald; Li, Rui; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D), O(3P), and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to water vapor mixing ratio (H2O) and external OH reactivity (OHRext), as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportionally to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D), O(3P), and O3 have relative contributions to volatile organic compound (VOC) consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. We define "riskier OFR conditions" as those with either low H2O (< 0.1 %) or high OHRext ( ≥ 100 s-1 in OFR185 and > 200 s-1 in OFR254). We strongly suggest avoiding such conditions as the importance of non-OH reactants can be substantial for the most sensitive species, although OH may still dominate under some riskier conditions, depending on the species present. Photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm) may play a significant (> 20 %) role in the degradation of some aromatics, as well as some oxidation intermediates, under riskier reactor conditions, if the quantum yields are high. Under riskier conditions, some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3, similarly to

  1. Numerical modeling of flow through orifice meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholesiami, M. Z.; Patel, B. R.

    1988-03-01

    Numerical modeling is performed for turbulent flow through orifice meters using Creare's computer program FLUENT. FLUENT solves the time averaged Navier-Stokes equations in 2-D and 3-D Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates. Turbulence is simulated using a two equation k-epsilon or algebraic stress turbulence model. It is shown that an 80 x 60 grid distribution is sufficient to resolve the flow field around the orifice. The variations in discharge coefficient are studied as a result of variation in beta ratio, Reynolds number, upstream and downstream boundary conditions, pipe surface roughness, and upstream swirl. The effects of beta ratio and Reynolds number on the discharge coefficient are shown to be similar to the experimental data. It is also shown that the surface roughness can increase the discharge coefficient by about 0.7 percent for the range of roughness heights encountered in practice. The numerical modeling approach would be most effective if it is combined with a systematic experimental program that can supply the necessary boundary conditions. It is recommended that numerical modeling be used for the study of other flow meters.

  2. Terrestrial Laser Scanning of Lava Flows to Constrain Fracture Models in Geothermal Reservoirs; a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massiot, C.; Garcia-Sélles, D.; Nicol, A., , Prof; Mcnamara, D. D.; Townend, J.; Archibald, G.; Siratovich, P. A.; Villeneuve, M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal reservoirs hosted in volcanic rocks, like the Rotokawa Geothermal Field in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, typically contain fracture networks that control fluid flow. Realistic discrete fracture network (DFN) models have the potential to improve geothermal resource management. However, the spatial distribution and geometries of fracture networks are often poorly understood due to limited data and complex deformation histories including lava emplacement, subsequent burial and faulting.To understand better the distribution of fractures formed during lava emplacement, we study andesitic flow exposures from Mt Ruapehu, at the southern end of the TVZ. Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) acquisition on three 50-200 m2 outcrops provided large 3D point clouds of the shape of the outcrop. Delineation of thousands of individual fractures has been semi-automated using local geometrical constraints and a shape detection algorithm detecting planar and curved surfaces. Fracture orientation, length, area, linear (P10) and areal (P20) densities from the TLS data provide input parameters for the DFN models. Fracture detection is validated using high-resolution panoramic photographs (GigaPan) and manual scanline measurements. Cooling joints are highly connected via sub-horizontal joints that are aligned with vesicular layers. UCS tests show a mechanical anisotropy between vertical and horizontal samples. Most of the cooling joints terminate within or at the brecciated margins of individual flows which contrast mechanically with the massive flow interior. Thus, highly connected and curved fractures are mostly confined to lava flows.This study provides a framework for developing DFNs for geothermal reservoirs hosted in andesitic flows based on empirical observations of intrinsic fracturing and mechanical anisotropies of the host lithology. Fractures in individual lava flows may be interconnected in the reservoir by a combination of cooling joints, subsequent

  3. Development of Nested, Heterogeneous Ground-Water Flow Models for Study of Transport and Fate of Agricultural Chemicals, Merced County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, S. P.; Green, C. T.; Zamora, C.

    2006-05-01

    Multi-scale models of ground-water flow were developed as part of a study of the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the US Geological Survey. Agricultural chemicals of interest included forms of nitrogen and selected pesticides A three- dimensional local-scale model (17 square km) surrounds a well-instrumented, 1-km transect near the Merced River within a principally agricultural land-use setting. This model is nested within a regional-scale model (2,700 square km) of northeastern San Joaquin Valley, California, which provides hydrologically reasonable boundary conditions for the local model. Boundary fluxes were passed from the regional to local model using a hydraulic-conductivity-weighted distribution. The heterogeneity of aquifer materials was incorporated explicitly into the regional and local models. Three-dimensional kriging was used to interpolate sediment texture data from about 3,500 drillers' logs in the regional model area. The resulting distribution of sediment texture was used to estimate hydraulic parameters for each cell in the 16-layer regional model. A subset of these data was used to generate multiple transition-probability-based realizations of hydrofacies distributions for the 110-layer local model. Explicit depiction of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity and porosity in the local model incorporates macro-scale hydrodynamic dispersion into the flow model, allowing more direct comparison of particle-tracking results to tracer-derived estimates of ground-water age. Water levels measured in multi-depth wells along the 1-km transect were used to calibrate the local model (median error 0.12 m). Two-dimensional heat-flow models calibrated using continuous multi-depth temperature data from below the bed of the Merced River suggest an annual range of ground-water inflow of about 0-2.4 cm/d for water year 2005. This estimate compares reasonably well to the 4 cm/d simulated in the

  4. VISCOPLASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR DEBRIS FLOW ROUTING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how a generalized viscoplastic fluid model, which was developed based on non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, can be successfully applied to routing a debris flow down a channel. The one-dimensional dynamic equations developed for unsteady clear-water flow can be used for debris flow routing if the flow parameters, such as the momentum (or energy) correction factor and the resistance coefficient, can be accurately evaluated. The writer's generalized viscoplastic fluid model can be used to express such flow parameters in terms of the rheological parameters for debris flow in wide channels. A preliminary analysis of the theoretical solutions reveals the importance of the flow behavior index and the so-called modified Froude number for uniformly progressive flow in snout profile modeling.

  5. Models for water steam condensing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróblewski, Włodzimierz; Dykas, Sławomir; Chmielniak, Tadeusz

    2012-08-01

    The paper presents a description of selected models dedicated to steam condensing flow modelling. The models are implemented into an in-house computational fluid dynamics code that has been successfully applied to wet steam flow calculation for many years now. All models use the same condensation model that has been validated against the majority of available experimental data. The state equations for vapour and liquid water, the physical model as well as the numerical techniques of solution to flow governing equations have been presented. For the single-fluid model, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for vapour/liquid mixture are solved, whereas the two-fluid model solves separate flow governing equations for the compressible, viscous and turbulent vapour phase and for the compressible and inviscid liquid phase. All described models have been compared with relation to the flow through the Laval nozzle.

  6. Comparison of three rheological models of shear flow behavior studied on blood samples from post-infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska-Gapińska, Anna; Gapinski, Jacek; Elikowski, Waldemar; Jaroszyk, Feliks; Kubisz, Leszek

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of blood viscosity was performed on the basis of mathematical models of non-Newtonian fluid shear flow behavior (Casson, Ree-Eyring and Quemada). A total of 100 blood samples were drawn from clinically stable survivors of myocardial infarction, treated with aspirin or acenocoumarol and controls to these drugs. Whole blood and plasma viscosity were measured at a broad range of shear rates using a rotary-oscillating viscometer Contraves LS40. Numerical analysis of the experimental data was carried out by means of linear (for Casson) and non-linear regression for the remaining models. In the evaluation of the results, both the fit quality and physical interpretation of the models' parameters were considered. The Quemada model fitted most precisely with the experimental findings and, despite the controversies concerning the relationship between in vivo tissue perfusion and in vitro rheological measurements, seemed to be a valuable method enhancing investigation possibilities of cardiovascular patients. Our results suggest that aspirin does not affect blood rheological properties, while acenocoumarol may slightly alter red cell deformability and rouleaux formation. PMID:17674068

  7. A stochastic index flow model of flow duration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellarin, Attilio; Vogel, Richard M.; Brath, Armando

    2004-03-01

    Annual flow duration curves (AFDCs) are used increasingly because unlike traditional period of record flow duration curves (FDCs), they provide confidence intervals for the median AFDC, they enable one to assign return periods to individual AFDCs, and they offer opportunities for developing a generalized stochastic model of daily streamflow. Previous stochastic models of FDCs and AFDCs were unable to reproduce the variance of AFDCs. We introduce an index flow approach to modeling the relationship between an FDC and AFDCs of daily streamflow series, which is able to reproduce the FDC, as well as the mean, median, and variance of the AFDCs without resorting to assumptions regarding the seasonal or persistence structure of daily streamflow series. Our approach offers additional opportunities for the regionalization of flow duration curves and for the generation of time series of daily streamflows at ungauged sites. Our approach is tested on three river basins in eastern central Italy.

  8. Study of modeling unsteady blade row interaction in a transonic compressor stage part 2: influence of deterministic correlations on time-averaged flow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang-Wei; Liu, Bao-Jie; Lu, Li-Peng

    2012-04-01

    The average-passage equation system (APES) provides a rigorous mathematical framework for accounting for the unsteady blade row interaction through multistage compressors in steady state environment by introducing deterministic correlations (DC) that need to be modeled to close the equation system. The primary purpose of this study was to provide insight into the DC characteristics and the influence of DC on the time-averaged flow field of the APES. In Part 2 of this two-part paper, the influence of DC on the time-averaged flow field was systematically studied. Several time-averaging computations were conducted with various boundary conditions and DC for the downstream stator in a transonic compressor stage, by employing the CFD solver developed in Part 1 of this two-part paper. These results were compared with the time-averaged unsteady flow field and the steady one. The study indicated that the circumferential-averaged DC can take into account major part of the unsteady effects on spanwise redistribution of flow fields in compressors. Furthermore, it demonstrated that both deterministic stresses and deterministic enthalpy fluxes are necessary to reproduce the time-averaged flow field.

  9. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being

  10. Flow-visualization study of the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack using a 1/48-scale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Stacey J.; Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1994-01-01

    A water-tunnel study on a 1/48-scale model of the X-29A aircraft was performed at the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. The water-tunnel test enhanced the results of the X-29A flight tests by providing flow-visualization data for comparison and insights into the aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft. The model was placed in the water tunnel at angles of attack of 20 to 55 deg. and with angles of sideslip from 0 to 5 deg. In general, flow-visualization techniques provided useful information on vortex formation, separation, and breakdown and their role in yaw asymmetries and tail buffeting. Asymmetric forebody vortices were observed at angles of attack greater than 30 deg. with 0 deg. sideslip and greater than 20 deg. with 5 deg. sideslip. While the asymmetric flows observed in the water tunnel did not agree fully with the flight data, they did show some of the same trends. In addition, the flow visualization indicated that the interaction of forebody vortices and the wing wake at angles of attack between 20 and 35 deg. may cause vertical-tail buffeting observed in flight.

  11. Modeling of heavy nitrate corrosion in anaerobe aquifer injection water biofilm: a case study in a flow rig.

    PubMed

    Drønen, Karine; Roalkvam, Irene; Beeder, Janiche; Torsvik, Terje; Steen, Ida H; Skauge, Arne; Liengen, Turid

    2014-01-01

    Heavy carbon steel corrosion developed during nitrate mitigation of a flow rig connected to a water injection pipeline flowing anaerobe saline aquifer water. Genera-specific QPCR primers quantified 74% of the microbial biofilm community, and further 87% of the community of the nonamended parallel rig. The nonamended biofilm hosted 6.3 × 10(6) SRB cells/cm(2) and the S(35)-sulfate-reduction rate was 1.1 μmol SO4(2-)/cm(2)/day, being congruent with the estimated SRB biomass formation and the sulfate areal flux. Nitrate amendment caused an 18-fold smaller SRB population, but up to 44 times higher sulfate reduction rates. This H2S formation was insufficient to form the observed Fe3S4 layer. Additional H2S was provided by microbial disproportionation of sulfur, also explaining the increased accessibility of sulfate. The reduced nitrate specie nitrite inhibited the dominating H2-scavenging Desulfovibrio population, and sustained the formation of polysulfide and Fe3S4, herby also dissolved sulfur. This terminated the availability of acetate in the inner biofilm and caused cell starvation that initiated growth upon metallic electrons, probably by the sulfur-reducing Desulfuromonas population. On the basis of these observations we propose a model of heavy nitrate corrosion where three microbiological processes of nitrate reduction, disproportionation of sulfur, and metallic electron growth are nicely woven into each other. PMID:25020005

  12. Cerebral aneurysms treated with flow-diverting stents: Computational models using intravascular blood flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Michael R; McGah, Patrick M; Aliseda, Alberto; Mourad, Pierre D; Nerva, John D; Vaidya, Sandeep S; Morton, Ryan P; Ghodke, Basavaraj V; Kim, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Computational fluid dynamics modeling is useful in the study of the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms, but patient-specific measurements of boundary conditions, such as blood flow velocity and pressure, have not been previously applied to the study of flow-diverting stents. We integrated patient-specific intravascular blood flow velocity and pressure measurements into computational models of aneurysms before and after treatment with flow-diverting stents to determine stent effects on aneurysm hemodynamics. Methods Blood flow velocity and pressure were measured in peri-aneurysmal locations using an intravascular dual-sensor pressure and Doppler velocity guidewire before and after flow-diverting stent treatment of four unruptured cerebral aneurysms. These measurements defined inflow and outflow boundary conditions for computational models. Intra-aneurysmal flow rates, wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient were calculated. Results Measurements of inflow velocity and outflow pressure were successful in all four patients. Computational models incorporating these measurements demonstrated significant reductions in intra-aneurysmal wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient, and a trend in reduced intra-aneurysmal blood flow. Conclusions Integration of intravascular dual-sensor guidewire measurements of blood flow velocity and blood pressure provided patient-specific computational models of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysm treatment with flow-diverting stents reduces blood flow and hemodynamic shear stress in the aneurysm dome. PMID:23868162

  13. A study of thin liquid sheet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Calfo, Frederick D.; Mcconley, Marc W.; Mcmaster, Matthew S.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    1993-01-01

    This study was a theoretical and experimental investigation of thin liquid sheet flows in vacuum. A sheet flow created by a narrow slit of width, W, coalesces to a point at a distance, L, as a result of surface tension forces acting at the sheet edges. As the flow coalesces, the fluid accumulates in the sheet edges. The observed triangular shape of the sheet agrees with the calculated triangular result. Experimental results for L/W as a function of Weber number, We, agree with the calculated result, L/W = the sq. root of 8We. The edge cross sectional shape is found to oscillate from elliptic to 'cigar' like to 'peanut' like and then back to elliptic in the flow direction. A theoretical one-dimensional model was developed that yielded only elliptic solutions for the edge cross section. At the points where the elliptic shapes occur, there is agreement between theory and experiment.

  14. Performance of a 10-kJ SMES model cooled by liquid hydrogen thermo-siphon flow for ASPCS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makida, Y.; Shintomi, T.; Hamajima, T.; Ota, N.; Katsura, M.; Ando, K.; Takao, T.; Tsuda, M.; Miyagi, D.; Tsujigami, H.; Fujikawa, S.; Hirose, J.; Iwaki, K.; Komagome, T.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new electrical power storage and stabilization system, called an Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), which consists of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and hydrogen energy storage, converged on a liquid hydrogen station for fuel cell vehicles. A small 10- kJ SMES system, in which a BSCCO coil cooled by liquid hydrogen was installed, was developed to create an experimental model of an ASPCS. The SMES coil is conductively cooled by liquid hydrogen flow through a thermo-siphon line under a liquid hydrogen buffer tank. After fabrication of the system, cooldown tests were carried out using liquid hydrogen. The SMES coil was successfully charged up to a nominal current of 200 A. An eddy current loss, which was mainly induced in pure aluminum plates pasted onto each pancake coils for conduction cooling, was also measured.

  15. A superstatistical model of vehicular traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosun, Caglar; Ozdemir, Serhan

    2016-02-01

    In the analysis of vehicular traffic flow, a myriad of techniques have been implemented. In this study, superstatistics is used in modeling the traffic flow on a highway segment. Traffic variables such as vehicular speeds, volume, and headway were collected for three days. For the superstatistical approach, at least two distinct time scales must exist, so that a superposition of nonequilibrium systems assumption could hold. When the slow dynamics of the vehicle speeds exhibit a Gaussian distribution in between the fluctuations of the system at large, one speaks of a relaxation to a local equilibrium. These Gaussian distributions are found with corresponding standard deviations 1 /√{ β }. This translates into a series of fluctuating beta values, hence the statistics of statistics, superstatistics. The traffic flow model has generated an inverse temperature parameter (beta) distribution as well as the speed distribution. This beta distribution has shown that the fluctuations in beta are distributed with respect to a chi-square distribution. It must be mentioned that two distinct Tsallis q values are specified: one is time-dependent and the other is independent. A ramification of these q values is that the highway segment and the traffic flow generate separate characteristics. This highway segment in question is not only nonadditive in nature, but a nonequilibrium driven system, with frequent relaxations to a Gaussian.

  16. Modelling flow to leachate wells in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Thani, A.A.; Beaven, R.P.; White, J.K

    2004-07-01

    Vertical wells are frequently used as a means of controlling leachate levels in landfills. They are often the only available dewatering option for both old landfills without any basal leachate collection layer and for newer sites where the installed drainage infrastructure has failed. When the well is pumped, a seepage face develops at the entry into the well so that the drawdown in the surrounding waste will not be as great as might be expected. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW-SURFACT, which contains the functionality to model seepage surfaces, has been used to investigate the transient dewatering of a landfill. The study concludes that the position of the seepage face and information about the characteristics of the induced seepage flow field are important and should not be neglected when designing wells in landfills.

  17. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jin

    2007-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the

  18. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. II. Experimental model studies with the radial-flow detachment assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenburger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface are crucial for understanding the role of certain key parameters in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. Here, we use the probabilistic attachment and detachment models developed in the preceding paper to interpret transient data from well-defined experiments. These data are obtained with a simple model cell system that consists of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) and a Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA) using a ligand-coated glass disc. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine transient behavior with particles that possess fairly uniform properties that can be varied systematically, and the RFDA is designed for direct observation of adhesion to the ligand-coated glass surface over a range of shear stresses. Our experiments focus on the effects of surface shear stress, receptor density, and ligand density. These data provide a crucial test of the probabilistic framework. We show that these data can be explained with the probabilistic analyses, whereas they cannot be readily interpreted on the basis of a deterministic analysis. In addition, we examine transient data on cell adhesion reported from other assays, demonstrating the consistency of these data with the predictions of the probabilistic models. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2174272

  19. Numerical modeling of pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sonu S; Frankel, Steven H

    2003-08-01

    Pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels has been numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation approach. The commercially available computational fluid dynamics code (CFD), FLUENT, has been used for these studies. Two different experiments were modeled involving pulsatile flow through axisymmetric stenoses. Four different turbulence models were employed to study their influence on the results. It was found that the low Reynolds number k-omega turbulence model was in much better agreement with previous experimental measurements than both the low and high Reynolds number versions of the RNG (renormalization-group theory) k-epsilon turbulence model and the standard k-epsilon model, with regard to predicting the mean flow distal to the stenosis including aspects of the vortex shedding process and the turbulent flow field. All models predicted a wall shear stress peak at the throat of the stenosis with minimum values observed distal to the stenosis where flow separation occurred. PMID:12968569

  20. Modeling and interpretation of two-phase flow and tracer studies from a subbituminous coal seam in the San Juan basin of New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, H.E.; Travis, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Field and modeling studies were performed to characterize two-phase flow within the natural cleat structure of an upper Cretaceous subbituminous coal seam. A two borehole pattern with open completion was used in a study of dewatering and tracer residence time distribution. Air was pumped into a five meter thick seam located about 170 meters below the surface. Krypton 85 was used as the airborne tracer. Air inflow and air and water production rates and tracer arrival times were monitored. The field tests were simulated with a two-phase, three component, porous flow code. Results showed that the air inflow and air and water outflow rates and breakthrough times could not be modeled assuming a uniform darcy-type permeability. The use of a pressure dependent permeability did provide, however, a much better match with the field data.

  1. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  2. Swan falls instream flow study

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, D.R.; Cummings, T.R.; Ecklund, A.E.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of the Swan Falls Instream Flow Study was to define the relationship between streamflows and instream habitat for resident fish species and to assess the relative impact of several different hydrographs on resident fish habitat. Specific objectives included the following: (1) Conduct a literature search to compile life history, distribution, and habitat requirements for species of interest. Physical and hydrologic characteristics of the Snake River were also compiled. (2) Determine physical habitat versus discharge relationships and conduct habitat time series analysis for each species/lifestage using the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (3) Examine the impacts on resident fish habitat of proposed hydrographs, including Swan Falls Agreement flows, relative to current conditions. (4) Characterize water quality conditions, including water temperature and dissolved oxygen, in the vicinity of the study area and determine the implications of those conditions for the resident species of interest. (5) Determine streamflows necessary to protect and maintain resident fish habitat in the study area.

  3. Can we simulate regional groundwater flow in a karst system using equivalent porous media models? Case study, Barton Springs Edwards aquifer, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Mace, Robert E.; Barrett, Michael E.; Smith, Brian

    2003-05-01

    Various approaches can be used to simulate groundwater flow in karst systems, including equivalent porous media distributed parameter, lumped parameter, and dual porosity approaches, as well as discrete fracture or conduit approaches. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two different equivalent porous media approaches: lumped and distributed parameter, for simulating regional groundwater flow in a karst aquifer and to evaluate the adequacy of these approaches. The models were applied to the Barton Springs Edwards aquifer, Texas. Unique aspects of this study include availability of detailed information on recharge from stream-loss studies and on synoptic water levels, long-term continuous water level monitoring in wells throughout the aquifer, and spring discharge data to compare with simulation results. The MODFLOW code was used for the distributed parameter model. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity distribution was optimized by using a combination of trial and error and automated inverse methods. The lumped parameter model consists of five cells representing each of the watersheds contributing recharge to the aquifer. Transient simulations were conducted using both distributed and lumped parameter models for a 10-yr period (1989-1998). Both distributed and lumped parameter models fairly accurately simulated the temporal variability in spring discharge; therefore, if the objective of the model is to simulate spring discharge, either distributed or lumped parameter approaches can be used. The distributed parameter model generally reproduced the potentiometric surface at different times. The impact of the amount of pumping on a regional scale on spring discharge can be evaluated using a lumped parameter model; however, more detailed evaluation of the effect of pumping on groundwater levels and spring discharge requires a distributed parameter modeling approach. Sensitivity analyses indicated that spring discharge was much more sensitive to variations in

  4. Performance testing of the Silo Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, S.P.; O`Connor, D.; Gould, A.F.

    1994-12-31

    Several instruments are commercially available for on-line analysis of coal properties such as total moisture, ash, sulfur, and mineral matter content. These instruments have found use in coal cleaning and coal-fired utility applications. However, in many instances, the coal is stored in large bunkers or silos after on-line analysis, making the data gathered from on-line analysis a poor predictor of short-term coal quality due to the flow pattern and mixing within the silo. A computerized model, the Silo Flow Model, has been developed to model the flow of coal through a silo or bunker thus providing a prediction of the output coal quality based on on-line measurements of the quality of coal entering the silo. A test procedure was developed and demonstrated to test the performance of the Silo Flow Model. The testing was performed using controlled addition of silver nitrate to the coal, in conjunction with surface profile measurements using an array of ultrasonic gauges and data acquired from plant instrumentation. Results obtained from initial testing provided estimates of flow-related parameters used in the Silo flow Model. Similar test techniques are also used to compare predicted and actual silver content at the silo outlet as a measure of model performance. This paper describes test procedures used to validate the Silo Flow Model, the testing program, and the results obtained to data. The Silo Flow Model performance is discussed and compared against other modeling approaches.

  5. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  6. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  7. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-02-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  8. Guidelines for Evaluating Ground-Water Flow Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-water flow modeling is an important tool frequently used in studies of ground-water systems. Reviewers and users of these studies have a need to evaluate the accuracy or reasonableness of the ground-water flow model. This report provides some guidelines and discussion on how to evaluate complex ground-water flow models used in the investigation of ground-water systems. A consistent thread throughout these guidelines is that the objectives of the study must be specified to allow the adequacy of the model to be evaluated.

  9. A compressible Navier-Stokes code for turbulent flow modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    An implicit, finite volume code for solving two dimensional, compressible turbulent flows is described. Second order upwind differencing of the inviscid terms of the equations is used to enhance stability and accuracy. A diagonal form of the implicit algorithm is used to improve efficiency. Several zero and two equation turbulence models are incorporated to study their impact on overall flow modeling accuracy. Applications to external and internal flows are discussed.

  10. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  11. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-01-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  12. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-08-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  13. Mathematical and computational models of plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinsky, K. V.

    Investigations of plasma flows are of interest, firstly, due to numerous applications, and secondly, because of their general principles, which form a special branch of physics: the plasma dynamics. Numerical simulation and computation, together with theoretic and experimental methods, play an important part in these investigations. Speaking on flows, a relatively dense plasma is mentioned, so its mathematical models appertain to the fluid mechanics, i.e., they are based on the magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma. Time dependent two dimensional models of plasma flows of two wide-spread types are considered: the flows across the magnetic field and those in the magnetic field plane.

  14. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3  MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Das, A. K.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-01-15

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50 kW DC power and 3 MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications.

  15. Numerical modelling of the flow in the resin infusion process on the REV scale: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, M.; Jambhekar, V. A.; Gersborg, A. R.; Spangenberg, J.; Hattel, J. H.; Helmig, R.

    2016-06-01

    The resin infusion process (RIP) has developed as a low cost method for manufacturing large fibre reinforced plastic parts. However, the process still presents some challenges to industry with regards to reliability and repeatability, resulting in expensive and inefficient trial and error development. In this paper, we show the implementation of 2D numerical models for the RIP using the open source simulator DuMuX. The idea of this study is to present a model which accounts for the interfacial forces coming from the capillary pressure on the so-called representative elementary volume (REV) scale. The model is described in detail and three different test cases — a constant and a tensorial permeability as well as a preform/Balsa domain — are investigated. The results show that the developed model is very applicable for the RIP for manufacturing of composite parts. The idea behind this study is to test the developed model for later use in a real application, in which the preform medium has numerous layers with different material properties.

  16. Analytical models for complex swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, A.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    We develops a new class of analytical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for swirling flows, and suggests ways to predict and control such flows occurring in various technological applications. We view momentum accumulation on the axis as a key feature of swirling flows and consider vortex-sink flows on curved axisymmetric surfaces with an axial flow. We show that these solutions model swirling flows in a cylindrical can, whirlpools, tornadoes, and cosmic swirling jets. The singularity of these solutions on the flow axis is removed by matching them with near-axis Schlichting and Long's swirling jets. The matched solutions model flows with very complex patterns, consisting of up to seven separation regions with recirculatory 'bubbles' and vortex rings. We apply the matched solutions for computing flows in the Ranque-Hilsch tube, in the meniscus of electrosprays, in vortex breakdown, and in an industrial vortex burner. The simple analytical solutions allow a clear understanding of how different control parameters affect the flow and guide selection of optimal parameter values for desired flow features. These solutions permit extension to other problems (such as heat transfer and chemical reaction) and have the potential of being significantly useful for further detailed investigation by direct or large-eddy numerical simulations as well as laboratory experimentation.

  17. Third-moment closure of turbulence for predictions of separating and reattaching shear flows: A study of Reynolds-stress closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.; Goel, P.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study of computations in backward-facing steps with flow separation and reattachment, using the Reynolds stress closure is presented. The highlight of this study is the improvement of the Reynold-stress model (RSM) by modifying the diffusive transport of the Reynolds stresses through the formulation, solution and subsequent incorporation of the transport equations of the third moments, bar-u(i)u(j)u(k), into the turbulence model. The diffusive transport of the Reynolds stresses, represented by the gradients of the third moments, attains greater significance in recirculating flows. The third moments evaluated by the development and solution of the complete transport equations are superior to those obtained by existing algebraic correlations. A low-Reynolds number model for the transport equations of the third moments is developed and considerable improvement in the near-wall profiles of the third moments is observed. The values of the empirical constants utilized in the development of the model are recommended. The Reynolds-stress closure is consolidated by incorporating the equations of k and e, containing the modified diffusion coefficients, and the transport equations of the third moments into the Reynolds stress equations. Computational results obtained by the original k-e model, the original RSM and the consolidated and modified RSM are compared with experimental data. Overall improvement in the predictions is seen by consolidation of the RMS and a marked improvement in the profiles of bar-u(i)u(j)u(k) is obtained around the reattachment region.

  18. Analysis of multicomopnent groundwater flow in karst aquifer by CFC, tritium, tracer test and modelling, case study at Skaistkalnes vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikshe, Janis; Babre, Alise; Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater in karst environments tends to have difficulties to distinguish multiple flows if several sources of water are present. Skaistkalne vicinity faces with such situation where old groundwater, fresh groundwater and inflow from river Iecava occurs. Attempts were made to distinguish groundwater residence time of multiple components of water applying CFC and tritium dating techniques supplied by tracer test and numerical model of study area. Study area covers territory between two rivers Iecava and Memele with water level difference of 7 meters and horizontal distance of 2.2 kilometres between both. Study area consists of karst affected Devonian gypsum and carbonaceous rocks covered by Quaternary low to high permeable deposits. Confined groundwater at depth of 10-25 meters where analysed by CFC's and tritium. At this depth groundwater exhibits anoxic reducing environment that has caused degradation of CFC's at similar degree in all samples. Taking it into account, mean residence time based on CFC piston flow model is 22 - 42 years and 28 - 34 years based on binary mixing model. Tritium results show signs of incensement of groundwater residence time towards discharge area. CFC combined with tritium proved increased vertical velocity in middle part between the rivers likely caused by hydrogeological window in Quaternary deposits created by karst processes. Numerical model (Delina et al. 2012) was applied and calculations yielded groundwater flow velocity rate at 0.3 - 1 m/day in area between the rivers. Investigation of CFC data resulted in possible groundwater flow rate of at a minimum of 0.2 m/day although it's not applicable to all sampled wells due to specific hydrogeological conditions. Tracer test was made between the rivers in order to distinguish main water flow paths and flow velocity. Results showed that very high permeable conduits connect rivers and karst lakes with velocity rates of 800 - 1300 m/day. Complex investigation leads to conclude that

  19. SRMAFTE facility checkout model flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Equipment (SRMAFTE) facility was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the internal propellant, insulation, and nozzle configurations of solid propellant rocket motor designs. This makes the characterization of the facility internal flow field very important in assuring that no facility induced flow field features exist which would corrupt the model related measurements. In order to verify the design and operation of the facility, a three-dimensional computational flow field analysis was performed on the facility checkout model setup. The checkout model measurement data, one-dimensional and three-dimensional estimates were compared, and the design and proper operation of the facility was verified. The proper operation of the metering nozzles, adapter chamber transition, model nozzle, and diffuser were verified. The one-dimensional and three-dimensional flow field estimates along with the available measurement data are compared.

  20. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matt; Zachara, John M

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions. PMID:21216023

  1. Study of argon–oxygen flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon–oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon–oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  2. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  3. Prospects of Elliptic Flow Studies at NICA/MPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraksiev, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    As a key observable, anisotropic flow presents a unique insight into heavy ion collision physics. The presented poster reveals the prospects of studying elliptic flow at the NICA/MPD facility through the UrQMD model. Here, results for the elliptic flow of simulated and reconstructed hadrons at the planned NICA energy range are presented.

  4. Interfacial shear modeling and flow predictions for internal film condesation flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Internal flow of pure vapor experiencing film condesation on the walls of a straight duct is studied. The commonly occuring case of turbulent (or laminar) vapor flow in the core and laminar flow of the liquid condensate-with or without waves on the interface-is emphasized. We propose and implement a new first principle methodolgy which model interfacial shear with the help of reliable experimental data on heat transfer rates. Other details of the flow are predicted with the help of this model. These predictions are shown to be in agreement with relevant experimental data. Correlations for film thickness and heat transfer rates are also given.

  5. Vortex dynamics studies in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergine, Fabrizio

    This dissertation covers the study of selected vortex interaction scenarios both in cold and high enthalpy reacting flows. Specifically, the experimental results and the analysis of the flowfields resulting from two selected supersonic vortex interaction modes in a Mach 2.5 cold flow are presented. Additionally, the experiment design, based on vortex dynamics concepts, and the reacting plume survey of two pylon injectors in a Mach 2.4 high enthalpy flow are shown. All the cold flow experiments were conducted in the supersonic wind tunnel of the Aerodynamics Research Center at the University of Texas at Arlington. A strut injector equipped with specified ramp configurations was designed and used to produce the flowfields of interest. The reacting flow experiments were conducted in the the Expansion Tube Facility located in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory of Stanford University. A detailed description of the supersonic wind tunnel, the instrumentation, the strut injector and the supersonic wake flow downstream is shown as part of the characterization of the facility. As Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry was the principal flow measurement technique used in this work to probe the streamwise vortices shed from ramps mounted on the strut, this dissertation provides a deep overview of the challenges and the application of the aforementioned technique to the survey of vortical flows. Moreover, the dissertation provides the comprehensive analysis of the mean and fluctuating velocity flowfields associated with two distinct vortex dynamics scenarios, as chosen by means of the outcomes of the simulations of a reduced order model developed in the research group. Specifically, the same streamwise vortices (strength, size and Reynolds number) were used experimentally to investigate both a case in which the resulting dynamics evolve in a vortex merging scenario and a case where the merging process is voluntarily avoided in order to focus the analysis on the

  6. Modeling the effects of urban expansion on natural capital stocks and ecosystem service flows: A case study in the Puget Sound, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zank, Ben; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Voigt, Brian; Villa, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Urban expansion and its associated landscape modifications are important drivers of changes in ecosystem service (ES). This study examined the effects of two alternative land use-change development scenarios in the Puget Sound region of Washington State on natural capital stocks and ES flows. Land-use change model outputs served as inputs to five ES models developed using the Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) platform. While natural capital stocks declined under managed (1.3–5.8%) and unmanaged (2.8–11.8%) development scenarios, ES flows increased by 18.5–56% and 23.2–55.7%, respectively. Human development of natural landscapes reduced their capacity for service provision, while simultaneously adding beneficiaries, particularly along the urban fringe. Using global and local Moran’s I, we identified three distinct patterns of change in ES due to projected landuse change. For services with location-dependent beneficiaries – open space proximity, viewsheds, and flood regulation – urbanization led to increased clustering and hot-spot intensities. ES flows were greatest in the managed land-use change scenario for open space proximity and flood regulation, and in the unmanaged land-use change scenario for viewsheds—a consequence of the differing ES flow mechanisms underpinning these services. We observed a third pattern – general declines in service provision – for carbon storage and sediment retention, where beneficiaries in our analysis were not location dependent. Contrary to past authors’ finding of ES declines under urbanization, a more nuanced analysis that maps and quantifies ES provision, beneficiaries, and flows better identifies gains and losses for specific ES beneficiaries as urban areas expand.

  7. New flow model for the triple media carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Renshi; Meng, Yingfeng; Yang, Zhaozhong; Guo, Jianchun; Jia, Yonglu

    2011-02-01

    A new flow model in triple media carbonate reservoir is established. There exists a triple total system including the matrix, fracture and vug subsystem, and the three subsystems are relatively independent in physical properties; in the process of oil flow, the inter-porosity flow of the vug subsystem to fracture subsystem would occur and the inter-porosity flow of the matrix subsystem to fracture subsystem would also occur and ignore the inter-porosity flow between the matrix subsystem and vug subsystem. Compared with the traditional model (the inter-porosity flow of vug to fracture is pseudo-steady), the new model considers the unsteady inter-porosity flow, based on the hypothesis that the shape of vug is spherical. The new model is illustrated and solved, and the standard type curves are drawn up, so the process and characteristics of flow are analysed thoroughly, and it is found that the new-style type curves in shape and characteristics are evidently different from the type curves of traditional model. The research would not only deepen the understanding of flow law but also enrich the theoretical models for carbonate reservoir. The research results on this new model could be applied to a real case study.

  8. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-01

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  9. Modeling soil detachment capacity by rill flow using hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongdong; Wang, Zhanli; Shen, Nan; Chen, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between soil detachment capacity (Dc) by rill flow and hydraulic parameters (e.g., flow velocity, shear stress, unit stream power, stream power, and unit energy) at low flow rates is investigated to establish an accurate experimental model. Experiments are conducted using a 4 × 0.1 m rill hydraulic flume with a constant artificial roughness on the flume bed. The flow rates range from 0.22 × 10-3 m2 s-1 to 0.67 × 10-3 m2 s-1, and the slope gradients vary from 15.8% to 38.4%. Regression analysis indicates that the Dc by rill flow can be predicted using the linear equations of flow velocity, stream power, unit stream power, and unit energy. Dc by rill flow that is fitted to shear stress can be predicted with a power function equation. Predictions based on flow velocity, unit energy, and stream power are powerful, but those based on shear stress, especially on unit stream power, are relatively poor. The prediction based on flow velocity provides the best estimates of Dc by rill flow because of the simplicity and availability of its measurements. Owing to error in measuring flow velocity at low flow rates, the predictive abilities of Dc by rill flow using all hydraulic parameters are relatively lower in this study compared with the results of previous research. The measuring accuracy of experiments for flow velocity should be improved in future research.

  10. A study of the rotor wake of a small-scale rotor model in forward flight using laser light sheet flow visualization with comparisons to analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghee, Terence A.; Elliott, Joe W.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the 14 by 22 ft subsonic tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center to quantify the rotor wake behind a scale model helicopter rotor in forward flight (mu = 0.15 and 0.23) at one thrust level (C sub T = 0.0064). The rotor system used in the present test consisted of a four-bladed, fully articulated hub and utilized blades of rectangular planform with a NACA-0012 airfoil section. A laser light sheet, seeded with propylene glycol smoke, was used to visualize the flow in planes parallel and perpendicular to the freestream flow. Quantitative measurements of vortex location, vertical skew angle, and vortex particle void radius were obtained for vortices in the flow; convective velocities were obtained for blade tip vortices. Comparisons were made between the experimental results and the wake geometry generated by computational predictions. The results of these comparisons show that the interaction between wake vortex structures is an important consideration for correctly predicting the wake geometry.

  11. Improved regional groundwater flow modeling using drainage features: a case study of the central northern karst aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid Y.; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2016-04-01

    In northern Puerto Rico (USA), subsurface conduit networks with unknown characteristics, and surface features such as springs, rivers, lagoons and wetlands, drain the coastal karst aquifers. In this study, drain lines connecting sinkholes and springs are used to improve the developed regional model by simulating the drainage effects of conduit networks. Implemented in an equivalent porous media (EPM) approach, the model with drains is able to roughly reproduce the spring discharge hydrographs in response to rainfall. Hydraulic conductivities are found to be scale dependent and significantly increase with higher test radius, indicating scale dependency of the EPM approach. Similar to other karst regions in the world, hydraulic gradients are steeper where the transmissivity is lower approaching the coastline. This study enhances current understanding of the complex flow patterns in karst aquifers and suggests that using a drainage feature improves modeling results where available data on conduit characteristics are minimal.

  12. Modeling information flow in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo-Ah; Przytycki, Jozef H.; Wuchty, Stefan; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2011-06-01

    Large-scale molecular interaction networks are being increasingly used to provide a system level view of cellular processes. Modeling communications between nodes in such huge networks as information flows is useful for dissecting dynamical dependences between individual network components. In the information flow model, individual nodes are assumed to communicate with each other by propagating the signals through intermediate nodes in the network. In this paper, we first provide an overview of the state of the art of research in the network analysis based on information flow models. In the second part, we describe our computational method underlying our recent work on discovering dysregulated pathways in glioma. Motivated by applications to inferring information flow from genotype to phenotype in a very large human interaction network, we generalized previous approaches to compute information flows for a large number of instances and also provided a formal proof for the method.

  13. Numerical Study of Tip Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer; Hafez, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and summary of the many different research work related to tip vortex flows and wake/trailing vortices as applied to practical engineering problems. As a literature survey paper, it outlines relevant analytical, theoretical, experimental and computational study found in literature. It also discusses in brief some of the fundamental aspects of the physics and its complexities. An appendix is also included. The topics included in this paper are: 1) Analytical Vortices; 2) Experimental Studies; 3) Computational Studies; 4) Wake Vortex Control and Management; 5) Wake Modeling; 6) High-Lift Systems; 7) Issues in Numerical Studies; 8) Instabilities; 9) Related Topics; 10) Visualization Tools for Vertical Flows; 11) Further Work Needed; 12) Acknowledgements; 13) References; and 14) Appendix.

  14. Performance study of a data flow architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, George

    1985-01-01

    Teams of scientists studied data flow concepts, static data flow machine architecture, and the VAL language. Each team mapped its application onto the machine and coded it in VAL. The principal findings of the study were: (1) Five of the seven applications used the full power of the target machine. The galactic simulation and multigrid fluid flow teams found that a significantly smaller version of the machine (16 processing elements) would suffice. (2) A number of machine design parameters including processing element (PE) function unit numbers, array memory size and bandwidth, and routing network capability were found to be crucial for optimal machine performance. (3) The study participants readily acquired VAL programming skills. (4) Participants learned that application-based performance evaluation is a sound method of evaluating new computer architectures, even those that are not fully specified. During the course of the study, participants developed models for using computers to solve numerical problems and for evaluating new architectures. These models form the bases for future evaluation studies.

  15. Nonlinear Reynolds stress model for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. Michael; Rubinstein, R.; Kirtley, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear algebraic Reynolds stress model, derived using the renormalization group, is applied to equilibrium homogeneous shear flow and fully developed flow in a square duct. The model, which is quadratically nonlinear in the velocity gradients, successfully captures the large-scale inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the flows studied. The ratios of normal stresses, as well as the actual magnitudes of the stresses are correctly predicted for equilibrium homogeneous shear flow. Reynolds normal stress anisotropy and attendant turbulence driven secondary flow are predicted for a square duct. Profiles of mean velocity and normal stresses are in good agreement with measurements. Very close to walls, agreement with measurements diminishes. The model has the benefit of containing no arbitrary constants; all values are determined directly from the theory. It seems that near wall behavior is influenced by more than the large scale anisotropy accommodated in the current model. More accurate near wall calculations may well require a model for anisotropic dissipation.

  16. Flow model of Saginaw River near Saginaw, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.

    1981-01-01

    An unsteady-flow simulation model was applied to a 19.5-mile reach of Saginaw River. The model provides a method of determining instantaneous discharge for flows from -8,000 to 12 ,000 cubic feet per second. The currently used slope-rating method can be utilized to compute discharge only under steady and high-flow conditions. Unsteady flow frequently occurs in the Saginaw River as a result of lake seiching. Model computations are based on solution of the continuity and momentum flow equations, on hydraulic characteristics of Saginaw River, and on time-dependent boundary conditions. An implicit, finite-difference technique is used to solve the one-dimensional flow equations. Channel storage and conveyance characteristics were obtained from data collected during a 1979 field survey and through model calibration. Boundary conditions are specified by stage or discharge data at the model extremities. Optionally, wind velocity data are incorporated in the flow simulations. The model can simulate instantaneous stage and discharge data and summarize or plot the data. Simulations of low-flows are sensitive to small errors in stage data and to gentle breezes. Simulation of high flows for present channel conditions requires additional data and further study. (USGS)

  17. Compressor Flow Control Concepts. 2; UEET Compressor Flow Control Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2001-01-01

    Several passive flow control devices have been modeled computationally in the Swift CFD code. The models were applied to the first stage rotor and stator of the baseline UEET compressor in an attempt to improve efficiency and/or stall margin. The devices included suction surface bleed, tip injection, self-aspirated rotors, area-ruled casing, and vortex generators. The models and computed results will be described in the presentation. None of the results have shown significant gains in efficiency; however, casing vortex generators have shown potential improvements in stall margin.

  18. [Improvement of municipal sewage sludge dewaterability by bioleaching: a pilot-scale study with a continuous plug flow reaction model].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fen-Wu; Zhou, Li-Xiang; Zhou, Jun; Jiang, Feng

    2011-10-01

    A plug-flow bio-reactor of 700 L working volume for sludge bioleaching was used in this study. The reactor was operationally divided into six sections along the direction of the sludge movement. Ten duration of continuous operation of sludge bioleaching with Acidibacillus spp. and 1.2 m3 x h(-1) aeration amount was conducted. In this system, sludge retention time was 2.5 d, and the added amount of microbial nutritional substance was 4 g x L(-1). During sludge bioleaching, the dynamic changes of pH, dewaterability (specific resistance to filtration, SRF) of sewage sludge in different sections, the moisture content and moisture evaporation rate of dewatered bioleached sludge cake obtained by chamber filter press were investigated. The results showed that the SRF of sludge significantly decreased from initial 1.50 x 10(13) m x kg(-1) to the final 0.34 x 10(13) m x kg(-1). The wasted bioleached sludge was collected and dewatered by chamber filter press under the following pressures as 0.3 MPa for 4 h (2 h for feeding sludge, 2 h for holding pressure), 3 h (1.5 h for feeding sludge, 1.5 h for holding pressure), 2 h (1 h for feeding sludge, 1 h for holding pressure), and 1 h (0.5 h for feeding sludge, 0.5 h for holding pressure). Correspondingly, the moisture of dewatered sludge was reduced to 57.9%, 59.2%, 59.6%, and 63.4% of initial moisture, respectively. Moreover, the moisture content of bioleached sludge cake was reduced to about 45% and less than 10% if the cake was placed at 25 degrees C for 15 h and 96 h, respectively. Obviously, sludge bioleaching followed by sludge dewatering using chamber filter press is a promising attractive approach for sludge half-dryness treatment in engineering application. PMID:22279914

  19. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  20. Transient Wellbore Fluid Flow Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1982-04-06

    WELBORE is a code to solve transient, one-dimensional two-phase or single-phase non-isothermal fluid flow in a wellbore. The primary thermodynamic variables used in solving the equations are the pressure and specific energy. An equation of state subroutine provides the density, quality, and temperature. The heat loss out of the wellbore is calculated by solving a radial diffusion equation for the temperature changes outside the bore. The calculation is done at each node point in themore » wellbore.« less

  1. Neural network model for extracting optic flow.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Kazuya; Fukushima, Kunihiko

    2005-01-01

    When we travel in an environment, we have an optic flow on the retina. Neurons in the area MST of macaque monkeys are reported to have a very large receptive field and analyze optic flows on the retina. Many MST-cells respond selectively to rotation, expansion/contraction and planar motion of the optic flow. Many of them show position-invariant responses to optic flow, that is, their responses are maintained during the shift of the center of the optic flow. It has long been suggested mathematically that vector-field calculus is useful for analyzing optic flow field. Biologically, plausible neural network models based on this idea, however, have little been proposed so far. This paper, based on vector-field hypothesis, proposes a neural network model for extracting optic flows. Our model consists of hierarchically connected layers: retina, V1, MT and MST. V1-cells measure local velocity. There are two kinds of MT-cell: one is for extracting absolute velocities, the other for extracting relative velocities with their antagonistic inputs. Collecting signals from MT-cells, MST-cells respond selectively to various types of optic flows. We demonstrate through a computer simulation that this simple network is enough to explain a variety of results of neurophysiological experiments. PMID:16112546

  2. Microfluidic flow switching design using volume of fluid model.

    PubMed

    Chein, Reiyu; Tsai, S H

    2004-03-01

    In this study, a volume of fluid (VOF) model was employed for microfluidic switch design. The VOF model validity in predicting the interface between fluid streams with different viscosities co-flowing in a microchannel was first verified by experimental observation. It was then extended to microfluidic flow switch design. Two specific flow switches, one with a guided fluid to one of five desired outlet ports, and another with a guided fluid flows into one, two, or three outlet ports equally distributed along the outlet channel of a Y-shaped channel. The flow switching was achieved by controlling the flow rate ratios between tested and buffer fluids. The numerical results showed that the VOF model could successfully predict the flow switching phenomena in these flow switches. The numerical results also showed that the flow rate ratio required for flow switching depends on the viscosity ratio between the tested and buffer fluids. The numerical simulation was verified by experimental study and the agreement was good. PMID:15307449

  3. Experimental studies of rotating exchange flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, B.; Smeed, D. A.; Dalziel, S. B.; Lane-Serff, G. F.

    2007-02-01

    Ocean basins are connected by straits and passages, geometrically limiting important heat and salt exchanges which in turn influence the global thermohaline circulation and climate. Such exchange can be modeled in an idealized way by taking into consideration the density-driven two-layer flow along a strait under the influence of rotation. We use a laboratory model of a lock exchange between two reservoirs of different density through a flat-bottom channel with a horizontal narrows, set up on two different platforms: a 1 m diameter turntable, where density interface position was measured by dye attenuation, and the 14 m diameter turntable at Coriolis/LEGI (Grenoble, France), where correlation imaging velocimetry, a particle imaging technique, allowed us to obtain for the first time detailed measurements of the velocity fields in these flows. The influence of rotation is studied by varying a parameter, Bu, a type of Burger number given by the ratio of the Rossby radius to the channel width at the narrows. In addition, a two-layer version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Model (MICOM) is used, to study the cases with low Burger number. Results from experiments by Dalziel [1988. Two-layer hydraulics: maximal exchange flows. Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, see also ] are also included for comparison. Time-mean exchange fluxes for any Bu are in close agreement with the inviscid zero-potential vorticity theory of Dalziel [1990. Rotating two-layer sill flows. In: Pratt, L.J. (Ed.), The Physical Oceanography of Sea Straits. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp. 343-371] and Whitehead et al. [1974. Rotating hydraulics of strait and sill flows. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 6, 101-125], who found that fluxes for Bu>1 mainly vary with channel width, similar to non-rotating flow, but for Bu<1 are only limited by the Rossby radius. We also show

  4. Optimization of solver for gas flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichkin, D.; Dodulad, O.; Kloss, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of the work is optimization of the solver for rarefied gas flow modeling based on the Boltzmann equation. Optimization method is based on SIMD extensions for ×86 processors. Computational code is profiled and manually optimized with SSE instructions. Heat flow, shock waves and Knudsen pump are modeled with optimized solver. Dependencies of computational time from mesh sizes and CPU capabilities are provided.

  5. Holistic Flow Model of Spiritual Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Melanie; Dupey, Peggy

    2005-01-01

    The Holistic Flow Model of Spiritual Wellness is a conceptualization of spiritual health and well-being that has implications for clinical practice and research. The model is unique in its placement of the spirit at the center of Life and in its fluid vision of the spirit. The authors present the model after a discussion of spirituality and the…

  6. Thermal effects of groundwater flow through subarctic fens - a case study based on field observation and numerical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoberg, Ylva; Coon, Ethan T.; Sannel, A. Britta K.; Pannetier, Romain; Harp, Dylan; Frampton, Andrew; Painter, Scott L; Lyon, Steve W

    2016-01-01

    Modeling and observation of ground temperature dynamics are the main tools for understand-ing current permafrost thermal regimes and projecting future thaw. Until recently, most studies on perma-frost have focused on vertical ground heat uxes. Groundwater can transport heat in both lateral andvertical directions but its in uence on ground temperatures at local scales in permafrost environments isnot well understood. In this study we combine eld observations from a subarctic fen in the sporadic per-mafrost zone with numerical simulations of coupled water and thermal uxes. At the Tavvavuoma studysite in northern Sweden, ground temperature pro les and groundwater levels were observed in boreholes.These observations were used to set up one- and two-dimensional simulations down to 2 m depth across agradient of permafrost conditions within and surrounding the fen. Two-dimensional scenarios representingthe fen under various hydraulic gradients were developed to quantify the in uence of groundwater ow onground temperature. Our observations suggest that lateral groundwater ow signi cantly affects groundtemperatures. This is corroborated by modeling results that show seasonal ground ice melts 1 month earlierwhen a lateral groundwater ux is present. Further, although the thermal regime may be dominated by ver-tically conducted heat uxes during most of the year, isolated high groundwater ow rate events such asthe spring freshet are potentially important for ground temperatures. As sporadic permafrost environmentsoften contain substantial portions of unfrozen ground with active groundwater ow paths, knowledge ofthis heat transport mechanism is important for understanding permafrost dynamics in these environments.

  7. A compendium of fracture flow models, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Diodato, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    The report is designed to be used as a decision-making aid for individuals who need to simulate fluid flow in fractured porous media. Fracture flow codes of varying capability in the public and private domain were identified in a survey of government, academia, and industry. The selection and use of an appropriate code requires conceptualization of the geology, physics, and chemistry (for transport) of the fracture flow problem to be solved. Conceptual models that have been invoked to describe fluid flow in fractured porous media include explicit discrete fracture, dual continuum (porosity and/or permeability), discrete fracture network, multiple interacting continua, multipermeability/multiporosity, and single equivalent continuum. The explicit discrete-fracture model is a ``near-field`` representation, the single equivalent continuum model is a ``far-field`` representation, and the dual-continuum model is intermediate to those end members. Of these, the dual-continuum model is the most widely employed. The concept of multiple interacting continua has been applied in a limited number of examples. Multipermeability/multiporosity provides a unified conceptual model. The ability to accurately describe fracture flow phenomena will continue to improve as a result of advances in fracture flow research and computing technology. This improvement will result in enhanced capability to protect the public environment, safety, and health.

  8. ITG sideband coupling models for zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Stransky, M.

    2011-05-15

    Four-wave interaction model between ITG mode and zonal flow was derived using fluid equations. In this model, the zonal flow is excited non-linearly by ITG turbulence via Reynolds stress. Numerical simulations show that the system allows for a small range above the ITG threshold where the zonal flow can stabilize an unstable ITG mode, effectively increasing {eta}{sub i} threshold, an effect which has been called the Dimits shift. However, the shift is smaller than in known cases such that in the Cyclone base.

  9. Modeling of Wall-Bounded Complex Flows and Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Various wall-bounded flows with complex geometries and free shear flows have been studied with a newly developed realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. The model development is based on the invariant theory in continuum mechanics. This theory enables us to formulate a general constitutive relation for the Reynolds stresses. Pope was the first to introduce this kind of constitutive relation to turbulence modeling. In our study, realizability is imposed on the truncated constitutive relation to determine the coefficients so that, unlike the standard k-E eddy viscosity model, the present model will not produce negative normal stresses in any situations of rapid distortion. The calculations based on the present model have shown an encouraging success in modeling complex turbulent flows.

  10. A modelling study of atrial septostomy for pulmonary arterial hypertension, and its effect on the state of tissue oxygenation and systemic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Lammers, Astrid E; Haworth, Sheila G; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Derrick, Graham; Bonhoeffer, Philipp; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Francis, Darrel P

    2010-02-01

    Atrial septostomy is performed in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, and has been shown to improve symptoms, quality of life and survival. Despite recognized clinical benefits, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. We aimed to assess the effects of right-to-left shunting on arterial delivery of oxygen, mixed venous content of oxygen, and systemic cardiac output in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and a fixed flow of blood to the lungs. We formulated equations defining the mandatory relationship between physiologic variables and delivery of oxygen in patients with right-to-left shunting. Using calculus and computer modelling, we considered the simultaneous effects of right-to-left shunting on physiologies with different pulmonary flows, total metabolic rates, and capacities for carrying oxygen. Our study indicates that, when the flow of blood to the lungs is fixed, increasing right-to-left shunting improves systemic cardiac output, arterial blood pressure, and arterial delivery of oxygen. In contrast, the mixed venous content of oxygen, which mirrors the average state of tissue oxygenation, remains unchanged. Our model suggests that increasing the volume of right-to-left shunting cannot compensate for right ventricular failure. Atrial septostomy in the setting of pulmonary arterial hypertension, therefore, increases the arterial delivery of oxygen, but the mixed systemic saturation of oxygen, arguably the most important index of tissue oxygenation, stays constant. Our data suggest that the clinically observed beneficial effects of atrial septostomy are the result of improved flow of blood rather than augmented tissue oxygenation, provided that right ventricular function is adequate. PMID:20144254

  11. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Hyun, S.

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  12. Experimental Study of Flow in a Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresconi, Frank; Prasad, Ajay

    2003-11-01

    An instability known as the Dean vortex occurs in curved pipes with a longitudinal pressure gradient. A similar effect is manifest in the flow in a converging or diverging bifurcation, such as those found in the human respiratory airways. The goal of this study is to characterize secondary flows in a bifurcation. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in a clear, plastic model. Results show the strength and migration of secondary vortices. Primary velocity features are also presented along with dispersion patterns from dye visualization. Unsteadiness, associated with a hairpin vortex, was also found at higher Re. This work can be used to assess the dispersion of particles in the lung. Medical delivery systems and pollution effect studies would profit from such an understanding.

  13. A Baroclinic Model of turbulent dusty flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-04-01

    The problem considered here is the numerical simulation of the turbulent dusty flow induced by explosions over soil surfaces. Some of the unresolved issues are: (1) how much dust is scoured from such surfaces; (2) where does the dust go in the boundary layer; (3) what is the dusty boundary layer height versus time; (4) what are the dusty boundary layer profiles; (5) how much of the dust mass becomes entrained into the dust stem; and (6) where does the dust go in the buoyant cloud? The author proposes a Baroclinic Model for flows with large density variations that actually calculates the turbulent mixing and transport of dust on an adaptive grid. The model is based on the following idealizations: (1) a loose dust bed; (2) an instantaneous shock fluidization of the dust layer; (3) the dust and air are in local equilibrium (so air viscosity enforces the no-slip condition); (4) the dust-air mixture is treated as a continuum dense fluid with zero viscosity; and (5) the turbulent mixing is dominated by baroclinically-generated vorticity. These assumptions lead to an inviscid set of conservation laws for the mixture, which are solved by means of a high-order Godunov algorithm for gasdynamics. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is used to capture the turbulent mixing processes on the grid. One of the unique characteristics of these flows is that mixing occurs because vorticity is produced by an inviscid, baroclinic mechanism. A number of examples are presented to illustrate these baroclinic effects including shock interactions with dense-gas layers and dust beds, and dusty wall jets of airblast precursors. The conclusion of these studies is that dusty boundary layers grow because of mass entrainment from the fluidized bed (and not because of viscous wall drag) as proven by the Mass Integral Equation.

  14. Modeling of nonequilibrium space plasma flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    1995-01-01

    Godunov-type numerical solution of the 20 moment plasma transport equations. One of the centerpieces of our proposal was the development of a higher order Godunov-type numerical scheme to solve the gyration dominated 20 moment transport equations. In the first step we explored some fundamental analytic properties of the 20 moment transport equations for a low b plasma, including the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of propagating disturbances. The eigenvalues correspond to wave speeds, while the eigenvectors characterize the transported physical quantities. In this paper we also explored the physically meaningful parameter range of the normalized heat flow components. In the second step a new Godunov scheme type numerical method was developed to solve the coupled set of 20 moment transport equations for a quasineutral single-ion plasma. The numerical method and the first results were presented at several national and international meetings and a paper describing the method has been published in the Journal of Computational Physics. To our knowledge this is the first numerical method which is capable of producing stable time-dependent solutions to the full 20 (or 16) moment set of transport equations, including the full heat flow equation. Previous attempts resulted in unstable (oscillating) solutions of the heat flow equations. Our group invested over two man-years into the development and implementation of the new method. The present model solves the 20 moment transport equations for an ion species and thermal electrons in 8 domain extending from a collision dominated to a collisionless region (200 km to 12,000 km). This model has been applied to study O+ acceleration due to Joule heating in the lower ionosphere.

  15. A model for insect tracheolar flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Anne; Chatterjee, Krishnashis

    2015-11-01

    Tracheoles are the terminal ends of the microscale tracheal channels present in most insect respiratory systems that transport air directly to the tissue. From a fluid dynamics perspective, tracheolar flow is notable because it lies at the intersection of several specialized fluid flow regimes. The flow through tracheoles is creeping, microscale gas flow in the rarefied regime. Here, we use lubrication theory to model the flow through a single microscale tracheole and take into account fluid-structure interactions through an imposed periodic wall deformation corresponding to the rhythmic abdominal compression found in insects, and rarefaction effects using slip boundary conditions. We compare the pressure, axial pressure gradient, and axial and radial velocities in the channel, and the volumetric flow rate through the channel for no-slip, low slip, and high slip conditions under two different channel deformation regimes. We find that the presence of slip tends to reduce the flow rate through the model tracheole and hypothesize that one of the mechanical functions of tracheoles is to act as a diffuser to decelerate the flow, enhance mixing, and increase the residency time of freshly oxygenated air at the surface of the tissue. This work was funded by the NSF under grant no. 1437387.

  16. Nitrification cessation and recovery in an aerated saturated vertical subsurface flow treatment wetland: Field studies and microscale biofilm modeling.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Clodagh; Rajabzadeh, Amin R; Weber, Kela P; Nivala, Jaime; Wallace, Scott D; Cooper, David J

    2016-06-01

    In aerated treatment wetlands, oxygen availability is not a limiting factor in sustaining a high level of nitrification in wastewater treatment. In the case of an air blower failure, nitrification would cease, potentially causing adverse effects to the nitrifying bacteria. A field trial was completed investigating nitrification loss when aeration is switched off, and the system recovery rate after the aeration is switched back on. Loss of dissolved oxygen was observed to be more rapid than loss of nitrification. Nitrate was observed in the effluent long after the aeration was switched off (48h+). A complementary modeling study predicted nitrate diffusion out of biofilm over a 48h period. After two weeks of no aeration in the established system, nitrification recovered within two days, whereas nitrification establishment in a new system was previously observed to require 20-45days. These results suggest that once established resident nitrifying microbial communities are quite robust. PMID:26967335

  17. Modeling flow and sedimention of slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondy, L.; Rao, R.; Altobelli, S.; Ingber, M.; Graham, A.

    2002-12-01

    Many natural processes involve flows of sediments at high particle concentrations. The equations describing such two-phase flows are highly nonlinear. We will give an overview of the performance of a continuum constitutive model of suspensions of particles in liquid for low Reynolds number flows. The diffusive flux model (Leighton and Acrivos, J. Fluid Mech., 1987, and Phillips et al., Phys. Fluids A, 1992) is implemented in a general purpose finite element computational program. This constitutive description couples a Newtonian stress/shear-rate relationship (where the local viscosity of the suspension is dependent on the local volume fraction of solids) with a shear-induced migration model of the suspended particles. The momentum transport, continuity, and diffusive flux equations are solved simultaneously. The formulation is fully three-dimensional and can be run on a parallel computer platform. Recent work introducing a flow-aligned tensor correction to this model has had success in representing the anisotropic force that is seen in curvilinear flows. Gravity effects are added in an approach similar to that of Zhang and Acrivos (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 1994). The model results are compared with laboratory data obtained with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) of evolving particle concentration profiles in complex flows, as well as in batch sedimentation. Interesting secondary flows appear both in the experiment and model. Overall, good agreement is found between the experiments and the simulations. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy. The authors would like to acknowledge support for this work by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Engineering and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  18. Flow visualization studies of the internal flow characteristics in a simulated mixed flow vectored thrust ASTOVL engine configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, K. R.; Ferraro, P. J.; Flood, J. D.; Grey, R. E.; Wazyniak, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of internal flowfields in a Mixed Flow Vectored Thrust (MFVT) propulsion system for Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft were investigated using flow visualization techniques. A highly parametric 14 percent scale transparent model was used to simulate the MFVT propulsion system. The working medium was water. The mixing between the fan and core flow was studied using flow visualization for a variety of geometrical and flow parameters including three bypass ratio variations. The flow visualization technique involves the use of laser light sheet for illumination and fluorescent dye or air bubbles as tracers. Results indicate the existence of a strong vortex flowfield in the hover mode of operation that is responsible for good mixing between the fan and core flows.

  19. Reduced order model of draft tube flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, P.; Štefan, D.

    2014-03-01

    Swirling flow with compact coherent structures is very good candidate for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), i.e. for decomposition into eigenmodes, which are the cornerstones of the flow field. Present paper focuses on POD of steady flows, which correspond to different operating points of Francis turbine draft tube flow. Set of eigenmodes is built using a limited number of snapshots from computational simulations. Resulting reduced order model (ROM) describes whole operating range of the draft tube. ROM enables to interpolate in between the operating points exploiting the knowledge about significance of particular eigenmodes and thus reconstruct the velocity field in any operating point within the given range. Practical example, which employs axisymmetric simulations of the draft tube flow, illustrates accuracy of ROM in regions without vortex breakdown together with need for higher resolution of the snapshot database close to location of sudden flow changes (e.g. vortex breakdown). ROM based on POD interpolation is very suitable tool for insight into flow physics of the draft tube flows (especially energy transfers in between different operating points), for supply of data for subsequent stability analysis or as an initialization database for advanced flow simulations.

  20. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  1. Supersonic boundary-layer flow turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi-Rong

    1993-01-01

    Baldwin-Lomax and kappa-epsilon turbulence models were modified for use in Navier-Stokes numerical computations of Mach 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows along compression ramps. The computational results of Reynolds shear stress profiles were compared with experimental data. The Baldwin-Lomax model was modified to account for the Reynolds shear stress amplification within the flow field. A hybrid kappa-epsilon model with viscous sublayer turbulence treatment was constructed to predict the Reynolds shear stress profiles within the entire flow field. These modified turbulence models were effective for the computations of the surface pressure and the skin friction factor variations along an 8 deg ramp surface. The hybrid kappa-epsilon model could improve the predictions of the Reynolds shear stress profile and the skin friction factor near the corner of a 16 deg ramp.

  2. How to Model Water Flow in Moulins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, T. P.; Steffen, K.

    2007-12-01

    The development of large melt ponds on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) and their drainage system indicate that moulins are a major contributor to the englacial water system. Here we review the current state of knowledge and the history of moulin research. In the late 19th century glaciologists led by Vallot climbed and studied the Grand Moulin on Mont Blanc. Despite being considered mystic due to their size and water drainage they have been studied by a few scientists such as Holmlund and Hooke (1980) or Puccini and Badino (1990). We develop a qualitative model of geometry as well as of the driving forces in the life cycle of moulins using data, photos, sketches, and climbing reports by ice speleologists and climbers. The GIS is temperate for the first 10 km at its margin and consists of cold ice further inland. The recent increase in melt water leads to an increase in basal water availability. The observed increase in ice velocity might be caused by the lubrication at the bed combined with a possible temperature rise in the cold part of the GIS. The raise of englacial water flow increases the volume of the conduits thus reducing the timing of water to reach the ice sheet bed. Our initial model starts with a narrow englacial non-arborescent channel network. We anticipate the development of the englacial hydrology system by using the 'Roethlisberger' conduit model. In addition we will show first model results on temperature fluctuations in the ice due to the hydrologic system.

  3. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes

  4. Modeling depth distributions of overland flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark W.; Cox, Nicholas J.; Bracken, Louise J.

    2011-02-01

    Hydrological and erosion models use water depth to estimate routing velocity and resultant erosion at each spatial element. Yet the shear stress distribution imposed on the soil surface and any resulting flow detachment and rill incision is controlled by the full probability distribution of depths of overland flow. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is used in conjunction with simple field-flume experiments to provide high-resolution measures of overland flow depth-distributions for three semi-arid hillslope transects with differing soil properties. A two-parameter gamma distribution is proposed as the optimum model for depths of both interrill and rill flows. The shape and scale parameters are shown to vary consistently with distance downslope reflecting the morphological signature of runoff processes. The scale parameter is related to the general increase of depths with discharge ( P < 0.0001) as flows gradually concentrate; the shape parameter is more related to the soil surface roughness and potentially provides a control on the rate of depth, but also velocity increase with discharge. Such interactions between surface roughness and overland flows are of crucial importance for flow hydraulics and modeling sediment transport.

  5. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries’ roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading “trophic levels” have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows. PMID:26569618

  6. International Trade Modelling Using Open Flow Networks: A Flow-Distance Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bin; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Yixiao; Zheng, Qiuhua; Li, Xingsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper models and analyzes international trade flows using open flow networks (OFNs) with the approaches of flow distances, which provide a novel perspective and effective tools for the study of international trade. We discuss the establishment of OFNs of international trade from two coupled viewpoints: the viewpoint of trading commodity flow and that of money flow. Based on the novel model with flow distance approaches, meaningful insights are gained. First, by introducing the concepts of trade trophic levels and niches, countries' roles and positions in the global supply chains (or value-added chains) can be evaluated quantitatively. We find that the distributions of trading "trophic levels" have the similar clustering pattern for different types of commodities, and summarize some regularities between money flow and commodity flow viewpoints. Second, we find that active and competitive countries trade a wide spectrum of products, while inactive and underdeveloped countries trade a limited variety of products. Besides, some abnormal countries import many types of goods, which the vast majority of countries do not need to import. Third, harmonic node centrality is proposed and we find the phenomenon of centrality stratification. All the results illustrate the usefulness of the model of OFNs with its network approaches for investigating international trade flows. PMID:26569618

  7. Linking Climate, Hydrology and Groundwater in High-Resolution Transient Groundwater Flow Models: a Case Study For a Climate Change Impacts Assessment in Grand Forks, BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibek, J.; Allen, D. M.; Whitfield, P.; Wei, M.

    2004-05-01

    A case study of an unconfined aquifer in the Grand Forks valley in south-central BC was used to develop methodology for linking climate models, hydrologic models, and groundwater models to investigate future impacts of climate change on groundwater resources. A three dimensional groundwater flow model of variable spatial resolution (constrained by borehole spacing) was implemented in MODFLOW, and calibrated to observation well data. Multiple scenarios of the hydraulic conductivity fields were used in a sensitivity analysis. A new methodology was developed for generating spatially-distributed and temporally-varying recharge zonation for the surficial aquifer, using GIS linked to the one-dimensional HELP (USEPA) hydrologic model that estimates aquifer recharge. The recharge model accounts for soil distribution, vadose zone depth and hydraulic conductivity, extent of impermeable areas, surficial geology, and vadose zone thickness. Production well pumping and irrigation return flow during the summer season were included in recharge computations. Although recharge was computed as monthly averages per climate scenario, it is driven by physically-based daily weather inputs generated by a stochastic weather generator and calibrated to local observed climate. Four year long climate scenarios were run, each representing one typical year in the present and future (2020s, 2050s, and 2080s), by perturbing the historical weather according to the downscaled CGCM1 general circulation model results (Environment Canada). CGCM1 model outputs were calibrated for local conditions during the downscaling procedure. These include absolute and relative changes in precipitation; including indirect measures of precipitation intensity, dry and wet spell lengths, temperature, and solar radiation for the evapotranspiration model. CGCM1 downscaling was also used to predict basin-scale runoff for the Kettle River upstream of Grand Forks. This river exerts strong control on the groundwater levels

  8. GENERALIZED VISCOPLASTIC MODELING OF DEBRIS FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1988-01-01

    The earliest model developed by R. A. Bagnold was based on the concept of the 'dispersive' pressure generated by grain collisions. Some efforts have recently been made by theoreticians in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics to modify or improve Bagnold's concept or model. A viable rheological model should consist both of a rate-independent part and a rate-dependent part. A generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model that has both parts as well as two major rheological properties (i. e. , the normal stress effect and soil yield criterion) is shown to be sufficiently accurate, yet practical for general use in debris-flow modeling. In fact, Bagnold's model is found to be only a particular case of the GVF model. analytical solutions for (steady) uniform debris flows in wide channels are obtained from the GVF model based on Bagnold's simplified assumption of constant grain concentration.

  9. Space shuttle orbiter flow visualization study. [water tunnel study of vortex flow during atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The vortex flows generated at subsonic speed during the final portion of atmospheric reentry were defined using a 0.01 scale model of the orbiter in a diagnostic water tunnel. Flow visualization photographs were obtained over an angle-of-attack range to 40 deg and sideslip angles up to 10 deg. The vortex flow field development, vortex path, and vortex breakdown characteristics were determined as a function of angle-of-attack at zero sideslip. Vortex flows were found to develop on the highly swept glove, on the wing, and on the upper surface of the fuselage. No significant asymmetries were observed at zero sideslip in the water tunnel tests. The sensitivity of the upper surface vortex flow fields to variations in sideslip angle was also studied. The vortex formed on the glove remained very stable in position above the wing up through the 10 deg of sideslip tested. There was a change in the vortex lifts under sideslip due to effective change in leading-edge sweep angles. Asymmetric flow separation occurred on the upper surface of the fuselage at small sideslip angles. The influence of vortex flow fields in sideslip on the lateral/ directional characteristics of the orbiter is discussed.

  10. Axial compressor middle stage secondary flow study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation of the secondary flow within and aft of an axial compressor model with thick endwall boundary layers. The objective of the study was to obtain detailed aerodynamic and trace gas concentration traverse data aft of a well documented isolated rotor for the ultimate purpose of improving the design phases of compressor development based on an improved physical understanding of secondary flow. It was determined from the flow visualization, aerodynamic, and trace gas concentration results that the relative unloading of the midspan region of the airfoil inhibitied a fullspan separation at high loading preventing the massive radial displacement of the hub corner stall to the tip. Radial distribution of high and low total pressure fluid influenced the magnitude of the spanwise distribution of loss, such that, there was a general decreases in loss near the hub to the extent that for the least loaded case a negative loss (increase in total pressure) was observed. The ability to determine the spanwise distribution of blockage was demonstrated. Large blockage was present in the endwall regions due to the corner stall and tip leakage with little blockage in the core flow region. Hub blockage was found to increase rapidly with loading.

  11. Numerical study of the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane using a model based on a kinetic theory approach. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, K.R.

    1993-11-01

    In the previous report the linearized stability results for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, modeled by a constitutive theory based on the kinetic theory approach were presented. In this report, the authors derive the governing equations for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, modeled by the constitutive theory proposed by Boyle and Massoudi (1990). The governing equations obtained will be solved numerically to obtain the basic solutions.

  12. Studies of two phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    The development of instrumentation for the support of research in two-phase flow in simulated microgravity conditions was performed. The funds were expended in the development of a technique for characterizing the motion and size distribution of small liquid droplets dispersed in a flowing gas. Phenomena like this occur in both microgravity and normal earth gravity situations inside of conduits that are carrying liquid-vapor mixtures at high flow rates. Some effort to develop a conductance probe for the measurement of liquid film thickness was also expended.

  13. Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Zyvoloski

    2001-06-28

    The purpose of the flow calibration analysis work is to provide Performance Assessment (PA) with the calibrated site-scale saturated zone (SZ) flow model that will be used to make radionuclide transport calculations. As such, it is one of the most important models developed in the Yucca Mountain project. This model will be a culmination of much of our knowledge of the SZ flow system. The objective of this study is to provide a defensible site-scale SZ flow and transport model that can be used for assessing total system performance. A defensible model would include geologic and hydrologic data that are used to form the hydrogeologic framework model; also, it would include hydrochemical information to infer transport pathways, in-situ permeability measurements, and water level and head measurements. In addition, the model should include information on major model sensitivities. Especially important are those that affect calibration, the direction of transport pathways, and travel times. Finally, if warranted, alternative calibrations representing different conceptual models should be included. To obtain a defensible model, all available data should be used (or at least considered) to obtain a calibrated model. The site-scale SZ model was calibrated using measured and model-generated water levels and hydraulic head data, specific discharge calculations, and flux comparisons along several of the boundaries. Model validity was established by comparing model-generated permeabilities with the permeability data from field and laboratory tests; by comparing fluid pathlines obtained from the SZ flow model with those inferred from hydrochemical data; and by comparing the upward gradient generated with the model with that observed in the field. This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) Development Plan ''Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a).

  14. Analysis of groundwater flow in arid areas with limited hydrogeological data using the Grey Model: a case study of the Nubian Sandstone, Kharga Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, Wael Elham; Watanabe, Kunio; Zahr-Eldeen, Ashraf A.

    2013-08-01

    Management of groundwater resources can be enhanced by using numerical models to improve development strategies. However, the lack of basic data often limits the implementation of these models. The Kharga Oasis in the western desert of Egypt is an arid area that mainly depends on groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS), for which the hydrogeological data needed for groundwater simulation are lacking, thereby introducing a problem for model calibration and validation. The Grey Model (GM) was adopted to analyze groundwater flow. This model combines a finite element method (FEM) with a linear regression model to try to obtain the best-fit piezometric-level trends compared to observations. The GM simulation results clearly show that the future water table in the northeastern part of the study area will face a severe drawdown compared with that in the southwestern part and that the hydraulic head difference between these parts will reach 140 m by 2060. Given the uncertainty and limitation of available data, the GM produced more realistic results compared with those obtained from a FEM alone. The GM could be applied to other cases with similar data limitations.

  15. Computational Modeling of Flow-Altering Surgeries in Basilar Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Rayz, V. L.; Abla, A.; Boussel, L.; Leach, J. R.; Acevedo-Bolton, G.; Saloner, D.; Lawton, M. T.

    2014-01-01

    In cases where surgeons consider different interventional options for flow alterations in the setting of pathological basilar artery hemodynamics, a virtual model demonstrating the flow fields resulting from each of these options can assist in making clinical decisions. In this study, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were used to simulate the flow in four basilar artery aneurysms in order to evaluate postoperative hemodynamics that would result from flow-altering interventions. Patient-specific geometries were constructed using MR angiography and velocimetry data. CFD simulations carried out for the preoperative flow conditions were compared to in vivo phase-contrast MRI measurements (4DFlowMRI) acquired prior to the interventions. The models were then modified according to the procedures considered for each patient. Numerical simulations of the flow and virtual contrast transport were carried out in each case in order to assess postoperative flow fields and estimate the likelihood of intra-aneurysmal thrombus deposition following the procedures. Postoperative imaging data, when available, were used to validate computational predictions. In two cases, where the aneurysms involved vital pontine perforator arteries branching from the basilar artery, idealized geometries of these vessels were incorporated into the CFD models. The effect of interventions on the flow through the perforators was evaluated by simulating the transport of contrast in these vessels. The computational results were in close agreement with the MR imaging data. In some cases, CFD simulations could help determine which of the surgical options was likely to reduce the flow into the aneurysm while preserving the flow through the basilar trunk. The study demonstrated that image-based computational modeling can provide guidance to clinicians by indicating possible outcome complications and indicating expected success potential for ameliorating pathological aneurysmal flow, prior

  16. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O.

    1994-04-04

    Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

  17. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  18. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-11-15

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  19. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-08-02

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  20. A model for transonic plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, Luca; Hameiri, Eliezer

    2014-02-15

    A linear, two-dimensional model of a transonic plasma flow in equilibrium is constructed and given an explicit solution in the form of a complex Laplace integral. The solution indicates that the transonic state can be solved as an elliptic boundary value problem, as is done in the numerical code FLOW [Guazzotto et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)]. Moreover, the presence of a hyperbolic region does not necessarily imply the presence of a discontinuity or any other singularity of the solution.

  1. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  2. Nonlocal modeling of granular flows down inclines.

    PubMed

    Kamrin, Ken; Henann, David L

    2015-01-01

    Flows of granular media down a rough inclined plane demonstrate a number of nonlocal phenomena. We apply the recently proposed nonlocal granular fluidity model to this geometry and find that the model captures many of these effects. Utilizing the model's dynamical form, we obtain a formula for the critical stopping height of a layer of grains on an inclined surface. Using an existing parameter calibration for glass beads, the theoretical result compares quantitatively to existing experimental data for glass beads. This provides a stringent test of the model, whose previous validations focused on driven steady-flow problems. For layers thicker than the stopping height, the theoretical flow profiles display a thickness-dependent shape whose features are in agreement with previous discrete particle simulations. We also address the issue of the Froude number of the flows, which has been shown experimentally to collapse as a function of the ratio of layer thickness to stopping height. While the collapse is not obvious, two explanations emerge leading to a revisiting of the history of inertial rheology, which the nonlocal model references for its homogeneous flow response. PMID:25376561

  3. Unsteady flow through in-vitro models of the glottis.

    PubMed

    Hofmans, G C J; Groot, G; Ranucci, M; Graziani, G; Hirschberg, A

    2003-03-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional flow through fixed rigid in vitro models of the glottis is studied in some detail to validate a more accurate model based on the prediction of boundary-layer separation. The study is restricted to the flow phenomena occurring within the glottis and does not include effects of vocal-fold movement on the flow. Pressure measurements have been carried out for a transient flow through a rigid scale model of the glottis. The rigid model with a fixed geometry driven by an unsteady pressure is used in order to achieve a high accuracy in the specification of the geometry of the glottis. The experimental study is focused on flow phenomena as they might occur in the glottis, such as the asymmetry of the flow due to the Coanda effect and the transition to turbulent flow. It was found that both effects need a relatively long time to establish themselves and are therefore unlikely to occur during the production of normal voiced speech when the glottis closes completely during part of the oscillation cycle. It is shown that when the flow is still laminar and symmetric the prediction of the boundary-layer model and the measurement of the pressure drop from the throat of the glottis to the exit of the glottis agree within 40%. Results of the boundary-layer model are compared with a two-dimensional vortex-blob method for viscous flow. The difference between the results of the simpiflied boundary-layer model and the experimental results is explained by an additional pressure difference between the separation point and the far field within the jet downstream of the separation point. The influence of the movement of the vocal folds on our conclusions is still unclear. PMID:12656399

  4. Unsteady flow through in-vitro models of the glottis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmans, G. C. J.; Groot, G.; Ranucci, M.; Graziani, G.; Hirschberg, A.

    2003-03-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional flow through fixed rigid in vitro models of the glottis is studied in some detail to validate a more accurate model based on the prediction of boundary-layer separation. The study is restricted to the flow phenomena occurring within the glottis and does not include effects of vocal-fold movement on the flow. Pressure measurements have been carried out for a transient flow through a rigid scale model of the glottis. The rigid model with a fixed geometry driven by an unsteady pressure is used in order to achieve a high accuracy in the specification of the geometry of the glottis. The experimental study is focused on flow phenomena as they might occur in the glottis, such as the asymmetry of the flow due to the Coanda effect and the transition to turbulent flow. It was found that both effects need a relatively long time to establish themselves and are therefore unlikely to occur during the production of normal voiced speech when the glottis closes completely during part of the oscillation cycle. It is shown that when the flow is still laminar and symmetric the prediction of the boundary-layer model and the measurement of the pressure drop from the throat of the glottis to the exit of the glottis agree within 40%. Results of the boundary-layer model are compared with a two-dimensional vortex-blob method for viscous flow. The difference between the results of the simpiflied boundary-layer model and the experimental results is explained by an additional pressure difference between the separation point and the far field within the jet downstream of the separation point. The influence of the movement of the vocal folds on our conclusions is still unclear.

  5. Asymptotic study of the initial value problem to a standard one pressure model of multifluid flows in nondivergence form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombeau, M.

    2016-01-01

    We construct families of approximate solutions to the initial value problem and provide complete mathematical proofs that they tend to satisfy the standard system of isothermal one pressure two-fluid flows in 1-D when the data are L1 in densities and L∞ in velocities. To this end, we use a method that reduces this system of PDEs to a family of systems of four ODEs in Banach spaces whose smooth solutions are these approximate solutions. This method is constructive: using standard numerical methods for ODEs one can easily and accurately compute these approximate solutions which, therefore, from the mathematical proof, can serve for comparison with numerical schemes. One observes agreement with previously known solutions from scientific computing (Evje and Flatten, 2003 [16]) We show that one recovers the solutions of these authors (exactly in one case, with a slight difference in another case). Then we propose an efficient numerical scheme for the original system of two-fluid flows and show it gives back exactly the same results as the theoretical solutions obtained above.

  6. Application of heat flow models to SOI current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feixia; Cheng, Ming-C.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical heat flow model for SOI circuits is presented. The model is able to account for heat exchanges among devices and heat loss from the silicon film and interconnects to the substrate through the buried oxide. The developed model can accurately and efficiently predict the temperature distribution in the interconnect/poly-lines and SOI devices. The model is applied to SOI current mirrors to study heat flow in different layout designs. The results from the developed model are verified with those from Raphael, a 3D numerical simulator that can provide the detailed 3D temperature distribution in interconnect/poly-lines.

  7. Numerical modeling of laser thermal propulsion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Thoenes, J.

    1984-01-01

    An review of the problems associated with modeling laser thermal propulsion flows, a synopsis of the status of such models, and the attributes of a successful model are presented. The continuous gaseous hydrogen laser-supported combustion wave (LSCW) thruster, for which a high-energy laser system (preferably space-based) should exist by the time the propulsion technology is developed, is considered in particular. The model proposed by Raizer (1970) is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional flow at constant pressure with heat conduction as the principal heat transfer mechanism. Consideration is given to subsequent models which account for radiative transfer into the ambient gas; provide a two-dimensional generalization of Raizer's analysis for the subsonic propagation of laser sparks in air; include the effect of forward plasma radiation in a one-dimensional model; and attempt a time-dependent (elliptic) solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow in a simple axisymmetric thruster. Attention is also given to thruster and nozzle flow models and thermodynamic and transport properties.

  8. Rarefied-flow Shuttle aerodynamics model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1993-01-01

    A rarefied-flow shuttle aerodynamic model spanning the hypersonic continuum to the free molecule-flow regime was formulated. The model development has evolved from the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) experiment conducted on the Orbiter since 1983. The complete model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as functions of angle-of-attack, body flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle-of-attack are presented, along with flight derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made with data from the Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book (OADDB), applicable wind-tunnel data, and recent flight data from STS-35 and STS-40. The flight-derived model aerodynamic force coefficient ratio is in good agreement with the wind-tunnel data and predicts the flight measured force coefficient ratios on STS-35 and STS-40. The model is not, however, in good agreement with the OADDB. But, the current OADDB does not predict the flight data force coefficient ratios of either STS-35 or STS-40 as accurately as the flight-derived model. Also, the OADDB differs with the wind-tunnel force coefficient ratio data.

  9. THE USE OF MODELED ATMOSPHERIC WIND TRAJECTORIES TO DETERMINE POTENTIAL DOWNWIND GENE FLOW; A CASE STUDY USING GM-BENTGRASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The down-wind dispersal of pollen and the airborne spread of seed are affected by the size, shape and weight of the particles and by the strength, buoyancy and direction of surface winds. An atmospheric model (HYSPLIT model: www.arl.noaa.gov\\ready.html) was used to reconstruct w...

  10. Evolution of Coronary Flow in an Experimental Slow Flow Model in Swines: Angiographic and Pathological Insights

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yupeng; Hu, Liqun; Yu, Delong; Peng, Sheng; Liu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Mingjing; Gu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Pathomechanism of coronary slow flow phenomenon remains largely unclear now. Present study observed the pathological and angiographic evolution in a pig model of coronary slow flow. Methods. Coronary slow flow was induced by repeat coronary injection of small doses of 40 µm microspheres in 18 male domestic pigs and angiographic and pathological changes were determined at 3 hours, 7 days, and 28 days after microspheres injection. Results. Compared to control group treated with coronary saline injection (n = 6) and baseline level, coronary flow was significantly reduced at 3 hours and 7 days but completely recovered at 28 days after coronary microsphere injection in slow flow group. Despite normal coronary flow at 28 days after microsphere injection, enhanced myocardial cytokine expression, left ventricular dysfunction, adverse remodelling, and ischemia/microembolism related pathological changes still persisted or even progressed from 3 hours to 28 days after coronary microsphere injection. Conclusions. Our results show that this large animal slow flow model could partly reflect the chronic angiographic, hemodynamic, and pathological changes of coronary slow flow and could be used to test new therapy strategies against the slow flow phenomenon. PMID:26539516

  11. A void distribution model-flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new model for flashing flow based on wall nucleations is proposed here and the model predictions are compared with some experimental data. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites was used. Thus it was possible to avoid the usual assumption of a constant bubble number density. Comparisons of the model with the data shows that the model based on the nucleation site density correlation appears to be acceptable to describe the vapor generation in the flashing flow. For the limited data examined, the comparisons show rather satisfactory agreement without using a floating parameter to adjust the model. This result indicated that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic predictions of the flashing phenomenon is possible on the present wall nucleation based model.

  12. Flow-based model of computer hackers' motivation.

    PubMed

    Voiskounsky, Alexander E; Smyslova, Olga V

    2003-04-01

    Hackers' psychology, widely discussed in the media, is almost entirely unexplored by psychologists. In this study, hackers' motivation is investigated, using the flow paradigm. Flow is likely to motivate hackers, according to views expressed by researchers and by hackers themselves. Taken as granted that hackers experience flow, it was hypothesized that flow increases with the increase of hackers' competence in IT use. Self-selected subjects were recruited on specialized web sources; 457 hackers filled out a web questionnaire. Competence in IT use, specific flow experience, and demographic data were questioned. An on-line research was administered within the Russian-speaking community (though one third of Ss are non-residents of Russian Federation); since hacking seems to be international, the belief is expressed that the results are universal. The hypothesis is not confirmed: flow motivation characterizes the least and the most competent hackers, and the members of an intermediate group, that is, averagely competent Ss report the "flow crisis"-no (or less) flow experience. Two differing strategies of task choice were self-reported by Ss: a step-by-step increase of the difficulty of choices leads to a match of challenges and skills (and to preserving the flow experience); putting choices irrespective of the likelihood of solution leads to a "flow crisis." The findings give productive hints on processes of hackers' motivational development. The flow-based model of computer hackers' motivation was developed. It combines both empirically confirmed and theoretically possible ways of hackers' "professional" growth. PMID:12804029

  13. Numerical study on the spontaneous condensation flow in an air cryogenic turbo-expander using equilibrium and non-equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wan; Niu, Lu; Chen, Liang; Chen, Shuangtao; Zhang, Xingqun; Hou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty of data measurement in cryogenic environments and the complicated mechanism of nucleation process have restricted the design of wet type turbo-expander for cryogenic liquid plants. In this paper, equilibrium and non-equilibrium models are used to model the spontaneous condensation flow in a cryogenic turbo-expander along the main stream passage including nozzle, impeller and diffuser. The comparison shows a distinct difference of the predicted wetness fraction distribution along the streamline between the equilibrium model and the non-equilibrium model. In non-equilibrium model, the distributions of supercooling and nucleation rate along the length of turbo-expander are given for the analysis of flow characteristics. The comparison of outlet wetness fraction with the experimental data is also provided for verification and discussion. Both the effects of the rotation on nucleation and the effects of the nucleation on flow along suction side of the impeller are investigated.

  14. Thermosensitive core-shell particles as model systems for studying the flow behavior of concentrated colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Crassous, J J; Siebenbürger, M; Ballauff, M; Drechsler, M; Henrich, O; Fuchs, M

    2006-11-28

    We report on a comprehensive investigation of the flow behavior of colloidal thermosensitive core-shell particles at high densities. The particles consist of a solid core of poly(styrene) onto which a network of cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) is affixed. Immersed in water the shell of these particles will swell if the temperature is low. Raising the temperature above 32 degrees C leads to a volume transition within this shell which leads to a marked shrinking of the shell. The particles have well-defined core-shell structure and a narrow size distribution. The remaining electrostatic interactions due to a small number of charges affixed to the core particles can be screened by adding 0.05M KCl to the suspensions. Below the lower critical solution temperature at 32 degrees C the particles are purely repulsive. Above this transition, a thermoreversible coagulation takes place. Lowering the temperature again leads to full dissociation of the aggregates formed by this process. The particles crystallize for effective volume fractions between 0.48 and 0.55. The crystallites can be molten by shear in order to reach a fluid sample again. The reduced shear stress measured in this metastable disordered state was found to be a unique function of the shear rate and the effective volume fraction. These reduced flow curves thus obtained can be described quantitatively by the theory of Fuchs and Cates [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 248304 (2002)] which is based on the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition. PMID:17144739

  15. Modelling water flow under glaciers and ice sheets

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Gwenn E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of dynamic water systems beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have sparked renewed interest in modelling subglacial drainage. The foundations of today's models were laid decades ago, inspired by measurements from mountain glaciers, discovery of the modern ice streams and the study of landscapes evacuated by former ice sheets. Models have progressed from strict adherence to the principles of groundwater flow, to the incorporation of flow ‘elements’ specific to the subglacial environment, to sophisticated two-dimensional representations of interacting distributed and channelized drainage. Although presently in a state of rapid development, subglacial drainage models, when coupled to models of ice flow, are now able to reproduce many of the canonical phenomena that characterize this coupled system. Model calibration remains generally out of reach, whereas widespread application of these models to large problems and real geometries awaits the next level of development. PMID:27547082

  16. Advances in turbulence studies. [Magnetohydrodynamic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Branover, H.; Unger, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Important contemporary trends in both experimental and theoretical turbulence research are reported. Particular attention is given to vortex reconnection, cascade, and mixing in turbulent flows; intermittent turbulence from closures; tearing instabilities in 2D MHD turbulence; axisymmetric hydromagnetic dynamo; bifurcations in MHD flow generated by electric current discharge; renormalization group analysis of MHD turbulence with low magnetic Reynolds number; Solution for turbulent primary azimuthal velocity in liquid-metal flows in sliding electric contacts; analogies between geophysical and hydromagnetic flows; turbulent electrically-induced vortical flows; dissipation length scale dynamics; two-phase grid turbulence; abridged octave wavenumber ring models for 2D turbulence; rag theory of magnetic fluctuations in turbulent flow; and instabilities of the nonuniform flows of a low-temperature plasma in MHD channels.

  17. Ribosome flow model with positive feedback

    PubMed Central

    Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs usually form a circular structure; thus, ribosomes that terminatae translation at the 3′ end can diffuse with increased probability to the 5′ end of the transcript, initiating another cycle of translation. This phenomenon describes ribosomal flow with positive feedback—an increase in the flow of ribosomes terminating translating the open reading frame increases the ribosomal initiation rate. The aim of this paper is to model and rigorously analyse translation with feedback. We suggest a modified version of the ribosome flow model, called the ribosome flow model with input and output. In this model, the input is the initiation rate and the output is the translation rate. We analyse this model after closing the loop with a positive linear feedback. We show that the closed-loop system admits a unique globally asymptotically stable equilibrium point. From a biophysical point of view, this means that there exists a unique steady state of ribosome distributions along the mRNA, and thus a unique steady-state translation rate. The solution from any initial distribution will converge to this steady state. The steady-state distribution demonstrates a decrease in ribosome density along the coding sequence. For the case of constant elongation rates, we obtain expressions relating the model parameters to the equilibrium point. These results may perhaps be used to re-engineer the biological system in order to obtain a desired translation rate. PMID:23720534

  18. Model flocks in a steady vortical flow.

    PubMed

    Baggaley, A W

    2015-05-01

    We modify the standard Vicsek model to clearly distinguish between intrinsic noise due to imperfect alignment between organisms and extrinsic noise due to fluid motion. We then consider the effect of a steady vortical flow, the Taylor-Green vortex, on the dynamics of the flock, for various flow speeds, with a fixed intrinsic particle speed. We pay particular attention to the morphology of the flow, and quantify its filamentarity. Strikingly, above a critical flow speed there is a pronounced increase in the filamentarity of the flock, when compared to the zero-flow case. This is due to the fact that particles appear confined to areas of low vorticity; a familiar phenomena, commonly seen in the clustering of inertial particles in vortical flows. Hence, the cooperative motion of the particles gives them an effective inertia, which is seen to have a profound effect on the morphology of the flock, in the presence of external fluid motion. Finally, we investigate the angle between the flow and the particles direction of movement and find it follows a power-law distribution. PMID:26066260

  19. Model flocks in a steady vortical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggaley, A. W.

    2015-05-01

    We modify the standard Vicsek model to clearly distinguish between intrinsic noise due to imperfect alignment between organisms and extrinsic noise due to fluid motion. We then consider the effect of a steady vortical flow, the Taylor-Green vortex, on the dynamics of the flock, for various flow speeds, with a fixed intrinsic particle speed. We pay particular attention to the morphology of the flow, and quantify its filamentarity. Strikingly, above a critical flow speed there is a pronounced increase in the filamentarity of the flock, when compared to the zero-flow case. This is due to the fact that particles appear confined to areas of low vorticity; a familiar phenomena, commonly seen in the clustering of inertial particles in vortical flows. Hence, the cooperative motion of the particles gives them an effective inertia, which is seen to have a profound effect on the morphology of the flock, in the presence of external fluid motion. Finally, we investigate the angle between the flow and the particles direction of movement and find it follows a power-law distribution.

  20. Modeling magnetically insulated devices using flow impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Rosenthal, S.E. )

    1995-04-01

    In modern pulsed power systems the electric field stresses at metal surfaces in vacuum transmission lines are so high that negative surfaces are space-charge-limited electron emitters. These electrons do not cause unacceptable losses because magnetic fields due to system currents result in net motion parallel to the electrodes. It has been known for several years that a parameter known as flow impedance is useful for describing these flows. Flow impedance is a measure of the separation between the anode and the mean position of the electron cloud, and it will be shown in this paper that in many situations flow impedance depends upon the geometry of the transmission line upstream of the point of interest. It can be remarkably independent of other considerations such as line currents and voltage. For this reason flow impedance is a valuable design parameter. Models of impedance transitions and voltage adders using flow impedance will be developed. Results of these models will be compared to two-dimensional, time-dependent, particle-in-cell simulations.

  1. Steady flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    PubMed

    Budwig, R; Elger, D; Hooper, H; Slippy, J

    1993-11-01

    Steady flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm models has been examined for four aneurysm sizes over Reynolds numbers from 500 to 2600. The Reynolds number is based on entrance tube diameter, and the inlet condition is fully developed flow. Experimental and numerical methods have been used to determine: (i) the overall features of the flow, (ii) the stresses on the aneurysm walls in laminar flow, and (iii) the onset and characteristics of turbulent flow. The laminar flow field is characterized by a jet of fluid (passing directly through the aneurysm) surrounded by a recirculating vortex. The wall shear stress magnitude in the recirculation zone is about ten times less than in the entrance tube. Both wall shear stress and wall normal stress profiles exhibit large magnitude peaks near the reattachment point at the distal end of the aneurysm. The onset of turbulence in the model is intermittent for 2000 < Re < 2500. The results demonstrate that a slug of turbulence in the entrance tube grows much more rapidly in the aneurysm than in a corresponding length of uniform cross section pipe. When turbulence is present in the aneurysm the recirculation zone breaks down and the wall shear stress returns to a magnitude comparable to that in the entrance tube. PMID:8309237

  2. A Substance Flow Model for Global Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccari, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    A system-based substance flow model (SFM) for phosphorus is developed based on the global phosphorus substance flow analysis (SFA) of Cordell et al (2009). The model is based strictly on mass balance considerations. It predicts the sensitivity of phosphorus consumption to various interventions intended to conserve reserves, as well as interactions among these efforts, allowing a comparison of their impacts on phosphorus demand. The interventions include control of phosphorus losses from soil erosion, food production and food waste, or phosphorus recycling such as from animal manure or human waste.

  3. Troughs under threshold modeling of minimum flows in perennial streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önöz, B.; Bayazit, M.

    2002-02-01

    Troughs under threshold analysis has so far found little application in the modeling of minimum streamflows. In this study, all the troughs under a certain threshold level are considered in deriving the probability distribution of annual minima through the total probability theorem. For the occurrence of minima under the threshold, Poissonian, binomial or negative binomial processes are assumed. The magnitude of minima follows the generalized Pareto, exponential or power distribution. It is shown that asymptotic extreme value distributions for minima or the two-parameter Weibull distribution is obtained for the annual minima, depending on which models are assumed for the occurrence and magnitude of troughs under the threshold. Derived distributions can be used for modeling the minimum flows in streams which do not have zero flows. Expressions for the T-year annual minimum flow are obtained. An example illustrates the application of the troughs under threshold model to the minimum flows observed in a stream.

  4. Hybrid laminar flow control study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) in which leading edge suction is used in conjunction with wing pressure distribution tailoring to postpone boundary layer transition and reduce friction drag was examined. Airfoil design characteristics required for laminar flow control (LFC) were determined. The aerodynamic design of the HLFC wing for a 178 passenger commercial turbofan transport was developed, and a drag was estimated. Systems changes required to install HLFC were defined, and weights and fuel economy were estimated. The potential for 9% fuel reduction for a 3926-km (2120-nmi) mission is identified.

  5. PWR internal flow modeling with fuel assemblies details

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, E.; Yan, J.; Karoutas, Z.; Gehin, J.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.

    2012-07-01

    This study is an example of a massive parallel computing of the coolant flow in a nuclear reactor. It resolves the flow velocities in each assembly on pin level and predicts the flow distribution in complex geometries such as the lower and upper reactor plenums. The size of the developed model (1.035 billion cells) required the runs to be executed on the NCCS clusters (www.nccs.gov). STAR-CCM+ code (www.ed-adapco.com) was installed on two clusters: JAGUARXT5 and FROST, both of which were capable of executing this model. (authors)

  6. Predicting dynamics and rheology of blood flow: A comparative study of multiscale and low-dimensional models of red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-05-27

    In this work we compare the predictive capability of two mathematical models for red blood cells (RBCs) focusing on blood flow in capillaries and arterioles. Both RBC models as well as their corresponding blood flows are based on the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method, a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach. The first model employs a multiscale description of the RBC (MS-RBC), with its membrane represented by hundreds or even thousands of DPD-particles connected by springs into a triangular network in combination with out-of-plane elastic bending resistance. Extra dissipation within the network accounts for membrane viscosity, while the characteristic biconcave RBC shape is achieved by imposition of constraints for constant membrane area and constant cell volume. The second model is based on a low-dimensional description (LD-RBC) constructed as a closed torus-like ring of only 10 large DPD colloidal particles. They are connected into a ring by worm-like chain (WLC) springs combined with bending resistance. The LD-RBC model can be fitted to represent the entire range of nonlinear elastic deformations as measured by optical-tweezers for healthy and for infected RBCs in malaria. MS-RBCs suspensions model the dynamics and rheology of blood flow accurately for any size vessel but this approach is computationally expensive above 100 microns. Surprisingly, the much more economical suspensions of LD-RBCs also capture the blood flow dynamics and rheology accurately except for vessels with sizes comparable to RBC diameter. In particular, the LD-RBC suspensions are shown to properly capture the experimental data for the apparent viscosity of blood and its cell-free layer (CFL) in tube flow. Taken together, these findings suggest a hierarchical approach in modeling blood flow in the arterial tree, whereby the MS-RBC model should be employed for capillaries and arterioles below 100 microns, the LD-RBC model for arterioles, and the continuum description for

  7. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuhovcak, Jan; Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  8. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  9. A hyperbolic model for viscous Newtonian flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkov, Ilya; Romenski, Evgeniy

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a pure hyperbolic alternative to the Navier-Stokes equations, which are of parabolic type. As a result of the substitution of the concept of the viscosity coefficient by a microphysics-based temporal characteristic, particle settled life (PSL) time, it becomes possible to formulate a model for viscous fluids in a form of first-order hyperbolic partial differential equations. Moreover, the concept of PSL time allows the use of the same model for flows of viscous fluids (Newtonian or non-Newtonian) as well as irreversible deformation of solids. In the theory presented, a continuum is interpreted as a system of material particles connected by bonds; the internal resistance to flow is interpreted as elastic stretching of the particle bonds; and a flow is a result of bond destructions and rearrangements of particles. Finally, we examine the model for simple shear flows, arbitrary incompressible and compressible flows of Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that Newton's viscous law can be obtained in the framework of the developed hyperbolic theory as a steady-state limit. A basic relation between the viscosity coefficient, PSL time, and the shear sound velocity is also obtained.

  10. Modeling Stromatolite Growth Under Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. J.; Gong, J.; Tice, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stromatolite growth models based on diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) has been fairly successful at producing features commonly recognized in stromatolitic structures in the rock record. These models generally require slow mixing of solutes at time scales comparable to the growth of organisms and largely ignore fluid erosions. Recent research on microbial mats suggests that fluid flow might have a dominant control on the formation, deformation and erosion of surface microbial structures, raising the possibility that different styles of fluid flow may influence the morphology of stromatolites. Many stromatolites formed in relatively high energy, shallow water environments under oscillatory currents driven by wind-induced waves. In order to investigate the potential role of oscillatory flows in shaping stromatolites, we are constructing a numerical model of stromatolite growth parameterized by flume experiments with cyanobacterial biofilms. The model explicitly incorporates reaction-diffusion processes, surface deformation and erosion, biomass growth, sedimentation and mineral precipitation. A Lattice-Boltzmann numerical scheme was applied to the reaction-diffusion equations in order to boost computational efficiency. A basic finite element method was employed to compute surface deformation and erosion. Growth of biomass, sedimentation and carbonate precipitation was based on a modified discrete cellular automata scheme. This model will be used to test an alternative hypothesis for the formation of stromatolites in higher energy, shallow and oscillatory flow environments.

  11. Stochastic modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronkite-Ratcliff, Collin; Phelps, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes preliminary three-dimensional geostatistical modeling of a lava-flow aquifer system using a multiple-point geostatistical model. The purpose of this study is to provide a proof-of-concept for this modeling approach. An example of the method is demonstrated using a subset of borehole geologic data and aquifer test data from a portion of the Calico Hills Formation, a lava-flow aquifer system that partially underlies Pahute Mesa, Nevada. Groundwater movement in this aquifer system is assumed to be controlled by the spatial distribution of two geologic units—rhyolite lava flows and zeolitized tuffs. The configuration of subsurface lava flows and tuffs is largely unknown because of limited data. The spatial configuration of the lava flows and tuffs is modeled by using a multiple-point geostatistical simulation algorithm that generates a large number of alternative realizations, each honoring the available geologic data and drawn from a geologic conceptual model of the lava-flow aquifer system as represented by a training image. In order to demonstrate how results from the geostatistical model could be analyzed in terms of available hydrologic data, a numerical simulation of part of an aquifer test was applied to the realizations of the geostatistical model.

  12. Comparison of Conventional and ANN Models for River Flow Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Ganti, R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrological models are useful in many water resources applications such as flood control, irrigation and drainage, hydro power generation, water supply, erosion and sediment control, etc. Estimates of runoff are needed in many water resources planning, design development, operation and maintenance activities. River flow is generally estimated using time series or rainfall-runoff models. Recently, soft artificial intelligence tools such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have become popular for research purposes but have not been extensively adopted in operational hydrological forecasts. There is a strong need to develop ANN models based on real catchment data and compare them with the conventional models. In this paper, a comparative study has been carried out for river flow forecasting using the conventional and ANN models. Among the conventional models, multiple linear, and non linear regression, and time series models of auto regressive (AR) type have been developed. Feed forward neural network model structure trained using the back propagation algorithm, a gradient search method, was adopted. The daily river flow data derived from Godavari Basin @ Polavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India have been employed to develop all the models included here. Two inputs, flows at two past time steps, (Q(t-1) and Q(t-2)) were selected using partial auto correlation analysis for forecasting flow at time t, Q(t). A wide range of error statistics have been used to evaluate the performance of all the models developed in this study. It has been found that the regression and AR models performed comparably, and the ANN model performed the best amongst all the models investigated in this study. It is concluded that ANN model should be adopted in real catchments for hydrological modeling and forecasting.

  13. Physical modeling studies of electrolyte flow due to gas evolution and some aspects of bubble behavior in advanced hall cells: Part I. Flow in cells with a flat anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, R.; Evans, J. W.

    1994-06-01

    The need for energy reduction in the electrolytic production of aluminum led to the concept of advanced Hall cells that can be operated at lower interelectrode gaps compared to existing cells. However, gas bubbles generated by the anodic reaction increase the resistivity of electrolyte and cancel out part of the reduction in interelectrode resistance expected from bringing the electrodes closer together. Therefore, the primary objective of this work was to determine a cell design in which flow can be managed to promote the removal of anode gas bubbles from the interelectrode gap. In particular, this article focuses on advanced Hall cells equipped with “flat” anodes, similar to those used in existing cells. The principal experimental tool has been a “water” model consisting of a large tank in which simulated anodes can be suspended in either the horizontal or near-horizontal configurations. Gas was generated by forcing compressed air through porous graphite, and the fine bubbles characteristic of inert anodes used in advanced Hall cells were produced by adding butanol to water. Velocities were measured using a laser-Doppler velocimeter (LDV). This study indicates that the existing cell configuration might not be the optimum configuration for advanced Hall cells. The results also show that operation of an advanced Hall cell with a fully submerged anode should give rise to higher electrolyte velocities and thus rapid removal of bubbles. The bubble effect should be further lowered in a near-horizontal configuration; however, the flow pattern could have an adverse effect on current efficiency and alumina distribution in the cell. It has also been shown that the bubble size, and, therefore, the physical properties of the electrolyte, can have a significant effect on the electrolyte flow pattern in the interelectrode gap.

  14. Experimental and mathematical modeling of flow in headboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariati, Mohammad Reza

    The fluid flow patterns in a paper-machine headbox have a strong influence on the quality of the paper produced by the machine. Due to increasing demand for high quality paper there is a need to investigate the details of the fluid flow in the paper machine headbox. The objective of this thesis is to use experimental and computational methods of modeling the flow inside a typical headbox in order to evaluate and understand the mean flow patterns and turbulence created there. In particular, spatial variations of the mean flow and of the turbulence quantities and the turbulence generated secondary flows are studied. In addition to the flow inside the headbox, the flow leaving the slice is also modeled both experimentally and computationally. Comparison of the experimental and numerical results indicated that streamwise mean components of the velocities in the headbox are predicted well by all the turbulence models considered in this study. However, the standard k-epsilon model and the algebraic turbulence models fail to predict the turbulence quantities accurately. Standard k-epsilon-model also fails to predict the direction and magnitude of the secondary flows. Significant improvements in the k-epsilon model predictions were achieved when the turbulence production term was artificially set to zero. This is justified by observations of the turbulent velocities from the experiments and by a consideration of the form of the kinetic energy equation. A better estimation of the Reynolds normal stress distribution and the degree of anisotropy of turbulence was achieved using the Reynolds stress turbulence model. Careful examination of the measured turbulence velocity results shows that after the initial decay of the turbulence in the headbox, there is a short region close to the exit, but inside the headbox, where the turbulent kinetic energy actually increases as a result of the distortion imposed by the contraction. The turbulence energy quickly resumes its decay in the

  15. Modeling of blood flow in arterial trees.

    PubMed

    Anor, Tomer; Grinberg, Leopold; Baek, Hyoungsu; Madsen, Joseph R; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Karniadakis, George E

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computational methods and medical imaging techniques have enabled accurate simulations of subject-specific blood flows at the level of individual blood cell and in complex arterial networks. While in the past, we were limited to simulations with one arterial bifurcation, the current state-of-the-art is simulations of arterial networks consisting of hundreds of arteries. In this paper, we review the advances in methods for vascular flow simulations in large arterial trees. We discuss alternative approaches and validity of various assumptions often made to simplify the modeling. To highlight the similarities and discrepancies of data computed with different models, computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) and inexpensive one-dimensional (1D) flow simulations in very large arterial networks are employed. Finally, we discuss the possibilities, challenges, and limitations of the computational methods for predicting outcomes of therapeutic interventions for individual patients. PMID:20836052

  16. The lagRST Model: A Turbulence Model for Non-Equilibrium Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillard, Randolph P.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Olsen, Michael E.; Blaisdell, Gregory A.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new class of turbulence model designed for wall bounded, high Reynolds number flows with separation. The model addresses deficiencies seen in the modeling of nonequilibrium turbulent flows. These flows generally have variable adverse pressure gradients which cause the turbulent quantities to react at a finite rate to changes in the mean flow quantities. This "lag" in the response of the turbulent quantities can t be modeled by most standard turbulence models, which are designed to model equilibrium turbulent boundary layers. The model presented uses a standard 2-equation model as the baseline for turbulent equilibrium calculations, but adds transport equations to account directly for non-equilibrium effects in the Reynolds Stress Tensor (RST) that are seen in large pressure gradients involving shock waves and separation. Comparisons are made to several standard turbulence modeling validation cases, including an incompressible boundary layer (both neutral and adverse pressure gradients), an incompressible mixing layer and a transonic bump flow. In addition, a hypersonic Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction with separation is assessed along with a transonic capsule flow. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWTBLI flows assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the baseline models, but the over prediction of the peak heat flux downstream of the reattachment shock that plagues many models is reduced.

  17. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Electrochemical Flow Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, NC; Wainright, JS; Savinell, RF

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical flow capacitors (EFCs) for grid-scale energy storage are a new technology that is beginning to receive interest. Prediction of the expected performance of such systems is important as modeling can be a useful avenue in the search for design improvements. Models based off of circuit analogues exist to predict EFC performance, but these suffer from deficiencies (e.g. a multitude of fitting constants that are required and the ability to analyze only one spatial direction at a time). In this paper mathematical models based off of three-dimensional macroscopic balances (similar to models for porous electrodes) are reported. Unlike existing three-dimensional porous electrode-based approaches for modeling slurry electrodes, advection (i.e., transport associated with bulk fluid motion) of the overpotential is included in order to account for the surface charge at the interface between flowing particles and the electrolyte. Doing so leads to the presence of overpotential boundary layers that control the performance of EFCs. These models were used to predict the charging behavior of an EFC under both flowing and non-flowing conditions. Agreement with experimental data was good, including proper prediction of the steady-state current that is achieved during charging of a flowing EFC. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License (CC BY-NC-ND, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is not changed in any way and is properly cited. For permission for commercial reuse, please email: oa@electrochem.org. All rights reserved.

  19. Template Matching Using a Fluid Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William Curtis

    Template matching is successfully used in machine recognition of isolated spoken words. In these systems a word is broken into frames (20 millisecond time slices) and the spectral characteristics of each frame are found. Thus, each word is represented as a 2-dimensional (2-D) function of spectral characteristic and frame number. An unknown word is recognized by matching its 2-D representation to previously stored example words, or templates, also in this 2-D form. A new model for this matching step will be introduced. The 2-D representations of the template and unknown are used to determine the shape of a volume of viscous fluid. This volume is broken up into many small elements. The unknown is changed into the template by allowing flows between the element boundaries. Finally the match between the template and unknown is determined by calculating a weighted squared sum of the flow values. The model also allows the relative flow resistance between the element boundaries to be changed. This is useful for characterizing the important features of a given template. The flow resistances are changed according to the gradient of a simple performance function. This performance function is evaluated using a set of training samples provided by the user. The model is applied to isolated word and single character recognition tasks. Results indicate the applications where this model works best.

  20. Turbulence modeling for impinging jet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Robert E.; Rodman, Laura C.; Bradshaw, Peter; Bott, Donald M.; Shoemaker, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to improve the accuracy of the k-epsilon turbulence model for flows involving one or more jets impinging on a plate in a crossflow which generate a horseshoe vortex. The k-epsilon model is modified by adding source terms to the epsilon equation, which enables it to more accurately predict the shear stress in flows subject to streamline curvature and vortex stretching (or lateral divergence). Calculations with the modified model predict the ground vortex core to be about 15 percent upstream of its experimental location. This is a significant improvement over the standard model which yields higher errors for calculation of the vortex-core location.

  1. Large scale modelling of bankfull flow: An example for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christof; Flörke, Martina; Eisner, Stephanie; Voss, Frank

    2011-10-01

    SummaryBankfull flow is a relevant parameter in the field of large scale modelling especially for the analysis of environmental flows and flood related hydrological processes. In our case, bankfull flow data were required within the SCENES project in order to analyse ecological important inundation events at selected grid cells of a European raster. In practise, the determination of bankfull flow is a complex task even on local scale. Subsequent to a literature survey of bankfull flow studies, this paper describes a method which can be applied to estimate bankfull flow on a global or continental grid cell raster. The method is based on the partial duration series approach taking into account a 40-years time series of daily discharge data modelled by the global water model WaterGAP. An increasing threshold censoring procedure, a declustering scheme and the generalised Pareto distribution are applied. Modelled bankfull flow values are then validated by different efficiency criteria against bankfull flows observed at gauging stations in Europe. Thereby, the impact of (i) the applied distribution function, (ii) the threshold setting in the partial duration series, (iii) the climate input data and (iv) applying the annual maxima series are evaluated and compared to the proposed approach. The results show that bankfull flow can be reasonably estimated with a high model efficiency ( E1 = 0.71) and weighted correlation ( ωr2 = 0.90) as well as a systematic overestimation of 22.8%. Finally it turned out that in our study focusing on hydrological extremes, the appliance of the daily climate input data is a basic requirement. While the choice of the distribution function had no significant impact on the final results, the threshold setting in the partial duration series was crucial.

  2. Multiphase flow modeling in centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Adelmann, S; Schwienheer, C; Schembecker, G

    2011-09-01

    The separation efficiency in Centrifugal Partition Chromatography (CPC) depends on selection of a suitable biphasic solvent system (distribution ratio, selectivity factor, sample solubility) and is influenced by hydrodynamics in the chambers. Especially the stationary phase retention, the interfacial area for mass transfer and the flow pattern (backmixing) are important parameters. Their relationship with physical properties, operating parameters and chamber geometry is not completely understood and predictions are hardly possible. Experimental flow visualization is expensive and two-dimensional only. Therefore we simulated the flow pattern using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) method, which was implemented in OpenFOAM®. For the three-dimensional simulation of a rotating FCPC®-chamber, gravitational centrifugal and Coriolis forces were added to the conservation equation. For experimental validation the flow pattern of different solvent systems was visualized with an optical measurement system. The amount of mobile phase in a chamber was calculated from gray scale values of videos recorded by an image processing routine in ImageJ®. To visualize the flow of the stationary phase polyethylene particles were used to perform a qualitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis. We found a good agreement between flow patterns and velocity profiles of experiments and simulations. By using the model we found that increasing the chamber depth leads to higher specific interfacial area. Additionally a circular flow in the stationary phase was identified that lowers the interfacial area because it pushes the jet of mobile phase to the chamber wall. The Coriolis force alone gives the impulse for this behavior. As a result the model is easier to handle than experiments and allows 3D prediction of hydrodynamics in the chamber. Additionally it can be used for optimizing geometry and operating parameters for given physical properties of solvent systems. PMID:21324465

  3. Traffic flow forecasting: Comparison of modeling approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.L.; Demetsky, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    The capability to forecast traffic volume in an operational setting has been identified as a critical need for intelligent transportation systems (ITS). In particular, traffic volume forecasts will support proactive, dynamic traffic control. However, previous attempts to develop traffic volume forecasting models have met with limited success. This research effort focused on developing traffic volume forecasting models for two sites on Northern Virginia`s Capital Beltway. Four models were developed and tested for the freeway traffic flow forecasting problem, which is defined as estimating traffic flow 15 min into the future. They were the historical average, time-series, neural network, and nonparametric regression models. The nonparametric regression model significantly outperformed the other models. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test revealed that the nonparametric regression model experienced significantly lower errors than the other models. In addition, the nonparametric regression model was easy to implement, and proved to be portable, performing well at two distinct sites. Based on its success, research is ongoing to refine the nonparametric regression model and to extend it to produce multiple interval forecasts.

  4. Carreau model for oscillatory blood flow in a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakova, S.; Nikolova, E.; Radev, St.

    2014-11-01

    The analysis of the blood flow dynamics (hemodynamics) in tubes is crucial when investigating the rupture of different types of aneurysms. The blood viscosity nonlinear dependence on the flow shear rate creates complicated manifestations of the blood pulsations. Although a great number of studies exists, experimental and numerical, this phenomenon is still not very well understood. The aim of the present work is to propose a numerical model of the oscillatory blood flow in a tube on the basis of the Carreau model of the blood viscosity (nonlinear model with respect to the shear rate). The obtained results for the flow velocity and tangential stress on the tube wall are compared well with other authors' results.

  5. Fuzzy temporal logic based railway passenger flow forecast model.

    PubMed

    Dou, Fei; Jia, Limin; Wang, Li; Xu, Jie; Huang, Yakun

    2014-01-01

    Passenger flow forecast is of essential importance to the organization of railway transportation and is one of the most important basics for the decision-making on transportation pattern and train operation planning. Passenger flow of high-speed railway features the quasi-periodic variations in a short time and complex nonlinear fluctuation because of existence of many influencing factors. In this study, a fuzzy temporal logic based passenger flow forecast model (FTLPFFM) is presented based on fuzzy logic relationship recognition techniques that predicts the short-term passenger flow for high-speed railway, and the forecast accuracy is also significantly improved. An applied case that uses the real-world data illustrates the precision and accuracy of FTLPFFM. For this applied case, the proposed model performs better than the k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models. PMID:25431586

  6. Fuzzy Temporal Logic Based Railway Passenger Flow Forecast Model

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Fei; Jia, Limin; Wang, Li; Xu, Jie; Huang, Yakun

    2014-01-01

    Passenger flow forecast is of essential importance to the organization of railway transportation and is one of the most important basics for the decision-making on transportation pattern and train operation planning. Passenger flow of high-speed railway features the quasi-periodic variations in a short time and complex nonlinear fluctuation because of existence of many influencing factors. In this study, a fuzzy temporal logic based passenger flow forecast model (FTLPFFM) is presented based on fuzzy logic relationship recognition techniques that predicts the short-term passenger flow for high-speed railway, and the forecast accuracy is also significantly improved. An applied case that uses the real-world data illustrates the precision and accuracy of FTLPFFM. For this applied case, the proposed model performs better than the k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models. PMID:25431586

  7. Model for high-throughput screening of drug immunotoxicity--study of the anti-microbial G1 over peritoneal macrophages using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Tenorio-Borroto, Esvieta; Peñuelas-Rivas, Claudia G; Vásquez-Chagoyán, Juan C; Castañedo, Nilo; Prado-Prado, Francisco J; García-Mera, Xerardo; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2014-01-24

    Quantitative Structure-Activity (mt-QSAR) techniques may become an important tool for prediction of cytotoxicity and High-throughput Screening (HTS) of drugs to rationalize drug discovery process. In this work, we train and validate by the first time mt-QSAR model using TOPS-MODE approach to calculate drug molecular descriptors and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) function. This model correctly classifies 8258 out of 9000 (Accuracy = 91.76%) multiplexing assay endpoints of 7903 drugs (including both train and validation series). Each endpoint correspond to one out of 1418 assays, 36 molecular and cellular targets, 46 standard type measures, in two possible organisms (human and mouse). After that, we determined experimentally, by the first time, the values of EC50 = 21.58 μg/mL and Cytotoxicity = 23.6% for the anti-microbial/anti-parasite drug G1 over Balb/C mouse peritoneal macrophages using flow cytometry. In addition, the model predicts for G1 only 7 positive endpoints out 1251 cytotoxicity assays (0.56% of probability of cytotoxicity in multiple assays). The results obtained complement the toxicological studies of this important drug. This work adds a new tool to the existing pool of few methods useful for multi-target HTS of ChEMBL and other libraries of compounds towards drug discovery. PMID:24445280

  8. Compressible turbulent flows: Modeling and similarity considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Otto

    1991-01-01

    With the recent revitalization of high speed flow research, compressibility presents a new set of challenging problems to turbulence researchers. Questions arise as to what extent compressibility affects turbulence dynamics, structures, the Reynolds stress-mean velocity (constitutive) relation, and the accompanying processes of heat transfer and mixing. In astrophysical applications, compressible turbulence is believed to play an important role in intergalactic gas cloud dynamics and in accretion disk convection. Understanding and modeling of the compressibility effects in free shear flows, boundary layers, and boundary layer/shock interactions is discussed.

  9. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets. PMID:26764625

  10. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapolli, N.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets.

  11. A study of vapor-liquid flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, Cengiz; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    1994-01-20

    We study the heat transfer-driven liquid-to-vapor phase change in single-component systems in porous media by using pore network models and flow visualization experiments. Experiments using glass micromodels were conducted. The flow visualization allowed us to define the rules for the numerical pore network model. A numerical pore network model is developed for vapor-liquid displacement where fluid flow, heat transfer and capillarity are included at the pore level. We examine the growth process at two different boundary conditions.

  12. Transition and Turbulence Modeling for Blunt-Body Wake Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Robert P.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hassan, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    This study attempts t o improve the modeling and computational prediction of high- speed transitional wake flows. The recently developed kappa - zeta (Enstrophy) turbulence model is coupled with a newly developed transition prediction method and implemented in an implicit flow solver well-suited to hypersonic flows. In this model, transition onset is determined as part of the solution. Results obtained using the new model for a 70- deg blunted cone/sting geometry demonstrate better agreement with experimental heat- transfer measurements when compared to laminar calculations as well as solutions using the kappa - omega model. Results are also presented for the situation where transition onset is preselected. It is shown that, in this case, results are quite sensitive to location of the transition point.

  13. Lagrangian particle model for multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Meakin, Paul

    2009-10-01

    A Lagrangian particle model for multiphase multicomponent fluid flow, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), was developed and used to simulate the flow of an emulsion consisting of bubbles of a non-wetting liquid surrounded by a wetting liquid. In SPH simulations, fluids are represented by sets of particles that are used as discretization points to solve the Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics equations. In the multiphase multicomponent SPH model, a modified van der Waals equation of state is used to close the system of flow equations. The combination of the momentum conservation equation with the van der Waals equation of state results in a particle equation of motion in which the total force acting on each particle consists of many-body repulsive and viscous forces, two-body (particle-particle) attractive forces, and body forces such as gravitational forces. Similarly to molecular dynamics, for a given fluid component the combination of repulsive and attractive forces causes a phase separation. The surface tension at liquid-liquid interfaces is imposed through component dependent attractive forces. The wetting behavior of the fluids is controlled by phase dependent attractive interactions between the fluid particles and stationary particles that represent the solid phase. The dynamics of fluids away from interface is governed by purely hydrodynamic forces. Comparison with analytical solutions for static conditions and relatively simple flows demonstrates the accuracy of the SPH model.

  14. Single point modeling of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Mansour, N. N.; Zeman, O.

    1994-01-01

    A model for the effects of rotation on turbulence is proposed and tested. These effects which influence mainly the rate of turbulence decay are modeled in a modified turbulent energy dissipation rate equation that has explicit dependence on the mean rotation rate. An appropriate definition of the rotation rate derived from critical point theory and based on the invariants of the deformation tensor is proposed. The modeled dissipation rate equation is numerically well behaved and can be used in conjunction with any level of turbulence closure. The model is applied to the two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model and is used to compute separated flows in a backward-facing step and an axisymmetric swirling coaxial jets into a sudden expansion. In general, the rotation modified dissipation rate model shows some improvements over the standard kappa-epsilon model.

  15. Single point modeling of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Mansour, N. N.; Zeman, O.

    1994-12-01

    A model for the effects of rotation on turbulence is proposed and tested. These effects which influence mainly the rate of turbulence decay are modeled in a modified turbulent energy dissipation rate equation that has explicit dependence on the mean rotation rate. An appropriate definition of the rotation rate derived from critical point theory and based on the invariants of the deformation tensor is proposed. The modeled dissipation rate equation is numerically well behaved and can be used in conjunction with any level of turbulence closure. The model is applied to the two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model and is used to compute separated flows in a backward-facing step and an axisymmetric swirling coaxial jets into a sudden expansion. In general, the rotation modified dissipation rate model shows some improvements over the standard kappa-epsilon model.

  16. Two-Phase Flow within Geological Flow Analogies--A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, G.; Smith, D.H.; Ferer, M.V.; Richards, M.; Bromhal, G.S.

    2006-10-01

    Displacement of a viscous fluid in heterogeneous geological media by a less viscous one does not evacuate 100% of the defending fluid due to capillary and viscous fingering. This is of importance in geological flows that are encountered in secondary oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration in saturated brine fields. Hele-Shaw and pore/throat cells are commonly used to study this in the labratory. Numerical simulations of this flow phenomenon with pore-throat models have been prevalent for over two decades. This current work solves the full Navier-Stokes equations of conservation within random pore-throat geometries with varying properties to study the resulting flow properties. Verification of the solution method is performed by comparison of the model predictions with the available experimental data in the literature. Experimental flows in a pore-throat cell with a known geometrical structure are shown to be in good agreement with the model. Dynamic comparisons to a computational pore-throat model have been shown to be in good agreement as well. There are also additional two-phase immiscible flow patterns that can be identified from the current solutions for which the corresponding laboratory counter part or the pore-throat model predictions are not available. The identification of these flow patterns may allow more accurate modeling of fluid displacement on the reservoir scale.

  17. Stationary spiral flow in polytropic stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Pekeris, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    It is shown that, in addition to the static Emden solution, a self-gravitating polytropic gas has a dynamic option in which there is stationary flow along spiral trajectories wound around the surfaces of concentric tori. The motion is obtained as a solution of a partial differential equation which is satisfied by the meridional stream function, coupled with Poisson's equation and a Bernoulli-type equation for the pressure (density). The pressure is affected by the whole of the Bernoulli term rather than by the centrifugal part only, which acts for a rotating model, and it may be reduced down to zero at the center. The spiral type of flow is illustrated for an incompressible fluid (n = 0), for which an exact solution is obtained. The features of the dynamic constant-density model are discussed as a basis for future comparison with the solution for compressible models.

  18. Flow stress model in metal cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the plastic deformation that occurs in metal cutting, based on dislocation mechanics, is presented. The model explains the fundamental deformation structure that develops during machining and is based on the well known Cottrell-Stokes Law, wherein the flow stress is partitioned into two parts; an athermal part which occurs in the shear fronts (or shear bands); and a thermal part which occurs in the lamella regions. The deformation envokes the presence of a cellular dislocation distribution which always exists in the material ahead of the shear process. This 'alien' dislocation distribution either exists in the metal prior to cutting or is produced by the compressive stress field which operates in front of the shear process. The magnitude of the flow stress and direction of the shear are shown to be correlated to the stacking fault energy of the metal being cut. The model is tested with respect to energy consumption rates and found to be consistent with observed values.

  19. Continuum modeling of cooperative traffic flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoduy, D.; Hoogendoorn, S. P.; Liu, R.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a continuum approach to model the dynamics of cooperative traffic flow. The cooperation is defined in our model in a way that the equipped vehicle can issue and receive a warning massage when there is downstream congestion. Upon receiving the warning massage, the (up-stream) equipped vehicle will adapt the current desired speed to the speed at the congested area in order to avoid sharp deceleration when approaching the congestion. To model the dynamics of such cooperative systems, a multi-class gas-kinetic theory is extended to capture the adaptation of the desired speed of the equipped vehicle to the speed at the downstream congested traffic. Numerical simulations are carried out to show the influence of the penetration rate of the equipped vehicles on traffic flow stability and capacity in a freeway.

  20. Experimental evaluations of the microchannel flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances have enabled a new wave of biomechanics measurements, and have renewed interest in selecting appropriate rheological models for soft tissues such as the liver, thyroid, and prostate. The microchannel flow model was recently introduced to describe the linear response of tissue to stimuli such as stress relaxation or shear wave propagation. This model postulates a power law relaxation spectrum that results from a branching distribution of vessels and channels in normal soft tissue such as liver. In this work, the derivation is extended to determine the explicit link between the distribution of vessels and the relaxation spectrum. In addition, liver tissue is modified by temperature or salinity, and the resulting changes in tissue responses (by factors of 1.5 or greater) are reasonably predicted from the microchannel flow model, simply by considering the changes in fluid flow through the modified samples. The 2 and 4 parameter versions of the model are considered, and it is shown that in some cases the maximum time constant (corresponding to the minimum vessel diameters), could be altered in a way that has major impact on the observed tissue response. This could explain why an inflamed region is palpated as a harder bump compared to surrounding normal tissue.

  1. Full-scale cold-flow modelling of the SRC-I slurry fired heater at Creare, Inc. mixing and 1/sup 0/ downslope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    One of the major pieces of equipment in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant is the slurry fired heater. Because of the absence of any plant data at comparable combinations of operating severity, a cold-flow modelling experimental program was initiated at Creare, Inc. The first phase of the test program confirmed the fired heater design and established reliable boundaries of flow rates for proper operation of the fired heater. An experimental setup was designed and built at Creare to duplicate the piping arrangement and flow conditions of the fired heater. The pipe dimensions, flow rates, and fluid properties were selected to minimize areas of scale-up and extrapolation. This follow-up test program was developed to resolve concerns raised from the observations made in the first phase. Tests were conducted to establish the extent of mixing between the liquid carpet and the fast-moving liquid slugs above it. The other segment of the test program was designed to develop the flow regime and pressure drop data in the 1/sup 0/ downslope configuration. The results demonstrated a significant amount of mixing between the liquid carpet and the liquid slugs for water and the 400-cP fluid at the design flow conditions. The extent of mixing improved with increasing liquid and gas velocities and decreasing liquid viscosities. Adequate mixing was observed at liquid flow rates as low as 50% of the design flow conditions. Slug flow was observed at design conditions in the 1/sup 0/ downslope configuration. Although adequate mixing is expected in heater pipes, different techniques should be investigated to improve the extent of mixing, especially near the transition boundary. 4 references, 5 figures, 8 tables.

  2. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  3. Modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Fogwell, T.W.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1994-12-31

    The authors will explore the numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. An interdisciplinary team of mathematicians, computer scientists, hydrologists, and environmental engineers is developing a sophisticated simulation code for use on workstation clusters and MPPs. To date, they have concentrated on modeling flow in the saturated zone (single phase), which requires the solution of a large linear system. they will discuss their implementation of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers. The preconditioners under consideration include simple diagonal scaling, s-step Jacobi, adaptive Chebyshev polynomial preconditioning, and multigrid. They will present some preliminary numerical results, including simulations of groundwater flow at the LLNL site. They also will demonstrate the code`s scalability.

  4. Two-equation turbulence modeling for 3-D hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J. E.; Coakley, T. J.; Marvin, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation to verify, incorporate and develop two-equation turbulence models for three-dimensional high speed flows is presented. The current design effort of hypersonic vehicles has led to an intensive study of turbulence models for compressible hypersonic flows. This research complements an extensive review of experimental data and the current development of 2D turbulence models. The review of experimental data on 2D and 3D flows includes complex hypersonic flows with pressure profiles, skin friction, wall heat transfer, and turbulence statistics data. In a parallel effort, turbulence models for high speed flows have been tested against flat plate boundary layers, and are being tested against the 2D database. In the present paper, we present the results of 3D Navier-Stokes numerical simulations with an improved k-omega two-equation turbulence model against experimental data and empirical correlations of an adiabatic flat plate boundary layer, a cold wall flat plate boundary layer, and a 3D database flow, the interaction of an oblique shock wave and a thick turbulent boundary layer with a free stream Mach number = 8.18 and Reynolds number = 5 x 10 to the 6th.

  5. [Ecological management model of agriculture-pasture ecotone based on the theory of energy and material flow--a case study in Houshan dryland area of Inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinlong; Pan, Zhihua; Zhao, Ju; Zheng, Dawei; Tuo, Debao; Zhao, Peiyi

    2004-04-01

    The degradation of ecological environment in the agriculture-pasture ecotone in northern China has been paid more attentions. Based on our many years' research and under the guide of energy and material flow theory, this paper put forward an ecological management model, with a hill as the basic cell and according to the natural, social and economic characters of Houshan dryland farming area inside the north agriculture-pasture ecotone. The input and output of three models, i.e., the traditional along-slope-tillage model, the artificial grassland model and the ecological management model, were observed and recorded in detail in 1999. Energy and material flow analysis based on field test showed that compared with traditional model, ecological management model could increase solar use efficiency by 8.3%, energy output by 8.7%, energy conversion efficiency by 19.4%, N output by 26.5%, N conversion efficiency by 57.1%, P output by 12.1%, P conversion efficiency by 45.0%, and water use efficiency by 17.7%. Among the models, artificial grassland model had the lowest solar use efficiency, energy output and energy conversion efficiency; while the ecological management model had the most outputs and benefits, was the best model with high economic effect, and increased economic benefits by 16.1%, compared with the traditional model. PMID:15334949

  6. A numerical study of pyroclastic flow dynamics: A shallow-water model for gravity currents with wide ranges of density differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Koyaguchi, Takehiro; Suzuki, Yujiro J.

    2016-04-01

    During explosive volcanic eruptions, gravity currents of mixtures of volcanic particles and gas flowing on the ground surface (pyroclastic flows) are commonly generated. The pyroclastic flows are characterized by strong density stratification with wide ranges of density ratio ρc/ρa = 100‑3, where ρc and ρa are the densities of the currents and ambient, respectively. We aim to understand the dynamics of pyroclastic flows, such as flow velocity and run-out distance. For this purpose, we have developed a new numerical model based on shallow-water equations for gravity currents with a wide range of ρc/ρa. In order to calculate gravity currents with a wide range of ρc/ρa, the balance between the driving force and the resistance of ambient at the flow front (i.e., front condition) needs to be correctly taken into account. In previous works, two types of numerical models have been proposed to solve the front condition: Boundary-Condition (BC) model and Artificial-Bed (AB) model. In BC model, the front condition is calculated directly as a boundary condition at each time step. In AB model, on the other hand, the front condition is calculated by setting a thin artificial bed ahead of the front. We have verified these numerical models by comparing their results with exact analytical solutions which are available for a simple case of homogeneous currents. The results show that AB model provides good approximations of the exact solutions for ρc/ρa ≳ 102, given a sufficiently small artificial bed thickness, whereas it fails to reproduce the exact solutions when ρc/ρa ≲ 102. On the other hand, the results of BC model agree well with the exact solutions when ρc/ρa ≲ 102, whereas it tends to overestimate the speed of the front position when ρc/ρa ≳ 102. It is, therefore, suggested that AB model is applicable to the currents of ρc/ρa ≳ 102, whereas BC model should be used for the currents of ρc/ρa ≲ 102. On the basis of the present results, we have

  7. Spiral blood flow in aorta-renal bifurcation models.

    PubMed

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-07-01

    The presence of a spiral arterial blood flow pattern in humans has been widely accepted. It is believed that this spiral component of the blood flow alters arterial haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of spiral flow on haemodynamic changes in aorta-renal bifurcations. In this regard, a computational fluid dynamics analysis of pulsatile blood flow was performed in two idealised models of aorta-renal bifurcations with and without flow diverter. The results show that the spirality effect causes a substantial variation in blood velocity distribution, while causing only slight changes in fluid shear stress patterns. The dominant observed effect of spiral flow is on turbulent kinetic energy and flow recirculation zones. As spiral flow intensity increases, the rate of turbulent kinetic energy production decreases, reducing the region of potential damage to red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, the recirculation zones which form on the cranial sides of the aorta and renal artery shrink in size in the presence of spirality effect; this may lower the rate of atherosclerosis development and progression in the aorta-renal bifurcation. These results indicate that the spiral nature of blood flow has atheroprotective effects in renal arteries and should be taken into consideration in analyses of the aorta and renal arteries. PMID:26414530

  8. Modeling the interaction between flow and highly flexible aquatic vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, J. T.; Uittenbogaard, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Aquatic vegetation has an important role in estuaries and rivers by acting as bed stabilizer, filter, food source, and nursing area. However, macrophyte populations worldwide are under high anthropogenic pressure. Protection and restoration efforts will benefit from more insight into the interaction between vegetation, currents, waves, and sediment transport. Most aquatic plants are very flexible, implying that their shape and hence their drag and turbulence production depend on the flow conditions. We have developed a numerical simulation model that describes this dynamic interaction between very flexible vegetation and a time-varying flow, using the sea grass Zostera marina as an example. The model consists of two parts: an existing 1DV k-ɛ turbulence model simulating the flow combined with a new model simulating the bending of the plants, based on a force balance that takes account of both vegetation position and buoyancy. We validated this model using observations of positions of flexible plastic strips and of the forces they are subjected to, as well as hydrodynamic measurements. The model predicts important properties like the forces on plants, flow velocity profiles, and turbulence characteristics well. Although the validation data are limited, the results are sufficiently encouraging to consider our model to be of generic value in studying flow processes in fields of flexible vegetation.

  9. Throat Flow Modelling of Expansion Deflection Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. V.; Hempsell, C. M.

    Modelling of the supersonic flow within a rocket nozzle of both conventional and expansion deflection (ED) design is well handled by Method of Characteristics based algorithms. This approach provides both a predic- tion of the flowfield, and allows efficient optimisation of nozzle shape with respect to length. However, the Method of Characteristics requires a solution of the transonic flow through the nozzle throat to provide initial conditions, and the accuracy of the description of the transonic flow will clearly affect the overall accuracy of the complete nozzle flow calculation. However, it is relatively simple to show that conventional analytical methods for this process break down when applied to the more complex throat geometry of ED nozzles. This requires the use of a time marching solution method, which allows the analysis of the flow within this region even on such advanced configurations. This paper demonstrates this capability, outlines a general method for ED nozzle throat geometric definition, and examines the effect of various throat parameters on the permissible range of ED contours. It is found that the design of length optimised ED nozzles is highly sensitive to small changes in these parameters, and hence they must be selected with care.

  10. Computational flow study of the continuous flow ventricular assist device, prototype number 3 blood pump.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J B; Wood, H G; Allaire, P E; Bearnson, G; Khanwilkar, P

    2000-05-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of blood flow in the continuous flow ventricular assist device, Prototype No. 3 (CFVAD3), which consists of a 4 blade shrouded impeller fully supported in magnetic bearings, was performed. This study focused on the regions within the pump where return flow occurs to the pump inlet, and where potentially damaging shear stresses and flow stagnation might occur: the impeller blade passages and the narrow gap clearance regions between the impeller-rotor and pump housing. Two separate geometry models define the spacing between the pump housing and the impeller's hub and shroud, and a third geometry model defines the pump's impeller and curved blades. The flow fields in these regions were calculated for various operating conditions of the pump. Pump performance curves were calculated, which compare well with experimentally obtained data. For all pump operating conditions, the flow rates within the gap regions were predicted to be toward the inlet of the pump, thus recirculating a portion of the impeller flow. Two smaller gap clearance regions were numerically examined to reduce the recirculation and to improve pump efficiency. The computational and geometry models will be used in future studies of a smaller pump to determine increased pump efficiency and the risk of hemolysis due to shear stress, and to insure the washing of blood through the clearance regions to prevent thrombosis. PMID:10848679

  11. Experiments with models committees for flow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, J.; Kayastha, N.; van Andel, S. J.; Fenicia, F.; Solomatine, D. P.

    2012-04-01

    In hydrological modelling typically a single model accounting for all possible hydrological loads, seasons and regimes is used. We argue however, that if a model is not complex enough (and this is the case if conceptual or semi-distributed models are used), then a single model can hardly capture all facets of a complex process, and hence more flexible modelling architectures are required. One possibility here is building several specialized models and making them responsible for various sub-processes. An output would be then a combination of outputs of individual models. In machine learning this approach is widely applied: several learning models are combined in a committee (where each model has a "voting" right with a particular weight). In this presentation we concentrate on optimising the above mentioned process of building a model committee, and on various ways of (a) building individual specialized models (mainly concentrating on calibrating them on various subsets of data and regimes corresponding to hydrological sub-processes), and (b) on various ways of combining their outputs (using the ideas of a fuzzy committee with various parameterisations). In doing so, we extend the approaches developed in [1, 2] and present new results. We consider this problem in multi-objective optimization setting (where objective functions correspond to different hydrological regimes) - leading to a number of Pareto-optimal model combinations from which the most appropriate for a given task can be chosen. Applications of the presented approach to flow forecasting are presented.

  12. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10 years have been processed. The HiRAP-derived aerodynamics model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as function of angle of attack, body-flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle of attack are also presented, along with flight-derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made between the aerodynamics model, data from the latest Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book, applicable computer simulations, and wind-tunnel data.

  13. Tracing man's impact on groundwater dependent ecosystem using geochemical an isotope tools combined with 3D flow and transport modeling: case study from southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Anna; Witczak, Stanislaw; Kania, Jaroslaw; Wachniew, Przemyslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Dulinski, Marek; Jench, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Niepolomice Forest. There is a growing concern that continued exploitation of those wells may lead to lowering water table in the Niepolomice Forest area and, as a consequence, may trigger drastic changes in this unique ecosystem. A dedicated study was launched with the main aim to quantify the interaction between Niepolomice Forest, with the focus the Wielkie Bloto fen, and the underlying Bogucice Sands aquifer. The work was pursued along three major lines: (i) vertical profiling of the Wielkie Bloto fen aimed at characterizing chemical and isotope contrast in the shallow groundwater occupying the Quaternary cover in order to identify upward leakage of deeper groundwater in the investigated area, (ii) regular monitoring of flow rate, chemistry and environmental isotopes of the Dluga Woda stream draining the Wielkie Bloto fen, and (iii) 3D modeling of groundwater flow in the vicinity of the Wielkie Bloto fen focusing on quantifying the impact of the Wola Batorska well field on the regional groundwater flow patterns. The results of isotope and chemical analyses confirmed existence of upward seepage of groundwater from the Bogucice Sands aquifer in the area of Wielkie Bloto fen. Preliminary assessment of the water balance of Dluga Woda catchment indicates that the baseflow originating from groundwater seepage is equal approximately 16% of the annual precipitation. Results of 3D flow model applied to the study area indicate that prolonged operation of the well-field Wola Batorska at maximum capacity may lead to substantial lowering of water table in the Niepolomice Forest area and, as a consequence, endanger further existence of this unique GDTE. Acknowledgements. Partial financial support of this work through GENESIS project (http:/www.thegenesisproject.eu) funded by the European Commission 7FP contract 226536, and through statutory funds of the AGH University of Science and Technology (projects No.11.11.140.026 and 11.11.220.01) is kindly acknowledged.

  14. Analogue experiments as benchmarks for models of lava flow emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E. C.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2013-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flow advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and on the effusion rate. Fast-computing models have arisen in the past decade in order to predict in near real time lava flow path and rate of advance. This type of model, crucial to mitigate volcanic hazards and organize potential evacuation, has been mainly compared a posteriori to real cases of emplaced lava flows. The input parameters of such simulations applied to natural eruptions, especially effusion rate and topography, are often not known precisely, and are difficult to evaluate after the eruption. It is therefore not straightforward to identify the causes of discrepancies between model outputs and observed lava emplacement, whereas the comparison of models with controlled laboratory experiments appears easier. The challenge for numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement is to model the simultaneous advance and thermal structure of viscous lava flows. To provide original constraints later to be used in benchmark numerical simulations, we have performed lab-scale experiments investigating the cooling of isoviscous gravity currents. The simplest experimental set-up is as follows: silicone oil, whose viscosity, around 5 Pa.s, varies less than a factor of 2 in the temperature range studied, is injected from a point source onto a horizontal plate and spreads axisymmetrically. The oil is injected hot, and progressively cools down to ambient temperature away from the source. Once the flow is developed, it presents a stationary radial thermal structure whose characteristics depend on the input flow rate. In addition to the experimental observations, we have developed in Garel et al., JGR, 2012 a theoretical model confirming the relationship between supply rate, flow advance and stationary surface thermal structure. We also provide

  15. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  16. Modelling boundary layer flow over barnacle-fouled surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadique, Jasim; Yang, Xiang; Meneveau, Charles; Mittal, Rajat

    2014-11-01

    Macro-biofouling is a critical concern for the marine industry. However, there is little data on flow and drag over such surfaces. Accurate modelling of such multi-scale flows remains a big challenge. Such simulations are vital in providing insights into the fundamental flow physics, and they can be used to estimate the timing, need and effectiveness of measures used to counteract bio-fouling. This talk focuses on the use of a sharp-interface immersed boundary method coupled with a wall model and large-eddy simulations to carry out accurate simulations of a turbulent boundary layer flow over macro-fouled surfaces. For the current study, high resolution scans of barnacles were used to create simple geometrical representations. Simulations were then carried out to test how well these simpler geometric models mimic the flow over actual barnacles. Simulations of array of modeled barnacles, with different barnacle densities have also been carried out and we present results on the effect distribution density on the flow physics and drag on the surfaces. This work is funded by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0582.

  17. Two relaxation time lattice Boltzmann model for rarefied gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahani, Javad Abolfazli; Norouzi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with two relaxation times (TRT) is implemented in order to study gaseous flow through a long micro/nano-channel. A new relation is introduced for the reflection factor in the bounce-back/specular reflection (BSR) boundary condition based on the analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. The focus of the present study is on comparing TRT with the other LBE models called multiple relaxation times (MRT) and single relaxation time (SRT) in simulation of rarefied gas flows. After a stability analysis for the TRT and SRT models, the numerical results are presented and validated by the analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with slip boundary condition, direct simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) and information preservation (IP) method. The effect of various gases on flow behavior is also investigated by using the variable hard sphere (VHS) model through the symmetrical relaxation time.

  18. Microscopic modeling of multi-lane highway traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, Nathan O.; Jagota, Anand

    2003-12-01

    We discuss a microscopic model for the study of multi-lane highway traffic flow dynamics. Each car experiences a force resulting from a combination of the desire of the driver to attain a certain velocity, aerodynamic drag, and change of the force due to car-car interactions. The model also includes multi-lane simulation capability and the ability to add and remove obstructions. We implement the model via a Java applet, which is used to simulate traffic jam formation, the effect of bottlenecks on traffic flow, and the existence of light, medium, and heavy traffic flow. The simulations also provide insight into how the properties of individual cars result in macroscopic behavior. Because the investigation of emergent characteristics is so common in physics, the study of traffic in this manner sheds new light on how the micro-to-macro transition works in general.

  19. The generalized Nash model for river flow routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baowei; Guo, Shenglian; Liang, Ji; Sun, Huaiwei

    2015-11-01

    The widely used instantaneous unit hydrograph (IUH) based on the Nash cascade reservoir model was obtained under a zero initial condition, or equivalently an empty reservoir assumption. In this study, a more general case with a non-zero initial condition is considered in the derivation of the classical Nash model. A generalized Nash model (GNM) has been deduced using the Laplace transform and the principle of mathematical induction. For river flow routing, the GNM physically interprets the formation of downstream outflow, i.e. the summation of the recession flow of the initial channel storage and the response to upstream inflow. The GNM, written in a state-space representation, is able to update the state of the river system in time, and hence can be applied in real-time forecasting. Two separate case studies have been used for illustration. It is indicated that the proposed updating procedure results in improved river flow forecasts when compared with the traditional IUH method.

  20. Improved engineering models for turbulent wall flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Xi; Zou, Hong-Yue; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach, called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), involving new concepts to describe the mean quantities in wall-bounded flows, and its application to improving the existing engineering turbulence models, as well as its physical interpretation. First, a revised k - ω model for pipe flows is obtained, which accurately predicts, for the first time, both mean velocity and (streamwise) kinetic energy for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), validated by Princeton experimental data. In particular, a multiplicative factor is introduced in the dissipation term to model an anomaly in the energy cascade in a meso-layer, predicting the outer peak of agreeing with data. Secondly, a new one-equation model is obtained for compressible turbulent boundary layers (CTBL), building on a multi-layer formula of the stress length function and a generalized temperature-velocity relation. The former refines the multi-layer description - viscous sublayer, buffer layer, logarithmic layer and a newly defined bulk zone - while the latter characterizes a parabolic relation between the mean velocity and temperature. DNS data show our predictions to have a 99% accuracy for several Mach numbers Ma = 2.25, 4.5, improving, up to 10%, a previous similar one-equation model (Baldwin & Lomax, 1978). Our results promise notable improvements in engineering models.

  1. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-10

    Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer ground-water flow models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. In the area of scientific modeling, the M&O CRWMS has the following responsibilities: To provide overall management and integration of modeling activities. To provide a framework for focusing modeling and model development. To identify areas that require increased or decreased emphasis. To ensure that the tools necessary to conduct performance assessment are available. These responsibilities are being initiated through a three-step process. It consists of a thorough review of existing models, testing of models which best fit the established requirements, and making recommendations for future development that should be conducted. Future model enhancement will then focus on the models selected during this activity. Furthermore, in order to manage future model development, particularly in those areas requiring substantial enhancement, the three-step process will be updated and reported periodically in the future.

  2. Modeling density segregation in granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Lueptow, Richard; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A recently developed continuum-based model accurately predicts segregation in flows of granular mixtures varying in particle size by considering the interplay of advection, diffusion and segregation. In this research, we extend the domain of the model to include density driven segregation. Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-2D bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density driven segregation velocity on local shear rate, particle concentration, and a segregation length which scales with the particle size and the logarithm of the density ratio. With these inputs, the model yields theoretical predictions of density segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios (1.11-3.33) and flow rates (19.2-113.6 cm3/s). Matching experiments with various combinations of glass, steel and ceramic particles were also performed which reproduced the segregation patterns obtained in both the simulations and the theory.

  3. A new nonlinear Muskingum flood routing model incorporating lateral flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahan, Halil; Gurarslan, Gurhan; Geem, Zong Woo

    2015-06-01

    A new nonlinear Muskingum flood routing model taking the contribution from lateral flow into consideration was developed in the present study. The cuckoo search algorithm, a quite novel and robust algorithm, was used in the calibration and verification of the model parameters. The success and the dependability of the proposed model were tested on five different sets of synthetic and real flood data. The optimal solutions for the test cases were determined by the currently proposed model rather than by different models taken from the literature, indicating that this model could be suitable for use in flood routing problems.

  4. Heat transfer and fluid flow modelling in supra-detachment basins: a case study of the Devonian basins of western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souche, A.; Dabrowski, M.; Andersen, T. B.; Medvedev, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Devonian basins of western Norway are supra-detachment basins located above a large crustal-scale detachment system, so-called the Nordfjord Sogn Detachment Zone. These basins are characterised by a thick succession (>10km) of siliciclastic sediments ranging in size from coarse conglomerates to fine grain sandstones and organized into narrow half-graben systems. Their architecture and geometry is closely controlled by the development of the coeval (i.e. Early to Middle Devonian) detachment acting as a normal fault/shear zone beneath the basins. The exhumation of rocks within the footwall of the detachment was subsequently followed by an increase of the geothermal gradient at the base of the sedimentary successions. Shear heating resulting from the intense rock deformation within the shear zone also played a role in increasing the temperature at the base of the basins. These two significant processes might have in turn contributed to the fluid mobility in the basins. In this study, we explore the feasibility of porous convection to occur spontaneously in sedimentary basins due to a regional increase of the geothermal gradient. Such process can be approximated by Darcy flow through porous media where the fluid density in the system might introduce a buoyancy-driven instability between lighter hot fluids at the base and denser cold fluids at the top of the basin. In geological systems porous flow might be inhibited by the closing of pores with depth, which leads to a reduced permeability and a limited amount of heat carrying fluids. Also, geological heterogeneities inherited from the layered structure of the sedimentary strata introduce large variations in the rock transport properties. We address these problems numerically by modelling heat and mass transport in porous media assuming quasi-incompressible Darcy flow. The fluid (water) density, viscosity, and specific heat are computed from the pore fluid pressure and the temperature. We investigate the onset of

  5. Modelling of flow in pipes and ultrasonic flowmeter bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Richard; Cibera, Vaclav; Syka, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    The contribution gives a summary of the flow modelling in flow parts of ultrasonic flowmeters using CFD system ANSYS/FLUENT. The article describes the basic techniques used to create CFD models of flow parts flow and selected results of the flow fields. The first part of the article summarizes the results of velocity profiles in smooth pipes for various turbulent models and used relations. The second part describes selected results of the numerical modelling of flow in the flow parts of the ultrasonic flowmeters and their partially comparison with experimental results.

  6. Model of Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Hidesada

    2001-11-01

    For circular pipe flows, a model of transition from laminar to turbulent flow has already been proposed and the minimum critical Reynolds number of approximately 2040 was obtained (Kanda, 1999). In order to prove the validity of the model, another verification is required. Thus, for plane Poiseuille flow, results of previous investigations were studied, focusing on experimental data on the critical Reynolds number Rc, the entrance length, and the transition length. Consequently, concerning the natural transition, it was confirmed from the experimental data that (i) the transition occurs in the entrance region, (ii) Rc increases as the contraction ratio in the inlet section increases, and (iii) the minimum Rc is obtained when the contraction ratio is the smallest or one, and there is no-bellshaped entrance or straight parallel plates. Its value exists in the neighborhood of 1300, based on the channel height and the average velocity. Although, for Hagen-Poiseuille flow, the minimum Rc is approximately 2000, based on the pipe diameter and the average velocity, there seems to be no significant difference in the transition from laminar to turbulent flow between Hagen-Poiseuille flow and plane Poiseuille flow (Kanda, 2001). Rc is determined by the shape of the inlet. Kanda, H., 1999, Proc. of ASME Fluids Engineering Division - 1999, FED-Vol. 250, pp. 197-204. Kanda, H., 2001, Proc. of ASME Fluids Engineering Division - 2001.

  7. Modeling of Turbulent Flow in Electromagnetically Levitated Metal Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, S.; Hyers, R. W.; Abedian, B.; Racz, L. M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This article details an effort to improve the understanding and prediction of turbulent flow inside a droplet of molten metal levitated in an electromagnetic field. It is shown that the flow field in a test case, a nickel droplet levitated under microgravity conditions, is in the transitional regime between laminar and turbulent flow. Past research efforts have used laminar, enhanced viscosity, and k-epsilon turbulence models to describe the flow. The method highlighted in our study is the renormalization group (RNG) algorithm. We show that an accurate description of the turbulent eddy viscosity is critical in order to obtain realistic velocity fields, and that the turbulent eddy viscosity cannot be uniform in levitated droplets. The RNG method does not impose isotropic length or time scales on the flow field, thus allowing such nonuniform features to be captured. A number of other materials processing applications exhibit similarly complex flow characteristics, such as highly recirculating, transitional, and free surface flows, for which this modeling approach may prove useful.

  8. Smart licensing and environmental flows: Modeling framework and sensitivity testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, R. L.; Fenn, C. R.; Wood, P. J.; Timlett, R.; Lequesne, T.

    2011-12-01

    Adapting to climate change is just one among many challenges facing river managers. The response will involve balancing the long-term water demands of society with the changing needs of the environment in sustainable and cost effective ways. This paper describes a modeling framework for evaluating the sensitivity of low river flows to different configurations of abstraction licensing under both historical climate variability and expected climate change. A rainfall-runoff model is used to quantify trade-offs among environmental flow (e-flow) requirements, potential surface and groundwater abstraction volumes, and the frequency of harmful low-flow conditions. Using the River Itchen in southern England as a case study it is shown that the abstraction volume is more sensitive to uncertainty in the regional climate change projection than to the e-flow target. It is also found that "smarter" licensing arrangements (involving a mix of hands off flows and "rising block" abstraction rules) could achieve e-flow targets more frequently than conventional seasonal abstraction limits, with only modest reductions in average annual yield, even under a hotter, drier climate change scenario.

  9. Numerical study of free surface flow around large obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanming

    In this thesis a numerical model was developed to study three-dimensional turbulent flows around large obstacles in an open channel. With this numerical model, a series of numerical tests was carried out, and the properties of turbulent flows around a single obstacle or a cluster of obstacles were investigated. The origin of this study was to study the flow properties around fish habitat structures. Actually, the numerical model can be applied to the study of general turbulent flows under free surfaces. In the numerical model the three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with k-epsilon turbulence model were solved in a free surface fitted coordinate system. First, different forms of governing equations for turbulent flow were investigated, and a concise form of fully transformed governing equations in a general curvilinear coordinate system was derived. In the numerical solution the FAVOR (Fractional Area/Volume Obstacle Representation) technique was extended into the free surface fitted coordinate system. With this feature the problem of complex turbulent flow with a free surface and general shaped obstacles could be solved efficiently. To locate the free surface, a method based on integrating the momentum equation in the vertical direction was developed. After study and tests of several popular difference schemes, a QUICK scheme with UMIST limiter was adopted in this numerical model. Several test cases were presented to demonstrate the present numerical model. The first test case was to simulate a submerged hydraulic jump. The calculated velocity, free surface profile and turbulence properties of the flow showed a close match with the experimental data. The second test was a submerged hydraulic jump with a baffle sill. The comparison between numerical and experimental data indicated that the current numerical model could catch the general flow structures of the submerged hydraulic jumps. The last two test cases were flows around a

  10. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    PubMed

    Soltani, M; Chen, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model. PMID:23840579

  11. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, M.; Chen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor’s surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy’s law for tissue, and simplified Navier–Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling’s law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model. PMID:23840579

  12. Mathematical models of continuous flow electrophoresis: Electrophoresis technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, Dudley A.

    1986-01-01

    Two aspects of continuous flow electrophoresis were studied: (1) the structure of the flow field in continuous flow devices; and (2) the electrokinetic properties of suspended particles relevant to electrophoretic separations. Mathematical models were developed to describe flow structure and stability, with particular emphasis on effects due to buoyancy. To describe the fractionation of an arbitrary particulate sample by continuous flow electrophoresis, a general mathematical model was constructed. In this model, chamber dimensions, field strength, buffer composition, and other design variables can be altered at will to study their effects on resolution and throughput. All these mathematical models were implemented on a digital computer and the codes are available for general use. Experimental and theoretical work with particulate samples probed how particle mobility is related to buffer composition. It was found that ions on the surface of small particles are mobile, contrary to the widely accepted view. This influences particle mobility and suspension conductivity. A novel technique was used to measure the mobility of particles in concentrated suspensions.

  13. Unified Model Deformation and Flow Transition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Liu, Tianshu; Garg, Sanjay; Bell, James H.; Morgan, Daniel G.

    1999-01-01

    The number of optical techniques that may potentially be used during a given wind tunnel test is continually growing. These include parameter sensitive paints that are sensitive to temperature or pressure, several different types of off-body and on-body flow visualization techniques, optical angle-of-attack (AoA), optical measurement of model deformation, optical techniques for determining density or velocity, and spectroscopic techniques for determining various flow field parameters. Often in the past the various optical techniques were developed independently of each other, with little or no consideration for other techniques that might also be used during a given test. Recently two optical techniques have been increasingly requested for production measurements in NASA wind tunnels. These are the video photogrammetric (or videogrammetric) technique for measuring model deformation known as the video model deformation (VMD) technique, and the parameter sensitive paints for making global pressure and temperature measurements. Considerations for, and initial attempts at, simultaneous measurements with the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and the videogrammetric techniques have been implemented. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) has been found to be useful for boundary-layer transition detection since turbulent boundary layers convect heat at higher rates than laminar boundary layers of comparable thickness. Transition is marked by a characteristic surface temperature change wherever there is a difference between model and flow temperatures. Recently, additional capabilities have been implemented in the target-tracking videogrammetric measurement system. These capabilities have permitted practical simultaneous measurements using parameter sensitive paint and video model deformation measurements that led to the first successful unified test with TSP for transition detection in a large production wind tunnel.

  14. Dynamic thermal-hydraulic modeling and stack flow pattern analysis for all-vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhongbao; Zhao, Jiyun; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Xiong, Binyu

    2014-08-01

    The present study focuses on dynamic thermal-hydraulic modeling for the all-vanadium flow battery and investigations on the impact of stack flow patterns on battery performance. The inhomogeneity of flow rate distribution and reversible entropic heat are included in the thermal-hydraulic model. The electrolyte temperature in tanks is modeled with the finite element modeling (FEM) technique considering the possible non-uniform distribution of electrolyte temperature. Results show that the established model predicts electrolyte temperature accurately under various ambient temperatures and current densities. Significant temperature gradients exist in the battery system at extremely low flow rates, while the electrolyte temperature tends to be the same in different components under relatively high flow rates. Three stack flow patterns including flow without distribution channels and two cases of flow with distribution channels are compared to investigate their effects on battery performance. It is found that the flow rates are not uniformly distributed in cells especially when the stack is not well designed, while adding distribution channels alleviates the inhomogeneous phenomenon. By comparing the three flow patterns, it is found that the serpentine-parallel pattern is preferable and effectively controls the uniformity of flow rates, pressure drop and electrolyte temperature all at expected levels.

  15. Shock Scattering in a Multiphase Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D

    2003-04-08

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities. Such an approach work poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. The physical original of this difficulty is traced to an inadequate model of the interfacial pressure term as it appears in the momentum and turbulence kinetic energy equations. Constraints on the form of a better model from a variety of sources are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  16. Modeling transport of Escherichia coli in a creek during and after artificial high-flow events: three-year study and analysis.

    PubMed

    Yakirevich, A; Pachepsky, Y A; Guber, A K; Gish, T J; Shelton, D R; Cho, K H

    2013-05-15

    Escherichia coli is the leading indicator of microbial contamination of natural waters, and so its in-stream fate and transport needs to be understood to eventually minimize surface water contamination by microorganisms. To better understand mechanisms of E. coli release and transport from soil sediment in a creek the artificial high-water flow events were created by releasing 60-80 m(3) of city water on a tarp-covered stream bank in four equal allotments in July 2008, 2009 and 2010. A conservative tracer difluorobenzoic acid (DFBA) was added to the released water in 2009 and 2010. Water flow rate, E. coli and DFBA concentrations as well as water turbidity were monitored with automated samplers at three in-stream weirs. A one-dimensional model was applied to simulate water flow, and E. coli and DFBA transport during these experiments. The Saint-Venant equations were used to calculate water depth and discharge while a stream solute transport model accounted for release of bacteria by shear stress from bottom sediments, advection-dispersion, and exchange with transient storage (TS). Reach-specific model parameters were estimated by evaluating observed time series of flow rates and concentrations of DFBA and E. coli at all three weir stations. Observed DFBA and E. coli breakthrough curves (BTC) exhibited long tails after the water pulse and tracer peaks had passed indicating that transient storage (TS) might be an important element of the in-stream transport process. Comparison of simulated and measured E. coli concentrations indicated that significant release of E. coli continued when water flow returned to the base level after the water pulse passed and bottom shear stress was small. The mechanism of bacteria continuing release from sediment could be the erosive boundary layer exchange enhanced by changes in biofilm properties by erosion and sloughing detachment. PMID:23521976

  17. TANK MIXING STUDY WITH FLOW RECIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-25

    The primary objective of this work is to quantify the mixing time when two miscible fluids are mixed by one recirculation pump and to evaluate adequacy of 2.5 hours of pump recirculation to be considered well mixed in SRS tanks, JT-71/72. The work scope described here consists of two modeling analyses. They are the steady state flow pattern analysis during pump recirculation operation of the tank liquid and transient species transport calculations based on the initial steady state flow patterns. The modeling calculations for the mixing time are performed by using the 99% homogeneity criterion for the entire domain of the tank contents.

  18. The lag RST turbulence model applied to vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchfield, Matthew John

    of misalignment between the principal axes of the Reynolds stress and the mean strain rate tensors increases (which also results in an increased misalignment between the contours of the Reynolds shear stress components and those of their corresponding strain rate components), and the peak magnitude of the Reynolds stresses is decreased. In these vortex flows, values of alpha0 that provide the correct amount of misalignment between the principal axes of the Reynolds stress and the mean strain rate tensors predict too small of peak values of Reynolds stresses. There is currently no way to independently control the misalignment and the Reynolds stress magnitudes. The lag RST model also does not properly predict the growth and decay rates of turbulence in the q-vortex, no matter which value of alpha0 is chosen. Although it has some flaws, its performance in predicting vortical flows is very good and could be a useful tool in the study of wingtip vortices. However, improvement of the model should be pursued. An outline for modifications that should be explored to improve the model's performance is included in this thesis. These modifications focus on replacing the model constant alpha 0 with a variable parameter and on the possibility of replacing the lag time scale, which is the specific dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, o, with a more relevant time scale that incorporates the mean flow.

  19. Measuring and Modeling Flow in Welded Fractured Tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    R. Salve; C. Doughty; J.S. Wang

    2001-10-03

    We have carried out a series of in situ liquid-release experiments in conjunction with a numerical modeling study to examine the effect of the rock matrix on liquid flow and transport occurring primarily through the fracture network. Field experiments were conducted in the highly fractured Topopah Spring welded tuff at a site accessed from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESFS), an underground laboratory in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. During the experiment, wetting-front movement, flow-field evolution, and drainage of fracture flow paths were evaluated. Modeling was used to aid in experimental design, predict experimental results, and study the physical processes accompanying liquid flow through unsaturated fractured welded tuff. Field experiments and modeling suggest that it may not be sufficient to conceptualize the fractured tuff as consisting of a single network of high-permeability fractures embedded in a low-permeability matrix. The need to include a secondary fracture network is demonstrated by comparison to the liquid flow observed in the field.

  20. Model Assessment and Optimization Using a Flow Time Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. J.; Marshall, L. A.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrologic modeling is a particularly complex problem that is commonly confronted with complications due to multiple dominant streamflow states, temporal switching of streamflow generation mechanisms, and dynamic responses to model inputs based on antecedent conditions. These complexities can inhibit the development of model structures and their fitting to observed data. As a result of these complexities and the heterogeneity that can exist within a catchment, optimization techniques are typically employed to obtain reasonable estimates of model parameters. However, when calibrating a model, the cost function itself plays a large role in determining the "optimal" model parameters. In this study, we introduce a transformation that allows for the estimation of model parameters in the "flow time" domain. The flow time transformation dynamically weights streamflows in the time domain, effectively stretching time during high streamflows and compressing time during low streamflows. Given the impact of cost functions on model optimization, such transformations focus on the hydrologic fluxes themselves rather than on equal time weighting common to traditional approaches. The utility of such a transform is of particular note to applications concerned with total hydrologic flux (water resources management, nutrient loading, etc.). The flow time approach can improve the predictive consistency of total fluxes in hydrologic models and provide insights into model performance by highlighting model strengths and deficiencies in an alternate modeling domain. Flow time transformations can also better remove positive skew from the streamflow time series, resulting in improved model fits, satisfaction of the normality assumption of model residuals, and enhanced uncertainty quantification. We illustrate the value of this transformation for two distinct sets of catchment conditions (snow-dominated and subtropical).

  1. Study of unsteady flow conditions for slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ekmann, J.M.; Wildman, D.J.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the past three years, transport characteristics of coal-water mixtures (CWMs) have been studied at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. The effort has concentrated predominantly on studying flow conditions in straight horizontal and vertical sections, and to a lesser extent on studying the flow patterns around elbows of a one-inch-diameter loop and a two-inch-diameter loop. Steady-state flow was characterized for in-house prepared slurries and commercially prepared slurries. For lower concentrated slurries (55 wt % to 60 wt %) and coarse particle size distributions (50% finer than 75 microns), nonhomogeneous flow conditions were encountered across horizontal test sections. Since nonhomogeneous conditions existed in straight sections during steady-state flow, it was decided to further investigate flow conditions during changes in velocity (magnitude and direction). This paper concentrates on nonuniform flow conditions of two types. The first nonuniform flow condition arises from sudden increases in the magnitude of the flow velocity. Pressure measurements recorded at a fixed position in the vertical section of the two-inch-diameter loop during sudden changes in velocity can be analyzed via classic control theory to evaluate the dynamic properties of the CWM. The second nonuniform flow condition occurs as the CWM passes through a bend. Both long-radius bends and 90-degree elbows made of glass and steel have been studied. Pressure-loss data around the long-radius bends and elbows were analyzed with a modified version of the model developed by Ito for single-phase flow around bends. Flow patterns around glass bends and elbows were observed for slurries prepared of vinyl coating powder and water. They are described in an effort to increase understanding of the pressure-loss data. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Numerical modeling of flowing soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Federico; Benzi, Roberto; Bernaschi, Massimo; Perlekar, Prasad; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Succi, Sauro

    2012-11-01

    The structural properties of soft-flowing and non-ergodic materials, such as emulsions, foams and gels shares similarities with the three basic states of matter (solid, liquid and gas). The macroscopic properties are characterized by non-standard features such as non-Newtonian rheology, long-time relaxation, caging effects, enhanced viscosity, structural arrest, hysteresis, dynamic disorder, aging and related phenomena. Large scale non-homogeneities can develop, even under simple shear conditions, by means of the formation of macroscopic bands of widely different viscosities (``shear banding'' phenomena). We employ a numerical model based on the Lattice Boltzmann method to perform numerical simulations of soft-matter under flowing conditions. Results of 3d simulations are presented and compared to previous 2d investigations.

  3. Modeling steam pressure under martian lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2013-01-01

    Rootless cones on Mars are a valuable indicator of past interactions between lava and water. However, the details of the lava–water interactions are not fully understood, limiting the ability to use these features to infer new information about past water on Mars. We have developed a model for the pressurization of a dry layer of porous regolith by melting and boiling ground ice in the shallow subsurface. This model builds on previous models of lava cooling and melting of subsurface ice. We find that for reasonable regolith properties and ice depths of decimeters, explosive pressures can be reached. However, the energy stored within such lags is insufficient to excavate thick flows unless they draw steam from a broader region than the local eruption site. These results indicate that lag pressurization can drive rootless cone formation under favorable circumstances, but in other instances molten fuel–coolant interactions are probably required. We use the model results to consider a range of scenarios for rootless cone formation in Athabasca Valles. Pressure buildup by melting and boiling ice under a desiccated lag is possible in some locations, consistent with the expected distribution of ice implanted from atmospheric water vapor. However, it is uncertain whether such ice has existed in the vicinity of Athabasca Valles in recent history. Plausible alternative sources include surface snow or an aqueous flood shortly before the emplacement of the lava flow.

  4. Modelling susceptibility of grassland soil to macropore flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Abdallah

    2015-06-01

    Investigating preferential flow, including macropore flow, is crucial to predicting and preventing point sources of contamination in soil, for example in the vicinity of pumping wells. With a view to advancing groundwater protection, this study aimed (i) to quantify the strength of macropore flow in four representative natural grassland soils on the Swiss plateau, and (ii) to define the parameters that significantly control macropore flow in grassland soil. For each soil type we selected three measurement points on which three successive irrigation experiments were carried out, resulting in a total of 36 irrigations. The strength of macropore flow, parameterized as the cumulated water volume flowing from macropores at a depth of 1 m in response to an irrigation of 60 mm h-1 intensity and 1 h duration, was simulated using the dual-permeability MACRO model. The model calibration was based on the key soil parameters and fine measurements of water content at different depths. Modelling results indicate high performance of macropore flow in all investigated soil types except in gleysols. The volume of water that flowed from macropores and was hence expected to reach groundwater varied between 81% and 94% in brown soils, 59% and 67% in para-brown soils, 43% and 56% in acid brown soils, and 22% and 35% in gleysols. These results show that spreading pesticides and herbicides in pumping well protection zones poses a high risk of contamination and must be strictly prohibited. We also found that organic carbon content was not correlated with the strength of macropore flow, probably due to its very weak variation in our study, while saturated water content showed a negative correlation with macropore flow. The correlation between saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and macropore flow was negative as well, but weak. Macropore flow appears to be controlled by the interaction between the bulk density of the uppermost topsoil layer (0-0.10 m) and the macroporosity of the soil

  5. Study on turbulence in interior ballistics flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiser, R.; Garloff, J.

    1992-02-01

    The compressible, viscous, turbulent gas expansion flow behind an accelerating projectile moving in a gun tube is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations. For future theoretical investigations of the heat transfer from the hot gases to the walls, a reliable modeling of the turbulence is needed. Turbulence is described by two algebraic models, namely, the models by Cebeci-Smith-Mosinskis and Baldwin-Lomax, as well as by a one-equation model for the turbulent kinetic energy. Computational results obtained by application of these models are compared to experimental data obtained with two low-pressure gun simulators. Also, numerical predictions are reported for the flow behind a projectile under more realistic interior ballistic conditions.

  6. Model reduction and feedback control of transitional channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilak, Milos

    ) compensators, which include a reduced-order estimator based on a small number of velocity measurements, are designed for these models and used for feedback control of the energy growth of a localized perturbation near the channel wall. The performance of both a localized body-force near the channel wall and wall blowing/suction as actuation mechanisms is first studied in linearized DNS. It is found that the linear compensators are successful in reducing the growth of the perturbation energy, and that the body force actuation results in a larger decrease of the perturbation energy growth than actuation using wall blowing/suction. We then proceed to show that these compensators are also able to prevent transition to turbulence for nonlinear simulations in some cases, despite performance limitations imposed by the spatial separation of the perturbation and the actuator. Finally, since it is found that a fundamentally nonlinear mechanism of transition is not captured by the linear models, it is of interest to study nonlinear models for flow control. As a first step towards investigating nonlinear balanced truncation models of channel flow, a method for empirical nonlinear balanced truncation proposed by Lall et al. (2002) is tested on a nonlinear 1-D model problem, the Complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation. The performance of the resulting models is compared to the performance of nonlinear models obtained by projection of the full equation onto modes computed via balanced truncation of the linear part of the CGL equation. It is found that the models obtained by the latter approach are not only able to capture the dynamics of the nonlinear CGL equation, but that they also outperform the models obtained using the empirical nonlinear balanced truncation method.

  7. A dual-species microbial model for studying the dynamics between oral streptococci and periodontal pathogens during biofilm development on titanium surfaces by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Manti, Anita; Ciandrini, Eleonora; Campana, Raffaella; Dominici, Sabrina; Ciacci, Caterina; Federici, Sara; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco B L; Papa, Stefano; Baffone, Wally

    2016-06-01

    The association of the pioneer organisms Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 or Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811 with secondary colonizers Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 or Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 during biofilm development on titanium surfaces was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM) using specific polyclonal antibodies. ELISA and FCM were employed, revealing high antibody sensitivity and specificity. Biofilm formation of four dual-species combinations was analyzed by crystal violet staining, while the association between streptococci and periodontal pathogens was assessed using FCM. Dual-species association between S. oralis and P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum showed a proportional decrease in S. oralis during biofilm development, with a concomitant increase in P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum. This trend was not observed in either of the dual-species associations of S. mutans with the periodontal pathogens. Our dual-species microbial model, which employed FCM, proved to be useful in the study of partnerships between bacteria in oral associations, showing that the presence of primary colonizers is required for the establishment of secondary colonizers in biofilms. The proposed experimental approach is technically simple to prepare and analyze, and also proved to be reproducible; hence, it is well-suited for investigating the development and dynamics of oral communities. PMID:27032997

  8. Computational studies of flow through cross flow fans - effect of blade geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, M.; Sampat, D. Lakshmana

    2005-09-01

    This present paper describes three dimensional computational analysis of complex internal flow in a cross flow fan. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software code CFX was used for the computation. RNG k-ɛ two equation turbulence model was used to simulate the model with unstructured mesh. Sliding mesh interface was used at the interface between the rotating and stationary domains to capture the unsteady interactions. An accurate assessment of the present investigation is made by comparing various parameters with the available experimental data. Three impeller geometries with different blade angles and radius ratio are used in the present study. Maximum energy transfer through the impeller takes place in the region where the flow follows the blade curvature. Radial velocity is not uniform through blade channels. Some blades work in turbine mode at very low flow coefficients. Static pressure is always negative in and around the impeller region.

  9. HIGHER EDUCATION--A POPULATION FLOW FEEDBACK MODEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REISMAN, ARNOLD

    A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IS DEVELOPED TO STUDY THE PRODUCTION OF DOCTORAL, MASTER'S, AND BACHELOR'S DEGREES AND THEIR FEEDBACK INTO HIGHER EDUCATION. FEEDBACK IS DETERMINED BY A SET OF "BASIC BALANCE EQUATIONS" WHICH STATE THAT THE TOTAL RATE OF FLOW INTO A CATEGORY LESS THE RATE OF OUTFLOW IS EQUAL TO THE RATE OF ACCUMULATION OR GROWTH IN A GIVEN…

  10. In-line pressure-flow module for in vitro modelling of haemodynamics and biosensor validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, S. C.; Schaub, J. D.; Ewert, D. L.; Swope, R. D.; Convertino, V. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    An in-line pressure-flow module for in vitro modelling of haemodynamics and biosensor validation has been developed. Studies show that good accuracy can be achieved in the measurement of pressure and of flow, in steady and pulstile flow systems. The model can be used for development, testing and evaluation of cardiovascular-mechanical-electrical anlogue models, cardiovascular prosthetics (i.e. valves, vascular grafts) and pressure and flow biosensors.

  11. Observing and Modeling Earth's Energy Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews, from the authors' perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within ±2 W m-2. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute

  12. Study on flow instability and countermeasure in a draft tube with swirling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, T.; Matsuzaka, R.; Miyagawa, K.; Yonezawa, K.; Tsujimoto, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The swirling flow in the draft tube of a Francis turbine can cause the flow instability and the cavitation surge and has a larger influence on hydraulic power operating system. In this paper, the cavitating flow with swirling flow in the diffuser was studied by the draft tube component experiment, the model Francis turbine experiment and the numerical simulation. In the component experiment, several types of fluctuations were observed, including the cavitation surge and the vortex rope behaviour by the swirling flow. While the cavitation surge and the vortex rope behaviour were suppressed by the aeration into the diffuser, the loss coefficient in the diffuser increased by the aeration. In the model turbine test the aeration decreased the efficiency of the model turbine by several percent. In the numerical simulation, the cavitating flow was studied using Scale-Adaptive Simulation (SAS) with particular emphasis on understanding the unsteady characteristics of the vortex rope structure. The generation and evolution of the vortex rope structures have been investigated throughout the diffuser using the iso-surface of vapor volume fraction. The pressure fluctuation in the diffuser by numerical simulation confirmed the cavitation surge observed in the experiment. Finally, this pressure fluctuation of the cavitation surge was examined and interpreted by CFD.

  13. Modeling of Liquid Flow in a Packed Bed in the Presence of Gas Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Gupta, G. S.; Sarkar, S.

    2007-06-01

    Liquid metal and slag descend through a porous coke matrix in the lower part of an iron making blast furnace. The size of the raceway is an important factor in determining the gas penetration into the bed, which pushes the liquid toward the deadman region. This, in turn, affects the gas flow in the bed. The current study tries to explain theoretically the effect of cavity size hysteresis on gas-liquid distribution in a packed bed. The liquid flow has been modeled considering it to be discrete in nature. The turbulent nature of gas flow has been modeled using the k-ɛ model for turbulent flow. The model results have been verified on a structured package. It is observed that the liquid is pushed away further from the nozzle-side wall in the case of decreasing gas velocity than increasing gas velocity at the same inlet gas velocity. The implications of the current study to the dropping zone of a blast furnace have been discussed.

  14. Numerical modeling of an all vanadium redox flow battery.

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Jonathan R.; Brunini, Victor E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Martinez, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a capability to simulate reduction-oxidation (redox) flow batteries in the Sierra Multi-Mechanics code base. Specifically, we focus on all-vanadium redox flow batteries; however, the capability is general in implementation and could be adopted to other chemistries. The electrochemical and porous flow models follow those developed in the recent publication by [28]. We review the model implemented in this work and its assumptions, and we show several verification cases including a binary electrolyte, and a battery half-cell. Then, we compare our model implementation with the experimental results shown in [28], with good agreement seen. Next, a sensitivity study is conducted for the major model parameters, which is beneficial in targeting specific features of the redox flow cell for improvement. Lastly, we simulate a three-dimensional version of the flow cell to determine the impact of plenum channels on the performance of the cell. Such channels are frequently seen in experimental designs where the current collector plates are borrowed from fuel cell designs. These designs use a serpentine channel etched into a solid collector plate.

  15. A study of the FDG model in the presence of an altered blood brain barrier (BBB) and glucose metabolic/flow relationships in human brain tumors with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, R.A.; Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Wapenski, J.A.; Silberman, A.W.

    1985-05-01

    The authors performed 3 hour kinetic FDG studies (5 parameter model, 5th parameter represents cerebral blood volume (CBV) on 8 patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors. One subject also had a direct measurement of BBB permeability with Ga-68 EDTA and 5 subjects also had cerebral blood flow (CBF) determinations with bolus injections of 0-15 water. Estimates of hexose distribution volumes (HDV=k/sub 1/*/k/sub 2/*), FDG distribution volumes (DV=k/sub 1/*/(k/sub 2/*+k/sub 3/*), a ratio R=k/sub 3/*k/sub 2/* that is related to the stability of the lumped constant (LC) and glucose extraction ratios (GER) were calculated. GER averaged 8.8 (+- 4.6)% in tumors, 7.7 (+- 1.7)% in gray matter, 10.3 (+- 3.8)% in white matter and 8.4 (+- 2.1)% in hemispheric regions. R averaged 0.46 (+- 0.19) in tumors, 0.47 (+- 0.24) in gray matter, 0.45 (+- 0.18) in white matter and 0.57 (+- 0.25) in hemispheric regions. HDV estimates were 0.33 (+- 0.11) in tumors, 0.48 (+- 0.25) in gray matter, 0.34 (+- 0.14) in white matter and 0.38 (+- 0.25) in hemispheric regions. DV estimates were smaller than HDV but were not significantly different over the same groups. These results suggest that the compartmental configuration of the FDG model is still appropriate in this set of patients with increased BBB permeability and that LC is relatively stable. A lack of significant increase in the FDG rate constants k/sub 1/* and k/sub 2/* with increases BBB permeability suggests that facilitated diffusion remains the dominant mechanism of glucose transport even with BBB abnormalities.

  16. The Piece Wise Linear Reactive Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Souers, P C

    2005-08-18

    For non-ideal explosives a wide range of behavior is observed in experiments dealing with differing sizes and geometries. A predictive detonation model must be able to reproduce many phenomena including such effects as: variations in the detonation velocity with the radial diameter of rate sticks; slowing of the detonation velocity around gentle corners; production of dead zones for abrupt corner turning; failure of small diameter rate sticks; and failure for rate sticks with sufficiently wide cracks. Most models have been developed to explain one effect at a time. Often, changes are made in the input parameters used to fit each succeeding case with the implication that this is sufficient for the model to be valid over differing regimes. We feel that it is important to develop a model that is able to fit experiments with one set of parameters. To address this we are creating a new generation of models that are able to produce better fitting to individual data sets than prior models and to simultaneous fit distinctly different regimes of experiments. Presented here are details of our new Piece Wise Linear reactive flow model applied to LX-17.

  17. Data-Flow Based Model Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saad, Christian; Bauer, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    The concept of (meta) modeling combines an intuitive way of formalizing the structure of an application domain with a high expressiveness that makes it suitable for a wide variety of use cases and has therefore become an integral part of many areas in computer science. While the definition of modeling languages through the use of meta models, e.g. in Unified Modeling Language (UML), is a well-understood process, their validation and the extraction of behavioral information is still a challenge. In this paper we present a novel approach for dynamic model analysis along with several fields of application. Examining the propagation of information along the edges and nodes of the model graph allows to extend and simplify the definition of semantic constraints in comparison to the capabilities offered by e.g. the Object Constraint Language. Performing a flow-based analysis also enables the simulation of dynamic behavior, thus providing an "abstract interpretation"-like analysis method for the modeling domain.

  18. Flow visualization study of spanwise blowing applied to the F-4 fighter aircraft configuration. [water tunnel test using a 1/48-scale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Water tunnel studies were performed to define the changes that occur in vortex flow fields above the wing due to spanwise blowing over the inboard and outboard wing panels and over the trailing-edge flaps. Flow visualization photographs were obtained for angles of attack up to 30 deg and sideslip angles up to 10 deg. The sensitivity of the vortex flows to changes in flap deflection angle, nozzle position, and jet momentum coefficient was determined. Deflection of the leading edge flap delayed flow separation and the formation of the wing vortex to higher angles of attack. Spanwise blowing delayed the breakdown of the wing vortex to farther outboard and to higher angles of attack. Spanwise blowing over the trailing edge flap entrained flow downward, producing a lift increase over a wide range of angles of attack. The sweep angle of the windward wing was effectively reduced in sideslip. This decreased the stability of the wing vortex, and it burst farther inboard. Reduced wing sweep required a higher blowing rate to maintain a stable vortex. A vortex could be stabilized on the outboard wing panel when an outboard blowing nozzle was used. Blowing from both an inboard and an outboard nozzle was found to have a favorable interaction.

  19. Study of flow patterns in fume hood enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    A three-dimensional model for flow inside a fume hood enclosure was developed and numerical computations were carried out to explore the flow pattern and possible path of contaminant transport under different operating conditions of the hood. Equations for the conservation of mass and momentum were solved for different flow rate and opening conditions in the hood. The face velocity was maintained constant at its rated value of 0.4 m/s. The flow was assumed to enter through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leave the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The {kappa}-{var_epsilon} model was used for the prediction of turbulence. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow patterns around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. In addition, the effect of a person standing in front of the hood on the flow pattern was investigated. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its trailing surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. The computed flow patterns will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air from inside the room.

  20. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  1. Concentrated flow erodibility for physically-based erosion models: temporal variability in disturbed and undisturbed rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current physically based overland flow erosion models for rangeland application do not separate disturbed and undisturbed conditions in modeling concentrated flow erosion. In this study, concentrated flow simulations on disturbed and undisturbed rangelands were used to estimate the erodibility and t...

  2. Flow diagnostics downstream of a tribladed rotor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, I. V.; Rahmanov, V. V.; Okulov, V. L.; Velte, C. M.; Meyer, K. E.; Mikkelsen, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents results of a study of vortex wake structures and measurements of instantaneous 3D velocity fields downstream of a triblade turbine model. Two operation modes of flow around the rotor with different tip speed ratios were tested. Initially the wake structures were visualized and subsequently quantitative data were recorded through velocity field restoration from particle tracks using a stereo PIV system. The study supplied flow diagnostics and recovered the instantaneous 3D velocity fields in the longitudinal cross section behind a tribladed rotor at different values of tip speed ratio. This set of data provided a basis for testing and validating assumptions and hypothesis regarding classical theories of rotors.

  3. Complex groundwater flow systems as traveling agent models

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Pablo; Escolero, Oscar; González, Tomas; Morales-Casique, Eric; Osorio-Olvera, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing field data from pumping tests, we show that as with many other natural phenomena, groundwater flow exhibits complex dynamics described by 1/f power spectrum. This result is theoretically studied within an agent perspective. Using a traveling agent model, we prove that this statistical behavior emerges when the medium is complex. Some heuristic reasoning is provided to justify both spatial and dynamic complexity, as the result of the superposition of an infinite number of stochastic processes. Even more, we show that this implies that non-Kolmogorovian probability is needed for its study, and provide a set of new partial differential equations for groundwater flow. PMID:25337455

  4. Theory and Low-Order Modeling of Unsteady Airfoil Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Kiran

    Unsteady flow phenomena are prevalent in a wide range of problems in nature and engineering. These include, but are not limited to, aerodynamics of insect flight, dynamic stall in rotorcraft and wind turbines, leading-edge vortices in delta wings, micro-air vehicle (MAV) design, gust handling and flow control. The most significant characteristics of unsteady flows are rapid changes in the circulation of the airfoil, apparent-mass effects, flow separation and the leading-edge vortex (LEV) phenomenon. Although experimental techniques and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have enabled the detailed study of unsteady flows and their underlying features, a reliable and inexpensive loworder method for fast prediction and for use in control and design is still required. In this research, a low-order methodology based on physical principles rather than empirical fitting is proposed. The objective of such an approach is to enable insights into unsteady phenomena while developing approaches to model them. The basis of the low-order model developed here is unsteady thin-airfoil theory. A time-stepping approach is used to solve for the vorticity on an airfoil camberline, allowing for large amplitudes and nonplanar wakes. On comparing lift coefficients from this method against data from CFD and experiments for some unsteady test cases, it is seen that the method predicts well so long as LEV formation does not occur and flow over the airfoil is attached. The formation of leading-edge vortices (LEVs) in unsteady flows is initiated by flow separation and the formation of a shear layer at the airfoil's leading edge. This phenomenon has been observed to have both detrimental (dynamic stall in helicopters) and beneficial (high-lift flight in insects) effects. To predict the formation of LEVs in unsteady flows, a Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) is proposed. This parameter is calculated from inviscid theory and is a measure of the suction at the airfoil's leading edge. It

  5. Beyond poiseuille: preservation fluid flow in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Randle, Lucy V; Callaghan, Paul T; Watson, Christopher J E; Callaghan, Chris J

    2013-01-01

    Poiseuille's equation describes the relationship between fluid viscosity, pressure, tubing diameter, and flow, yet it is not known if cold organ perfusion systems follow this equation. We investigated these relationships in an ex vivo model and aimed to offer some rationale for equipment selection. Increasing the cannula size from 14 to 20 Fr increased flow rate by a mean (SD) of 13 (12)%. Marshall's hyperosmolar citrate was three times less viscous than UW solution, but flows were only 45% faster. Doubling the bag pressure led to a mean (SD) flow rate increase of only 19 (13)%, not twice the rate. When external pressure devices were used, 100 mmHg of continuous pressure increased flow by a mean (SD) of 43 (17)% when compared to the same pressure applied initially only. Poiseuille's equation was not followed; this is most likely due to "slipping" of preservation fluid within the plastic tubing. Cannula size made little difference over the ranges examined; flows are primarily determined by bag pressure and fluid viscosity. External infusor devices require continuous pressurisation to deliver high flow. Future studies examining the impact of perfusion variables on graft outcomes should include detailed equipment descriptions. PMID:24062943

  6. Beyond Poiseuille: Preservation Fluid Flow in an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saurabh; Randle, Lucy V.; Callaghan, Paul T.; Watson, Christopher J. E.; Callaghan, Chris J.

    2013-01-01

    Poiseuille's equation describes the relationship between fluid viscosity, pressure, tubing diameter, and flow, yet it is not known if cold organ perfusion systems follow this equation. We investigated these relationships in an ex vivo model and aimed to offer some rationale for equipment selection. Increasing the cannula size from 14 to 20 Fr increased flow rate by a mean (SD) of 13 (12)%. Marshall's hyperosmolar citrate was three times less viscous than UW solution, but flows were only 45% faster. Doubling the bag pressure led to a mean (SD) flow rate increase of only 19 (13)%, not twice the rate. When external pressure devices were used, 100 mmHg of continuous pressure increased flow by a mean (SD) of 43 (17)% when compared to the same pressure applied initially only. Poiseuille's equation was not followed; this is most likely due to “slipping” of preservation fluid within the plastic tubing. Cannula size made little difference over the ranges examined; flows are primarily determined by bag pressure and fluid viscosity. External infusor devices require continuous pressurisation to deliver high flow. Future studies examining the impact of perfusion variables on graft outcomes should include detailed equipment descriptions. PMID:24062943

  7. Modeling of heavy-gas effects on airfoil flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drela, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic models were constructed for a calorically imperfect gas and for a non-ideal gas. These were incorporated into a quasi one dimensional flow solver to develop an understanding of the differences in flow behavior between the new models and the perfect gas model. The models were also incorporated into a two dimensional flow solver to investigate their effects on transonic airfoil flows. Specifically, the calculations simulated airfoil testing in a proposed high Reynolds number heavy gas test facility. The results indicate that the non-idealities caused significant differences in the flow field, but that matching of an appropriate non-dimensional parameter led to flows similar to those in air.

  8. Computational Flow Modeling of Human Upper Airway Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylavarapu, Goutham

    Computational modeling of biological systems have gained a lot of interest in biomedical research, in the recent past. This thesis focuses on the application of computational simulations to study airflow dynamics in human upper respiratory tract. With advancements in medical imaging, patient specific geometries of anatomically accurate respiratory tracts can now be reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) or Computed Tomography (CT) scans, with better and accurate details than traditional cadaver cast models. Computational studies using these individualized geometrical models have advantages of non-invasiveness, ease, minimum patient interaction, improved accuracy over experimental and clinical studies. Numerical simulations can provide detailed flow fields including velocities, flow rates, airway wall pressure, shear stresses, turbulence in an airway. Interpretation of these physical quantities will enable to develop efficient treatment procedures, medical devices, targeted drug delivery etc. The hypothesis for this research is that computational modeling can predict the outcomes of a surgical intervention or a treatment plan prior to its application and will guide the physician in providing better treatment to the patients. In the current work, three different computational approaches Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Flow-Structure Interaction (FSI) and Particle Flow simulations were used to investigate flow in airway geometries. CFD approach assumes airway wall as rigid, and relatively easy to simulate, compared to the more challenging FSI approach, where interactions of airway wall deformations with flow are also accounted. The CFD methodology using different turbulence models is validated against experimental measurements in an airway phantom. Two case-studies using CFD, to quantify a pre and post-operative airway and another, to perform virtual surgery to determine the best possible surgery in a constricted airway is demonstrated. The unsteady

  9. Continuum modeling of dense granular flow down heaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henann, David; Liu, Daren

    Dense, dry granular flows display many manifestations of grain-size dependence, or nonlocality, in which the finite-size of grains has an observable impact on flow phenomenology. Such behaviors make the formulation of an accurate continuum model for dense granular flow particularly difficult, since local continuum models are not equipped to describe size-effects. One example of grain-size dependence is seen when avalanches occur on a granular heap - a situation which is frequently encountered in industry, as in rotating drums, as well as in nature, such as in landslides. In this case, flow separates into a thin, quickly flowing surface layer and a slowly creeping bulk. While existing local granular flow models are capable of capturing aspects of the flowing surface layer, they fail to even predict the existence of creeping flow beneath, much less being able to quantitatively describe the flow fields. Recently, we have proposed a new, scale-dependent continuum model - the nonlocal granular fluidity (NGF) model - that successfully predicted steady, slow granular flow fields, including grain-size-dependent shear-band widths in a variety of flow configurations. In this talk, we extend our model to the rapid flow regime and show that the model is capable of quantitatively predicting all aspects of gravity-driven heap flow. In particular, the model predicts the coexistence of a rapidly flowing, rate-dependent top surface layer and a rate-independent, slowly creeping bulk - a feature which is beyond local continuum approaches.

  10. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Liu

    2000-03-03

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models.