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Sample records for fluctuation induced forces

  1. Hydrodynamic fluctuation-induced forces in confined fluids.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Christopher; Naji, Ali; Horgan, Ronald; Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-01-14

    We study thermal, fluctuation-induced hydrodynamic interaction forces in a classical, compressible, viscous fluid confined between two rigid, planar walls with no-slip boundary conditions. We calculate hydrodynamic fluctuations using the linearized, stochastic Navier-Stokes formalism of Landau and Lifshitz. The mean fluctuation-induced force acting on the fluid boundaries vanishes in this system, so we evaluate the two-point, time-dependent force correlations. The equal-time correlation function of the forces acting on a single wall gives the force variance, which we show to be finite and independent of the plate separation at large inter-plate distances. The equal-time, cross-plate force correlation, on the other hand, decays with the inverse inter-plate distance and is independent of the fluid viscosity at large distances; it turns out to be negative over the whole range of plate separations, indicating that the two bounding plates are subjected to counter-phase correlations. We show that the time-dependent force correlations exhibit damped temporal oscillations for small plate separations and a more irregular oscillatory behavior at large separations. The long-range hydrodynamic correlations reported here represent a "secondary Casimir effect", because the mean fluctuation-induced force, which represents the primary Casimir effect, is absent. PMID:26477742

  2. Fluctuation-induced casimir forces in granular fluids.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, C; Brito, R; Marconi, U Marini Bettolo; Nori, F; Soto, R

    2006-05-01

    We numerically investigate the behavior of driven noncohesive granular media and find that two fixed large intruder particles, immersed in a sea of small particles, experience, in addition to a short-range depletion force, a long-range repulsive force. The observed long-range interaction is fluctuation-induced and we propose a mechanism similar to the Casimir effect that generates it: The hydrodynamic fluctuations are geometrically confined between the intruders, producing an unbalanced renormalized pressure. An estimation based on computing the possible Fourier modes explains the repulsive force and is in qualitative agreement with the simulations. PMID:16712336

  3. Constraints on Stable Equilibria with Fluctuation-Induced (Casimir) Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten

    2010-08-13

    We examine whether fluctuation-induced forces can lead to stable levitation. First, we analyze a collection of classical objects at finite temperature that contain fixed and mobile charges and show that any arrangement in space is unstable to small perturbations in position. This extends Earnshaw's theorem for electrostatics by including thermal fluctuations of internal charges. Quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are responsible for Casimir or van der Waals interactions. Neglecting permeabilities, we find that any equilibrium position of items subject to such forces is also unstable if the permittivities of all objects are higher or lower than that of the enveloping medium, the former being the generic case for ordinary materials in vacuum.

  4. Mechanical temporal fluctuation induced distance and force systematic errors in Casimir force experiments.

    PubMed

    Lamoreaux, Steve; Wong, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    The basic theory of temporal mechanical fluctuation induced systematic errors in Casimir force experiments is developed and applications of this theory to several experiments is reviewed. This class of systematic error enters in a manner similar to the usual surface roughness correction, but unlike the treatment of surface roughness for which an exact result requires an electromagnetic mode analysis, time dependent fluctuations can be treated exactly, assuming the fluctuation times are much longer than the zero point and thermal fluctuation correlation times of the electromagnetic field between the plates. An experimental method for measuring absolute distance with high bandwidth is also described and measurement data presented. PMID:25965319

  5. Mechanical temporal fluctuation induced distance and force systematic errors in Casimir force experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, Steve; Wong, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    The basic theory of temporal mechanical fluctuation induced systematic errors in Casimir force experiments is developed and applications of this theory to several experiments is reviewed. This class of systematic error enters in a manner similar to the usual surface roughness correction, but unlike the treatment of surface roughness for which an exact result requires an electromagnetic mode analysis, time dependent fluctuations can be treated exactly, assuming the fluctuation times are much longer than the zero point and thermal fluctuation correlation times of the electromagnetic field between the plates. An experimental method for measuring absolute distance with high bandwidth is also described and measurement data presented.

  6. Fluctuating Pressure Environments and Hydrodynamic Radial Force Mitigation for a Two Blade Unshrouded Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure data from water flow testing of an unshrouded two blade inducer revealed a cavitation induced oscillation with the potential to induce a radial load on the turbopump shaft in addition to other more traditionally analyzed radial loads. Subsequent water flow testing of the inducer with a rotating force measurement system confirmed that the cavitation induced oscillation did impart a radial load to the inducer. After quantifying the load in a baseline configuration, two inducer shroud treatments were selected and tested to reduce the cavitation induced load. The first treatment was to increase the tip clearance, and the second was to introduce a circumferential groove near the inducer leading edge. Increasing the clearance resulted in a small decrease in radial load along with some steady performance degradation. The groove greatly reduced the hydrodynamic load with little to no steady performance loss. The groove did however generate some new, relatively high frequency, spatially complex oscillations to the flow environment.

  7. Fluctuation-Induced Interactions in external magnetic fields: Casimir force and Radiative Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, Raul

    Thermally induced electromagnetic fields give rise to the Casimir force and the near field heat transfer between two bodies separated by a gap. These phenomena are described by Rytova's theory of fluctuating electromagnetic fields and both the Casimir force and the near field heat transfer depend on the local dielectric function of the bodies. In this work we present a theoretical calculation on the modulation of fluctuation-induced interactions in the presence of an external magnetic field. The system consists of two parallel plates separated by a gap d. Each plate is isotropic and has a local dielectric function. Applying an external magnetic field parallel to the plates, in the so called Voigt configuration, the plates become anisotropic. In particular, we consider plates of InSb. For the Casimir force the two plates are kept at the same temperature and the external field reduces the magnitude of the force. Similarly if the two plates are kept at different temperature the near field radiative heat transfer is modulated by the magnitude of the external magnetic field. The results are extended to semiconducting quantum wells. In both cases, the excitation of magnetoplasmons provides an explanation for the observed effect.

  8. Depletion-induced forces and crowding in polymer-nanoparticle mixtures: Role of polymer shape fluctuations and penetrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wei Kang; Denton, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Depletion forces and macromolecular crowding govern the structure and function of biopolymers in biological cells and the properties of polymer nanocomposite materials. To isolate and analyze the influence of polymer shape fluctuations and penetrability on depletion-induced interactions and crowding by nanoparticles, we model polymers as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor of an ideal random walk. Within this model, we apply Monte Carlo simulation methods to compute the depletion-induced potential of mean force between hard nanospheres and crowding-induced shape distributions of polymers in the protein limit, in which polymer coils can be easily penetrated by smaller nanospheres. By comparing depletion potentials from simulations of ellipsoidal and spherical polymer models with predictions of polymer field theory and free-volume theory, we show that polymer depletion-induced interactions and crowding depend sensitively on polymer shapes and penetrability, with important implications for bulk thermodynamic phase behavior.

  9. Phase noise induced due to amplitude fluctuations in dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, S.; Gysin, U.; Meyer, E.

    2009-02-01

    In dynamic force microscopy, the force sensor is driven on its resonance frequency and the amplitude of the cantilever is sustained at a constant value. The amplitude typically ranges between 0.1 and 30 nm. If a large amplitude is set, the cantilever tip senses both long-range and short-range interaction forces provided that the tip is close to the sample surface. The short-range interactions are decisive for the atomic contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. They can be separated from the long-range interactions by setting an amplitude which encompasses the typical range of the interaction force, i.e., the subangstrom regime for van der Waals contribution. It is distinctive for cantilevers operated at small driving amplitudes that the cantilever deflection can be considered as a sinusoidal signal superimposed with a quasimonochromatic random signal originating from fluctuations. If one measures experimentally the standard deviation of the phase σφ of the signal with respect to a monochromatic reference signal, a universal relationship between the standard deviation of the phase σφ and the cantilever amplitude x0 is found. The smaller the ratio of rms amplitude of the sinusoidal signal and the rms value of random signal is, the larger the phase fluctuations are. Phase fluctuations are of importance for measurements at small amplitudes, since they determine the limit of phase-sensitive measurements or the lateral imaging resolution in the so-called pendulum mode of AFM operation. In this paper we develop a heuristic model, which provides an analytical formula for the probability density of phase noise of a sinusoidal signal superimposed by a quasimonochromatic one with respect to a reference oscillator. The variance of the phase noise can be deduced from the distribution functions. The suggested model is verified experimentally and is compared with theoretical predictions. The amplitude-dependent phase fluctuations are a powerful tool to determine the

  10. Depletion-induced forces and crowding in polymer-nanoparticle mixtures: Role of polymer shape fluctuations and penetrability.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei Kang; Denton, Alan R

    2016-01-14

    Depletion forces and macromolecular crowding govern the structure and function of biopolymers in biological cells and the properties of polymer nanocomposite materials. To isolate and analyze the influence of polymer shape fluctuations and penetrability on depletion-induced interactions and crowding by nanoparticles, we model polymers as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor of an ideal random walk. Within this model, we apply Monte Carlo simulation methods to compute the depletion-induced potential of mean force between hard nanospheres and crowding-induced shape distributions of polymers in the protein limit, in which polymer coils can be easily penetrated by smaller nanospheres. By comparing depletion potentials from simulations of ellipsoidal and spherical polymer models with predictions of polymer field theory and free-volume theory, we show that polymer depletion-induced interactions and crowding depend sensitively on polymer shapes and penetrability, with important implications for bulk thermodynamic phase behavior. PMID:26772587

  11. Classical and fluctuation-induced electromagnetic interactions in micron-scale systems: designer bonding, antibonding, and Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Hui, Pui-Chuen; Woolf, David P.; Johnson, Steven G.; Lončar, Marko; Capasso, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Whether intentionally introduced to exert control over particles and macroscopic objects, such as for trapping or cooling, or whether arising from the quantum and thermal fluctuations of charges in otherwise neutral bodies, leading to unwanted stiction between nearby mechanical parts, electromagnetic interactions play a fundamental role in many naturally occurring processes and technologies. In this review, we survey recent progress in the understanding and experimental observation of optomechanical and quantum-fluctuation forces. Although both of these effects arise from exchange of electromagnetic momentum, their dramatically different origins, involving either real or virtual photons, lead to different physical manifestations and design principles. Specifically, we describe recent predictions and measurements of attractive and repulsive optomechanical forces, based on the bonding and antibonding interactions of evanescent waves, as well as predictions of modified and even repulsive Casimir forces between nanostructured bodies. Finally, we discuss the potential impact and interplay of these forces in emerging experimental regimes of micromechanical devices.

  12. Hydration force fluctuations in hydrophilic planar systems.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R

    2016-03-01

    Utilizing all-atom simulations with explicit solvent, the authors model hydrophilic surfaces interacting across water at a fixed chemical potential. They extract the hydration forces acting between the surfaces and assess force fluctuations as well as interlamellar water number fluctuations. The trends obtained from the simulations are captured by a continuum-based description with effective model parameters. The significance of fluctuations depends on surface hydrophilicity and rigidity. The authors show that the force fluctuations play an important role in kinetic processes in systems with lateral sizes smaller than several tens of nanometers. PMID:26746163

  13. Force fluctuations impact kinetics of biomolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Koslover, Elena F; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2012-07-01

    A wide array of biological processes occur at rates that vary significantly with force. Instantaneous molecular forces fluctuate due to thermal noise and active processes, leading to concomitant fluctuations in biomolecular rate constants. We demonstrate that such fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the transition kinetics of force-dependent processes. As an illustrative, biologically relevant example, we model the pausing of eukaryotic RNA polymerase as it transcribes nucleosomal DNA. Incorporating force fluctuations in the model yields qualitatively different predictions for the pausing time scales when compared to behavior under the average force alone. We use our model to illustrate the broad range of behaviors that can arise in biomolecular processes that are susceptible to force fluctuations. The fluctuation time scale, which varies significantly for in vivo biomolecular processes, yields very different results for overall rates and dramatically alters the force regime of relevance to the transition. Our results emphasize the importance of transient high-force behavior for determining kinetics in the fluctuating environment of a living cell. PMID:23005451

  14. Force fluctuations impact kinetics of biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslover, Elena F.; Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    2012-07-01

    A wide array of biological processes occur at rates that vary significantly with force. Instantaneous molecular forces fluctuate due to thermal noise and active processes, leading to concomitant fluctuations in biomolecular rate constants. We demonstrate that such fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the transition kinetics of force-dependent processes. As an illustrative, biologically relevant example, we model the pausing of eukaryotic RNA polymerase as it transcribes nucleosomal DNA. Incorporating force fluctuations in the model yields qualitatively different predictions for the pausing time scales when compared to behavior under the average force alone. We use our model to illustrate the broad range of behaviors that can arise in biomolecular processes that are susceptible to force fluctuations. The fluctuation time scale, which varies significantly for in vivo biomolecular processes, yields very different results for overall rates and dramatically alters the force regime of relevance to the transition. Our results emphasize the importance of transient high-force behavior for determining kinetics in the fluctuating environment of a living cell.

  15. Force fluctuations in stretching a tethered polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Anoop; Vemparala, Satyavani; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    The recently proposed fluctuation relation in unfolding forces [Phys. Rev. E1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.060101 84, 060101(R) (2011)] is reexamined taking into account the explicit time dependence of the force distribution. The stretching of a tethered Rouse polymer is exactly solved and the ratio of the probabilities of positive to negative forces is shown to be an exponential in force. Extensive steered molecular dynamics simulations of unfolding of deca alanine peptide confirm the form of fluctuation relation proposed earlier, but with explicit correct time dependence of unfolding forces taken into account. From exact calculations and simulations, a linear dependence of the constant in the exponential of the fluctuation relation on average unfolding forces and inverse temperature is proposed.

  16. Superfluid helium sloshing dynamics induced oscillations and fluctuations of angular momentum, force and moment actuated on spacecraft driven by gravity gradient or jitter acceleration associated with slew motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The generalized mathematical formulation of sloshing dynamics for partially filled liquid of cryogenic superfluid helium II in dewar containers driven by the gravity gradient and jitter accelerations associated with slew motion for the purpose to perform scientific observation during the normal spacecraft operation are investigated. An example is given with the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility-Spectroscopy (AXAF-S) for slew motion which is responsible for the sloshing dynamics. The jitter accelerations include slew motion, spinning motion, atmospheric drag on the spacecraft, spacecraft attitude motions arising from machinery vibrations, thruster firing, pointing control of spacecraft, crew motion, etc. Explicit mathematical expressions to cover these forces acting on the spacecraft fluid systems are derived. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertia frame spacecraft bound coordinate, and solve time-dependent, three-dimensional formulations of partial differential equations subject to initial and boundary conditions. The explicit mathematical expressions of boundary conditions to cover capillary force effect on the liquid-vapor interface in microgravity environments are also derived. The formulations of fluid moment and angular moment fluctuations in fluid profiles induced by the sloshing dynamics, together with fluid stress and moment fluctuations exerted on the spacecraft dewar containers have also been derived. Examples are also given for cases applicable to the AXAF-S spacecraft sloshing dynamics associated with slew motion.

  17. Force fluctuation in a semiflexible loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, James; Kim, Harold; Harold Kim Team

    DNA-binding proteins can regulate genetic expression by holding two sites in close proximity, forming a closed loop. Such complexes may require strong bending of DNA segments on the order of one persistence length or less. Both this elastic bending and the thermal fluctuations of the DNA molecule are necessary to describe the resulting behavior. To explore this problem, we consider a discrete model of a wormlike chain, kept in the fixed extension ensemble. By using a novel method to sample conformations in both position and momentum space, we can obtain a distribution of constraint forces as a function of chain length, extension, and flexibility. Our coarse-grained model allows us to explore the space of these parameters more efficiently than a detailed molecular dynamics approach. We find that increasing contour length decreases average force by relieving bending stress, but that the additional freedom allows fluctuations in the constraint force to increase. This implies that the probability of large forces may go up even as the mean goes down, impacting the lifetime of such bound states in a way unforeseen by purely equilibrium methods.

  18. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, [le][approximately][ovr J] [times] [approximately][ovr B][ge], has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  19. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, {le}{approximately}{ovr J} {times} {approximately}{ovr B}{ge}, has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  20. Short distance expansion for fluctuation induced interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emig, Thorsten; Bimonte, Giuseppe

    Fluctuation induced interactions become most prominent in close to proximity to surfaces. Examples include van der Waals and Casimir forces, heat transfer, and spectral shifts for atoms and molecules. In many situations, the surfaces are curved or structured which makes the computation of the interaction in general complicated. Here we present a versatile and powerful approach to this problem which is based on a derivative expansion. It applies to distances much smaller than the radii of surface curvature. Explicit results include orientational effects for anisotropic particles, thermal effects, and spectral modifications.

  1. Entropic Force and its Fluctuation in Euclidean Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue

    In this paper, we study the idea about gravity as entropic force proposed by Verlinde. By interpreting Euclidean gravity in the language of thermodynamic quantities on holographic screen, we find the gravitational force can be calculated from the change of entropy on the screen. We show that normal gravity calculation can be reinterpreted in the language of thermodynamic variables. We also study the fluctuation of the force and find the fluctuation acting on the point-like particle can never be larger than the expectation value of the force. For a black hole in AdS space, by gauge/gravity duality, the fluctuation may be interpreted as arising from thermal fluctuation in the boundary description. And for a black hole in flat space, the ratio between fluctuation and force goes to a constant (T)/(m) at infinity.

  2. Noncontact Friction and Force Fluctuations between Closely Spaced Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Stipe, B. C.; Mamin, H. J.; Stowe, T. D.; Kenny, T. W.; Rugar, D.

    2001-08-27

    Noncontact friction between a Au(111) surface and an ultrasensitive gold-coated cantilever was measured as a function of tip-sample spacing, temperature, and bias voltage using observations of cantilever damping and Brownian motion. The importance of the inhomogeneous contact potential is discussed and comparison is made to measurements over dielectric surfaces. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the force fluctuations are interpreted in terms of near-surface fluctuating electric fields interacting with static surface charge.

  3. Stability of focal adhesion enhanced by its inner force fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhi-Xiu; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Cells actively sense and respond to mechanical signals from the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. By representing a single focal adhesion as a cluster of slip bonds, it has been demonstrated that the cluster often became unstable under fluctuated forces. However, an unusual case was also reported, where the stability of the cluster might be substantially enhanced by a fluctuated force with a relatively low fluctuation frequency and high fluctuation amplitude. Such an observation cannot be explained by the conventional fracture theory of fatigue. Here, we intensively investigate this intriguing observation by carrying out systematic parametric studies. Our intensive simulation results indicate that stability enhancement of this kind is in fact quite robust, which can be affected by the stochastic features of a single bond and the profile of the fluctuated forces such as the average value of bond force. We then suggest that the fluctuation of traction force within a focal adhesion might enhance its stability in a certain way. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.*11372279).

  4. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.

    1993-11-01

    The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the MST reversed field pinch (over the radial range r/a > 0.75). The flux, produced by electrons traveling parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field, is obtained from correlation between the fluctuations in the parallel heat flux and the radial magnetic field. The fluctuation induced flux is large (100 kW/cm{sup 2}) in the ``core`` (r/a < 0.85) and small (< 10--30 kW/cm{sup 2}) in the edge.

  5. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.R. )

    1994-02-14

    The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the MST reversed field pinch (over the radial range [ital r]/[ital a][gt]0.75).The flux, produced by electrons traveling parallel to a fluctuating magentic field, is obtained from correlation between the fluctuations in the parallel heat flux and the radial magnetic field. The fluctuation induced flux is large (100 kW/cm[sup 2]) in the core'' ([ital r]/[ital a][lt]0.85) and small ([lt]10--30 kW/cm[sup 2]) in the edge.

  6. A Langevin model of physical forces in cell volume fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, Steven M; Zegers, Federico M; Angelini, Thomas E

    2016-05-24

    Cells interact mechanically with their physical surroundings by attaching to the extracellular matrix or other cells and contracting the cytoskeleton. Cells do so dynamically, exhibiting fluctuating contractile motion in time. In monolayers, these dynamic contractions manifest as volume fluctuations, which involve the transport of fluid in and out of the cell. An integrated understanding of cell elasticity, actively generated stresses, and fluid transport has not yet been developed. Here we apply a minimal model of these forces to cell volume fluctuation data, elucidating the dynamic behavior of cells within monolayers. PMID:26787009

  7. Calculation of a fluctuating entropic force by phase space sampling.

    PubMed

    Waters, James T; Kim, Harold D

    2015-07-01

    A polymer chain pinned in space exerts a fluctuating force on the pin point in thermal equilibrium. The average of such fluctuating force is well understood from statistical mechanics as an entropic force, but little is known about the underlying force distribution. Here, we introduce two phase space sampling methods that can produce the equilibrium distribution of instantaneous forces exerted by a terminally pinned polymer. In these methods, both the positions and momenta of mass points representing a freely jointed chain are perturbed in accordance with the spatial constraints and the Boltzmann distribution of total energy. The constraint force for each conformation and momentum is calculated using Lagrangian dynamics. Using terminally pinned chains in space and on a surface, we show that the force distribution is highly asymmetric with both tensile and compressive forces. Most importantly, the mean of the distribution, which is equal to the entropic force, is not the most probable force even for long chains. Our work provides insights into the mechanistic origin of entropic forces, and an efficient computational tool for unbiased sampling of the phase space of a constrained system. PMID:26274308

  8. On the fluctuation induced mass enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoa, Nguyen; Tuan, Vu Ngoc; Van Xuan, Le; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    The effective mass induced by the background fluctuation on particles is considered. The analytical results show that the effective mass depends only on the properties of fluctuation, and takes non-zero value when and only when fluctuation mean value is non-zero. The possible applications of the obtained results to complex systems such as biology and ecology where environmental factors lead to the changes of the information exchange ranges from long to short one are discussed, i.e. the possibility of using physical modeling techniques to investigate macroscopic behaviors of some complex systems under consideration.

  9. Dislocation dynamical approach to force fluctuations in nanoindentation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthakrishna, G.; Katti, Rohit; K, Srikanth

    2014-09-01

    We develop an approach that combines the power of nonlinear dynamics with the evolution equations for the mobile and immobile dislocation densities and force to explain force fluctuations in nanoindentation experiments. The model includes nucleation, multiplication, and propagation thresholds for mobile dislocations, and other well known dislocation transformation mechanisms. The model predicts all the generic features of nanoindentation such as the Hertzian elastic branch followed by several force drops of decreasing magnitudes, and residual plasticity after unloading. The stress corresponding to the elastic force maximum is close to the yield stress of an ideal solid. The predicted values for all the quantities are close to those reported by experiments. Our model allows us to address the indentation-size effect including the ambiguity in defining the hardness in the force drop dominated regime. At large indentation depths, the hardness remains nearly constant with a marginal decreasing trend.

  10. Force fluctuations in three-dimensional suspended fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Schlosser, Florian; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    Cells are sensitive to mechanical cues from their environment and at the same time generate and transmit forces to their surroundings. To test quantitatively forces generated by cells not attached to a substrate, we used a dual optical trap to suspend 3T3 fibroblasts between two fibronectin-coated beads. In this simple geometry, we measured both the cells' elastic properties and the force fluctuations they generate with high bandwidth. Cell stiffness decreased substantially with both myosin inhibition by blebbistatin and serum-starvation, but not with microtubule depolymerization by nocodazole. We show that cortical forces generated by non-muscle myosin II deform the cell from its rounded shape in the frequency regime from 0.1 to 10 Hz. The amplitudes of these forces were strongly reduced by blebbistatin and serum starvation, but were unaffected by depolymerization of microtubules. Force fluctuations show a spectrum that is characteristic for an elastic network activated by random sustained stresses with abrupt transitions. PMID:25533089

  11. Force fluctuations in three-dimensional suspended fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Florian; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2015-02-01

    Cells are sensitive to mechanical cues from their environment and at the same time generate and transmit forces to their surroundings. To test quantitatively forces generated by cells not attached to a substrate, we used a dual optical trap to suspend 3T3 fibroblasts between two fibronectin-coated beads. In this simple geometry, we measured both the cells' elastic properties and the force fluctuations they generate with high bandwidth. Cell stiffness decreased substantially with both myosin inhibition by blebbistatin and serum-starvation, but not with microtubule depolymerization by nocodazole. We show that cortical forces generated by non-muscle myosin II deform the cell from its rounded shape in the frequency regime from 0.1 to 10 Hz. The amplitudes of these forces were strongly reduced by blebbistatin and serum starvation, but were unaffected by depolymerization of microtubules. Force fluctuations show a spectrum that is characteristic for an elastic network activated by random sustained stresses with abrupt transitions. PMID:25533089

  12. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  13. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  14. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence.

    PubMed

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of α effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of α, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other. PMID:26651796

  15. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-02

    Here, this article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  16. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-02

    Here, this article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is nomore » strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.« less

  17. Magnetic fluctuation induced transport in MST (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.R.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Prager, S.C.; Ji, H. )

    1995-01-01

    We made local measurements of the magnetic fluctuation induced transport of particles and energy in the outer region ([ital r]/[ital a][gt]0.75) of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. These measurements allow comparison with the Rochester--Rosenbluth stochastic diffusion coefficients. An electrostatic electron energy analyzer and fast pyrobolometer were employed in combination with magnetic pickup coils to directly measure the correlated products [l angle][ital [tilde J

  18. Traction force and tension fluctuations in growing axons

    PubMed Central

    Polackwich, Robert J.; Koch, Daniel; McAllister, Ryan; Geller, Herbert M.; Urbach, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Actively generated mechanical forces play a central role in axon growth and guidance, but the mechanisms that underly force generation and regulation in growing axons remain poorly understood. We report measurements of the dynamics of traction stresses from growth cones of actively advancing axons from postnatal rat DRG neurons. By tracking the movement of the growth cone and analyzing the traction stress field from a reference frame that moves with it, we are able to show that there is a clear and consistent average stress field that underlies the complex spatial stresses present at any one time. The average stress field has strong maxima on the sides of the growth cone, directed inward toward the growth cone neck. This pattern represents a contractile stress contained within the growth cone, and a net force that is balanced by the axon tension. Using high time-resolution measurements of the growth cone traction stresses, we show that the stress field is composed of fluctuating local stress peaks, with a large number peaks that live for a short time, a population of peaks whose lifetime distribution follows an exponential decay, and a small number of very long-lived peaks. We show that the high time-resolution data also reveal that the tension appears to vary randomly over short time scales, roughly consistent with the lifetime of the stress peaks, suggesting that the tension fluctuations originate from stochastic adhesion dynamics. PMID:26578882

  19. Suppression of force fluctuations in flow past an aerofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlin, A.; Mao, X.

    2015-07-01

    Force fluctuations on a solid body are associated with unsteadiness in the wake, e.g. vortex shedding. Therefore, the control of force fluctuations can be realised by suppressing the flow unsteadiness. A NACA0024 aerofoil closed with a round trailing edge is chosen to represent the solid body throughout this investigation, with the Reynolds number fixed at Re = 1000 and angle of attack α ≤ 15o, at which the uncontrolled flow is two-dimensional. A linear optimal control is calculated by analysing the distribution of sensitivity of unsteadiness to control around the entire surface of the body. The nonlinear effects of the calculated control, which can be actuated through surface-normal suction and blowing across the surface of the aerofoil, are tested through two-dimensional direct numerical simulations. It is observed that a surface-normal velocity control with a maximum magnitude less than 8% of the free stream velocity completely suppresses unsteadiness at α = 10° with an overall drag reduction of 14% and a 138% increase of lift.

  20. Traction force and tension fluctuations in growing axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Polackwich, Jamie; Koch, Daniel; McAllister, Ryan; Geller, Herbert

    Actively generated mechanical forces play a central role in axon growth and guidance during nervous system development. We describe the dynamics of traction stresses from growth cones of actively advancing axons from postnatal rat DRG neurons. By tracking the movement of the growth cone and analyzing the traction stresses in a co-moving reference frame, we show that there is a clear and consistent average stress field underlying the complex spatial stresses present at any one time. The average stress field has strong maxima on the sides of the growth cone, directed inward toward the growth cone neck. This pattern represents a Contractile stress contained within the growth cone, and a net force that is balanced by the axon tension. In addition, using high time-resolution measurements, we show that the stress field is composed of fluctuating local stress peaks, with a population of peaks whose lifetime distribution follows an exponential decay, and a small number of very long-lived peaks. We also find that the tension appears to vary randomly over short time scales, roughly consistent with the lifetime of the stress peaks, suggesting that the tension fluctuations originate from stochastic adhesion dynamics.

  1. Fluctuations of the Casimir-like force between two membrane inclusions.

    PubMed

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dommersnes, Paul G; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-05-01

    Although Casimir forces are inseparable from their fluctuations, little is known about these fluctuations in soft matter systems. We use the membrane stress tensor to study the fluctuations of the membrane-mediated Casimir-like force. This method enables us to recover the Casimir force between two inclusions and to calculate its variance. We show that the Casimir force is dominated by its fluctuations. Furthermore, when the distance d between the inclusions is decreased from infinity, the variance of the Casimir force decreases as -1/d2. This distance dependence shares a common physical origin with the Casimir force itself. PMID:20866178

  2. Quadratic nonlinear behavior of lift and drag fluctuations on cylinders undergoing forced oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Williams, D. R.

    1998-11-01

    The instantaneous pressure distribution was measured around the azimuth of a circular cylinder undergoing forced oscillations. The forcing direction was either in-line or cross-flow to produce symmetric or antisymmetric disturbances, respectively. The fluctuating lift and drag coefficients were computed from the pressure distributions. Combination modes appear in the spectrum of the surface pressure signals when the forcing frequency is different from the von Karman vortex shedding frequency, fo. The spatial symmetry of the sum and difference modes depends on the direction of the cylinder oscillation, and is predictable with a simple set of symmetry relations representative of quadratic nonlinear interaction. As a result, cross-flow oscillations channel energy into the fluctuating drag component through the combination modes, while in-line oscillations affect the fluctuating lift. The second harmonic (3 fo) commonly seen in flow-induced vibrations is the result of the nonlinear interaction between the fundamental and its first harmonic. By the symmetry relations, the 3 fo mode necessarily appears in the fluctuating lift spectrum.

  3. Tailoring photonic forces on a magnetodielectric nanoparticle with a fluctuating optical source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auñón, Juan Miguel; Qiu, Cheng Wei; Nieto-Vesperinas, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    We address the forces exerted by the random electromagnetic field emitted by a fluctuating optical source on a kind of dielectric nanoparticles that have arisen much interest because of their recently shown magnetodielectric behavior. The illumination with light, or other electromagnetic wave, of a given state of coherence allows us to create photonic forces, a particular case of which are optical analogous to the Casimir-Polder and van der Waals forces, as well as of thermal forces out of thermodynamic equilibrium. This leads to a deeper understanding of the conditions and limitations under which some theories of these forces were established. We also study the effects of the coherence length and of sharp changes in the particle differential scattering cross section due to Kerker minimum forward or zero backward conditions. We show how the nanoparticle Mie resonances, constituted by the induced electric and magnetic dipoles, lead to long distance attractions to the source, as well as to the possible predominance of magnetic forces. In addition, it is shown how, by manipulating the fluctuating source, either pushing or tractor beams are obtained, even in the far zone. These effects are specially relevant when quasimonochromatic emission is employed, and manifest the possibility of performing a monitoring of these mechanical interactions, in particular by a photonic analogy of those aforementioned classical thermal forces. This opens paths to nanoparticle ensembling and manipulation. The influence of the excitation of surface waves of the source is also considered.

  4. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    SciTech Connect

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  5. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction.

    PubMed

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A; Loring, Roger F

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers. PMID:24320286

  6. Influence of the Basset force on the resonant behavior of an oscillator with fluctuating frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekker, A.; Mankin, R.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of hydrodynamic interactions, such as Stokes and Basset forces, on the dynamics of a harmonically trapped Brownian tracer is considered. A generalized Langevin equation is used to describe the tracer's response to an external periodic force and to dichotomous fluctuations of the stiffness of the trapping potential. Relying on the Shapiro-Loginov formula, exact expressions for the complex susceptibility and for the response function are presented. On the basis of these exact formulas, it is demonstrated that interplay of a multiplicative colored noise and the Basset force induced memory effects can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as multiresonance versus the driving frequency, as well as stochastic resonance versus noise parameters. In particular, in certain parameter regions the response function exhibits a resonance-like enhancement at intermediate values of the intensity of the Basset force. Conditions for the appearance of these effects are also discussed.

  7. Influence of the Basset force on the resonant behavior of an oscillator with fluctuating frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Rekker, A. Mankin, R.

    2015-10-28

    The influence of hydrodynamic interactions, such as Stokes and Basset forces, on the dynamics of a harmonically trapped Brownian tracer is considered. A generalized Langevin equation is used to describe the tracer’s response to an external periodic force and to dichotomous fluctuations of the stiffness of the trapping potential. Relying on the Shapiro-Loginov formula, exact expressions for the complex susceptibility and for the response function are presented. On the basis of these exact formulas, it is demonstrated that interplay of a multiplicative colored noise and the Basset force induced memory effects can generate a variety of cooperation effects, such as multiresonance versus the driving frequency, as well as stochastic resonance versus noise parameters. In particular, in certain parameter regions the response function exhibits a resonance-like enhancement at intermediate values of the intensity of the Basset force. Conditions for the appearance of these effects are also discussed.

  8. Diastolic scattered light fluctuation, resting force and twitch force in mammalian cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lakatta, E. G.; Lappé, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    1. When coherent light was passed through isolated isometric cardiac muscles during the diastolic or resting period, intensity fluctuations were observed in the scattered field. The frequency of these intensity fluctuations (f½) varied with many experimental interventions known to enhance Ca2+ flux into the cell. 2. In rat muscles stimulated at low frequencies (0.1 ± 2.0 min-1) stepwise increases (0.4-10 mm) of [Ca2+] in the bathing fluid ([Ca2+]e), or addition of ouabain (10-6-6 × 10-4 m) to the perfusate caused stepwise increases in f½. These were paralleled by increments in resting force (RF) such that the changes in f½ and RF were highly correlated. Substitution of K+ for Na+ in the perfusate resulted in parallel transients in RF and f½. 3. In contrast to the rat, most cat muscles stimulated at low frequencies in the steady state exhibited neither diastolic intensity fluctuations nor Ca2+-dependent changes in RF in [Ca2+]e of 10 mm or less; when [Ca2+]e was increased to 12-32 mm, however, steady-state Ca2+-dependent f½ and RF were observed. In a given [Ca2+]e reduction of [Na+]e increased f½. In the transient state following cessation of regular stimulation at more rapid rates (12-96 min-1) intensity fluctuations were present in all [Ca2+]e and decayed with time (seconds to minutes); the f½ and time course of the decay of the fluctuations were determined by the rate of prior stimulation and [Ca2+]e. 4. Maximum potentiation of twitch force in response to the above inotropic interventions was associated with an optimal level of f½ which was similar in both species; when higher levels of f½ were produced by more intense inotropic intervention, twitch force declined. Over the range of inotropic intervention up to and including that at which maximum twitch potentiation occurred, the increase in diastolic f½ predicted the extent of twitch potentiation with a high degree of accuracy (r > 0.97) both in the transient and steady states. 5. In contrast to the

  9. Structural fluctuation of proteins induced by thermodynamic perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Fumio; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-28

    A theory to describe structural fluctuations of protein induced by thermodynamic perturbations, pressure, temperature, and denaturant, is proposed. The theory is formulated based on the three methods in the statistical mechanics: the generalized Langevin theory, the linear response theory, and the three dimensional interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. The theory clarifies how the change in thermodynamic conditions, or a macroscopic perturbation, induces the conformational fluctuation, which is a microscopic property. The theoretical results are applied, on the conceptual basis, to explain the experimental finding by Akasaka et al., concerning the NMR experiment which states that the conformational change induced by pressure corresponds to structural fluctuations occurring in the ambient condition. A method to evaluate the structural fluctuation induced by pressure is also suggested by means of the 3D-RISM and the site-site Kirkwood-Buff theories.

  10. Trapped Electron Precession Shear Induced Fluctuation Decorrelation

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; E.-J. Kim

    2002-07-29

    We consider the effects of trapped electron precession shear on the microturbulence. In a similar way the strong E x B shear reduces the radial correlation length of ambient fluctuations, the radial variation of the trapped electron precession frequency can reduce the radial correlation length of fluctuations associated with trapped electrons. In reversed shear plasmas, with the explicit dependence of the trapped electron precession shearing rate on B(subscript)theta, the sharp radial gradient of T(subscript)e due to local electron heating inside qmin can make the precession shearing mechanism more effective, and reduce the electron thermal transport constructing a positive feedback loop for the T(subscript)e barrier formation.

  11. Comment on ``Gravity as a zero-point-fluctuation force''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, S.

    1993-04-01

    A paper by H. Puthoff [Phys. Rev. A 39, 2333 (1989)], which claims to derive Newtonian gravity from stochastic electrodynamics, contains a serious computational error. When the calculation is corrected, the resulting force is shown to be nongravitational and negligible.

  12. Approach and Coalescence of Gold Nanoparticles Driven by Surface Thermodynamic Fluctuations and Atomic Interaction Forces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Shuai; Cui, Kai; Li, Dangguo; Chen, Darong

    2016-02-23

    The approach and coalescence behavior of gold nanoparticles on a silicon surface were investigated by experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. By analyzing the behavior of the atoms in the nanoparticles in the simulations, it was found that the atoms in a single isolated nanoparticle randomly fluctuated and that the surface atoms showed greater fluctuation. The fluctuation increased as the temperature increased. When there were two or more neighboring nanoparticles, the fluctuating surface atoms of the nanoparticles "flowed" toward the neighboring nanoparticle because of atomic interaction forces between the nanoparticles. With the surface atoms "flowing", the gold nanoparticles approached and finally coalesced. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results. It can be concluded that surface thermodynamic fluctuations and atomic interaction forces are the causes of the approach and coalescence behavior of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:26756675

  13. Vacuum Fluctuation Force on a Rigid Casimir Cavity in de Sitter and Schwarzschild-De Sitter Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the net force on a rigid Casimir cavity generated by vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field in three cases: de Sitter space-time, de Sitter space-time with weak gravitational field and Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time. In de Sitter space-time the resulting net force follows the square inverse law but unfortunately it is too weak to be measurable due to the large universe radius. By introducing a weak gravitational field into the de Sitter space-time, we find that the net force can now be split into two parts, one is the gravitational force due to the induced effective mass between the two plates and the other one is generated by the metric structure of de Sitter space-time. In order to investigate the vacuum fluctuation force on the rigid cavity under strong gravitational field, we perform a similar analysis in Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time and results are obtained in three different limits. The most interesting one is when the cavity gets closer to the horizon of a blackhole, square inverse law is recovered and the repulsive force due to negative energy/mass of the cavity now has an observable strength. More importantly the force changes from being repulsive to attractive when the cavity crosses the event horizon, so that the energy/mass of the cavity switches the sign, which suggests the unusual time direction inside the event horizon.

  14. Short-term climatic fluctuations forced by thermal anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    A two level, global, spectral model using pressure as a vertical coordinate was developed. The system of equations describing the model is nonlinear and quasi-geostrophic (linear balance). Static stability is variable in the model. A moisture budget is calculated in the lower layer only. Convective adjustment is used to avoid supercritical temperature lapse rates. The mechanical forcing of topography is introduced as a vertical velocity at the lower boundary. Solar forcing is specified assuming a daily mean zenith angle. The differential diabatic heating between land and sea is paramterized. On land and sea ice surfaces, a steady state thermal energy equation is solved to calculate the surface temperature. On the oceans, the sea surface temperature is specified as the climatological average for January. The model is used to simulate the January, February and March circulations.

  15. Thermal field fluctuations in a magnetic tip / implications for magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, J. D.; Chantrell, R. W.; Rugar, D.

    2000-05-01

    Thermally excited magnetic fluctuations are fundamental to the behavior of small ferromagnetic particles and have practical consequences for the proposed detection of individual spins by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). In particular, fluctuating fields from a nearby magnetic tip can increase the relaxation rate of spins in a sample if there is significant spectral density of field fluctuation at the Larmor frequency of the target spin. As an initial step toward understanding this issue, magnetic field fluctuations have been simulated which emanate from a magnetic tip with dimensions 60 nm×60 nm×2 μm. It was found that the fluctuations in a cobalt magnetic tip were too strong for MRFM experiments aimed at detecting individual electron spins. However, the results obtained for a PrFeB tip fell within the tolerance required.

  16. Branching influences force-velocity curves and length fluctuations in actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansda, Deepak Kumar; Sen, Shamik; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-12-01

    We investigate collective dynamics of branched actin networks growing against a rigid movable wall constrained by a resistive force. Computing the force velocity relations, we show that the stall force of such networks depends not only on the average number of filaments touching the wall, but also on the amount of fluctuation of the leading edge of the network. These differences arise due to differences in the network architecture, namely, distance between two adjacent branching points and the initial distance of the starting filament from the wall, with their relative magnitudes influencing the nature of the force velocity curves (convex versus concave). We also show that the introduction of branching results in nonmonotonic diffusion constant, a quantity that measures the growth in length fluctuation of the leading edge of the network, as a function of externally applied force. Together our results demonstrate how the collective dynamics of a branched network differs from that of a parallel filament network.

  17. Fluctuations of the proton-electromotive force across the inner mitochondrial membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Joaquim; Fornés, José A.

    1997-05-01

    The intermembrane mitochondrial space (IMMS) is delimited by the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes and defines a region of molecular dimension where fluctuations of the number of free protons and of transmembrane voltage can give rise to fluctuations in the proton-electromotive force EPMF across the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). We have applied the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistor Rm in parallel with a capacitor Cm representing the passive electrical properties of the IMM, in series with another capacitor Cb representing the proton-buffering power of the IMMS fluid. An access resistance Ra was defined as a link between the capacitor Cb and the membrane. Average EPMF fluctuations across the IMM were calculated for different assumptions concerning the intermembrane space dimensions. The calculated average EPMF fluctuations were in the vicinity of 100 mV for relaxation times in the few-microseconds range. The corresponding fluctuational protonic free energy is about 10 kJ/mole, which is comparable to the binding energy for protons in different transporters. This suggests that fluctuations in EPMF can be of relevance in the universe of forces influencing the molecular machinery embedded in the IMM.

  18. Fluctuation-induced in-plane magnetoconductivity in bilayered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ramallo, M.V.; Mosqueira, J.; Vidal, F.; Pomar, A.

    1996-11-01

    In this paper the authors summarize some of their theoretical results for the paraconductivity and for the fluctuation-induced in-plane magnetoconductivity in the weak magnetic field limit of layered superconductors with several interlayer separations. Also, they briefly discuss the existing experimental data obtained in untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} crystals.

  19. Differential interferometry for measurement of density fluctuations and fluctuation-induced transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Bergerson, W. F.; Yates, T. F.

    2010-10-15

    Differential interferometry employs two parallel laser beams with a small spatial offset (less than beam width) and frequency difference (1-2 MHz) using common optics and a single mixer for a heterodyne detection. The differential approach allows measurement of the electron density gradient, its fluctuations, as well as the equilibrium density distribution. This novel interferometry technique is immune to fringe skip errors and is particularly useful in harsh plasma environments. Accurate calibration of the beam spatial offset, accomplished by use of a rotating dielectric wedge, is required to enable broad application of this approach. Differential interferometry has been successfully used on the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch plasma to directly measure fluctuation-induced transport along with equilibrium density profile evolution during pellet injection. In addition, by combining differential and conventional interferometry, both linear and nonlinear terms of the electron density fluctuation energy equation can be determined, thereby allowing quantitative investigation of the origin of the density fluctuations. The concept, calibration, and application of differential interferometry are presented.

  20. Slipstream-induced pressure fluctuations on a wing panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunggren, Sten; Samuelsson, Ingemar; Widig, Kurt

    1989-10-01

    Propeller-induced pressure fluctuations have been measured on a wind-tunnel model. The results show that the main contribution on the wing panels can be attributed to the propeller tip vortex, which gives a pressure level at least 20 dB above the level from the inner parts of the propeller. The pressure fluctuations are predominantly periodic and the spectrum shows strong peaks at the blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The pressure level at the blade passage frequency is approximately the same on wing panel and fuselage, while the level of the higher harmonics is substantially higher on the wing panel than on the fuselage.

  1. Underwater light polarization and radiance fluctuations induced by surface waves.

    PubMed

    Sabbah, Shai; Shashar, Nadav

    2006-07-01

    The underwater light field is an ever-changing environment. Surface waves induce variability in the radiance and the light's polarization. We examined the dependence of the polarization fluctuations associated with diffuse light (not including contribution from direct skylight) on the viewing zenith angle (30 degrees, 70 degrees, and 90 degrees), solar zenith angle (23 degrees -72 degrees), depth of 0.5-3 m, and light wavelength (380-650 nm) while observing within the azimuthal plane in the wind-wave direction. Polarization and radiance fluctuated with time. Light variability (presented by the coefficient of variation calculated over a series of fluctuations in the radiance and percent polarization, and by the standard deviation calculated over a series of fluctuations in the e-vector orientation) was highest at a viewing zenith angle of 70 degrees , depended positively on the solar zenith angle, and decreased with depth at viewing zenith angles of 30 degrees and 70 degrees . Additionally, the variability of the percent polarization was significantly higher than that of the radiance. The temporal light fluctuations offer possibilities, such as enhancing the detection of transparent and reflecting objects; however, they set constraints on the optimal underwater polarization vision by both animals and by the use of instruments. PMID:16799688

  2. Characterization of speed fluctuation and drag force in young swimmers: a gender comparison.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Morais, Jorge E; Morouço, Pedro; Moreira, Marc; Garrido, Nuno D; Marinho, Daniel A; Silva, António J

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed fluctuation and the drag force in young swimmers between genders. Twenty-three young pubertal swimmers (12 boys and 11 girls) volunteered as subjects. Speed fluctuation was measured using a kinematical mechanical method (i.e., speedo-meter) during a maximal 25-m front crawl bout. Active drag, active drag coefficient and power needed to overcome drag were measured with the velocity perturbation method for another two maximal 25m front crawl bouts with and without the perturbation device. Passive drag and the passive drag coefficient were estimated using the gliding decay velocity method after a maximal push-off from the wall while being fully immersed. The technique drag index was also assessed as a ratio between active and passive drag. Boys presented meaningfully higher speed fluctuation, active drag, power needed to overcome drag and technique drag index than the girls. There were no significant gender differences for active drag coefficient, passive drag and passive drag coefficient. There were positive and moderate-strong associations between active drag and speed fluctuation when controlling the effects of swim velocity. So, increasing speed fluctuation leads to higher drag force values and those are even higher for boys than for girls. PMID:24071552

  3. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  4. Fluctuation-induced dissipation in non-equilibrium moving systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, Mohammad; Golestanian, Ramin; Jaffe, Robert; Kardar, Mehran

    2013-03-01

    Quantum fluctuations in moving systems lead to nontrivial effects such as dissipation and radiation. We consider moving bodies--a single rotating object or multiple objects in relative motion--and derive the frictional force by using techniques from non-equilibrium statistical physics as well as quantum optics. The radiation to the environment is obtained as a general expression in terms of the scattering matrix which is a powerful analytical tool. We apply our general formulas to several examples of systems out of equilibrium due to their motion.

  5. Mean and Fluctuating Force Distribution in a Random Array of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiki, Georges; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a numerical study of the force distribution within a cluster of mono-disperse spherical particles. A direct forcing immersed boundary method is used to calculate the forces on individual particles for a volume fraction range of [0.1, 0.4] and a Reynolds number range of [10, 625]. The overall drag is compared to several drag laws found in the literature. As for the fluctuation of the hydrodynamic streamwise force among individual particles, it is shown to have a normal distribution with a standard deviation that varies with the volume fraction only. The standard deviation remains approximately 25% of the mean streamwise force on a single sphere. The force distribution shows a good correlation between the location of two to three nearest upstream and downstream neighbors and the magnitude of the forces. A detailed analysis of the pressure and shear forces contributions calculated on a ghost sphere in the vicinity of a single particle in a uniform flow reveals a mapping of those contributions. The combination of the mapping and number of nearest neighbors leads to a first order correction of the force distribution within a cluster which can be used in Lagrangian-Eulerian techniques. We also explore the possibility of a binary force model that systematically accounts for the effect of the nearest neighbors. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF OISE-0968313) under Partnership for International Research and Education (PIRE) in Multiphase Flows at the University of Florida.

  6. Flow induced force of labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwatsubo, T.; Motooka, N.; Kawai, R.

    1982-01-01

    Flow induced instability force due to a labyrinth seal is analyzed. An approximate solution is given for the partial differential equation representing the flow in labyrinth seal and it is compared with the finite difference method in order to verify the accuracy of both methods. The effects of difference of inlet and outlet pressures of the seal, deflection of pressure and mass flow from the steady state, rotor diameter, seal clearance, seal interval and seal number on the flow induced force of the seal are investigated and it is known that some of these factors are very influential on the flow induced force.

  7. Decoherence in current induced forces: Application to adiabatic quantum motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Alcázar, Lucas J.; Bustos-Marún, Raúl A.; Pastawski, Horacio M.

    2015-08-01

    Current induced forces are not only related with the discrete nature of electrons but also with its quantum character. It is natural then to wonder about the effect of decoherence. Here, we develop the theory of current induced forces including dephasing processes and we apply it to study adiabatic quantum motors (AQMs). The theory is based on Büttiker's fictitious probe model, which here is reformulated for this particular case. We prove that it accomplishes the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We also show that, in spite of decoherence, the total work performed by the current induced forces remains equal to the pumped charge per cycle times the voltage. We find that decoherence affects not only the current induced forces of the system but also its intrinsic friction and noise, modifying in a nontrivial way the efficiency of AQMs. We apply the theory to study an AQM inspired by a classical peristaltic pump where we surprisingly find that decoherence can play a crucial role by triggering its operation. Our results can help to understand how environmentally induced dephasing affects the quantum behavior of nanomechanical devices.

  8. A fluctuation theorem for non-equilibrium relaxational systems driven by external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Francesco; Bonetto, Federico; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Kurchan, Jorge

    2005-09-01

    We discuss an extension of the fluctuation theorem to stochastic models that, in the limit of zero external drive, are not able to equilibrate with their environment, extending earlier results of Sellitto. We show that if the entropy production rate is suitably defined, its probability distribution function verifies the fluctuation relation with the ambient temperature replaced by a (frequency dependent) effective temperature. We derive modified Green-Kubo relations. We illustrate these results with the simple example of an oscillator coupled to a non-equilibrium bath driven by an external force. We discuss the relevance of our results for driven glasses and the diffusion of Brownian particles in out-of-equilibrium media and propose a concrete experimental strategy for measuring the low frequency value of the effective temperature using the fluctuations of the work done by an ac conservative field. We compare our results to related ones that appeared in the literature recently.

  9. Geometry-induced fluctuations of olfactory searches in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Juan Duque; Gómez-Ullate, David; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    In olfactory search an immobile target emits chemical molecules at constant rate. The molecules are transported by the medium, which is assumed to be turbulent. Considering a searcher able to detect such chemical signals and whose motion follows the infotaxis strategy, we study the statistics of the first-passage time to the target when the searcher moves on a finite two-dimensional lattice of different geometries. Far from the target, where the concentration of chemicals is low, the direction of the searcher's first movement is determined by the geometry of the domain and the topology of the lattice, inducing strong fluctuations on the average search time with respect to the initial position of the searcher. The domain is partitioned in well-defined regions characterized by the direction of the first movement. If the search starts over the interface between two different regions, large fluctuations in the search time are observed.

  10. Eustatic sea level fluctuations induced by polar wander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabadini, Roberto; Doglioni, Carlo; Yuen, David A.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown here that polar wander of a viscoelastic, stratified earth can induce global sea level fluctuations comparable to the short-term component in eustatic sea-level curves. The sign of these fluctuations, which are very sensitive to the rheological stratification, depends on the geographical location of the observation point; rises and falls in sea level can thus be coeval in different parts of the world. This finding is a distinct contrast to the main assumption underlying the reconstruction of eustatic curves, namely that global sea-level events produce the same depositional sequence everywhere. It is proposed that polar wander should be added to the list of geophysical mechanisms that can control the third-order cycles in sea level.

  11. Thermoelectricity in polymer composites due to fluctuation-induced tunneling.

    PubMed

    Stedman, T; Wei, K; Nolas, G S; Woods, L M

    2015-11-01

    Transport in heavily-doped polymer composites, characterized by localized charge regions, is examined in light of the recent interest in polymers for thermoelectric applications. The developed fundamental transport theory describes carrier tunneling between charged localizations by taking into account thermally induced fluctuations of the applied potential. A range of characteristic behaviors corresponding to experimental data are described. Deviations from the Wiedemann-Franz law are also identified. This novel theory enables the determination of factors dominating the transport in polymers and a comparison to tunneling without thermal fluctuations is also provided. The obtained asymptotic expressions for the conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and carrier thermal conductivity are particularly useful for elucidating possible routes for thermoelectric transport control and optimization. PMID:26437575

  12. Large-eddy simulation - prediction of fluctuating lift and drag forces and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pruitt, J.M.; Hassan, Y.A. ); Steininger, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Excessive tube vibration caused by turbulent flow buffeting and fluid-elastic excitation is one of the main problems associated with steam generators. Vibration can lead to rupture of tubes within the steam generator, necessitating plugging, and perhaps even replacement of the component. Turbulence buffeting, and resulting excitation, is believed to be one of the mechanisms leading to tube vibration. The large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is being considered as a possible design analysis tool for defining the temporally fluctuating forces on steam generator tube banks. The present investigation uses LES to calculate the flow field for an array of tubes subject to turbulent flow and to compare the fluctuating lift and drag forces on a central tube with experimental findings. Predictions to date using LES methodology compare quite favorably with experimental data.

  13. Scaling fluctuation analysis of forcings and outputs of a simplified last millennium climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun; Varotsos, Costas

    2014-05-01

    Existing climate models are essentially weather models with extra couplings, coarser resolutions and different parametrisations. The model climate is the state to which averages of model outputs will converge for fixed atmospheric compositions and boundary conditions. By changing these, the climate is forced, climate change is thus viewed as the response of the models to "climate forcings". Over the pre-industrial last millennium, the main forcings are volcanic and solar, however - at least for sunspot based solar reconstructions - the statistical character of the these forcings are opposite: the volcanic forcings can be very strong at short time scales, but decrease (in a scaling manner, exponent ≡ -0.4), whereas on the contrary, the solar forcings increase with time scale (exponent ≡ 0.4). However, multiproxy series show that fluctuations in temperatures start to increase at centennial and millennial scales (exponent ≡ 0.4), and it is therefore unlikely that this can be explained by volcanic forcings. In comparison, although the solar forcings do increase with scale, they remain small. In accord with the forcing statistics, recent results from the GISS ER2 climate model display overly weak centennial and longer variability, but performing large numbers of runs is expensive: it is of interest to consider the response of simplified climate models. In this presentation, we analyze the outputs of the Zebiak-Cane model for the coupled ocean-atmosphere system in the tropical Pacific. Large numbers of realizations were obtained by Mann et al. (2005), and we used scaling fluctuation analysis based on Haar fluctuations to quantify the temporal scale dependence with and without (reconstructed) solar and volcanic forcings. Our results are compared with the GISS-ER2 outputs and with multiproxy variability. At scales less than about 100 years, the Zebiak-Cane responses to volcanic forcings is much weaker than the GISS ER2 volcanic only response and is not far from the

  14. Fluctuations of the van der Waals attraction force between macroscopic bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, A. S.

    2003-01-01

    The tliccry of the fluctuations of the van der Waals (vdW) attractive force between macroscopic bodies is developed. A general equation for the spectral density of the fluctuating surface Maxwell stress (force per unit mea.) in va,cuurn nea,r the surface of a body is derived under the assumption that, inside the bodies, the random La.ngevin sources of the electric and magnetic fields (charges, polarizations, currents) are Gaussian. This spectral density of stress is an integral over frequencies of a sum of terms each of which is a product of Fourier amplitudes of two field components' correlation functions. For metallic bodies, the contribution of free electrons to the vdW force (at frequencies up to the frequency of electron scattering) is calculated. This contribution to the force and its noise grows with temperature. Application of noiseless voltage to two interacting metals across the vacuum gap between them generates an additional force noise. This additional noise is proportional to the volta.ge squared and to the spectral density of the random electric field at the frequency of noise measurement. The theoretical qualitative conclusions are in good agreement with experirncnts.

  15. Atomic force microscopy of confined liquids using the thermal bending fluctuations of the cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    We use atomic force microscopy to measure the distance-dependent solvation forces and the dissipation across liquid films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) confined between a silicon tip and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate without active excitation of the cantilever. By analyzing the thermal bending fluctuations, we minimize possible nonlinearities of the tip-substrate interaction due to finite excitation amplitudes because these fluctuations are smaller than the typical 1 Å, which is much smaller than the characteristic interaction length. Moreover, we avoid the need to determine the phase lag between cantilever excitation and response, which suffers from complications due to hydrodynamic coupling between cantilever and fluid. Consistent results, and especially high-quality dissipation data, are obtained by analyzing the power spectrum and the time autocorrelation of the force fluctuations. We validate our approach by determining the bulk viscosity of OMCTS using tips with a radius of approximately 1 μm at tip-substrate separations >5 nm. For sharp tips we consistently find an exponentially decaying oscillatory tip-substrate interaction stiffness as well as a clearly nonmonotonic variation of the dissipation for tip-substrate distances up to 8 and 6 nm, respectively. Both observations are in line with the results of recent simulations which relate them to distance-dependent transitions of the molecular structure in the liquid.

  16. Atomic force microscopy of confined liquids using the thermal bending fluctuations of the cantilever.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    We use atomic force microscopy to measure the distance-dependent solvation forces and the dissipation across liquid films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) confined between a silicon tip and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate without active excitation of the cantilever. By analyzing the thermal bending fluctuations, we minimize possible nonlinearities of the tip-substrate interaction due to finite excitation amplitudes because these fluctuations are smaller than the typical 1 Å, which is much smaller than the characteristic interaction length. Moreover, we avoid the need to determine the phase lag between cantilever excitation and response, which suffers from complications due to hydrodynamic coupling between cantilever and fluid. Consistent results, and especially high-quality dissipation data, are obtained by analyzing the power spectrum and the time autocorrelation of the force fluctuations. We validate our approach by determining the bulk viscosity of OMCTS using tips with a radius of approximately 1 μm at tip-substrate separations >5 nm. For sharp tips we consistently find an exponentially decaying oscillatory tip-substrate interaction stiffness as well as a clearly nonmonotonic variation of the dissipation for tip-substrate distances up to 8 and 6 nm, respectively. Both observations are in line with the results of recent simulations which relate them to distance-dependent transitions of the molecular structure in the liquid. PMID:23848696

  17. Cosmological implications of modified gravity induced by quantum metric fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Harko, Tiberiu; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of modified gravities induced by the quantum fluctuations of the gravitational metric. If the metric can be decomposed as the sum of the classical and of a fluctuating part, of quantum origin, then the corresponding Einstein quantum gravity generates at the classical level modified gravity models with a non-minimal coupling between geometry and matter. As a first step in our study, after assuming that the expectation value of the quantum correction can be generally expressed in terms of an arbitrary second order tensor constructed from the metric and from the thermodynamic quantities characterizing the matter content of the Universe, we derive the (classical) gravitational field equations in their general form. We analyze in detail the cosmological models obtained by assuming that the quantum correction tensor is given by the coupling of a scalar field and of a scalar function to the metric tensor, and by a term proportional to the matter energy-momentum tensor. For each considered model we obtain the gravitational field equations, and the generalized Friedmann equations for the case of a flat homogeneous and isotropic geometry. In some of these models the divergence of the matter energy-momentum tensor is non-zero, indicating a process of matter creation, which corresponds to an irreversible energy flow from the gravitational field to the matter fluid, and which is direct consequence of the non-minimal curvature-matter coupling. The cosmological evolution equations of these modified gravity models induced by the quantum fluctuations of the metric are investigated in detail by using both analytical and numerical methods, and it is shown that a large variety of cosmological models can be constructed, which, depending on the numerical values of the model parameters, can exhibit both accelerating and decelerating behaviors.

  18. Forces and mechanical energy fluctuations during diagonal stride roller skiing; running on wheels?

    PubMed

    Kehler, Alyse L; Hajkova, Eliska; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Kram, Rodger

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical energy can be conserved during terrestrial locomotion in two ways: the inverted pendulum mechanism for walking and the spring-mass mechanism for running. Here, we investigated whether diagonal stride cross-country roller skiing (DIA) utilizes similar mechanisms. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that running and DIA would share similar phase relationships and magnitudes of kinetic energy (KE), and gravitational potential energy (GPE) fluctuations, indicating elastic energy storage and return, as if roller skiing is like 'running on wheels'. Experienced skiers (N=9) walked and ran at 1.25 and 3 m s(-1), respectively, and roller skied with DIA at both speeds on a level dual-belt treadmill that recorded perpendicular and parallel forces. We calculated the KE and GPE of the center of mass from the force recordings. As expected, the KE and GPE fluctuated with an out-of-phase pattern during walking and an in-phase pattern during running. Unlike walking, during DIA, the KE and GPE fluctuations were in phase, as they are in running. However, during the glide phase, KE was dissipated as frictional heat and could not be stored elastically in the tendons, as in running. Elastic energy storage and return epitomize running and thus we reject our hypothesis. Diagonal stride cross-country skiing is a biomechanically unique movement that only superficially resembles walking or running. PMID:25189366

  19. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  20. Vibrational spectra from atomic fluctuations in dynamics simulations. II. Solvent-induced frequency fluctuations at femtosecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Tavan, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The midinfrared (MIR) spectra of molecules in polar solvents exhibit inhomogeneously broadened bands whose spectral positions are shifted as compared to the gas phase. The shifts are caused by interactions with structured solvation shells and the broadenings by fluctuations of these interactions. The MIR spectra can be calculated from hybrid molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which treat the solute molecule by density functional theory and the solvent by molecular mechanics by the so-called instantaneous normal mode analysis (INMA) or by Fourier transforming the time correlation function (FTTCF) of the molecular dipole moment. In Paper I of this work [M. Schmitz and P. Tavan, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 12233 (2004)] we explored an alternative method based on generalized virial (GV) frequencies noting, however, that GV systematically underestimates frequencies. As shown by us these artifacts are caused by solvent-induced fluctuations of the (i) equilibrium geometry, (ii) force constants, and (iii) normal mode directions as well as by (iv) diagonal and (v) off-diagonal anharmonicities. Here we now show, by analyzing the time scales of fluctuations and sample MD trajectories of formaldehyde in the gas phase and in water, that all these sources of computational artifacts can be made visible by a Fourier analysis of the normal coordinates. Correspondingly, the error sources (i) and (iii)-(v) can be removed by bandpass filtering, as long as the spectral signatures of the respective effects are well separated from the fundamental band. Furthermore, the artifacts arising from effect (ii) can be strongly diminished by a time-resolved version of the GV approach (TF-GV). The TF-GV method then yields for each mode j a trajectory of the vibrational frequency ωj(t|τ) at a time resolution τ>τj, which is only limited by the corresponding oscillation time τj=2π/ωj and, thus, is in the femtosecond range. A correlation analysis of these trajectories clearly separates the

  1. Ambipolar magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in toroidal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Fiksel, G.; Ji, H.; Almagri, A.F.; Cekic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Diamond, P.H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Ware, A.S.

    1996-05-01

    The total magnetic fluctuation-induced electron thermal flux has been determined in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch [Fusion Technol. {bold 19}, 131 (1991)] from the measured correlation of the heat flux along perturbed fields with the radial component of the perturbed field. In the edge region the total flux is convective and intrinsically ambipolar constrained, as evidenced by the magnitude of the thermal diffusivity, which is well approximated by the product of ion thermal velocity and the magnetic diffusivity. A self-consistent theory is formulated and shown to reproduce the experimental results, provided nonlinear charge aggregation in streaming electrons is accounted for in the theory. For general toroidal configurations, it is shown that ambipolar constrained transport applies when remote magnetic fluctuations (i.e., global modes resonant at distant rational surfaces) dominate the flux. Near locations where the dominant modes are resonant, the transport is nonambipolar. This agrees with the radial variation of diffusivity in MST. Expectations for the tokamak are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Velocity Measurement by Scattering from Index of Refraction Fluctuations Induced in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lading, Lars; Saffman, Mark; Edwards, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Induced phase screen scattering is defined as scatter light from a weak index of refraction fluctuations induced by turbulence. The basic assumptions and requirements for induced phase screen scattering, including scale requirements, are presented.

  3. Radiation-induced robust oscillation and non-Gaussian fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Yan, Shi-Wei; Geng, Yi-Zhao

    2011-12-01

    There have been many recent studies devoted to the consequences of stochasticity in protein circuitry. Stress conditions, including DNA damage, hypoxia, heat shock, nutrient deprivation, and oncogene activation, can result in the activation and accumulation of p53. Several experimental studies show that oscillations can be induced by DNA damage following nuclear irradiation. To explore the underlying dynamical features and the role of stochasticity, we discuss the oscillatory dynamics in the well-studied regulatory network motif. The fluctuations around the fixed point of a delayed system are Gaussian in the limit of sufficiently weak delayed feedback, and remain Gaussian along a limit cycle when viewed tangential to the trajectory. The experimental results are recapitulated in this study. We illustrate several features of the p53 activities, which are robust when the parameters change. Furthermore, the distribution in protein abundance can be characterized by its non-Gaussian nature.

  4. Thermal Fluctuations of a Metal Disk Levitated by the Casimir Force above a Liquid-Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio; Goto, Kosuke

    2015-04-01

    The thermal fluctuations in the tilt angles of a disk levitated above a liquid-liquid interface by a repulsive Casimir force are compared with those of a disk suspended by surface tension at the interface. By using a proximity force approximation, the probability density function of the tilt angle of a copper disk immersed in cyclohexane in contact with water is calculated. We show that the tilt angle of the levitated disk of micron-order radius exhibits comparatively large fluctuations. Observance of the difference in the amplitude of the fluctuations could be helpful in determining the position of the disk relative to the liquid-liquid interface.

  5. Enhanced production of 2,3-butanediol from glycerol by forced pH fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Kaloyan; Petrova, Penka

    2010-07-01

    The glycerol fermentation by Klebsiella pneumoniae occurs by receiving more than five liquid products-organic acids, diols, and ethanol. Aiming to direct the glycerol conversion towards predominant production of 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), the main influencing parameters (the aeration and the pH) were investigated during fed-batch processes. The regime of intensive aeration (2.2 vvm air supply) was evaluated as most favorable for 2,3-BD synthesis and ensured the decrease of all other metabolites. Thus, without pH control, 52.5 g/l 2,3-BD were produced, as the carbon conversion of glycerol into 2,3-BD reached 60.6%. Additional enhancement in 2,3-BD production (by significant increase of glycerol utilization) was achieved by the development of a new method of "forced pH fluctuations". It was realized by consecutive raisings of pH using definite DeltapH value, at exact time intervals, allowing multiple variations. Thus, the optimal conditions for maximal glycerol consumption were defined, and 70 g/l 2,3-BD were produced, which is the highest amount obtained from glycerol as a sole carbon source until now. The forced pH fluctuations emphasized pH as a governing factor in microbial conversion processes. PMID:20361325

  6. Pressure distribution, fluctuating forces and vortex shedding behavior of circular cylinder with rotatable splitter plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, F.; Wang, J. S.; Qiao, X. Q.; Huang, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on the flow around a circular cylinder with fixed splitter plates have shown that the drag and lift can be reduced, and the primary vortex shedding can be suppressed obviously. In this study, a wind tunnel experiment on the flow around a circular cylinder with diameter D (40 mm) attached with ten splitter plates freely rotatable around the cylinder axis has been carried out with different ratios of length to cylinder diameter (L/D) from 0.5 to 6.0, in a range of Reynolds number from 3×104 to 6×104. The influences of the attachment of these rotatable splitter plates on the pressure distribution, fluctuating drag and lift forces and vortex shedding behavior were investigated. It is found that the splitter plates rotate to an off-axis equilibrium angle δ (on either side of the wake with equal probability) rather than align themselves with free stream due to the integrated effect of the pressure difference along the sides of the splitter plates. The plate length L/D is crucial in determining the equilibrium angle δ. Longer splitter plate causes smaller angle; δ remains zero, i.e., parallel to the flow direction, for L/D≥4. The mean pressures in the wake near the cylinder are higher than that of a bare cylinder. Further, the mean drag coefficients and the root-mean-square fluctuating lift coefficients, which are also largely determined by δ, are less than those of the corresponding bare cylinder, with a reduction up to about 30% and 90%, respectively. However, freely rotatable splitter plate develops a mean lift force towards the side the plate has deflected. In addition, the Strouhal number of fluctuating forces and correlation analysis are presented. The visualized flow structures show that the freely rotatable splitter plates elongate the vortex formation region, and the communication between the two shear layers on either side of the body is inhibited. For comparison, experiments of attaching fixed splitter plates with the same size were

  7. Estimating Transmissivity from the Water Level Fluctuations of a Sinusoidally Forced Well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehnert, E.; Valocchi, A.J.; Heidari, M.; Kapoor, S.G.; Kumar, P.

    1999-01-01

    The water levels in wells are known to fluctuate in response to earth tides and changes in atmospheric pressure. These water level fluctuations can be analyzed to estimate transmissivity (T). A new method to estimate transmissivity, which assumes that the atmospheric pressure varies in a sinusoidal fashion, is presented. Data analysis for this simplified method involves using a set of type curves and estimating the ratio of the amplitudes of the well response over the atmospheric pressure. Type curves for this new method were generated based on a model for ground water flow between the well and aquifer developed by Cooper et al. (1965). Data analysis with this method confirmed these published results: (1) the amplitude ratio is a function of transmissivity, the well radius, and the frequency of the sinusoidal oscillation; and (2) the amplitude ratio is a weak function of storativity. Compared to other methods, the developed method involves simpler, more intuitive data analysis and allows shorter data sets to be analyzed. The effect of noise on estimating the amplitude ratio was evaluated and found to be more significant at lower T. For aquifers with low T, noise was shown to mask the water level fluctuations induced by atmospheric pressure changes. In addition, reducing the length of the data series did not affect the estimate of T, but the variance of the estimate was higher for the shorter series of noisy data.

  8. A fluctuation-induced plasma transport diagnostic based upon fast-Fourier transform spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, J. Y.; Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A diagnostic, based on fast Fourier-transform spectral analysis techniques, that provides experimental insight into the relationship between the experimentally observable spectral characteristics of the fluctuations and the fluctuation-induced plasma transport is described. The model upon which the diagnostic technique is based and its experimental implementation is discussed. Some characteristic results obtained during the course of an experimental study of fluctuation-induced transport in the electric field dominated NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma are presented.

  9. Hydro-climatic fluctuations driven by natural and anthropogenic forcing in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Yang, D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrological change is one of the most profound parts of global change which is associated with freshwater resources, food security and balance of ecosystem. Its driving factors in the past need to be understood and quantified for projection of future changes and management of water available. Here by applying the Budyko water-energy balance framework, we analyse the hydro-climatic fluctuations at annual scale and their natural and anthropogenic drivers during past fifty years in six major Chinese drainage basins, from south to north, and from natural basins to human-modified basins. Natural forcing here means the fluctuations in precipitation and temperature, and the shift of precipitation from snow towards rain. And we focus on the impact of change in vegetational coverage, agricultural irrigation and water division as anthropogenic effect. By cross-regional comparison and within-region comparison, we explore the spatial variability of the hydro-climatic change and the type and contribution of different driven factors, especially various human modifications, throughout China. This study shows how the complex coupled system of climate, human and eco-hydrology can be described and explored by an effective and simple model and how the water balance constraints of hydrological basins affect water available throughout China and their spatial variability in the past half century.

  10. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.

  11. Spin jam induced by quantum fluctuations in a frustrated magnet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junjie; Samarakoon, Anjana; Dissanayake, Sachith; Ueda, Hiroaki; Klich, Israel; Iida, Kazuki; Pajerowski, Daniel; Butch, Nicholas P; Huang, Q; Copley, John R D; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2015-09-15

    Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for existence of a glassy state, which we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 [SCGO(p)], a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr(3+) (s = 3/2) ions form a quasi-2D triangular system of bipyramids. Our experimental data show that as the nonmagnetic Ga(3+) impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: an exotic glassy state, which we call a spin jam, for the high magnetic concentration region (p > 0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration (p < 0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states of dense frustrated magnets can be understood. PMID:26324917

  12. Structural and Fluctuation Induced Excess Conductivity in R:1113 Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedky, A.; Youssif, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    We report here the fluctuation-induced excess conductivity in RBaSrCu3O7-δ (R = Y, Gd, Nd, and La) superconductor. It is found that Y and Gd samples are orthorhombic, while the Nd and La samples are quasi-tetragonal. The oxygen content is found to be close to 7 for all R:1113 samples. The logarithmic plots of ∆ σ and reduced temperature M#1028; reveal two different exponents corresponding to crossover temperature due to shifting the order parameter from (2D/1D) to (3D). The critical temperature, mean field temperature, crossover temperature, out of plane coherence length, and interlayer coupling are decreased as the ionic size increases. While the in plane and effective coherence lengths, and anisotropy are increased. We have also estimated several physical parameters such as upper critical magnetic fields in both a- b- and c-axis (Bab and BC), and critical current density J (0 K), and their values are found to be decrease as the ionic size increases. The results are discussed in terms of oxygen rearrangement, localization of carriers, coherence lengths, and anisotropy which are produced as the ionic size increases.

  13. Spin jam induced by quantum fluctuations in a frustrated magnet

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junjie; Samarakoon, Anjana; Dissanayake, Sachith; Ueda, Hiroaki; Klich, Israel; Iida, Kazuki; Pajerowski, Daniel; Butch, Nicholas P.; Huang, Q.; Copley, John R. D.; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for existence of a glassy state, which we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 [SCGO(p)], a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr3+ (s = 3/2) ions form a quasi-2D triangular system of bipyramids. Our experimental data show that as the nonmagnetic Ga3+ impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: an exotic glassy state, which we call a spin jam, for the high magnetic concentration region (p>0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration (p<0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states of dense frustrated magnets can be understood. PMID:26324917

  14. Progressive Shear Failure in Granular Materials: Linking Force Fluctuations With Acoustic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, G. K.; Cohen, D. O.; Or, D.

    2011-12-01

    Natural hazards associated with rapid mass movements such as shallow landslides, rock falls or debris flows are notoriously difficult to predict even though precursor events associated with small internal failures are known to occur. In this study we focus on grain scale processes preceding the formation of a shear plane in granular materials such as frictional sliding of grain contacts, accommodation of contact networks and fracturing of grain bonds (in cohesive materials) - all of which are discrete micro-mechanical failure events that emit characteristic acoustic emissions that could be used to study internal failure and potentially provide early warning (albeit short). Experiments involving direct shear tests using glass beads and sand were combined with acoustic emission (AE) measurements using piezoelectric sensors with sensitivities to frequencies in the range of 20kHz - 200kHz and accelerometers (0.2kHz - 20kHz) buried within the sheared sample. We obtained good correlations between shear deformation and associated grain-scale mechanical behavior with key characteristics of measured AE (frequency content, signal energy). Fluctuations of shear force occurring during strain controlled deformation are assumed to represent micro-structural rearrangements of the material. We obtained exponential distributions of force fluctuation magnitudes and low frequency AE event statistics. The number of AE events increased with confining stress as well as with particle roughness and were inversely related to grain size. These results were linked with conceptual models of failure accumulation such as the fiber-bundle model. The statistics of AE event occurrence, particularly magnitude-frequency distributions may provide prediction of imminent mechanical collapse. The strong attenuation of acoustic signals within most earth materials present a major challenge to field applications requiring innovative deployment strategies such as the use of acoustic waveguides.

  15. Space-time metrical fluctuations induced by cosmic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1980-01-01

    For a stochastic stress-energy tensor associated with cosmic turbulence, it is observed that Einstein's equations imply fluctuations in the space-time metric tensor. Such metrical fluctuations are shown to engender modified values for the average effective proper density and total pressure and thus to alter the solutions to the Friedman equations.

  16. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  17. Orbital forced sea level fluctuations during the Middle Eocene (ODP site 1172, East Tasman Plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnaar, J.; Stickley, C.; Jovane, L.; Roehl, U.; Brinkhuis, H.; Visscher, H.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean Drilling Program leg 189 was undertaken to test and refine the hypothesis (by Kennett et al., 1975), that the reconfiguration of continents around Antarctica (e.g.: the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway and Drake passage) led to the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current that, in turn, would cause thermal isolation and hence cooling of Antarctica. This would possibly even cause global cooling, as suggested by the 33.3 Ma Oi1 event. The cores of leg 189, site 1172 on the eastern side of the Tasmanian Gateway provided a nearly complete succession of Eocene and Oligocene sediments. Cyclostratigraphic analysis based on XRF derived Ca and Fe records indicates distinct Milankovitch cyclicity between 40 and 36 Ma. (Röhl et al, in press). In the core-section representing magnetochron 18n-1n, the Ca record shows precession cycles in combination with obliquity, suggested to reflect sea level fluctuations (Röhl et al, in press). New datasets include microfossil data (organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts, pollen/spores and diatoms), loss-on-ignition measurements, magnetic data (environmental magnetics - ARM). Here, we aim to further investigate the proposed relationship between astronomical forcing and sea-level fluctuations. Additionally, we aim to obtain insight in the palaeoecology of the distinct endemic circum-Antarctic late Middle to Late Eocene dinoflagellate cyst assemblages. Results corroborate the concept that the cyclicity recorded by Ca and Fe measurements is the result of sea-level fluctuations. This implies that during late Middle Eocene times, astronomical forcing has modulated sea level - most likely through Antarctic ice buildup and meltdown. In turn, this would indicate the presence of significant, though probably modest, ice masses already ~40 Ma ago, well before the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Kennett, J. P., R. E. Houtz, et al. (1975). Development of the circum-Antarctic current. Science 186: 144-147. Röhl, U.; H. Brinkhuis, C

  18. Mean and fluctuating basal forces generated by granular flows: Laboratory observations in a large vertically rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Dietrich, W. E.; Sklar, L. S.

    2014-06-01

    A flowing granular mass generates forces on the boundary that drive near-bed grain dynamics, bed surface erosion, and energy dissipation. Few quantitative analyses exist of the controls on the dynamically fluctuating force caused by granular flows with wide-grain-size distributions and a liquid phase in the pores. To study the mechanisms controlling the boundary forces, we used a 225 cm2 load plate to measure the bed-normal force from a suite of granular flows in a 4 m diameter, 80 cm wide vertically rotating drum. We analyzed the time series of bed forces generated in flows composed of granular material for both narrow (gravel-water) and wide (muddy, sand-gravel-cobble) grain-size distributions. The tail of the force distribution was captured more closely by a generalized Pareto distribution than an exponential distribution, suggesting a way to predict empirically the force distribution. We show that the impulse on the bed, related to kinetic energy transferred to the bed from the granular collisions, is quantified by the standard deviation of the force. The mean bulk force equaled the static weight of the flow, whereas the force fluctuations, represented by the standard deviation and the averaged top 1% of force, were a near-linear function of effective grain diameter and flow velocity, and a ˜0.5 power function of an inertial stress scaling term. The force fluctuations depend on both Savage and Bagnold numbers. The correlations revealed in this study suggest that it may be possible to estimate dynamic forces on the bed from gross properties of the flows.

  19. Interrelation between various types of optically induced forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    Optically induced forces applied to a transparent optical medium are analyzed. It is shown on the basis of various approaches that the density of optically induced forces applied to a homogeneous optical medium located in an inhomogeneous electrical field is equal to zero at a steady-state. This result contradicts that obtained by means of an approach based on the Lorentz density force. An explanation is presented that the Lorentz density force is compensated at a steady-state by other kind of optically induced force. Thus, a calculation of optically induced force based on the approach using the Lorentz force is inconsistent.

  20. Large fluctuations in the disassembly rate of microtubules revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Neil H; Kasas, Sandor; Riederer, Beat M; Catsicas, Stefan; Dietler, Giovanni; Kulik, Andrzej J; Forró, László

    2003-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in situ has been used to observe the cold disassembly dynamics of microtubules at a previously unrealised spatial resolution. Microtubules either electrostatically or covalently bound to aminosilane surfaces disassembled at room temperature under buffer solutions with no free tubulin present. This process was followed by taking sequential tapping-mode AFM images and measuring the change in the microtubule end position as a function of time, with an spatial accuracy down to +/-20nm and a temporal accuracy of +/-1s. As well as giving average disassembly rates on the order of 1-10 tubulin monomers per second, large fluctuations in the disassembly rate were revealed, indicating that the process is far from smooth and linear under these experimental conditions. The surface bound rates measured here are comparable to the rates for GMPCPP-tubulin microtubules free in solution, suggesting that inhibition of tubulin curvature through steric hindrance controls the average, relatively low disassembly rate. The large fluctuations in this rate are thought to be due to multiple pathways in the kinetics of disassembly with differing rate constants and/or stalling due to defects in the microtubule lattice. Microtubules that were covalently bound to the surface left behind the protofilaments covalently cross-linked to the aminosilane via glutaraldehyde during the disassembly process. Further work is needed to quantitatively assess the effects of surface binding on protofibril disassembly rates, reveal any differences in disassembly rates between the plus and minus ends and to enable assembly as well as disassembly to be imaged in the microscope fluid cell in real-time. PMID:12801676

  1. Magnetic-Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a High-Temperature Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    2009-07-10

    The first direct measurement of magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle flux in the core of a high-temperature plasma is reported. Transport occurs due to magnetic field fluctuations associated with global tearing instabilities. The electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density and radial magnetic fluctuations, accounts for density profile relaxation during a magnetic reconnection event. The measured particle transport is much larger than that expected for ambipolar particle diffusion in a stochastic magnetic field.

  2. Casimir-like force arising from quantum fluctuations in a slowly moving dilute Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D C; Pomeau, Y

    2005-09-30

    We calculate a force due to zero-temperature quantum fluctuations on a stationary object in a moving superfluid flow. We model the object by a localized potential varying only in the flow direction and model the flow by a three-dimensional weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate at zero temperature. We show that this force exists for any arbitrarily small flow velocity and discuss the implications for the stability of superfluid flow. PMID:16241666

  3. Influence of dust charge fluctuation and polarization force on radiative condensation instability of magnetized gravitating dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Bhakta, S.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of dust charge fluctuation, thermal speed and polarization force due to massive charged dust grains is studied on the radiative condensation instability (RCI) of magnetized self-gravitating astrophysical dusty (complex) plasma. The dynamics of the charged dust and inertialess electrons are considered while the Boltzmann distributed ions are assumed to be thermal. The dusty fluid model is formulated and the general dispersion relations are derived analytically using the plane wave solutions under the long wavelength limits in both the presence and the absence of dust charge fluctuations. The combined effects of polarization force, dust thermal speed, dust charge fluctuation and dust cyclotron frequency are observed on the low frequency wave modes and radiative modified Jeans Instability. The classical criterion of RCI is also derived which remains unaffected due to the presence of these parameters. Numerical calculations have been performed to calculate the growth rate of the system and plotted graphically. We find that dust charge fluctuation, radiative cooling and polarization force have destabilizing while dust thermal speed and dust cyclotron frequency have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability. The results have been applied to understand the radiative cooling process in dusty molecular cloud when both the dust charging and polarization force are dominant.

  4. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  5. Fluctuating wind forces measured on a bluff body extending from a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Brian W.

    1989-12-01

    The effect of wind forces measured on a bluff body extending from a cavity was investigated. This was accomplished by measuring wind induced vibratory inputs to a plexiglas bluff body model. The model extended from a ground board cavity installed in the AFIT 5-Foot Wind Tunnel. Forces and moments were measured from an 8 element load cell unit built and installed in the base of a plexiglas model. Three different size cavity openings were tested for both a no-rotation and 45 degree rotation referenced to the wind. Data was taken at individual speed points between 55 ft/s and 180 ft/s, producing Reynolds number based on model width in the range of 1.5 x 10 to the 5th power to 5.0 x 10 to the 5th power. Baseline data for a closed cavity configuration was collected and compared to previous studies conducted at the USAF Academy. Force and moment coefficient data are presented, comparing cavity opening and model rotation effects. Results of shedding frequency analysis are presented based on transient data recorded.

  6. Limits on cloud-induced fluctuation in photovoltaic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, W.T. ); Unruh, T.D. )

    1990-03-01

    When cloud shadows move across a photovoltaic (PV) array, the array's power output is reduced. It resumes full production when the shadow moves away. The utility must follow these changes with other types of generations. Under certain cloud conditions, the changes can be large and fast. A methodology is presented to assess the cost of such fluctuations and their effect on a utility's ability to serve its load. A case study is also presented.

  7. Rotation shear induced fluctuation decorrelation in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    The enhanced decorrelation of fluctuations by the combined effects of the E {times} B flow (V{sub E}) shear, the parallel flow (V{sub {parallel}}) shear, and the magnetic shear is studied in toroidal geometry. A two-point nonlinear analysis previously utilized in a cylindrical model shows that the reduction of the radial correlation length below its ambient turbulence value ({Delta}r{sub 0}) is characterized by the ratio between the shearing rate {omega}{sub s} and the ambient turbulence scattering rate {Delta}{omega}{sub T}. The derived shearing rate is given by {omega}{sub s}{sup 2} = ({Delta}r{sub 0}){sup 2}[1/{Delta}{phi}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(qV{sub E}/r){r_brace}{sup 2} + 1/{Delta}{eta}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(V{parallel}/qR){r_brace}{sup 2}], where {Delta}{phi} and {Delta}{eta} are the correlation angles of the ambient turbulence along the toroidal and parallel directions. This result deviates significantly from the cylindrical result for high magnetic shear or for ballooning-like fluctuations. For suppression of flute-like fluctuations, only the radial shear of qV{sub E}/r contributes, and the radial shear of V{parallel}/qR is irrelevant regardless of the plasma rotation direction.

  8. Inducer Hydrodynamic Forces in a Cavitating Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a measurement device for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The device - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The rotating balance was calibrated statically using a dead-weight load system in order to generate the 6 x 12 calibration matrix later used to convert measured voltages to engineering units. Structural modeling suggested that the rotating assembly first bending mode would be significantly reduced with the balance s inclusion. This reduction in structural stiffness was later confirmed experimentally with a hammer-impact test. This effect, coupled with the relatively large damping associated with the rotating balance waterproofing material, limited the device s bandwidth to approximately 50 Hertz Other pre-test validations included sensing the test article rotating assembly built-in imbalance for two configurations and directly measuring the assembly mass and buoyancy while submerged under water. Both tests matched predictions and confirmed the device s sensitivity while stationary and rotating. The rotating balance was then demonstrated in a water test of a full-scale Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure liquid oxygen pump inducer. Experimental data was collected a scaled operating conditions at three flow coefficients across a range of cavitation numbers for the single inducer geometry and radial clearance. Two distinct cavitation modes were observed symmetric tip vortex cavitation and alternate-blade cavitation. Although previous experimental tests on the same inducer demonstrated two additional

  9. Prediction of fluctuating pressure environments associated with plume-induced separated flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    The separated flow environment induced by underexpanded rocket plumes during boost phase of rocket vehicles has been investigated. A simple semi-empirical model for predicting the extent of separation was developed. This model offers considerable computational economy as compared to other schemes reported in the literature, and has been shown to be in good agreement with limited flight data. The unsteady pressure field in plume-induced separated regions was investigated. It was found that fluctuations differed from those for a rigid flare only at low frequencies. The major difference between plume-induced separation and flare-induced separation was shown to be an increase in shock oscillation distance for the plume case. The prediction schemes were applied to PRR shuttle launch configuration. It was found that fluctuating pressures from plume-induced separation are not as severe as for other fluctuating environments at the critical flight condition of maximum dynamic pressure.

  10. Fluorescence quenching induced by conformational fluctuations in unsolvated polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangguo; Duft, Denis; Parks, Joel H

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved measurements were conducted to relate the fluorescence lifetimes of dye-derivatized polypeptides to local conformational dynamics in trapped, unsolvated peptide ions. This research was performed to better understand the intramolecular interactions leading to the observed increase of fluorescence quenching with temperature and, in particular, how this quenching is related to conformational fluctuations. Dye-derivatized polyproline ions, Dye-[Pro] n -Arg (+)-Trp, are formed by electrospray ionization and trapped in a variable-temperature quadrupole ion trap where they are exposed to a pulsed laser which excites fluorescence. Lifetime data exhibit fluorescence quenching as a result of an interaction between the dye and tryptophan (Trp) side chain. This result is consistent with solution measurements performed for comparison. The lifetime temperature dependence is closely fit over the range 150-463 K by an Arrhenius model of the ensemble averaged quenching rate, k q. Model fits of the measured lifetimes yield a frequency prefactor of approximately 10 (11) s (-1) for k q characteristic of collective motions of the side chains identified in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The data fits also yield activation barriers of approximately 0.3 eV, which are comparable to intramolecular electrostatic interactions calculated between the unshielded charge on the Arg residue and the dye. As a result, the quenching rate appears to be determined by the rate of conformational fluctuations and not by the rate of a specific quenching mechanism. The peptide sequence of Dye-Trp-[Pro] n -Arg (+) was also studied and identified a dependence of the quenching rate on the electrostatic field in the vicinity of the dye, Trp pair. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed over the range of experimental measurements to study trajectories relevant to the quenching interaction. The MD simulations indicate that as the temperature is increased, conformational fluctuations in

  11. Force on a slow moving impurity due to thermal and quantum fluctuations in a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, David; Sykes, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    We study the drag force acting on an impurity moving through a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of both quantum and thermal fluctuations. We are able to find exact analytical solutions of the partial differential equations to the level of the Bogoliubov approximation. At zero temperature, we find a nonzero force is exerted on the impurity at subcritical velocities, due to the scattering of quantum fluctuations. We make the following explicit assumptions: far from the impurity the system is in a quantum state given by that of a zero (or finite) temperature Bose-Einstein condensate, and the scattering process generates only causally related reflection/transmission. The results raise unanswered questions in the quantum dynamics associated with the formation of persistent currents.

  12. Measurements of ICRF wave-induced density fluctuations in LHD by a microwave reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, A.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujii, N.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H.; Kamio, S.; Seki, R.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, I.; Takase, Y.

    2015-12-01

    An O-mode microwave reflectometer has been developed to measure ICRF wave induced electron density fluctuations in LHD plasmas. The system has two probing frequencies (28.8 and 30.1 GHz) to measure two spatial points simultaneously. The rms density fluctuation levels are typically 0.01%. The linearity between the measured density fluctuation amplitude and the square root of the RF power is discussed. The decay length of the RF field was estimated to be 1 to 7 m under the operational condition investigated. A typical spatial distance between the two measurement points corresponding to the two probing frequencies is a few centimeters, and the fluctuation amplitudes at the two points are similar in amplitude. The phase difference between the two fluctuations show in-phase relationship on average. Out-of phase relationships, which implies a standing wave structure, are often observed when the wave absorption is expected to be poor.

  13. Current-induced forces in mesoscopic systems: A scattering-matrix approach

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Niels; Egger, Reinhold; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Summary Nanoelectromechanical systems are characterized by an intimate connection between electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom. Due to the nanoscopic scale, current flowing through the system noticeably impacts upons the vibrational dynamics of the device, complementing the effect of the vibrational modes on the electronic dynamics. We employ the scattering-matrix approach to quantum transport in order to develop a unified theory of nanoelectromechanical systems out of equilibrium. For a slow mechanical mode the current can be obtained from the Landauer–Büttiker formula in the strictly adiabatic limit. The leading correction to the adiabatic limit reduces to Brouwer’s formula for the current of a quantum pump in the absence of a bias voltage. The principal results of the present paper are the scattering-matrix expressions for the current-induced forces acting on the mechanical degrees of freedom. These forces control the Langevin dynamics of the mechanical modes. Specifically, we derive expressions for the (typically nonconservative) mean force, for the (possibly negative) damping force, an effective “Lorentz” force that exists even for time-reversal-invariant systems, and the fluctuating Langevin force originating from Nyquist and shot noise of the current flow. We apply our general formalism to several simple models that illustrate the peculiar nature of the current-induced forces. Specifically, we find that in out-of-equilibrium situations the current-induced forces can destabilize the mechanical vibrations and cause limit-cycle dynamics. PMID:22428105

  14. Fluctuation-induced traffic congestion in heterogeneous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, A. S.; Yurkevich, I. V.; Constantinou, C. C.; Lerner, I. V.

    2012-11-01

    In studies of complex heterogeneous networks, particularly of the Internet, significant attention was paid to analyzing network failures caused by hardware faults or overload, where the network reaction was modeled as rerouting of traffic away from failed or congested elements. Here we model another type of the network reaction to congestion —a sharp reduction of the input traffic rate through congested routes which occurs on much shorter time scales. We consider the onset of congestion in the Internet where local mismatch between demand and capacity results in traffic losses and show that it can be described as a phase transition characterized by strong non-Gaussian loss fluctuations at a mesoscopic time scale. The fluctuations, caused by noise in input traffic, are exacerbated by the heterogeneous nature of the network manifested in a scale-free load distribution. They result in the network strongly overreacting to the first signs of congestion by significantly reducing input traffic along the communication paths where congestion is utterly negligible.

  15. The detection of long-range correlations of operation force and sEMG with multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Li, Dongxu; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Shanguang; Lv, Ming; Wang, Miao

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the application of multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) on the nonlinear characteristics of correlation between operation force and surface electromyography (sEMG), which is an applied frontier of human neuromuscular system activity. We established cross-correlation functions between the signal of force and four typical sEMG time-frequency domain index sequences (force-sEMG cross-correlation sequences), and dealt with the sequences with MF-DFA. In addition, we demonstrated that the force-sEMG cross-correlation sequences have strong statistical self-similarity and the fractal characteristic of the signal spectrum is similar to 1/f noise or fractional Brownian motion. PMID:26405873

  16. Superstatistical view of stress-induced electric current fluctuations in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright-Taylor, Alexis; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The concepts of non-extensive statistical physics, which have recently been applied in the study of complex systems, have been used here to analyse stress-induced electric current data in triaxially deformed Carrara marble samples. The fluctuations of electric current appear to follow a q-Gaussian distribution, with the PDF exhibiting ‘fat tails’. The application of super-statistical techniques to these electric current fluctuations shows to good approximation that they can be described by local Gaussian processes with fluctuating variance.

  17. Spectroscopic Observation of Fluctuation-Induced Dynamo in the Edge of the Reversed-Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, P. W.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Fiksel, G.; Prager, S. C.

    2000-07-17

    The fluctuation-induced dynamo has been investigated by direct measurement of v(tilde sign) and b(tilde sign) in the edge of a reversed-field pinch and is found to be significant in balancing Ohm's law. The velocity fluctuations producing the dynamo emf have poloidal mode number m=0 , consistent with MHD calculations and in contrast with the core m=1 dynamo. The velocity fluctuations exhibit the parity relative to their resonant surface predicted by linear MHD theory. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, J. W.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed-matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that slow (<1 Hz ) drift of the homogeneous magnetic-field limits control and measurement precision. We report on previously undocumented higher-frequency field noise (10-200 Hz) that limits the coherence time of Be+9 electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 -T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ˜6 ms for the Be+9 electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz , limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ˜50 ms.

  19. Retinal Changes Induced by Epiretinal Tangential Forces

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Mario R.; Comune, Chiara; Ferrara, Mariantonia; Cennamo, Gilda; De Cillà, Stefano; Toto, Lisa; Cennamo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Two kinds of forces are active in vitreoretinal traction diseases: tangential and anterior-posterior forces. However, tangential forces are less characterized and classified in literature compared to the anterior-posterior ones. Tangential epiretinal forces are mainly due to anomalous posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), vitreoschisis, vitreopapillary adhesion (VPA), and epiretinal membranes (ERMs). Anomalous PVD plays a key role in the formation of the tangential vectorial forces on the retinal surface as consequence of gel liquefaction (synchysis) without sufficient and fast vitreous dehiscence at the vitreoretinal interface. The anomalous and persistent adherence of the posterior hyaloid to the retina can lead to vitreomacular/vitreopapillary adhesion or to a formation of avascular fibrocellular tissue (ERM) resulting from the proliferation and transdifferentiation of hyalocytes resident in the cortical vitreous remnants after vitreoschisis. The right interpretation of the forces involved in the epiretinal tangential tractions helps in a better definition of diagnosis, progression, prognosis, and surgical outcomes of vitreomacular interfaces. PMID:26421183

  20. Numerical Study on the Partitioning of the Molecular Polarizability into Fluctuating Charge and Induced Atomic Dipole Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Ye; Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; DiStasio, Robert A.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Shao, Yihan

    2015-01-01

    In order to carry out a detailed analysis of the molecular static polarizability, which is the response of the molecule to a uniform external electric field, the molecular polarizability was computed using the finite-difference method for 21 small molecules, using density functional theory. Within nine charge population schemes (Löwdin, Mulliken, Becke, Hirshfeld, CM5, Hirshfeld-I, NPA, CHELPG, MK-ESP) in common use, the charge fluctuation contribution is found to dominate the molecular polarizability, with its ratio ranging from 59.9% with the Hirshfeld or CM5 scheme to 96.2% with the Mulliken scheme. The Hirshfeld-I scheme is also used to compute the other contribution to the molecular polarizability coming from the induced atomic dipoles, and the atomic polarizabilities in 8 small molecules and water pentamer are found to be highly anisotropic for most atoms. Overall, the results suggest that (a) more emphasis probably should be placed on the charge fluctuation terms in future polarizable force field development; (b) an anisotropic polarizability might be more suitable than an isotropic one in polarizable force fields based entirely or partially on the induced atomic dipoles. PMID:25945749

  1. Wall pressure fluctuations and flow-induced noise in a turbulent boundary layer over a bump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joongnyon; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2006-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a turbulent boundary layer over a bump were performed to examine the effects of surface longitudinal curvature on wall pressure fluctuations (p_{w}) and flow-induced noise. Turbulence statistics and frequency spectra were obtained to elucidate the response of wall pressure fluctuations to the longitudinal curvature and to the corresponding pressure gradient. Wall pressure fluctuations were significantly enhanced near the trailing edge of the bump, where the boundary layer was subjected to a strong adverse pressure gradient. Large-scale structures in the distribution of wall pressure fluctuations were observed to grow rapidly near the trailing edge of the bump and convect downstream. Acoustic sources of the Lighthill equations were investigated in detail at various longitudinal surface curvatures. The acoustic sources (S) were highest near the trailing edge of the bump, where the root mean square wall pressure fluctuations were greatest. The maximum correlation coefficient between p_{w} and S was located just above the location of maximum wall pressure fluctuations. Far-field acoustic density fluctuations were computed using the Lighthill acoustic analogy. We found that the surface dipole is dominant in the total acoustic field. The contribution of the volume quadrupoles to the total acoustic field gradually increases with increasing radius of the surface curvature (delta/ R).

  2. Fluctuation induced diamagnetism in the zero magnetic field limit in a low temperature superconducting alloy.

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, J; Carballeira, C; Vidal, F

    2001-10-15

    By using a Pb-18 at. % In alloy, the fluctuation induced diamagnetism was measured in the zero magnetic field limit, never observed until now in a low-T(C) superconductor. This allows us to disentangle the dynamic and the nonlocal electrodynamic effects from the short-wavelength fluctuation effects. The latter may be explained on the grounds of the Gaussian-Ginzburg-Landau approach by introducing a total energy cutoff in the fluctuation spectrum, which strongly suggests the existence of a well-defined temperature in the normal state above which all fluctuating modes vanish. This conclusion may also have implications when describing the superconducting state formation of the high-T(C) cuprates. PMID:11690233

  3. New spreading law of thin film liquids controlled by gravity and vdW forces under thermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesic, Svetozar; Cuerno Rejado, Rodolfo; Moro Egido, Esteban

    2013-11-01

    It has been shown that, in the regime controlled by surface tension, the spreading dynamics of a thin viscous fluid droplet changes significantly when it is subjected to thermal fluctuations. Technically, this has been accomplished through the incorporation of appropriate stochastic terms into the standard lubrication equation. In practice, it leads to a modification of the classic Tanner's law for spreading, with implications for Micro and Nanofluidic systems. We have recently found a new law of spreading for the same kind of systems, but in the gravity-dominated regime. Moreover, in the deteministic case a finite contact angle is formed when a van der Waals attractive force is introduced to the system and we show that there is a slight change in contact angle when thermal fluctuations are taken into account. Ph.D student and a member of GISC (http://matematicas.uc3m.es/index.php/gisc).

  4. Drift- or fluctuation-induced ordering and self-organization in driven many-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, D.; Platkowski, T.

    2002-10-01

    According to empirical observations, some pattern formation phenomena in driven many-particle systems are more pronounced in the presence of a certain noise level. We investigate this phenomenon of fluctuation-driven ordering with a cellular-automaton model of interactive motion in space and find an optimal noise strength, while order breaks down at high(er) fluctuation levels. Additionally, we discuss the phenomenon of noise- and drift-induced self-organization in systems that would show disorder in the absence of fluctuations. In the future, related studies may have applications to the control of many-particle systems such as the efficient separation of particles. The rather general formulation of our model in the spirit of game theory may allow to shed some light on several different kinds of noise-induced ordering phenomena observed in physical, chemical, biological, and socio-economic systems (e.g., attractive and repulsive agglomeration, or segregation).

  5. Thermal fluctuations and stability of a particle levitated by a repulsive Casimir force in a liquid.

    PubMed

    Inui, Norio; Goto, Kosuke

    2013-11-01

    We study the vertical Brownian motion of a gold particle levitated by a repulsive Casimir force to a silica plate immersed in bromobenzene. The time evolution of the particle distribution starting from an equilibrium position, where the Casimir force and gravitational force are balanced, is considered by solving the Langevin equation using the Monte Carlo method. When the gold particle is very close to the silica plate, the Casimir force changes from repulsive to attractive, and the particle eventually sticks to the surface. The escape rate from a metastable position is calculated by solving the Fokker-Plank equation; it agrees with the value obtained by Kramers' escape theory. The duration of levitation increases as the particle radius increases up to around 2.3 μm. As an example, we show that a 1-μm-diameter gold particle can be levitated for a significantly long time by the repulsive Casimir force at room temperature. PMID:24329240

  6. Force fluctuations while pressing and moving against high- and low-friction touch screen surfaces.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mukta N; Keenan, Kevin G

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of a high- and low-friction surface on the ability to maintain a steady downward force during an index finger pressing and moving task. Fifteen right-handed subjects (24-48 years) performed a static force pressing task and a hybrid pressing and moving task on the surface of an iPad mini while holding a steady 2-N force on high- and low-friction surfaces. Variability of force was quantified as the standard deviation (SD) of normal force (F z) and shear force (F xy) across friction conditions and tasks. The SD of F z was 227 % greater during the hybrid task as compared to the static task (p < .001) and was 19 % greater for the high- versus low-friction condition (p = .033). There were positive correlations between SD of F z and F xy during the hybrid force/motion tasks on the high- and low-friction conditions (r (2) = 0.5 and 0.86, respectively), suggesting significant associations between normal and shear forces for this hybrid task. The correlation between the SD of F z for static and hybrid tasks was r (2) = 0.44, indicating that the common practice of examining the control of static tasks may not sufficiently explain performance during hybrid tasks, at least for the young subjects tested in the current study. As activities of daily living frequently require hybrid force/motion tasks (e.g., writing, doing the dishes, and cleaning counters), the results of this study emphasize the need to study motor performance during hybrid tasks in addition to static force tasks. PMID:26898313

  7. Polymer-induced forces at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangarajan, Murali

    This dissertation concerns studies of forces generated by confined and physisorbed flexible polymers using lattice mean-field theories, and those generated by confined and clamped semiflexible polymers modeled as slender elastic rods. Lattice mean-field theories have been used in understanding and predicting the behavior of polymeric interfacial systems. In order to efficiently tailor such systems for various applications of interest, one has to understand the forces generated in the interface due to the polymer molecules. The present work examines the abilities and limitations of lattice mean-field theories in predicting the structure of physisorbed polymer layers and the resultant forces. Within the lattice mean-field theory, a definition of normal force of compression as the negative derivative of the partition-function-based excess free energy with surface separation gives misleading results because the theory does not explicitly account for the normal stresses involved in the system. Correct expressions for normal and tangential forces are obtained from a continuum-mechanics-based formulation. Preliminary comparisons with lattice Monte Carlo simulations show that mean-field theories fail to predict significant attractive forces when the surfaces are undersaturated, as one would expect. The corrections to the excluded volume (non-reversal chains) and the mean-field (anisotropic field) approximations improve the predictions of layer structure, but not the forces. Bending of semiflexible polymer chains (elastic rods) is considered for two boundary conditions---where the chain is hinged on both ends and where the chain is clamped on one end and hinged on the other. For the former case, the compressive forces and chain shapes obtained are consistent with the inflexional elastica published by Love. For the latter, multiple and higher-order solutions are observed for the hinged-end position for a given force. Preliminary studies are conducted on actin-based motility

  8. Including Thermal Fluctuations in Actomyosin Stable States Increases the Predicted Force per Motor and Macroscopic Efficiency in Muscle Modelling.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Lorenzo; Washio, Takumi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2016-09-01

    Muscle contractions are generated by cyclical interactions of myosin heads with actin filaments to form the actomyosin complex. To simulate actomyosin complex stable states, mathematical models usually define an energy landscape with a corresponding number of wells. The jumps between these wells are defined through rate constants. Almost all previous models assign these wells an infinite sharpness by imposing a relatively simple expression for the detailed balance, i.e., the ratio of the rate constants depends exponentially on the sole myosin elastic energy. Physically, this assumption corresponds to neglecting thermal fluctuations in the actomyosin complex stable states. By comparing three mathematical models, we examine the extent to which this hypothesis affects muscle model predictions at the single cross-bridge, single fiber, and organ levels in a ceteris paribus analysis. We show that including fluctuations in stable states allows the lever arm of the myosin to easily and dynamically explore all possible minima in the energy landscape, generating several backward and forward jumps between states during the lifetime of the actomyosin complex, whereas the infinitely sharp minima case is characterized by fewer jumps between states. Moreover, the analysis predicts that thermal fluctuations enable a more efficient contraction mechanism, in which a higher force is sustained by fewer attached cross-bridges. PMID:27626630

  9. Pilot investigation - Nominal crew induced forces in zero-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, Glenn K.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents pilot-study data of test subject forces induced by intravehicular activities such as push-offs and landings with both hands and feet. Five subjects participated in this investigation. Three orthogonal force axes were measured in the NASA KC-135 research aircraft's 'zero-g' environment. The largest forces were induced during vertical foot push-offs, including one of 534 newtons (120 lbs). The mean vertical foot push-off was 311 newtons (70 lbs). The vertical hand push-off forces were also relatively large, including one of 267 newtons (60 lbs) with a mean of 151 newtons (34 lbs). These force magnitudes of these forces would result in a Shuttle gravity environment of about 1 x exp 10 -4 g's.

  10. Protein denaturants at aqueous-hydrophobic interfaces: self-consistent correlation between induced interfacial fluctuations and denaturant stability at the interface.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shu-Ching; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    The notion of direct interaction between denaturing cosolvent and protein residues has been proposed in dialogue relevant to molecular mechanisms of protein denaturation. Here we consider the correlation between free energetic stability and induced fluctuations of an aqueous-hydrophobic interface between a model hydrophobically associating protein, HFBII, and two common protein denaturants, guanidinium cation (Gdm(+)) and urea. We compute potentials of mean force along an order parameter that brings the solute molecule close to the known hydrophobic region of the protein. We assess potentials of mean force for different relative orientations between the protein and denaturant molecule. We find that in both cases of guanidinium cation and urea relative orientations of the denaturant molecule that are parallel to the local protein-water interface exhibit greater stability compared to edge-on or perpendicular orientations. This behavior has been observed for guanidinium/methylguanidinium cations at the liquid-vapor interface of water, and thus the present results further corroborate earlier findings. Further analysis of the induced fluctuations of the aqueous-hydrophobic interface upon approach of the denaturant molecule indicates that the parallel orientation, displaying a greater stability at the interface, also induces larger fluctuations of the interface compared to the perpendicular orientations. The correlation of interfacial stability and induced interface fluctuation is a recurring theme for interface-stable solutes at hydrophobic interfaces. Moreover, observed correlations between interface stability and induced fluctuations recapitulate connections to local hydration structure and patterns around solutes as evidenced by experiment (Cooper et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 5657.) and high-level ab initio/DFT calculations (Baer et al., Faraday Discuss 2013, 160, 89). PMID:25536388

  11. Protein Denaturants at Aqueous–Hydrophobic Interfaces: Self-Consistent Correlation between Induced Interfacial Fluctuations and Denaturant Stability at the Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The notion of direct interaction between denaturing cosolvent and protein residues has been proposed in dialogue relevant to molecular mechanisms of protein denaturation. Here we consider the correlation between free energetic stability and induced fluctuations of an aqueous–hydrophobic interface between a model hydrophobically associating protein, HFBII, and two common protein denaturants, guanidinium cation (Gdm+) and urea. We compute potentials of mean force along an order parameter that brings the solute molecule close to the known hydrophobic region of the protein. We assess potentials of mean force for different relative orientations between the protein and denaturant molecule. We find that in both cases of guanidinium cation and urea relative orientations of the denaturant molecule that are parallel to the local protein–water interface exhibit greater stability compared to edge-on or perpendicular orientations. This behavior has been observed for guanidinium/methylguanidinium cations at the liquid–vapor interface of water, and thus the present results further corroborate earlier findings. Further analysis of the induced fluctuations of the aqueous–hydrophobic interface upon approach of the denaturant molecule indicates that the parallel orientation, displaying a greater stability at the interface, also induces larger fluctuations of the interface compared to the perpendicular orientations. The correlation of interfacial stability and induced interface fluctuation is a recurring theme for interface-stable solutes at hydrophobic interfaces. Moreover, observed correlations between interface stability and induced fluctuations recapitulate connections to local hydration structure and patterns around solutes as evidenced by experiment (Cooper et al., J. Phys. Chem. A2014, 118, 5657.) and high-level ab initio/DFT calculations (Baer et al., Faraday Discuss2013, 160, 89). PMID:25536388

  12. Photo-induced conductance fluctuations in mesoscopic Ge/Si systems with quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Stepina, N. P.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Moers, J.; Gruetzmacher, D.

    2014-08-20

    We study the evolution of electron transport in strongly localized mesoscopic system with quantum dots under small photon flux. Exploring devices with narrow transport channels lead to the observation of giant fluctuations of the photoconductance, which is attributed to the strong dependence of hopping current on the filling of dots by holes. In our experiments, single-photon mode operation is indicated by the linear dependence of the frequency of photo-induced fluctuations on the light intensity and the step-like response of conductance on the pulse excitation. The effect of the light wavelength, measurement temperature, size of the conductive channel on the device efficiency are considered.

  13. Nonlinear fluctuations-induced rate equations for linear birth-death processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkonen, J.

    2008-05-01

    The Fock-space approach to the solution of master equations for one-step Markov processes is reconsidered. It is shown that in birth-death processes with an absorbing state at the bottom of the occupation-number spectrum and occupation-number independent annihilation probability of occupation-number fluctuations give rise to rate equations drastically different from the polynomial form typical of birth-death processes. The fluctuation-induced rate equations with the characteristic exponential terms are derived for Mikhailov’s ecological model and Lanchester’s model of modern warfare.

  14. Parallel magnetic-field-induced conductance fluctuations in one- and two-subband ballistic quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, C.; Faniel, S.; Hackens, B.; Melinte, S.; Shayegan, M.; Bayot, V.

    2003-12-01

    We report on conductance fluctuations of ballistic quantum dots in a strictly parallel magnetic field B. The quantum dots are patterned in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG’s), confined to 15- and 45-nm-thick GaAs quantum wells (QW) with one and two occupied subbands at B=0, respectively. For both dots we observe universal conductance fluctuations (UCF’s) and, in the case of the wide QW dot, a reduction in their amplitude at large B. Our data suggest that the finite thickness of the 2DEG and the orbital effect are responsible for the parallel B-induced UCF’s.

  15. Shock induced ignition and DDT in the presence of mechanically driven fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentian; McDonald, James G.; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2015-11-01

    The present study addresses the problem of shock induced ignition and transition to detonation in the presence of mechanical and thermal fluctuations. These departures from a homogeneous medium are of significant importance in practical situations, where such fluctuations may promote hot-spot ignition and favor the flame transition to detonation. The problem is studied in 1D, where a piston-induced shock ignites the gas. The fluctuations in the shock-compressed medium are controlled by allowing the piston's speed to oscillate around a mean, with controllable frequency and amplitude. A Lagrangian numerical formulation is used, which allows to treat exactly the transient boundary condition at the piston head. The hydrodynamic solver is coupled with the reactive dynamics of the gas using Cantera. The code was verified by comparison with steady state ZND solutions and previous shock induced ignition results in homogeneous media. Results obtained for different fuels illustrate the strong relation of the DDT amplification length to mechanical fluctuations in systems with a high effective activation energy and fast rate of energy deposition, consistent with experiments performed on fast flame acceleration in the presence of strong mechanical perturbations. Financial support from NSERC and Shell, with A. Pekalski and M. Levin as technical monitors, are greatly acknowledged.

  16. Visualization of Thermally Fluctuating Surface Structure in Noncontact Atomic-Force Microscopy and Tip Effects on Fluctuation: Theoretical Study of Si(111)-( √3 ×√3)-Ag Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Naruo; Watanabe, Satoshi; Tsukada, Masaru

    2002-01-01

    We investigated noncontact atomic-force microscopy (NC-AFM) images of a thermally fluctuating surface structure together with tip effects based on the first-principles electronic state calculation. As an example the Si(111)-( (3)×(3))-Ag ( (3)-Ag) surface is studied. We have succeeded in theoretically visualizing the thermal fluctuation of the (3)-Ag surface at room temperature, and in reproducing the observed NC-AFM image for the first time. Further, the pinning effect of the thermal fluctuation of the (3)-Ag surface by the tip is clarified, which shows a novel ability of NC-AFM to modify the surface structure.

  17. Critical Casimir force and its fluctuations in lattice spin models: exact and Monte Carlo results.

    PubMed

    Dantchev, Daniel; Krech, Michael

    2004-04-01

    We present general arguments and construct a stress tensor operator for finite lattice spin models. The average value of this operator gives the Casimir force of the system close to the bulk critical temperature T(c). We verify our arguments via exact results for the force in the two-dimensional Ising model, d -dimensional Gaussian, and mean spherical model with 2force F(C) in a slab geometry confining a critical substance in-between is k(b) TD(T) (A/ a(d-1) )(1/2), where A is the surface area of the plates, a is the lattice spacing, and D(T) is a slowly varying nonuniversal function of the temperature T. The numerical calculations demonstrate that at the critical temperature T(c) the force possesses a Gaussian distribution centered at the mean value of the force = k(b) T(c) (d-1)Delta/ (L/a)(d), where L is the distance between the plates and Delta is the (universal) Casimir amplitude. PMID:15169081

  18. Fluctuation Induced Structure in Chemical Reaction with Small Number of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    We investigate the behaviors of chemical reactions of the Lotka-Volterra model with small number of molecules; hence the occurrence of random fluctuations modifies the deterministic behavior and the law of mass action is replaced by a stochastic model. We model it by using Abstract Rewriting System on Multisets, ARMS; ARMS is a stochastic method of simulating chemical reactions and it is based on the reaction rate equation. We confirmed that the magnitude of fluctuations on periodicity of oscillations becomes large, as the number of involved molecules is getting smaller; and these fluctuations induce another structure, which have not observed in the reactions with large number of molecules. We show that the underling mechanism through investigating the coarse grained phase space of ARMS.

  19. Casimir force-induced instability in freestanding nanotweezers and nanoactuators made of cylindrical nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhabadi, Amin; Abadian, Naeimeh; Kanjouri, Faramarz; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2014-05-01

    The quantum vacuum fluctuation i.e., Casimir attraction can induce mechanical instability in ultra-small devices. Previous researchers have focused on investigating the instability in structures with planar or rectangular cross-section. However, to the best knowledge of the authors, no attention has been paid for modeling this phenomenon in the structures made of nanowires with cylindrical geometry. In this regard, present work is dedicated to simulate the Casimir force-induced instability of freestanding nanoactuator and nanotweezers made of conductive nanowires with circular cross-section. To compute the quantum vacuum fluctuations, two approaches i.e., the proximity force approximation (for small separations) and scattering theory approximation (for large separations), are considered. The Euler-beam model is employed, in conjunction with the size-dependent modified couple stress continuum theory, to derive governing equations of the nanostructures. The governing nonlinear equations are solved via three different approaches, i.e., using lumped parameter model, modified variation iteration method (MVIM) and numerical solution. The deflection of the nanowire from zero to the final stable position is simulated as the Casimir force is increased from zero to its critical value. The detachment length and minimum gap, which prevent the instability, are computed for both nanosystems.

  20. Current Induced Forces on Adsorbates at Conducting Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mingo, N.; Yang, Liu; Han, Jie

    2001-01-01

    The problem addressed is force on an impurity due to electric current. In order to determine the size and direction of the force, as well as its dependence on the voltage, LCAO (Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals) and the Green's Function approach were implemented. The resultant induced mean force was directed outwards in addition to a smaller component in the electron flow direction. At low bias, force is larger for larger radius, and crosses over the opposite trend when increasing the bias. The crossover current is approximately inversely proportional to the radius.

  1. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  2. Internal flows and force matrices in axial flow inducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    1994-01-01

    Axial flow inducers such as those used in high speed rocket engine turbopumps are subject to complex internal flows and fluid-induced lateral and rotordynamic forces. An investigation of these internal flows was conducted using boundary layer flow visualization on the blades, hub and housing of unshrouded and shrouded inducers. Results showed that the blade boundary layer flows have strong radial components at off-design conditions and remain attached to the blade surface at all flow coefficients tested. The origin of upstream swirling backflow was found to be at the discharge plane of the inducer. In addition, flow reversal was observed at the suction side blade tip near the leading edge in a shrouded inducer. Re-entry of the hub boundary layer flow, a downstream backflow, into the blade passage area was observed at flow coefficients below design. For unshrouded inducers the radially outward flow near the blade tip mixed with the leakage flow to form the upstream backflow. The lateral and rotordynamic forces acting on an inducer due to an imposed whirl motion was also investigated at various flow coefficients. It was found that the rotordynamic force data at various whirl frequency ratios does not allow a normal quadratic fit; consequently the conventional inertial, stiffness and damping coefficients cannot be obtained and a definite whirl ratio describing the instability region does not result. Application of an actuator disk theory proved to be inaccurate in estimating the rotordynamic tangential force in a non-whirling inducer. The effect of upstream and downstream flow distortions on the rotordynamic and lateral forces on an inducer were studied. It was found that at flow coefficients below design, large lateral forces occurred in the presence of a downstream asymmetry. Results of inlet distortion experiments show that a strong inlet shear causes a significant increase in the lateral force. Cavitation was found to have important consequences for fluid-induced

  3. Measurements of temperature, density, pressure, and their fluctuations in supersonic turbulence using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.; Logan, P.

    1987-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence method has been developed that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in unheated compressible flows. Pressure and its fluctuations are also deduced using the equation of state. Fluorescence is induced in nitric oxide that has been seeded into a nitrogen flow in concentrations of 100 ppm. Measurements are obtained from each laser pulse, with a spatial resolution of 1 mm and a temporal resolution of 125 ns. The method was applied to a supersonic, turbulent, boundary-layer flow with a free-stream Mach number of 2. For stream conditions in the range from 150-300 K and 0.3-1 atm, temperature is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 1 percent rms, while density and pressure uncertainties are approximately 2 percent rms.

  4. Fluctuation-induced noise in out-of-equilibrium disordered superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Petković, Aleksandra; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2013-12-15

    We study out-of-equilibrium transport in disordered superconductors close to the superconducting transition. We consider a thin film connected by resistive tunnel interfaces to thermal reservoirs having different chemical potentials and temperatures. The nonequilibrium longitudinal current–current correlation function is calculated within the nonlinear sigma model description and nonlinear dependence on temperatures and chemical potentials is obtained. Different contributions are calculated, originating from the fluctuation-induced suppression of the quasiparticle density of states, Maki–Thompson and Aslamazov–Larkin processes. As a special case of our results, close-to-equilibrium we obtain the longitudinal ac conductivity using the fluctuation–dissipation theorem. -- Highlights: •Contributions to the current noise induced by superconducting fluctuations are calculated. •Nonequilibrium physics is studied. •Nonlinear dependence of the noise on temperatures and chemical potentials of the reservoirs is found.

  5. Fluctuation-induced transport of two coupled particles: Effect of the interparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnovskii, Yurii A.; Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Trakhtenberg, Leonid I.; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-06-01

    We consider a system of two coupled particles fluctuating between two states, with different interparticle interaction potentials and particle friction coefficients. An external action drives the interstate transitions that induces reciprocating motion along the internal coordinate x (the interparticle distance). The system moves unidirectionally due to rectification of the internal motion by asymmetric friction fluctuations and thus operates as a dimeric motor that converts input energy into net movement. We focus on how the law of interaction between the particles affects the dimer transport and, in particular, the role of thermal noise in the motion inducing mechanism. It is argued that if the interaction potential behaves at large distances as xα, depending on the value of the exponent α, the thermal noise plays a constructive (α > 2), neutral (α = 2), or destructive (α < 2) role. In the case of α = 1, corresponding piecewise linear potential profiles, an exact solution is obtained and discussed in detail.

  6. Homotopy Perturbation Method-Based Analytical Solution for Tide-Induced Groundwater Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Munusamy, Selva Balaji; Dhar, Anirban

    2016-05-01

    The groundwater variations in unconfined aquifers are governed by the nonlinear Boussinesq's equation. Analytical solution for groundwater fluctuations in coastal aquifers under tidal forcing can be solved using perturbation methods. However, the perturbation parameters should be properly selected and predefined for traditional perturbation methods. In this study, a new dimensional, higher-order analytical solution for groundwater fluctuations is proposed by using the homotopy perturbation method with a virtual perturbation parameter. Parameter-expansion method is used to remove the secular terms generated during the solution process. The solution does not require any predefined perturbation parameter and valid for higher values of amplitude parameter A/D, where A is the amplitude of the tide and D is the aquifer thickness. PMID:26340338

  7. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  8. Nonequilibrium Casimir-like Forces in Liquid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, T. R.; Ortiz de Zárate, J. M.; Sengers, J. V.

    2015-07-01

    In this Letter, we consider a liquid mixture confined between two thermally conducting walls subjected to a stationary temperature gradient. While in a one-component liquid nonequilibrium fluctuation forces appear inside the liquid layer, nonequilibrium fluctuations in a mixture induce a Casimir-like force on the walls. The physical reason is that the temperature gradient induces large concentration fluctuations through the Soret effect. Unlike temperature fluctuations, nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations are also present near a perfectly thermally conducting wall. The magnitude of the fluctuation-induced Casimir force is proportional to the square of the Soret coefficient and is related to the concentration dependence of the heat and volume of mixing.

  9. Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a Stochastic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, David L.

    2009-11-01

    Particle transport and density relaxation associated with electromagnetic fluctuations is an unresolved problem of long standing in plasma physics and magnetic fusion research. In toroidal fusion plasmas, magnetic field fluctuations can arise spontaneously from global MHD instabilities, e.g., tearing fluctuations associated with sawtooth oscillations. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) have also been externally imposed to mitigate the effect of edge localized modes (ELMs) by locally enhancing edge transport in Tokamaks. Understanding stochastic-field-driven transport processes is thus not only of basic science interest but possibly critical to ELM control in ITER. We report on the first direct measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport in the core of a high-temperature plasma, the MST reversed field pinch. Measurements focus on the sawtooth crash, when the stochastic field resulting from tearing reconnection is strongest, and are accomplished using newly developed, laser-based, differential interferometry and Faraday rotation techniques. The measured electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density (δn) and radial magnetic fluctuations (δbr), accounts for density profile relaxation during these magnetic reconnection events. Surprisingly, the electron diffusion is 30 times larger than estimates of ambipolarity-constrained transport in a stochastic magnetic field. A significant ion flux associated with parallel ion flow velocity fluctuations (δvi,//) correlated with δbr appears responsible for transport larger than predictions from the quasi-linear test particle model. These results indicate the need for improved understanding of particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. Work performed in collaboration with W.X. Ding, W.F. Bergerson, T.F. Yates, UCLA; D.J. Den Hartog, G. Fiksel, S.C. Prager, J.S. Sarff and the MST Group, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  10. Thermal-induced force release in oxyhemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, S. G.; Allahverdyan, A. E.; Gevorgyan, D. S.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is released to living tissues via conformational changes of hemoglobin from R-state (oxyhemoglobin) to T-state (desoxyhemoglobin). The detailed mechanism of this process is not yet fully understood. We have carried out micromechanical experiments on oxyhemoglobin crystals to determine the behavior of the Young’s modulus and the internal friction for temperatures between 20 °C and 70 °C. We have found that around 49 °C oxyhemoglobin crystal samples undergo a sudden and strong increase of their Young’s modulus, accompanied by a sudden decrease of the internal friction. This sudden mechanical change (and the ensuing force release) takes place in a partially unfolded state and precedes the full denaturation transition at higher temperatures. After this transformation, the hemoglobin crystals have the same mechanical properties as their initial state at room temperatures. We conjecture that it can be relevant for explaining the oxygen-releasing function of native oxyhemoglobin when the temperature is increased, e.g. due to active sport. The effect is specific for the quaternary structure of hemoglobin, and is absent for myoglobin with only one peptide sequence. PMID:26277901

  11. Valence state parameters of all transition metal atoms in metalloproteins--development of ABEEMσπ fluctuating charge force field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Zhi; Wang, Jian-Jiang; Zhao, Dong-Xia

    2014-09-01

    To promote accuracy of the atom-bond electronegativity equalization method (ABEEMσπ) fluctuating charge polarizable force fields, and extend it to include all transition metal atoms, a new parameter, the reference charge is set up in the expression of the total energy potential function. We select over 700 model molecules most of which model metalloprotein molecules that come from Protein Data Bank. We set reference charges for different apparent valence states of transition metals and calibrate the parameters of reference charges, valence state electronegativities, and valence state hardnesses for ABEEMσπ through linear regression and least square method. These parameters can be used to calculate charge distributions of metalloproteins containing transition metal atoms (Sc-Zn, Y-Cd, and Lu-Hg). Compared the results of ABEEMσπ charge distributions with those obtained by ab initio method, the quite good linear correlations of the two kinds of charge distributions are shown. The reason why the STO-3G basis set in Mulliken population analysis for the parameter calibration is specially explained in detail. Furthermore, ABEEMσπ method can also quickly and quite accurately calculate dipole moments of molecules. Molecular dynamics optimizations of five metalloproteins as the examples show that their structures obtained by ABEEMσπ fluctuating charge polarizable force field are very close to the structures optimized by the ab initio MP2/6–311G method. This means that the ABEEMσπ/MM can now be applied to molecular dynamics simulations of systems that contain metalloproteins with good accuracy. PMID:25042901

  12. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin's motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force. PMID:21797399

  13. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin’s motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force.

  14. QED vacuum fluctuations and induced electric dipole moment of the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, C. A.; Falomir, H.; Ipinza, M.; Loewe, M.; Kohler, S.; Rojas, J. C.

    2009-08-01

    Quantum fluctuations in the QED vacuum generate nonlinear effects, such as peculiar induced electromagnetic fields. In particular, we show here that an electrically neutral particle, possessing a magnetic dipole moment, develops an induced electric dipole-type moment with unusual angular dependence, when immersed in a quasistatic, constant external electric field. The calculation of this effect is done in the framework of the Euler-Heisenberg effective QED Lagrangian, corresponding to the weak field asymptotic expansion of the effective action to one-loop order. It is argued that the neutron might be a good candidate to probe this signal of nonlinearity in QED.

  15. Analytical Solution for Subsurface Gas Flow to a Well Induced by Surface Pressure Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.

    2001-06-20

    A simple analytical model is presented for predicting subsurface gas flow to a vadose zone well in response to atmospheric pressure fluctuations (barometric pumping). The effective radial permeability (kr) in the vicinity of the well is determined during model calibration using less than two weeks of data. By combining the flow solution with a solution for the vertical gas pressure, only atmospheric pressure data are required to predict the induced flow through a well. The ability to quantitatively predict naturally induced flow in vadose zone wells by simple and inexpensive measurements is invaluable for systems using barometric pumping for remediation.

  16. Analytical solution for subsurface gas flow to a well induced by surface pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Rossabi, Joseph; Falta, Ronald W

    2002-01-01

    A simple analytical model is presented for predicting subsurface gas flow to a vadose-zone well in response to atmospheric pressure fluctuations (barometric pumping). The effective radial permeability (kr) in the vicinity of the well is determined during model calibration using less than two weeks worth of data. By combining the flow solution with a solution for the vertical gas pressure, only atmospheric pressure data are required to predict the induced flow through a well. The ability to quantitatively predict naturally induced flow in vadose-zone wells by simple and inexpensive measurements is invaluable for systems using barometric pumping for remediation. PMID:11798048

  17. Orbitally Forced Climatic Fluctuations in Snowball Earth: Compelling Evidence from a Data-Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, D.; Fairchild, I. J.; Le Hir, G.; Fleming, E.; Ramstein, G.; Stevenson, C.; Donnadieu, Y.; Bao, H.; Hambrey, M.; Petronis, M. S.; Wynn, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Snowball Earth model provides a powerful conceptual framework for understanding the causes and demise of the extreme global glaciations that occurred during the Neoproterozoic, and can be refined through creative interactions between geological, geochemical and modeling studies. We present unequivocal evidence for oscillating glacier extent and varying hydrological conditions during the Marinoan, the second major Cryogenian glaciation (~650-635 Ma), from the Wilsonbreen Formation of NE Svalbard. Extensive exposures record (1) a possibly long arid periglacial phase; (2) multiple switches between subglacial, glaciolacustrine, carbonate lacustrine and non-glacial terrestrial deposition; and (3) rapid deglaciation. Oxygen and sulfur isotopes of sulfate in carbonate facies indicate persistently high pCO2 consistent with deposition of the Formation on a 105-year timescale. Using an ice sheet model (GRISLI) coupled to a General Circulation Model (LMDz), the response of the continental ice-sheet to insolation changes (i.e. orbital forcing) and pCO2 is investigated. We show that land-ice cover waxes and wanes over the course of a precession cycle for pCO2 levels from 0.01 to 0.05 bar. Growth and retreat of ice reflect shifts in the balance between precipitation and evaporation (P-E), in response to migration of the tropical Hadley Cell. In cold conditions (<0.01bar), the weakness of the hydrological cycle makes the system insensitive to precession changes, explaining relatively stable ice-sheets during the earlier stages of the Snowball Earth. With 0.01forcing) produces advances/retreats of the ice sheet in <10 kyr. With pCO2>0.05bar, the albedo effect is overcome and air temperatures rise in ice free regions in low latitudes and deglaciation occurs. The results show that the Snowball Earth model can be reconciled with evidence for prolonged, pulsed glacial deposition. The main, longest

  18. Transient violations of the second law of thermodynamics in protein unfolding examined using synthetic atomic force microscopy and the fluctuation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramore, Sterling; Ayton, Gary S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2007-09-01

    The synthetic atomic force microscopy (AFM) method is developed to simulate a periodically replicated atomistic system subject to force and length fluctuations characteristic of an AFM experiment. This new method is used to examine the forced-extension and subsequent rupture of the α-helical linker connecting periodic images of a spectrin protein repeat unit. A two-dimensional potential of mean force (PMF) along the length and a reaction coordinate describing the state of the linker was calculated. This PMF reveals that the basic material properties of the spectrin repeat unit are sensitive to the state of linker, an important feature that cannot be accounted for in a one-dimensional PMF. Furthermore, nonequilibrium simulations were generated to examine the rupture event in the context of the fluctuation theorem. These atomistic simulations demonstrate that trajectories which are in apparent violation of the second law can overcome unfolding barriers at significantly reduced rupture forces.

  19. Nonconservative current-induced forces: A physical interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Dundas, Daniel; Paxton, Anthony T; Horsfield, Andrew P

    2011-01-01

    Summary We give a physical interpretation of the recently demonstrated nonconservative nature of interatomic forces in current-carrying nanostructures. We start from the analytical expression for the curl of these forces, and evaluate it for a point defect in a current-carrying system. We obtain a general definition of the capacity of electrical current flow to exert a nonconservative force, and thus do net work around closed paths, by a formal noninvasive test procedure. Second, we show that the gain in atomic kinetic energy over time, generated by nonconservative current-induced forces, is equivalent to the uncompensated stimulated emission of directional phonons. This connection with electron–phonon interactions quantifies explicitly the intuitive notion that nonconservative forces work by angular momentum transfer. PMID:22259754

  20. Force-induced stretched state: effects of temperature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Mishra, Garima

    2008-07-01

    A model of self-avoiding walks with suitable constraint has been developed to study the effect of temperature on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the constant force ensemble. Our exact calculations for small chains show that the extension (reaction coordinate) may increase or decrease with the temperature depending on the applied force. The simple model developed here, which incorporates semimicroscopic details of base direction, provides an explanation of the force-induced transitions in ssDNA as observed in experiments. PMID:18763982

  1. Pressure induced by thermal fluctuation of an elastic filament confined within a narrow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, L. B.

    2016-08-01

    Consider a flexible macro-molecule that is immersed in water at or above room temperature. As a result of thermal motion within the water, the filament is driven to undergo random fluctuations in shape. These fluctuations are a consequence of uncoordinated motion of water molecules. If the range of filament motion is restricted by nearby surfaces, the phenomenon becomes more complex. In this study, it is presumed that the filament is restricted to lie within a plane so that the motion is two dimensional. Furthermore, the range of the planar motion of the filament is confined to the region between inflexible straight boundaries lying in the plane of motion. A result of thermal fluctuation of the filament is that, when in close proximity to a boundary, a normal pressure is induced between the filament and that confining boundary. In the present development, frictional interaction of the filament with either confining boundary is presumed to be negligible. The goal is to determine the dependence of the induced pressure on the separation distance between the confining boundaries in terms of prevailing thermal conditions and physical characteristics of the system.

  2. Thermal gradient-induced forces on geodesic reference masses for LISA

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, L.; Ciani, G.; Dolesi, R.; Hueller, M.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Weber, W. J.; Cavalleri, A.

    2007-11-15

    The low frequency sensitivity of space-borne gravitational wave observatories will depend critically on the geodesic purity of the trajectories of orbiting test masses. Fluctuations in the temperature difference across the enclosure surrounding the free-falling test mass can produce noisy forces through several processes, including the radiometric effect, radiation pressure, and outgassing. We present here a detailed experimental investigation of thermal gradient-induced forces for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave mission and the LISA Pathfinder, employing high resolution torsion pendulum measurements of the torque on a LISA-like test mass suspended inside a prototype of the LISA gravitational reference sensor that will surround the test mass in orbit. The measurement campaign, accompanied by numerical simulations of the radiometric and radiation pressure effects, allows a more accurate and representative characterization of thermal-gradient forces in the specific geometry and environment relevant to LISA free-fall. The pressure dependence of the measured torques allows clear identification of the radiometric effect, in quantitative agreement with the model developed. In the limit of zero gas pressure, the measurements are most likely dominated by outgassing, but at a low level that does not threaten the current LISA noise estimate, which assumes a maximum net force per degree of temperature difference of 100(pN/K) for the overall thermal gradient-induced effects.

  3. Changes in Relative Thylakoid Protein Abundance Induced by Fluctuating Light in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Grouneva, Irina; Muth-Pawlak, Dorota; Battchikova, Natalia; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-05-01

    One of the hallmarks of marine diatom biology is their ability to cope with rapid changes in light availability due to mixing of the water column and the lens effect. We investigated how irradiance fluctuations influence the relative abundance of key photosynthetic proteins in the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana by means of mass-spectrometry-based approaches for relative protein quantitation. Most notably, fluctuating-light conditions lead to a substantial overall up-regulation of light-harvesting complex proteins as well as several subunits of photosystems II and I. Despite an initial delay in growth under FL, there were no indications of FL-induced photosynthesis limitation, in contrast to other photosynthetic organisms. Our findings further strengthen the notion that diatoms use a qualitatively different mechanism of photosynthetic regulation in which chloroplast-mitochondria interaction has overtaken crucial regulatory processes of photosynthetic light reactions that are typical for the survival of land plants, green algae, and cyanobacteria. PMID:27025989

  4. Fluctuation-induced shear flow and energy transfer in plasma interchange turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Sun, C. K.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X. G.; Ernst, D. R.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation-induced E × B shear flow and energy transfer for plasma interchange turbulence are examined in a flux-driven system with both closed and open magnetic field lines. The nonlinear evolution of interchange turbulence shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high E × B flow shear. In the first regime, the large-scale turbulent convection is dominant and the mean E × B shear flow is at a relatively low level. By increasing the heat flux above a certain threshold, the increased turbulent intensity gives rise to the transfer of energy from fluctuations to mean E × B flows. As a result, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which a strong mean E × B shear flow is generated.

  5. Flow shear induced fluctuation suppression in finite aspect ratio shaped tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Burrell, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    The suppression of turbulence by the E {times} B flow shear and parallel flow shear is studied in an arbitrary shape finite aspect ratio tokamak plasma using the two point nonlinear analysis previously utilized in a high aspect rat& tokamak plasma. The result shows that only the E {times} B flow shear is responsible for the suppression of flute-like fluctuations. This suppression occurs regardless of the plasma rotation direction and is therefore, relevant for the VH mode plasma core as well as for the H mode plasma edge. Experimentally observed in-out asymmetry of fluctuation reduction behavior can be addressed in the context of flux expansion and magnetic field pitch variation on a given flux surface. The adverse effect of neutral particles on confinement improvement is also discussed in the context of the charge exchange induced parallel momentum damping.

  6. Turbulence induced fluctuations in cloud saturation ratio: Doppler radar measurements and implications for drizzle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, R. L.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a statistical examination of in-cloud updraft and downdraft velocities using Doppler cloud radar and radiosonde measurements collected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) climate research facility. The measurements, including moments and other statistical properties derived from them are used in conjunction with adiabatic parcel and entrainment models to derive the properties of turbulence-induced fluctuations in saturation ratio and cloud droplet size. An especially important parameter for models of cloud droplet evolution and dispersion and also for predicting conditions at the drizzle threshold is the ratio of saturation ratio fluctuation variance to correlation time [McGraw and Liu, GRL, 33, L03802 (2006)]. The goal of the present analysis is to develop methods to estimate this key turbulence parameter needed in the kinetic potential theory of drizzle formation from remote sensing methods and in particular from the Doppler radar measurements.

  7. Blade Section Design of Marine Propellers with Minimum Cavitation Induced Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhibo; Kuiper, Gert

    2015-12-01

    To minimize cavitation induced pressure fluctuations by marine propellers with minimum efficiency loss, the paper presents a new design and optimization method using a blade section design method. The sheet cavity volume variation on a two-dimensional blade section in quasi-steady condition has been simplified to a relation with only a limited number of non-dimensional parameters. This results in a fast prediction method of the cavity volume of a blade section passing a wake peak, using a pre-calculated database. This makes optimization feasible. The optimization method was applied to the propeller of a container ship. Extensive tests in a towing tank and a cavitation channel validated the reduction of pressure fluctuations: 33% reduction in the first blade frequency amplitude and 18% reduction in the second blade frequency amplitude, with the same open water efficiency.

  8. Unstable amplitude and noisy image induced by tip contamination in dynamic force mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, H.-Y.; McIntyre, N. S.

    2007-02-01

    Liquid 1-decanethiol was confined on an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip apex and the effect was investigated by measuring amplitude-distance curves in dynamic force mode. Within the working distance in the dynamic force mode AFM, the thiol showed strong interactions bridging between a gold-coated probe tip and a gold-coated Si substrate, resulting in unstable amplitude and noisy AFM images. We show that under such a situation, the amplitude change is dominated by the extra forces induced by the active material loaded on the tip apex, overwhelming the amplitude change caused by the geometry of the sample surface, thus resulting in noise in the image the tip collects. We also show that such a contaminant may be removed from the apex by pushing the tip into a material soft enough to avoid damage to the tip.

  9. Nonlinear restoring forces in vortex-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2011-11-01

    When studying vortex-induced vibration of a rigid circular cylinder, almost all experimental and computational studies involve the cylinder being supported by linear springs. However, there are cases in which we may be interested in the VIV response of a cylinder supported by nonlinear springs. A system with nonlinearities in the restoring force has the potential to increase the amplitude response envelope, critical to the success of aero-vibrating energy harvesters. On the other hand, designing nonlinear restoring forces to decrease the amplitude response may lead to structures more able to withstand flow-induced vibration. In addition, adding nonlinear terms to the restoring force on a rigid cylinder might be used to simulate higher-order dynamics of long, elastic marine cables. To experimentally observe the effects of nonlinear springs on flow-induced vibration, we apply a novel approach that lets us parametrically control the nature of the springs and the strength of the nonlinearities. The technique, called Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics, uses a force-feedback control system to simulate arbitrary forces on a submerged body [the details of this system were shown in the APS presentation of Mackowski & Williamson (2010)]. We present results using this technique to explore the amplitude response of a circular cylinder in a crossflow.

  10. Interrelation between ball lightning and optically induced forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    Optically induced forces are considered as a key factor for explaining the phenomenon of ball lightning. They can provide not only the existence of ball lightning in the form of self-confined intense white light circulating in a spherical shell of air strongly compressed by the light but also the anomalous motion of ball lightning in the terrestrial atmosphere.

  11. Tokamak Plasma Flows Induced by Local RF Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2015-10-01

    The tokamak plasma flows induced by the local radio frequency (RF) forces in the core region are analyzed. The effective components of local RF forces are composed of the momentum absorption term and the resonant parallel momentum transport term (i.e. the parallel component of the resonant ponderomotive forces). Different momentum balance relations are employed to calculate the plasma flows depending on different assumptions of momentum transport. With the RF fields solved from RF simulation codes, the toroidal and poloidal flows by these forces under the lower hybrid current drive and the mode conversion ion cyclotron resonance heating on EAST-like plasmas are evaluated. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405218, 11325524, 11375235 and 11261140327), in part by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB111002, 2013GB112001 and 2013GB112010), and the Program of Fusion Reactor Physics and Digital Tokamak with the CAS “One-Three-Five” Strategic Planning

  12. Tip-bias-induced domain evolution in PMN-PT transparent ceramics via piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, K. Y.; Zhao, W.; Zeng, H. R.; Yu, H. Z.; Ruan, W.; Xu, K. Q.; Li, G. R.

    2015-05-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) was employed to investigate ferroelectric domain structures and their dynamic behavior of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PMN-PT)] transparent ceramics under an tip-bias-induced electric field. A remarkable effect of fluctuation of PT content on the domain configurations and domain dynamic response in PMN-PT transparent ferroelectric ceramics were found by PFM. Comparing with PMN-10%PT and PMN-20%PT, the reversed polarization of macrodomain area in PMN-35%PT and PMN-25%PT exhibits a relatively higher response behavior and better polarization retention performance under the PFM tip-bias-induced electric field, which correspond to their unique macroscopic electro-optic properties.

  13. Higher Harmonic Forces in Purely Crossflow Vortex-Induced Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya; Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Bourguet, Remi; Karniadakis, George; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    In vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of flexibly-mounted rigid cylinders free to oscillate both in the inline and crossflow directions, higher (3rd) harmonic forces have already been observed in the crossflow direction. In the present work, we report higher harmonic force components for a flexibly-mounted rigid cylinder with only one degree of freedom in the crossflow direction. We show that the inline displacement is not necessary to observe higher harmonic components in the crossflow force spectrum. Due to the relative velocity of the cylinder with respect to the oncoming flow, the lift and drag forces make an angle with respect to the crossflow and inline directions, and the contribution of the components of each of these forces in the crossflow direction results in a 3rd harmonic force component. These higher harmonic components have been observed in self-excited VIV experiments, performed in a water tunnel for a Reynolds number range of Re = 400-1000, as well as in numerical simulation results at Re = 100. We also find that the maximum ratio of the 3rd harmonic to the 1st harmonic occurs when the phase between the crossflow force and displacement changes from 0 to 180 degrees, resulting in a small first harmonic component.

  14. Force-Induced Rupture of a DNA Duplex: From Fundamentals to Force Sensors.

    PubMed

    Mosayebi, Majid; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K; Ouldridge, Thomas E

    2015-12-22

    The rupture of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article, we consider the shear-induced rupture of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that rupture must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to rupture a duplex depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to show that this approach naturally captures the observed dependence of the force required to rupture a duplex within a given time on duplex length. In particular, this critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence of each additional base pair within the duplex is thermodynamically unfavorable rather than allowing for metastability, does not predict a time-scale-dependent critical force and does not naturally incorporate a critical force of zero for the shortest duplexes. We demonstrate that our findings have important consequences for the behavior of a new force-sensing nanodevice, which operates in a mixed mode that interpolates between shearing and unzipping. At a fixed time scale and duplex length, the critical force exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the fraction of the duplex that is subject to shearing. PMID:26575598

  15. Geometry-induced modification of fluctuation spectrum in quasi-two-dimensional condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arko; Angom, D.

    2016-08-01

    We report the structural transformation of the low-lying spectral modes, especially the Kohn mode, from radial to circular topology as harmonic confining potential is modified to a toroidal one, and this corresponds to a transition from simply to multiply connected geometry. For this we employ the Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov theory to examine the evolution of low energy quasiparticles. We, then, use the Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov theory with the Popov approximation to demonstrate the two striking features of quantum and thermal fluctuations. At T = 0, the non-condensate density due to interaction induced quantum fluctuations increases with the transformation from pancake to toroidal geometry. The other feature is, there is a marked change in the density profile of the non-condensate density at finite temperatures with the modification of trapping potential. In particular, the condensate and non-condensate density distributions have overlapping maxima in the toroidal condensate, which is in stark contrast to the case of pancake geometry. The genesis of this difference lies in the nature of the thermal fluctuations.

  16. Transition linewidth of cross correlations in random intensity fluctuations in electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Li, Pengxiong; Zhang, Mengzhen; Wang, Tun; Xiao, Yanhong

    2014-01-01

    It is known that cross correlation between the random intensity fluctuations of two lasers forming electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) exhibits a transition from correlation to anticorrelation. We study the linewidth behavior of this transition and have found the linewidth is below the (effective) coherence lifetime limit and is limited only by competing noises. We established a numerical model which reveals the linewidth dependence on laser linewidth and laser power. Our experiments using lasers with different linewidth showed results in qualitative agreement with the model. This result is useful for quantum optics using EIT and may also have applications in spectroscopy and precision measurements.

  17. The role of fluctuation-induced transport in a toroidal plasma with strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Hong, J. Y.; Kim, Y. C.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work employing digitally implemented spectral analysis techniques is extended to demonstrate that radial fluctuation-induced transport is the dominant ion transport mechanism in an electric field dominated toroidal plasma. Such transport can be made to occur against a density gradient, and hence may have a very beneficial effect on confinement in toroidal plasmas of fusion interest. It is shown that Bohm or classical diffusion down a density gradient, the collisional Pedersen-current mechanism, and the collisionless electric field gradient mechanism described by Cole (1976) all played a minor role, if any, in the radial transport of this plasma.

  18. Materials for damping the PTC-induced thermal fluctuations of the cold-head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catarino, I.; Martins, D.; Sudiwala, R.

    2015-12-01

    The cold head on mechanical Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTCs) is subject to substantially less mechanical vibration and electromagnetic interference compared to that typically found in Gifford MacMahon coolers. However, thermal fluctuations at the PTC frequency are still present at the cold-head, typically at a level of 200 mK peak-to-peak at 1.4 Hz for a Cryomech Model PT405 cooler running at 4 K. It is highly desirable to damp out these fluctuations if PTCs are to be used successfully for running systems sensitive to such thermal fluctuations, for example, bolometeric detectors. We report here the characterization over the temperature range 2.5 K to 6 K of two materials, GOS (Gd2O2S) and GAP (GdAlO3), for use as low-pass thermal filters. These materials have antiferromagnetic transitions at around 4 K giving rise to an enhanced heat capacity and have a high thermal conductance. These are two highly desirable properties for thermal dampers in this application. Those materials were fired as ceramic discs to be tested as thermal dumpers. Thermal filter assemblies with discs of diameter 75 mm and thickness 2.5 mm and 1.6 mm (GOS and GAP, respectively) mounted in a PTC show thermal attenuation levels of x0.12 (GOS) and x0.11 (GAP) at 0.01Hz with a clean-side temperature of 4 K; the PTC induced fluctuations at 1.48 Hz are damped completely to within the noise limits (0.2 mK) of the thermometers. Experimentally determined thermal conductance and heat capacity data are reported. For this system, with a PTC cold-head (dirty-side) temperature of 3.3 K, a clean-side power dissipation of up to 30 mW is realized before its temperature rises above 4.2 K.

  19. Force-Induced Craniosynostosis in the Murine Sagittal Suture

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Rhee, Samuel T.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The etiology of non-syndromic craniosynostosis remains elusive. While compressive forces have been implicated in premature suture fusion, conclusive evidence of force-induced craniosynostosis is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclical loading of the murine calvarium could induce suture fusion. METHODS Calvarial coupons from post-natal day 21, B6CBA wild-type mice (n = 18) were harvested and cultured. A custom appliance capable of delivering controlled, cyclical, compressive loads was applied perpendicular to the sagittal suture within the coupon in vitro. Nine coupons were subjected to 0.3g of force for 30 minutes each day for a total of 14 days. A control group of nine coupons was clamped in the appliance without loading. Analysis of suture phenotype was performed using alkaline phosphatase and H&E staining techniques, as well as in situ hybridization analysis using Bone Sialoprotein (BSP). RESULTS Control group sagittal sutures—which normally remain patent in mice—showed their customary histological appearance. In contradistinction, sagittal sutures subjected to cyclic loading showed histological evidence of premature fusion (craniosynostosis). In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and BSP expression was observed to be increased in the experimental group when compared to matched controls. CONCLUSIONS An in vitro model of forced-induced craniosynostosis has been devised. Premature fusion of the murine sagittal suture was induced with the application of controlled, cyclical, compressive loads. These results implicate abnormal forces in the development of non-syndromic craniosynostosis, which supports our global hypothesis that epigenetic phenomena have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. PMID:19952640

  20. Light-induced optomechanical forces in graphene waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guizal, Brahim; Antezza, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    We show that the electromagnetic forces generated by the excitations of a mode in graphene-based optomechanical systems are highly tunable by varying the graphene chemical potential, and orders of magnitude stronger than usual non-graphene-based devices, in both attractive and repulsive regimes. We analyze coupled waveguides made of two parallel graphene sheets, either suspended or supported by dielectric slabs, and study the interplay between the light-induced force and the Casimir-Lifshitz interaction. These findings pave the way to advanced possibilities of control and fast modulation for optomechanical devices and sensors at the nano- and microscales.

  1. Monochromatic waves induced by large-scale parametric forcing.

    PubMed

    Nepomnyashchy, A; Abarzhi, S I

    2010-03-01

    We study the formation and stability of monochromatic waves induced by large-scale modulations in the framework of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with parametric nonresonant forcing dependent on the spatial coordinate. In the limiting case of forcing with very large characteristic length scale, analytical solutions for the equation are found and conditions of their existence are outlined. Stability analysis indicates that the interval of existence of a monochromatic wave can contain a subinterval where the wave is stable. We discuss potential applications of the model in rheology, fluid dynamics, and optics. PMID:20365907

  2. Event-by-event fluctuations in the medium-induced jet evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Miguel A.; Iancu, Edmond

    2016-05-01

    We develop the event-by-event picture of the gluon distribution produced via medium-induced gluon branching by an energetic jet which propagates through a dense QCD medium. A typical event is characterized by the production of a large number of soft gluons which propagate at large angles with respect to the jet axis and which collectively carry a substantial amount of energy. By explicitly computing 2-gluon correlations, we demonstrate the existence of large event-by-event fluctuations, which reflect the stochastic nature of the branching process. For the two quantities that we have investigated — the energy loss at large angles and the soft gluon multiplicity —, the dispersion is parametrically as large as the respective expectation value. We identify interesting scaling laws, which suggest that the multiplicity distribution should exhibit KNO (Koba-Nielsen-Olesen) scaling. A similar scaling is known to hold for a jet branching in the vacuum, but the medium-induced distribution is found to be considerably broader. We predict that event-by-event measurements of the di-jet asymmetry in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC should observe large fluctuations in the number of soft hadrons propagating at large angles and also in the total energy carried by these hadrons.

  3. Force-Driven Polymerization and Turgor-Induced Wall Expansion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Olivier; Traas, Jan

    2016-05-01

    While many molecular players involved in growth control have been identified in the past decades, it is often unknown how they mechanistically act to induce specific shape changes during development. Plant morphogenesis results from the turgor-induced yielding of the extracellular and load-bearing cell wall. Its mechanochemical equilibrium appears as a fundamental link between molecular growth regulation and the effective shape evolution of the tissue. We focus here on force-driven polymerization of the cell wall as a central process in growth control. We propose that mechanical forces facilitate the insertion of wall components, in particular pectins, a process that can be modulated through genetic regulation. We formalize this idea in a mathematical model, which we subsequently test with published experimental results. PMID:26895732

  4. Effects of mixing-induced irradiance fluctuations on nitrogen uptake in size-fractionated coastal phytoplankton communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguer, Jean-François; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Waeles, Matthieu

    2015-03-01

    In coastal waters subjected to strong tidal forcing, phytoplankton populations are exposed to highly variable light regimes. To grow under such fluctuating light environments, phytoplankton adjust their physiological properties. Here, we investigated nitrogen (N) uptake patterns in the western English Channel to determine whether phytoplankton modify their physiological processes involved in N uptake in response to changing irradiance conditions induced by spring-neap tidal cycles. Nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) uptake kinetics as a function of irradiance (VN-E curves) were assessed using 15N tracer techniques on two size fractions (<10 and >10 μm) of phytoplankton collected at 50% and 1% of surface irradiance during two spring-neap tidal cycles. Overall, the results showed that both small and large phytoplankton, whatever their vertical position in the water column, increased their maximum uptake capacity and their light utilization efficiency for the two N substrates following the decrease in vertical mixing intensity. Moreover, the improvement of irradiance conditions at neap tides was of greater benefit for the larger cells than for the smaller ones and was more favorable for NO3- uptake than for NH4+ uptake. These findings show that the light regime fluctuation resulting from the relaxation of tidal mixing during spring-neap tidal cycle leads to profound physiological adjustments of N uptake processes in phytoplankton communities. They suggest that the changes in NO3- uptake by large phytoplankton associated with the fortnightly spring-neap tidal cycle can account for most of the deviation in background productivity in the western English Channel which is based on NH4+ and is dominated by small cells. The dynamic light regime inherent to macrotidal coastal ecosystems could therefore determine, to a large extent, the importance of new vs. regenerated production as well as the size structure of the phytoplankton community.

  5. Local force induced conical protrusions of phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Vonna, Laurent; Wiedemann, Agnès; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Sackmann, Erich

    2003-03-01

    Magnetic tweezers were used to study the passive and active response of macrophages to local centripetal nanonewton forces on beta1 integrins. Superparamagnetic beads coated with the beta1-integrin-binding protein invasin were attached to J774 murine macrophages to mimic phagocytosis of bacterial pathogens. Forces exceeding approximately 0.5 nN induce the active formation of trumpet-like protrusions resembling pseudopodia after an initial elastic deflection and a response time of approximately 30 seconds. The speed of advancement of the protrusion is =0.065+/-0.020 micro m second(-1) and is force independent. After saturation (after about 100 seconds) the protrusion stops abruptly and is completely retracted again against forces exceeding 5 nN with an effective relaxation time of approximately 30 seconds. The active protrusion is tentatively attributed to the growth of the actin cortex in the direction of the force, and evidence for the involvement of actin is provided by the finding that Latrunculin A abolishes the activated cone growth. The growth is assumed to be activated by cell signaling mediated by the invasin-specific integrins (exhibiting beta1 chains) and could play a role in phagocytic and protrusive events during immune response by macrophages. PMID:12571276

  6. First observation for a cuprate superconductor of fluctuation-induced diamagnetism well inside the finite-magnetic-field regime

    PubMed

    Carballeira; Mosqueira; Revcolevschi; Vidal

    2000-04-01

    For the first time for a cuprate superconductor, measurements performed above T(c) in high quality grain aligned La1.9Sr0.1CuO4 samples have allowed the observation of the thermal fluctuation induced diamagnetism well inside the finite-magnetic-field fluctuation regime. These results may be explained in terms of the Gaussian Ginzburg-Landau approach for layered superconductors, but only if the finite field contributions are estimated by taking off the short-wavelength fluctuations. PMID:11019036

  7. Market forces and technological substitutes cause fluctuations in the value of bat pest-control services for cotton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    López-Hoffman, Laura; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Sansone, Chris; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Goldstein, Joshua; LaSharr, Kelsie; Loomis, John; McCracken, Gary; Medellin, Rodrigo A.; Russell, Amy; Semmens, Darius J.

    2014-01-01

    Critics of the market-based, ecosystem services approach to biodiversity conservation worry that volatile market conditions and technological substitutes will diminish the value of ecosystem services and obviate the “economic benefits” arguments for conservation. To explore the effects of market forces and substitutes on service values, we assessed how the value of the pest-control services provided by Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) to cotton production in the southwestern U.S. has changed over time. We calculated service values each year from 1990 through 2008 by estimating the value of avoided crop damage and the reduced social and private costs of insecticide use in the presence of bats. Over this period, the ecosystem service value declined by 79% ($19.09 million U.S. dollars) due to the introduction and widespread adoption of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) cotton transgenically modified to express its own pesticide, falling global cotton prices and the reduction in the number of hectares in the U.S. planted with cotton. Our results demonstrate that fluctuations in market conditions can cause temporal variation in ecosystem service values even when ecosystem function – in this case bat population numbers – is held constant. Evidence is accumulating, however, of the evolution of pest resistance to Bt cotton, suggesting that the value of bat pest-control services may increase again. This gives rise to an economic option value argument for conserving Mexican free-tailed bat populations. We anticipate that these results will spur discussion about the role of ecosystem services in biodiversity conservation in general, and bat conservation in particular.

  8. Market Forces and Technological Substitutes Cause Fluctuations in the Value of Bat Pest-Control Services for Cotton

    PubMed Central

    López-Hoffman, Laura; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Sansone, Chris; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Cryan, Paul; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Goldstein, Joshua; LaSharr, Kelsie; Loomis, John; McCracken, Gary; Medellín, Rodrigo A.; Russell, Amy; Semmens, Darius

    2014-01-01

    Critics of the market-based, ecosystem services approach to biodiversity conservation worry that volatile market conditions and technological substitutes will diminish the value of ecosystem services and obviate the “economic benefits” arguments for conservation. To explore the effects of market forces and substitutes on service values, we assessed how the value of the pest-control services provided by Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) to cotton production in the southwestern U.S. has changed over time. We calculated service values each year from 1990 through 2008 by estimating the value of avoided crop damage and the reduced social and private costs of insecticide use in the presence of bats. Over this period, the ecosystem service value declined by 79% ($19.09 million U.S. dollars) due to the introduction and widespread adoption of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) cotton transgenically modified to express its own pesticide, falling global cotton prices and the reduction in the number of hectares in the U.S. planted with cotton. Our results demonstrate that fluctuations in market conditions can cause temporal variation in ecosystem service values even when ecosystem function – in this case bat population numbers – is held constant. Evidence is accumulating, however, of the evolution of pest resistance to Bt cotton, suggesting that the value of bat pest-control services may increase again. This gives rise to an economic option value argument for conserving Mexican free-tailed bat populations. We anticipate that these results will spur discussion about the role of ecosystem services in biodiversity conservation in general, and bat conservation in particular. PMID:24498400

  9. Fluctuations and the Rate-Limiting Step of Peptide-Induced Membrane Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, C.; Orioni, B.; Coletta, M.; Formaggio, F.; Toniolo, C.; Maulucci, G.; De Spirito, M.; Pispisa, B.; Venanzi, M.; Stella, L.

    2010-01-01

    Peptide-induced vesicle leakage is a common experimental test for the membrane-perturbing activity of antimicrobial peptides. The leakage kinetics is usually very slow, requiring minutes to hours for complete release of vesicle contents, and exhibits a biphasic behavior. We report here that, in the case of the peptaibol trichogin GA IV, all processes involved in peptide-membrane interaction, such as peptide-membrane association, peptide aggregation, and peptide translocation, take place on a timescale much shorter than the leakage kinetics. On the basis of these findings, we propose a stochastic model in which the leakage kinetics is determined by the discrete nature of a vesicle suspension: peptides are continuously exchanging among vesicles, producing significant fluctuations over time in the number of peptide molecules bound to each vesicle, and in the formation of pores. According to this model, the fast initial leakage is caused by vesicles that contain at least one pore after the peptides are randomly distributed among the liposomes, whereas the slower release is associated with the time needed to occasionally reach in an intact vesicle the critical number of bound peptides necessary for pore formation. Fluctuations due to peptide exchange among vesicles therefore represent the rate-limiting step of such a slow mechanism. PMID:20858423

  10. Investigation of the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets induced by random surface fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L.; Bourasseau, E.; Filippini, G.

    2016-07-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets of tin induced by random surface fluctuations. The static regime is analyzed by simulating sheets of different thicknesses, and the dynamic fragmentation is ensured by applying along the longitudinal direction of a sheet an instantaneous expansion velocity per initial unit length (expansion rate) with values ranging from 1 × 109 to 3 × 1010 s-1. The simulations show that the static/dynamic fragmentation becomes possible when the fluctuations of the upper and lower surfaces of the sheets can either overlap or make the local volume density of the system go down below a critical value. These two mechanisms cause locally in the sheet the random nucleation of pores of void, on a timescale that exponentially increases with the sheet thickness. Afterwards, the pores develop following distinct stages of growth, coalescence, and percolation, and later in time aggregates of liquid metal are formed. The simulations also show that the fragmentation of static sheets is characterized by relatively mono-dispersed surface and volume distributions of the pores and aggregates, respectively, whereas in extreme conditions of dynamic fragmentation (expansion rate typically in the range of 1 × 1010 s-1), the distributions are rather poly-dispersed and obey a power law decay with surface (volume). A model derived from the simulations suggests that both dynamic and static regimes of fragmentation are similar for expansion rates below typically 1 × 107 s-1.

  11. Tidal-Force-Induced Precessions of Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hajime

    2012-04-01

    The preccession of an accretion disk around a compact star in a close binary has been studied. When the accretion disk tilts, the tidal force from the companion star induces a torque on it, which causes a preccession of the disk. We firstly consider the properties of a preccessing motion of a ring, which is circularly rotating around a compact star, and is preccessing with a slightly tilting angle under the influence of a tidal force from a companion star. We next compare the predicted behaviors of the preccessing ring with observations, and find that several observational facts from Her X-1, SS 433, and some other X-ray binaries can be explained by a tidal-force-induced precession scheme quite reasonably. We further examine the energetics of the preccessing ring as a function of the tilting angle. It is shown that the kinetic and potential energies of the orbiting motions of the ring matter around the compact star increases as the tilting angle increases, while the thermal and effective potential energies for hydro-static balance in the meridian cross section of the ring decreases through adiabatic expansion. Quantitative estimations have shown that when the ring has sufficient thermal energy, the decrease of the energy for the hydro-static balance can be larger than the increase of the energy for circular motion around the compact star until the tilting angle reaches a certain value. It is strongly suggested that preccessions of accretion disks are often realized in close binaries.

  12. Glassiness and exotic entropy scaling induced by quantum fluctuations in a disorder-free frustrated magnet

    PubMed Central

    Klich, I.; Lee, S.-H.; Iida, K.

    2014-01-01

    When spins are arranged in a lattice of triangular motif, the phenomenon of frustration leads to numerous energetically equivalent ground states, and results in exotic states such as spin liquid and spin ice. Here we report an alternative situation: a system, classically a liquid, freezes in the clean limit into a glassy state induced by quantum fluctuations. We call such glassy state a spin jam. The case in point is a frustrated magnet, where spins are arranged in a triangular network of bipyramids. Quantum corrections break the classical degeneracy into a set of aperiodic spin configurations forming local minima in a rugged energy landscape. This is established by mapping the problem into tiling with hexagonal tiles. The number of tessellations scales with the boundary length rather than its volume, showing the absence of local zero-energy modes. Low-temperature thermodynamics is discussed to compare it with other glassy materials. PMID:24686398

  13. Observation of fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction in micrometer-sized tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu-Ren; Yu, Kai-Fu; Lin, Yong-Han; Wu, Jong-Ching; Lin, Juhn-Jong

    2012-09-01

    Micrometer-sized Al/AlOx/Y tunnel junctions were fabricated by the electron-beam lithography technique. The thin (≈ 1.5-2 nm thickness) insulating AlOx layer was grown on top of the Al base electrode by O2 glow discharge. The zero-bias conductances G(T) and the current-voltage characteristics of the junctions were measured in a wide temperature range 1.5-300 K. In addition to the direct tunneling conduction mechanism observed in low-G junctions, high-G junctions reveal a distinct charge transport process which manifests the thermally fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction (FITC) through short nanoconstrictions. We ascribe the experimental realization of the FITC mechanism to originating from the formations of "hot spots" (incomplete pinholes) in the AlOx layer owing to large junction-barrier interfacial roughness.

  14. Centrifugal Force Induced Collapse of Strange Stars Into Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Nucita, A. A.; Qadir, Asghar

    It has been suggested that there could be objects even more compact than neutron stars, like the so-called strange stars, P-stars, and magnetars. Strange stars are collapsed stars consisting of u, d, and s quarks. P-stars are a new class of compact stars made of u and d quarks in β-equilibrium with electrons in an Abelian chromomagnetic condensate. It has also been shown that a particle in a circular orbit around a stationary black hole is subject to a centrifugal force that turns out to be directed inwards if the particle orbit radius is between the Schwarzschild radius rs and 3rs/2. Here it is proposed that rotation of a sufficiently compact collapsed object may lead to a centrifugal force induced collapse to a black hole that could emit short gamma-ray bursts.

  15. Deformation field of the soft substrate induced by capillary force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. L.; Nie, Z. X.; Jiang, W. G.

    2009-05-01

    Prediction on the deformation of a soft substrate induced by capillary force has been widely paid attention in the broad range of applications, such as metallurgy, material science, astronavigation, micro/nano-technology, etc., which is also a supplementary result to the classical Young's equation. We quantitatively analyzed the deformation of an elastic substrate under capillary force by means of the energy principle and the continuum mechanics method. The actual drop's morphology was investigated and was compared with that calculated based on the classical spherical shape assumption of the droplet. The displacement field of the substrate was obtained, especially, its singularity at the droplet edge was also discussed. The results are beneficial to engineering application and micro/nano-measurement.

  16. Tissue deformation induced by radiation force from Gaussian transducers.

    PubMed

    Myers, Matthew R

    2006-05-01

    Imaging techniques based upon the tissue mechanical response to an acoustic radiation force are being actively researched. In this paper a model for predicting steady-state tissue displacement induced by a radiation force arising from the absorption of Gaussian ultrasound beams is presented. A simple analytic expression is derived that agrees closely with the numerical quadrature of the displacement convolution integrals. The analytic result reveals the dependence of the steady-state axial displacement upon the operational parameters, e.g., an inverse proportional relationship to the tissue shear modulus. The derivation requires that the transducer radius be small compared to the focal length, but accurate results were obtained for transducer radii comparable to the focal length. Favorable comparisons with displacement predictions for non-Gaussian transducers indicate that the theory is also useful for a broader range of transducer intensity profiles. PMID:16708969

  17. Experimental investigation of impulsive magnetic reconnection induced by large amplitude electromagnetic fluctuations in the presence of a guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Akihiro; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yanai, Ryoma; Ono, Yasushi

    2015-11-01

    Impulsive enhancement of magnetic reconnection is one of the potential candidates to invoke various explosive events observed in nature and laboratory plasmas. In TS-3 laboratory experiment with a guide field of Bguide /Brec = 1-2.5, impulsive growth of the reconnection electric field was observed just behind the onset of large-amplitude electromagnetic fluctuations (f = 1.5-2 fci and the amplitude was 0.1Brec). It was found that both the fluctuation amplitude and the enhanced reconnection electric field during the fluctuation period showed positive correlation with the guide field. The normalized reconnection rate of about 0.03 before the onset of fluctuations was reasonably comparable with the classical reconnection rate of Sweet-Parker model. However, the reconnection rate rose up to 0.11 after the fluctuations onset, suggesting that the transition from slow steady reconnection to fast impulsive reconnection took place. Since the fluctuation amplitude was so large that the nonlinear terms of the induced electric field was not negligible. The electric field enhancement due to the nonlinear contribution from the observed fluctuation was 650 V/m, which showed good agreement with the experimentally observed electric field increment of about 800 V/m.

  18. Moist Greenhouse states with solar and CO2-induced forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Max; Schmidt, Hauke; Marotzke, Jochem

    2016-04-01

    Water-rich planets such as Earth are expected to become eventually uninhabitable, because liquid water does not remain stable at the surface as surface temperatures increase with the solar luminosity over time. It is conceivable that a large increase in atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations could also destroy the habitability of water-rich planets, but previous studies could not clearly establish this. Here we use for the first time a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model, namely a modified version of ECHAM6, to compare the potential of both solar and CO2-induced forcing to render a water-rich planet uninhabitable. We find that CO2-induced forcing as readily destabilizes a present-day Earth-like climate as does solar forcing. This climate instability is caused by a positive cloud feedback, which is in turn caused by the weakening large-scale circulation with increasing surface temperature. The climate does not run away, but instead attains a new steady state with global-mean sea-surface temperatures above 330 K. The upper atmosphere is considerably moister in this warm steady state than in the reference climate. The upper-atmospheric mixing ratio of water exceeds the so-called Moist-Greenhouse limit, which implies that the planet would be subject to substantial loss of water to space. For either a certain range of elevated CO2 concentrations or solar irradiation, we find both cold and warm equilibrium states. Therefore the transition to the warm state may not simply be reversed by removing the additional forcing.

  19. Noise-induced organized slow fluctuations in networks of neural areas with interarea feed-forward excitation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongmyeong; Kim, Seunghwan; Ko, Tae-Wook

    2014-06-01

    Slow coherent spontaneous fluctuations (<0.1 Hz) in functional magnetic resonance imaging blood-oxygen-level-dependent signals have been observed for a resting state of the human brain. In this paper, considering feed-forward inhibition in addition to excitation between brain areas, which we assume to be in up (active) or down (quiescent) states, we propose a model for the generation and organization of the slow fluctuations. Connectivity with feed-forward excitation and inhibition between the areas makes the system have multiple stable states and organized slow fluctuations manifest as noise-induced slow transitions between the states. With various connectivities, we observe slow fluctuations and various organizations, including anticorrelated clusters, through numerical simulations. PMID:25019817

  20. Quantum Mechanical Enhancement of the Random Dopant Induced Threshold Voltage Fluctuations and Lowering in Sub 0.1 Micron MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Slavcheva, G.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.; Saini, Subhash

    1999-01-01

    A detailed study of the influence of quantum effects in the inversion layer on the random dopant induced threshold voltage fluctuations and lowering in sub 0.1 micron MOSFETs has been performed. This has been achieved using a full 3D implementation of the density gradient (DG) formalism incorporated in our previously published 3D 'atomistic' simulation approach. This results in a consistent, fully 3D, quantum mechanical picture which implies not only the vertical inversion layer quantisation but also the lateral confinement effects manifested by current filamentation in the 'valleys' of the random potential fluctuations. We have shown that the net result of including quantum mechanical effects, while considering statistical fluctuations, is an increase in both threshold voltage fluctuations and lowering.

  1. Liquid metal folding patterns induced by electric capillary force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental phenomenon regarding spontaneous formation of symmetrical folding patterns induced on liquid metal free surface with circular shape features was disclosed. The occurrence and evolution processes of the patterns were demonstrated and interpreted. The electric capillary force imposed on liquid metal due to surface tension gradient was found responsible for producing a variety of surface folding patterns like wheel-shape, dual concentric ring-shape, and so on. All the patterns display a property of axial symmetry and could be analogue to the Rayleigh-Benard convection which produces hexagonal patterns. This finding on liquid metal flow folding refreshes knowledge of classical fluid kinematics.

  2. Current-induced forces and hot spots in biased nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jing-Tao; Christensen, Rasmus B; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Hedegård, Per; Brandbyge, Mads

    2015-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the interplay of current-induced forces (CIFs), Joule heating, and heat transport inside a current-carrying nanoconductor. We find that the CIFs, due to the electron-phonon coherence, can control the spatial heat dissipation in the conductor. This yields a significant asymmetric concentration of excess heating (hot spot) even for a symmetric conductor. When coupled to the electrode phonons, CIFs drive different phonon heat flux into the two electrodes. First-principles calculations on realistic biased nanojunctions illustrate the importance of the effect. PMID:25793838

  3. Anomalies of the Asian Monsoon Induced by Aerosol Forcings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.

    2004-01-01

    Impacts of aerosols on the Asian summer monsoon are studied using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM), with radiative forcing derived from three-dimensional distributions of five aerosol species i.e., black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport Model (GOCART). Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in & early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also I i enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol-induced large-scale surface' temperature cooling leads to a reduction of monsoon rainfall over the East Asia continent, and adjacent oceanic regions.

  4. Theory of spin-fluctuation induced superconductivity in iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Junhua

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation we focus on the investigation of the pairing mechanism in the recently discovered high-temperature superconductor, iron pnictides. Due to the proximity to magnetic instability of the system, we considered short-range spin fluctuations as the major mediating source to induce superconductivity. Our calculation supports the magnetic fluctuations as a strong candidate that drives Cooper-pair formation in this material. We find the corresponding order parameter to be of the so-called ss-wave type and show its evolution with temperature as well as the capability of supporting high transition temperature up to several tens of Kelvin. On the other hand, our itinerant model calculation shows pronounced spin correlation at the observed antiferromagnetic ordering wave vector, indicating the underlying electronic structure in favor of antiferromagnetic state. Therefore, the electronic degrees of freedom could participate both in the magnetic and in the superconducting properties. Our work shows that the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity plays an important role to the understanding of the rich physics in this material. The magnetic-excitation spectrum carries important information on the nature of magnetism and the characteristics of superconductivity. We analyze the spin excitation spectrum in the normal and superconducting states of iron pnictides in the magnetic scenario. As a consequence of the sign-reversed gap structure obtained in the above, a spin resonance mode appears below the superconducting transition temperature. The calculated resonance energy, scaled with the gap magnitude and the magnetic correlation length, agrees well with the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. More interestingly, we find a common feature of those short-range spin fluctuations that are capable of inducing a fully gapped ss state is the momentum anisotropy with elongated span along the direction transverse to the antiferromagnetic momentum

  5. Earthquake-induced water-level fluctuations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, G.M.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents earthquake-induced water-level and fluid-pressure data for wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during June 1992. Three earthquakes occurred which caused significant water-level and fluid-pressure responses in wells. Wells USW H-5 and USW H-6 are continuously monitored to detect short-term responses caused by earthquakes. Two wells, monitored hourly, had significant, longer-term responses in water level following the earthquakes. On June 28, 1992, a 7.5-magnitude earthquake occurred near Landers, California causing an estimated maximum water-level change of 90 centimeters in well USW H-5. Three hours later a 6.6-magnitude earthquake occurred near Big Bear Lake, California; the maximum water-level fluctuation was 20 centimeters in well USW H-5. A 5.6-magnitude earthquake occurred at Little Skull Mountain, Nevada, on June 29, approximately 23 kilometers from Yucca Mountain. The maximum estimated short-term water-level fluctuation from the Little Skull Mountain earthquake was 40 centimeters in well USW H-5. The water level in well UE-25p {number_sign}1, monitored hourly, decreased approximately 50 centimeters over 3 days following the Little Skull Mountain earthquake. The water level in UE-25p {number_sign}1 returned to pre-earthquake levels in approximately 6 months. The water level in the lower interval of well USW H-3 increased 28 centimeters following the Little Skull Mountain earthquake. The Landers and Little Skull Mountain earthquakes caused responses in 17 intervals of 14 hourly monitored wells, however, most responses were small and of short duration. For several days following the major earthquakes, many smaller magnitude aftershocks occurred causing measurable responses in the continuously monitored wells.

  6. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in tokamaks and RFP

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Hartog, D.D.; Cekic, M.; Prager, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    It has long been recognized that fluctuations in the magnetic field are a potent mechanism for the anomalous transport of energy in confined plasmas. The energy transport process originates from particle motion along magnetic fields, which have a fluctuating component in the radial direction (perpendicular to the confining equilibrium magnetic surfaces). A key feature is that the transport can be large even if the fluctuation amplitude is small. If the fluctuations are resonant with the equilibrium magnetic field (i.e., the fluctuation amplitude is constant along an equilibrium field line) then a small fluctuation can introduce stochasticity to the field line trajectories. Particles following the chaotically wandering field lines can rapidly carry energy across the plasma.

  7. Experimental investigation of lateral forces induced by flow through model labyrinth glands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, Y. M. M. S.; Brown, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The lateral forces induced by flow through model labyrinth glands were investigated. Circumferential pressure distributions, lateral forces and stiffness coefficients data obtained are discussed. The force system is represented as a negative spring and a tangential force orthogonal to eccentricity. The magnitude of these forces are dependent on eccentricity, entry swirl, rotor peripheral velocity and seal size. A pressure equalization chamber at midgland tests should in significantly reduced forces and stiffness coefficients.

  8. Derivation of Aero-Induced Fluctuating Pressure Environments for Ares I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Michael Y.; Wilby, John F.

    2008-01-01

    A description is given of the external aero-inducted fluctuating pressure model which was fit and anchored to wind tunnel data from the past 40 years. This model is based upon the assumption that the flow around a vehicle can be divided into discrete flow zones with independent fluctuating pressure properties. The model is then used to derive fluctuating pressure environments during ascent for the Ares I-X test vehicle. A sensitivity study of the structural response to the spatial correlation of the fluctuating pressures is also performed.

  9. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhovich, E. A.; Hopkinson, M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2015-02-01

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear-nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2-4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging.

  10. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Hopkinson, M; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2015-01-01

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear-nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2-4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging. PMID:25704639

  11. Suppression of nuclear spin bath fluctuations in self-assembled quantum dots induced by inhomogeneous strain

    PubMed Central

    Chekhovich, E.A.; Hopkinson, M.; Skolnick, M.S.; Tartakovskii, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction with nuclear spins leads to decoherence and information loss in solid-state electron-spin qubits. One particular, ineradicable source of electron decoherence arises from decoherence of the nuclear spin bath, driven by nuclear–nuclear dipolar interactions. Owing to its many-body nature nuclear decoherence is difficult to predict, especially for an important class of strained nanostructures where nuclear quadrupolar effects have a significant but largely unknown impact. Here, we report direct measurement of nuclear spin bath coherence in individual self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots: spin-echo coherence times in the range 1.2–4.5 ms are found. Based on these values, we demonstrate that strain-induced quadrupolar interactions make nuclear spin fluctuations much slower compared with lattice-matched GaAs/AlGaAs structures. Our findings demonstrate that quadrupolar effects can potentially be used to engineer optically active III-V semiconductor spin-qubits with a nearly noise-free nuclear spin bath, previously achievable only in nuclear spin-0 semiconductors, where qubit network interconnection and scaling are challenging. PMID:25704639

  12. Spatiotemporal patterns of water table fluctuations and evapotranspiration induced by riparian vegetation in a semiarid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weifeng; Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Chen, Xunhong

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater evapotranspiration (ETg) links various ecohydrological processes and is an important component in regional water budgets. In this study, an extensive monitoring network was established in a semiarid riparian area to investigate various controls on the spatiotemporal pattern of water table fluctuations (WTFs) and ETg induced by riparian vegetation. Along a vegetation gradient (˜1200 m), diurnal WTFs were observed during a growing season in areas covered by woody species (Populus sect. Aigeiros and Juniperus virginiana) and wet slough vegetation (Panicum virgatum and Bromus inermis) with deeper root systems; whereas, no diurnal WTFs were found in the middle section with shallower-rooted grasses (Poa pratensis and Carex sp.). The occurrence of diurnal WTFs was related to temperature-controlled plant phenology at seasonal scales and to radiation at subdaily scales. Daily ETg in the mid-growing season was calculated using the White method. The results revealed that depth to water table (DTWT) was the dominant control on ETg, followed by potential evapotranspiration (ETp). By combining the effects of DTWT and ETp, it was found that at shallower depths, ETg was more responsive to changes in ETp, due to the closer linkage of land surface processes with shallower groundwater. Finally, exponential relationships between ETg/ETp and DTWT were obtained at the study site, although those relationships varied considerably across the sites. This study demonstrates the complex interactions of WTFs and ETg with surrounding environmental variables and provides further insight into modeling ETg over different time scales and riparian vegetation.

  13. Fluctuations of visual awareness: Combining motion-induced blindness with binocular rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Lages, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Binocular rivalry (BR) and motion-induced blindness (MIB) are two phenomena of visual awareness where perception alternates between multiple states despite constant retinal input. Both phenomena have been extensively studied, but the underlying processing remains unclear. It has been suggested that BR and MIB involve the same neural mechanism, but how the two phenomena compete for visual awareness in the same stimulus has not been systematically investigated. Here we introduce BR in a dichoptic stimulus display that can also elicit MIB and examine fluctuations of visual awareness over the course of each trial. Exploiting this paradigm we manipulated stimulus characteristics that are known to influence MIB and BR. In two experiments we found that effects on multistable percepts were incompatible with the idea of a common oscillator. The results suggest instead that local and global stimulus attributes can affect the dynamics of each percept differently. We conclude that the two phenomena of visual awareness share basic temporal characteristics but are most likely influenced by processing at different stages within the visual system. PMID:25240063

  14. Can Real Forces Be Induced by Interference of Quantum Wavefunctions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminer, Ido; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Rechtsman, Mikael; Bekenstein, Rivka; Segev, Mordechai

    2013-04-01

    In 1958, a revolutionary paper by Aharonov and Bohm predicted a phase difference between two parts of an electron wavefunction even when being confined to a regime with no EM field. The Aharonov-Bohm effect was groundbreaking: proving that the EM vector potential is a real physical quantity, affecting the outcome of experiments not only through the EM fields extracted from it. But is the EM potential a real necessity for an Aharonov-Bohm-type effect? Can it exist in a potential-free system such as free-space? Here, we find self-accelerating wavepackets that are solutions of the free Dirac equation, for massive/massless fermions/bosons. These accelerating Dirac particles mimic the dynamics of a free-charge moving under a ``virtual'' EM field, even though no field is acting and there is no charge: the entire dynamics is a direct result of the initial conditions. We show that such particles display an effective Aharonov-Bohm effect caused by exactly the same ``virtual'' potential that also ``causes'' the acceleration. Altogether, along the trajectory, there is no way to distinguish between a real force and the self-induced force - it is real by all measurable quantities. This proves that one can create all effects induced by EM fields by only controlling the initial conditions of a wave pattern, while the dynamics is in free-space. These phenomena can be observed in various settings: e.g., optical waves in honeycomb photonic lattices or in hyperbolic metamaterials, and matter waves in honeycomb interference structures.

  15. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  16. A field investigation of phreatophyte-induced fluctuations in the water table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J., Jr.; Kluitenberg, G.J.; Whittemore, D.O.; Loheide, S.P., II; Jin, W.; Billinger, M.A.; Zhan, X.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrographs from shallow wells in vegetated riparian zones frequently display a distinctive pattern of diurnal water table fluctuations produced by variations in plant water use. A multisite investigation assessed the major controls on these fluctuations and the ecohydrologic insights that can be gleaned from them. Spatial and temporal variations in the amplitude of the fluctuations are primarily a function of variations in (1) the meteorological drivers of plant water use, (2) vegetation density, type, and vitality, and (3) the specific yield of sediments in the vicinity of the water table. Past hydrologic conditions experienced by the riparian zone vegetation, either in previous years or earlier within the same growing season, are also an important control. Diurnal water table fluctuations can be considered a diagnostic indicator of groundwater consumption by phreatophytes at most sites, so the information embedded within these fluctuations should be more widely exploited in ecohydrologic studies. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  18. Fluctuation-induced heat release from temperature-quenched nuclear spins near a quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Kaur, N; Atkins, B M; Dalal, N S; Takano, Y

    2009-12-11

    At a quantum critical point (QCP)--a zero-temperature singularity in which a line of continuous phase transition terminates--quantum fluctuations diverge in space and time, leading to exotic phenomena that can be observed at nonzero temperatures. Using a quantum antiferromagnet, we present calorimetric evidence that nuclear spins frozen in a high-temperature nonequilibrium state by temperature quenching are annealed by quantum fluctuations near the QCP. This phenomenon, with readily detectable heat release from the nuclear spins as they are annealed, serves as an excellent marker of a quantum critical region around the QCP and provides a probe of the dynamics of the divergent quantum fluctuations. PMID:20366226

  19. Effects of eddy viscosity and thermal conduction and Coriolis force in the dynamics of gravity wave driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical-dynamical model of Walterscheid et al. (1987), which describes wave-driven fluctuations in OH nightglow, was modified to include the effects of both eddy thermal conduction and viscosity, as well as the Coriolis force (with the shallow atmosphere approximation). Using the new model, calculations were performed for the same nominal case as used by Walterscheid et al. but with only wave periods considered. For this case, the Coriolis force was found to be unimportant at any wave period. For wave periods greater than 2 or 3 hours, the inclusion of thermal conduction alone greatly modified the results (in terms of a complex ratio 'eta' which expresses the relationship between the intensity oscillation about the time-averaged intensity and the temperature oscillation about the time-averaged temperature); this effect was reduced with the further inclusion of the eddy viscosity.

  20. Heterogeneity in (2-butoxyethanol + water) mixtures: Hydrophobicity-induced aggregation or criticality-driven concentration fluctuations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indra, Sandipa; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-05-01

    Micro-heterogeneity in aqueous solutions of 2-butoxyethanol (BE), a system with closed loop miscibility gap, has been explored via absorption and time-resolved fluorescence measurements of a dissolved dipolar solute, coumarin 153 (C153), in the water-rich region at various BE mole fractions (0 ≤ XBE ≤ 0.25) in the temperature range, 278 ≤ T/K ≤ 320. Evidences for both alcohol-induced H-bond strengthening and subsequent structural transition of H-bond network have been observed. Analyses of steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic data for these aqueous mixtures and comparisons with the results for aqueous solutions of ethanol and tertiary butanol indicate that alcohol aggregation in BE/water mixtures is driven by hydrophobic interaction with no or insignificant role for criticality-driven concentration fluctuations preceding phase separation. Excitation energy dependence of fluorescence emission of C153 confirms formation of aggregated structures at very low BE mole fractions. No asymptotic critical power law dependence for relaxation rates of the type, k ∝ (|T - Tc|/Tc)γ, with γ denoting universal critical constant, has been observed for both solute's rotational relaxation and population relaxation rates in these mixtures upon either approaching to critical concentration or critical temperature. Estimated activation energies for rotational relaxation rate of C153 and solution viscosity have been found to follow each other with no abrupt changes in either of them at any mixture composition. In addition, measured C153 rotation times at various compositions and temperatures reflect near-hydrodynamic viscosity coupling through the dependence, <τr> ∝ (η/T)p, with p = 0.8-1.0, suggesting solute's orientational relaxation dynamics being, on an average, temporally homogeneous.

  1. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique was developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  2. Nanomechanical sensing of gravitational wave-induced Casimir force perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    It is shown by means of the optical medium analogy that the static Casimir force between two conducting plates is modulated by gravitational waves. The magnitude of the resulting force changes within the range of already existing small force metrology. It is suggested to enhance the effects on a Casimir force oscillator by mechanical parametric amplification driven by periodic illumination of interacting semiconducting boundaries. This represents a novel opportunity for the ground-based laboratory detection of gravitational waves on the nanoscale.

  3. Brevity of haptic force perturbations induces heightened adaptive sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wanda, Paul A.; Fine, Michael S.; Weeks, Heidi M.; Gross, Andrew M.; Macy, Jenny L.; Thoroughman, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    We have exposed human participants to both full-movement and pulsatile viscous force perturbations to study the effect of force duration on the incremental transformation of sensation into adaptation. Traditional views of movement biomechanics could suggest that pulsatile forces would largely be attenuated as stiffness and viscosity act as a natural low-pass filter. Sensory transduction, however, tends to react to changes in stimuli and therefore could underlie heightened sensitivity to briefer, pulsatile forces. Here, participants adapted within perturbation duration conditions in a manner proportionate to sensed force and positional errors. Across perturbation conditions, we found participants had greater adaptive sensitivity when experiencing pulsatile forces rather than full-movement forces. In a follow-up experiment, we employed error-clamped, force channel trials to determine changes in predictive force generation. We found that while participants learned to closely compensate for the amplitude and breadth of full-movement forces, they exhibited a persistent mismatch in amplitude and breadth between adapted motor output and experienced pulsatile forces. This mismatch could generate higher salience of error signals that contribute to heightened sensitivity to pulsatile forces. PMID:23468159

  4. Revisit on dynamic radiation forces induced by pulsed Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Gang; Chai, Hai-Shui

    2011-07-18

    Motivated by the recent optical trapping experiments using ultra-short pulsed lasers [Opt. Express 18, 7554 (2010); Appl. Opt. 48, G33 (2009)], in this paper we have re-investigated the trapping effects of the pulsed radiation force (PRF), which is induced by a pulsed Gaussian beam acting on a Rayleigh dielectric sphere. Based on our previous model [Opt. Express 15, 10615 (2007)], we have considered the effects arisen from both the transverse and axial PRFs, which lead to the different behaviors of both velocities and displacements of a Rayleigh particle within a pulse duration. Our analysis shows that, for the small-sized Rayleigh particles, when the pulse has the large pulse duration, it might provide the three-dimensional optical trapping; and when the pulse has the short pulse duration, it only provides the two-dimensional optical trapping with the axial movement along the pulse propagation. When the particle is in the vacuum or in the situation with the very weak Brownian motion, the particle can always be trapped stably due to the particle's cumulative momentum transferred from the pulse, and only in this case the trapping effect is independent of pulse duration. Finally, we have predicted that for the large-sized Rayleigh particles, the pulse beam can only provide the two-dimensional optical trap (optical guiding). Our results provide the important information about the trapping mechanism of pulsed tweezers. PMID:21934801

  5. Ultrasonic Measurement of Microdisplacement Induced by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Izumi, Takuya; Komatsu, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative evaluation of human skin aging is achieved by measuring the viscoelasticity of the skin. In the present study, microdisplacement induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF) is quantitatively measured by high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS) and the result is confirmed by laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 1% cellulose particles was used as the biological phantom. A concave piezoelectric zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer with a diameter and focal length of 3 cm was used as an applicator to generate ARF. Microdisplacement at each depth of PVA was measured by the phased tracking method at 100 MHz of ultrasound with a repetition rate of 2000 Hz. When 80 tone-burst pulses were applied, the displacement measured by HFUS was 9 µm and the same result was obtained by LDV. As the displacement at each depth of PVA is measurable using ARF and the HFUS system, the system could be applied to measuring the viscoelasticity of the layered structure of the human skin.

  6. Wavelength dependence of eddy dissipation and Coriolis force in the dynamics of gravity wave driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of inclusion of Coriolis force and eddy dissipation in the gravity wave dynamics theory of Walterscheid et al. (1987). It was found that the values of the ratio 'eta' (where eta is a complex quantity describing the ralationship between the intensity oscillation about the time-averaged intensity, and the temperature oscillation about the time-averaged temperature) strongly depend on the wave period and the horizontal wavelength; thus, if comparisons are to be made between observations and theory, horizontal wavelengths will need to be measured in conjunction with the OH nightglow measurements. For the waves with horizontal wavelengths up to 1000 km, the eddy dissipation was found to dominate over the Coriolis force in the gravity wave dynamics and also in the associated values of eta. However, for waves with horizontal wavelengths of 10,000 km or more, the Coriolis force cannot be neglected; it has to be taken into account along with the eddy dissipation.

  7. Nonambipolar Magnetic-Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Plasma Flow in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Craig, D.; Deng, B. H.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Svidzinski, V.

    2007-08-03

    First direct measurements of nonambipolar magnetic fluctuation-induced charge transport in the interior of a high-temperature plasma are reported. Global resistive tearing modes drive the charge transport which is measured in the vicinity of the resonant surface for the dominant core resonant mode. Finite charge transport has two important consequences. First, it generates a potential well along with locally strong electric field and electric field shear at the resonant surface. Second, this electric field induces a spontaneous ExB driven zonal flow.

  8. Thermally relativistic flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kojiro; Kuroda, Hisayasu

    2009-12-15

    Thermally relativistic flows in the early Universe can be characterized by the emergence of flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime as well as induced by the gravitational force. In this paper, thermally relativistic flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime are discussed on the basis of the general relativistic Boltzmann equation. As an object of analysis, we consider the flow from the static state inside the Schwarzschild radius of a thermally relativistic stuffed black hole induced by such motion. Analytical results obtained using the collisionless, nongravitational general relativistic Boltzmann equation reveal that the initial cluster is induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion. Numerical results obtained using the nongravitational general relativistic Anderson-Witting model confirm the presence of an initial cluster inside the thermally relativistic stuffed black hole, which is induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion.

  9. Research of fluid-induced pressure fluctuation due to impeller-volute interaction in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. Z.; Yang, K.; Y Li, D.; Gong, R. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The fluid pressure fluctuation generated by unsteady flow is a very important factor to induce vibration of the centrifugal pump. The relative movement between impeller and volute generates an unsteady interaction which affects not only the overall pump performance, but is also responsible for pressure fluctuations. Pressure fluctuations interact with the volute casing or even with the circuit and give rise to dynamic effects over the mechanical parts, which are one of the most important sources of vibration and hydraulic noise. To investigate the flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump, the unsteady flow is simulated by CFD methods in this paper. Unsteady flow characteristic in the centrifugal pump is obtained considering the impeller-volute interaction in the whole flow field. Based on the unsteady flow simulation, amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pressure fluctuation in the centrifugal pump are obtained through setting up monitoring point at the impeller outlet. The research shows that the frequency component include the blade passing frequency as the main component, the multiplication of blade passing frequency, and the harmonic interference due to the unsteady flow.

  10. Decay of bound states in the continuum of Majorana fermions induced by vacuum fluctuations: Proposal of qubit technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, L. S.; Marques, Y.; Dessotti, F. A.; Machado, R. S.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a theoretical investigation of the interplay between vacuum fluctuations, Majorana quasiparticles (MQPs), and bound states in the continuum (BICs) by proposing a new venue for qubit storage. BICs emerge due to quantum interference processes as the Fano effect and, since such a mechanism is unbalanced, these states decay as regular into the continuum. Such fingerprints identify BICs in graphene as we have discussed in detail in Phys. Rev. B 92, 245107 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.245107 and Phys. Rev. B, 92, 045409 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.045409. Here, by considering two semi-infinite Kitaev chains within the topological phase, coupled to a quantum dot (QD) hybridized with leads, we show the emergence of a novel type of BICs, in which MQPs are trapped. As the MQPs of these chains far apart build a delocalized fermion and qubit, we identify that the decay of these BICs is not connected to Fano and it occurs when finite fluctuations are observed in the vacuum composed by electron pairs for this qubit. From the experimental point of view, we also show that vacuum fluctuations can be induced just by changing the chain-dot couplings from symmetric to asymmetric. Hence, we show how to perform the qubit storage within two delocalized BICs of MQPs and to access it when the vacuum fluctuates by means of a complete controllable way in quantum transport experiments.

  11. Polysilicon Gate Enhancement of the Random Dopant Induced Threshold Voltage Fluctuations in Sub-100 nm MOSFET's with Ultrathin Gate Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Saini, Subhash

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate various aspects of the polysilicon gate influence on the random dopant induced threshold voltage fluctuations in sub-100 nm MOSFET's with ultrathin gate oxides. The study is done by using an efficient statistical three-dimensional (3-D) "atomistic" simulation technique described else-where. MOSFET's with uniform channel doping and with low doped epitaxial channels have been investigated. The simulations reveal that even in devices with a single crystal gate the gate depletion and the random dopants in it are responsible for a substantial fraction of the threshold voltage fluctuations when the gate oxide is scaled-in the range of 1-2 nm. Simulation experiments have been used in order to separate the enhancement in the threshold voltage fluctuations due to an effective increase in the oxide thickness associated with the gate depletion from the direct influence of the random dopants in the gate depletion layer. The results of the experiments show that the both factors contribute to the enhancement of the threshold voltage fluctuations, but the effective increase in the oxide-thickness has a dominant effect in the investigated range of devices. Simulations illustrating the effect or the polysilicon grain boundaries on the threshold voltage variation are also presented.

  12. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  13. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in the Police Force

    PubMed Central

    Win, Kyaw N.; Balalla, Nayake B.P.; Lwin, Min Z.; Lai, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Background Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major preventable occupational health problem with 250 million people worldwide known to have disabling impairment of moderate to greater severity. The aims of the study are to estimate the prevalence of NIHL in the police force; and study its association with age, sex, duration of service (years), smoking and alcohol habits, use of hearing protective devices, as well as preexisting chronic diseases. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 543 police personnel who had undergone periodic medical examination over a 12-month period. The diagnostic criteria for NIHL were (1) history of occupational noise exposure, (2) bilateral hearing loss, (3) hearing loss of ≥ 25 dBA at 4,000 Hz in two consecutive audiograms, and (4) no significant medical history affecting hearing. Severity of NIHL was based on the World Health Organization grading. Results Males (74.8%) made up the majority of the police force. The mean age for police personnel was 35.55 ± 9.57 years, and the mean duration of service was 14.75 ± 9.39 years. Compliance with the usage of hearing protective devices was seen in 64.4%. The prevalence of NIHL in this study population was 34.2%, with a higher prevalence in males (37.7%) than in females (23.9%). The study also showed strong associations between NIHL and male sex (odds ratio, 1.9; P < 0.05), and hypertension (odds ratio, 3.3; P < 0.001). Overall, 93% were found to have mild NIHL, 3.5% had moderate NIHL, and 3.5% had severe NIHL. No police personnel were found to have profound hearing loss. Conclusion The prevalence of NIHL in this study is high compared to other similar studies among police personnel. This study shows that increasing age, male, presence of hypertension, diabetes, and longer duration of service are significant associated factors for NIHL. Preventative strategies include health surveillance, implementation of a hearing conservation program, and legislation. PMID

  14. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Database for Pressure Fluctuations Induced by High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of Mach 6 turbulent boundary layer with nominal freestream Mach number of 6 and Reynolds number of Re(sub T) approximately 460 are conducted at two wall temperatures (Tw/Tr = 0.25, 0.76) to investigate the generated pressure fluctuations and their dependence on wall temperature. Simulations indicate that the influence of wall temperature on pressure fluctuations is largely limited to the near-wall region, with the characteristics of wall-pressure fluctuations showing a strong temperature dependence. Wall temperature has little influence on the propagation speed of the freestream pressure signal. The freestream radiation intensity compares well between wall-temperature cases when normalized by the local wall shear; the propagation speed of the freestream pressure signal and the orientation of the radiation wave front show little dependence on the wall temperature.

  15. Horse chestnut extract induces contraction force generation in fibroblasts through activation of Rho/Rho kinase.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Tsutomu; Moriwaki, Shigeru; Hotta, Mitsuyuki; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori

    2006-06-01

    Contraction forces generated by non-muscle cells such as fibroblasts play important roles in determining cell morphology, vasoconstriction, and/or wound healing. However, few factors that induce cell contraction forces are known, such as lysophosphatidic acid and thrombin. Our study analyzed various plant extracts for ingredients that induce generation of cell contraction forces in fibroblasts populating collagen gels. We found that an extract of Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) is able to induce such contraction forces in fibroblasts. The involvement of actin polymerization and stress fiber formation in the force generation was suggested by inhibition of this effect by cytochalasin D and by Rhodamine phalloidin. Rho kinase inhibitors (Y27632 and HA1077) and a Rho inhibitor (exoenzyme C3) significantly inhibited the force generation induced by the Horse chestnut extract. H7, which inhibits Rho kinase as well as other protein kinases, also significantly inhibited induction of force generation. However, inhibitors of other protein kinases such as myosin light chain kinase (ML-9), protein kinase C (Calphostin), protein kinase A (KT5720), and tyrosine kinase (Genistein, Herbimycin A) had no effect on force generation induced by Horse chestnut extract. These results suggest that the Horse chestnut extract induces generation of contraction forces in fibroblasts through stress fiber formation followed by activation of Rho protein and Rho kinase but not myosin light chain kinase or other protein kinases. PMID:16754996

  16. Charge mobility induced by Brownian fluctuations in π-conjugated polymers in solution.

    PubMed

    Poole, Jessica Ellen; Damry, Djamshid Ahmud; Tozer, Oliver Robert; Barford, William

    2016-01-28

    We study the motion of a doped charge in a π-conjugated polymer chain in solution subject to Brownian fluctuations. Specifically, we take poly(para-phenylene) to be our model system where the Brownian fluctuations cause rotational motion of the phenylene rings. The instantaneous torsional fluctuations cause Anderson localization of the charge wavefunction, with the lower-energy spectrum being composed of local ground states and the higher-energy spectrum being composed of quasi-extended states. At low temperatures, additional charge localization occurs via torsional relaxation. The dynamical torsional fluctuations lead to two distinct modes of motion of the charge: adiabatic and non-adiabatic. Adiabatic motion is a 'crawling' motion of the charge along the polymer chain while the charge remains in its local ground state. Non-adiabatic motion is a rapid 'hopping' motion as the charge is excited into higher energy quasi-extended states and travels ballistically along the chain before relaxing into a local ground state. The adiabatic motion dominates at low temperatures, and exhibits a linear temperature dependence and thus a constant zero-field charge mobility. Non-adiabatic motion begins to dominate as the temperature is increased, as the charge is thermally excited into higher energy states. At high temperatures the diffusion constant becomes almost temperature independent, indicating a decrease in the charge mobility with increasing temperature, which we attribute to the charge localization length being a decreasing function of temperature at high temperatures. PMID:26699806

  17. Fluctuation-induced dielectric permittivity in the isotropic phase of cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prabir K.; Das, Asok K.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature and pressure dependence of the static dielectric permittivity in the isotropic phase of the isotropic to cholesteric phase transition is calculated using Landau-de Gennes’s fluctuation theory, allowing spatial variation of the orientational order parameter. A comparison is made with experimental data available in the isotropic phase of the isotropic to cholesteric phase transition.

  18. Laser-based measurements of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport and nonlinear mode interactions in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Travis Fred

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport and density fluctuations have been investigated in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-filed pinch using a far infrared (FIR) laser based interferometer-polarimetry system. An extensive study focuses on the particle transport and density fluctuations during the sawtooth crash where the stochastic magnetic field is largest. Particle flux arising from the inieraction between density fluctuations and magnetic fluctuations has been measured to be significant at the reversal surface where modes with poloidal mode number m = 0 are resonant. The particle flux is comparable to that measured in the core where m = 1 modes dominate. The origin of density fluctuations has been studied experimentally. It is found that density fluctuations not only result from linear advection but also non-linear three-wave interactions. This is different from the previously reported results that indicated that the edge density fluctuations originate from linear advection. The results reported here reveal that m = 0 modes play an important role in density fluctuations and particle flux. An experiment where m = 0 modes are greatly reduced, by removing the reversal surface from the plasma, indicates that particle flux and density fluctuations are reduced significantly, which further confirms the importance of edge resonant modes in particle transport.

  19. Force-induced remodelling of proteins and their complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Radford, Sheena E; Brockwell, David J

    2015-01-01

    Force can drive conformational changes in proteins, as well as modulate their stability and the affinity of their complexes, allowing a mechanical input to be converted into a biochemical output. These properties have been utilised by nature and force is now recognised to be widely used at the cellular level. The effects of force on the biophysical properties of biological systems can be large and varied. As these effects are only apparent in the presence of force, studies on the same proteins using traditional ensemble biophysical methods can yield apparently conflicting results. Where appropriate, therefore, force measurements should be integrated with other experimental approaches to understand the physiological context of the system under study. PMID:25710390

  20. Analysis of Environmental Forcing and Melange Fluctuation in Asynchronous Retreat of Ocean Terminating Glaciers in Greenland's Sermilik Fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, F.; Galey, C. E.; Bassis, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Widespread near synchronous retreat of marine terminating outlet glaciers has been observed across wide swaths of the Greenland Ice Sheet. However, despite large-scale patterns of retreat, there is considerable variability in the timing and retreat patterns of individual glaciers with geographically adjacent glaciers that experience similar climate and meteorological forcing displaying markedly different behavior. Here we applied an automated identification algorithm that we developed to track the terminus and melange in order better understand the complex dynamics and varying drivers of glacier retreat. The algorithm was applied to three major glaciers (Helheim Glacier, Fenris Glacier and Midgard Glacier) that terminate in Greenland's Sermilik Fjord over the period of 2000- 2014. The terminus position and the percentage of the fjord filled with melange or sea ice from 2001 to present was determined. Since these glaciers exist within the same fjord system, they should experience comparable environmental forcing conditions, but appear to respond to these conditions differently causing them to have varying patterns of retreat. Helheim Glacier and Fenris Glacier have terminus locations closely spaced in the fjord but Helheim Glacier's terminus retreated over 7 km before advancing to stabilize at a 5 km retreat over the observation period and Fenris Glacier's terminus has stayed in roughly the same place. Midgard Glacier is located across the fjord from Helheim Glacier and its terminus has continuously retreated with a retreat of approximately 8 km. This asynchronous retreat shows that proximity alone cannot determine retreat behavior, and a more complex interaction between internal variability and external forcing must be taking place. To better understand the variability within the system and the cause of asynchronous retreat, ocean and air temperature datasets, in conjunction with the fjord geometry, were compared with our derived melange/sea ice and terminus

  1. Analysis of the effective viscosity of thin interlayers of aliphatic liquids in the fields of fluctuation forces generated by solid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altoiz, B. A.; Kiriyan, S. V.; Shatagina, E. A.

    2010-10-01

    It is established experimentally that the viscosity of micrometer interlayers of mineral motor oil and n-hexadecane between metal substrates differs from the viscosity of the isotropic liquid and depends on the shear strain rate. The observed difference is attributed to the formation of orientation-ordered layers in the field of fluctuation forces of the substrates; the thickness of these layers decreases with the intensity of the flow. The results of viscosimetric experiments are interpreted using a rheological model of a structurally inhomogeneous interlayer with “constant-viscosity” surface layers and an isotropic liquid between these layers. This model is employed for calculating the main structural parameters of such layers and the effect of the flow on them.

  2. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  3. Rapid fluctuations in extracellular brain glucose levels induced by natural arousing stimuli and intravenous cocaine: fueling the brain during neural activation

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Glucose, a primary energetic substrate for neural activity, is continuously influenced by two opposing forces that tend to either decrease its extracellular levels due to enhanced utilization in neural cells or increase its levels due to entry from peripheral circulation via enhanced cerebral blood flow. How this balance is maintained under physiological conditions and changed during neural activation remains unclear. To clarify this issue, enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry were used in freely moving rats to evaluate fluctuations in extracellular glucose levels induced by brief audio stimulus, tail pinch (TP), social interaction with another rat (SI), and intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg). Measurements were performed in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), which drastically differ in neuronal activity. In NAcc, where most cells are powerfully excited after salient stimulation, glucose levels rapidly (latency 2–6 s) increased (30–70 μM or 6–14% over baseline) by all stimuli; the increase differed in magnitude and duration for each stimulus. In SNr, where most cells are transiently inhibited by salient stimuli, TP, SI, and cocaine induced a biphasic glucose response, with the initial decrease (−20–40 μM or 5–10% below baseline) followed by a reboundlike increase. The critical role of neuronal activity in mediating the initial glucose response was confirmed by monitoring glucose currents after local microinjections of glutamate (GLU) or procaine (PRO). While intra-NAcc injection of GLU transiently increased glucose levels in this structure, intra-SNr PRO injection resulted in rapid, transient decreases in SNr glucose. Therefore, extracellular glucose levels in the brain change very rapidly after physiological and pharmacological stimulation, the response is structure specific, and the pattern of neuronal activity appears to be a critical factor determining direction and magnitude of physiological

  4. Fluctuations of a Greenlandic tidewater glacier driven by changes in atmospheric forcing: observations and modelling of Kangiata Nunaata Sermia, 1859-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, J. M.; Mair, D. W. F.; Nick, F. M.; Rea, B. R.; van As, D.; Morlighem, M.; Nienow, P. W.; Weidick, A.

    2014-11-01

    Many tidewater glaciers in Greenland are known to have undergone significant retreat during the last century following their Little Ice Age maxima. Where it is possible to reconstruct glacier change over this period, they provide excellent records for comparison to climate records, as well as calibration/validation for numerical models. These glacier change records therefore allow for tests of numerical models that seek to simulate tidewater glacier behaviour over multi-decadal to centennial timescales. Here we present a detailed record of behaviour from Kangiata Nunaata Sermia (KNS), SW Greenland, between 1859 and 2012, and compare it against available oceanographic and atmospheric temperature data between 1871 and 2012. We also use these records to evaluate the ability of a well-established one-dimensional flow-band model to replicate behaviour for the observation period. The record of terminus change demonstrates that KNS has advanced/retreated in phase with atmosphere and ocean climate anomalies averaged over multi-annual to decadal timescales. Results from an ensemble of model runs demonstrate that observed dynamics can be replicated. Model runs that provide a reasonable match to observations always require a significant atmospheric forcing component, but do not necessarily require an oceanic forcing component. Although the importance of oceanic forcing cannot be discounted, these results demonstrate that changes in atmospheric forcing are likely to be a primary driver of the terminus fluctuations of KNS from 1859 to 2012. We propose that the detail and length of the record presented makes KNS an ideal site for model validation exercises investigating links between climate, calving rates, and tidewater glacier dynamics.

  5. EMG and peak force responses to PNF stretching and the relationship between stretching-induced force deficits and bilateral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Asim

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of an interaction between stretching induced deficit (SFD) and bilateral deficits (BLD) during maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion under PNF stretch and no-stretch conditions through measurement of EMG and force production. [Subjects and Methods] Ten physically active male Caucasian students (age, 24.1±2.38 years; body mass, 79.48±11.40 kg; height, 174.15±0.8 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. EMG and force measurements of the subjects were recorded during either unilateral or bilateral 3-second maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion (MVC) against a force transducer. The paired sample t-test was used to examine the significance of differences among several conditions. Pearson product-moment correlation was used to evaluate the associations between different parameters. [Results] Stretching-induced deficits correlated with bilateral deficits in both force (r=0.85) and iEMG (r=0.89). PNF stretching caused significant decrements in the bilateral and unilateral conditions for both the right and left sides. [Conclusion] Since both force and iEMG decreases were observed in most measurements; it suggests there is a neural mechanism behinnd both the BLD and the SFD. PMID:25931696

  6. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested. PMID:24697421

  7. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-01

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  8. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  9. Structure-fluctuation-induced abnormal thermoelectric properties in semiconductor copper selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Huili; Shi, Xun; Kirkham, Melanie J; Wang, Hsin; Li, Qiang; Uher, Ctirad; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects and related technologies have attracted a great interest due to the world-wide energy harvesting. Thermoelectricity has usually been considered in the context of stable material phases. Here we report that the fluctuation of structures during the second-order phase transition in Cu2Se semiconductor breaks the conventional trends of thermoelectric transports in normal phases, leading to a critically phase-transition-enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit zT above unity at 400K, a three times larger value than for the normal phases. Dynamic structural transformations introduce intensive fluctuations and extreme complexity, which enhance the carrier entropy and thus the thermopower, and strongly scatter carriers and phonons as well to make their transports behave critically.

  10. Precipitation-Induced Voltage-Dependent Ion Current Fluctuations in Conical Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2010-01-01

    Single conically shaped nanopores produce stable ion current fluctuations when in contact with weakly soluble salts, such as calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO{sub 4}) and cobalt hydrogen phosphate (CoHPO{sub 4}). The pore spontaneously switches between high and low conductance states, called open and closed states, respectively. Pore opening and closing are linked to the dynamic formation of the calcium and cobalt precipitates at the small opening of the pore. The probabilities of pore opening and closing are voltage-dependent, and this characteristic of ion current signal is known for biological voltage-gated channels. We show that new types of ion current fluctuations are obtained in conditions at which precipitates of CaHPO{sub 4} and CoHPO{sub 4} can form in the pore at the same time.