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Sample records for fluid bilayer membranes

  1. Micropatterned composite membranes of polymerized and fluid lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Morigaki, Kenichi; Kiyosue, Kazuyuki; Taguchi, Takahisa

    2004-08-31

    Micropatterned composite membranes of polymerized and fluid lipid bilayers were constructed on solid substrates. Lithographic photopolymerization of a diacetylene-containing phospholipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DiynePC), and subsequent removal of nonreacted monomers by a detergent solution (0.1 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) yielded a patterned polymeric bilayer matrix on the substrate. Fluid lipid bilayers of phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk (egg-PC) were incorporated into the lipid-free wells surrounded by the polymeric bilayers through the process of fusion and reorganization of suspended small unilamellar vesicles. Spatial distribution of the fluid bilayers in the patterned bilayer depended on the degree of photopolymerization that in turn could be modulated by varying the applied UV irradiation dose. The polymeric bilayer domains blocked lateral diffusion of the fluid lipid bilayers and confined them in the defined areas (corrals), if the polymerization was conducted with a sufficiently large UV dose. On the other hand, lipid molecules of the fluid bilayers penetrated into the polymeric bilayer domains, if the UV dose was relatively small. A direct correlation was observed between the applied UV dose and the lateral diffusion coefficient of fluorescent marker molecules in the fluid bilayers embedded within the polymeric bilayer domains. Artificial control of lateral diffusion by polymeric bilayers may lead to the creation of complex and versatile biomimetic model membrane arrays. PMID:15323525

  2. Relaxation dynamics of two-component fluid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Kanemori, Yuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the relaxation dynamics of a nearly flat binary lipid bilayer membrane by taking into account the membrane tension, hydrodynamics of the surrounding fluid, inter-monolayer friction and mutual diffusion. Mutual diffusion is the collective irreversible process that leads to homogenization of the density difference between the two lipid species. We find that two relaxation modes associated with the mutual diffusion appear in addition to the three previously discussed relaxation modes reflecting the bending and compression of the membrane. Because of the symmetry, only one of the two diffusive modes is coupled to the bending mode. The two diffusive modes are much slower than the bending and compression modes in the entire realistic wave number range. This means that the long time relaxation behavior is dominated by the mutual diffusion in binary membranes. The two diffusive modes become even slower in the vicinity of the unstable region towards phase separation, while the other modes are almost unchanged. In short time scales, on the other hand, the lipid composition heterogeneity induces in-plane compression and bending of the bilayer. PMID:27145960

  3. Efficient tunable generic model for self-assembling fluid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Markus

    2005-03-01

    We present a new model for the simulation of generic lipid bilayers in the mesoscopic regime (between a few nanometers and many tens of nanometers), which is very robust, versatile, and extremely efficient, since it avoids the need for an embedding solvent. Based entirely on simple pair potentials, it features a wide region of unassisted self assembly into fluid bilayers without the need for careful parameter tuning. The resulting membranes display the correct continuum elastic behavior with bending constants in the experimentally relevant range. It can be readily used to study events like bilayer fusion, bilayer melting, lipid mixtures, rafts, and protein-bilayer interactions.

  4. A class of supported membranes: formation of fluid phospholipid bilayers on photonic band gap colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Brozell, Adrian M; Muha, Michelle A; Sanii, Babak; Parikh, Atul N

    2006-01-11

    We report the formation of a new class of supported membranes consisting of a fluid phospholipid bilayer coupled directly to a broadly tunable colloidal crystal with a well-defined photonic band gap. For nanoscale colloidal crystals exhibiting a band gap at the optical frequencies, substrate-induced vesicle fusion gives rise to a surface bilayer riding onto the crystal surface. The bilayer is two-dimensionally continuous, spanning multiple beads with lateral mobilities which reflect the coupling between the bilayer topography and the curvature of the supporting colloidal surface. In contrast, the spreading of vesicles on micrometer scale colloidal crystals results in the formation of bilayers wrapping individual colloidal beads. We show that simple UV photolithography of colloidal crystals produces binary patterns of crystal wettabilities, photonic stopbands, and corresponding patterns of lipid mono- and bilayer morphologies. We envisage that these approaches will be exploitable for the development of optical transduction assays and microarrays for many membrane-mediated processes, including transport and receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:16390122

  5. Nonequilibrium patterns of cholesterol-rich chemical heterogenieties within single fluid supported phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sapuri-Butti, Annapoorna R; Li, Qijuan; Groves, Jay T; Parikh, Atul N

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a simple method to introduce cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-rich chemical heterogeneities into controlled densities and concentrations within predetermined regions of another distinct fluid phospholipid bilayer supported on a solid substrate. A contiguous primary phase--a fluid POPC bilayer displaying a well-defined array of lipid-free voids (e.g., 20-100 microm squares)--was first prepared on a clean glass surface by microcontact printing under water using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamp. The aqueous-phase primary bilayer pattern was subsequently incubated with secondary-phase small unilamellar vesicles composed of independent chemical compositions. Backfilling by comparable vesicles resulted in gradual mixing between the primary- and secondary-phase lipids, effacing the pattern. When the secondary vesicles consisted of phase-separating mixtures of cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and a phospholipid (2:1:1 POPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol or 1:1:1 DOPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol), well-defined spatial patterns of fluorescence, chemical compositions, and fluidities emerged. We conjecture that these patterns form because of the differences in the equilibration rates of the secondary liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases with the primary fluid POPC phase. The pattern stability depended strongly on the ambient-phase temperature, cholesterol concentration, and miscibility contrast between the two phases. When cholesterol concentration in the secondary vesicles was below 20 mol %, secondary intercalants gradually diffused within the primary POPC bilayer phase, ultimately dissolving the pattern in several minutes and presumably forming a new quasi-equilibrated lipid mixture. These phase domain micropatterns retain some properties of biological rafts including detergent resistance and phase mixing induced by selective cholesterol extraction. These patterns enable direct comparisons of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-rich phase domains and fluid phospholipid

  6. Bending membranes on demand: fluid phospholipid bilayers on topographically deformable substrates.

    PubMed

    Sanii, Babak; Smith, Andreia Michelle; Butti, Ravichandra; Brozell, Adrian M; Parikh, Atul N

    2008-03-01

    We combine hierarchical surface wrinkling of elastomers with lipid membrane deposition techniques to dynamically template complex three-dimensional topographies onto supported lipid bilayers. The real-time introduction of corresponding nano- to micrometer scale curvatures triggers spatially periodic, elastic bending of the bilayer, accompanied by molecular-level reorganizations. This ability to dynamically impose curvatures on supported bilayers and the ensuing re-equilibration promises fundamental material and biophysical investigations of curvature-dependent, static heterogeneities and dynamic reorganizations pervasive in biological membranes. PMID:18271562

  7. Life, death and membrane bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, A J

    2003-07-01

    Membrane bilayers are essential elements of life, and the synthesis of the hydrocarbons that make up membrane bilayers may have preceded the appearance of life on Earth. Membrane-associated processes are significant components of metabolism, and the acyl composition of membrane bilayers is associated with metabolic activity in a predictable manner. This has resulted in the "membrane pacemaker" theory of metabolism, which proposes that the relative balance between monounsaturated and long-chain polyunsaturated acyl chains in membrane bilayers is a fundamental determinant of metabolic rate of a species. The omega-3 polyunsaturated docosahexaenoate is an especially important component of membranes in this regard. Whilst it is suggested that the physical properties of membrane polyunsaturates are important with respect to their influence on metabolic rate, it is their chemistry that is important in aging. Membrane acyl composition is related to maximum lifespan in mammals and birds, probably via their role in lipid peroxidation. Calorie restriction modifies acyl composition of membrane bilayers and is associated with decreased membrane lipid peroxidation and lifespan extension. The membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism has given birth to the membrane pacemaker hypothesis of aging, which will require further investigation. PMID:12796449

  8. Approaches toward functional fluid supported lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Kevin Chun-I.

    Planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs) have attracted immense interest for their properties as model cell membranes and for potential applications in biosensors and lab-on-a-chip devices. Our study covers three aspects of the construction, characterization, and application of functional PSLBs. First, a combination of micro-fabrication, the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique, and fusion of extruded small unilamellar vesicle (E-SUVs) in sequence was used to create polymer-cushioned PSLBs in a microarray format. Random lipo-glycocopolymer mixed with L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) was compressed at the air-water interface and transferred onto the photoresist-patterned substrate by the LB technique to achieve spatially directed deposition. Construction of planar bilayers in an aqueous environment was subsequently completed by vesicle fusion. Epifluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and electrophoresis-relaxation were employed to examine the resulting patterns as well as to verify the two-dimensional mobility of the supported membrane systems. This approach could possibly provide a useful route to create functional arrays of polymer-supported lipid bilayers. Second, we report the formation of fluid planar biomembranes on hydrophilic silica aerogels and xerogels. When the aerogel/xerogel was pre-hydrated and then allowed to incubate in egg PC E-SUV solution, lipid bilayers were formed due to the favorable interaction of vesicles with the hydroxyl-abundant silica surface. FRAP was used to determine the lateral diffusivity of membranes on aerogels. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to monitor the kinetics of the irreversible adsorption and fusion of vesicles into bilayers on xerogel thin films. Finally, we compared the formation of PSLBs with and without incorporation of monosialoganglioside GM1 (GM1) as the antigen for in situ antibody binding. Quantifiable differences were observed in the

  9. Interaction of n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside with giant magnetic-fluid-loaded phosphatidylcholine vesicles: direct visualization of membrane curvature fluctuations as a function of surfactant partitioning between water and lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Ménager, Christine; Guemghar, Dihya; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2010-10-01

    The present study deals with the morphological modifications of giant dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles (DOPC GUVs) induced by the nonionic surfactant n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside at sublytic levels, i.e., in the first steps of the vesicle-to-micelle transition process, when surfactant inserts into the vesicle bilayer without disruption. Experimental conditions were perfected to exactly control the surfactant bilayer composition of the vesicles, in line with former work focused on the mechanical properties of the membrane of magnetic-fluid-loaded DOPC GUVs submitted to a magnetic field. The purpose here was to systematically examine, in the absence of any external mechanical constraint, the dynamics of giant vesicle shape and membrane deformations as a function of surfactant partitioning between the aqueous phase and the lipid membrane, beforehand established by turbidity measurements from small unilamellar vesicles. PMID:20825201

  10. Design of Asymmetric Peptide Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Mehta, Anil K; Sidorov, Anton N; Orlando, Thomas M; Jiang, Zhigang; Anthony, Neil R; Lynn, David G

    2016-03-16

    Energetic insights emerging from the structural characterization of peptide cross-β assemblies have enabled the design and construction of robust asymmetric bilayer peptide membranes. Two peptides differing only in their N-terminal residue, phosphotyrosine vs lysine, coassemble as stacks of antiparallel β-sheets with precisely patterned charged lattices stabilizing the bilayer leaflet interface. Either homogeneous or mixed leaflet composition is possible, and both create nanotubes with dense negative external and positive internal solvent exposed surfaces. Cross-seeding peptide solutions with a preassembled peptide nanotube seed leads to domains of different leaflet architecture within single nanotubes. Architectural control over these cross-β assemblies, both across the bilayer membrane and along the nanotube length, provides access to highly ordered asymmetric membranes for the further construction of functional mesoscale assemblies. PMID:26942690

  11. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. This includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.

  12. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. Thismore » includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.« less

  13. DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Langecker, Martin; Arnaut, Vera; List, Jonathan; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA has been previously shown to be useful as a material for the fabrication of static nanoscale objects, and also for the realization of dynamic molecular devices and machines. In many cases, nucleic acid assemblies directly mimic biological structures, for example, cytoskeletal filaments, enzyme scaffolds, or molecular motors, and many of the applications envisioned for such structures involve the study or imitation of biological processes, and even the interaction with living cells and organisms. An essential feature of biological systems is their elaborate structural organization and compartmentalization, and this most often involves membranous structures that are formed by dynamic assemblies of lipid molecules. Imitation of or interaction with biological systems using the tools of DNA nanotechnology thus ultimately and necessarily also involves interactions with lipid membrane structures, and thus the creation of DNA-lipid hybrid assemblies. Due to their differing chemical nature, however, highly charged nucleic acids and amphiphilic lipids do not seem the best match for the construction of such systems, and in fact they are rarely found in nature. In recent years, however, a large variety of lipid-interacting DNA conjugates were developed, which are now increasingly being applied also for the realization of DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we will present the current state of this emerging class of nanosystems. After a brief overview of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of lipids and lipid bilayer membranes, we will discuss how DNA molecules can interact with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions or via covalent modification with hydrophobic moieties. We will then show how such DNA-lipid interactions have been utilized for the realization of DNA nanostructures attached to or embedded within lipid bilayer membranes. Under certain conditions, DNA nanostructures remain mobile on

  14. Line tension of multicomponent bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Ashkan; Pastor, Kyle A.; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-02-01

    The line tension or edge energy of bilayer membranes self-assembled from binary amphiphilic molecules is studied using self-consistent-field theory (SCFT). Specifically, solutions of the SCFT equations corresponding to an infinite membrane with a circular pore, or an open membrane, are obtained for a coarse-grained model in which the amphiphilic species and hydrophilic solvents are represented by A B and E D diblock copolymers and C homopolymers, respectively. The edge energy of the membrane is extracted from the free energy of the open membranes. Results for membranes composed of mixtures of symmetric and cone- or inverse cone-shaped amphiphilic molecules with neutral and/or repulsive interactions are obtained and analyzed. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of the cone-shaped species leads to a decrease of the line tension. In contrast, adding inverse cone-shaped copolymers results in an increase of the line tension. Furthermore, the density profile of the copolymers reveals that the line tension is regulated by the distribution of the amphiphiles at the bilayer edge.

  15. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  16. Fluctuation and dynamics of a lipid bilayer membrane under an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Yuan-Nan; Miksis, Michael; Vlahovska, Petia

    2015-11-01

    Membrane fluctuation and dynamics under an electric field is investigated, and results show that the membrane instability and dynamics depend not only on the mismatch in conductivity and permittivity between the bulk fluids, but also on the membrane charging time. In addition, the (entropic) membrane tension is found to depend on the electric field. Lubrication theory is utilized to examine the nonlinear dynamics of a planar lipid bilayer membrane with and without electrokinetics. Partial support from NSF/DMS 1222550, 1412789.

  17. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  18. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D.; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  19. Combined influence of cholesterol and synthetic amphiphillic peptides upon bilayer thickness in model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Nezil, F A; Bloom, M

    1992-01-01

    Deuterium (2H) NMR was used to study bilayer hydrophobic thickness and mechanical properties when cholesterol and/or synthetic amphiphillic polypeptides were added to deuterated POPC lipid bilayer membranes in the liquid-crystalline (fluid) phase. Smoothed acyl chain orientational order profiles were used to calculate bilayer hydrophobic thickness. Addition of 30 mol% cholesterol to POPC at 25 degrees C increased the bilayer thickness from 2.58 to 2.99 nm. The peptides were chosen to span the bilayers with more or less mismatch between the hydrophobic peptide length and membrane hydrophobic thickness. The average thickness of the pure lipid bilayers was significantly perturbed upon addition of peptide only in cases of large mismatch, being increased (decreased) when the peptide hydrophobic length was greater (less) than that of the pure bilayer, consistent with the "mattress" model of protein lipid interactions (Mouritsen, O.G., and M. Bloom. 1984. Biophys. J. 46:141-153). The experimental results were also used to examine the combined influence of the polypeptides and cholesterol on the orientational order profile and thickness expansivity of the membranes. A detailed model for the spatial distribution of POPC and cholesterol molecules in the bilayers was proposed to reconcile the general features of these measurements with micromechanical measurements of area expansivity in closely related systems. Experiments to test the model were proposed. PMID:1600079

  20. Phase transitions in planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    White, S H

    1975-01-01

    Temperature-dependent structural changes in planar bilayer membranes formed from glycerol monooleate (GMO) dispersed in various n-alkane solvents (C12-C17) have been studied using precise measurements of specific geometric capacitance (Cg). Cg generally increases as temperature (T) decreases. A change in the slope of Cg(T) occurs between 15 and 18 degrees C for all solvent systems examined. Measurements of the interfacial tension (gamma) of the bulk GMO-alkane dispersions against 0.1 M NaCl show that gamma generally decreases with decreasing temperature. The data can be fitted with two straight lines of different slope which intersect on the average at 17 degrees C. Pagano et al. (1973, Science (Wash. D.C.). 181:557) have shown using calorimetry that GMO has a phase transition at about 15 degrees C. Thus, the changes in Cg and gamma with temperature are likely to result from a GMO phase transition. A second structural change is observed to occur between 5 and 10 degrees C which has not been detected calorimetrically. Calculations of Cg based on various estimates of the hydrocarbon dielectric coefficient (epsilon-b) and/or hydrocarbon thickness (delta-b) leads to models for the structure of the bilayer above and below the phase transition temperature. PMID:1111634

  1. Hydrodynamic coupling of particle inclusions embedded in curved lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Jon Karl; Atzberger, Paul J

    2016-08-10

    We develop theory and computational methods to investigate particle inclusions embedded within curved lipid bilayer membranes. We consider the case of spherical lipid vesicles where inclusion particles are coupled through (i) intramembrane hydrodynamics, (ii) traction stresses with the external and trapped solvent fluid, and (iii) intermonolayer slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. We investigate relative to flat membranes how the membrane curvature and topology augment hydrodynamic responses. We show how both the translational and rotational mobility of protein inclusions are effected by the membrane curvature, ratio of intramembrane viscosity to solvent viscosity, and intermonolayer slip. For general investigations of many-particle dynamics, we also discuss how our approaches can be used to treat the collective diffusion and hydrodynamic coupling within spherical bilayers. PMID:27373277

  2. Dynamics and instabilities of lipid bilayer membrane shapes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes undergo constant shape remodeling involving the formation of highly curved structures. The lipid bilayer represents the fundamental architecture of the cellular membrane with its shapes determined by the Helfrich curvature bending energy. However, the dynamics of bilayer shape transitions, especially their modulation by membrane proteins, and the resulting shape instabilities, are still not well understood. Here, we review in a unifying manner several theories that describe the fluctuations (i.e. undulations) of bilayer shapes as well as their local coupling with lipid or protein density variation. The coupling between local membrane curvature and lipid density gives rise to a ‘slipping mode’ in addition to the conventional ‘bending mode’ for damping the membrane fluctuation. This leads to a number of interesting experimental phenomena regarding bilayer shape dynamics. More importantly, curvature-inducing proteins can couple with membrane shape and eventually render the membrane unstable. A criterion for membrane shape instability is derived from a linear stability analysis. The instability criterion reemphasizes the importance of membrane tension in regulating the stability and dynamics of membrane geometry. Recent progresses in understanding the role of membrane tension in regulating dynamical cellular processes are also reviewed. Protein density is emphasized as a key factor in regulating membrane shape transitions: a threshold density of curvature coupling proteins is required for inducing membrane morphology transitions. PMID:24529968

  3. Dynamics and instabilities of lipid bilayer membrane shapes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    Biological membranes undergo constant shape remodeling involving the formation of highly curved structures. The lipid bilayer represents the fundamental architecture of the cellular membrane with its shapes determined by the Helfrich curvature bending energy. However, the dynamics of bilayer shape transitions, especially their modulation by membrane proteins, and the resulting shape instabilities, are still not well understood. Here, we review in a unifying manner several theories that describe the fluctuations (i.e. undulations) of bilayer shapes as well as their local coupling with lipid or protein density variation. The coupling between local membrane curvature and lipid density gives rise to a 'slipping mode' in addition to the conventional 'bending mode' for damping the membrane fluctuation. This leads to a number of interesting experimental phenomena regarding bilayer shape dynamics. More importantly, curvature-inducing proteins can couple with membrane shape and eventually render the membrane unstable. A criterion for membrane shape instability is derived from a linear stability analysis. The instability criterion reemphasizes the importance of membrane tension in regulating the stability and dynamics of membrane geometry. Recent progresses in understanding the role of membrane tension in regulating dynamical cellular processes are also reviewed. Protein density is emphasized as a key factor in regulating membrane shape transitions: a threshold density of curvature coupling proteins is required for inducing membrane morphology transitions. PMID:24529968

  4. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  5. Fusion and fission of fluid amphiphilic bilayers.

    PubMed

    Gotter, Martin; Strey, Reinhard; Olsson, Ulf; Wennerström, Håkan

    2005-01-01

    The system water-oil (n-decane)-nonionic surfactant (C12E5) forms bilayer phases in a large concentration region, but, for a given oil-to-surfactant ratio, only in a narrow temperature range. In addition to the anisotropic lamellar phase (Lalpha) there is also, at slightly higher temperature, a sponge or L3-phase where the bilayers build up an isotropic structure extending macroscopically in three dimensions. In this phase the bilayer mid-surface has a mean curvature close to zero and a negative Euler characteristic. In this paper we study how the bilayers in the lamellar and the sponge phase respond dynamically to sudden temperature changes. The monolayer spontaneous curvature depends sensitively on temperature and a change of temperature thus provides a driving force for a change in bilayer topology. The equilibration therefore involves kinetic steps of fusion/fission of bilayers. Such dynamic processes have previously been monitored by temperature jump experiments using light scattering in the sponge phase. These experiments revealed an extraordinarily strong dependence of the relaxation time on the bilayer volume fraction phi. At phi < 0.1 the relaxation times are so slow that experiments using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H-NMR) appear feasible. We here report on the first experiments concerned with the dynamics of the macroscopic phase transition sponge-lamellae by 2H-NMR. We find that the sponge-to-lamellae transition occurs through a nucleation process followed by domain growth involving bilayer fission at domain boundaries. In contrast, the lamellae-to-sponge transformation apparently occurs through a succession of uncorrelated bilayer fusion events. PMID:15715316

  6. Evidence for superlattice arrangements in fluid phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K H; Ruonala, M; Virtanen, J; Somerharju, P

    1997-01-01

    Recently, evidence for cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules to adapt superlattice arrangements in fluid lipid bilayers has been presented. Whether superlattice arrangements exist in other biologically relevant lipid membranes, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PC, is still speculative. In this study, we have examined the physical properties of fluid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PE (POPE) binary mixtures as a function of the POPE mole fraction (X(PE)) using fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. At 30 degrees C, i.e., above the Tm of POPE and POPC, deviations, or dips, as well as local data scattering in the excimer-to-monomer fluorescence intensity ratio of intramolecular excimer forming dipyrenylphosphatidylcholine probe in POPE/POPC mixtures were detected at X(PE) approximately 0.04, 0.11, 0.16, 0.26, 0.33, 0.51, 0.66, 0.75, 0.82, 0.91, and 0.94. The above critical values of X(PE) coincide (within +/-0.03) with the critical mole fractions X(HX,PE) or X(R,PE) predicted by a headgroup superlattice model, which assumes that the lipid headgroups form hexagonal or rectangular superlattice, respectively, in the bilayer. Other spectroscopic data, generalized polarization of Laurdan and infrared carbonyl and phosphate stretching frequency, were also collected. Similar agreements between some of the observed critical values of X(PE) from these data and the X(HX,PE) or X(R,PE) values were also found. However, all techniques yielded critical values of X(PE) (e.g., 0.42 and 0.58) that cannot be explained by the present headgroup superlattice model. The effective cross-sectional area of the PE headgroup is smaller than that of the acyl chains. Hence, the relief of "packing frustration" of PE in the presence of PC (larger headgroup than PE) may be one of the major mechanisms in driving the PE and PC components to superlattice-like lateral distributions in the bilayer. We propose that headgroup superlattices may

  7. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  8. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  9. Viscoelastic changes measured in partially suspended single bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imad Younus; Mechler, Adam

    2015-07-21

    For studies involving biomimetic phospholipid membrane systems, such as membrane-protein interactions, it is crucial that the supported membrane is biomimetic in its physical properties as well as in its composition. Two often overlooked aspects of biomimicry are the need for unrestrained lipid mobility, reflected in the viscoelastic properties of the membrane, and sufficient space between the membrane and the support for the insertion of transmembrane proteins. Here we show for a series of DMPC-based membranes that a partially suspended single bilayer membrane can be formed on functionalized gold surface without tethering. These membranes exhibit sufficient freedom of motion to represent the viscoelastic properties of a free lamellar bilayer membrane as demonstrated by determining the phase transition temperatures of these single bilayer membranes from the viscosity change upon chain melting using the dissipation signal of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D). Atomic force microscopy imaging confirmed confluent, smooth membrane coverage of the QCM-D sensor that completely obscured the roughness of the sputtered gold surface. High-force AFM imaging was able to push membrane patches into the valleys of the gold morphology, confirming the inherently suspended nature of the MPA supported membrane. We show that the correlation between frequency and dissipation changes in the QCM-D sensograms is a sensitive indicator of the morphology of the membrane. PMID:26073288

  10. Galactocerebroside-phospholipid interactions in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruocco, M J; Shipley, G G; Oldfield, E

    1983-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction have been used to study the interaction of hydrated N-palmitoylgalactosylsphingosine (NPGS) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). For mixtures containing less than 23 mol% NPGS, complete miscibility of NPGS into hydrated DPPC bilayers is observed in both the bilayer gel and liquid-crystal phases. X-ray diffraction data demonstrate insignificant differences in the DPPC-bilayer gel-phase parameters on incorporation of up to 23 mol% NPGS. At greater than 23 mol% NPGS, additional high-temperature transitions occur, indicating phase separation of cerebroside. For these cerebroside concentrations, at 20 degrees C, x-ray diffraction shows two lamellar phases, hydrated DPPC-NPGS gel bilayers (d = 64 A) containing 23 mol% NPGS, and NPGS "crystal" bilayers (d = 55 A). On heating to temperatures greater than 45 degrees C, the mixed DPPC-NPGS bilayer phase undergoes chain melting, and on further increasing the temperature progressively more NPGS is incorporated into the liquid-crystal DPPC-NPGS bilayer phase. At temperatures greater than 82 degrees C (the transition temperature of hydrated NPGS), complete lipid miscibility is observed at all DPPC/NPGS molar ratios. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:6688367

  11. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Nablo, Brian J; Panchal, Rekha G; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E; Robertson, Joseph W F; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M; Kasianowicz, John J

    2013-08-14

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891

  12. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  13. Micropatterned fluid lipid bilayer arrays created using a continuous flow microspotter.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathryn A; Gale, Bruce K; Conboy, John C

    2008-11-01

    We have developed a new method for creating micropatterned lipid bilayer arrays (MLBAs) using a 3D microfluidic system. An array of fluid lipid membranes was patterned onto a glass substrate using a Continuous Flow Microspotter. Fluorescence microscopy experiments were used to verify the formation of a bilayer structure on the glass substrate. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments demonstrated the bilayers' fluidity was maintained while being individually corralled on the substrate. The reproducibility of bilayer formation within an array was demonstrated by the linear response of membrane fluorescence versus mol % rhodamine functionalized lipids incorporated into the vesicles prior to fusion to the surface. The highly customizable nature of the MLBAs was demonstrated utilizing three different fluorescently labeled lipids to generate a multiple component lipid array. Finally, the cholera toxin B/ganglioside GM 1, antidinitrophenyl (DNP) antibody/DNP, and NeutrAvidin/biotin protein-ligand systems were used to model multiple protein-ligand binding on the MLBAs. The multicomponent patterned bilayers were functionalized with GM 1, DNP, and biotin lipids, and binding curves was generated by recording surface fluorescence versus increasing concentration of membrane bound ligands. PMID:18841940

  14. Micropatterned Fluid Lipid Bilayer Arrays Created Using a Continuous Flow Microspotter

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathryn A.; Gale, Bruce K.; Conboy, John C.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new method for creating micropatterned lipid bilayer arrays (MLBAs) using a 3D microfluidic system. An array of fluid lipid membranes was patterned onto a glass substrate using a Continuous Flow Microspotter™ (CFM). Fluorescence microscopy experiments were used to verify the formation of a bilayer structure on the glass substrate. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments demonstrated the bilayers fluidity was maintained while being individually corralled on the substrate. The reproducibility of bilayer formation within an array was demonstrated by the linear response of membrane fluorescence versus mol % rhodamine functionalized lipids incorporated into the vesicles prior to fusion to the surface. The highly customizable nature of the MLBAs was demonstrated utilizing three different fluorescently labeled lipids to generate a multiple component lipid array. Finally, the cholera toxin B (CTB)/ganglioside GM1, anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) antibody/DNP and NeutrAvidin/biotin protein-ligand systems were used to model multiple protein-ligand binding on the MLBAs. The multi-component patterned bilayers were functionalized with GM1, DNP and biotin lipids and binding curves was generated by recording surface fluorescence versus increasing concentration of membrane bound ligands. PMID:18841940

  15. Lipid Interactions and Organization in Complex Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Oskar; Yasuda, Tomokazu; Hautala, Victor; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Murata, Michio; Slotte, J Peter

    2016-04-12

    Bilayer lipids influence the lateral structure of the membranes, but the relationship between lipid properties and the lateral structure formed is not always understood. Model membrane studies on bilayers containing cholesterol and various phospholipids (PLs) suggest that high and low temperature melting PLs may segregate, especially in the presence of cholesterol. The effect of different PL headgroups on lateral structure of bilayers is also not clear. Here, we have examined the formation of lateral heterogeneity in increasingly complex (up to five-component) multilamellar bilayers. We have used time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with domain-selective fluorescent probes (PL-conjugated trans-parinaric acid), and (2)H NMR spectroscopy with site or perdeuterated PLs. We have measured changes in bilayer order using such domain-selective probes both as a function of temperature and composition. Our results from time-resolved fluorescence and (2)H NMR showed that in ternary bilayers, acyl chain order and thermostability in sphingomyelin-rich domains were not affected to any greater extent by the headgroup structure of the monounsaturated PLs (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylserine) in the bilayer. In the complex five-component bilayers, we could not detect major differences between the different monounsaturated PLs regarding cholesterol-induced ordering. However, cholesterol clearly influenced deuterated N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin differently than the other deuterated PLs, suggesting that cholesterol favored N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin over the other PLs. Taken together, both the fluorescence spectroscopy and (2)H NMR data suggest that the complex five-component membranes displayed lateral heterogeneity, at least in the lower temperature regimen examined. PMID:27074681

  16. Modeling Nanoparticle Wrapping or Translocation in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10Å to 250Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10Å does not . Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it could interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10Å to 40Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers. PMID:26260123

  17. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 108-109 V m-1, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ˜1 V (˜2 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ˜1.4 V (˜2.8 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC

  18. Supported lipid bilayer membranes for water purification by reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yair; Berman, Amir; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2010-05-18

    Some biological plasma membranes pass water with a permeability and selectivity largely exceeding those of commercial membranes for water desalination using specialized trans-membrane proteins aquaporins. However, highly selective transport of water through aquaporins is usually driven by an osmotic rather mechanical pressure, which is not as attractive from the engineering point of view. The feasibility of adopting biomimetic membranes for water purification driven by a mechanical pressure, i.e., filtration is explored in this paper. Toward this goal, it is proposed to use a commercial nanofiltration (NF) membrane as a support for biomimetic lipid bilayer membranes to render them robust enough to withstand the required pressures. It is shown in this paper for the first time that by properly tuning molecular interactions supported phospholipid bilayers (SPB) can be prepared on a commercial NF membrane. The presence of SPB on the surface was verified and quantified by several spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which showed morphology close to the desired one with very few defects. As an ultimate test it is shown that hydraulic permeability of the SPB supported on the NF membrane (NTR-7450) approaches the values deduced from the typical osmotic permeabilities of intact continuous bilayers. This permeability was unaffected by the trans-membrane flow of water and by repeatedly releasing and reapplying a 10 bar pressure. Along with a parallel demonstration that aquaporins could be incorporated in a similar bilayer on mica, this demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed approach. The prepared SPB structure may be used as a platform for preparing biomimetic filtration membranes with superior performance based on aquaporins. The concept of SPBs on permeable substrates of the present type may also be useful in the future for studying transport of various molecules through trans-membrane proteins. PMID:20099798

  19. Elastic deformation and failure of lipid bilayer membranes containing cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, D; Nunn, R S

    1990-01-01

    Giant bilayer vesicles were reconstituted from several lipids and lipid/cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures: stearolyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC), bovine sphingomyelin (BSM), diarachidonylphosphatidylcholine (DAPC), SOPC/CHOL, BSM/CHOL, DAPC/CHOL, and extracted red blood cell (RBC) lipids with native cholesterol. Single-walled vesicles were manipulated by micropipette suction and several membrane material properties were determined. The properties measured were the elastic area compressibility modulus K, the critical areal strain alpha c, and the tensile strength tau lys, from which the failure energy or membrane toughness Tf was calculated. The elastic area expansion moduli for these lipid and lipid/cholesterol bilayers ranged from 57 dyn/cm for DAPC to 1,734 dyn/cm for BSM/CHOL. The SOPC/CHOL series and RBC lipids had intermediate values. The results indicated that the presence of cholesterol is the single most influential factor in increasing bilayer cohesion, but only for lipids where both chains are saturated, or mono- or diunsaturated. Multiple unsaturation in both lipid chains inhibits the condensing effect of cholesterol in bilayers. The SOPC/CHOL system was studied in more detail. The area expansion modulus showed a nonlinear increase with increasing cholesterol concentration up to a constant plateau, indicating a saturation limit for cholesterol in the bilayer phase of approximately 55 mol% CHOL. The membrane compressibility was modeled by a property-averaging composite theory involving two bilayer components, namely, uncomplexed lipid and a lipid/cholesterol complex of stoichiometry 1/1.22. The area expansion modulus of this molecular composite membrane was evaluated by a combination of the expansion moduli of each component scaled by their area fractions in the bilayer. Bilayer toughness, which is the energy stored in the bilayer at failure, showed a maximum value at approximately 40 mol% CHOL. This breakdown energy was found to be only a fraction of the

  20. Simulations of a Membrane-Anchored Peptide: Structure, Dynamics, and Influence on Bilayer Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten Ø.; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Peters, Günther H.

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional structure of a model decapeptide is obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations of the peptide in explicit water. Interactions between an N-myristoylated form of the folded peptide anchored to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine fluid phase lipid membranes are studied at different applied surface tensions by molecular dynamics simulations. The lipid membrane environment influences the conformational space explored by the peptide. The overall secondary structure of the anchored peptide is found to deviate at times from its structure in aqueous solution through reversible conformational transitions. The peptide is, despite the anchor, highly mobile at the membrane surface with the peptide motion along the bilayer normal being integrated into the collective modes of the membrane. Peptide anchoring moderately alters the lateral compressibility of the bilayer by changing the equilibrium area of the membrane. Although membrane anchoring moderately affects the elastic properties of the bilayer, the model peptide studied here exhibits conformational flexibility and our results therefore suggest that peptide acylation is a feasible way to reinforce peptide-membrane interactions whereby, e.g., the lifetime of receptor-ligand interactions can be prolonged. PMID:15189854

  1. Behavior of Bilayer Leaflets in Asymmetric Model Membranes: Atomistic Simulation Studies.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianhui; Nickels, Jonathan; Katsaras, John; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2016-08-25

    Spatial organization within lipid bilayers is an important feature for a range of biological processes. Leaflet compositional asymmetry and lateral lipid organization are just two of the ways in which membrane structure appears to be more complex than initially postulated by the fluid mosaic model. This raises the question of how the phase behavior in one bilayer leaflet may affect the apposing leaflet and how one begins to construct asymmetric model systems to investigate these interleaflet interactions. Here we report on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (a total of 4.1 μs) of symmetric and asymmetric bilayer systems composed of liquid-ordered (Lo) or liquid-disordered (Ld) leaflets, based on the nanodomain-forming POPC/DSPC/cholesterol system. We begin by analyzing an asymmetric bilayer with leaflets derived from simulations of symmetric Lo and Ld bilayers. In this system, we observe that the properties of the Lo and Ld leaflets are similar to those of the Lo and Ld leaflets in corresponding symmetric systems. However, it is not obvious that mixing the equilibrium structures of their symmetric counterparts is the most appropriate way to construct asymmetric bilayers nor that these structures will manifest interleaflet couplings that lead to domain registry/antiregistry. We therefore constructed and simulated four additional asymmetric bilayer systems by systematically adding or removing lipids in the Ld leaflet to mimic potential density fluctuations. We find that the number of lipids in the Ld leaflet affects its own properties, as well as those of the apposing Lo leaflet. Collectively, the simulations reveal the presence of weak acyl chain interdigitation across bilayer leaflets, suggesting that interdigitation alone does not contribute significantly to the interleaflet coupling in nonphase-separated bilayers of this chemical composition. However, the properties of both leaflets appear to be sensitive to changes in in-plane lipid packing, possibly

  2. Helix insertion into bilayers and the evolution of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Polytopic α-helical membrane proteins cannot spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers without assistance from polytopic α-helical membrane proteins that already reside in the membrane. This raises the question of how these proteins evolved. Our current knowledge of the insertion of α-helices into natural and model membranes is reviewed with the goal of gaining insight into the evolution of membrane proteins. Topics include: translocon-dependent membrane protein insertion, antibiotic peptides and proteins, in vitro insertion of membrane proteins, chaperone-mediated insertion of transmembrane helices, and C-terminal tail-anchored (TA) proteins. Analysis of the E. coli genome reveals several predicted C-terminal TA proteins that may be descendents of proteins involved in pre-cellular membrane protein insertion. Mechanisms of pre-translocon polytopic α-helical membrane protein insertion are discussed. PMID:20039094

  3. Effect of cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of fluid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Heiss, Arno; Salditt, Tim; Katsaras, John; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the effect of 5 and 40 mol% cholesterol on the lateral nanoscale dynamics of phospholipid membranes. By measuring the excitation spectrum at several lateral q || values (up to q || = 3 1), complete dispersion curves were determined of gel, fluid and liquid-ordered phase bilayers. The inclusion of cholesterol had a distinct effect on the collective dynamics of the bilayer s hydrocarbon chains; specifically, we observed a pronounced stiffening of the membranes on the nanometer length scale in both gel and fluid bilayers, even though they were experiencing a higher degree of molecular disorder. Also, for the first time we determined the nanoscale dynamics in the high-cholesterol liquid-ordered phase of bilayers containing cholesterol. Namely, this phase appears to be softer than fluid bilayers, but better ordered than bilayers in the gel phase.

  4. Effects of Phospholipase A2 Inhibitors on Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Dubinin, Mikhail V; Astashev, Maxim E; Penkov, Nikita V; Gudkov, Sergey V; Dyachenko, Igor A; Samartsev, Victor N; Belosludtsev, Konstantin N

    2016-06-01

    The work examines the effect of inhibitors of cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent phospholipases A2 on bilayer lipid membranes. It was established that trifluoroperazine (TFP) and, to a lesser extent, arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF3) and palmitoyl trifluoromethyl ketone (PACOCF3) were able to permeabilize artificial lipid membranes (BLM and liposomes). It was shown that AACOCF3 lowered the temperature of phase transition of DMPC liposomes, inducing disordering of the hydrophobic region of lipid bilayer. TFP disordered membranes both in the hydrophobic region and in the region of hydrophilic heads, this being accompanied by changes in the membrane permeability: appearance of a channel-like BLM activity and leakage of sulforhodamine B from liposomes. In contrast to AACOCF3 and TFP, PACOCF3 increased membrane orderliness in the hydrophobic region (heightened the temperature of phase transition of DMPC liposomes) and in the region of lipid heads. The effectiveness of AACOCF3 and PACOCF3 as inductors of BLM and liposome permeabilization was considerably lower comparatively to TFP. As revealed by dynamic light scattering, incorporation of TFP, AACOCF3 and PACOCF3 into the membrane of liposomes resulted in the increase of the average size of particles in the suspension, presumably due to their aggregation or fusion. The paper discusses possible mechanisms of the influence of phospholipase A2 inhibitors on bilayer lipid membranes. PMID:26762382

  5. Spontaneous curvature of bilayer membranes from molecular simulations: Asymmetric lipid densities and asymmetric adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RóŻycki, Bartosz; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Biomimetic and biological membranes consist of molecular bilayers with two leaflets which are typically exposed to different aqueous environments and may differ in their molecular density or composition. Because of these asymmetries, the membranes prefer to curve in a certain manner as quantitatively described by their spontaneous curvature. Here, we study such asymmetric membranes via coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We consider two mechanisms for the generation of spontaneous curvature: (i) different lipid densities within the two leaflets and (ii) leaflets exposed to different concentrations of adsorbing particles. We focus on membranes that experience no mechanical tension and describe two methods to compute the spontaneous curvature. The first method is based on the detailed structure of the bilayer's stress profile which can hardly be measured experimentally. The other method starts from the intuitive view that the bilayer represents a thin fluid film bounded by two interfaces and reduces the complexity of the stress profile to a few membrane parameters that can be measured experimentally. For the case of asymmetric adsorption, we introduce a simulation protocol based on two bilayers separated by two aqueous compartments with different adsorbate concentrations. The adsorption of small particles with a size below 1 nm is shown to generate large spontaneous curvatures up to about 1/(24 nm). Our computational approach is quite general: it can be applied to any molecular model of bilayer membranes and can be extended to other mechanisms for the generation of spontaneous curvatures as provided, e.g., by asymmetric lipid composition or depletion layers of solute molecules.

  6. Local membrane mechanics of pore-spanning bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mey, Ingo; Stephan, Milena; Schmitt, Eva K; Müller, Martin Michael; Ben Amar, Martine; Steinem, Claudia; Janshoff, Andreas

    2009-05-27

    The mechanical behavior of lipid bilayers spanning the pores of highly ordered porous silicon substrates was scrutinized by local indentation experiments as a function of surface functionalization, lipid composition, solvent content, indentation velocity, and pore radius. Solvent-containing nano black lipid membranes (nano-BLMs) as well as solvent-free pore-spanning bilayers were imaged by fluorescence and atomic force microscopy prior to force curve acquisition, which allows distinguishing between membrane-covered and uncovered pores. Force indentation curves on pore-spanning bilayers attached to functionalized hydrophobic porous silicon substrates reveal a predominately linear response that is mainly attributed to prestress in the membranes. This is in agreement with the observation that indentation leads to membrane lysis well below 5% area dilatation. However, membrane bending and lateral tension dominate over prestress and stretching if solvent-free supported membranes obtained from spreading giant liposomes on hydrophilic porous silicon are indented. An elastic regime diagram is presented that readily allows determining the dominant contribution to the mechanical response upon indentation as a function of load and pore radius. PMID:19453196

  7. Lipid Bilayer Membrane Perturbation by Embedded Nanopores: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fandiño, Rebeca; Piñeiro, Ángel; Trick, Jemma L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-03-22

    A macromolecular nanopore inserted into a membrane may perturb the dynamic organization of the surrounding lipid bilayer. To better understand the nature of such perturbations, we have undertaken a systematic molecular dynamics simulation study of lipid bilayer structure and dynamics around three different classes of nanopore: a carbon nanotube, three related cyclic peptide nanotubes differing in the nature of their external surfaces, and a model of a β-barrel nanopore protein. Periodic spatial distributions of several lipid properties as a function of distance from the nanopore were observed. This was especially clear for the carbon nanotube system, for which the density of lipids, the bilayer thickness, the projection of lipid head-to-tail vectors onto the membrane plane, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficients exhibited undulatory behavior as a function of the distance from the surface of the channel. Overall, the differences in lipid behavior as a function of the nanopore structure reveal local adaptation of the bilayer structure and dynamics to different embedded nanopore structures. Both the local structure and dynamic behavior of lipids around membrane-embedded nanopores are sensitive to the geometry and nature of the outer surface of the macromolecule/molecular assembly forming the pore. PMID:26943498

  8. Covalent attachment of functionalized lipid bilayers to planar waveguides for measuring protein binding to biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heyse, S.; Vogel, H.; Sänger, M.; Sigrist, H.

    1995-01-01

    A new method is presented for measuring sensitively the interactions between ligands and their membrane-bound receptors in situ using integrated optics, thus avoiding the need for additional labels. Phospholipid bilayers were attached covalently to waveguides by a novel protocol, which can in principle be used with any glass-like surface. In a first step, phospholipids carrying head-group thiols were covalently immobilized onto SiO2-TiO2 waveguide surfaces. This was accomplished by acylation of aminated waveguides with the heterobifunctional crosslinker N-succinimidyl-3-maleimidopropionate, followed by the formation of thioethers between the surface-grafted maleimides and the synthetic thiolipids. The surface-attached thiolipids served as hydrophobic templates and anchors for the deposition of a complete lipid bilayer either by fusion of lipid vesicles or by lipid self-assembly from mixed lipid/detergent micelles. The step-by-step lipid bilayer formation on the waveguide surface was monitored in situ by an integrated optics technique, allowing the simultaneous determination of optical thickness and one of the two refractive indices of the adsorbed organic layers. Surface coverages of 50-60% were calculated for thiolipid layers. Subsequent deposition of POPC resulted in an overall lipid layer thickness of 45-50 A, which corresponds to the thickness of a fluid bilayer membrane. Specific recognition reactions occurring at cell membrane surfaces were modeled by the incorporation of lipid-anchored receptor molecules into the supported bilayer membranes. (1) The outer POPC layer was doped with biotinylated phosphatidylethanolamine. Subsequent specific binding of streptavidin was optically monitored. (2) A lipopeptide was incorporated in the outer POPC monolayer. Membrane binding of monoclonal antibodies, which were directed against the peptide moiety of the lipopeptide, was optically detected. The specific antibody binding correlated well with the lipopepitde

  9. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  10. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: A lattice model

    PubMed Central

    Pink, David A.; Chapman, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure—area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T0, which locates the gel—fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a “smooth” homogeneous surface (“cholesterol-like”) and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T0 can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken “annulus” of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T0 does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10-7 sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed. PMID:286996

  11. Intermonolayer Friction and Surface Shear Viscosity of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    den Otter, W. K.; Shkulipa, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The flow behavior of lipid bilayer membranes is characterized by a surface viscosity for in-plane shear deformations, and an intermonolayer friction coefficient for slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. Both properties have been studied for a variety of coarse-grained double-tailed model lipids, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For lipids with two identical tails, the surface shear viscosity rises rapidly with tail length, while the intermonolayer friction coefficient is less sensitive to the tail length. Interdigitation of lipid tails across the bilayer midsurface, as observed for lipids with two distinct tails, strongly enhances the intermonolayer friction coefficient, but hardly affects the surface shear viscosity. The simulation results are compared against the available experimental data. PMID:17468168

  12. The effect of compatible solute ectoines on the structural organization of lipid monolayer and bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Wulff, Stephanie; Lentzen, Georg; Neuhaus, Thorsten; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2010-08-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes responsible for osmotic balance and at the same time compatible with the cellular metabolism. Here, we have investigated the effect of the compatible solutes, ectoine and hydroxyectoine, on the fluid-rigid domain structure of lipid monolayer and bilayer membranes. Mainly saturated dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine membranes exhibiting a clear le/lc phase transition were used. Fluorescence microscopy showed that ectoines added to the aqueous subphase expand and fluidize the lipid monolayers especially at surface pressures below 30mN/m. The domain structure at the le/lc phase transition is sensitively modified leading to smaller but more numerous domains in the presence of ectoines. Hydroxyectoine was more efficient than ectoine. These results are explained by the replacement theory assuming that the ectoines are likely to be expelled from the membrane surface thus favoring the hydration of the lipid membrane. This effect reduces the line tension, which is the interfacial energy at the domain edges leading to reduced domain sizes and increased number of rigid domains. Isotherms of negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol membranes show a similar expansion, while unsaturated lipids are less affected. Mixed phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol membranes exhibit the same effect on the line tension increasing the tendency for a phase separation. This could be shown also in bilayer vesicles, where the compatible solutes have only a minor effect on the lipid main phase transition in pure DPPC membranes but reduce the extent of the pretransition. In mixed DPPC/DPPG bilayer membranes ectoines cause a phase separation leading to the enrichment of expanded DPPC domains. In conclusion, our study gives for the first time evidence that ectoines have an effect on lipid membranes increasing the hydration of the surface and thus increasing the mobility of the lipid head groups and fluidizing the lipid layer accordingly. This increased

  13. The mechanoelectrical response of droplet interface bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Freeman, E C; Najem, J S; Sukharev, S; Philen, M K; Leo, D J

    2016-03-28

    Mechanotransduction and interfacial properties in unsupported liquid biomimetic membranes are explored using the droplet-interface bilayer technique. The fluidic monolayer-membrane system afforded by this technique allows for dynamic control over the membrane dimensions and curvature, which under periodic deformations generates capacitive currents (akin to a Kelvin probe), and permits a detailed electrostatic characterization of the boundary layers as well as observation of flexoelectric effects. Both high and low displacement frequency regimes are examined, and the results show that the mechanoelectric signals generated by the membranes may be linked to the membrane electrostatic structure. In addition, we show that periodic membrane bending in a high-frequency regime generates tension sufficient to activate reconstituted mechanosensitive channels. PMID:26905644

  14. Forming lipid bilayer membrane arrays on micropatterned polyelectrolyte film surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xuejing; Qi, Guodong; Han, Xiaojun

    2013-07-01

    A novel method of forming lipid bilayer membrane arrays on micropatterned polyelectrolyte film surfaces is introduced. Polyelectrolyte films were fabricated by the layer-by-layer technique on a silicon oxide surface modified with a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) monolayer. The surface pK(a) value of the APTES monolayer was determined by cyclic voltammetry to be approximately 5.61, on the basis of which a pH value of 2.0 was chosen for layer-by-layer assembly. Micropatterned polyelectrolyte films were obtained by deep-UV (254 nm) photolysis though a mask. Absorbed fluorescent latex beads were used to visualize the patterned surfaces. Lipid bilayer arrays were fabricated on the micropatterned surfaces by immersing the patterned substrates into a solution containing egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies yielded a lateral diffusion coefficient for probe molecules of 1.31±0.17 μm(2) s(-1) in the bilayer region, and migration of the lipid NBD PE in bilayer lipid membrane arrays was observed in an electric field. PMID:23695862

  15. Supported Bilayers with Excess Membrane Reservoir: A Template for Reconstituting Membrane Budding and Fission

    PubMed Central

    Pucadyil, Thomas J.; Schmid, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A complete mechanistic understanding of membrane-localized processes in vesicular transport, such as membrane budding and fission, requires their reconstitution with biochemically-defined components from a biochemically-defined substrate. Supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion represent an attractive substrate for this purpose. However, conventional supported bilayers lack a sufficient membrane reservoir to recreate membrane budding and fission events. We describe the formation of supported bilayers with excess membrane reservoir (SUPER) templates from the fusion of liposomes containing negatively charged lipids on silica beads under high-ionic-strength conditions. Using a fluorescence microscopy-based assay to monitor early and late stages of supported bilayer formation, we show that an increase in ionic strength leads to an increase in the rates of liposome adsorption and subsequent fusion during formation of supported bilayers. The two rates, however, increase disproportionally, leading to accumulation of excess reservoir with an increase in ionic strength. SUPER templates allow the seamless application of microscopy-based assays to analyze membrane-localized processes together with sedimentation-based assays to isolate vesicular and nonvesicular products released from the membrane. The results presented here emphasize the general utility of these templates for analyzing vesicular and nonvesicular transport processes. PMID:20643070

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of melittin in a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Bernèche, S; Nina, M; Roux, B

    1998-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories of melittin in an explicit dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer are generated to study the details of lipid-protein interactions at the microscopic level. Melittin, a small amphipathic peptide found in bee venom, is known to have a pronounced effect on the lysis of membranes. The peptide is initially set parallel to the membrane-solution interfacial region in an alpha-helical conformation with unprotonated N-terminus. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and polarized attenuated total internal reflectance Fourier transform infrared (PATIR-FTIR) properties of melittin are calculated from the trajectory to characterize the orientation of the peptide relative to the bilayer. The residue Lys7 located in the hydrophobic moiety of the helix and residues Lys23, Arg24, Gln25, and Gln26 at the C-terminus hydrophilic form hydrogen bonds with water molecules and with the ester carbonyl groups of the lipids, suggesting their important contribution to the stability of the helix in the bilayer. Lipid acyl chains are closely packed around melittin, contributing to the stable association with the membrane. Calculated density profiles and order parameters of the lipid acyl chains averaged over the molecular dynamics trajectory indicate that melittin has effects on both layers of the membrane. The presence of melittin in the upper layer causes a local thinning of the bilayer that favors the penetration of water through the lower layer. The energetic factors involved in the association of melittin at the membrane surface are characterized using an implicit mean-field model in which the membrane and the surrounding solvent are represented as structureless continuum dielectric material. The results obtained by solving the Poisson-Bolztmann equation numerically are in qualitative agreement with the detailed dynamics. The influence of the protonation state of the N-terminus of melittin is examined. After 600 ps, the N-terminus of melittin

  17. Lipid Bilayer Membrane-Triggered Presynaptic Vesicle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The formation of functional synapses on artificial substrates is a very important step in the development of engineered in vitro neural networks. Spherical supported bilayer lipid membranes (SS-BLMs) are used here as a novel substrate to demonstrate presynaptic vesicle accumulation at an in vitro synaptic junction. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments have been used to characterize the SS-BLMs. Conventional immunocytochemistry combined with confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the formation of presynaptic vesicles at the neuron−SS-BLM contacts. These results indicate that lipid phases may play a role in the observed phenomenon, in addition to the chemical and electrostatic interactions between the neurons and SS-BLMs. The biocompatibility of lipid bilayers along with their membrane tunability makes the suggested approach a useful “toolkit” for many neuroengineering applications including artificial synapse formation and synaptogenesis in vivo. PMID:22778819

  18. Electrochemical characterization of bilayer lipid membrane-semiconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao Kang; Baral, S.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-03-08

    Three different systems of glyceryl monooleate (GMO), bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) supported semiconductor particles have been prepared and characterized. A single composition of particulate semiconductor deposited only on one side of the BLM constituted system A, two different compositions of particulate semiconductors sequentially deposited on the same side of the BLM represented system B, and two different compositions of particulate semiconductors deposited on the opposite sides of the BLM made up system C.

  19. Evidence for a discrete charge effect within lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C C; Bruner, L J

    1978-01-01

    A high amplitude voltage step technique has been used to meausre the surface density of dipicrylamine anions adsorbed at the surfaces of lipid bilayer membranes. Accompanying low amplitude measurements have determined the relaxation time for transient current flow across the membranes, a parameter governed by the height of the central energy barrier which dipicrylamine anions must cross in moving from one membrane surface to the other. Measured relaxation times and surface charge densities have been related by a quasi-continuum model of the discrete charge effect, which predicts that the membrane central barrier height will increase with increasing density of adsorbed surface charge. The experimentally determined relationship is in satisfactory agreement with the predictions of the model. The model does not provide a complete description of the membrane/solution interface, however, because it cannot be applied to the description of previously measured isotherms for the adsorption of dipicrylamine anions onto bilayer membranes surfaces. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. PMID:737286

  20. Modeling Lipid-Lipid Correlations across a Bilayer Membrane Using the Quasi-chemical Approximation.

    PubMed

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Roth, Joseph; May, Sylvio

    2015-09-15

    Mixed fluid-like lipid membranes exhibit interactions not only among the lipids within a given leaflet but also across the bilayer. The ensuing collective interleaflet coupling of entire membrane domains has been modeled previously using various mean-field approaches. Yet, also on the level of individual lipids have correlations across the bilayer been observed experimentally for binary mixtures of charged/uncharged lipids with mismatching combinations of short and long acyl chain lengths. The present study proposes a lattice gas model to quantify these correlations. To this end, we represent a macroscopically homogeneous lipid bilayer by two coupled two-dimensional lattice gases that we study using the quasi-chemical approximation. We demonstrate that the rationalization of previous experimental results is only possible if besides two-body lipid-lipid interactions within and across the bilayer our model also accounts for an additional multibody interaction mechanism, namely the local hydrophobic height mismatch created by pairing short and long chain lipids together. The robustness of the quasi-chemical approximation is verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26302019

  1. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  2. Wetting and freezing of water on supported bilayer lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Zachary; Miskowiec, Andrew; Brown, Mia; Kaiser, Helmut; King, Gavin; Jiji, Renee; Cooley, Jason; Taub, Haskell; Hansen, Flemming; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Diallo, Souleymane; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Temperature-dependent elastic incoherent neutron scattering shows qualitatively different behavior for water associated with single bilayers of the charge-neutral DMPC (dimyristoylphosphocholine) lipid than for the anionic DMPG (dimyristoylphosphoglycerol) bilayer supported on an SiO2-coated silicon substrate. For the neutral DMPC membrane, the membrane-associated water shows a step-like freezing transition somewhat below the bulk freezing point followed by a continuous freezing behavior and, on heating, a step-like melting transition at the bulk melting point of 273 K. In contrast, water near the anionic DMPG membrane shows only continuous freezing that extends to much lower temperatures than for DMPC and continuous melting that is complete well below the bulk melting point. We suggest that these results may be explained by a film-like water structure in the DMPG case owing to the hydrophilic nature of the membrane surface, while most of the water in the DMPC system is bulk-like and dewets from this more hydrophobic membrane surface. Supported by NSF Grant Nos. DMR-0944772 and DGE-1069091.

  3. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T

    2015-10-01

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid-Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200-11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. A model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell. PMID:26074009

  4. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.

  5. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those thatmore » cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.« less

  6. Proton/hydroxide conductance and permeability through phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Gutknecht, J

    1987-01-01

    Proton/hydroxide (H+/OH-) permeability of phospholipid bilayers is several orders of magnitude higher than alkali or halide ion permeabilities at pH 7. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) of H+/OH- conductance and permeability through planar phospholipid bilayer membranes. Membranes were formed from decane solutions of bacterial phosphatidylethanolamine, diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine, or egg phosphatidylcholine plus cholesterol. At pH 7, H+/OH- conductance (GH/OH) ranged from 2 to 6 nS.cm-2, corresponding to H+/OH- "net" permeabilities of (0.4-1.6) X 10(-5) cm.sec-1. GH/OH was inhibited by serum albumin (fatty acid-free), phloretin, and low pH. GH/OH was increased by chlorodecane, long-chain fatty acids, and voltages greater than 80 mV. Water permeability and GH/OH were not correlated. The results suggest that the H+/OH- charge carrier (i) is primarily anionic, (ii) crosses the membrane via nonpolar pathway(s), and (iii) can be removed from the membrane by "washing" with serum albumin. The simplest explanation is that the phospholipids contain weakly acidic contaminants that act as proton carriers at neutral pH. However, at low pH or in the presence of inhibitors, a "background" GH/OH remains that may be due to other mechanisms. PMID:2819878

  7. Nanometric Gap Structure with a Fluid Lipid Bilayer for the Selective Transport and Detection of Biological Molecules.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koji; Tanabe, Masashi; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2016-08-01

    The biological membrane is a natural biosensing platform that can detect specific molecules with extremely high sensitivity. We developed a biosensing methodology by combining a model biological membrane and a nanometer-sized gap structure on a glass substrate. The model membrane comprised lithographically patterned polymeric and fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric bilayer was bonded to a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sheet by using an adhesion layer with a defined thickness (lipid vesicles). Extruded lipid vesicles having a biotin moiety on the surface were used as the adhesion layer in conjunction with the biotin-streptavidin linkage. A gap structure was formed between the fluid bilayer and PDMS (nanogap junction). The thickness of the gap structure was several tens of nanometers, as determined by the thickness of the adhesion layer. The nanogap junction acted as a sensitive biosensing platform. From a mixture of proteins (cholera toxin and albumin), the target protein (cholera toxin) was selectively transported into the gap by the specific binding to a glycolipid (GM1) in the fluid bilayer and lateral diffusion. The target protein molecules were then detected with an elevated signal-to-noise ratio due to the reduced background noise in the nanometric gap. The combination of selective transport and reduced background noise drastically enhanced the sensitivity toward the target protein. The nanogap junction should have broad biomedical applications by realizing highly selective and sensitive biosensing in samples having diverse coexisting molecules. PMID:27427950

  8. Solute effects on the colloidal and phase behavior of lipid bilayer membranes: ethanol-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Vierl, U; Löbbecke, L; Nagel, N; Cevc, G

    1994-01-01

    By means of the scanning differential calorimetry, x-ray diffractometry, and the dynamic light scattering, we have systematically studied the phase and packing properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles or multibilayers in the presence of ethanol. We have also determined the partial ternary phase diagram of such dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/water/ethanol mixtures. The directly measured variability of the structural bilayer parameters implies that ethanol binding to the phospholipid bilayers increases the lateral as well as the transverse repulsion between the lipid molecules. This enlarges the hydrocarbon tilt (by up to 23 degrees) and molecular area (by < or = 40%). Ethanol-phospholid association also broadens the interface and, thus, promotes lipid headgroup solvation. This results in excessive swelling (by 130%) of the phosphatidylcholine bilayers in aqueous ethanol solutions. Lateral bilayer expansion, moreover, provokes a successive interdigitation of the hydrocarbon chains in the systems with bulk ethanol concentrations of 0.4-1.2 M. The hydrocarbon packing density as well as the propensity for the formation of lamellar gel phases simultaneously increase. The pretransition temperature of phosphatidylcholine bilayers is more sensitive to the addition of alcohol (initial shift: delta Tp = 22 degrees C/mol) than the subtransition temperature (delta Ts reversible 5 degrees C/mol), whereas the chain-melting phase transition temperature is even less affected (delta Tm = 1.8 degrees C/mol). After an initial decrease of 3 degrees for the bulk ethanol concentrations below 1.2 M, the Tm value increases by 2.5 degrees above this limiting concentration. The gel-phase phosphatidylcholine membranes below Tm are fully interdigitated above this limiting concentration. The chain tilt on the fringe of full chain interdigitation is zero and increases with higher ethanol concentrations. Above Tm, some of the lipid molecules are solubilized by the bound ethanol

  9. Conducting polymer supported bilayer lipid membrane reconstituted with alamethicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Salinas, Sergio; Baba Sundaresan, Vishnu

    2011-09-01

    Ionic electroactive polymers and bioderived materials have been independently demonstrated as actuators, sensors and energy harvesting devices. In an electroactive polymer, the applied electric field between the cathode and anode drives ion transport between the electrodes, impregnated electrolyte and the bulk of the polymer to generate force and displacement. Similarly, in a bioderived material an input stimulus (electrical, chemoelectrical or chemical) applied across the protein in a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) displaces ions across the membrane barrier and enables sensing and actuation functions. This paper presents a novel architecture for a device that integrates the ionic function of an electroactive polymer and a bioderived material into a thin-film laminated device combining their unique advantages. A conducting polymer (PPy(DBS)) is used as the electroactive polymer and alamethicin-bound bilayer lipid membrane is used as the bioderived material in the thin-film laminated device. Owing to the configuration of the laminated device, the protein regulates the ionic concentration in the conducting polymer and regulates the electrochemical doping/undoping process in the polymer. By electrically connecting the conducting polymer across its thickness, this arrangement provides a mechanism external to the polymer besides electrical field that can control the electrical, mechanical and/or optical properties of the conducting polymer. This paper also presents the fabrication and characterization of the integrated ionic device and presents a template for the development of a novel category of electroactive ionic devices.

  10. The impact of cell-penetrating peptides on membrane bilayer structure during binding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Daniel J; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Kulkarni, Ketav; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the effect of penetratin and a truncated analogue on the bilayer structure using dual polarisation interferometry, to simultaneously measure changes in mass per unit area and birefringence (an optical parameter representing bilayer order) with high sensitivity during the binding and dissociation from the membrane. Specifically, we studied penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), along with a shortened and biotinylated version known as R8K-biotin (RRMKWKKK(Biotin)-NH2). Overall both peptides bound only weakly to the neutral DMPC and POPC bilayers, while much higher binding was observed for the anionic DMPC/DMPG and POPC/POPG. The binding of penetratin to gel-phase DMPC/DMPG was adequately represented by a two-state model, whereas on the fluid-phase POPC/POPG it exhibited a distinctly different binding pattern, best represented by a three-state kinetic model. However, R8K-biotin did not bind well to DMPC/DMPG and showed a more transitory and superficial binding to POPC/POPG. Comparing the modelling results for both peptides binding to POPC/POPG suggests an important role for a securely bound intermediate prior to penetratin insertion and translocation. Overall these results further elucidate the mechanism of penetratin, and provide another example of the significance of the ability of DPI to measure structural changes and the use of kinetic analysis to investigate the stages of peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:27163492

  11. Automated Lipid Bilayer Membrane Formation Using a Polydimethylsiloxane Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sangbaek; Yoon, Sunhee; Ryu, Hyunil; Kim, Sun Min; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2016-01-01

    An artificial lipid bilayer, or black lipid membrane (BLM), is a powerful tool for studying ion channels and protein interactions, as well as for biosensor applications. However, conventional BLM formation techniques have several drawbacks and they often require specific expertise and laborious processes. In particular, conventional BLMs suffer from low formation success rates and inconsistent membrane formation time. Here, we demonstrate a storable and transportable BLM formation system with controlled thinning-out time and enhanced BLM formation rate by replacing conventionally used films (polytetrafluoroethylene, polyoxymethylene, polystyrene) to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In this experiment, a porous-structured polymer such as PDMS thin film is used. In addition, as opposed to conventionally used solvents with low viscosity, the use of squalene permitted a controlled thinning-out time via slow solvent absorption by PDMS, prolonging membrane lifetime. In addition, by using a mixture of squalene and hexadecane, the freezing point of the lipid solution was increased (~16 °C), in addition, membrane precursors were produced that can be indefinitely stored and readily transported. These membrane precursors have reduced BLM formation time of < 1 hr and achieved a BLM formation rate of ~80%. Moreover, ion channel experiments with gramicidin A demonstrated the feasibility of the membrane system. PMID:27501114

  12. Effect of membrane tension on the physical properties of DOPC lipid bilayer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, A. Srinivas; Warshaviak, Dora Toledo; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer were performed to explore its mechanosensitivity. Variations in the bilayer properties, such as area per lipid, volume, thickness, hydration depth (HD), hydration thickness (HT), lateral diffusion coefficient, and changes in lipid structural order were computed in the membrane tension range 0 to 15 dyn/cm. We determined that an increase in membrane tension results in a decrease in the bilayer thickness and HD of ∼5% and ∼5.7% respectively, whereas area per lipid, volume, and HT/HD increased by 6.8%, 2.4%, and 5% respectively. The changes in lipid conformation and orientation were characterized using orientational (S2) and deuterium (SCD) order parameters. Upon increase of membrane tension both order parameters indicated an increase in lipid disorder by 10– 20%, mostly in the tail end region of the hydrophobic chains. The effect of membrane tension on lipid lateral diffusion in the DOPC bilayer was analyzed on three different time scales corresponding to inertial motion, anomalous diffusion and normal diffusion. The results showed that lateral diffusion of lipid molecules is anomalous in nature due to the non-exponential distribution of waiting times. The anomalous and normal diffusion coefficients increased by 20% and 52% when the membrane tension changed from 0 to 15 dyn/cm, respectively. In conclusion, our studies showed that membrane tension causes relatively significant changes in the area per lipid, volume, polarity, membrane thickness, and fluidity of the membrane suggesting multiple mechanisms by which mechanical perturbation of the membrane could trigger mechanosensitive response in cells. PMID:22588133

  13. Lateral organization, bilayer asymmetry, and inter-leaflet coupling of biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2015-07-29

    Understanding of cell membrane organization has evolved significantly from the classic fluid mosaic model. It is now recognized that biological membranes are highly organized structures, with differences in lipid compositions between inner and outer leaflets and in lateral structures within the bilayer plane, known as lipid rafts. These organizing principles are important for protein localization and function as well as cellular signaling. However, the mechanisms and biophysical basis of lipid raft formation, structure, dynamics and function are not clearly understood. One key question, which we focus on in this review, is how lateral organization and leaflet compositional asymmetry are coupled. Detailed information elucidating this question has been sparse because of the small size and transient nature of rafts and the experimental challenges in constructing asymmetric bilayers. Resolving this mystery will require advances in both experimentation and modeling. We discuss here the preparation of model systems along with experimental and computational approaches that have been applied in efforts to address this key question in membrane biology. Furthermore, we seek to place recent and future advances in experimental and computational techniques in context, providing insight into in-plane and transverse organization of biological membranes.

  14. Lateral organization, bilayer asymmetry, and inter-leaflet coupling of biological membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2015-07-29

    Understanding of cell membrane organization has evolved significantly from the classic fluid mosaic model. It is now recognized that biological membranes are highly organized structures, with differences in lipid compositions between inner and outer leaflets and in lateral structures within the bilayer plane, known as lipid rafts. These organizing principles are important for protein localization and function as well as cellular signaling. However, the mechanisms and biophysical basis of lipid raft formation, structure, dynamics and function are not clearly understood. One key question, which we focus on in this review, is how lateral organization and leaflet compositional asymmetry are coupled.more » Detailed information elucidating this question has been sparse because of the small size and transient nature of rafts and the experimental challenges in constructing asymmetric bilayers. Resolving this mystery will require advances in both experimentation and modeling. We discuss here the preparation of model systems along with experimental and computational approaches that have been applied in efforts to address this key question in membrane biology. Furthermore, we seek to place recent and future advances in experimental and computational techniques in context, providing insight into in-plane and transverse organization of biological membranes.« less

  15. Reconstitution of a plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase into bilayer lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, W; Slayman, C L; Cartwright, C P

    1993-10-01

    The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase of Neurospora has been reconstituted into planar lipid bilayer membranes by means of the vesicle-fusion technique described by Finkelstein and his collaborators (Zimmerberg et al., 1980; Cohen et al., 1980, 1984; Akabas et al., 1984). Enzyme was first transferred from isolated plasma membrane fragments into asolectin vesicles by a detergent-dialysis procedure (Perlin et al., 1984). After H(+)-pumping activity had been checked by quenching of acridine orange fluorescence, the vesicles were fused into performed bilayers. Critical features of the fusion process include (i) attachment of the vesicles to the bilayer in the presence of divalent cations (Mg++), and (ii) rapid osmotic swelling, which was enhanced by prior sonication or freeze-thawing of the vesicles, and/or by inclusions of physiologic channels. Enough proton pumps could be thus incorporated into bilayers to achieve ATP-driven, vanadate-sensitive currents of 0.04-0.4 pA. Aqueous solutions of low ionic strength were used to suppress conductance fluctuations due to the channels, and when that precaution was taken, we could demonstrate the proton pump the work against membrane potentials of at least 50 mV. PMID:8181690

  16. The assembly and use of tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs).

    PubMed

    Cranfield, Charles; Carne, Sonia; Martinac, Boris; Cornell, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Because they are firmly held in place, tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are considerably more robust than supported lipid bilayers such as black lipid membranes (BLMs) (Cornell et al. Nature 387(6633): 580-583, 1997). Here we describe the procedures required to assemble and test tethered lipid bilayers that can incorporate various lipid species, peptides, and ion channel proteins. PMID:25331126

  17. Electrostatics of phosphoinositide bilayer membranes. Theoretical and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Langner, M; Cafiso, D; Marcelja, S; McLaughlin, S

    1990-01-01

    We made fluorescence, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electrophoretic mobility, and ionizing electrode measurements to study the effect of the monovalent lipid phosphatidylinositol (PI) and the trivalent lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) on the electrostatic potential adjacent to bilayer membranes. When the membranes were formed from mixtures of PI and the zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), the Gouy-Chapman-Stern (GCS) theory described adequately the dependence of potential on distance (0, 1, 2 nm) from the membrane, mole % negative lipid, and [KCI]. Furthermore, all EPR and fluorescence probes reported identical surface potentials with a PC/PI membrane. With PC/PIP2 membranes, however, the anionic (coion) probes reported less negative potentials than the cationic (counterion) probes; the deviations from the GCS theory were greater for the coions than the counterions. Discreteness-of-charge theories based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation incorrectly predict that deviations from the GCS theory should be greater for counterions than for coions. We discuss a consistent statistical mechanical theory that takes into account three effects ignored in the GCS theory: the finite size of the ions in the double layer, the electrical interaction between pairs of ions (correlation effects), and the mobile discrete nature of the surface charges. This theory correctly predicts that deviations from GCS theory should be negligible for monovalent lipids, significant for trivalent lipids, and greater for coions than for counterions. PMID:2156577

  18. Carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Laprade, R; Grenier, F; Pagé-Dansereau, M; Dansereau, J

    1984-08-01

    The electrical properties predicted by a widely accepted model for carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayers are described. The different steps leading to ion transport and their associated rate constants are reaction at the interface between an ion in the aqueous phase and a carrier in the membrane (kRi), followed by translocation of the ion-carrier complex across the membrane interior (kis) and its dissociation at the other interface (kDi) after which the free carrier crosses back the membrane interior (ks). Results on glyceryl monooleate (GMO) membranes for a family of homologue carriers, the macrotetralide actin antibiotics (nonactin, monactin, dinactin, trinactin, and tetranactin) and a variety of ions (Na+, Cs+, Rb+, K+, NH4+, and Tl+) are presented. Internally consistent data obtained from steady-state electrical measurements (zero-current potential and conductance, current-voltage relationship) allow us to obtain the equilibrium permeability ratios for the different ions and show that for a given carrier kRi is relatively invariant from one ion to the other, except for Tl+ (larger), which implies that the ionic selectivity is controlled by the dissociation of the complex. The values of the individual rate constants obtained from current relaxation experiments are also presented and confirm the findings from steady-state measurements, as well as the isostericity concept for complexes of different ions with the same carrier (kis invariant). These also allow us to determine the aqueous phase membrane and torus membrane partition coefficients. Finally, the observed increase in kis from nonactin to tetranactin and, for all homologues, from GMO-decane to solvent-free GMO membranes, together with the concomitant decrease in kDi, can be explained in terms of modifications of electrostatic energy profiles induced by variations in carrier size and membrane thickness. PMID:6498590

  19. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  20. Detergent interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes for protein reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccio, Matteo; Zan Goh, Haw; Loesche, Mathias

    2009-03-01

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are self-assembled biomimetic structures in which the membrane is separated from a solid substrate by a nm-thick hydrated submembrane space. These model systems are being used in binding studies of peripheral proteins and exotoxins. Here we aim at their application for the reconstitution of water-insoluble integral membrane proteins. As an alternative to fusion of preformed proteoliposomes we study the direct reconstitution of such proteins for applications in biosensing and pharmaceutical screening. For reconstitution, highly insulating tBLMs (R˜10^5-10^6 φ) were temporarily incubated with a detergent to screen for conditions that keep the detergent-saturated membranestable and ready to incorporate detergent-solubilized proteins. We assess the electrical characteristics, i.e. specific resistance and capacitance, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under timed incubation with decylmaltoside and dodecylmaltoside detergents in a regime around their critical micelle concentration, 1.8 mM and 0.17 mM respectively and demonstrate the restoration of the tBLM upon detergent removal. Thereby a range of concentration and incubation times was identified, that represents optimal conditions for the subsequent membrane protein reconstitution.

  1. Multiscale modeling of droplet interface bilayer membrane networks.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Eric C; Farimani, Amir B; Aluru, Narayana R; Philen, Michael K

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are considered for the development of stimuli-responsive membrane-based materials inspired by cellular mechanics. These DIB networks are often modeled as combinations of electrical circuit analogues, creating complex networks of capacitors and resistors that mimic the biomolecular structures. These empirical models are capable of replicating data from electrophysiology experiments, but these models do not accurately capture the underlying physical phenomena and consequently do not allow for simulations of material functionalities beyond the voltage-clamp or current-clamp conditions. The work presented here provides a more robust description of DIB network behavior through the development of a hierarchical multiscale model, recognizing that the macroscopic network properties are functions of their underlying molecular structure. The result of this research is a modeling methodology based on controlled exchanges across the interfaces of neighboring droplets. This methodology is validated against experimental data, and an extension case is provided to demonstrate possible future applications of droplet interface bilayer networks. PMID:26594262

  2. Properties of ganglioside GM1 in phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Reed, R A; Shipley, G G

    1996-03-01

    Gangliosides have been shown to function as cell surface receptors, as well as participating in cell growth, differentiation, and transformation. In spite of their multiple biological functions, relatively little is known about their structure and physical properties in membrane systems. The thermotropic and structural properties of ganglioside GM1 alone and in a binary system with 1,2-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. By DSC hydrated GM1 undergoes a broad endothermic transition TM = 26 degrees C (delta H = 1.7 kcal/mol GM1). X-ray diffraction below (-2 degrees C) and above (51 degrees C) this transition indicates a micellar structure with changes occurring only in the wide angle region of the diffraction pattern (relatively sharp reflection at 1/4.12 A-1 at -2 degrees C; more diffuse reflection at 1/4.41 A-1 at 51 degrees C). In hydrated binary mixtures with DPPC, incorporation of GM1 (0-30 mol%; zone 1) decreases the enthalpy of the DPPC pretransition at low molar compositions while increasing the TM of both the pre- and main transitions (limiting values, 39 and 44 degrees C, respectively). X-ray diffraction studies indicate the presence of a single bilayer gel phase in zone 1 that can undergo chain melting to an L alpha bilayer phase. A detailed hydration study of GM1 (5.7 mol %)/DPPC indicated a conversion of the DPPC bilayer gel phase to an infinite swelling system in zone 1 due to the presence of the negatively charged sialic acid moiety of GM1. At 30-61 mol % GM1 (zone 2), two calorimetric transitions are observed at 44 and 47 degrees C, suggesting the presence of two phases. The lower transition reflects the bilayer gel --> L alpha transition (zone 1), whereas the upper transition appears to be a consequence of the formation of a nonbilayer, micellar or hexagonal phase, although the structure of this phase has not been defined by x-ray diffraction. At > 61 mol % GM

  3. Enhanced sensitivity of a microfabricated resonator using a graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Eunho; Cho, Kilwon; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-08-18

    A graphene layer was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition methods and a polystyrene solution was spin-cast onto the graphene film. The graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane was attached between the two tines of a microfabricated quartz tuning fork (QTF). The modulus of the graphene-polystyrene bilayer was measured to be twice that of a pristine polystyrene membrane. Exposure of the membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor decreased the resonance frequency of the microresonator. The bilayer membrane-coated QTF produced a frequency change that was three times the change obtained using a polystyrene membrane-coated QTF, with a lower degree of degradation in the Q factor. The limit of detection of the bilayer membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor was determined to be 20 ppm.

  4. Kinetics of Domains Registration in Multicomponent Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sornbundit, Kan; Modchang, Charin; Triampo, Wannapong; Triampo, Darapond; Nuttavut, Narin; Sunil Kumar, P.B; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of registration of lipid domains in the apposing leaflets of symmetric bilayer membranes is investigated via systematic dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The decay of the distance between the centres of mass of the domains in the apposing leaflets is almost linear during early stages, and then becomes exponential during late times. The time scales of both linear and exponential decays are found to increase with decreasing the strength of interleaflet coupling. The ratio between the time scales of the exponential and linear regimes decreases with increasing the domain size, implying that the decay of the distance between the domains centres of mass is essentially linear for large domains. These numerical results are largely in agreement with the recent theoretical predictions of Han and Haataja [Soft Matter (2013) 9:2120-2124]. We also found that the domains become elongated during the registration process. PMID:25090030

  5. Pressure effects on the equilibrium configurations of bilayer lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVita, Raffaella; Stewart, Iain W.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-10-01

    Planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are currently employed to construct many bio-inspired material systems and structures. In order to characterize the pressure effects on the equilibrium configurations of these biological membranes, a novel continuum model is proposed. The BLM is assumed to be a two-layer smectic A liquid crystal. The mean orientation of the amphiphilic molecules comprising the membrane is postulated to be perpendicular to the layers and each layer is idealized as a two-dimensional liquid. Moreover, the BLM is modeled as a simply supported plate undergoing small deformations. It is subjected to a pressure load that acts perpendicularly to the layers. The equilibrium equations and boundary conditions are derived from the bulk elastic energy for smectic A liquid crystals as described by de Gennes and Prost (1993 The Physics of Liquid Crystals 2nd edn (Oxford Science Publications)) by using variational methods. The resulting fourth-order linear partial differential equation is solved by employing cylindrical functions and the series solution is proved to be convergent. The solution is numerically computed for values of the model parameters that are reported in the literature. This paper is dedicated to the memory of our colleagues, Professors Kevin P Granata and Liviu Librescv, who lost their lives during the sensless tragedy on 16 April, 2007 at Virginia Tech.

  6. Neuronal Activation by GPI-Linked Neuroligin-1 Displayed in Synthetic Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Groves, Jay T.; Dean, Camin; Pautot, Sophie; DeMaria, Shannon; Isacoff, Ehud

    2006-01-01

    We have characterized, in vitro, interactions between hippocampal neuronal cells and silica microbeads coated with synthetic, fluid, lipid bilayer membranes containing the glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-linked extracellular domain of the postsynaptic membrane protein neuroligin-1. These bilayer–neuroligin-1 beads activated neuronal cells to form presynaptic nerve terminals at the point of contact in a manner similar to that observed for live PC12 cells, ectopically expressing the full length neuroligin-1. The synthetic membranes exhibited biological activity at neuroligin-1 densities of ∼1 to 6 proteins/μm2. Polyolycarbonate beads with neuroligin-1 covalently attached to the surface failed to activate neurons despite the fact that neuroligin-1 binding activity is preserved. This implies that a lipid membrane environment is likely to be essential for neuroligin-1 activity. This technique allows the study of isolated proteins in an environment that has physical properties resembling those of a cell surface; proteins can diffuse freely within the membrane, retain their in vivo orientations, and are in a nondenatured state. In addition, the synthetic membrane environment affords control over both lipid and protein composition. This technology is easily implemented and can be applied to a wide variety of cellular studies. PMID:16262338

  7. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine andmore » phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.« less

  8. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  9. Acyl chain composition and coexisting fluid phases in lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Bradley, Miranda; Mitchell, Drake

    2011-10-01

    At room temperature phospholipid bilayers enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol may form a solid phase as well as two coexisting fluid phases. These are the standard fluid phase, or the liquid-disordered phase, ld, and the liquid-ordered phase, lo, which is commonly associated with lipid rafts. Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form coexisting lo, ld and solid phases over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes to detect these 2 phases: NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions strongly into the lo phase and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions strongly into the ld phase. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the ternary phase diagram of POPC/SPM/Chol with particular focus on the functionally important lo/ld coexistence region. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of these two fluorescent probes.

  10. Analyzing membrane remodeling and fission using supported bilayers with excess membrane reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Sylvia; Pucadyil, Thomas J; Schmid, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    A complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing vesicle formation requires quantitative assays and vesicle reconstitution using purified components. We describe a simple model membrane template for studying protein-mediated membrane remodeling and vesicle formation or fission that is amenable to both quantitative biochemical analysis and real-time imaging by epifluorescence microscopy. Supported bilayers with excess membrane reservoir (SUPER) templates are compositionally well-defined unilamellar membrane systems prepared on 2–5-μm silica beads under conditions that enable incorporation of excess membrane to form a loosely fitting bilayer that can be used to study membrane remodeling and fission. This protocol describes methods for SUPER template formation and characterization, as well as for the qualitative observation and quantitative measurement of vesicle formation and fission via microscopy and a simple sedimentation assay. SUPER templates can be prepared within 60 min. Results from either sedimentation-based or microscopy-based assays can be obtained within an additional 60 min. PMID:23288321

  11. Silica nanoparticles for the oriented encapsulation of membrane proteins into artificial bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Schadauer, Florian; Geiss, Andreas F; Srajer, Johannes; Siebenhofer, Bernhard; Frank, Pinar; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Ludwig, Bernd; Richter, Oliver-M H; Nowak, Christoph; Naumann, Renate L C

    2015-03-01

    An artificial bilayer lipid membrane system is presented, featuring the oriented encapsulation of membrane proteins in a functionally active form. Nickel nitrilo-triacetic acid-functionalized silica nanoparticles, of a diameter of around 25 nm, are used to attach the proteins via a genetically engineered histidine tag in a uniform orientation. Subsequently, the proteins are reconstituted within a phospholipid bilayer, formed around the particles by in situ dialysis to form so-called proteo-lipobeads (PLBs). With a final size of about 50 nm, the PLBs can be employed for UV/vis spectroscopy studies, particularly of multiredox center proteins, because the effects of light scattering are negligible. As a proof of concept, we use cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) from P. denitrificans with the his tag genetically engineered to subunit I. In this orientation, the P side of CcO is directed to the outside and hence electron transfer can be initiated by reduced cytochrome c (cc). UV/vis measurements are used in order to determine the occupancy by CcO molecules encapsulated in the lipid bilayer as well as the kinetics of electron transfer between CcO and cc. The kinetic data are analyzed in terms of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics showing that the turnover rate of CcO is significantly decreased compared to that of solubilized protein, whereas the binding characteristics are improved. The data demonstrate the suitability of PLBs for functional cell-free bioassays of membrane proteins. PMID:25670233

  12. Particle-based simulations of bilayer membranes: self-assembly, structural analysis, and shock-wave damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, Martin O.; Schindler, Tanja

    2016-08-01

    We report on the results of particle-based, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous environment where the membrane structures at equilibrium are subsequently exposed to strong shock waves, and their damage is analyzed. The lipid molecules self-assemble from unbiased random initial configurations to form stable bilayer membranes, including closed vesicles. During self-assembly of lipid molecules, we observe several stages of clustering, starting with many small clusters of lipids, gradually merging together to finally form one single bilayer membrane. We find that the clustering of lipids sensitively depends on the hydrophobic interaction h_c of the lipid tails in our model and on temperature T of the system. The self-assembled bilayer membranes are quantitatively analyzed at equilibrium with respect to their degree of order and their local structure. We also show that—by analyzing the membrane fluctuations and using a linearized theory— we obtain area compression moduli K_A and bending stiffnesses κ_B for our bilayer membranes which are within the experimental range of in vivo and in vitro measurements of biological membranes. We also discuss the density profile and the pair correlation function of our model membranes at equilibrium which has not been done in previous studies of particle-based membrane models. Furthermore, we present a detailed phase diagram of our lipid model that exhibits a sol-gel transition between quasi-solid and fluid domains, and domains where no self-assembly of lipids occurs. In addition, we present in the phase diagram the conditions for temperature T and hydrophobicity h_c of the lipid tails of our model to form closed vesicles. The stable bilayer membranes obtained at equilibrium are then subjected to strong shock waves in a shock tube setup, and we investigate the damage in the membranes due to their interaction with shock waves. Here, we find a transition from self

  13. Effective interactions between fluid membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d≪√S but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d≫√S, whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ, which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ. Moreover, σ scales as d for d≪√S but saturates at √kBTS/κ for d≫√S. In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions. PMID:26382349

  14. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S , we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d ≪√{S } but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d ≫√{S } , whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ , which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ . Moreover, σ scales as d for d ≪√{S } but saturates at √{kBT S /κ } for d ≫√{S } . In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  15. A nanohybrid membrane with lipid bilayer-like properties utilized as a conductimetric saccharin sensor.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Nikolaos G; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2007-10-31

    Since their introduction, artificial lipid bilayer membranes were used in a wide array of applications, such as sensors, biocompatible materials and study-models of the cell's outer boundary. Here, we present a nanohybrid membrane using an inorganic host and amphiphilic organic molecules with lipid bilayer-like properties. The stability of the presented mimetic membrane is significantly improved when compared to existing methods. The nanohybrid membrane exhibited two thermotropic phases corresponding to the L(alpha) and L(beta) phases that lipid bilayer membranes are known to adopt. Integration of cholesterol molecules into the nanohybrid membrane lead to the same qualitative effects as in lipid bilayers, including expansion of the bilayer spacing and decrease of the L(alpha) to L(beta) transition enthalpy. To further illustrate the similarities of the synthesized membrane with a lipid bilayer, the ability of the nanohybrid membrane to function as saccharin conductimetric sensor was evaluated. The lower limit of detection of the sensor was 6 microM and the linear range of response was from 20 to 400 microM. PMID:17548189

  16. Investigation of the effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on SANS/SAXS profile for short membrane wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Victor; Hawa, Takumi

    2013-09-28

    The effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profile is investigated based on harmonic motions of the surfactant bilayers with bending as well as thickness fluctuation motions. In this study we consider the case in which the wavelength of the bilayer membrane is shorter than the thickness of the membrane. We find that the thickness of the surfactant bilayer membrane, d{sub m}, affects both q{sub dip} and q{sub peak} of I(q,0) profile, and that the fluctuation amplitude, a, of the membrane changes the peak of I(q,0). A simple formula is derived to estimate the thickness of the bilayer based on the q{sub dip} of the profile obtained from the simulation. The resulting estimates of the thickness of the bilayer with harmonic motion showed accuracy within 1%. Moreover, the bilayer thicknesses estimated from the proposed formula show an excellent agreement with the SANS and SAXS experimental results available in the literatures. We also propose a curve fit model, which describes the relationship between the fluctuation amplitude and the normalized q{sub peak} ratio. The present results show the feasibility of the simple formula to estimate the fluctuation amplitude based on the SANS and SAXS profiles.

  17. Phase Behavior of Dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol Bilayer Membrane in Saline Water Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saeko; Goto, Masaki; Tamai, Nobutake; Matsuki, Hitoshi

    The phase transitions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) bilayer membrane in the aqueous NaCl solution were observed by means of an optical method under atmospheric and high pressures. The temperature-pressure phase diagram of the DPPG bilayer showed that the phase behavior of the DPPG bilayer was similar to that of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer except for the interdigitated gel (LβI) phase. Comparing the phase diagram with the diagram obtained in a phosphate buffer, it turned out that the formation of the LβI phase is suppressed by the shielding effect of NaCl on the repulsive interaction among polar headgroups.

  18. Microfabrication of hybrid fluid membrane for microengines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, R.; Formosa, F.; de Labachelerie, M.; Badel, A.; Lanzetta, F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the microfabrication and dynamic characterization of thick membranes providing a technological solution for microengines. The studied membranes are called hybrid fluid-membrane (HFM) and consist of two thin membranes that encapsulate an incompressible fluid. This work details the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scalable fabrication and characterization of HFMs. The membranes are composite structures based on Silicon spiral springs embedded in a polymer (RTV silicone). The anodic bonding of multiple stacks of Si/glass structures, the fluid filling and the sealing have been demonstrated. Various HFMs were successfully fabricated and their dynamic characterization demonstrates the agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Method of fabricating lipid bilayer membranes on solid supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Glenn, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support. With this method, a solution of lipid vesicles is first deposited on the solid support. Next, the lipid vesicles are destabilized by adding an amphipathic peptide solution to the lipid vesicle solution. This destabilization leads to production of a planar lipid bilayer on the solid support. The present invention also provides a supported planar lipid bilayer, where the planar lipid bilayer is made of naturally occurring lipids and the solid support is made of unmodified gold or titanium oxide. Preferably, the supported planar lipid bilayer is continuous. The planar lipid bilayer may be made of any naturally occurring lipid or mixture of lipids, including, but not limited to phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinsitol, cardiolipin, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin.

  20. Filament networks attached to membranes: cytoskeletal pressure and local bilayer deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    Several cell types, among them red blood cells, have a cortical, two-dimensional (2D) network of filaments sparsely attached to their lipid bilayer. In many mammalian cells, this 2D polymer network is connected to an underlying 3D, more rigid cytoskeleton. In this paper, we consider the pressure exerted by the thermally fluctuating, cortical network of filaments on the bilayer and predict the bilayer deformations that are induced by this pressure. We treat the filaments as flexible polymers and calculate the pressure that a network of such linear chains exerts on the bilayer; we then minimize the bilayer shape in order to predict the resulting local deformations. We compare our predictions with membrane deformations observed in electron micrographs of red blood cells. The polymer pressure along with the resulting membrane deformation can lead to compartmentalization, regulate in-plane diffusion and may influence protein sorting as well as transmit signals to the polymerization of the underlying 3D cytoskeleton.

  1. Ionic conductivity of the aqueous layer separating a lipid bilayer membrane and a glass support.

    PubMed

    White, Ryan J; Zhang, Bo; Daniel, Susan; Tang, John M; Ervin, Eric N; Cremer, Paul S; White, Henry S

    2006-12-01

    The in-plane ionic conductivity of the approximately 1-nm-thick aqueous layer separating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer membrane and a glass support was investigated. The aqueous layer conductivity was measured by tip-dip deposition of a POPC bilayer onto the surface of a 20- to 75-microm-thick glass membrane containing a single conical-shaped nanopore and recording the current-voltage (i-V) behavior of the glass membrane nanopore/POPC bilayer structure. The steady-state current across the glass membrane passes through the nanopore (45-480 nm radius) and spreads radially outward within the aqueous layer between the glass support and bilayer. This aqueous layer corresponds to the dominant resistance of the glass membrane nanopore/POPC bilayer structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements using dye-labeled lipids verified that the POPC bilayer maintains a significant degree of fluidity on the glass membrane. The slopes of ohmic i-V curves yield an aqueous layer conductivity of (3 +/- 1) x 10(-3) Omega(-1) cm(-1) assuming a layer thickness of 1.0 nm. This conductivity is essentially independent of the concentration of KCl in the bulk solution (10-4 to 1 M) in contact with the membrane. The results indicate that the concentration and mobility of charge carriers in the aqueous layer between the glass support and bilayer are largely determined by the local structure of the glass/water/bilayer interface. PMID:17129059

  2. Erythrocyte Membrane Model with Explicit Description of the Lipid Bilayer and the Spectrin Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-01-01

    The membrane of the red blood cell (RBC) consists of spectrin tetramers connected at actin junctional complexes, forming a two-dimensional (2D) sixfold triangular network anchored to the lipid bilayer. Better understanding of the erythrocyte mechanics in hereditary blood disorders such as spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and especially, sickle cell disease requires the development of a detailed membrane model. In this study, we introduce a mesoscale implicit-solvent coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model of the erythrocyte membrane that explicitly describes the phospholipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton, by extending a previously developed two-component RBC membrane model. We show that the proposed model represents RBC membrane with the appropriate bending stiffness and shear modulus. The timescale and self-consistency of the model are established by comparing our results with experimentally measured viscosity and thermal fluctuations of the RBC membrane. Furthermore, we measure the pressure exerted by the cytoskeleton on the lipid bilayer. We find that defects at the anchoring points of the cytoskeleton to the lipid bilayer (as in spherocytes) cause a reduction in the pressure compared with an intact membrane, whereas defects in the dimer-dimer association of a spectrin filament (as in elliptocytes) cause an even larger decrease in the pressure. We conjecture that this finding may explain why the experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of band-3 proteins are higher in elliptocytes than in spherocytes, and higher than in normal RBCs. Finally, we study the effects that possible attractive forces between the spectrin filaments and the lipid bilayer have on the pressure applied on the lipid bilayer by the filaments. We discover that the attractive forces cause an increase in the pressure as they diminish the effect of membrane protein defects. As this finding contradicts with experimental results, we conclude that the attractive forces are moderate and do

  3. Study of supported bilayer lipid membranes for use in chemo-electric energy conversion via active proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Sundaresan, Vishnu B.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-09-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been studied extensively due to functional and structural similarities to cell membranes, fostering research to understand ion-channel protein functions, measure bilayer mechanical properties, and identify self-assembly mechanisms. BLMs have traditionally been formed across single pores in substrates such as PTFE (Teflon). The incorporation of ion-channel proteins into the lipid bilayer enables the selective transfer of ions and fluid through the BLM. Processes of this nature have led to the measurement of ion current flowing across the lipid membrane and have been used to develop sensors that signal the presence of a particular reactant (glucose, urea, penicillin), improve drug recognition in cells, and develop materials capable of creating chemical energy from light. Recent research at Virginia Tech has shown that the incorporation of proton transporters in a supported BLM formed across an array of pores can convert chemical energy available in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into electricity. Experimental results from this work show that the system-named Biocell-is capable of developing 2µW/cm2 of membrane area with 15μl of ATPase. Efforts to increase the power output and conversion efficiency of this process while moving toward a packaged device present a unique engineering problem. The bilayer, as host to the active proton transporters, must therefore be formed evenly across a porous substrate, remain stable and yet fluid-like for protein interaction, and exhibit a large seal resistance. This article presents the ongoing work to characterize the Biocell using impedance analysis. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to study the effect of adding ATPase proteins to POPS:POPE bilayer lipid membranes and correlate structural changes evident in the impedance data to the energy-conversion capability of various partial and whole Biocell assemblies. The specific membrane resistance of a pure BLM drops from 40-120k

  4. Effects of Anesthetic Membrane Solutes on Orientational Order in Lecithin Bilayer Membranes: a Deuterium NMR Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phonphok, Nason

    _{z^ ' z^'}.. A theory for the molecular mechanism of anesthesia is proposed. Our working hypothesis is that general anesthetics interact with phosphatidylcholine bilayers in the headgroup region, changing its time-averaged conformation and altering the extent of cation binding to the surface of the membrane. In this manner the electrical properties of the membrane are changed. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  5. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the permselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  6. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the perselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  7. Composite membranes for fluid separations

    DOEpatents

    Blume, Ingo; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Pinnau, Ingo; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    1990-01-01

    A method for designing and making composite membranes having a microporous support membrane coated with a permselective layer. The method involves calculating the minimum thickness of the permselective layer such that the selectivity of the composite membrane is close to the intrinsic selectivity of the permselective layer. The invention also provides high performance membranes with optimized properties.

  8. Semiconductor particles in bilayer lipid membranes. Formation, characterization, and photoelectrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.K.; Baral, S.B.; Rolandi, R.; Fendler, J.H.

    1988-02-17

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been formed from bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS), glyceryl monooleate (GMO), and a ploymerizable surfactant, (n-C/sub 15/H/sub 31/CO/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/))/sub 2/N/sup +/(CH/sub 3/)CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/CH==CH/sub 2/Cl/sup -/(STYRS). These BLMs were then used to provide matrices for the in situ generation of microcrystalline CdS, CuS, Cu/sub 2/S, PbS, ZnS, HgS, and In/sub 2/S/sub 3/. Semiconductors were formed by injecting appropriate metal ion precursors and H/sub 2/S into the bathing solutions on opposite sides of the BLM. Their presence was established by voltage-dependent capacitance measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and optical microscopy. Subsequent to the injection of H/sub 2/S, the first observable change was the appearance of fairly uniform white dots on the black film. These dots rapidly moved around and grew in size, forming islands that then merged with themselves and with a second generation of dots, which ultimately led to a continuous film that continued to grow in thickness. Film formation and growth were monitored by simultaneous optical thickness and capacitance measurements. These data were treated in terms of an equivalent R-C circuit and allowed for the assessment of the semiconductor penetration depth into the BLM. This value for a GMO-BLM-supported In/sub 2/S/sub 3/ film was determined to be 24 A. Bandgap excitation, by nanosecond-pulsed or continuous illumination of the BLM-supported semiconductor film, led to observable photoelectric effects. Visible light (lambda > 350 nm) excitation into STYRS-BLM-supported CdS led to polymerization of the styrene moiety of STYRS. BLM-supported semiconductors remained stable for days.

  9. Characterization of the Red Beet Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase Reconstituted in a Planar Bilayer System.

    PubMed Central

    Briskin, D. P.; Basu, S.; Assmann, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The transport activity of the red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plasma membrane H+-ATPase was examined following reconstitution into a planar bilayer membrane. Fusion of partially purified plasma membrane H+-ATPase with the bilayer membrane was accomplished by perfusion of proteoliposomes against the bilayer under hypoosmotic conditions. Following incorporation into the bilayer, an ATP-dependent current was measured that demonstrated properties consistent with those of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. Current production was substrate specific for ATP, inhibited by orthovanadate, and insensitive to 200 nM erythrosin B but inhibited by 100 [mu]M erythrosin B. When current production was measured as a function of Mg:ATP concentration, a simple Michaelis-Menten relationship was observed and a Km of 0.62 mM was estimated. Current-voltage analysis of ATP-dependent current in the presence of 0.5 mM ATP, 20 mM ADP, 40 mM orthophosphate, and an opposing 2.5-unit [delta]pH revealed a reversal potential of about -149 mV. Based on the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis, this reversal potential is consistent with an H+/ATP stoichiometry of 1. This study demonstrates the usefulness of a planar bilayer system for investigation of energy coupling to H+ transport by the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. PMID:12228483

  10. Bipolar membranes with fluid distribution passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor); Archer, Shivaun (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. (Inventor); Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia (Inventor); Cisar, Alan J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a bipolar membrane and methods for making and using the membrane. The bipolar membrane comprises a cation-selective region, an anion-selective region, an interfacial region between the anion-selective region and the cation-selective region, and means for delivering fluid directly into the interfacial region. The means for delivering fluid includes passages that may comprise a fluid-permeable material, a wicking material, an open passage disposed within the membrane or some combination thereof. The passages may be provided in many shapes, sizes and configurations, but preferably deliver fluid directly to the interfacial region so that the rate of electrodialysis is no longer limited by the diffusion of fluid through the cation- or anion-selective regions to the interfacial region.

  11. Elastic Properties of Polymerised and Fluid Membranes Under Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillcock, Julian Charles

    The stability of a living cell relies on the properties and interrelations of its constituent parts. The fluid bilayer surrounding the cell separates the cytoplasm inside the cell from the extracellular environment. A cross-linked network of proteins within the cytoplasm supports the fluid bilayer and contributes to the cell's elasticity. Three properties relating to the behaviour of a model fluid bilayer and polymerised network are investigated by Monte Carlo simulation: the phase behaviour of a system of discotic liquid crystal molecules, the elastic properties of a model polymerised network, and the stability and rupture of a model fluid membrane. The isotropic to nematic transition induced by hydrostatic pressure in a system of discotic liquid cystal molecules in three dimensions is presented. The study concentrates on the phase behaviour resulting from the anisotropy of the disks. The transition is present for disks whose thickness to radius ratio is less than 40%, but is absent for thicker disks. A more specialised model of disks restricted to intersect a planar interface between two immiscible fluids is investigated, but has no isotropic -nematic phase transition at finite temperature. The elastic properties of a two-dimensional, triangulated network of Hookean springs are investigated as a function of temperature and applied tension. The compression modulus decreases, and the shear modulus increases, as the tension on the network is increased. The elastic properties of self-avoiding networks at low temperature are well described by a mean field theory. When the self-avoidance constraint is removed, the network undergoes a phase transition to a collapsed state of small area as the tension is reduced to zero. Both types of network show an unstable expansion of their area when the stretching tension exceeds a specified value. Both networks also have the unusual property (referred to as a negative Poisson ratio) of expanding transversely when stretched

  12. Elastic properties and line tension of self-assembled bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Pastor, Kyle A; Shi, An-Chang; Schmid, Friederike; Zhou, Jiajia

    2013-07-01

    The elastic properties of a self-assembled bilayer membrane are studied using the self-consistent field theory, applied to a model system composed of flexible amphiphilic chains dissolved in hydrophilic polymeric solvents. Examining the free energy of bilayer membranes with different geometries allows us to calculate their bending modulus, Gaussian modulus, two fourth-order membrane moduli, and the line tension. The dependence of these parameters on the microscopic characteristics of the amphiphilic chain, characterized by the volume fraction of the hydrophilic component, is systematically studied. The theoretical predictions are compared with the results from a simple monolayer model, which approximates a bilayer membrane by two monolayers. The region of validity of the linear elasticity theory is analyzed by examining the higher-order contributions. PMID:23944501

  13. Elastic properties and line tension of self-assembled bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianfeng; Pastor, Kyle A.; Shi, An-Chang; Schmid, Friederike; Zhou, Jiajia

    2013-07-01

    The elastic properties of a self-assembled bilayer membrane are studied using the self-consistent field theory, applied to a model system composed of flexible amphiphilic chains dissolved in hydrophilic polymeric solvents. Examining the free energy of bilayer membranes with different geometries allows us to calculate their bending modulus, Gaussian modulus, two fourth-order membrane moduli, and the line tension. The dependence of these parameters on the microscopic characteristics of the amphiphilic chain, characterized by the volume fraction of the hydrophilic component, is systematically studied. The theoretical predictions are compared with the results from a simple monolayer model, which approximates a bilayer membrane by two monolayers. The region of validity of the linear elasticity theory is analyzed by examining the higher-order contributions.

  14. High-throughput formation of lipid bilayer membrane arrays with an asymmetric lipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Yamanaka, Tomoko; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present a micro-device in which more than 10,000 asymmetric lipid bilayer membranes are formed at a time on micro-chamber arrays. The arrayed asymmetric lipid bilayers, where lipid compositions are different between the inner and outer leaflets, are formed with high efficiency of over 97% by injecting several types of liquids into a micro-device that has hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic surfaces. The lipid compositional asymmetry is an intrinsic property of bio-membranes, and therefore, this micro-device extends the versatility of artificial lipid-bilayer systems, which were previously limited to symmetric bilayer formation, and could contribute to the understanding of the role of lipid compositional asymmetry in cell physiology and also to further analytical and pharmacological applications. PMID:25399694

  15. Anionic deep cavitands enable the adhesion of unmodified proteins at a membrane bilayer.

    PubMed

    Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Perez, Lizeth; Morgan, Melissa A; Si, Fang; Hamdy, Omar M; Beecher, Consuelo N; Larive, Cynthia K; Julian, Ryan R; Zhong, Wenwan; Cheng, Quan; Hooley, Richard J

    2014-12-28

    An anionic self-folding deep cavitand is capable of immobilizing unmodified proteins and enzymes at a supported lipid bilayer interface, providing a simple, soft bioreactive surface that allows enzymatic function under mild conditions. The adhesion is based on complementary charge interactions, and the hosts are capable of binding enzymes such as trypsin at the bilayer interface: the catalytic activity is retained upon adhesion, allowing selective reactions to be performed at the membrane surface. PMID:25366572

  16. Interaction of Nuclease Colicins with Membranes: Insertion Depth Correlates with Bilayer Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Vankemmelbeke, Mireille; O′Shea, Paul; James, Richard; Penfold, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein transport across cellular membranes is an important aspect of toxin biology. Escherichia coli cell killing by nuclease colicins occurs through DNA (DNases) or RNA (RNases) hydrolysis and to this end their cytotoxic domains require transportation across two sets of membranes. In order to begin to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the membrane translocation of colicin nuclease domains, we have analysed the membrane association of four DNase domains (E9, a charge reduction E9 mutant, E8, and E7) and one ribosomal RNase domain (E3) using a biomembrane model system. Principal Results We demonstrate, through the use of large unilamellar vesicles composed of synthetic and E. coli lipids and a membrane surface potential sensor, that the colicin nuclease domains bind anionic membranes only, with micromolar affinity and via a cooperative binding mechanism. The evaluation of the nuclease bilayer insertion depth, through a fluorescence quenching analysis using brominated lipids, indicates that the nucleases locate to differential regions in the bilayer. Colicin DNases target the interfacial region of the lipid bilayer, with the DNase E7 showing the deepest insertion, whereas the ribosomal RNase E3 penetrates into the hydrophobic core region of the bilayer. Furthermore, the membrane association of the DNase E7 and the ribosomal RNase E3 induces vesicle aggregation, lipid mixing and content leakage to a much larger extent than that of the other DNases analysed. Conclusions/Significance Our results show, for the first time, that after the initial electrostatically driven membrane association, the pleiotropic membrane effects induced by colicin nuclease domains relate to their bilayer insertion depth and may be linked to their in vivo membrane translocation. PMID:23029560

  17. Electrical monitoring of gel-protected bilayer lipid membranes using a bipotentiostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddow, J. A.; Peterson, Ian R.; Heptinstall, J.; Walton, D. J.

    2001-09-01

    Electrically monitored lipid bilayer membranes, protected form mechanical damage and contact with low-energy liquids by a hydrogel layer, show promise in biosensing applications. We describe the principle and implementation of a bipotentiostatic circuit for the measurement of both resistance and capacitance of gel-protected membranes. We report measurements taken using the bipotentiostat of membranes formed using glycerol 1-monooleate, and the response of these membranes taken using the bipotentiostat of membranes formed using glycerol 1-monooleate, and the response of these membranes to the ionophore, valinomycin.

  18. Continuum electrostatic approach for evaluating positions and interactions of proteins in a bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Supunyabut, Chirayut; Fuklang, Sunit; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-06-01

    Orientations of proteins in the membranes are crucial to their function and stability. Unfortunately the exact positions of these proteins in the lipid bilayer are mostly undetermined. Here, the spatial orientation of membrane proteins within the lipid membrane was evaluated using a Poisson-Boltzmann solvent continuum approach to calculate the electrostatic free energy of the protein solvation at various orientations in an implicit bilayer. The solvation energy was obtained by computing the difference in electrostatic energies of the protein in water and in lipid/water environments, treating each as an implicit solvent model. The optimal position of transmembrane proteins (TMP) in a lipid bilayer is identified by the minimum in the "downhill" pathway of the solvation energy landscape. The energy landscape pattern was considerably conserved in various TMP classes. Evaluation of the position of 1060 membrane proteins from the orientations of proteins in membranes (OPM) database revealed that most of the polytopic and β-barrel proteins were in good agreement with those of the OPM database. The study provides a useful scheme for estimating the membrane solvation energy made by lipid-exposed amino acids in membrane proteins. In addition, our results tested with the bacterial potassium channel model demonstrated the potential usefulness of the approach in assessing the quality of membrane protein models. The present approach should be applicable for constructing transmembrane proteins-lipid configuration suitable for membrane protein simulations and will have utility for the structural modeling of membrane proteins. PMID:25912455

  19. A Bilayered Structure Comprised of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Desalination by Membrane Distillation.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Madhuleena; Roy, Sagar; Mitra, Somenath

    2016-08-01

    The development of a novel carbon nanotube (CNT) immobilized membrane comprised of a double-layer structure is presented for water desalination by membrane distillation. The bilayered structure is comprised of CNTs functionalized with a hydrophobic octadecyl amine group on the feed side and carboxylated CNTs on the permeate side. The latter is more hydrophilic. The hydrophobic CNTs provide higher water vapor permeation, while the hydrophilic CNTs facilitate the condensation of water vapor. Together, these led to superior performance, and flux in a direct contact membrane distillation mode was found to be as high as 121 kg/m(2)h at 80 °C. The bilayered membrane represented an enhancement of 70% over the unmodified membrane and 37% over a membrane which had a monolayered structure where only the feed side was CNT-modified. PMID:27387851

  20. Plasmonic nanoantenna arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of lipid molecules embedded in a bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Kühler, Paul; Weber, Max; Lohmüller, Theobald

    2014-06-25

    We demonstrate a strategy for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of supported lipid membranes with arrays of plasmonic nanoantennas. Colloidal lithography refined with plasma etching is used to synthesize arrays of triangular shaped gold nanoparticles. Reducing the separation distance between the triangle tips leads to plasmonic coupling and to a strong enhancement of the electromagnetic field in the nanotriangle gap. As a result, the Raman scattering intensity of molecules that are located at this plasmonic "hot-spot" can be increased by several orders of magnitude. The nanoantenna array is then embedded with a supported phospholipid membrane which is fluid at room temperature and spans the antenna gap. This configuration offers the advantage that molecules that are mobile within the bilayer membrane can enter the "hot-spot" region via diffusion and can therefore be measured by SERS without static entrapment or adsorption of the molecules to the antenna itself. PMID:24896979

  1. Transport methods for probing the barrier domain of lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, T X; Chen, X; Anderson, B D

    1992-01-01

    Two experimental techniques have been utilized to explore the barrier properties of lecithin/decane bilayer membranes with the aim of determining the contributions of various domains within the bilayer to the overall barrier. The thickness of lecithin/decane bilayers was systematically varied by modulating the chemical potential of decane in the annulus surrounding the bilayer using different mole fractions of squalene in decane. The dependence of permeability of a model permeant (acetamide) on the thickness of the solvent-filled region of the bilayer was assessed in these bilayers to determine the contribution of this region to the overall barrier. The flux of acetamide was found to vary linearly with bilayer area with Pm = (2.9 +/- 0.3) x 10(-4) cm s-1, after correcting for diffusion through unstirred water layers. The ratio between the overall membrane permeability coefficient and that calculated for diffusion through the hydrocarbon core in membranes having maximum thickness was 0.24, suggesting that the solvent domain contributes only slightly to the overall barrier properties. Consistent with these results, the permeability of acetamide was found to be independent of bilayer thickness. The relative contributions of the bilayer interface and ordered hydrocarbon regions to the transport barrier may be evaluated qualitatively by exploring the effective chemical nature of the barrier microenvironment. This may be probed by comparing functional group contributions to transport with those obtained for partitioning between water and various model bulk solvents ranging in polarity or hydrogen-bonding potential. A novel approach is described for obtaining group contributions to transport using ionizable permeants and pH adjustment. Using this approach, bilayer permeability coefficients of p-toluic acid and p-hydroxymethyl benzoic acid were determined to be 1.1 +/- 0.2 cm s-1 and (1.6 +/- 0.4) x 10(-3) cm s-1, respectively. From these values, the -OH group contribution

  2. Proton switch for modulating oxygen reduction by a copper electrocatalyst embedded in a hybrid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, Christopher J.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Li, Ying; Sobyra, Thomas B.; Zimmerman, Steven C.; Hosseini, Ali; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular switches gate many fundamental processes in natural and artificial systems. Here, we report the development of an electrochemical platform in which a proton carrier switches the activity of a catalyst. By incorporating an alkyl phosphate in the lipid layer of a hybrid bilayer membrane, we regulate proton transport to a Cu-based molecular oxygen reduction reaction catalyst. To construct this hybrid bilayer membrane system, we prepare an example of a synthetic Cu oxygen reduction reaction catalyst that forms a self-assembled monolayer on Au surfaces. We then embed this Cu catalyst inside a hybrid bilayer membrane by depositing a monolayer of lipid on the self-assembled monolayer. We envisage that this electrochemical system can give a unique mechanistic insight not only into the oxygen reduction reaction, but into proton-coupled electron transfer in general.

  3. Arrayed water-in-oil droplet bilayers for membrane transport analysis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, R; Soga, N; Hara, M; Noji, H

    2016-08-01

    The water-in-oil droplet bilayer is a simple and useful lipid bilayer system for membrane transport analysis. The droplet interface bilayer is readily formed by the contact of two water-in-oil droplets enwrapped by a phospholipid monolayer. However, the size of individual droplets with femtoliter volumes in a high-throughput manner is difficult to control, resulting in low sensitivity and throughput of membrane transport analysis. To overcome this drawback, in this study, we developed a novel micro-device in which a large number of droplet interface bilayers (>500) are formed at a time by using femtoliter-sized droplet arrays immobilized on a hydrophobic/hydrophilic substrate. The droplet volume was controllable from 3.5 to 350 fL by changing the hydrophobic/hydrophilic pattern on the device, allowing high-throughput analysis of membrane transport mechanisms including membrane permeability to solutes (e.g., ions or small molecules) with or without the aid of transport proteins. Thus, this novel platform broadens the versatility of water-in-oil droplet bilayers and will pave the way for novel analytical and pharmacological applications such as drug screening. PMID:27080052

  4. Shape dynamics, lipid hydrodynamics, and the complex viscoelasticity of bilayer membranes [corrected].

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mohammad; Arroyo, Marino

    2012-07-01

    Biological membranes are continuously brought out of equilibrium, as they shape organelles, package and transport cargo, or respond to external actions. Even the dynamics of plain lipid membranes in experimental model systems are very complex due to the tight interplay between the bilayer architecture, the shape dynamics, and the rearrangement of the lipid molecules. We formulate and numerically implement a continuum model of the shape dynamics and lipid hydrodynamics, which describes the bilayer by its midsurface and by a lipid density field for each monolayer. The viscoelastic response of bilayers is determined by the stretching and curvature elasticity, and by the inter-monolayer friction and the membrane interfacial shear viscosity. While the bilayer equilibria are well understood theoretically, dynamical calculations have relied on simplified continuum approaches of uncertain transferability, or on molecular simulations reaching very limited length and time scales. Our approach incorporates the main physics, is fully nonlinear, does not assume predefined shapes, and can access a wide range of time and length scales. We validate it with the well understood tether extension. We investigate the tubular lipid transport between cells, the dynamics of bud absorption by a planar membrane, and the fate of a localized lipid density asymmetry in vesicles. These axisymmetric examples bear biological relevance and highlight the diversity of dynamical regimes that bilayers can experience. PMID:23005476

  5. Application of self-consistent field theory to self-assembled bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping-Wen; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-12-01

    Bilayer membranes self-assembled from amphiphilic molecules such as lipids, surfactants, and block copolymers are ubiquitous in biological and physiochemical systems. The shape and structure of bilayer membranes depend crucially on their mechanical properties such as surface tension, bending moduli, and line tension. Understanding how the molecular properties of the amphiphiles determine the structure and mechanics of the self-assembled bilayers requires a molecularly detailed theoretical framework. The self-consistent field theory provides such a theoretical framework, which is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical parameters of self-assembled bilayer membranes. In this mini review we summarize the formulation of the self-consistent field theory, as exemplified by a model system composed of flexible amphiphilic chains dissolved in hydrophilic polymeric solvents, and its application to the study of self-assembled bilayer membranes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11421101 and 21274005) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada.

  6. Mechanism of ionophoric transport of indium-111 cations through a lipid bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.O.; Hwang, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The use of mobile ionophores to facilitate the transport of /sup 111/In through a lipid bilayer membrane has broad applications in liposome technology and cell labeling. However, the mechanism of such ionophore-mediated transport of /sup 111/In through a lipid bilayer membrane is not completely clear. The present report describes the correlations of the behaviors of ionophoric loading of /sup 111/In into liposomes with the lipophilicity and the indium-binding affinity of three ionophores, namely, 8-hydroxyquinoline, acetylacetone, and tropolone. Our results suggest that the mechanism of the ionophoric transport of /sup 111/In through a lipid bilayer membrane involves the rapid exchange of /sup 111/In cations among the ionophores in both the aqueous solution and the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, the effectiveness of an ionophore in facilitating the transport of /sup 111/In from the external aqueous compartment to the entrapped nitrilotriacetic acid depends not only on the lipophilicity of the (/sup 111/In)ionophore complex, but also on the lipophilicity of the free ionophore itself and the competition of /sup 111/In between nitrilotriacetic acid inside the inner aqueous compartment of the liposome and the ionophore imbedded in the lipid bilayer membrane of the liposome.

  7. The Influence of Hydrogen Bonding on Sphingomyelin/Colipid Interactions in Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Al Sazzad, Md Abdullah; Jäntti, Niklas Z; Pentikäinen, Olli T; Slotte, J Peter

    2016-01-19

    The phospholipid acyl chain composition and order, the hydrogen bonding, and properties of the phospholipid headgroup all influence cholesterol/phospholipid interactions in hydrated bilayers. In this study, we examined the influence of hydrogen bonding on sphingomyelin (SM) colipid interactions in fluid uni- and multilamellar vesicles. We have compared the properties of oleoyl or palmitoyl SM with comparable dihydro-SMs, because the hydrogen bonding properties of SM and dihydro-SM differ. The association of cholestatrienol, a fluorescent cholesterol analog, with oleoyl sphingomyelin (OSM) was significantly stronger than its association with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, in bilayers with equal acyl chain order. The association of cholestatrienol with dihydro-OSM, which lacks a trans double bond in the sphingoid base, was even stronger than the association with OSM, suggesting an important role for hydrogen bonding in stabilizing sterol/SM interactions. Furthermore, with saturated SM in the presence of 15 mol % cholesterol, cholesterol association with fluid dihydro-palmitoyl SM bilayers was stronger than seen with palmitoyl SM under similar conditions. The different hydrogen bonding properties in OSM and dihydro-OSM bilayers also influenced the segregation of palmitoyl ceramide and dipalmitoylglycerol into an ordered phase. The ordered, palmitoyl ceramide-rich phase started to form above 2 mol % in the dihydro-OSM bilayers but only above 6 mol % in the OSM bilayers. The lateral segregation of dipalmitoylglycerol was also much more pronounced in dihydro-OSM bilayers than in OSM bilayers. The results show that hydrogen bonding is important for sterol/SM and ceramide/SM interactions, as well as for the lateral segregation of a diglyceride. A possible molecular explanation for the different hydrogen bonding in SM and dihydro-SM bilayers is presented and discussed. PMID:26789766

  8. Magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers with positive ordering: a new model membrane system.

    PubMed

    Prosser, R S; Hwang, J S; Vold, R R

    1998-05-01

    A stable smectic phospholipid bilayer phase aligned with the director parallel to the magnetic field can be generated by the addition of certain trivalent paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a bicellar solution of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in water. Suitable lanthanide ions are those with positive anisotropy of their magnetic susceptibility, namely Eu3+, Er3+, Tm3+, and Yb3+. For samples doped with Tm3+, this phase extends over a wide range of Tm3+ concentrations (6-40 mM) and temperatures (35-90 degrees C) and appears to undergo a transition from a fluid nematic discotic to a fluid, but highly ordered, smectic phase at a temperature that depends on the thulium concentration. As a membrane mimetic, these new, positively ordered phospholipid phases have high potential for structural studies using a variety of techniques such as magnetic resonance (EMR and NMR), small-angle x-ray and neutron diffraction, as well as optical and infrared spectroscopy. PMID:9591667

  9. Tilted bilayer membranes as simple transmission quarter-wave retardation plates.

    PubMed

    Azzam, R M; Mahmoud, F A

    2001-02-01

    A tilted bilayer membrane, which consists of two thin films of transparent optically isotropic materials of different refractive indices, can function as a transmission quarter-wave retarder (QWR) at a high angle of incidence. A specific design using a cryolite-Si membrane in the infrared is presented, and its tolerances to small shifts of wavelength, incidence angle, and film thickness errors are discussed. Some designs provide a dual QWR in transmission and reflection. Such devices provide simple linear-to-circular (and circular-to-linear) polarization transformers. Bilayer eighth-wave retarders without diattenuation are also introduced. PMID:11205989

  10. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Camley, Brian A; Lerner, Michael G; Pastor, Richard W; Brown, Frank L H

    2015-12-28

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model. PMID:26723598

  11. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Camley, Brian A.; Lerner, Michael G.; Pastor, Richard W.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-12-28

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  12. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Lerner, Michael G.; Pastor, Richard W.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  13. A Hybrid Model for Erythrocyte Membrane: A Single Unit of Protein Network Coupled with Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiang; Vera, Carlos; Asaro, Robert J.; Sche, Paul; Sung, L. Amy

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the nanomechanics of the erythrocyte membrane we developed a hybrid model that couples the actin-spectrin network to the lipid bilayer. This model features a Fourier space Brownian dynamics model of the bilayer, a Brownian dynamics model of the actin protofilament, and a modified wormlike-chain model of the spectrin (including a cable-dynamics model to predict the oscillation in tension). This model enables us to predict the nanomechanics of single or multiple units of the protein network, the lipid bilayer, and the effect of their interactions. The present work is focused on the attitude of the actin protofilament at the equilibrium states coupled with the elevations of the lipid bilayer through their primary linkage at the suspension complex in deformations. Two different actin-spectrin junctions are considered at the junctional complex. With a point-attachment junction, large pitch angles and bifurcation of yaw angles are predicted. Thermal fluctuations at bifurcation may lead to mode-switching, which may affect the network and the physiological performance of the membrane. In contrast, with a wrap-around junction, pitch angles remain small, and the occurrence of bifurcation is greatly reduced. These simulations suggest the importance of three-dimensional molecular junctions and the lipid bilayer/protein network coupling on cell membrane mechanics. PMID:17449663

  14. Using Micropatterned Lipid Bilayer Arrays to Measure the Effect of Membrane Composition on Merocyanine 540 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathryn A.; Conboy, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The lipophilic dye merocyanine 540 (MC540) was used to model small molecule-membrane interactions using micropatterned lipid bilayer arrays (MLBAs) prepared using a 3D Continuous Flow Microspotter (CFM). Fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor MC540 binding to fifteen different bilayer compositions simultaneously. MC540 fluorescence was two times greater for bilayers composed of liquid-crystalline (l.c.) phase lipids (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)) compared to bilayers in the gel phase (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC)). The effect cholesterol (CHO) had on MC540 binding to the membrane was found to be dependent on the lipid component; cholesterol decreased MC540 bindingin DMPC, DPPC and DSPC bilayers while having little to no effect on the remaining l.c. phase lipids. MC540 fluorescence was also lowered when 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (sodium salt) (DOPS) was incorporated into DOPC bilayers. The increase in the surface charge density appears to decrease the occurrence of highly fluorescent monomers and increase the formation of weakly fluorescent dimers via electrostatic repulsion. This paper demonstrates that MLBAs are a useful tool for preparing high density reproducible bilayer arrays to study small molecule-membrane interactions in a high-throughput manner. PMID:21376014

  15. Electric field increases the phase transition temperature in the bilayer membrane of phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Antonov, V F; Smirnova EYu; Shevchenko, E V

    1990-02-01

    The effect of the electric field on the phase transition temperature (Tc) of acidic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DPPA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-thionphosphate (thion-DPPA) and zwitterion, i.e. 1,2-dipalmitoyl-rac-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-distearoyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC and DSPC), lipids has been investigated. The phase transition was detected using the jump-like increase effect in the conductance of the planar bilayer membrane. A voltage increase to 150 mV has been shown to increase the phase transition temperature in a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) of phosphatidic acids (DPPA and thion-DPPA) by 8-12 degrees C while the transition temperature in the bilayer of zwitterion lipids (DPPC and DSPC) increases insignificantly. The increasing of Tt in BLM of acidic lipids is attributed to the voltage-induced changes in the molecule packing density. PMID:2340602

  16. Natural channel protein inserts and functions in a completely artificial, solid-supported bilayer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fu, Wangyang; Palivan, Cornelia G.; Meier, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Reconstitution of membrane proteins in artificial membrane systems creates a platform for exploring their potential for pharmacological or biotechnological applications. Previously, we demonstrated amphiphilic block copolymers as promising building blocks for artificial membranes with long-term stability and tailorable structural parameters. However, the insertion of membrane proteins has not previously been realized in a large-area, stable, and solid-supported artificial membrane. Here, we show the first, preliminary model of a channel membrane protein that is functionally incorporated in a completely artificial polymer, tethered, solid-supported bilayer membrane (TSSBM). Unprecedented ionic transport characteristics that differ from previous results on protein insertion into planar, free-standing membranes, are identified. Our findings mark a change in understanding protein insertion and ion flow within natural channel proteins when inserted in an artificial TSSBM, thus holding great potential for numerous applications such as drug screening, trace analyzing, and biosensing. PMID:23846807

  17. Parameters affecting the fusion of unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F S; Akabas, M H; Zimmerberg, J; Finkelstein, A

    1984-03-01

    It was previously shown (Cohen, F. S., J. Zimmerberg, and A. Finkelstein, 1980, J. Gen. Physiol., 75:251-270) that multilamellar phospholipid vesicles can fuse with decane-containing phospholipid bilayer membranes. An essential requirement for fusion was an osmotic gradient across the planar membrane, with the vesicle-containing (cis) side hyperosmotic with respect to the opposite (trans) side. We now report that unilamellar vesicles will fuse with "hydrocarbon-free" membranes subject to these same osmotic conditions. Thus the same conditions that apply to fusion of multilamellar vesicles with planar bilayer membranes also apply to fusion of unilamellar vesicles with these membranes, and hydrocarbon is not required for the fusion process. If the vesicles and/or planar membrane contain negatively charged lipids, divalent cation (approximately 15 mM Ca++) is required in the cis compartment (in addition to the osmotic gradient across the membrane) to obtain substantial fusion rates. On the other hand, vesicles made from uncharged lipids readily fuse with planar phosphatidylethanolamine planar membranes in the near absence of divalent cation with just an osmotic gradient. Vesicles fuse much more readily with phosphatidylethanolamine-containing than with phosphatidylcholine-containing planar membranes. Although hydrocarbon (decane) is not required in the planar membrane for fusion, it does affect the rate of fusion and causes the fusion process to be dependent on stirring in the cis compartment. PMID:6699081

  18. Diffusion in phospholipid bilayer membranes: dual-leaflet dynamics and the roles of tracer–leaflet and inter-leaflet coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Reghan J.; Wang, Chih-Ying

    2014-01-01

    A variety of observations—sometimes controversial—have been made in recent decades when attempting to elucidate the roles of interfacial slip on tracer diffusion in phospholipid membranes. Evans–Sackmann theory (1988) has furnished membrane viscosities and lubrication-film thicknesses for supported membranes from experimentally measured lateral diffusion coefficients. Similar to the Saffman and Delbrück model, which is the well-known counterpart for freely supported membranes, the bilayer is modelled as a single two-dimensional fluid. However, the Evans–Sackman model cannot interpret the mobilities of monotopic tracers, such as individual lipids or rigidly bound lipid assemblies; neither does it account for tracer–leaflet and inter-leaflet slip. To address these limitations, we solve the model of Wang and Hill, in which two leaflets of a bilayer membrane, a circular tracer and supports are coupled by interfacial friction, using phenomenological friction/slip coefficients. This furnishes an exact solution that can be readily adopted to interpret the mobilities of a variety of mosaic elements—including lipids, integral monotopic and polytopic proteins, and lipid rafts—in supported bilayer membranes. PMID:25002822

  19. Receptor Concentration and Diffusivity Control Multivalent Binding of Sv40 to Membrane Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Oliwia M.; González-Segredo, Nélido; Kukura, Philipp; Oppenheim, Ariella; Choquet, Daniel; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Helenius, Ari; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Ewers, Helge

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Incoming Simian Virus 40 particles bind to their cellular receptor, the glycolipid GM1, in the plasma membrane and thereby induce membrane deformation beneath the virion leading to endocytosis and infection. Efficient membrane deformation depends on receptor lipid structure and the organization of binding sites on the internalizing particle. To determine the role of receptor diffusion, concentration and the number of receptors required for stable binding in this interaction, we analyze the binding of SV40 to GM1 in supported membrane bilayers by computational modeling based on experimental data. We measure the diffusion rates of SV40 virions in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and of the receptor in bilayers by single molecule tracking. Quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) is used to measure binding of SV40 virus-like particles to bilayers containing the viral receptor GM1. We develop a phenomenological stochastic dynamics model calibrated against this data, and use it to investigate the early events of virus attachment to lipid membranes. Our results indicate that SV40 requires at least 4 attached receptors to achieve stable binding. We moreover find that receptor diffusion is essential for the establishment of stable binding over the physiological range of receptor concentrations and that receptor concentration controls the mode of viral motion on the target membrane. Our results provide quantitative insight into the initial events of virus-host interaction at the nanoscopic level. PMID:24244125

  20. Stochastic transport through carbon nanotubes in lipid bilayers and live cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jia; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Jianfei; Escalada, Artur; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Comolli, Luis R.; Allen, Frances I.; Shnyrova, Anna V.; Cho, Kang Rae; Munoz, Dayannara; Wang, Y. Morris; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M.; Frolov, Vadim A.; Noy, Aleksandr

    2014-10-01

    There is much interest in developing synthetic analogues of biological membrane channels with high efficiency and exquisite selectivity for transporting ions and molecules. Bottom-up and top-down methods can produce nanopores of a size comparable to that of endogenous protein channels, but replicating their affinity and transport properties remains challenging. In principle, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should be an ideal membrane channel platform: they exhibit excellent transport properties and their narrow hydrophobic inner pores mimic structural motifs typical of biological channels. Moreover, simulations predict that CNTs with a length comparable to the thickness of a lipid bilayer membrane can self-insert into the membrane. Functionalized CNTs have indeed been found to penetrate lipid membranes and cell walls, and short tubes have been forced into membranes to create sensors, yet membrane transport applications of short CNTs remain underexplored. Here we show that short CNTs spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers and live cell membranes to form channels that exhibit a unitary conductance of 70-100 picosiemens under physiological conditions. Despite their structural simplicity, these `CNT porins' transport water, protons, small ions and DNA, stochastically switch between metastable conductance substates, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced ionic current blockades. We also show that local channel and membrane charges can control the conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins, thereby establishing these nanopores as a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating stochastic sensors.

  1. Ambidextrous Binding of Cell and Membrane Bilayers by Soluble Matrix Metalloproteinase-12

    PubMed Central

    Koppisetti, Rama K.; Fulcher, Yan G.; Jurkevich, Alexander; Prior, Stephen H.; Xu, Jia; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate tissue remodeling, inflammation, and disease progression. Some soluble MMPs are inexplicably active near cell surfaces. Here, we demonstrate binding of MMP-12 directly to bilayers and cellular membranes using paramagnetic NMR and fluorescence. Opposing sides of the catalytic domain engage spin-labeled membrane mimics. Loops project from the β-sheet interface to contact the phospholipid bilayer with basic and hydrophobic residues. The distal membrane interface comprises loops on the other side of the catalytic cleft. Both interfaces mediate MMP-12 association with vesicles and cell membranes. MMP-12 binds plasma membranes and is internalized to hydrophobic perinuclear features, the nuclear membrane, and inside the nucleus within minutes. While binding of TIMP-2 to MMP-12 hinders membrane interactions beside the active site, TIMP-2-inhibited MMP-12 binds vesicles and cells, suggesting compensatory rotation of its membrane approaches. MMP-12 association with diverse cell membranes may target its activities to modulate innate immune responses and inflammation. PMID:25412686

  2. Ambidextrous binding of cell and membrane bilayers by soluble matrix metalloproteinase-12.

    PubMed

    Koppisetti, Rama K; Fulcher, Yan G; Jurkevich, Alexander; Prior, Stephen H; Xu, Jia; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Van Doren, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) regulate tissue remodelling, inflammation and disease progression. Some soluble MMPs are inexplicably active near cell surfaces. Here we demonstrate the binding of MMP-12 directly to bilayers and cellular membranes using paramagnetic NMR and fluorescence. Opposing sides of the catalytic domain engage spin-labelled membrane mimics. Loops project from the β-sheet interface to contact the phospholipid bilayer with basic and hydrophobic residues. The distal membrane interface comprises loops on the other side of the catalytic cleft. Both interfaces mediate MMP-12 association with vesicles and cell membranes. MMP-12 binds plasma membranes and is internalized to hydrophobic perinuclear features, the nuclear membrane and inside the nucleus within minutes. While binding of TIMP-2 to MMP-12 hinders membrane interactions beside the active site, TIMP-2-inhibited MMP-12 binds vesicles and cells, suggesting compensatory rotation of its membrane approaches. MMP-12 association with diverse cell membranes may target its activities to modulate innate immune responses and inflammation. PMID:25412686

  3. Interaction between bending and tension forces in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, T W

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the bending mechanics of a membrane consisting of two tightly-coupled leaflets, each of which shears and bends readily but strongly resists area changes. Structures of this type have been proposed to model biological membranes such as red blood cell membrane. It is shown that when such a membrane is bent, anisotropic components of resultant membrane tension (shear stresses) are induced, even when the tension in each leaflet is isotropic. The induced shear stresses increase as the square of the membrane curvature, and become significant for moderate curvatures (when the radius of curvature is much larger than the distance between the leaflets). This effect has implications for the analysis of shape and deformation of freely suspended and flowing red blood cells. PMID:3224154

  4. Aqueous-filled polymer microcavity arrays: versatile & stable lipid bilayer platforms offering high lateral mobility to incorporated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Basit, Hajra; Gaul, Vinnie; Maher, Sean; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-05-01

    A key prerequisite in an ideal supported lipid bilayer based cell membrane model is that the mobility of both the lipid matrix and its components are unhindered by the underlying support. This is not trivial and with the exception of liposomes, many of even the most advanced approaches, although accomplishing lipid mobility, fail to achieve complete mobility of incorporated membrane proteins. This is addressed in a novel platform comprising lipid bilayers assembled over buffer-filled, arrays of spherical cap microcavities formed from microsphere template polydimethoxysilane. Prior to bilayer assembly the PDMS is rendered hydrophilic by plasma treatment and the lipid bilayer prepared using Langmuir Blodgett assembly followed by liposome/proteoliposome fusion. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy confirmed the pore suspended lipid bilayer exhibits diffusion coefficients comparable to free-standing vesicles in solution. The bilayer modified arrays are highly reproducible and stable over days. As the bilayers are suspended over deep aqueous reservoirs, reconstituted membrane proteins experience an aqueous interface at both membrane interfaces and attain full lateral mobility. Their utility as membrane protein platforms was exemplified in two case studies with proteins of different dimensions in their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains reconstituted into DOPC lipid bilayers; Glycophorin A, and Integrin αIIbβ3. In both cases, the proteins exhibited 100% mobility with high lateral diffusion coefficients. PMID:25798456

  5. Holographic interferometry of ultrasmall-pressure-induced curvature changes of bilayer lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, G.; Schneider-Henriquez, J.E.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-01-25

    Two-exposure interferometric holograms have been shown to sensitively report ultrasmall-pressure (10 natm)-induced curvature changes in glyceryl monooleate (GMO) bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). The number of concentric fringes observed, and hence the lateral distance between the plane of the Teflon and the BLM, increased linearly with increasing transmembrane pressure and led to a value of 1.1 {plus minus} 0.05 dyn/cm for the surface tension of the BLM. BLMs with appreciable Plateau-Gibbs borders have been shown to undergo nonuniform deformation; the bilayer portion is distorted less than the surrounding Plateau-Gibbs border upon the application of a transmembrane pressure gradient.

  6. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  7. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A.; Boreyko, Jonathan; Hayes, Douglas G.; Collier, Pat

    2015-03-19

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, air-DIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that lifetimes of air-DIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining them at a temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (7 C at 38.5 % relative humidity) to room temperature results inmore » loss of water molecules of hydration from the polar head groups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation in an irreversible process that increases the overall entropy of the system. This dehydration transition affects primarily the bilayer resistance, by increasing ion permeability through the increasingly disordered polar head group region of the bilayer. Temperature and/or relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of air-DIBs membranes, while still allowing for operation in ambient environments.« less

  8. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A.; Boreyko, Jonathan; Hayes, Douglas G.; Collier, Pat

    2015-03-19

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, air-DIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that lifetimes of air-DIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining them at a temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (7 C at 38.5 % relative humidity) to room temperature results in loss of water molecules of hydration from the polar head groups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation in an irreversible process that increases the overall entropy of the system. This dehydration transition affects primarily the bilayer resistance, by increasing ion permeability through the increasingly disordered polar head group region of the bilayer. Temperature and/or relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of air-DIBs membranes, while still allowing for operation in ambient environments.

  9. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Hayes, Douglas G; Collier, C Patrick

    2015-04-14

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, airDIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that the lifetimes of airDIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining the temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (which was 7 °C at 38.5% relative humidity and 22 °C air temperature) to 20 °C results in the loss of hydrated water molecules from the polar headgroups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation, resulting in a phase transition with increased disorder. This dehydration transition primarily affects the bilayer electrical resistance by increasing the permeability through an increasingly disordered polar headgroup region of the bilayer. Temperature and relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of airDIB membranes while still allowing for operation in ambient environments. PMID:25790280

  10. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins in lipid bilayers - Unassisted and assisted folding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H

    2015-09-01

    In cells, β-barrel membrane proteins are transported in unfolded form to an outer membrane into which they fold and insert. Model systems have been established to investigate the mechanisms of insertion and folding of these versatile proteins into detergent micelles, lipid bilayers and even synthetic amphipathic polymers. In these experiments, insertion into lipid membranes is initiated from unfolded forms that do not display residual β-sheet secondary structure. These studies therefore have allowed the investigation of membrane protein folding and insertion in great detail. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins into lipid bilayers has been monitored from unfolded forms by dilution of chaotropic denaturants that keep the protein unfolded as well as from unfolded forms present in complexes with molecular chaperones from cells. This review is aimed to provide an overview of the principles and mechanisms observed for the folding of β-barrel transmembrane proteins into lipid bilayers, the importance of lipid-protein interactions and the function of molecular chaperones and folding assistants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25983306

  11. Model lipid bilayer with facile diffusion of lipids and integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Ingram, Colin; Weisshaar, James C

    2010-07-01

    A model membrane system is formed by the rupture of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) onto a passivating layer comprising a PEG polymer cushion anchored in a lipid bilayer supported on glass. The novel use of pH-dependent electrostatic interactions between NeutrAvidin in the passivating layer and anionic lipids in the GUV drives vesicle rupture. The resulting "GUV pancakes" are single, planar lipid bilayer patches whose diameters vary from approximately 20 to 50 microm. The pancakes have several potential advantages for the in vitro study of protein-lipid interactions and integral membrane protein function. All components are commercially available. The pancakes resist nonspecific binding of vesicles containing protein. Both lipids and integral membrane proteins exhibit good lateral mobility in the GUV pancakes, as evidenced by single-particle tracking (SPT) of the DiD double-tailed fluorescent probe and of the integral membrane protein syntaxin-1A, labeled with AlexaFluor 633 (AF633-Syx). At least 80% of both probes exhibit free, homogeneous diffusion with a diffusion coefficient of approximately 5.5 microm(2) s(-1), which is more than 10 times faster than diffusion in a GUV pancake supported on bare glass. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) suggests that the polymer cushion has a height of approximately 4 nm. The mobility of a large fraction of the AF633-Syx probe suggests that even integral membrane proteins with large domains on both sides of the lipid bilayer should exhibit free diffusion within a GUV pancake. PMID:20459075

  12. Energy of dissociation of lipid bilayer from the membrane skeleton of red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, W C; Waugh, R E

    1997-01-01

    The association between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton is important to cell function. In red blood cells, defects in this association can lead to various forms of hemolytic anemia. Although proteins involved in this association have been well characterized biochemically, the physical strength of this association is only beginning to be studied. Formation of a small cylindrical strand of membrane material (tether) from the membrane involves separation of the lipid bilayer from the membrane skeleton. By measuring the force required to form a tether, and knowing the contribution to the force due to the deformation of a lipid bilayer, it is possible to calculate the additional contribution to the work of tether formation due to the separation of membrane skeleton from the lipid bilayer. In the present study, we measured the tethering force during tether formation using a microcantilever (a thin, flexible glass fiber) as a force transducer. Numerical calculations of the red cell contour were performed to examine how the shape of the contour affects the calculation of tether radius, and subsequently separation work per unit area W(sk) and bending stiffness k(c). At high aspiration pressure and small external force, the red cell contour can be accurately modeled as a sphere, but at low aspiration pressure and large external force, the contour deviates from a sphere and may affect the calculation. Based on an energy balance and numerical calculations of the cell contour, values of the membrane bending stiffness k(c) = 2.0 x 10(-19) Nm and the separation work per unit area W(sk) = 0.06 mJ/m2 were obtained. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 8 PMID:9168042

  13. Advances in the use of nanoscale bilayers to study membrane protein structure and function.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Ketan; Alder, Nathan N

    2014-10-01

    Within the last decade, nanoscale lipid bilayers have emerged as powerful experimental systems in the analysis of membrane proteins (MPs) for both basic and applied research. These discoidal lipid lamellae are stabilized by annuli of specially engineered amphipathic polypeptides (nanodiscs) or polymers (SMALPs/Lipodisqs®). As biomembrane mimetics, they are well suited for the reconstitution of MPs within a controlled lipid environment. Moreover, because they are water-soluble, they are amenable to solution-based biochemical and biophysical experimentation. Hence, due to their solubility, size, stability, and monodispersity, nanoscale lipid bilayers offer technical advantages over more traditional MP analytic approaches such as detergent solubilization and reconstitution into lipid vesicles. In this article, we review some of the most recent advances in the synthesis of polypeptide- and polymer-bound nanoscale lipid bilayers and their application in the study of MP structure and function. PMID:25023464

  14. NMR structural studies of the bacterial outer membrane protein OmpX in oriented lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan; Franzin, Carla M.; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The β-barrels found in the outer membranes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms constitute an important functional class of proteins. Here we present solid-state NMR spectra of the bacterial outer membrane protein OmpX in oriented lipid bilayer membranes. We show that OmpX is folded in both glass-supported oriented lipid bilayers and in lipid bicelles that can be magnetically oriented with the membrane plane parallel or perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. The presence of resolved peaks in these spectra demonstrates that OmpX undergoes rotational diffusion around an axis perpendicular to the membrane surface. A tightly hydrogen-bonded domain of OmpX resists exchange with D2O for days and is assigned to the transmembrane β-barrel, while peaks at isotropic resonance frequencies that disappear rapidly in D2O are assigned to the extracellular and periplasmic loops. The two-dimensional 1H/15N separated local field spectra of OmpX have several resolved peaks, and agree well with the spectra calculated from the crystal structure of OmpX rotated with the barrel axis nearly parallel (5° tilt) to the direction of the magnetic field. The data indicate that it will be possible to obtain site-specific resonance assignments and to determine the structure, tilt, and rotation of OmpX in membranes using the solid-state NMR methods that are currently being applied to α-helical membrane proteins. PMID:17916325

  15. Mycobacterial outer membrane is a lipid bilayer and the inner membrane is unusually rich in diacyl phosphatidylinositol dimannosides

    PubMed Central

    Bansal-Mutalik, Ritu; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium species, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are unique among Gram-positive bacteria in producing a complex cell wall that contains unusual lipids and functions as a permeability barrier. Lipids in the cell wall were hypothesized to form a bilayer or outer membrane that would prevent the entry of chemotherapeutic agents, but this could not be tested because of the difficulty in extracting only the cell-wall lipids. We used reverse micellar extraction to achieve this goal and carried out a quantitative analysis of both the cell wall and the inner membrane lipids of Mycobacterium smegmatis. We found that the outer leaflet of the outer membrane contains a similar number of hydrocarbon chains as the inner leaflet composed of mycolic acids covalently linked to cell-wall arabinogalactan, thus validating the outer membrane model. Furthermore, we found that preliminary extraction with reverse micelles permitted the subsequent complete extraction of inner membrane lipids with chloroform–methanol–water, revealing that one-half of hydrocarbon chains in this membrane are contributed by an unusual lipid, diacyl phosphatidylinositol dimannoside. The inner leaflet of this membrane likely is composed nearly entirely of this lipid. Because it contains four fatty acyl chains within a single molecule, it may produce a bilayer environment of unusually low fluidity and may slow the influx of drugs, contributing to the general drug resistance phenotype of mycobacteria. PMID:24639491

  16. A membrane-bound synthetic receptor that promotes growth of a polymeric coating at the bilayer-water interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Young, Michael C; Moshe, Orly; Cheng, Quan; Hooley, Richard J

    2012-07-27

    Primed for action: Atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) can be promoted at a bilayer-water interface by anchoring initiator molecules (see scheme; red) in a membrane-bound synthetic receptor (yellow). The bilayer is formed on a calcinated nanofilm (gray) on a gold surface. PMID:22730162

  17. pH regulation of amphotericin B channels activity in the bilayer lipid membrane

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Tahereh; Sepehry, Hamid; Ashrafpour, Manuchehr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amphotericin B (AmB) is a polyene antibiotic frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections in spite of its secondary effects. The pH plays a crucial role in modulating biophysical features of ion channels in the bilayer lipid membranes. Aim: In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of AmB channel was assessed by single channel recording of ion channel incorporated in the artificial membrane. Materials and Methods: Bilayer lipid membrane was formed by phosphatidylcholine in a 350 μm diameter aperture between two chambers, cis and trans contained 200/50 mMKCl solutions, respectively; then AmB was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single channel recordings were used to indicate the effects of pH changes on AmB channels activity. The records were analyzed by Clamp fit 10 software. Results: A kinetic analysis of single channel currents indicated a cation ion channel with 500 pS conductance and voltage-dependence of the open probability of the AmB channel (Po). A reduction of cis pH to 6 decreased Po and conductance. This effect was also voltage-dependent, being greater at a more positive above −40. The pH changes in the range of 6-8 had no effect on the reversal potential and ion selectivity. Conclusion: Our data indicated that extracellular acidity can reduce AmB activity. PMID:27003977

  18. Fluctuations of coupled fluid and solid membranes with application to red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S A; Gov, Nir S

    2007-11-01

    The fluctuation spectra and the intermembrane interaction of two membranes at a fixed average distance are investigated. Each membrane can either be a fluid or a solid membrane, and in isolation, its fluctuations are described by a bare or a wave-vector-dependent bending modulus, respectively. The membranes interact via their excluded-volume interaction; the average distance is maintained by an external, homogeneous pressure. For strong coupling, the fluctuations can be described by a single, effective membrane that combines the elastic properties. For weak coupling, the fluctuations of the individual, noninteracting membranes are recovered. The case of a composite membrane consisting of one fluid and one solid membrane can serve as a microscopic model for the plasma membrane and cytoskeleton of the red blood cell. We find that, despite the complex microstructure of bilayers and cytoskeletons in a real cell, the fluctuations with wavelengths lambda greater, similar 400 nm are well described by the fluctuations of a single, polymerized membrane (provided that there are no inhomogeneities of the microstructure). The model is applied to the fluctuation data of discocytes ("normal" red blood cells), a stomatocyte, and an echinocyte. The elastic parameters of the membrane and an effective temperature that quantifies active, metabolically driven fluctuations are extracted from the experiments. PMID:18233690

  19. Fluctuations of coupled fluid and solid membranes with application to red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    The fluctuation spectra and the intermembrane interaction of two membranes at a fixed average distance are investigated. Each membrane can either be a fluid or a solid membrane, and in isolation, its fluctuations are described by a bare or a wave-vector-dependent bending modulus, respectively. The membranes interact via their excluded-volume interaction; the average distance is maintained by an external, homogeneous pressure. For strong coupling, the fluctuations can be described by a single, effective membrane that combines the elastic properties. For weak coupling, the fluctuations of the individual, noninteracting membranes are recovered. The case of a composite membrane consisting of one fluid and one solid membrane can serve as a microscopic model for the plasma membrane and cytoskeleton of the red blood cell. We find that, despite the complex microstructure of bilayers and cytoskeletons in a real cell, the fluctuations with wavelengths λ≳400nm are well described by the fluctuations of a single, polymerized membrane (provided that there are no inhomogeneities of the microstructure). The model is applied to the fluctuation data of discocytes (“normal” red blood cells), a stomatocyte, and an echinocyte. The elastic parameters of the membrane and an effective temperature that quantifies active, metabolically driven fluctuations are extracted from the experiments.

  20. Lipid Bilayer Domain Fluctuations as a Probe of Membrane Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Camley, Brian A.; Esposito, Cinzia; Baumgart, Tobias; Brown, Frank L.H.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that membrane viscosity, ηm, plays a prominent role in the thermal fluctuation dynamics of micron-scale lipid domains. A theoretical expression is presented for the timescales of domain shape relaxation, which reduces to the well-known ηm = 0 result of Stone and McConnell in the limit of large domain sizes. Experimental measurements of domain dynamics on the surface of ternary phospholipid and cholesterol vesicles confirm the theoretical results and suggest domain flicker spectroscopy as a convenient means to simultaneously measure both the line tension, σ, and the membrane viscosity, ηm, governing the behavior of individual lipid domains. PMID:20858410

  1. A Distributed Amplifier System for Bilayer Lipid Membrane (BLM) Arrays With Noise and Individual Offset Cancellation.

    PubMed

    Crescentini, Marco; Thei, Frederico; Bennati, Marco; Saha, Shimul; de Planque, Maurits R R; Morgan, Hywel; Tartagni, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Lipid bilayer membrane (BLM) arrays are required for high throughput analysis, for example drug screening or advanced DNA sequencing. Complex microfluidic devices are being developed but these are restricted in terms of array size and structure or have integrated electronic sensing with limited noise performance. We present a compact and scalable multichannel electrophysiology platform based on a hybrid approach that combines integrated state-of-the-art microelectronics with low-cost disposable fluidics providing a platform for high-quality parallel single ion channel recording. Specifically, we have developed a new integrated circuit amplifier based on a novel noise cancellation scheme that eliminates flicker noise derived from devices under test and amplifiers. The system is demonstrated through the simultaneous recording of ion channel activity from eight bilayer membranes. The platform is scalable and could be extended to much larger array sizes, limited only by electronic data decimation and communication capabilities. PMID:25252284

  2. Photoelectric Effects in Lipid Bilayer Membranes. A Pedagogical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides information appropriate for introductory lectures on photoelectric effects in membranes. Describes the apparatus and supplies required for laboratory exercises. Outlines typical laboratory exercises. Identifies the chromophores known to induce photoelectric effects. Concludes that this topic can provide useful subjects for undergraduate…

  3. Atomistic simulation of lipid and DiI dynamics in membrane bilayers under tension.

    PubMed

    Muddana, Hari S; Gullapalli, Ramachandra R; Manias, Evangelos; Butler, Peter J

    2011-01-28

    Membrane tension modulates cellular processes by initiating changes in the dynamics of its molecular constituents. To quantify the precise relationship between tension, structural properties of the membrane, and the dynamics of lipids and a lipophilic reporter dye, we performed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DiI-labeled dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers under physiological lateral tensions ranging from -2.6 mN m(-1) to 15.9 mN m(-1). Simulations showed that the bilayer thickness decreased linearly with tension consistent with volume-incompressibility, and this thinning was facilitated by a significant increase in acyl chain interdigitation at the bilayer midplane and spreading of the acyl chains. Tension caused a significant drop in the bilayer's peak electrostatic potential, which correlated with the strong reordering of water and lipid dipoles. For the low tension regime, the DPPC lateral diffusion coefficient increased with increasing tension in accordance with free-area theory. For larger tensions, free area theory broke down due to tension-induced changes in molecular shape and friction. Simulated DiI rotational and lateral diffusion coefficients were lower than those of DPPC but increased with tension in a manner similar to DPPC. Direct correlation of membrane order and viscosity near the DiI chromophore, which was just under the DPPC headgroup, indicated that measured DiI fluorescence lifetime, which is reported to decrease with decreasing lipid order, is likely to be a good reporter of tension-induced decreases in lipid headgroup viscosity. Together, these results offer new molecular-level insights into membrane tension-related mechanotransduction and into the utility of DiI in characterizing tension-induced changes in lipid packing. PMID:21152516

  4. Formation and fluidity measurement of supported lipid bilayer on polyvinyl chloride membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takuji Kono, Akiteru Sawada, Kazuaki; Futagawa, Masato; Tero, Ryugo

    2014-02-20

    We prepared an artificial lipid bilayer on a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane on a Si3N4 layer deposited on a Si wafer. We optimized the experimental condition for the fabrication of the PVC membrane, and obtained a PVC membrane with a flat and uniform surface on the scale of several hundreds of micrometer suitable for a substrate for supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLB of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) was formed on the PVC membrane by the vesicle fusion method. The observation with a conventional epi-fluorescence microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope gave geometrically uniform images of the SLB on the PVC membrane. The fluidity and the mobile fraction of the SLB was evaluated by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method, and compared with that on a thermally oxidized SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The SLB on the PVC membrane contained immobile fraction ∼30%, but the diffusion in the mobile fraction was two times faster than that in the SLB on SiO{sub 2}/Si, which had little immobile fraction.

  5. Formation and fluidity measurement of supported lipid bilayer on polyvinyl chloride membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takuji; Kono, Akiteru; Futagawa, Masato; Sawada, Kazuaki; Tero, Ryugo

    2014-02-01

    We prepared an artificial lipid bilayer on a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane on a Si3N4 layer deposited on a Si wafer. We optimized the experimental condition for the fabrication of the PVC membrane, and obtained a PVC membrane with a flat and uniform surface on the scale of several hundreds of micrometer suitable for a substrate for supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLB of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) was formed on the PVC membrane by the vesicle fusion method. The observation with a conventional epi-fluorescence microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope gave geometrically uniform images of the SLB on the PVC membrane. The fluidity and the mobile fraction of the SLB was evaluated by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method, and compared with that on a thermally oxidized SiO2/Si substrate. The SLB on the PVC membrane contained immobile fraction ˜30%, but the diffusion in the mobile fraction was two times faster than that in the SLB on SiO2/Si, which had little immobile fraction.

  6. Nondisruptive micropatterning of fluid membranes through selective vesicular adsorption and rupture by nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Na, Yu-Jin; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2009-05-19

    We report on a nondisruptive method of patterning fluid membranes into micrometer-scale arrays through a selective vesicular rupture pathway by nanotopography. The site- and pathway-selective formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) was achieved by different vesicular adsorption and rupture processes between nanocorrugated and nanosmooth topographies. The SLBs were first developed in the nanocorrugated region due to fast vesicular adsorption and then grew into the nanosmooth region through bilayer edge-induced vesicular rupture. Our topographic approach provides a viable scheme, yet unattainable in conventional ways, of actively controlling the position and the coverage of the SLBs on a variety of substrates without disrupting two-dimensional fluidity for highly integrated membrane devices. PMID:19368337

  7. Tunable Surface Hydrophobicity and Fluid Transport through Nanoporous Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Joseph H. J.

    There are more than three billion people across the globe that struggle to obtain clean drinkable water. One of the most promising avenues for generating potable water is through reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. Both solutions require a semipermeable membrane that prohibits passage of unwanted solute particles but allows passage of the solvent. Atomically thin two-dimensional membranes based on porous graphene show great promise as semipermeable materials, but modeling fluid flow on length scales between the microscopic (nanometer and smaller) and macroscopic (micron and larger) regimes presents formidable challenges. This thesis explores both equilibrium and nonequilibrium aspects of this problem and develops new methodology for simulating systems away from thermal equilibrium. First, we hypothesize that there is a wetting penalty for water as it tries to breach a sheet of graphene that should be naturally hydrophobic. By using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the hydrophobicity depends sensitively on the degree of electrical doping, offering an opportunity to tune the hydrophobic effect of graphene using small amounts of doping. The wetting contact angle, a measure of hydrophobicity, changes dramatically with the voltage applied to single layer graphene. We find that the sensitivity of the hydrophobic effect to voltage depends not on hydrogen bonding motifs at the interface between graphene and water, but instead on a phenomenon known as electrowetting. The theory of electrowetting predicts that the difference in surface tensions that defines the contact angle is quartic in the voltage, rather than quadratic, as it would be in bilayer graphene or in a two-dimensional metal. To explore the nonequilibrium aspects of fluid passage through atomically thin membranes, we developed a molecular dynamics methodology for simulating fluid flow at constant flux based on Gauss's principle of least constraint. This method develops microscopic

  8. Defining the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on membrane bilayers.

    PubMed

    Tourdot, Richard W; Ramakrishnan, N; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-08-01

    Curvature-sensing and curvature-remodeling proteins, such as Amphiphysin, Epsin, and Exo70, are known to reshape cell membranes, and this remodeling event is essential for key biophysical processes such as tubulation, exocytosis, and endocytosis. Curvature-inducing proteins can act as curvature sensors; they aggregate to membrane regions matching their intrinsic curvature; as well as induce curvature in cell membranes to stabilize emergent high curvature, nonspherical, structures such as tubules, discs, and caveolae. A definitive understanding of the interplay between protein recruitment and migration, the evolution of membrane curvature, and membrane morphological transitions is emerging but remains incomplete. Here, within a continuum framework and using the machinery of Monte Carlo simulations, we introduce and compare three free-energy methods to delineate the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on bilayer membranes. We demonstrate the utility of the Widom test particle (or field) insertion methodology in computing the excess chemical potentials associated with curvature-inducing proteins on the membrane-in particular, we use this method to track the onset of morphological transitions in the membrane at elevated protein densities. We validate this approach by comparing the results from the Widom method with those of thermodynamic integration and Bennett acceptance ratio methods. Furthermore, the predictions from the Widom method have been tested against analytical calculations of the excess chemical potential at infinite dilution. Our results are useful in precisely quantifying the free-energy landscape, and also in determining the phase boundaries associated with curvature-induction, curvature-sensing, and morphological transitions. This approach can be extended to studies exploring the role of thermal fluctuations and other external (control) variables, such as membrane excess area, in shaping curvature-mediated interactions on bilayer

  9. Lipid Bilayer-Bound Conformation of an Integral Membrane Beta Barrel Protein by Multidimensional MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Matthew T.; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms 2-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13C line width and less than 0.5 ppm 15N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  10. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Matthew T; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-04-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5-0.3 ppm for (13)C line widths and <0.5 ppm (15)N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  11. Fluid Phase Lipid Areas and Bilayer Thicknesses of Commonly Used Phosphatidylcholines as a Function of Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kucerka, Norbert; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Katsaras, John

    2011-01-01

    The structural parameters of fluid phase bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholines with fully saturated, mixed, and branched fatty acid chains, at several temperatures, have been determined by simultaneously analyzing small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. Bilayer parameters, such as area per lipid and overall bilayer thickness have been obtained in conjunction with intrabilayer structural parameters (e.g. hydrocarbon region thickness). The results have allowed us to assess the effect of temperature and hydrocarbon chain composition on bilayer structure. For example, we found that for all lipids there is, not surprisingly, an increase in fatty acid chain trans-gauche isomerization with increasing temperature. Moreover, this increase in trans-gauche isomerization scales with fatty acid chain length in mixed chain lipids. However, in the case of lipids with saturated fatty acid chains, trans-gauche isomerization is increasingly tempered by attractive chain-chain van der Waals interactions with increasing chain length. Finally, our results confirm a strong dependence of lipid chain dynamics as a function of double bond position along fatty acid chains.

  12. Analysis of Ion Transport through a Single Channel of Gramicidin A in Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Shintaro; Shirai, Osamu; Kitazumi, Yuki; Kano, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Ion transport through a single channel of gramicidin A (GA) within the bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) between two aqueous phases (W1 and W2) has been analyzed based on the electroneutrality principle. The single-channel current increases in proportion to the magnitude of the applied membrane potential and is also dependent on the permeability coefficients of electrolyte ions (K(+) and Cl(-)). By varying the ratio of the concentration of KCl in W1 to that in W2, the ratio of the diffusion coefficient of K(+) in the BLM to that of Cl(-) in the BLM can be evaluated. PMID:26860564

  13. Salt-bridge-supported bilayer lipid membrane biosensor for determination of anticancer drug cyclophosphamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Chunxu; Shen, Hanxi; Chao, Fuhuan

    2001-09-01

    A novel biosensor for assaying anticancer drug cyclophosphamide was constructed with salt-bridge supported bilayer lipid membrane modified with tetraphenylborate- cyclophosphamide complex. The modification was achieved by the introduction of the complex into the membrane forming solution. The biosensor show a linear response to the drug over the concentration range 8.96 X 10-6 mol L-1. The effects of coexistent substances and pH on assay were evaluated. The results show that the distinguish merits of this kind of biosensor is the excellently biological compatibility and no need of mediator for ions exchange. It also shows good selectivity and sensitivity for cyclophosphamide assay.

  14. Undulation instability in a bilayer lipid membrane due to electric field interaction with lipid dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Richard J.; Olmsted, Peter D.; Smye, Stephen W.

    2010-05-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are an essential component of all biological systems, forming a functional barrier for cells and organelles from the surrounding environment. The lipid molecules that form membranes contain both permanent and induced dipoles, and an electric field can induce the formation of pores when the transverse field is sufficiently strong (electroporation). Here, a phenomenological free energy is constructed to model the response of a BLM to a transverse static electric field. The model contains a continuum description of the membrane dipoles and a coupling between the headgroup dipoles and the membrane tilt. The membrane is found to become unstable through buckling modes, which are weakly coupled to thickness fluctuations in the membrane. The thickness fluctuations, along with the increase in interfacial area produced by membrane buckling, increase the probability of localized membrane breakdown, which may lead to pore formation. The instability is found to depend strongly on the strength of the coupling between the dipolar headgroups and the membrane tilt as well as the degree of dipolar ordering in the membrane.

  15. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  16. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  17. Bathroom greywater recycling using polyelectrolyte-complex bilayer membrane: Advanced study of membrane structure and treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, K S; Poh, P E; Chong, M N; Chan, E S; Lau, E V; Saint, C P

    2016-09-01

    Polyelectrolyte-complex bilayer membrane (PCBM) was fabricated using biodegradable chitosan and alginate polymers for subsequent application in the treatment of bathroom greywater. In this study, the properties of PCBMs were studied and it was found that the formation of polyelectrolyte network reduced the molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) from 242kDa in chitosan membrane to 2.71kDa in PCBM. The decrease in MWCO of PCBM results in better greywater treatment efficiency, subsequently demonstrated in a greywater filtration study where treated greywater effluent met the household reclaimed water standard of <2 NTU turbidity and <30ppm total suspended solids (TSS). In addition, a further 20% improvement in chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was achieved as compared to a single layer chitosan membrane. Results from this study show that the biodegradable PCBM is a potential membrane material in producing clean treated greywater for non-potable applications. PMID:27185127

  18. Defining the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on membrane bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourdot, Richard W.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-08-01

    Curvature-sensing and curvature-remodeling proteins, such as Amphiphysin, Epsin, and Exo70, are known to reshape cell membranes, and this remodeling event is essential for key biophysical processes such as tubulation, exocytosis, and endocytosis. Curvature-inducing proteins can act as curvature sensors; they aggregate to membrane regions matching their intrinsic curvature; as well as induce curvature in cell membranes to stabilize emergent high curvature, nonspherical, structures such as tubules, discs, and caveolae. A definitive understanding of the interplay between protein recruitment and migration, the evolution of membrane curvature, and membrane morphological transitions is emerging but remains incomplete. Here, within a continuum framework and using the machinery of Monte Carlo simulations, we introduce and compare three free-energy methods to delineate the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on bilayer membranes. We demonstrate the utility of the Widom test particle (or field) insertion methodology in computing the excess chemical potentials associated with curvature-inducing proteins on the membrane—in particular, we use this method to track the onset of morphological transitions in the membrane at elevated protein densities. We validate this approach by comparing the results from the Widom method with those of thermodynamic integration and Bennett acceptance ratio methods. Furthermore, the predictions from the Widom method have been tested against analytical calculations of the excess chemical potential at infinite dilution. Our results are useful in precisely quantifying the free-energy landscape, and also in determining the phase boundaries associated with curvature-induction, curvature-sensing, and morphological transitions. This approach can be extended to studies exploring the role of thermal fluctuations and other external (control) variables, such as membrane excess area, in shaping curvature-mediated interactions on bilayer

  19. Defining the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on membrane bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Tourdot, Richard W.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Curvature-sensing and curvature-remodeling proteins, such as Amphiphysin, Epsin, and Exo70, are known to reshape cell membranes, and this remodeling event is essential for key biophysical processes such as tubulation, exocytosis, and endocytosis. Curvature-inducing proteins can act as curvature sensors; they aggregate to membrane regions matching their intrinsic curvature; as well as induce curvature in cell membranes to stabilize emergent high curvature, nonspherical, structures such as tubules, discs, and caveolae. A definitive understanding of the interplay between protein recruitment and migration, the evolution of membrane curvature, and membrane morphological transitions is emerging but remains incomplete. Here, within a continuum framework and using the machinery of Monte Carlo simulations, we introduce and compare three free-energy methods to delineate the free-energy landscape of curvature-inducing proteins on bilayer membranes. We demonstrate the utility of the Widom test particle (or field) insertion methodology in computing the excess chemical potentials associated with curvature-inducing proteins on the membrane—in particular, we use this method to track the onset of morphological transitions in the membrane at elevated protein densities. We validate this approach by comparing the results from the Widom method with those of thermodynamic integration and Bennett acceptance ratio methods. Furthermore, the predictions from the Widom method have been tested against analytical calculations of the excess chemical potential at infinite dilution. Our results are useful in precisely quantifying the free-energy landscape, and also in determining the phase boundaries associated with curvature-induction, curvature-sensing, and morphological transitions. This approach can be extended to studies exploring the role of thermal fluctuations and other external (control) variables, such as membrane excess area, in shaping curvature-mediated interactions on bilayer

  20. Maleimide-functionalized lipids that anchor polypeptides to lipid bilayers and membranes.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J T; Prestwich, G D

    2000-01-01

    Two maleimide-containing diacylglycerol derivatives were synthesized to permit the anchoring of short peptides and longer polypeptides to phospholipid bilayers and membranes. The maleimide was introduced at the site normally occupied by a phospholipid headgroup. The first lipid, the dipalmitoyl ester of 1-maleimido-2,3-propanediol, was developed as a membrane anchor for extracellular domains of transmembrane proteins. The second anchoring lipid, in which the 3-position contained a 6-aminohexanoate, was designed for convenient modification with amine-reactive reporter groups. Specifically, the NBD fluorophore, 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-aminohexanoic-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester, was attached to give an fluorescent anchoring reagent. Next, these reagents were applied to the anchoring of a C-terminally cysteamine-modified 8 kDa polypeptide that comprises the extracellular N-terminal domain of the human thrombin receptor, a transmembrane protease-activated receptor (PAR-1). Gel filtration and fluorescence analysis showed that the fluorescent lipopolypeptide spontaneously inserted into preformed phospholipid vesicles, but it did not insert into whole cell membranes. In contrast, the dipalmitoyl derivative could only be reconstituted into artificial membranes by mixing the lipopolypeptide and phospholipid before vesicle formation. These results suggest that biophysical interactions governing the lipopolypeptide insertion into artificial and cellular membranes may differ. The thiol-reactive lipidating reagents should be valuable materials for studying the structure and function of peptides and polypeptides at phospholipid bilayer surfaces. PMID:11087332

  1. Amphipathic amines affect membrane excitability in paramecium: role for bilayer couple.

    PubMed

    Browning, J L; Nelson, D L

    1976-02-01

    Amphipathic amines and local anesthetics stimulated reversal of the ciliary beating direction in wild-type Paramecium. Ca++ influx across the surface membrane and the consequent increase in internal Ca++ causes ciliary reversal and backward swimming. Mutant cells of the "Pawn" class, which lack a "gating" mechanism for regulating Ca++ influx, did not swim backwards in the presence of local anesthetics. Local anesthetics stimulated the passive efflux of K+ but had no effect on the active transport of K+ or Ca++. Apparently passive influx of Ca++ also was stimulated by local anesthetics as evidenced by their effects on swimming direction. These data can be interpreted in terms of the "bilayer couple" hypothesis of Sheetz and Singer [(1974) Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 4457-4461]: amphipathic drugs affect cells by asymmetric insertion into one face of the lipid bilayer. As predicted by this hypothesis, the drugs' effects were seen only after a short time lag, and quaternary amines were less effective than tertiary amines. The effect on behavior was caused by any of several amphipathic cations, and the relative potency was a function of their hydrophobicity. Amphipathic anions, which according to the hypothesis would insert into the opposite face of the lipid bilayer, had little effect on ciliary reversal. Asymmetric perturbation of the lipid bilayer with amphipathic cations may trigger the opening of the Ca++ gate. PMID:1061147

  2. Magnetically Aligned Bicelles to Study the Orientation of Lipophilic Ligands in Membrane Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianxin; Yang, De-Ping; Chari, Ravi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Pavlopoulos, Spiro; Lu, Dai; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Magnetically aligned bicelles were used as a model membrane to study the orientation and dynamic properties of two cannabinoids (Δ8-THC and Me-Δ8-THC) using 31P- and 2H-NMR. The uniform alignment of the bicelles allowed us to obtain well resolved deuterium spectra from a solution NMR spectrometer. The preferred orientations of Δ8-THC and Me-Δ8-THC were calculated based on the measurements of individual quadrupolar splittings. Our results agree with previous experiments using multilamellar membranes as well as with molecular dynamics simulation data described here. In conjunction with our earlier report using small and fast tumbling bicelles, the present work of well aligned bicelles shows that bicelle preparations can provide either pseudo-isotropic or anisotropic NMR spectra to study the conformation, orientation and dynamic properties of ligands in membrane bilayers. Such data are of critical value for understanding the interactions of lipophilic drug molecules with membrane proteins. PMID:18834109

  3. Using supported bilayers to study the spatiotemporal organization of membrane bound proteins

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christine M.; Groen, Aaron C.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in prokaryotes and eukaryotes is commonly initiated by the well-controlled binding of proteins to the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane. However, a precise characterization of the spatiotemporal dynamics of membrane-bound proteins is often difficult to achieve in vivo. Here, we present protocols for the use of supported lipid bilayers to rebuild the cytokinetic machineries of cells with greatly different dimensions: the bacterium Escherichia coli and eggs of the vertebrate Xenopus laevis. Combined with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, these experimental setups allow for precise quantitative analyses of membrane-bound proteins. The protocols described to obtain glass-supported membranes from bacterial and vertebrate lipids can be used as starting points for other reconstitution experiments. We believe that similar biochemical assays will be instrumental to study the biochemistry and biophysics underlying a variety of complex cellular tasks, such as signaling, vesicle trafficking and cell motility. PMID:25997350

  4. AFM Study on the Electric-Field Effects on Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2008-01-01

    Electric-field induced changes in structure and conductivity of supported bilayer lipid membranes (SLM) have been studied at submicroscopic resolution using atomic force microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The SLMs are formed on gold surfaces modified with mixed self-assembled monolayers of a cholesterol-tether and 6-mercaptohexanol. At applied potentials of ≤−0.25 V versus standard hydrogen electrode, the conductance of the SLM increases and membrane areas of <150 nm in size are found to elevate from the surface up to 15 nm in height. To estimate the electric field experienced by the lipid membrane, electrowetting has been used to determine the point of zero charge of a 6-mercaptohexanol-modified surface (0.19 ± 0.13 V versus standard hydrogen electrode). The effects of electric fields on the structure and conductance of supported membranes are discussed. PMID:18326663

  5. Membrane-Protein Interactions in a Generic Coarse-Grained Model for Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    West, Beate; Brown, Frank L.H.; Schmid, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We study membrane-protein interactions and membrane-mediated protein-protein interactions by Monte Carlo simulations of a generic coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers with cylindrical hydrophobic inclusions. The strength of the hydrophobic force and the hydrophobic thickness of the proteins are systematically varied. The results are compared with analytical predictions of two popular analytical theories: The Landau-de Gennes theory and the elastic theory. The elastic theory provides an excellent description of the fluctuation spectra of pure membranes and successfully reproduces the deformation profiles of membranes around single proteins. However, its prediction for the potential of mean force between proteins is not compatible with the simulation data for large distances. The simulations show that the lipid-mediated interactions are governed by five competing factors: direct interactions; lipid-induced depletion interactions; lipid bridging; lipid packing; and a smooth long-range contribution. The mechanisms leading to hydrophobic mismatch interactions are critically analyzed. PMID:18835907

  6. Immobilization and activity assay of cytochrome P450 on patterned lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Morigaki, Kenichi . E-mail: morigaki-kenichi@aist.go.jp; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Yumoto, Noboru; Imaishi, Hiromasa . E-mail: himaish@kobe-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-20

    We report on a methodology for immobilizing cytochrome P450 on the surface of micropatterned lipid bilayer membranes and measuring the enzymatic activity. The patterned bilayer comprised a matrix of polymeric lipid bilayers and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric lipid bilayer domains act as a barrier to confine fluid lipid bilayers in defined areas and as a framework to stabilize embedded membranes. The fluid bilayer domains, on the other hand, can contain lipid compositions that facilitate the fusion between lipid membranes, and are intended to be used as the binding agent of microsomes containing rat CYP1A1. By optimizing the membrane compositions of the fluid bilayers, we could selectively immobilize microsomal membranes on these domains. The enzymatic activity was significantly higher on lipid bilayer substrates compared with direct adsorption on glass. Furthermore, competitive assay experiment between two fluorogenic substrates demonstrated the feasibility of bioassays based on immobilized P450s.

  7. Immobilization and activity assay of cytochrome P450 on patterned lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Morigaki, Kenichi; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Yumoto, Noboru; Imaishi, Hiromasa

    2007-04-20

    We report on a methodology for immobilizing cytochrome P450 on the surface of micropatterned lipid bilayer membranes and measuring the enzymatic activity. The patterned bilayer comprised a matrix of polymeric lipid bilayers and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. The polymeric lipid bilayer domains act as a barrier to confine fluid lipid bilayers in defined areas and as a framework to stabilize embedded membranes. The fluid bilayer domains, on the other hand, can contain lipid compositions that facilitate the fusion between lipid membranes, and are intended to be used as the binding agent of microsomes containing rat CYP1A1. By optimizing the membrane compositions of the fluid bilayers, we could selectively immobilize microsomal membranes on these domains. The enzymatic activity was significantly higher on lipid bilayer substrates compared with direct adsorption on glass. Furthermore, competitive assay experiment between two fluorogenic substrates demonstrated the feasibility of bioassays based on immobilized P450s. PMID:17335776

  8. The bilayer enhances rhodopsin kinetic stability in bovine rod outer segment disk membranes.

    PubMed

    Corley, Scott C; Sprangers, Peter; Albert, Arlene D

    2011-06-22

    Rhodopsin is a kinetically stable protein constituting >90% of rod outer segment disk membrane protein. To investigate the bilayer contribution to rhodopsin kinetic stability, disk membranes were systematically disrupted by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. Rhodopsin kinetic stability was examined under subsolubilizing (rhodopsin in a bilayer environment perturbed by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside) and under fully solubilizing conditions (rhodopsin in a micelle with cosolubilized phospholipids). As determined by DSC, rhodopsin exhibited a scan-rate-dependent irreversible endothermic transition at all stages of solubilization. The transition temperature (T(m)) decreased in the subsolubilizing stage. However, once the rhodopsin was in a micelle environment there was little change of the T(m) as the phospholipid/rhodopsin ratio in the mixed micelles decreased during the fully solubilized stage. Rhodopsin thermal denaturation is consistent with the two-state irreversible model at all stages of solubilization. The activation energy of denaturation (E(act)) was calculated from the scan rate dependence of the T(m) and from the rate of rhodopsin thermal bleaching at all stages of solubilization. The E(act) as determined by both techniques decreased in the subsolubilizing stage, but remained constant once fully solubilized. These results indicate the bilayer structure increases the E(act) to rhodopsin denaturation. PMID:21689528

  9. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  10. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  11. Distribution and dynamics of quinones in the lipid bilayer mimicking the inner membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaurola, Petri; Sharma, Vivek; Vonk, Amanda; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    Quinone and its analogues (Q) constitute an important class of compounds that perform key electron transfer reactions in oxidative- and photo-phosphorylation. In the inner membrane of mitochondria, ubiquinone molecules undergo continuous redox transitions enabling electron transfer between the respiratory complexes. In such a dynamic system undergoing continuous turnover for ATP synthesis, an uninterrupted supply of substrate molecules is absolutely necessary. In the current work, we have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to assess the structure, dynamics, and localization of quinone and its analogues in a lipid bilayer, whose composition mimics the one in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The results show that there is a strong tendency of both quinone and quinol molecules to localize in the vicinity of the lipids' acyl groups, right under the lipid head group region. Additionally, we observe a second location in the middle of the bilayer where quinone molecules tend to stabilize. Translocation of quinone through a lipid bilayer is very fast and occurs in 10-100ns time scale, whereas the translocation of quinol is at least an order of magnitude slower. We suggest that this has important mechanistic implications given that the localization of Q ensures maximal occupancy of the Q-binding sites or Q-entry points in electron transport chain complexes, thereby maintaining an optimal turnover rate for ATP synthesis. PMID:27342376

  12. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  13. Effect of antimicrobial peptide on the dynamics of phosphocholine membrane: role of cholesterol and physical state of bilayer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V K; Mamontov, E; Anunciado, D B; O'Neill, H; Urban, V S

    2015-09-14

    Antimicrobial peptides are universal in all forms of life and are well known for their strong interaction with the cell membrane. This makes them a popular target for investigation of peptide-lipid interactions. Here we report the effect of melittin, an important antimicrobial peptide, on the dynamics of membranes based on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid in both the solid gel and fluid phases. To probe the phase transition, elastic neutron intensity temperature scans have been carried out on DMPC-based unilamellar vesicles (ULV) with and without melittin. We have found that addition of a small amount (0.2 mol%) melittin eliminates the steep fall in the elastic intensity at 296 K associated with the solid gel to fluid phase transition, which is observed for pure DMPC vesicles. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV in the solid gel and fluid phases with and without 0.2 mol% melittin. The data analysis invariably shows the presence of lateral and internal motions of the DMPC molecule. We found that melittin does have a profound effect on the dynamics of lipid molecules, especially on the lateral motion, and affects it in a different way, depending on the phase of the bilayers. In the solid gel phase, it acts as a plasticizer, enhancing the lateral motion of DMPC. However, in the fluid phase it acts as a stiffening agent, restricting the lateral motion of the lipid molecules. These observations are consistent with the mean squared displacements extracted from the elastic intensity temperature scans. Their importance lies in the fact that many membrane processes, including signaling and energy transduction pathways, are controlled to a great extent by the lateral diffusion of lipids in the membrane. To investigate the effect of melittin on vesicles supplemented with cholesterol, QENS experiments have also been carried out on DMPC ULV with cholesterol in the presence and absence of 0.2 mol% melittin

  14. Voltage-sensitive styryl dyes as singlet oxygen targets on the surface of bilayer lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, V S; Gavrilchik, A N; Kulagina, A O; Meshkov, I N; Pohl, P; Gorbunova, Yu G

    2016-08-01

    Photosensitizers are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic agents killing cancer cells by photooxidation of their components. Development of new effective photosensitive molecules requires profound knowledge of possible targets for reactive oxygen species, especially for its singlet form. Here we studied photooxidation of voltage-sensitive styryl dyes (di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, RH-421 and RH-237) by singlet oxygen on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes commonly used as cell membrane models. Oxidation was induced by irradiation of a photosensitizer (aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate) and monitored by the change of dipole potential on the surface of the membrane. We studied the drop of the dipole potential both in the case when the dye molecules were adsorbed on the same side of the lipid bilayer as the photosensitizer (cis-configuration) and in the case when they were adsorbed on the opposite side (trans-configuration). Based on a simple model, we determined the rate of oxidation of the dyes from the kinetics of change of the potential during and after irradiation. This rate is proportional to steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen in the membrane under irradiation. Comparison of the oxidation rates of various dyes reveals that compounds of ANEPPS series are more sensitive to singlet oxygen than RH type dyes, indicating that naphthalene group is primarily responsible for their oxidation. PMID:27236238

  15. Aspirin, acetaminophen and proton transport through phospholipid bilayers and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, J

    1992-09-01

    Mechanisms of proton transport were investigated in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes exposed to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), acetaminophen (4-acetamidophenol), benzoic acid and three aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid and salicyluric acid). The objectives were to characterize the conductances and permeabilities of these weak acids in lipid bilayer membranes and then predict their effects on mitochondrial membranes. Of the compounds tested only aspirin, benzoate and salicylate caused significant increases in membrane conductance. The conductance was due mainly to proton current at low pH and to weak acid anion current at neutral pH. Analysis of the concentration and pH dependence suggests that these weak acids act as HA-2-type proton carriers when pH approximately pK and as lipid soluble anions at neutral pH. Salicylate is much more potent than aspirin and benzoate because salicylate contains an internal hydrogen bond which delocalizes the negative charge and increases the permeability of the anion. Model calculations for mitochondria suggest that salicylate causes net H+ uptake by a cyclic process of HA influx and A- efflux. This model can explain the salicylate-induced uncoupling and swelling observed in isolated mitochondria. Since ingested aspirin breaks down rapidly to form salicylate, these results may clarify the mechanisms of aspirin toxicity in humans. The results may also help to explain why the ingestion of aspirin but not acetaminophen is associated with Reye's syndrome, a disease characterized by impaired energy metabolism and mitochondrial swelling. PMID:1334228

  16. Arrayed lipid bilayer chambers allow single-molecule analysis of membrane transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Fujita, Daishi; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Yamauchi, Lisa; Hyeon Kim, Soo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Suga, Hiroaki; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Nano- to micron-size reaction chamber arrays (femtolitre chamber arrays) have facilitated the development of sensitive and quantitative biological assays, such as single-molecule enzymatic assays, digital PCR and digital ELISA. However, the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays is limited to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. Here we report an arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (ALBiC) that contains sub-million femtolitre chambers, each sealed with a stable 4-μm-diameter lipid bilayer membrane. When reconstituted with a limiting amount of the membrane transporter proteins α-hemolysin or F0F1-ATP synthase, the chambers within the ALBiC exhibit stochastic and quantized transporting activities. This demonstrates that the single-molecule analysis of passive and active membrane transport is achievable with the ALBiC system. This new platform broadens the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays and paves the way for novel applications aimed at furthering our mechanistic understanding of membrane proteins’ function. PMID:25058452

  17. PTEN interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes containing PI(4,5)P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, R.; Shenoy, S.; Shekhar, P.; Kalinowski, A.; Gericke, A.; Heinrich, F.; Loesche, M.

    2009-03-01

    Synthetic lipid membrane models are frequently used for the study of biophysical processes at cell membranes. We use a robust membrane model, the tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM), based on a (C14)2-(PEO)6-thiol anchor, WC14 [1]. Such membranes can be prepared to contain single phospholipids or complex lipid mixtures [2], including functional lipids involved in cell signaling, such as the highly charged phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs). To study the interaction between the tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) and model membranes we have incorporated phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) in tBLMs and use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), neutron reflectometry (NR) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for their characterization. NR shows that tBLMs formed with PI(4,5)P2 are complete. FCS of labeled PI(4,5)P2 shows that diffusion occurs at the time scale characteristic of membrane-incorporated lipid. Finally, SPR shows specific binding of PTEN to the model membrane thus confirming the incorporation of PI(4,5)P2 into the tBLM. [1] McGillivray et al, Biointerphases 2, 21-33 (2007) [2] Heinrich et al, Langmuir, submitted

  18. Fluid bilayer structure determination: Joint refinement in composition space using X-ray and neutron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.H.; Wiener, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Experimentally-determined structural models of fluid lipid bilayers are essential for verifying molecular dynamics simulations of bilayers and for understanding the structural consequences of peptide interactions. The extreme thermal motion of bilayers precludes the possibility of atomic-level structural models. Defining {open_quote}the structure{close_quote} of a bilayer as the time-averaged transbilayer distribution of the water and the principal lipid structural groups such as the carbonyls and double-bonds (quasimolecular fragments), one can represent the bilayer structure as a sum of Gaussian functions referred to collectively as the quasimolecular structure. One method of determining the structure is by neutron diffraction combined with exhaustive specific deuteration. This method is impractical because of the expense of the chemical syntheses and the limited amount of neutron beam time currently available. We have therefore developed the composition space refinement method for combining X-ray and minimal neutron diffraction data to arrive at remarkably detailed and accurate structures of fluid bilayers. The composition space representation of the bilayer describes the probability of occupancy per unit length across the width of the bilayer of each quasimolecular component and permits the joint refinement of X-ray and neutron lamellar diffraction data by means of a single quasimolecular structure that is fitted simultaneously to both data sets. Scaling of each component by the appropriate neutron or X-ray scattering length maps the composition-space profile to the appropriate scattering length space for comparison to experimental data. The difficulty with the method is that fluid bilayer structures are generally only marginally determined by the experimental data. This means that the space of possible solutions must be extensively explored in conjunction with a thorough analysis of errors.

  19. Phospholipid vesicle fusion on micropatterned polymeric bilayer substrates.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Takashi; Morigaki, Kenichi; Taguchi, Takahisa

    2006-09-01

    As an approach to create versatile model systems of the biological membrane we have recently developed a novel micropatterning strategy of substrate-supported planar lipid bilayers (SPBs) based on photolithographic polymerization of a diacetylene phospholipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. The micropatterned SPBs are composed of a polymeric bilayer matrix and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. In this study, we investigated the incorporation of fluid bilayers into micropatterned polymeric bilayer matrices through the adsorption and reorganization of phospholipid vesicles (vesicle fusion). Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy observation showed that vesicle fusion started at the boundary of polymeric bilayers and propagated into the central part of lipid-free regions. On the other hand, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring revealed that the transformation from adsorbed vesicles into SPBs was significantly accelerated for substrates with micropatterned polymeric bilayers. These results indicate that the edges of polymeric bilayers catalyze the formation of SPBs by destabilizing adsorbed vesicles and also support the premise that polymeric bilayers and embedded fluid bilayers are forming a continuous hybrid bilayer membrane, sealing energetically unfavorable bilayer edges. PMID:16766614

  20. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide on Dynamics of Phosphocholine Membrane. Role of Cholesterol and Physical State of Bilayer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sharma, Veerendra K; Mamontov, Eugene; Anunciado, Divina B; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Urban, Volker S

    2015-06-24

    Antimicrobial peptides are universal in all forms of life and are well known for their strong interaction with the cell membrane. This makes them a popular target for investigation of peptide-lipid interactions. Here we report the effect of melittin, an important antimicrobial peptide, on the dynamics of membranes based on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid in both the solid gel and fluid phases. To probe the phase transition, elastic neutron intensity temperature scans have been carried out on DMPC-based unilamellar vesicles (ULV) with and without melittin. We have found that addition of a small amount (0.2 mol%) melittin eliminates the steep fallmore » in the elastic intensity at 296 K associated with the solid gel to fluid phase transition, which is observed for pure DMPC vesicles. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV in the solid gel and fluid phases with and without 0.2 mol % melittin. The data analysis invariably shows the presence of lateral and internal motions of the DMPC molecule. We found that melittin does have a profound effect on the dynamics of lipid molecules, especially on the lateral motion, and affects it in a different way, depending on the phase of the bilayers. In the solid gel phase, it acts as a plasticizer, enhancing the lateral motion of DMPC. However, in the fluid phase it acts as a stiffening agent, restricting the lateral motion of the lipid molecules. These observations are consistent with the mean squared displacements extracted from the elastic intensity temperature scans. Cholesterol is a vital component of eukaryotic membrane, which is a natural target for melittin. To investigate the effect of melittin on vesicles supplemented with cholesterol, QENS experiments have also been carried out on DMPC ULV with 20 mol% cholesterol in the presence and absence of 0.2 mol% melittin. Remarkably, the effects of melittin on the membrane dynamics disappear in the presence

  1. Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide on Dynamics of Phosphocholine Membrane. Role of Cholesterol and Physical State of Bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Veerendra K; Mamontov, Eugene; Anunciado, Divina B; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Urban, Volker S

    2015-06-24

    Antimicrobial peptides are universal in all forms of life and are well known for their strong interaction with the cell membrane. This makes them a popular target for investigation of peptide-lipid interactions. Here we report the effect of melittin, an important antimicrobial peptide, on the dynamics of membranes based on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid in both the solid gel and fluid phases. To probe the phase transition, elastic neutron intensity temperature scans have been carried out on DMPC-based unilamellar vesicles (ULV) with and without melittin. We have found that addition of a small amount (0.2 mol%) melittin eliminates the steep fall in the elastic intensity at 296 K associated with the solid gel to fluid phase transition, which is observed for pure DMPC vesicles. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV in the solid gel and fluid phases with and without 0.2 mol % melittin. The data analysis invariably shows the presence of lateral and internal motions of the DMPC molecule. We found that melittin does have a profound effect on the dynamics of lipid molecules, especially on the lateral motion, and affects it in a different way, depending on the phase of the bilayers. In the solid gel phase, it acts as a plasticizer, enhancing the lateral motion of DMPC. However, in the fluid phase it acts as a stiffening agent, restricting the lateral motion of the lipid molecules. These observations are consistent with the mean squared displacements extracted from the elastic intensity temperature scans. Cholesterol is a vital component of eukaryotic membrane, which is a natural target for melittin. To investigate the effect of melittin on vesicles supplemented with cholesterol, QENS experiments have also been carried out on DMPC ULV with 20 mol% cholesterol in the presence and absence of 0.2 mol% melittin. Remarkably, the effects of melittin on the membrane dynamics disappear in the presence of 20 mol

  2. Structure elucidation of membrane-associated peptides and proteins in oriented bilayers by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Naito, Akira

    2009-10-01

    Solid-state NMR using magnetically oriented bilayer systems provides useful information on the structure and orientation of peptides and proteins bound to lipid bilayers. The ordering of the lipid bilayer along the magnetic field can be achieved in two ways. First, lipid can be macroscopically oriented by pressing lipid-water dispersion between flat glass plates, which is called a mechanically aligned system. Second, lipid molecules themselves can be aligned spontaneously in the magnetic field because of their diamagnetic anisotropy by forming bicelles or magnetically oriented vesicle systems. Structure and orientation of the membrane-associated peptides and proteins can be achieved by analyzing structural constraints obtained from anisotropic chemical shift interactions such as chemical shift oscillation or nuclear dipolar interactions such as dipolar wave and a combination of them such as PISA wheel. Detailed structure elucidation of various kinds of membrane peptides and proteins in such oriented bilayers is presented. PMID:19647984

  3. Protein-fluctuation-induced water-pore formation in ion channel voltage-sensor translocation across a lipid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksha, Suneth P.; Pal, Nibedita; Zheng, Desheng; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-11-01

    We have applied a combined fluorescence microscopy and single-ion-channel electric current recording approach, correlating with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the mechanism of voltage-sensor domain translocation across a lipid bilayer. We use the colicin Ia ion channel as a model system, and our experimental and simulation results show the following: (1) The open-close activity of an activated colicin Ia is not necessarily sensitive to the amplitude of the applied cross-membrane voltage when the cross-membrane voltage is around the resting potential of excitable membranes; and (2) there is a significant probability that the activation of colicin Ia occurs by forming a transient and fluctuating water pore of ˜15 Å diameter in the lipid bilayer membrane. The location of the water-pore formation is nonrandom and highly specific, right at the insertion site of colicin Ia charged residues in the lipid bilayer membrane, and the formation is intrinsically associated with the polypeptide conformational fluctuations and solvation dynamics. Our results suggest an interesting mechanistic pathway for voltage-sensitive ion channel activation, and specifically for translocation of charged polypeptide chains across the lipid membrane under a transmembrane electric field: the charged polypeptide domain facilitates the formation of hydrophilic water pore in the membrane and diffuses through the hydrophilic pathway across the membrane; i.e., the charged polypeptide chain can cross a lipid membrane without entering into the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane but entirely through the aqueous and hydrophilic environment to achieve a cross-membrane translocation. This mechanism sheds light on the intensive and fundamental debate on how a hydrophilic and charged peptide domain diffuses across the biologically inaccessible high-energy barrier of the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer: The peptide domain does not need to cross the hydrophobic core to move across a

  4. Capturing the nanoscale complexity of cellular membranes in supported lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The lateral mobility of cell membranes plays an important role in cell signaling, governing the rate at which embedded proteins can interact with other biomolecules. The past two decades have seen a dramatic transformation in understanding of this environment, as the mechanisms and potential implications of nanoscale structure of these systems has become accessible to theoretical and experimental investigation. In particular, emerging micro- and nano-scale fabrication techniques have made possible the direct manipulation of model membranes at the scales relevant to these biological processes. This review focuses on recent advances in nanopatterning of supported lipid bilayers, capturing the impact of membrane nanostructure on molecular diffusion and providing a powerful platform for further investigation of the role of this spatial complexity on cell signaling. PMID:19500676

  5. Fluctuation spectrum of fluid membranes coupled to an elastic meshwork: jump of the effective surface tension at the mesh size.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jean-Baptiste; Lacoste, David; Raphaël, Elie

    2004-01-01

    We identify a class of composite membranes: fluid bilayers coupled to an elastic meshwork that are such that the meshwork's energy is a function F(el)[A(xi)] not of the real microscopic membrane area A, but of a smoothed membrane's area A(xi), which corresponds to the area of the membrane coarse grained at the mesh size xi. We show that the meshwork modifies the membrane tension sigma both below and above the scale xi, inducing a steep crossover of amplitude deltasigma=dF(el)/dA(xi). The predictions of our model account for the fluctuation spectrum of red blood cell membranes coupled to their cytoskeleton. Our results indicate that the cytoskeleton might be under extensional stress, which would provide a means to regulate available membrane areas. We also predict an observable tension jump for membranes decorated with polymer "brushes." PMID:14754023

  6. Impact of monoolein on aquaporin1-based supported lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhining; Wang, Xida; Ding, Wande; Wang, Miaoqi; Qi, Xin; Gao, Congjie

    2015-08-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) based biomimetic membranes have attracted considerable attention for their potential water purification applications. In this paper, AQP1 incorporated biomimetic membranes were prepared and characterized. The morphology and structure of the biomimetic membranes were characterized by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and contact angle measurements. The nanofiltration performance of the AQP1 incorporated membranes was investigated at 4 bar by using 2 g l-1 NaCl as feed solution. Lipid mobility plays an important role in the performance of the AQP1 incorporated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membranes. We demonstrated that the lipid mobility is successfully tuned by the addition of monoolein (MO). Through in situ AFM and fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) measurements, the membrane morphology and the molecular mobility were studied. The lipid mobility increased in the sequence DPPC < DPPC/MO (RMO = 5/5) < DOPC/MO (RMO = 5/5) < DOPC, which is consistent with the flux increment and salt rejection. This study may provide some useful insights for improving the water purification performance of biomimetic membranes.

  7. Spreading-wetting method for highly reproducible tertiary growth of perfective bilayer TS-1 membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuguang; Liu, Yong; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Baoquan; Ma, Laibo

    2015-07-01

    Spreading-wetting method is adopted to seed a support for tertiary growth of hydrophobic TS-1 membrane. It deposits the seed on the macro-hole of the support and results in a dispersive seed distribution. This enables a highly reproducible preparation of the perfective TS-1 membrane, revealed by SEM as a bilayer structure. An intermediate layer of the TS-1 membrane avoids the leaching of Al from the support and ensures the upper layer as the pure hydrophobic TS-1 membrane, proved by XRD, EDS, and water contact angle measurements. Another important advance about the TS-1 membrane is employing a Pd/SiO2 catalytic hydrocracking method to activate it at 593 K. Such a mild method favors maintaining that perfective macrostructure and hydrophobicity. Bearing the thermal stress, generated during the activation process, desires the TS-1 membrane with a sufficient thickness, gained by prolonging the crystallization time. This phenomenon is verified by gas permeation and ascribed with the membrane's mechanical properties.

  8. Interaction of pyridinium bis-retinoid (A2E) with bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, V S; Sokolenko, E A; Sokolov, A V; Dontsov, A E; Chizmadzhev, Y A; Ostrovsky, M A

    2007-02-01

    The accumulation of lipofuscin granules within the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells is correlated with the progression of age-related macular degeneration. One of the fluorophores contained in lipofiscin granules is pyridinium bis-retinoid (A2E). To test its membrane-toxic effect, the interaction of A2E with bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) was studied. The incorporation of charged A2E molecules into the membranes has been detected as a change of either zeta-potential of multilayer liposomes or boundary potential of BLM. It was shown that the presence of up to 25mol% of A2E did not destabilize the bilayers made of saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC). However, the destabilizing effect became very significant when BLM contained negatively charged lipids such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylserine. The electrical breakdown measurements revealed that the A2E-induced decrease of BLM stability was primarily associated with the growing probability of lipid pore formation. It was found from the measurements of boundary potential of BLM that exposure of A2E to light initiates its transformation into at least two products. One of them is epoxy-A2E, which, being hydrophilic, moves from the membrane into water solution. The other product is a non-identified hydrophobic substance. Illumination of A2E-containing BLM made from unsaturated PC by visible light caused the membrane damage presumably due to oxidation of these lipids by singlet oxygen generated by excited A2E molecules. However, this effect was very weak compared to the effect of known photosensitizers. The illumination of BLM with A2E also leads to the damage of gramicidin incorporated into the membrane, as was detected by measuring the conductance of channels formed by this peptide. PMID:17070694

  9. Polyelectrolyte-Mediated Transport of Doxorubicin Through the Bilayer Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavov, Alexander A.; Kitaeva, Marina V.; Melik-Nubarov, Nikolay S.; Menger, Frederic M.

    A model is developed for the effect of ionic polymers on the transport of doxorubicin, an antitumor drug, through a bilayer membrane. Accordingly, a protonated (cationic) form of doxorubicin binds to an anionic polymer, poly(acrylic acid), the resulting complex being several hundred nanometers in size. Nevertheless, large complex species associate with neutral egg lecithin liposomes by means of hydrophobic attraction between the doxorubicin and the liposome bilayer. Then, the doxorubicin enters the liposome interior which has been imparted with an acidic buffer to protonate the doxorubicin. The rate of transmembrane Dox permeation decreases when elevating the polyacid-to-doxorubicin ratio. A cationic polymer, polylysine, being coupled with liposomes containing the negative lipid cardiolipin, accelerates membrane transport of doxorubicin with the maximum rate at a complete neutralization of the membrane charge by an interacting polycation. The effect of a polycation on doxorubicin transport becomes more pronounced as small negative liposomes (60-80 nm in diameter) are changed to larger ones (approx. 600 nm in diameter). An opportunity thus opens up for the manipulation of the kinetics of drug uptake by cells and, ultimately, the control of the pharmaceutical action of drugs.

  10. Conformational Transitions in the Membrane Scaffold Protein of Phospholipid Bilayer Nanodiscs*

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Christopher R.; Hebling, Christine M.; Rand, Kasper D.; Stafford, Darrel W.; Jorgenson, James W.; Engen, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs are model membrane systems that provide an environment where membrane proteins are highly stable and monodisperse without the use of detergents or liposomes. Nanodiscs consist of a discoidal phospholipid bilayer encircled by two copies of an amphipathic alpha helical membrane scaffold protein, which is modeled from apolipoprotein A-1. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry was used to probe the structure and dynamics of the scaffold protein in the presence and absence of lipid. On nanodisc self-assembly, the entire scaffold protein gained significant protection from exchange, consistent with a large, protein-wide, structural rearrangement. This protection was short-lived and the scaffold protein was highly deuterated within 2 h. Several regions of the scaffold protein, in both the lipid-free and lipid-associated states, displayed EX1 unfolding kinetics. The rapid deuteration of the scaffold protein and the presence of correlated unfolding events both indicate that nanodiscs are dynamic rather than rigid bodies in solution. This work provides a catalog of the expected scaffold protein peptic peptides in a nanodisc-hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry experiment and their deuterium uptake signatures, data that can be used as a benchmark to verify correct assembly and nanodisc structure. Such reference data will be useful control data for all hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry experiments involving nanodiscs in which transmembrane or lipid-associated proteins are the primary molecule(s) of interest. PMID:21715319

  11. Three-dimensional structure of Bax-mediated pores in membrane bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X-P; Zhai, D; Kim, E; Swift, M; Reed, J C; Volkmann, N; Hanein, D

    2013-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax) is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family having a pivotal role in triggering cell commitment to apoptosis. Bax is latent and monomeric in the cytosol but transforms into its lethal, mitochondria-embedded oligomeric form in response to cell stress, leading to the release of apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome C. Here, we dissected the structural correlates of Bax membrane insertion while oligomerization is halted. This strategy was enabled through the use of nanometer-scale phospholipid bilayer islands (nanodiscs) the size of which restricts the reconstituted system to single Bax-molecule activity. Using this minimal reconstituted system, we captured structural correlates that precede Bax homo-oligomerization elucidating previously inaccessible steps of the core molecular mechanism by which Bcl-2 family proteins regulate membrane permeabilization. We observe that, in the presence of BH3 interacting domain death agonist (Bid) BH3 peptide, Bax monomers induce the formation of ∼3.5-nm diameter pores and significantly distort the phospholipid bilayer. These pores are compatible with promoting release of ions as well as proteinaceous components, suggesting that membrane-integrated Bax monomers in the presence of Bid BH3 peptides are key functional units for the activation of the cell demolition machinery. PMID:23788040

  12. Three-dimensional structure of Bax-mediated pores in membrane bilayers.

    PubMed

    Xu, X-P; Zhai, D; Kim, E; Swift, M; Reed, J C; Volkmann, N; Hanein, D

    2013-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax) is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family having a pivotal role in triggering cell commitment to apoptosis. Bax is latent and monomeric in the cytosol but transforms into its lethal, mitochondria-embedded oligomeric form in response to cell stress, leading to the release of apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome C. Here, we dissected the structural correlates of Bax membrane insertion while oligomerization is halted. This strategy was enabled through the use of nanometer-scale phospholipid bilayer islands (nanodiscs) the size of which restricts the reconstituted system to single Bax-molecule activity. Using this minimal reconstituted system, we captured structural correlates that precede Bax homo-oligomerization elucidating previously inaccessible steps of the core molecular mechanism by which Bcl-2 family proteins regulate membrane permeabilization. We observe that, in the presence of BH3 interacting domain death agonist (Bid) BH3 peptide, Bax monomers induce the formation of ~3.5-nm diameter pores and significantly distort the phospholipid bilayer. These pores are compatible with promoting release of ions as well as proteinaceous components, suggesting that membrane-integrated Bax monomers in the presence of Bid BH3 peptides are key functional units for the activation of the cell demolition machinery. PMID:23788040

  13. Bilayer porous scaffold based on poly-(ɛ-caprolactone) nanofibrous membrane and gelatin sponge for favoring cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Yiwang; Nie, Huarong; Wang, Yang; Li, Fan; Zheng, Yan

    2011-12-01

    Electrospun poly-(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers has been widely used in the medical prosthesis. However, poor hydrophilicity and the lack of natural recognition sites for covalent cell-recognition signal molecules to promote cell attachment have limited its utility as tissue scaffolds. In this study, Bilayer porous scaffolds based on PCL electrospun membranes and gelatin (GE) sponges were fabricated through soft hydrolysis of PCL electrospun followed by grafting gelatin onto the fiber surface, through crosslinking and freeze drying treatment of additional gelatin coat and grafted gelatin surface. GE sponges were stably anchored on PCL membrane surface with the aid of grafted GE molecules. The morphologies of bilayer porous scaffolds were observed through SEM. The contact angle of the scaffolds was 0°, the mechanical properties of scaffolds were measured by tensile test, Young's moduli of PCL scaffolds before and after hydrolysis are 66-77.3 MPa and 62.3-75.4 MPa, respectively. Thus, the bilayer porous scaffolds showed excellent hydrophilic surface and desirable mechanical strength due to the soft hydrolysis and GE coat. The cell culture results showed that the adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells did more favor to adhere and grow on the bilayer porous scaffolds than on PCL electrospun membranes. The better cell affinity of the final bilayer scaffolds not only attributed to the surface chemistry but also the introduction of bilayer porous structure.

  14. Swelling of phospholipid membranes by divalent metal ions depends on the location of the ions in the bilayers.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Maria Schober, Rafaëla; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2016-08-10

    The Hofmeister series illustrates how salts produce a wide range of effects in biological systems, which are not exclusively explained by ion charge. In lipid membranes, charged ions have been shown to bind to lipids and either hydrate or dehydrate lipid head groups, and also to swell the water layer in multi-lamellar systems. Typically, Hofmeister phenomena are explained by the interaction of the ions with water, as well as with biological interfaces, such as proteins or membranes. We studied the effect of the divalent cations Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on oriented, stacked, phospholipid bilayers made of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). Using high-resolution X-ray diffraction, we observed that the cations lead to a swelling of the water layer between the bilayers, without causing significant changes to the bilayer structure. The cations swelled the bilayers in different amounts, in the order Fe(2+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+) > Zn(2+). By decomposing the total bilayer electron density into different molecular groups, Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) were found to interact with the glycerol groups of the lipid molecules and cause minor swelling of the bilayers. Mg(2+) and Fe(2+) were found to position near the phosphate groups and cause a strong increase in the number of hydration water molecules. Our results present a molecular mechanism-of-action for the Hofmeister series in phospholipid membranes. PMID:27453289

  15. The intermediate scattering function for lipid bilayer membranes: From nanometers to microns

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Max C.; Peng Yonggang; Zheng Yujun; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2011-11-21

    A numerical scheme based upon established hydrodynamic and elastic considerations is introduced and used to predict the intermediate scattering function for lipid bilayer membranes. The predictions span multiple wavelength regimes, including those studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS; microns) and neutron spin-echo (NSE) spectroscopy (10-100 nm). The results validate a recent theory specific to the NSE regime and expose slight inaccuracies associated with the theoretical results available in the DLS regime. The assumptions that underlie both our numerical methods and the related theoretical predictions are reviewed in detail to explain when certain results can be applied to experiment and where caution must be exercised.

  16. Bilayer registry in a multicomponent asymmetric membrane: Dependence on lipid composition and chain length

    SciTech Connect

    Polley, Anirban; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan E-mail: madan@ncbs.res.in

    2014-08-14

    A question of considerable interest to cell membrane biology is whether phase segregated domains across an asymmetric bilayer are strongly correlated with each other and whether phase segregation in one leaflet can induce segregation in the other. We answer both these questions in the affirmative, using an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to study the equilibrium statistical properties of a 3-component asymmetric lipid bilayer comprising an unsaturated palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidyl-choline, a saturated sphingomyelin, and cholesterol with different composition ratios. Our simulations are done by fixing the composition of the upper leaflet to be at the coexistence of the liquid ordered (l{sub o})-liquid disordered (l{sub d}) phases, while the composition of the lower leaflet is varied from the phase coexistence regime to the mixed l{sub d} phase, across a first-order phase boundary. In the regime of phase coexistence in each leaflet, we find strong transbilayer correlations of the l{sub o} domains across the two leaflets, resulting in bilayer registry. This transbilayer correlation depends sensitively upon the chain length of the participating lipids and possibly other features of lipid chemistry, such as degree of saturation. We find that the l{sub o} domains in the upper leaflet can induce phase segregation in the lower leaflet, when the latter is nominally in the mixed (l{sub d}) phase.

  17. Bilayer registry in a multicomponent asymmetric membrane: Dependence on lipid composition and chain length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polley, Anirban; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2014-08-01

    A question of considerable interest to cell membrane biology is whether phase segregated domains across an asymmetric bilayer are strongly correlated with each other and whether phase segregation in one leaflet can induce segregation in the other. We answer both these questions in the affirmative, using an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to study the equilibrium statistical properties of a 3-component asymmetric lipid bilayer comprising an unsaturated palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidyl-choline, a saturated sphingomyelin, and cholesterol with different composition ratios. Our simulations are done by fixing the composition of the upper leaflet to be at the coexistence of the liquid ordered (lo)-liquid disordered (ld) phases, while the composition of the lower leaflet is varied from the phase coexistence regime to the mixed ld phase, across a first-order phase boundary. In the regime of phase coexistence in each leaflet, we find strong transbilayer correlations of the lo domains across the two leaflets, resulting in bilayer registry. This transbilayer correlation depends sensitively upon the chain length of the participating lipids and possibly other features of lipid chemistry, such as degree of saturation. We find that the lo domains in the upper leaflet can induce phase segregation in the lower leaflet, when the latter is nominally in the mixed (ld) phase.

  18. Phosphatidylinositol induces fluid phase formation and packing defects in phosphatidylcholine model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Aaron; Pisal, Dipak S.; Doty, Amy; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2011-01-01

    Liposomes consisted of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) have been utilized as delivery vehicle for drugs and proteins. In the present work, we studied the effect of soy PI on physical properties of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) liposomes such as phase state of lipid bilayer, lipid packing and phase properties using multiple orthogonal biophysical techniques. The 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylamino naphthalene (Laurdan) fluorescence studies showed that presence of PI induces the formation of fluid phases in DMPC. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature dependent fluorescence anisotropy measurements, and generalized polarization values for Laurdan showed that the presence of as low as 10 mol% of PI induces substantial broadening and shift to lower temperature of phase transition of DMPC. The fluorescence emission intensity of DPH labeled, PI containing DMPC lipid bilayer decreased possibly due to deeper penetration of water molecules in lipid bilayer. In order to further delineate the effect of PI on the physico chemical properties of DMPC is due to either significant hydrophobic mismatch between the acyl chains of the DMPC and that of soy PI or due to the inositol head group, we systematically replaced soy PI with PC species of similar acyl chain composition (DPPC and 18:2 (Cis) PC) or with diacylglycerol (DAG) respectively. The anisotropy of PC membrane containing soy PI showed largest fluidity change compared to other compositions. The data suggests that addition of PI alters structure and dynamics of DMPC bilayer in that it promotes deeper water penetration in the bilayer, induces fluid phase characteristics and causes lipid packing defects that involve its inositol head group. PMID:22024173

  19. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-27

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when used in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes.

  20. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when used in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes. PMID:26015293

  1. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-27

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when usedmore » in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes.« less

  2. Fabrication and characterization of an integrated ionic device from suspended polypyrrole and alamethicin-reconstituted lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northcutt, Robert; Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba

    2012-09-01

    Conducting polymers are electroactive materials that undergo conformal relaxation of the polymer backbone in the presence of an electrical field through ion exchange with solid or aqueous electrolytes. This conformal relaxation and the associated morphological changes make conducting polymers highly suitable for actuation and sensing applications. Among smart materials, bioderived active materials also use ion transport for sensing and actuation functions via selective ion transport. The transporter proteins extracted from biological cell membranes and reconstituted into a bilayer lipid membrane in bioderived active materials regulate ion transport for engineering functions. The protein transporter reconstituted in the bilayer lipid membrane is referred to as the bioderived membrane and serves as the active component in bioderived active materials. Inspired by the similarities in the physics of transduction in conducting polymers and bioderived active materials, an integrated ionic device is formed from the bioderived membrane and the conducting polymer membrane. This ionic device is fabricated into a laminated thin-film membrane and a common ion that can be processed by the bioderived and the conducting polymer membranes couple the ionic function of these two membranes. An integrated ionic device, fabricated from polypyrrole (PPy) doped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDBS) and an alamethicin-reconstituted DPhPC bilayer lipid membrane, is presented in this paper. A voltage-gated sodium current regulates the electrochemical response in the PPy(DBS) layer. The integrated device is fabricated on silicon-based substrates through microfabrication, electropolymerization, and vesicle fusion, and ionic activity is characterized through electrochemical measurements.

  3. The dependence of the lipid bilayer membrane: buffer partition coefficient of pentobarbitone on pH and lipid composition.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K W; Yu, S C

    1977-01-01

    1 The membrane/buffer partition coefficient of [14C]-pentobarbitone has been determined as a function of the lipid composition of bilayer membranes. 2 A new technique based on ultrafiltration gave comparable results to conventional techniques but required less time for equilbration. 3 The membrane/buffer coefficient was independent of pentobarbitone concentration in the range studies. 4 The apparent partition coefficient varied with pH and was a linear function of the degree of dissociation of pentobarbition. 5 Both the charged and uncharged forms of pentobarbitone partitioned into the membrane, the latter to a much greater extent than the former. 6 At low pH the highest partition coefficient observed was in egg phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes. 7 Incorporation of cholesterol or phosphatidic acid into phosphatidylcholine membranes greatly reduced the partition coefficient. 8 High pressures do not greatly change these partition coefficients. PMID:21013

  4. Alginate/chitosan based bi-layer composite membrane as potential sustained-release wound dressing containing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Dong, Yang; Song, Aihua; Yin, Ran; Li, Sanming

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this research were to develop and evaluate a novel ciprofloxacin hydrochloride loaded bi-layer composite membrane based on alginate and chitosan. In vitro antimicrobial activity, drug permeation study, morphology, cytotoxicity, primary skin irritation and in vivo pharmacodynamics were investigated. Results showed that the membranes could inhibit the growth of microorganisms for longer than 7 days. And there was no significant decrease in the metabolic activity of the Hacat fibroblasts cells were treated with the membranes. No edema and erythema were observed after administration of membranes on the rabbit skin after 14 days. Moreover, the results of pharmacodynamics showed that the membranes were more effective in improving the wound healing process. In conclusion, a novel bi-layer composite membrane was developed and results suggested that it could be exploited as sustained-release wound dressings.

  5. Improved 1H amide resonance line narrowing in oriented sample solid-state NMR of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, George J.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate 1H amide resonance line widths <300 Hz in 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra of membrane proteins in aligned phospholipid bilayers. This represents a substantial improvement over typically observed line widths of ˜1 kHz. Furthermore, in a proton detected local field (PDLF) version of the experiment that measures heteronuclear dipolar couplings, line widths <130 Hz are observed. This dramatic line narrowing of 1H amide resonances enables many more individual signals to be resolved and assigned from uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions of temperature and pH. Finding that the decrease in line widths occurs only for membrane proteins that undergo fast rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal, but not immobile molecules, such as peptide single crystals, identifies a potential new direction for pulse sequence development that includes overall molecular dynamics in their design.

  6. Membrane Thinning Due to Antimicrobial Peptide Binding: An Atomic Force Microscopy Study of MSI-78 in Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Mecke, Almut; Lee, Dong-Kuk; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Orr, Bradford G.; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of an antimicrobial peptide, MSI-78, with phospholipid bilayers has been investigated using atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Binding of amphipathic peptide helices with their helical axis parallel to the membrane surface leads to membrane thinning. Atomic force microscopy of supported 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayers in the presence of MSI-78 provides images of the membrane thinning process at a high spatial resolution. This data reveals that the membrane thickness is not reduced uniformly over the entire bilayer area. Instead, peptide binding leads to the formation of distinct domains where the bilayer thickness is reduced by 1.1 ± 0.2 nm. The data is interpreted using a previously published geometric model for the structure of the peptide-lipid domains. In this model, the peptides reside at the hydrophilic-hydrophobic boundary in the lipid headgroup region, which leads to an increased distance between lipid headgroups. This picture is consistent with concentration-dependent 31P and 2H NMR spectra of MSI-78 in mechanically aligned DMPC bilayers. Furthermore, 2H NMR experiments on DMPC-d54 multilamellar vesicles indicate that the acyl chains of DMPC are highly disordered in the presence of the peptide as is to be expected for the proposed structure of the peptide-lipid assembly. PMID:16183881

  7. Investigations on membrane perturbation by chrysin and its copper complex using self-assembled lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Stalin; Krishnaswamy, Sridharan; Devashya, Venkappayya; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2011-11-01

    The mechanism of membrane interactions of most of the flavonoids in the presence of transition-metal ions is not well-understood. To understand this phenomenon, the present work aims to synthesize a chrysin-copper complex at room temperature and investigate its influence on the electrical characteristics of planar lipid bilayers. The chrysin-copper complex was characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and was found to have a metal/ligand ratio of 1:2 and of cationic nature. Its ability to inhibit 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals was not significant at alkaline pH because of the involvement of the 5-hydroxy group in coordination with the copper ion compared to its parent flavonoid, chrysin (p < 0.05). The addition of different concentrations (20-100 μM) of chrysin and the chrysin-copper complex to lipid bilayers decreases the resistance, indicating a strong surface interaction and partial insertion into the bilayer near the lipid-water interface. The dose-dependent reduction in resistance as a result of the chrysin-copper complex is more pronounced in comparison to chrysin, implying that the bulkier and charged chrysin-copper complex displays greater ability to distort the lipid bilayer architecture. These conclusions were further confirmed by curcumin-loaded liposome permeabilization studies, where both chrysin and its Cu(II) complex increased the fluidity in a dose-dependent manner. However, the extent of fluidization by the chrysin-copper complex was nearly twice that of chrysin alone (p < 0.05). The implications of these surface interactions of chrysin and its copper complex on cell membranes were studied using a hypotonic hemolysis assay. Our results demonstrate that, at low concentrations (20 μM), the chrysin-copper complex exhibited twice the protection against hypotonic stress-induced membrane disruption when compared to chrysin. However, this stabilizing effect gradually decreased and became comparable to chrysin at higher

  8. Chemotherapy Drugs Thiocolchicoside and Taxol Permeabilize Lipid Bilayer Membranes by Forming Ion Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Duszyk, M.; Tuszynski, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    We report ion channel formation by chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside (TCC) and taxol (TXL) which primarily target tubulin but not only. For example, TCC has been shown to interact with GABAA, nuclear envelope and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. TXL interferes with the normal breakdown of microtubules inducing mitotic block and apoptosis. It also interacts with mitochondria and found significant chemotherapeutic applications for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In order to better understand the mechanisms of TCC and TXL actions, we examined their effects on phospholipid bilayer membranes. Our electrophysiological recordings across membranes constructed in NaCl aqueous phases consisting of TCC or TXL under the influence of an applied transmembrane potential (V) indicate that both molecules induce stable ion flowing pores/channels in membranes. Their discrete current versus time plots exhibit triangular shapes which is consistent with a spontaneous time-dependent change of the pore conductance in contrast to rectangular conductance events usually induced by ion channels. These events exhibit conductance (~0.01-0.1 pA/mV) and lifetimes (~5-30 ms) within the ranges observed in e.g., gramicidin A and alamethicin channels. The channel formation probability increases linearly with TCC/TXL concentration and V and is not affected by pH (5.7 - 8.4). A theoretical explanation on the causes of chemotherapy drug induced ion pore formation and the pore stability has also been found using our recently discovered binding energy between lipid bilayer and the bilayer embedded ion channels using gramicidin A channels as tools. This picture of energetics suggests that as the channel forming agents approach to the lipids on bilayer the localized charge properties in the constituents of both channel forming agents (e.g., chemotherapy drugs in this study) and the lipids determine the electrostatic drug-lipid coupling energy through screened Coulomb interactions between the drug

  9. Model for the dynamic responses of taste receptor cells to salty stimuli. I. Function of lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Naito, M; Fuchikami, N; Sasaki, N; Kambara, T

    1991-06-01

    The dynamic response of the lipid bilayer membrane is studied theoretically using a microscopic model of the membrane. The time courses of membrane potential variations due to monovalent salt stimulation are calculated explicitly under various conditions. A set of equations describing the time evolution of membrane surface potential and diffusion potential is derived and solved numerically. It is shown that a rather simple membrane such as lipid bilayer has functions capable of reproducing the following properties of dynamic response observed in gustatory receptor potential. Initial transient depolarization does not occur under Ringer adaptation but does under water. It appears only for comparatively rapid flows of stimuli, the peak height of transient response is expressed by a power function of the flow rate, and the membrane potential gradually decreases after reaching its peak under long and strong stimulation. The dynamic responses in the present model arise from the differences between the time dependences in the surface potential phi s and the diffusion potential phi d across a membrane. Under salt stimulation phi d cannot immediately follow the variation in phi s because of the delay due to the charging up of membrane capacitance. It is suggested that lipid bilayer in the apical membrane is the most probable agency producing the initial phasic response to the stimulation. PMID:1873461

  10. Self-assembly of azobenzene bilayer membranes in binary ionic liquid-water nanostructured media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tejwant Singh; Ishiba, Keita; Morikawa, Masa-aki; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2014-03-11

    Anionic azobenzene-containing amphiphile 1 (sodium 4-[4-(N-methyl-N-dodecylamino)phenylazo]benzenesulfonate) forms ordered bilayer membranes in binary ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate, [C2mim][C2OSO3])-water mixtures. The binary [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water mixture is macroscopically homogeneous at any mixing ratio; however, it possesses fluctuating nanodomains of [C2mim][C2OSO3] molecules as observed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). These nanodomains show reversible heat-induced mixing behavior with water. Although the amphiphile 1 is substantially insoluble in pure water, it is dispersible in the [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water mixtures. The concentration of [C2mim][C2OSO3] and temperature exert significant influences on the self-assembling characteristics of 1 in the binary media, as shown by DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, and zeta-potential measurements. Bilayer membranes with rod- or dotlike nanostructures were formed at a lower content of [C2mim][C2OSO3] (2-30 v/v %), in which azobenzene chromophores adopt parallel molecular orientation regardless of temperature. In contrast, when the content of [C2mim][C2OSO3] is increased above 60 v/v %, azobenzene bilayers showed thermally reversible gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition. The self-assembly of azobenzene amphiphiles is tunable depending on the volume fraction of [C2mim][C2OSO3] and temperature, which are associated with the solvation by nanoclusters in the binary [C2mim][C2OSO3]-water media. These observations clearly indicate that mixtures of water-soluble ionic liquids and water provide unique and valiant environments for ordered molecular self-assembly. PMID:24528277

  11. Incorporation in lipid bilayers of a large conductance cationic channel from mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Thieffry, M; Chich, J F; Goldschmidt, D; Henry, J P

    1988-01-01

    Membranes from subcellular fractions of adrenal medulla were incorporated in phospholipid bilayers formed at the tip of microelectrodes. Current fluctuations recorded in the presence of a transmembrane potential revealed the existence of a voltage-dependent channel of large conductance. This channel is characterized by fast kinetics and four conductance levels separated by jumps of 100, 220 and 220 pS in 150 mM NaCl. It is permeant to Na+,K+, tetraethylammonium, Cl- and acetate and has some cation selectivity. Exposure to trypsin or pronase abolished the voltage-dependence. Upon subcellular fractionation, the activity was found to be associated with mitochondria. A similar activity was observed in mitochondrial fractions from other organs. By its kinetics, its selectivity and its potential-dependence, this channel differs from the voltage-dependent anion channel of outer mitochondrial membranes. Images PMID:2457497

  12. Interactions of Graphene Oxide with Model Cell Membranes: Probing Nanoparticle Attachment and Lipid Bilayer Disruption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitong; Chen, Kai Loon

    2015-11-10

    With the rapid growth in the application of graphene oxide (GO) in diverse fields, the toxicity of GO toward bacterial and mammalian cells has recently attracted extensive research attention. While several mechanisms have been proposed for the cytotoxicity of GO, the attachment of GO to cell membranes is expected to be the key initial process that precedes these mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the propensity for GO to attach to and disrupt model cell membranes using supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and supported vesicular layers (SVLs) that are composed of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). The deposition kinetics of GO on SLBs were determined using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and were observed to increase with increasing electrolyte (NaCl and CaCl2) concentrations, indicating that GO attachment to SLBs was controlled by electrostatic interactions. The GO deposition kinetics measured at elevated electrolyte concentrations were lower than mass-transfer-limited kinetics, likely due to the presence of hydration forces between GO and SLBs. Upon the attachment of GO to supported vesicles that were encapsulated with a fluorescent dye, dye leakage was detected, thus indicating that the lipid vesicles were disrupted. When the exposure of the SVL to the GO suspension was terminated, the leakage of dye decreased significantly, demonstrating that the pores on the lipid bilayers have a self-healing ability. PMID:26466194

  13. Lipid bilayer membrane affinity rationalizes inhibition of lipid peroxidation by a natural lignan antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Podloucká, Pavlína; Berka, Karel; Fabre, Gabin; Paloncýová, Markéta; Duroux, Jean-Luc; Otyepka, Michal; Trouillas, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a degenerative oxidative process that modifies the structure of membranes, influencing their biological functions. Lignans, natural polyphenolic antioxidants widely distributed in plants, can prevent this membrane damage by free-radical scavenging. Here, we rationalize the difference in lipid peroxidation inhibition activity of argenteane, a natural dilignan isolated from wild nutmeg, and 3,3'-dimethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-2,2'-diol, which represents the central part of argenteane responsible for its antioxidant activity. Although both compounds have the same capacity to scavenge free radicals, argenteane is a more active inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. We show that both compounds penetrate into DOPC and PLPC lipid bilayers and adopt similar positions and orientations, which therefore does not explain the difference in their lipid peroxidation inhibition activity. However, free energy profiles indicate that argenteane has a significantly higher affinity to the lipid bilayer, and thus a higher effective concentration to scavenge radicals formed during lipid peroxidation. This finding explains the higher activity of argenteane to inhibit lipid peroxidation. PMID:23560800

  14. Fibrillation of β amyloid peptides in the presence of phospholipid bilayers and the consequent membrane disruption.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Yau, Wai-Ming; Schulte, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillation of β amyloid (Aβ) peptides and the accumulation of amyloid plaques are considered as an important clinical hallmark to identify Alzheimer's disease (AD). The physiological connection between Aβ plaques and the disruption of neuronal cells has not been clearly understood. One hypothesis to explain the Aβ neurotoxicity is that the fibrillation process induces disruption to the cellular membrane. We studied the Aβ fibrillation process in two biologically relevant conditions with the peptide either pre-incorporated into or externally added to the synthetic phospholipid bilayers. These two sample preparation conditions mimic the physiological membrane proximities of Aβ peptides before and after the enzymatic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Using thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we were able to monitor the kinetics and morphological evolution of fibril formation, which was highly sensitive to the two sample preparation protocols. While the external addition protocol generates long and mature fibrils through normal fibrillation process, the pre-incubation protocol was found to stabilize the immature protofibrils. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies with doubly-labeled phospholipids indicated that there may be a lipid uptake process associated with the fibril formation. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provided evidence for high resolution structural variations in fibrils formed with different protocols, and in particular the stabilization of long-range contact between N- and C-terminal β strands. In addition, disruption of phospholipid bilayers was supported by measurements with ³¹P chemical shifts and relaxation time constants. PMID:24769158

  15. Photosensitizer binding to lipid bilayers as a precondition for the photoinactivation of membrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Rokitskaya, T I; Block, M; Antonenko, Y N; Kotova, E A; Pohl, P

    2000-01-01

    The photodynamic activity of sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanines (AlPcS(n), 1 membrane lipids. Adsorbing to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate induced the highest changes in their electrophoretic mobility. AlPcS(2) was also most efficient in mediating photoinactivation of gramicidin channels, as revealed by measurements of the electric current across planar lipid bilayers. The increase in the degree of sulfonation of phthalocyanine progressively reduced its affinity for the lipid bilayer as well as its potency of sensitizing gramicidin channel photoinactivation. The portion of photoinactivated gramicidin channels, alpha, increased with rising photosensitizer concentration up to some optimum. The concentration at which alpha was at half-maximum amounted to 80 nM, 30 nM, 200 nM, and 2 microM for AlPcS(1), AlPcS(2), AlPcS(3), and AlPcS(4), respectively. At high concentrations alpha was found to decrease, which was attributed to quenching of reactive oxygen species and self-quenching of the photosensitizer triplet state by its ground state. Fluoride anions were observed to inhibit both AlPcS(n) (2 membrane lipids is a prerequisite for the photodynamic inactivation of gramicidin channels. PMID:10777753

  16. Lipid bilayer membranes: Missing link in the comprehension of synovial lubrication?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Ross; Cowley, Leonie; Dubief, Yves

    2010-03-01

    The human body hosts an extremely efficient tribological system in its synovial joints that operate under very low friction and virtually no wear. It has long been assumed that the higher molecular weight molecules present in the synovial fluid (hyaluronic acid, lubricin) are solely responsible for the mechanical properties of joint. Smaller components, unsaturated phospholipids, have a virtually an undefined role, most probably because of the cancellation of their amphiphilic properties ex vivo caused by oxidation. Using experimental observations of multilamellar arrangements in synovial joints, we formulate the assumption that self-assembling structures provide the anisotropy necessary to synovial fluid to resist drainage under normal compression. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate the tremendous mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and also highlight their weakening consistent with modifications resulting from injuries or joint prosthesis.

  17. Effective lipid-detergent system for study of membrane active peptides in fluid liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sychev, Sergei V; Sukhanov, Stanislav V; Telezhinskaya, Irina N; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2016-02-01

    The structure of peptide antibiotic gramicidin A (gA) was studied in phosphatidylcholin liposomes modified by nonionic detergent Triton X-100. First, the detergent : lipid ratio at which the saturation of lipid membrane by Triton X-100 occurs (Re (sat)), was determined by light scattering. Measurements of steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene at sublytic concentrations of detergent showed that after saturation of the membrane by Triton X-100 microviscosity of lipid bilayer is reduced by 20%. The equilibrium conformational state of gA in phosphatidylcholine liposomes at Re (sat) was studied by CD spectroscopy. It was found that the conformational state of this channel-forming peptide changed crucially when Triton X-100 induced transition to more fluid membranes. The gA single-channel measurements were made with Triton X-100 containing bilayers. Tentative assignment of the channel type and gA structures was made by correlation of CD data with conductance histograms. Lipid-detergent system with variable viscosity developed in this work can be used to study the structure and folding of other membrane-active peptides. PMID:26751806

  18. Membrane interactions of ternary phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers and encapsulation efficiencies of a RIP II protein.

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, V; Winkler, K; Bunjes, V; Neub, A; Schubert, R; Bugarski, B; Leneweit, G

    2008-07-15

    Membrane interactions of liposomes of ternary phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers are investigated. These interactions lead to discoidal deformations and regular aggregations and are strongly enhanced by the presence of mistletoe lectin (ML), a RIP II type protein. The encapsulation of ML into liposomal nanocapsules is studied with a systematic variation of the lipid composition to monitor its effect on the physical properties: entrapment, mean size, morphology, and stability. Extrusion of multilamellar vesicles through filters 80 nm pore size was used for the generation of liposomes. The mean sizes of liposomes ranged between 120 and 200 nm in diameter with narrow size distributions. The increase in flow rate with pressure for three dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol (Chol)/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid mixtures was linear and allowed to extrapolate to the minimum burst pressure of the liposomal bilayers. From the minimum pressures P(min), the bilayer lysis tensions gamma(l) were determined. The increase in P(min) and gamma(l) with an increasing content of a saturated phosopholipid (DPPC) indicates that DPPC increases the mechanical strength of lipid bilayers. Apparently, DPPC, like cholesterol, leads to a less compressible surface and a more cohesive membrane. After preparation, vesicle solutions were purified by gel permeation chromatography to separate encapsulated ML from free ML in the extravesicular solution. Purified liposomes were then characterized. The content of entrapped and adsorbed ML was measured using ELISA. Repetitive freezing/thawing cycles prior to extrusion significantly increased ML uptake. On the contrary, adsorption was not affected neither by lipid composition, nor concentration and preparation. Differences in experimental encapsulation efficiency only reflect the differences in the mean vesicle sizes of the different samples as is revealed by a comparison to a theoretical estimate. Cryo-transmission electron

  19. Tethered bilayer membranes as a complementary tool for functional and structural studies: The pyolysin case.

    PubMed

    Preta, Giulio; Jankunec, Marija; Heinrich, Frank; Griffin, Sholeem; Sheldon, Iain Martin; Valincius, Gintaras

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) as an experimental platform for functional and structural studies of membrane associated proteins by electrochemical techniques. The reconstitution of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) pyolysin (PLO) from Trueperella pyogenes into tBLMs was followed in real-time by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Changes of the EIS parameters of the tBLMs upon exposure to PLO solutions were consistent with the dielectric barrier damage occurring through the formation of water-filled pores in membranes. Parallel experiments involving a mutant version of PLO, which is able to bind to the membranes but does not form oligomer pores, strengthen the reliability of this methodology, since no change in the electrochemical impedance was observed. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) and neutron reflectometry (NR) measurements revealed structural details of the membrane bound PLO, consistent with the structural transformations of the membrane bound toxins found for other cholesterol dependent cytolysins. In this work, using the tBLMs platform we also observed a protective effect of the dynamin inhibitor Dynasore against pyolysin as well as pneumolysin. An effect of Dynasore in tBLMs, which was earlier observed in experiments with live cells, confirms the biological relevance of the tBLMs models, as well as demonstrates the potential of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to quantify membrane damage by the pore forming toxins. In conclusion, tBLMs are a reliable and complementary method to explore the activity of CDCs in eukaryotic cells and to develop strategies to limit the toxic effects of CDCs. PMID:27211243

  20. Oriented Circular Dichroism: A Method to Characterize Membrane-Active Peptides in Oriented Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bürck, Jochen; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Fanghänel, Susanne; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-02-16

    The structures of membrane-bound polypeptides are intimately related to their functions and may change dramatically with the lipid environment. Circular dichroism (CD) is a rapid analytical method that requires relatively low amounts of material and no labeling. Conventional CD is routinely used to monitor the secondary structure of peptides and proteins in solution, for example, in the presence of ligands and other binding partners. In the case of membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins, these measurements can be applied to, and remain limited to, samples containing detergent micelles or small sonicated lipid vesicles. Such traditional CD analysis reveals only secondary structures. With the help of an oriented circular dichroism (OCD) setup, however, based on the preparation of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers, it is possible to address the membrane alignment of a peptide in addition to its conformation. This approach has been mostly used for α-helical peptides so far, but other structural elements are conceivable as well. OCD analysis relies on Moffitt's theory, which predicts that the electronic transition dipole moments of the backbone amide bonds in helical polypeptides are polarized either parallel or perpendicular to the helix axis. The interaction of the electric field vector of the circularly polarized light with these transitions results in an OCD spectrum of a membrane-bound α-helical peptide, which exhibits a characteristic line shape and reflects the angle between the helix axis and the bilayer normal. For parallel alignment of a peptide helix with respect to the membrane surface (S-state), the corresponding "fingerprint" CD band around 208 nm will exhibit maximum negative amplitude. If the helix changes its alignment via an obliquely tilted (T-state) to a fully inserted transmembrane orientation (I-state), the ellipticity at 208 nm decreases and the value approaches zero due to the decreased interactions between the field and the

  1. Tetra- and Penta-Cyclic Triterpenes Interaction with Lipid Bilayer Membrane: A Structural Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Rola; Charcosset, Catherine; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    The effect of tetracyclic (cortisol, prednisolone, and 9-fluorocortisol acetate) and pentacyclic (uvaol and erythrodiol) triterpenes (TTPs) on the fluidity of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) liposome membrane was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Liposomes were prepared in the absence and presence of TTPs at molar ratios DPPC:TTP 100:1, 100:2.5, and 100:10. All the studied TTPs abolished the pre-transition and modified the intensity of the Raman peak at 715 cm(-1) proving the interaction of TTP molecules with the choline head group of phospholipids. An increase in the Raman height intensity ratios of the peaks I 2935/2880, I 2844/2880, and I 1090/1130, giving information about the ratio disorder/order of the alkyl chains, and a decrease of the main transition temperature demonstrated the interaction of TTPs with the alkyl chains. The tetracyclic TTPs produced broadening of the phase transition profile. Besides, a scarcely splitting of the main transition peak was obtained with prednisolone and 9-fluorocortisol acetate. The results of fluorescence depolarization of DPH showed that the studied molecules fluidized the liposomal membrane at 25, 41, and 50 °C. Pentacyclic TTPs, being more hydrophobic than tetracyclic ones, demonstrated higher fluidizing effect than tetracyclic TTPs in the liquid crystalline phase suggesting a deeper incorporation in the lipid bilayer. The presence of a free polar head group at the ring D seems to control the TTP incorporation in the bilayer and consequently its effect on the membrane fluidity. PMID:26759229

  2. Outer membrane phospholipase A in phospholipid bilayers: A model system for concerted computational and experimental investigations of amino acid side chain partitioning into lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Patrick J.; Freites, J. Alfredo; Moon, C. Preston; Tobias, Douglas J.; Fleming, Karen G.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the forces that stabilize membrane proteins in their native states is one of the contemporary challenges of biophysics. To date, estimates of side chain partitioning free energies from water to the lipid environment show disparate values between experimental and computational measures. Resolving the disparities is particularly important for understanding the energetic contributions of polar and charged side chains to membrane protein function because of the roles these residue types play in many cellular functions. In general, computational free energy estimates of charged side chain partitioning into bilayers are much larger than experimental measurements. However, the lack of a protein-based experimental system that uses bilayers against which to vet these computational predictions has traditionally been a significant drawback. Moon & Fleming recently published a novel hydrophobicity scale that was derived experimentally by using a host-guest strategy to measure the side chain energetic perturbation due to mutation in the context of a native membrane protein inserted into a phospholipid bilayer. These values are still approximately an order of magnitude smaller than computational estimates derived from molecular dynamics calculations from several independent groups. Here we address this discrepancy by showing that the free energy differences between experiment and computation become much smaller if the appropriate comparisons are drawn, which suggests that the two fields may in fact be converging. In addition, we present an initial computational characterization of the Moon & Fleming experimental system used for the hydrophobicity scale: OmpLA in DLPC bilayers. The hydrophobicity scale used OmpLA position 210 as the guest site, and our preliminary results demonstrate that this position is buried in the center of the DLPC membrane, validating its usage in the experimental studies. We further showed that the introduction of charged Arg at position 210

  3. Structure and interactions of fluid phospholipid bilayers measured by high-resolution X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrache, Horia Iosif

    The topic of this work is the biologically relevant fluid phase of phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. A first goal is the determination of the average bilayer structure using low-angle X-ray scattering from multilamellar lipid vesicles (MLVs). The MLVs are smectic liquid crystals, for which interbilayer correlations decay algebraically. Consequently, the smectic Bragg peaks have power low tails, with the exponent related to the bilayer fluctuations. The analysis of such peaks requires good instrumental resolution and a sophisticated (and equally good) scattering theory. The high resolution is achieved at the F3 station at CHESS. The scattering theory is an improved version of the modified Caillé theory being developed in our laboratory. Data fitting gives the three pieces of information carried by the scattering peaks: position, amplitude, and power-law exponent. The position and the amplitude (form factor) are used to determine the bilayer structure. The power-law exponent is converted into mean square fluctuations in the interbilayer water spacing. This opens a new window on interbilayer interactions which is the second goal of this work. The fundamental issue of interbilayer interactions is addressed both experimentally and theoretically. We obtain the interbilayer water spacing fluctuation σ, as well as the traditional osmotic pressure P, both as functions of the lamellar repeat spacing D and the aqueous separation a. We show theoretically how to obtain the functional form of the fluctuational free energy from the a data, which is then determined to within a factor that depends upon the bending modulus, Kc. The resulting functional form determined from experimental data has an exponential decay rather than the power law decay that applies for hard confinement in the large a regime, thereby showing that a theory of soft confinement is necessary. The existing theory of soft confinement predicts an exponential decay, but with a smaller decay length λfl than we

  4. Surface-Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopy and Neutron Reflectivity Studies of Ubiquinone in Hybrid Bilayer Membranes under Potential Control.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Amanda; Lardner, Michael J; Tun, Zin; Burgess, Ian J

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared adsorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and neutron reflectometry (NR) were employed to characterize ubiquinone (UQ) containing hybrid bilayer membranes. The biomimetic membrane was prepared by fusing phospholipid vesicles on a hydrophobic octadecanethiol monolayer self-assembled on a thin gold film. Using SEIRAS, the assembly of the membrane is monitored in situ. The presence of ubiquinone is verified by the characteristic carbonyl peaks from the quinone ester. A well-ordered distal lipid leaflet results from fusion of vesicles with and without the addition of ubiquinone. With applied potential, the hybrid bilayer membrane in the absence of UQ behaves in the same way as previously reported solid supported phospholipid membranes. When ubiquinone is incorporated in the membrane, electric field induced changes in the distal leaflet are suppressed. Changes in the infrared vibrations of the ubiquinone due to applied potential indicate the head groups are located in both polar and nonpolar environments. The spectroscopic data reveal that the isoprenoid unit of the ubiquinone is likely lying in the midplane of the lipid bilayer while the head has some freedom to move within the hydrophobic core. The SEIRAS experiments show redox behavior of UQ incorporated in a model lipid membrane that are otherwise inaccessible with traditional electrochemistry techniques. PMID:26867110

  5. Thermodynamic free energy methods to investigate shape transitions in bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Tourdot, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The conformational free energy landscape of a system is a fundamental thermodynamic quantity of importance particularly in the study of soft matter and biological systems, in which the entropic contributions play a dominant role. While computational methods to delineate the free energy landscape are routinely used to analyze the relative stability of conformational states, to determine phase boundaries, and to compute ligand-receptor binding energies its use in problems involving the cell membrane is limited. Here, we present an overview of four different free energy methods to study morphological transitions in bilayer membranes, induced either by the action of curvature remodeling proteins or due to the application of external forces. Using a triangulated surface as a model for the cell membrane and using the framework of dynamical triangulation Monte Carlo, we have focused on the methods of Widom insertion, thermodynamic integration, Bennett acceptance scheme, and umbrella sampling and weighted histogram analysis. We have demonstrated how these methods can be employed in a variety of problems involving the cell membrane. Specifically, we have shown that the chemical potential, computed using Widom insertion, and the relative free energies, computed using thermodynamic integration and Bennett acceptance method, are excellent measures to study the transition from curvature sensing to curvature inducing behavior of membrane associated proteins. The umbrella sampling and WHAM analysis has been used to study the thermodynamics of tether formation in cell membranes and the quantitative predictions of the computational model are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. Furthermore, we also present a method based on WHAM and thermodynamic integration to handle problems related to end-point-catastrophe that are common in most free energy methods.

  6. Smart polymer brush nanostructures guide the self-assembly of pore-spanning lipid bilayers with integrated membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmina de Groot, G.; Demarche, Sophie; Santonicola, M. Gabriella; Tiefenauer, Louis; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-01-01

    Nanopores in arrays on silicon chips are functionalized with pH-responsive poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes and used as supports for pore-spanning lipid bilayers with integrated membrane proteins. Robust platforms are created by the covalent grafting of polymer brushes using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), resulting in sensor chips that can be successfully reused over several assays. His-tagged proteins are selectively and reversibly bound to the nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) functionalization of the PMAA brush, and consequently lipid bilayer membranes are formed. The enhanced membrane resistance as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and free diffusion of dyed lipids observed as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching confirmed the presence of lipid bilayers. Immobilization of the His-tagged membrane proteins on the NTA-modified PMAA brush near the pore edges is characterized by fluorescence microscopy. This system allows us to adjust the protein density in free-standing bilayers, which are stabilized by the polymer brush underneath. The potential application of the integrated platform for ion channel protein assays is demonstrated.

  7. Inverted micellar structures in bilayer membranes. Formation rates and half-lives.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, D P

    1984-01-01

    Two sorts of inverted micellar structures have previously been proposed to explain morphological and 31P-NMR observations of bilayer systems. These structures only form in systems with components that can adopt the inverse hexagonal (HII) phase. LIP (lipidic particles) are intrabilayer structures, whereas IMI (inverted micellar intermediates) are structures that form between apposed bilayers. Here, we calculate the formation rates and half-lives of these structures to determine which (or if either) of these proposed structures is a likely explanation of the data. Calculations for the egg phosphatidylethanolamine and the Ca+-cardiolipin systems show that IMI form orders of magnitude faster than LIP, which should form slowly, if at all. This result is probably true in general, and indicates that "lipidic particle" electron micrograph images probably represent interbilayer structures, as some have previously proposed. It is shown here that IMI are likely intermediates in the lamellar----HII phase transitions and in the process of membrane fusion in some systems. The calculated formation rates, half-lives, and vesicle-vesicle fusion rates are in agreement with this observation. PMID:6365189

  8. Effect of submicellar concentrations of conjugated and unconjugated bile salts on the lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K

    2011-11-15

    The interaction of submicellar concentrations of various physiologically important unconjugated [sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), sodium cholate (NaC)] and conjugated [sodium glycodeoxycholate (NaGDC), sodium glycocholate (NaGC), sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC), sodium taurocholate (NaTC)] bile salts with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles in solid gel (SG) and liquid crystalline (LC) phases was investigated using the excited-state prototropism of 1-naphthol. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence of the two excited-state prototropic forms of 1-naphthol indicate that submicellar bile salt concentration induces hydration of the lipid bilayer membrane into the core region. This hydration effect is a general phenomenon of the bile salts studied. The bilayer hydration efficiency of the bile salt follows the order NaDC > NaC > NaGDC > NaTDC > NaGC > NaTC for both DPPC and DMPC vesicles in their SG and LC phases. PMID:21973323

  9. Organic fluid permeation through fluoropolymer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nemser, Stuart M.; Kosaraju, Praveen; Bowser, John

    2015-07-14

    Separation of the components of liquid mixtures is achieved by contacting a liquid mixture with a nonporous membrane having a fluoropolymer selectively permeable layer and imposing a pressure gradient across the membrane from feed side to permeate side. Unusually high transmembrane flux is obtained when the membrane is subjected to one or more process conditions prior to separation. These include (a) leaving some residual amount of membrane casting solvent in the membrane, and (b) contacting the membrane with a component of the mixture to be separated for a duration effective to saturate the membrane with the component.

  10. Micro-patterning of ionic reservoirs within a double bilayer lipid membrane to fabricate a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Sansinena, J. M.; Yee, C. K.; Sapuri, A.; Swanson, Basil I.; Redondo, A.; Parikh, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple approach for the design of ionic reservoir arrays within a double phospholipid bilayer to ultimately develop a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors. As a first step, a primary bilayer lipid membrane is deposited onto an array of electrodes patterned onto a substrate surface. Subsequently, an array of microvoids is created within the bilayer by a wet photolithographic patterning of phospholipid bilayers using a deep UV light source and a quartz/chrome photomask. To ensure registry, the photomask used to pattern bilayers is designed to match up the microvoids within the primary bilayer with the array of electrodes on the substrate surface. The deposition of a secondary bilayer lipid membrane onto the primary bilayer that spans across the patterned microvoids leads to the formation of the array of ionic reservoirs within the double phospholipid bilayer. This is accomplished using giant unilamellar vesicles and by exploiting membrane electrostatics. The use of ion-channels incorporated into the secondary bilayer that covers the individual ionic reservoirs allows the construction of a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors that are able to recognize different target-agents simultaneously.