Science.gov

Sample records for fluid cell count

  1. Relationship between automated total nucleated cell count and enumeration of cells on direct smears of canine synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Dusick, Allison; Young, Karen M; Muir, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Canine osteoarthritis is a common disorder seen in veterinary clinical practice and causes considerable morbidity in dogs as they age. Synovial fluid analysis is an important tool for diagnosis and treatment of canine joint disease and obtaining a total nucleated cell count (TNCC) is particularly important. However, the low sample volumes obtained during arthrocentesis are often insufficient for performing an automated TNCC, thereby limiting diagnostic interpretation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether estimation of TNCC in canine synovial fluid could be achieved by performing manual cell counts on direct smears of fluid. Fifty-eight synovial fluid samples, taken by arthrocentesis from 48 dogs, were included in the study. Direct smears of synovial fluid were prepared, and hyaluronidase added before cell counts were obtained using a commercial laser-based instrument. A protocol was established to count nucleated cells in a specific region of the smear, using a serpentine counting pattern; the mean number of nucleated cells per 400?×?field was then calculated. There was a positive correlation between the automated TNCC and mean manual cell count, with more variability at higher TNCC. Regression analysis was performed to estimate TNCC from manual counts. By this method, 78% of the samples were correctly predicted to fall into one of three categories (within the reference interval, mildly to moderately increased, or markedly increased) relative to the automated TNCC. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreement was good to excellent. The results of the study suggest that interpretation of canine synovial fluid samples of low volume can be aided by methodical manual counting of cells on direct smears. PMID:25439439

  2. CSF cell count

    MedlinePLUS

    A CSF cell count is a test to measure the number of red and white blood cells that are in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF is ... The CSF cell count may help detect: Meningitis and infection of the brain or spinal cord Tumor, abscess, or area of ...

  3. White blood cell counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a prototype white blood cell counting system for use in the Skylab IMSS are presented. The counting system consists of a sample collection subsystem, sample dilution and fluid containment subsystem, and a cell counter. Preliminary test results show the sample collection and the dilution subsystems are functional and fulfill design goals. Results for the fluid containment subsystem show the handling bags cause counting errors due to: (1) adsorption of cells to the walls of the container, and (2) inadequate cleaning of the plastic bag material before fabrication. It was recommended that another bag material be selected.

  4. T-cell count

    MedlinePLUS

    A T-cell count measures the number of T cells in the blood. Your doctor may order this test if you ... T cells are a type of lymphocyte. Lymphocytes are white blood cells. They make up part of the immune ...

  5. CELL TYPES, DIFFERENTIAL CELL COUNTS, AND BLOOD CELL MEASUREMENTS OF

    E-print Network

    CELL TYPES, DIFFERENTIAL CELL COUNTS, AND BLOOD CELL MEASUREMENTS OF A PORTUGUESE SHARK describe the cell types, differential cell counts, and measurements of both the erythrocytes and leukocytes unusually large cell Sizes in all cell categories. Cell measurements revealed erythrocytes larger than those

  6. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  7. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160 Section...Hematology Devices § 864.6160 Manual blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to...

  8. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160 Section...Hematology Devices § 864.6160 Manual blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to...

  9. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160 Section...Hematology Devices § 864.6160 Manual blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to...

  10. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160 Section...Hematology Devices § 864.6160 Manual blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to...

  11. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160 Section...Hematology Devices § 864.6160 Manual blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to...

  12. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  13. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  14. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  15. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  16. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  17. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  18. Optical planar waveguide for cell counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, John; Mueller, Andrew J.; Prinz, Adrian; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    Low cost counting of cells has medical applications in screening, military medicine, disaster medicine, and rural healthcare. In this report, we present a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by potassium ion exchange in glass that enables low-cost and rapid counting of metal-tagged objects that lie in the evanescent field of the waveguide. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated proportionately to the presence of metal-coated microstructures fabricated from photoresist. This technology enables the low-cost enumeration of cells from blood, urine, or other biofluids.

  19. Optical planar waveguide for cell counting

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, John; Mueller, Andrew J.; Prinz, Adrian; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    Low cost counting of cells has medical applications in screening, military medicine, disaster medicine, and rural healthcare. In this report, we present a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by potassium ion exchange in glass that enables low-cost and rapid counting of metal-tagged objects that lie in the evanescent field of the waveguide. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated proportionately to the presence of metal-coated microstructures fabricated from photoresist. This technology enables the low-cost enumeration of cells from blood, urine, or other biofluids. PMID:22331960

  20. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  1. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  3. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  4. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  5. Smart and Fast Blood Counting of Trace Volumes of Body Fluids from Various Mammalian Species Using a Compact, Custom-Built Microscope Cytometer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tingjuan; Smith, Zachary J; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Carrade Holt, Danielle; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Dwyre, Denis M; Hood, James; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    We report an accurate method to count red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells, as well as to determine hemoglobin in the blood of humans, horses, dogs, cats, and cows. Red and white blood cell counts can also be performed on human body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and peritoneal fluid. The approach consists of using a compact, custom-built microscope to record large field-of-view, bright-field, and fluorescence images of samples that are stained with a single dye and using automatic algorithms to count blood cells and detect hemoglobin. The total process takes about 15 min, including 5 min for sample preparation, and 10 min for data collection and analysis. The minimum volume of blood needed for the test is 0.5 ?L, which allows for minimally invasive sample collection such as using a finger prick rather than a venous draw. Blood counts were compared to gold-standard automated clinical instruments, with excellent agreement between the two methods as determined by a Bland-Altman analysis. Accuracy of counts on body fluids was consistent with hand counting by a trained clinical lab scientist, where our instrument demonstrated an approximately 100-fold lower limit of detection compared to current automated methods. The combination of a compact, custom-built instrument, simple sample collection and preparation, and automated analysis demonstrates that this approach could benefit global health through use in low-resource settings where central hematology laboratories are not accessible. PMID:26496235

  6. Cell Counts in Cerebral Cortex of an Autistic Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Paul D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Numbers of neurons and glia were counted in the cerebral cortex of one case of autism and two age- and sex-matched controls. Cell counts were made in primary auditory cortex, Broca's speech area, and auditory association cortex. No consistent differences in cell density were found between brains of autistic and control patients. (Author/CL)

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Counting White Blood Cells from a Blood

    E-print Network

    Yang, Changhuei

    and circulate throughout the bloodstream and lymphatic system. An infection or a physical injury results and manual counting methods. Introduction White blood cells are the effector cells of the immune system

  8. White blood cell count - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Indications for a WBC count include infectious and inflammatory diseases; leukemia and lymphoma; and bone marrow disorders. ... numbers of WBCs (leukocytosis) may indicate: infectious diseases ... (such as rheumatoid arthritis or allergy) leukemia severe ...

  9. Sample to answer visualization pipeline for low-cost point-of-care blood cell counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne; Naidoo, Thegaran; Davies, Emlyn; Fourie, Louis; Nxumalo, Zandile; Swart, Hein; Marais, Philip; Land, Kevin; Roux, Pieter

    2015-03-01

    We present a visualization pipeline from sample to answer for point-of-care blood cell counting applications. Effective and low-cost point-of-care medical diagnostic tests provide developing countries and rural communities with accessible healthcare solutions [1], and can be particularly beneficial for blood cell count tests, which are often the starting point in the process of diagnosing a patient [2]. The initial focus of this work is on total white and red blood cell counts, using a microfluidic cartridge [3] for sample processing. Analysis of the processed samples has been implemented by means of two main optical visualization systems developed in-house: 1) a fluidic operation analysis system using high speed video data to determine volumes, mixing efficiency and flow rates, and 2) a microscopy analysis system to investigate homogeneity and concentration of blood cells. Fluidic parameters were derived from the optical flow [4] as well as color-based segmentation of the different fluids using a hue-saturation-value (HSV) color space. Cell count estimates were obtained using automated microscopy analysis and were compared to a widely accepted manual method for cell counting using a hemocytometer [5]. The results using the first iteration microfluidic device [3] showed that the most simple - and thus low-cost - approach for microfluidic component implementation was not adequate as compared to techniques based on manual cell counting principles. An improved microfluidic design has been developed to incorporate enhanced mixing and metering components, which together with this work provides the foundation on which to successfully implement automated, rapid and low-cost blood cell counting tests.

  10. DIFFERENTIAL BLOOD CELL COUNTS OF ATLANTIC HERRING, CLUPEA HARENGUS HARENGUS

    E-print Network

    DIFFERENTIAL BLOOD CELL COUNTS OF ATLANTIC HERRING, CLUPEA HARENGUS HARENGUS STUART W. SHERBURNE1 of white cell types and immature erythrocytes in the blood were found to be different from those previously- ences in the occurrence of blood cell types of Atlantic herring, Glupea harellgus harellgus, from

  11. A system for counting fetal and maternal red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ji; Gong, Zheng; Chen, Jun; Liu, Jun; Nguyen, John; Yang, Zongyi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Kleihauer-Betke (KB) test is the standard method for quantitating fetal-maternal hemorrhage in maternal care. In hospitals, the KB test is performed by a certified technologist to count a minimum of 2000 fetal and maternal red blood cells (RBCs) on a blood smear. Manual counting suffers from inherent inconsistency and unreliability. This paper describes a system for automated counting and distinguishing fetal and maternal RBCs on clinical KB slides. A custom-adapted hardware platform is used for KB slide scanning and image capturing. Spatial-color pixel classification with spectral clustering is proposed to separate overlapping cells. Optimal clustering number and total cell number are obtained through maximizing cluster validity index. To accurately identify fetal RBCs from maternal RBCs, multiple features including cell size, roundness, gradient, and saturation difference between cell and whole slide are used in supervised learning to generate feature vectors, to tackle cell color, shape, and contrast variations across clinical KB slides. The results show that the automated system is capable of completing the counting of over 60,000 cells (versus ?2000 by technologists) within 5 min (versus ?15 min by technologists). The throughput is improved by approximately 90 times compared to manual reading by technologists. The counting results are highly accurate and correlate strongly with those from benchmarking flow cytometry measurement. PMID:24879644

  12. Amniotic fluid stem cells prevent ?-cell injury

    PubMed Central

    VILLANI, VALENTINA; MILANESI, ANNA; SEDRAKYAN, SARGIS; DA SACCO, STEFANO; ANGELOW, SUSANNE; CONCONI, MARIA TERESA; DI LIDDO, ROSA; DE FILIPPO, ROGER; PERIN, LAURA

    2015-01-01

    Background aims The contribution of amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) to tissue protection and regeneration in models of acute and chronic kidney injuries and lung failure has been shown in recent years. In the present study, we used a chemically induced mouse model of type 1 diabetes to determine whether AFSC could play a role in modulating ?-cell injury and restoring ?-cell function. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were given intracardial injection of AFSC; morphological and physiological parameters and gene expression profile for the insulin pathway were evaluated after cell transplantation. Results AFSC injection resulted in protection from ?-cell damage and increased ?-cell regeneration in a subset of mice as indicated by glucose and insulin levels, increased islet mass and preservation of islet structure. Moreover, ?-cell preservation/regeneration correlated with activation of the insulin receptor/Pi3K/Akt signaling pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression involved in maintaining ?-cell mass and function. Conclusions Our results suggest a therapeutic role for AFSC in preserving and promoting endogenous ?-cell functionality and proliferation. The protective role of AFSC is evident when stem cell transplantation is performed before severe hyperglycemia occurs, which suggests the importance of early intervention. The present study demonstrates the possible benefits of the application of a non–genetically engineered stem cell population derived from amniotic fluid for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and gives new insight on the mechanism by which the beneficial effect is achieved. PMID:24210784

  13. Development of a stained cell nuclei counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timilsina, Niranjan; Moffatt, Christopher; Okada, Kazunori

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel cell counting system which exploits the Fast Radial Symmetry Transformation (FRST) algorithm [1]. The driving force behind our system is a research on neurogenesis in the intact nervous system of Manduca Sexta or the Tobacco Hornworm, which was being studied to assess the impact of age, food and environment on neurogenesis. The varying thickness of the intact nervous system in this species often yields images with inhomogeneous background and inconsistencies such as varying illumination, variable contrast, and irregular cell size. For automated counting, such inhomogeneity and inconsistencies must be addressed, which no existing work has done successfully. Thus, our goal is to devise a new cell counting algorithm for the images with non-uniform background. Our solution adapts FRST: a computer vision algorithm which is designed to detect points of interest on circular regions such as human eyes. This algorithm enhances the occurrences of the stained-cell nuclei in 2D digital images and negates the problems caused by their inhomogeneity. Besides FRST, our algorithm employs standard image processing methods, such as mathematical morphology and connected component analysis. We have evaluated the developed cell counting system with fourteen digital images of Tobacco Hornworm's nervous system collected for this study with ground-truth cell counts by biology experts. Experimental results show that our system has a minimum error of 1.41% and mean error of 16.68% which is at least forty-four percent better than the algorithm without FRST.

  14. Method of detecting and counting bacteria in body fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L. (inventors)

    1973-01-01

    A novel method is reported for determining bacterial levels in urine samples, which method depends on the quantitative determination of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the presence of non-bacterial ATP. After the removal of non-bacterial ATP, the bacterial ATP is released by cell rupture and is measured by an enzymatic bioluminescent assay using an enzyme obtained from the firefly.

  15. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. 864.8185 Section 864.8185 Food...Hematology Reagents § 864.8185 Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. 864.8185 Section 864.8185 Food...Hematology Reagents § 864.8185 Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. 864.8185 Section 864.8185 Food...Hematology Reagents § 864.8185 Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification....

  18. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. 864.8185 Section 864.8185 Food...Hematology Reagents § 864.8185 Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification....

  19. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. 864.8185 Section 864.8185 Food...Hematology Reagents § 864.8185 Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification....

  20. A New Method for Calculating Counts in Cells

    E-print Network

    Istvan Szapudi

    1997-11-19

    In the near future a new generation of CCD based galaxy surveys will enable high precision determination of the N-point correlation functions. The resulting information will help to resolve the ambiguities associated with two-point correlation functions thus constraining theories of structure formation, biasing, and Gaussianity of initial conditions independently of the value of $\\Omega$. As one the most successful methods to extract the amplitude of higher order correlations is based on measuring the distribution of counts in cells, this work presents an advanced way of measuring it with unprecedented accuracy. Szapudi and Colombi (1996, hereafter \\cite{sc96}) identified the main sources of theoretical errors in extracting counts in cells from galaxy catalogs. One of these sources, termed as measurement error, stems from the fact that conventional methods use a finite number of sampling cells to estimate counts in cells. This effect can be circumvented by using an infinite number of cells. This paper presents an algorithm, which, in practice achieves this goal, i.e. it is equivalent to throwing an infinite number of sampling cells in finite time. The errors associated with sampling cells are completely eliminated by this procedure which will be essential for the accurate analysis of future surveys.

  1. Metabolic activity of bacterial cells enumerated by direct viable count

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporating radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included (methyl-tritium thymidine or (Uranium-Carbon 14) glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate.

  2. AUTOMATED COUNTING OF CELL BODIES USING NISSL STAINED CROSS-SECTIONAL IMAGES

    E-print Network

    Keyser, John

    Committee: Dr. John Keyser Cell count is an important metric in neurological research. The loss in numbers functions but disorders like clinical depression as well. Since the manual counting of cell numbers

  3. Cell detection and counting through cell lysate impedance spectroscopy in microfluidic devices†

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Liu, Yi-shao; Irimia, Daniel; Demirci, Utkan; Yang, Liju; Zamir, Lee; Rodríguez, William R.; Toner, Mehmet; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based microfluidic devices have attracted interest for a wide range of applications. While optical cell counting and flow cytometry-type devices have been reported extensively, sensitive and efficient non-optical methods to detect and quantify cells attached over large surface areas within microdevices are generally lacking. We describe an electrical method for counting cells based on the measurement of changes in conductivity of the surrounding medium due to ions released from surface-immobilized cells within a microfluidic channel. Immobilized cells are lysed using a low conductivity, hypotonic media and the resulting change in impedance is measured using surface patterned electrodes to detect and quantify the number of cells. We found that the bulk solution conductance increases linearly with the number of isolated cells contributing to solution ion concentration. The method of cell lysate impedance spectroscopy is sensitive enough to detect 20 cells ?L–1, and offers a simple and efficient method for detecting and enumerating cells within microfluidic devices for many applications including measurement of CD4 cell counts in HIV patients in resource-limited settings. To our knowledge, this is the most sensitive approach using non-optical setups to enumerate immobilized cells. The microfluidic device, capable of isolating specific cell types from a complex bio-fluidic and quantifying cell number, can serve as a single use cartridge for a hand-held instrument to provide simple, fast and affordable cell counting in point-of-care settings. PMID:17538717

  4. Cell detection and counting through cell lysate impedance spectroscopy in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Liu, Yi-shao; Irimia, Daniel; Demirci, Utkan; Yang, Liju; Zamir, Lee; Rodríguez, William R; Toner, Mehmet; Bashir, Rashid

    2007-06-01

    Cell-based microfluidic devices have attracted interest for a wide range of applications. While optical cell counting and flow cytometry-type devices have been reported extensively, sensitive and efficient non-optical methods to detect and quantify cells attached over large surface areas within microdevices are generally lacking. We describe an electrical method for counting cells based on the measurement of changes in conductivity of the surrounding medium due to ions released from surface-immobilized cells within a microfluidic channel. Immobilized cells are lysed using a low conductivity, hypotonic media and the resulting change in impedance is measured using surface patterned electrodes to detect and quantify the number of cells. We found that the bulk solution conductance increases linearly with the number of isolated cells contributing to solution ion concentration. The method of cell lysate impedance spectroscopy is sensitive enough to detect 20 cells microL(-1), and offers a simple and efficient method for detecting and enumerating cells within microfluidic devices for many applications including measurement of CD4 cell counts in HIV patients in resource-limited settings. To our knowledge, this is the most sensitive approach using non-optical setups to enumerate immobilized cells. The microfluidic device, capable of isolating specific cell types from a complex bio-fluidic and quantifying cell number, can serve as a single use cartridge for a hand-held instrument to provide simple, fast and affordable cell counting in point-of-care settings. PMID:17538717

  5. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify L. pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoebae hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 134...

  6. CELLCOUNTER: Novel Open-Source Software for Counting Cell Migration and Invasion In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongshun; Zhu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Transwell Boyden chamber based migration/invasion assay is a simple and extensively used approach for the characterization of cell motility in vitro. Cell motility is quantified by counting the number of cells that pass through the filter membrane. The counting is usually performed manually, which is laborious and error prone. We have therefore developed CELLCOUNTER, an application that is capable of recognizing and counting the total number of cells through an intuitive graphical user interface. The counting can be performed in batch, and the counting results can be visualized and further curated manually. CELLCOUNTER will be helpful in streamlining the experimental process and improving the reliability of the data acquisition. PMID:25054152

  7. Application of a non-hazardous vital dye for cell counting with automated cell counters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo In; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Ho-Jae; Lee, Kiwon; Hong, Dongpyo; Lim, Hyunchang; Cho, Keunchang; Jung, Neoncheol; Yi, Yong Weon

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in automated cell counters enable us to count cells more easily with consistency. However, the wide use of the traditional vital dye trypan blue (TB) raises environmental and health concerns due to its potential teratogenic effects. To avoid this chemical hazard, it is of importance to introduce an alternative non-hazardous vital dye that is compatible with automated cell counters. Erythrosin B (EB) is a vital dye that is impermeable to biological membranes and is used as a food additive. Similarly to TB, EB stains only nonviable cells with disintegrated membranes. However, EB is less popular than TB and is seldom used with automated cell counters. We found that cell counting accuracy with EB was comparable to that with TB. EB was found to be an effective dye for accurate counting of cells with different viabilities across three different automated cell counters. In contrast to TB, EB was less toxic to cultured HL-60 cells during the cell counting process. These results indicate that replacing TB with EB for use with automated cell counters will significantly reduce the hazardous risk while producing comparable results. PMID:26399556

  8. WBC count

    MedlinePLUS

    Leukocyte count; White blood cell count ... is 4,500 to 10,000 white blood cells per microliter (mcL). Normal value ranges may vary ... LOW WHITE BLOOD CELL (WBC) COUNT A low number of WBCs is called leukopenia. A WBC count below 4500 is below normal One ...

  9. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NY); Walsh, Michael M. (Fairfield, CT)

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  10. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NY); Walsh, Michael M. (Fairfield, CT)

    2003-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  11. FISH and Chips: Automation of Fluorescent Dot Counting in Interphase Cell Nuclei

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    FISH and Chips: Automation of Fluorescent Dot Counting in Interphase Cell Nuclei Hans Netten,1 Ian abnormalities in inter- phase cell nuclei. This process is called dot counting. To estimate the distribution in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques in interphase cell nuclei have great potential, both in re- search

  12. Estimating Cell Count and Distribution in Labeled Histological Samples Using Incremental Cell Search

    PubMed Central

    Meruvia-Pastor, Oscar E.; Soh, Jung; Schmidt, Eric J.; Boughner, Julia C.; Xiao, Mei; Jamniczky, Heather A.; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2011-01-01

    Cell proliferation is critical to the outgrowth of biological structures including the face and limbs. This cellular process has traditionally been studied via sequential histological sampling of these tissues. The length and tedium of traditional sampling is a major impediment to analyzing the large datasets required to accurately model cellular processes. Computerized cell localization and quantification is critical for high-throughput morphometric analysis of developing embryonic tissues. We have developed the Incremental Cell Search (ICS), a novel software tool that expedites the analysis of relationships between morphological outgrowth and cell proliferation in embryonic tissues. Based on an estimated average cell size and stain color, ICS rapidly indicates the approximate location and amount of cells in histological images of labeled embryonic tissue and provides estimates of cell counts in regions with saturated fluorescence and blurred cell boundaries. This capacity opens the door to high-throughput 3D and 4D quantitative analyses of developmental patterns. PMID:21747822

  13. Micro-a-fluidics ELISA for rapid CD4 cell count at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuQi; Tasoglu, Savas; Chen, Paul Z; Chen, Michael; Akbas, Ragip; Wach, Sonya; Ozdemir, Cenk Ibrahim; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Giguel, Francoise F; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    HIV has become one of the most devastating pathogens in human history. Despite fast progress in HIV-related basic research, antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains the most effective method to save AIDS patients' lives. Unfortunately, ART cannot be universally accessed, especially in developing countries, due to the lack of effective treatment monitoring diagnostics. Here, we present an inexpensive, rapid and portable micro-a-fluidic platform, which can streamline the process of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a fully automated manner for CD4 cell count. The micro-a-fluidic CD4 cell count is achieved by eliminating operational fluid flow via "moving the substrate", as opposed to "flowing liquid" in traditional ELISA or microfluidic methods. This is the first demonstration of capturing and detecting cells from unprocessed whole blood using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a microfluidic channel. Combined with cell phone imaging, the presented micro-a-fluidic ELISA platform holds great promise for offering rapid CD4 cell count to scale up much needed ART in resource-constrained settings. The developed system can be extended to multiple areas for ELISA-related assays. PMID:24448112

  14. Improving reliability of live/dead cell counting through automated image mosaicing.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo; Tesei, Anna; Paganelli, Giulia; Zoli, Wainer; Bevilacqua, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Cell counting is one of the basic needs of most biological experiments. Numerous methods and systems have been studied to improve the reliability of counting. However, at present, manual cell counting performed with a hemocytometer still represents the gold standard, despite several problems limiting reproducibility and repeatability of the counts and, at the end, jeopardizing their reliability in general. We present our own approach based on image processing techniques to improve counting reliability. It works in two stages: first building a high-resolution image of the hemocytometer's grid, then counting the live and dead cells by tagging the image with flags of different colours. In particular, we introduce GridMos (http://sourceforge.net/p/gridmos), a fully-automated mosaicing method to obtain a mosaic representing the whole hemocytometer's grid. In addition to offering more significant statistics, the mosaic "freezes" the culture status, thus permitting analysis by more than one operator. Finally, the mosaic achieved can thus be tagged by using an image editor, thus markedly improving counting reliability. The experiments performed confirm the improvements brought about by the proposed counting approach in terms of both reproducibility and repeatability, also suggesting the use of a mosaic of an entire hemocytometer's grid, then labelled trough an image editor, as the best likely candidate for the new gold standard method in cell counting. PMID:25438936

  15. Association of Psychological Stress Response of Fatigue with White Blood Cell Count in Male Daytime Workers

    PubMed Central

    NISHITANI, Naoko; SAKAKIBARA, Hisataka

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between work-related psychological and physical stress responses and counts of white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils, and lymphocytes were investigated in 101 daytime workers. Counts of WBCs and neutrophils were positively associated with smoking and inversely correlated with high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. Additionally, general fatigue score as measured by the profile of mood state was positively correlated with WBC and neutrophil counts whereas lymphocyte counts was not significantly associated with fatigue score. Multiple regression analysis showed that WBC count was significantly related to general fatigue, age, and HDL-cholesterol levels. Neutrophil count was significantly related to HDL-cholesterol levels and fatigue score. Among various psychological stress response variables, general fatigue may be a key determinant of low-grade inflammation as represented by increases of WBC and neutrophil counts. PMID:24975105

  16. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Ohlsen, D.; Kittleman, S.; Borhani, N.; Leslie, F.; Miller, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment performed visualizations of thermal convection in a rotating differentially heated spherical shell of fluid. In these experiments dielectric polarization forces are used to generate a radially directed buoyancy force. This enables the laboratory simulation of a number of geophysically and astrophysically important situations in which sphericity and rotation both impose strong constraints on global scale fluid motions. During USML-2 a large set of experiments with spherically symmetric heating were carried out. These enabled the determination of critical points for the transition to various forms of nonaxisymmetric convection and, for highly turbulent flows, the transition latitudes separating the different modes of motion. This paper presents a first analysis of these experiments as well as data on the general performance of the instrument during the USML-2 flight.

  17. Accurate cell counts in live mouse embryos using optical quadrature and differential interference contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; Newmark, Judith A.; Zhao, Bing; Warner, Carol M.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2006-02-01

    Present imaging techniques used in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics are unable to produce accurate cell counts in developing embryos past the eight-cell stage. We have developed a method that has produced accurate cell counts in live mouse embryos ranging from 13-25 cells by combining Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) and Optical Quadrature Microscopy. Optical Quadrature Microscopy is an interferometric imaging modality that measures the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. The phase is transformed into an image of optical path length difference, which is used to determine the maximum optical path length deviation of a single cell. DIC microscopy gives distinct cell boundaries for cells within the focal plane when other cells do not lie in the path to the objective. Fitting an ellipse to the boundary of a single cell in the DIC image and combining it with the maximum optical path length deviation of a single cell creates an ellipsoidal model cell of optical path length deviation. Subtracting the model cell from the Optical Quadrature image will either show the optical path length deviation of the culture medium or reveal another cell underneath. Once all the boundaries are used in the DIC image, the subtracted Optical Quadrature image is analyzed to determine the cell boundaries of the remaining cells. The final cell count is produced when no more cells can be subtracted. We have produced exact cell counts on 5 samples, which have been validated by Epi-Fluorescence images of Hoechst stained nuclei.

  18. Current automated 3D cell detection methods are not a suitable replacement for manual stereologic cell counting

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Christoph; Eastwood, Brian S.; Tappan, Susan J.; Glaser, Jack R.; Peterson, Daniel A.; Hof, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Stereologic cell counting has had a major impact on the field of neuroscience. A major bottleneck in stereologic cell counting is that the user must manually decide whether or not each cell is counted according to three-dimensional (3D) stereologic counting rules by visual inspection within hundreds of microscopic fields-of-view per investigated brain or brain region. Reliance on visual inspection forces stereologic cell counting to be very labor-intensive and time-consuming, and is the main reason why biased, non-stereologic two-dimensional (2D) “cell counting” approaches have remained in widespread use. We present an evaluation of the performance of modern automated cell detection and segmentation algorithms as a potential alternative to the manual approach in stereologic cell counting. The image data used in this study were 3D microscopic images of thick brain tissue sections prepared with a variety of commonly used nuclear and cytoplasmic stains. The evaluation compared the numbers and locations of cells identified unambiguously and counted exhaustively by an expert observer with those found by three automated 3D cell detection algorithms: nuclei segmentation from the FARSIGHT toolkit, nuclei segmentation by 3D multiple level set methods, and the 3D object counter plug-in for ImageJ. Of these methods, FARSIGHT performed best, with true-positive detection rates between 38 and 99% and false-positive rates from 3.6 to 82%. The results demonstrate that the current automated methods suffer from lower detection rates and higher false-positive rates than are acceptable for obtaining valid estimates of cell numbers. Thus, at present, stereologic cell counting with manual decision for object inclusion according to unbiased stereologic counting rules remains the only adequate method for unbiased cell quantification in histologic tissue sections. PMID:24847213

  19. Mathematical modelling of adult hippocampal neurogenesis: effects of altered stem cell dynamics on cell counts and bromodeoxyuridine-labelled cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziebell, Frederik; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In the adult hippocampus, neurogenesis—the process of generating mature granule cells from adult neural stem cells—occurs throughout the entire lifetime. In order to investigate the involved regulatory mechanisms, knockout (KO) experiments, which modify the dynamic behaviour of this process, were conducted in the past. Evaluating these KOs is a non-trivial task owing to the complicated nature of the hippocampal neurogenic niche. In this study, we model neurogenesis as a multicompartmental system of ordinary differential equations based on experimental data. To analyse the results of KO experiments, we investigate how changes of cell properties, reflected by model parameters, influence the dynamics of cell counts and of the experimentally observed counts of cells labelled by the cell division marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). We find that changing cell proliferation rates or the fraction of self-renewal, reflecting the balance between symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions, may result in multiple time phases in the response of the system, such as an initial increase in cell counts followed by a decrease. Furthermore, these phases may be qualitatively different in cells at different differentiation stages and even between mitotically labelled cells and all cells existing in the system. PMID:24598209

  20. High Current CD4+ T Cell Count Predicts Suboptimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Alexander O.; de Bruin, Marijn; Bakker, Margreet

    2015-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are necessary for achieving and maintaining optimal virological suppression, as suboptimal adherence leads to therapy failure and disease progression. It is well known that adherence to ART predicts therapy response, but it is unclear whether clinical outcomes of ART predict adherence. To examine the predictive power of current CD4+ T cell count for adherence of HIV-infected individuals to ART, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of 133 Dutch HIV patients with electronically measured adherence. In a multivariate analysis adjusting for a number of sociodemographic and clinical variables, high current CD4+ T cell count (>660 cells/mm3) was most strongly associated with lower adherence to ART (assessed as a continuous variable) during a two-month period immediately following the measurements of variables (P = 0.008). The twice-per-day (versus once-per-day) dosing regimen was also significantly associated with lower adherence (P = 0.014). In a second multivariate analysis aimed at determining the predictors of suboptimal (<100% of the doses taken) adherence, high current CD4+ T cell count was again the strongest independent predictor of suboptimal adherence to ART (P = 0.015), and the twice-per-day dosing regimen remained associated with suboptimal adherence (P = 0.025). The association between suboptimal adherence and virological suppression was significant in patients with high CD4+ T cell counts, but not in patients with low or intermediate CD4+ T cell counts (P = 0.036 and P = 0.52, respectively; P = 0.047 for comparison of the effects of adherence on virological suppression between patients with high vs. low or intermediate CD4+ T cell counts), suggesting that apart from promoting suboptimal adherence, high CD4+ T cell count also strengthens the effect of adherence on virological suppression. Therefore, sustained efforts to emphasize continued adherence are necessary, especially for patients with high CD4+ T cell counts. PMID:26468956

  1. The volumes and transcript counts of single cells reveal concentration homeostasis and capture biological noise

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, Hermannus; Schwabe, Anne; Crémazy, Frédéric; Verschure, Pernette J.; Bruggeman, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional stochasticity can be measured by counting the number of mRNA molecules per cell. Cell-to-cell variability is best captured in terms of concentration rather than molecule counts, because reaction rates depend on concentrations. We combined single-molecule mRNA counting with single-cell volume measurements to quantify the statistics of both transcript numbers and concentrations in human cells. We compared three cell clones that differ only in the genomic integration site of an identical constitutively expressed reporter gene. The transcript number per cell varied proportionally with cell volume in all three clones, indicating concentration homeostasis. We found that the cell-to-cell variability in the mRNA concentration is almost exclusively due to cell-to-cell variation in gene expression activity, whereas the cell-to-cell variation in mRNA number is larger, due to a significant contribution of cell volume variability. We concluded that the precise relationship between transcript number and cell volume sets the biological stochasticity of living cells. This study highlights the importance of the quantitative measurement of transcript concentrations in studies of cell-to-cell variability in biology. PMID:25518937

  2. Optimization of a cell counting algorithm for mobile point-of-care testing platforms.

    PubMed

    Ahn, DaeHan; Kim, Nam Sung; Moon, SangJun; Park, Taejoon; Son, Sang Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    In a point-of-care (POC) setting, it is critically important to reliably count the number of specific cells in a blood sample. Software-based cell counting, which is far faster than manual counting, while much cheaper than hardware-based counting, has emerged as an attractive solution potentially applicable to mobile POC testing. However, the existing software-based algorithm based on the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) method is too time- and, thus, energy-consuming to be deployed for battery-powered mobile POC testing platforms. In this paper, we identify inefficiencies in the NCC-based algorithm and propose two synergistic optimization techniques that can considerably reduce the runtime and, thus, energy consumption of the original algorithm with negligible impact on counting accuracy. We demonstrate that an AndroidTM smart phone running the optimized algorithm consumes 11.5× less runtime than the original algorithm. PMID:25195851

  3. Optimization of a Cell Counting Algorithm for Mobile Point-of-Care Testing Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, DaeHan; Kim, Nam Sung; Moon, SangJun; Park, Taejoon; Son, Sang Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    In a point-of-care (POC) setting, it is critically important to reliably count the number of specific cells in a blood sample. Software-based cell counting, which is far faster than manual counting, while much cheaper than hardware-based counting, has emerged as an attractive solution potentially applicable to mobile POC testing. However, the existing software-based algorithm based on the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) method is too time- and, thus, energy-consuming to be deployed for battery-powered mobile POC testing platforms. In this paper, we identify inefficiencies in the NCC-based algorithm and propose two synergistic optimization techniques that can considerably reduce the runtime and, thus, energy consumption of the original algorithm with negligible impact on counting accuracy. We demonstrate that an Android™ smart phone running the optimized algorithm consumes 11.5× less runtime than the original algorithm. PMID:25195851

  4. CD8+ T-Cells Count in Acute Myocardial Infarction in HIV Disease in a Predominantly Male Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chung-Chou; So-Armah, Kaku A.; Baker, Jason V.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gordon, Adam J.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Goetz, Matthew B.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Bedimo, Roger; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Deeks, Steven G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freiberg, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus- (HIV-) infected persons have a higher risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than HIV-uninfected persons. Earlier studies suggest that HIV viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and antiretroviral therapy are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Whether CD8+ T-cell count is associated with CVD risk is not clear. We investigated the association between CD8+ T-cell count and incident AMI in a cohort of 73,398 people (of which 97.3% were men) enrolled in the U.S. Veterans Aging Cohort Study-Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC). Compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with high baseline CD8+ T-cell counts (>1065?cells/mm3) had increased AMI risk (adjusted HR = 1.82, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.46 to 2.28). There was evidence that the effect of CD8+ T-cell tertiles on AMI risk differed by CD4+ T-cell level: compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with CD4+ T-cell counts ?200?cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with high CD8+ T-cell count, while those with CD4+ T-cell counts <200?cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with low CD8+ T-cell count. CD8+ T-cell counts may add additional AMI risk stratification information beyond that provided by CD4+ T-cell counts alone. PMID:25688354

  5. Consequence for dairy herds in the United States of imposing different standards for somatic cell count

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New European Union (E.U.) regulations may require that a somatic cell count (SCC) limit of 400,000 cells/mL for milk be met by every farm that contributes to pooled milk exported to Europe. In the United States, the standard is 750,000 cells/mL. Because bulk tank SCC is not readily available through...

  6. White Blood Cell Count and Mortality in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Metter, E. Jeffrey; Cherubini, Antonio; Maggio, Marcello; Sen, Ranjan; Najjar, Samer S.; Windham, Gwen B.; Ble, Alessandro; Senin, Umberto; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the secular trend in white blood cell (WBC) count and the relationship between WBC count and mortality between 1958 and 2002. Background The WBC count is a clinical marker of inflammation and a strong predictor of mortality. Limited data exist on the WBC count secular trend and the relationship between WBC and mortality. Methods One thousand eighty-three women and 1,720 men were evaluated longitudinally in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Blood samples and medical information were collected at the study entry and every 2 years during follow-up visits. The WBC count and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality were assessed. Results A downward trend in WBC count was observed from 1958 to 2002. The secular downward trend was independent of age, gender, race, smoking, body mass index, and physical activity. The WBC count was nonlinearly associated with all-cause mortality and almost linearly associated with cardiovascular mortality. Participants with baseline WBC <3,500 cells/mm3 and WBC >6,000 cells/mm3 had higher mortality than those with 3,500 to 6,000 WBC/mm3. Within each WBC group, age-adjusted mortality rates declined in successive cohorts from the 1960s to the 1990s. Participants who died had higher WBC than those who survived, and the difference was statistically significant within 5 years before death. Conclusions Our study provides evidence for a secular downward trend in WBC count over the period from 1958 to 2002. Higher WBC counts are associated with higher mortality in successive cohorts. We found no evidence that the decline of age-specific mortality rates that occurred from 1960 to 2000 was attributable to a secular downward trend in WBC. PMID:17481443

  7. Response of sheep lymphocytes to PHA: quantitation by nuclear volume measurement and cell counts (40764)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.

    1980-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin response of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of sheep was studied. Assessment of proliferative response was performed by determination of nuclear volumes and cell counts in cultures from 14 sheep and by incorporation of tritiated thymidine in cultures in four additional sheep. PBL of sheep were found to transform and proliferate with PHA similarly to human peripheral blood lymphocytes with minor differences. Quantitation of the proliferative response by determining the cell count and nuclear volumes provided more information on cell kinetics in culture than the commonly used isotope-labeled thymidine incorporation method.

  8. Glial origin of rapidly adhering amniotic fluid cells.

    PubMed

    Aula, P; von Koskull, H; Teramo, K; Karjalainen, O; Virtanen, I; Lehto, V P; Dahl, D

    1980-11-29

    Rapidly adhering cells (RA cells) from the amniotic fluid of a pregnancy with fetal anencephaly were investigated by immunofluorescence assay with an antiserum against glial cells. After 24 hours' cultivation a high proportion of the cells showed positive glial-specific fluorescence, whereas no staining was seen in cells from samples of normal amniotic fluid. At the 24th week the mother was delivered of a stillborn infant with anencephaly. Immunofluorescence staining of RA cells with glial-specific antiserum may be used for the differential diagnosis of fetal abnormalities associated with a high alpha-fetoprotein concentration in amniotic fluid. PMID:7002257

  9. Consequence of changing standards for somatic cell count on US Dairy Herd Improvement herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consequence of noncompliance with European Union (EU) and current US standards for somatic cell count (SCC) as well as SCC standards proposed by the National Milk Producers Federation was examined for US herds. Somatic cell scores (SCS) from 14,854 Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) herds were analyzed. H...

  10. Phase-subtraction cell-counting method for live mouse embryos beyond the eight-cell stage.

    PubMed

    Warger, William C; Newmark, Judith A; Warner, Carol M; DiMarzio, Charles A

    2008-01-01

    Since 1978 in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures have resulted in the birth of over 3 million babies. Yet in 2005, IVF procedures had a live birth rate of only 34%, with 32% of these births resulting in multiple pregnancies. These multiple pregnancies were directly attributed to the transfer of multiple embryos to increase the probability that a single, healthy embryo was included. The predominantly accepted noninvasive viability markers for embryos created by IVF are (1) number of cells at specific time points during development and (2) overall morphology of the embryo. Currently, it is difficult to count the number of cells beyond the eight-cell stage noninvasively. We report a nontoxic cell-counting method capable of counting cell numbers ranging from 8 to 26 in live mouse embryos. This method is derived from the fusion of differential interference contrast and optical quadrature microscopy and is verified by epifluorescence images of Hoechst-stained nuclei. The phase-subtraction cell-counting method is the first accurate, nontoxic technique to count cells through the morula stage in mouse embryos and may enhance the use of cell number as a viability marker if adopted for use with human embryos in the IVF clinic. PMID:18601550

  11. Counting cells with a low-cost integrated microfluidics-waveguide sensor

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Daniel; Ghansah, Isaac; LeBlanc, John; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    The capability to count cells from biofluids at low cost has important diagnostic implications in resource-poor settings. Many approaches have been developed to address this important need, and while most envision a low per-test cost, the detector instrument can be quite expensive. In this report, we present a novel device that enables low-cost and rapid counting of cells from a drop of blood. We demonstrate a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by ion exchange in glass that underlies a microfluidic structure for capturing cells. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated by the number of metal nanoparticles tagged to the cells because of the interaction of the metal particles with the evanescent field of the waveguide. Calibration of the sensor using bead-tagged lymphocytes captured from human blood showed that the sensor could semi-quantitatively count as few as 100 cells/µL of blood. This technology enables the enumeration of specifically captured cells, allowing for a point-of-care, hand-held device for fast and affordable cell counting in screening, remote, or resource-poor settings. PMID:22454696

  12. Standardisation of platelet counting accuracy in blood banks by reference to an automated immunoplatelet procedure: comparative evaluation of Cell-Dyn CD4000 impedance and optical platelet counts.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, B; Haugen, T; Scott, C S

    2001-10-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic platelet transfusions are increasingly used for patients with conditions associated with thrombocytopenia in order to prevent the development of potentially life threatening bleeding. These clinical strategies have led to a significant expansion in platelet unit manufacture, and this now represents a major resource and cost commitment for blood banks. As part of the manufacturing process, blood banks are required to implement control procedures, and the determination of platelet counts in particular is necessary to confirm that the quality of platelet unit production meets the standards defined by national or international guidelines. Apart from linearity analysis and comparisons of platelet counts given by different instruments, there has been no systematic standardisation of platelet counting methods in blood bank practice because to date there has been no suitable reference method for counting platelets in citrate anticoagulants. The recent introduction of an automated immunoplatelet procedure on the Cell-Dyn CD4000 provides a means of determining a true platelet count that is unaffected by changes induced either by storage or anticoagulant. The CD4000 in its routine configuration also provides simultaneous impedance and optical platelet counts and this study was therefore undertaken in order to compare all three different platelet counting methods in parallel with a representative series of platelet units. Platelet counts determined after sub-sampling of platelet units into EDTA vs plain non-anticoagulated tubes revealed no differences in impedance or immunoplatelet counts but generally lower optical counts when aliquoted into tubes that did not contain EDTA. This study therefore routinely used EDTA for platelet unit sub-samples. Comparative results of platelet counts for buffy coat platelet units (n = 36) aliquoted into EDTA indicated that the impedance count was higher than the reference immunoplatelet count by a mean factor of 1.25 while the optical count was lower by a mean factor of 0.87. The degree of impedance count overestimation was particularly consistent while the optical count underestimation was more variable. Linearity studies of 10 fresh platelet units showed no deviation in the range 0-2305 x 10(9) l(-1) for impedance and 0 to 1420 x 10(9) l(-1) for the optical counts, and the relative numerical relationships between impedance and optical counts were conserved throughout the range of dilutions tested. In the CD4000 optical analysis, blood samples anticoagulated with EDTA showed a distinctive elliptical population distribution that fell within the system thresholds. In contrast, the optical pattern observed for platelet units (in CPD) and ACD-anticoagulated venous blood showed a wider 90 degrees scatter with a population of platelet events above the upper parallel discriminator. As these were excluded from the optical count (but were still identified as platelets by the immunoplatelet method) it meant that the optical counts of samples in citrate-based anticoagulants were systematically lower than immunoplatelet counts. Platelet units (n = 15) analysed daily over a seven day period of storage revealed that the greatest decline in platelet counts was with the optical measurement while the most stable value was obtained by impedance analysis. The results of the immunoplatelet analysis further suggested a progressive increase in small platelets with increasing storage time. The use in this study of a standardised immunoplatelet reference method to examine the question of analyser suitability for determining platelet counts/yields of platelet units thus provided a number of important findings. An impedance platelet counting method is utilised by the great majority of haematology instruments in current use, and in common with the CD4000 analyser, a correction factor is employed to take account of RBC/platelet coincidence. This study found that when analysed samples such as platelet units were RBC-free, that an inappropriate correction factor was applied. Consequently, the CD4000

  13. Effect of storage time on automated cell count and cytological interpretation of body cavity effusions.

    PubMed

    Maher, I; Tennant, K V; Papasouliotis, K

    2010-10-01

    The effect of 24- and 48-hour storage at room temperature on automated total nucleated cell count (TNCC), differential cell count (DCC) and cell morphology was assessed, and the effect of initial total protein concentration on canine and feline body cavity effusion samples (2 to 5 ml) was evaluated. At 24 and 48 hours, TNCC and absolute numbers of neutrophils, macrophages and small lymphocytes were significantly decreased and numbers of unrecognisable cells were significantly increased. Neoplastic cells and intracellular bacteria identified in fresh samples were missed at 24 and 48 hours. The initial total protein concentration was associated with an effect on percentage of unrecognisable cells and small lymphocytes over time. Change in TNCC over time would have resulted in misclassification of the effusion type in four of 47 samples. PMID:21257397

  14. Comparison of two automatic cell-counting solutions for fluorescent microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Lojk, J; ?ibej, U; Karlaš, D; Šajn, L; Pavlin, M

    2015-10-01

    Cell counting in microscopic images is one of the fundamental analysis tools in life sciences, but is usually tedious, time consuming and prone to human error. Several programs for automatic cell counting have been developed so far, but most of them demand additional training or data input from the user. Most of them do not allow the users to online monitor the counting results, either. Therefore, we designed two straightforward, simple-to-use cell-counting programs that also allow users to correct the detection results. In this paper, we present the Cellcounter and Learn123 programs for automatic and semiautomatic counting of objects in fluorescent microscopic images (cells or cell nuclei) with a user-friendly interface. Although Cellcounter is based on predefined and fine-tuned set of filters optimized on sets of chosen experiments, Learn123 uses an evolutionary algorithm to determine the adapt filter parameters based on a learning set of images. Cellcounter also includes an extension for analysis of overlaying images. The efficiency of both programs was assessed on images of cells stained with different fluorescent dyes by comparing automatically obtained results with results that were manually annotated by an expert. With both programs, the correlation between automatic and manual counting was very high (R(2) < 0.9), although Cellcounter had some difficulties processing images with no cells or weakly stained cells, where sometimes the background noise was recognized as an object of interest. Nevertheless, the differences between manual and automatic counting were small compared to variations between experimental repeats. Both programs significantly reduced the time required to process the acquired images from hours to minutes. The programs enable consistent, robust, fast and accurate detection of fluorescent objects and can therefore be applied to a range of different applications in different fields of life sciences where fluorescent labelling is used for quantification of various phenomena. Moreover, Cellcounter overlay extension also enables fast analysis of related images that would otherwise require image merging for accurate analysis, whereas Learn123's evolutionary algorithm can adapt counting parameters to specific sets of images of different experimental settings. PMID:26098834

  15. Raman-activated cell counting for profiling carbon dioxide fixing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengqiu; Ashok, Praveen C; Dholakia, Kishan; Huang, Wei E

    2012-06-28

    Raman microspectroscopy is a label-free and nondestructive technique to measure the intrinsic chemical profile of single cells. The naturally weak Raman signals hampered the application of Raman spectroscopy for high-throughput measurements. Nearly all photosynthetic microorganisms contain carotenoids that are active molecules for resonance Raman at a 532 nm excitation wavelength. Hence, the acquisition time for a single photosynthetic microorganism can be as short as 1 ms. The carotenoid bands in Raman spectra of photosynthetic microorganisms utilizing (13)CO(2) shifted when compared to the spectra of cells utilizing (12)CO(2). Here, a mixture of (12)C- and (13)C-cyanobacterial cells were counted using a microfluidic-device-based Raman-activated cell counting procedure to prove the concept that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a high-throughput method to profile a cell population. PMID:22320431

  16. Langerhans cell histiocytosis infiltration in cerebrospinal fluid: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, N; Kapila, K; Kakkar, S; Verma, K

    2001-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease of unknown etiology characterized by a proliferation of histiocytic cells resembling the integumentary cells bearing the name of Langerhans cells. LCH can be unifocal or multifocal, with one- or many-organ involvement. We present a case of LCH diagnosed in the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with generalized lymphadenopathy and central nervous system involvement. PMID:11169892

  17. Long-term increase in CD4+ T-cell counts during combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Judith J; Bosch, Ronald J; Benson, Constance A; Collier, Ann C; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Hughes, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Objective To inform guidelines concerning when to initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), we investigated whether CD4+ T-cell counts (CD4 counts) continue to increase over long periods of time on ART. Losses-to-follow-up and some patients discontinuing ART at higher CD4 counts hamper such evaluation, but novel statistical methods can help address these issues. We estimated the long-term CD4 count trajectory accounting for losses-to-follow-up and treatment discontinuations. Design The study population included 898 U.S. patients first initiating ART in a randomized trial (ACTG 384); 575 were subsequently prospectively followed in an observational study (ALLRT). Methods Inverse probability of censoring weighting statistical methods were used to estimate the CD4 count trajectory accounting for losses-to-follow-up and ART-discontinuations, overall and for pre-treatment CD4 count categories ? 200, 201–350, 351–500, and >500 cells/mm3. Results Median CD4 count increased from 270 cells/mm3 pre-ART to an estimated 556 at three and 532 cells/mm3 at seven years after starting ART in analyses ignoring treatment discontinuations; and to 570 and 640 cells/mm3, respectively, had all patients continued ART. However, even had ART been continued, an estimated 25%, 9%, 3% and 2% of patients with pre-treatment CD4 counts of ? 200, 201–350, 351–500, and >500 cells/mm3 would have had CD4 counts ?350 cells/mm3 after seven years. Conclusions If patients remain on ART, CD4 counts increase in most patients for at least seven years. However, the substantial percentage of patients starting therapy at low CD4 counts who still had low CD4 counts after seven years provides support for ART initiation at higher CD4 counts. PMID:20467286

  18. Transcript counting in single cells reveals dynamics of rDNA transcription

    E-print Network

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    REPORT Transcript counting in single cells reveals dynamics of rDNA transcription Rui Zhen Tan1 that this method resolves changes in these two variables even when the average rDNA expression is unaltered and transcription; RNA Keywords: rDNA; single-molecule FISH; Rpd3 This is an open-access article distributed under

  19. Automated cell colony counting and analysis using the circular Hough image transform algorithm (CHiTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewes, J. M.; Suchowerska, N.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    We present an automated cell colony counting method that is flexible, robust and capable of providing more in-depth clonogenic analysis than existing manual and automated approaches. The full form of the Hough transform without approximation has been implemented, for the first time. Improvements in computing speed have facilitated this approach. Colony identification was achieved by pre-processing the raw images of the colonies in situ in the flask, including images of the flask edges, by erosion, dilation and Gaussian smoothing processes. Colony edges were then identified by intensity gradient field discrimination. Our technique eliminates the need for specialized hardware for image capture and enables the use of a standard desktop scanner for distortion-free image acquisition. Additional parameters evaluated included regional colony counts, average colony area, nearest neighbour distances and radial distribution. This spatial and qualitative information extends the utility of the clonogenic assay, allowing analysis of spatially-variant cytotoxic effects. To test the automated system, two flask types and three cell lines with different morphology, cell size and plating density were examined. A novel Monte Carlo method of simulating cell colony images, as well as manual counting, were used to quantify algorithm accuracy. The method was able to identify colonies with unusual morphology, to successfully resolve merged colonies and to correctly count colonies adjacent to flask edges.

  20. Somatic Cell Count in Milk of Goats Enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement Program in 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of breed, parity, stage of lactation (month), herd size, and regions/states on somatic cell count (SCC) and production of milk from dairy goats enrolled in the Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) program in the United States in 2007 were investigated to monitor the current status of SCC and to ...

  1. Simple method for a cell count of the colonial Cyanobacterium, Microcystis sp.

    PubMed

    Joung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Choong-Jae; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Jang, Kam-Yong; Boo, Sung Min; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2006-10-01

    The cell counting of colonial Microcystis spp. is a rather difficult and error-prone proposition, as this genus forms irregularly-shaped and irregularly-sized colonies, which are packed with cells. Thus, in order to facilitate a cell count, four methods of dividing the colonies into single cells were compared, including vortexing, sonication, TiO2 treatment, and boiling. As a result, the boiling method was determined to generate the greatest number of single cells from a colony, and all colonies were found to have divided completely after only 6 min of treatment. Furthermore, no significant cell destruction, which might alter the actual cell density, was detected in conjunction with the boiling method (P = 0.158). In order to compute the cell number more simply, the relationship between the colony size and the cell number was determined, via the boiling method. The colony volume, rather than the area or diameter was correlated more closely with the cell number (r2 = 0.727), thereby suggesting that the cell numbers of colonial Microcystis sp. can also be estimated effectively from their volumes. PMID:17082751

  2. Longitudinal trends of total white blood cell and differential white blood cell counts of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wan-Ling; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Neriishi, Kazuo; Yamada, Michiko; Cologne, John; Fujiwara, Saeko

    2010-01-01

    In studying the late health effects of atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors, earlier findings were that white blood cell (WBC) count increased with radiation dose in cross-sectional studies. However, a persistent effect of radiation on WBC count and other risk factors has yet to be confirmed. The objectives of the present study were 1) to examine the longitudinal relationship between A-bomb radiation dose and WBC and differential WBC counts among A-bomb survivors and 2) to investigate the potential confounding risk factors (such as age at exposure and smoking status) as well as modification of the radiation dose-response. A total of 7,562 A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were included in this study from 1964-2004. A linear mixed model was applied using the repeated WBC measurements. During the study period, a secular downward trend of WBC count was observed. Radiation exposure was a significant risk factor for elevated WBC and differential WBC counts over time. A significant increase of WBC counts among survivors with high radiation dose (> 2 Gy) was detected in men exposed below the age of 20 and in women regardless of age at exposure. Effects on WBC of low dose radiation remain unclear, however. Cigarette smoking produced the most pronounced effect on WBC counts and its impact was much larger than that of radiation exposure. PMID:20543527

  3. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G. (Albany, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  4. HEMODOSE: A Biodosimetry Tool Based on Multi-type Blood Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaowen; Blakely, William F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral blood cell counts are important biomarkers of radiation exposure. In this work, a simplified compartmental modeling approach is applied to simulate the perturbation of the hematopoiesis system in humans after radiation exposure, and HemoDose software is reported to estimate individuals’ absorbed doses based on multi-type blood cell counts. Testing with patient data in some historical accidents indicates that either single or serial granulocyte, lymphocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts after exposure can be robust indicators of the absorbed doses. In addition, such correlation exists not only in the early time window (1 or 2 d) but also in the late phase (up to 4 wk) after exposure, when the four types of cell counts are combined for analysis. These demonstrate the capability of HemoDose as a rapid point-of-care diagnostic or centralized high-throughput assay system for personnel exposed to unintended high doses of radiation, especially in large-scale nuclear/radiological disaster scenarios involving mass casualties. PMID:26011498

  5. The impact of donor age and sex on the nucleated cell count and CD34 count in healthy bone marrow donors.

    PubMed

    Ince, Elif Unal; Ileri, Talia; Dogu, Figen; Ates, Can; Cakmakli, Hasan; Dalva, Klara; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Uysal, Zumrut; Ertem, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    BM remains an important source of stem cells. The BM characteristics change with age but the estimation of CD34 calculation of one CD34+ cell per 100 nucleated cells is used for all donors including pediatric donors in the operating room before getting the actual CD34 count. In order to see whether this formula is applicable for pediatric donors, we designed a retrospective study to see the affect of the age and sex on the BM NCC, CD34 count, and CD34/NCC ratios. Ninety-eight BM collections from 91 related donors were evaluated retrospectively (median age: nine yr [1.5-54 yr]; M/F: 41/50). A significant negative correlation was found between the donor age and NCC (r = -0.229, p < 0.05), CD34 count (r = -0.563, p < 0.01), and CD34/NCC (r = -0.664, p < 0.01). The negative correlation for CD34 count and CD34/NCC persisted in female and male donor groups. When donors younger than 16 yr of age were compared with the older donor group, the median NCC, median CD34 count, and CD34/NCC were significantly lower in the older group (p < 0.01). Age and sex have to be taken into consideration to avoid unnecessary high-volume collections and increased operating room time in the younger donors. PMID:25761650

  6. A comparative study of white blood cell counts and disease risk in carnivores.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Charles L; Gittleman, John L; Antonovics, Janis

    2003-01-01

    In primates, baseline levels of white blood cell (WBC) counts are related to mating promiscuity. It was hypothesized that differences in the primate immune system reflect pathogen risks from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Here, we test for the generality of this result by examining hypotheses involving behavioural, ecological and life-history factors in carnivores. Again, we find a significant correlation in carnivores between mating promiscuity and elevated levels of WBC counts. In addition, we find relationships with measures of sociality, substrate use and life-history parameters. These comparative results across independent taxonomic orders indicate that the evolution of the immune system, as represented by phylogenetic differences in basal levels of blood cell counts, is closely linked to disease risk involved with promiscuous mating and associated variables. We found only limited support for an association between the percentage of meat in the diet and WBC counts, which is consistent with the behavioural and physiological mechanisms that carnivores use to avoid parasite transmission from their prey. We discuss additional comparative questions related to taxonomic differences in disease risk, modes of parasite transmission and implications for conservation biology. PMID:12639313

  7. Sample stability for complete blood cell count using the Sysmex XN haematological analyser

    PubMed Central

    Daves, Massimo; Zagler, Elmar M.; Cemin, Roberto; Gnech, Flora; Joos, Alexandra; Platzgummer, Stefan; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Sample stability is a crucial aspect for the quality of results of a haematology laboratory. This study was conducted to investigate the reliability of haematological testing using Sysmex XN in samples stored for up to 24 h at different temperatures. Materials and methods Haematological tests were performed on whole blood samples collected from 16 ostensibly healthy outpatients immediately after collection and 3 h, 6 h or 24 h afterwards, with triple aliquots kept at room temperature, 4 °C or 37 °C. Results No meaningful bias was observed after 3 h under different storage conditions, except for red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and platelet count (impedance technique, PLT-I) at 37 °C. After 6 h, meaningful bias was observed for mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) at room temperature, red blood cell (RBC) count, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), MCH, MCV and PLT-I at 4 °C, and RBC, RDW, MCHC, MCH and PLT-I at 37 °C. After 24 h, a meaningful bias was observed for MCHC, MCV, platelet count (fluorescent technique, PLT-F) and mean platelet volume (MPV) at room temperature, MCHC, MCV, PLT-I and MPV at 4 °C, and all parameters except RBC count and MPV at 37 °C. Discussion Great caution should be observed when analysing results of haematological tests conducted more than 3 h after sample collection. PMID:26057491

  8. Neurocognitive and Motor Deficits in HIV-Infected Ugandan Children With High CD4 Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Michael J.; Boal, Hannah E.; Bangirana, Paul; Charlebois, Edwin; Havlir, Diane V.; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Dorsey, Grant; Achan, Jane; Akello, Carolyne; Kamya, Moses R.; Wong, Joseph K.

    2012-01-01

    (See the Editorial Commentary by Wagner and Frenkel, on pages 1010–2.) Background.?Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes neurocognitive or motor function deficits in children with advanced disease, but it is unclear whether children with CD4 cell measures above the World Health Organization (WHO) thresholds for antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation suffer significant impairment. Methods.?The neurocognitive and motor functions of HIV-infected ART-naive Ugandan children aged 6–12 years with CD4 cell counts of >350?cells/?L and CD4 cell percentage of >15% were compared with those of HIV-uninfected children, using the Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA), the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, second edition (KABC-2), and the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, second edition (BOT-2). Results.?Ninety-three HIV-infected children (median CD4 cell count, 655?cells/?L; plasma HIV RNA level, 4.7?log10 copies/mL) were compared to 106 HIV-uninfected children. HIV-infected children performed worse on TOVA visual reaction times (multivariate analysis of covariance; P?=?.006); KABC-2 sequential processing (P?=?.005), simultaneous processing (P?=?.039), planning/reasoning (P?=?.023), and global performance (P?=?.024); and BOT-2 total motor proficiency (P?=?.003). High plasma HIV RNA level was associated with worse performance in 10 cognitive measures and 3 motor measures. In analysis of only WHO clinical stage 1 or 2 HIV-infected children (n?=?68), significant differences between the HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected groups (P?cell counts of ?350?cells/?L and percentages of >15%. Study of whether early initiation of ART could prevent or reverse such deficits is needed. PMID:22308272

  9. Association Between White Blood Cell Count Following Radiation Therapy With Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chad; Gomez, Daniel R.; Wang, Hongmei; Levy, Lawrence B.; Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an inflammatory response to radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the association between RP and white blood cell (WBC) count, an established metric of systemic inflammation, after RT for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received ?60 Gy as definitive therapy. The primary endpoint was whether WBC count after RT (defined as 2 weeks through 3 months after RT completion) was associated with grade ?3 or grade ?2 RP. Median lung volume receiving ?20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 31%, and post-RT WBC counts ranged from 1.7 to 21.2 × 10{sup 3} WBCs/?L. Odds ratios (ORs) associating clinical variables and post-RT WBC counts with RP were calculated via logistic regression. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to define optimal post-RT WBC count cut points. Results: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly higher in patients with grade ?3 RP than without (P<.05). Optimal cut points for post-RT WBC count were found to be 7.4 and 8.0 × 10{sup 3}/?L for grade ?3 and ?2 RP, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between post-RT WBC count and grade ?3 (n=46, OR=2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4?4.9, P=.003) and grade ?2 RP (n=164, OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01). This association held in a stepwise multivariate regression. Of note, V{sub 20} was found to be significantly associated with grade ?2 RP (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01) and trended toward significance for grade ?3 RP (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=.06). Conclusions: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly and independently associated with RP and have potential utility as a diagnostic or predictive marker for this toxicity.

  10. Metabolic activity of bacterial cell enumerated by direct viable count. [Escherichia coli; Salmonella enteritidis

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporation radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included (methyl-/sup 3/H) thymidine or (U-/sup 14/C) glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca. 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate.

  11. Assembly of bionanostructures onto beta-cyclodextrin molecular printboards for antibody recognition and lymphocyte cell counting.

    PubMed

    Ludden, Manon J W; Li, Xiao; Greve, Jan; van Amerongen, Aart; Escalante, Maryana; Subramaniam, Vinod; Reinhoudt, David N; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2008-06-01

    The assembly of complex bionanostructures onto beta-cyclodextrin (betaCD) monolayers has been investigated with the aims of antibody recognition and cell adhesion. The formation of these assemblies relies on host-guest, protein-ligand, and protein-protein interactions. The buildup of a structure consisting of a divalent bis(adamantyl)-biotin linker, streptavidin (SAv), biotinylated protein A (bt-PA), and an Fc fragment of a human immunoglobin G (IgG-Fc) was studied with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Patterns of this bionanostructure were obtained via microcontact printing of the divalent linker at the molecular printboard, followed by the subsequent attachment of the proteins. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the buildup of these bionanostructures on the betaCD monolayers is highly specific. On the basis of these results, bionanostructures were made in which whole antibodies (ABs) were used instead of the IgG-Fc. These ABs were bound to the SAv layer via biotinylated protein G (bt-PG) or via a biotinylated AB. These constructions yielded specifically bound ABs with a less than maximal density, as shown by SPR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Finally, the immobilization of ABs to the molecular printboard was used to create platforms for lymphocyte cell count purposes. Monoclonal ABs (MABs) were attached to the SAv layer using bt-PG, an engineered biotin functionality, or through nonspecific adsorption. The binding specificity of the immobilized cells was the highest on the buildup made from bt-PG, which is attributed to an optimized orientation of the antibodies. An approximately linear relationship between the numbers of seeded cells and counted cells was demonstrated, rendering the platform potentially suitable for lymphocyte cell counting. PMID:18461928

  12. Association between pre–biopsy white blood cell count and prostate biopsy – related sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Suleyman; Aktas, Binhan Kagan; Gokkaya, Cevdet Serkan; Akdemir, Alp Ozgur; Erkmen, Akif Ersoy; Memis, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite all preventive measures and improved biopsy techniques, serious, life–threatening complications of prostate biopsy, including sepsis, still exist. In the present study, in order to identify the risk factors that may be associated with sepsis development after prostate–biopsy, we aimed to analyze retrospectively the data of our patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound–guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed the data of 889 patients who underwent prostate biopsy at our clinic. We compared pre–biopsy parameters (age, prostate volume, white blood cell (WBC) count, fasting blood glucose, free and total prostate specific antigen levels) between patients who developed sepsis and those who were sepsis–free following prostate biopsy. Results 28 patients (3.1%) developed sepsis. Among the risk factors evaluated, only pre–biopsy WBC count was found to be a significant risk factor for biopsy–related sepsis. A 5.1 fold increase was detected in the risk for sepsis development, when the cut–off value of WBC was accepted as 11.165/?L, OR: 5.1 (95% CI: 2.3–11.5). The post–biopsy sepsis development rate in patients with pre–biopsy WBC count greater and less than 11.165/?L was 13.7% (n = 10) and 3% (n = 18) respectively. Conclusions Patients with a pre–biopsy WBC count greater than 11.165/?L should be informed of the increased risk of developing post–biopsy sepsis. PMID:25914844

  13. Fluids as Dynamic Templates for Cytoskeletal Proteins in Plant Cells

    E-print Network

    J. T. Lofthouse

    2008-07-12

    The Dynamic Template model of biological cell membranes and the cytoplasm as spatially organised fluid layers is extended to plant cells, and is shown to offer a feasible shear driven mechanism for the co-alignment of internal and external fibres observed during growth and tropic responses

  14. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy at high CD4+ cell counts is associated with positive treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D.; Reuter, Anja; Harrigan, P. Richard; Lourenço, Lillian; Chau, William; Hull, Mark; Mackenzie, Lauren; Guillemi, Silvia; Hogg, Robert S.; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is limited research investigating the possible mechanisms of how starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) at a higher CD4+ cell count decreases mortality. This study investigated the association between initiating cART with short-term and long-term achievement of viral suppression; emergence of any drug resistance and of an AIDS-defining illness (ADI); long-term treatment adherence; and all-cause mortality. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 4120 naive patients who initiated cART between 2000 and 2012. Patients were followed until 2013, death or until the last contact date (varied by outcome). The main exposure was the interaction between period of cART initiation (2000–2006 and 2007–2012) and CD4+ cell count at cART initiation (<500 versus ?500 cells/?l). We considered both baseline and longitudinal covariates. We fitted different multivariable models using cross-sectional and longitudinal statistical methods, depending on the outcome. Results Patients who initiated cART with a CD4+ cell count at least 500 cells/?l in 2007–2012 had an increased likelihood of achieving viral suppression at 9 months and of maintaining an adherence level of at least 95% over time, and the lowest probability of developing any resistance and an ADI during follow-up. These patients were not the ones with the highest likelihood of maintaining viral suppression over time, most likely due to viral load blips experienced during the follow-up. Conclusion The outcomes in this study likely play an important role in explaining the positive impact of early cART initiation on mortality. These results should alleviate some of the concerns clinicians may have when initiating cART in patients with high CD4+s as recommended by current treatment guidelines. PMID:26165354

  15. Bacteriology and somatic cell counts in milk samples from ewes on a Scottish farm

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Milk samples from 50 sheep on a single Scottish research farm were collected weekly for 10 wk postpartum. Samples were analyzed for somatic cell counts (SCC) each week and bacteriologic culture was done for 7 of the 10 wk. A total of 492 udder half samples were cultured, of which 467 had corresponding cell count data. Statistical analysis on complete SCC and culture data showed no association between SCC and bacterial isolation, even when more than 10 colonies of a single bacterial species were present. Only 3.6% of the samples were simultaneously positive for high count (> 10 colonies from 0.01 mL of milk) of any one bacterial species and high SCC (> 1 × 106/mL). The bacteria recovered were: Staphylococcus equorum (19 times), S. xylosus (7 times), S. simulans (6 times), Streptococcus uberis (3 times) and other streptococci (4 times), Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica (2 times), Staphylococcus aureus (1 time), S. capitis (1 time), and Enterococcus faecium (1 time). There was an association between the test day and SCC, with higher SCC values in the first 2 wk. In addition, significantly higher SCC values were found in the oldest animals compared to the other age groups. PMID:15352543

  16. Large Scale-Invariant Fluctuations in Normal Blood Cell Counts A sign of criticality?

    E-print Network

    Perazzo, C A; Chialvo, D R; Willshaw, P; Perazzo, Carlos A.; Fernandez, Elmer A.; Chialvo, Dante R.; Willshaw, Peter

    2000-01-01

    All types of blood cells are formed by differentiation from a small self-maintaining population of pluri-potential stem cells in the bone marrow. Despite abundant information on the molecular aspects of division, differentiation, commitment and maturation of these cells, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of the system as a whole, and how it works to maintain this complex ``ecology'' in the observed normal ranges throughout life. Here we report unexpected large, scale-free, fluctuations detected from the first long-term analysis of the day-to-day variability of a healthy animal's blood cell counts measured over one thousand days. This scale-invariance cannot be accounted for by current theoretical models, and resembles some of the scenarios described for self-organized criticality.

  17. Cell sorting is analogous to phase ordering in fluids

    PubMed Central

    Beysens, D. A.; Forgacs, G.; Glazier, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Morphogenetic processes, like sorting or spreading of tissues, characterize early embryonic development. An analogy between viscoelastic fluids and certain properties of embryonic tissues helps interpret these phenomena. The values of tissue-specific surface tensions are consistent with the equilibrium configurations that the Differential Adhesion Hypothesis predicts such tissues reach after sorting and spreading. Here we extend the fluid analogy to cellular kinetics. The same formalism applies to recent experiments on the kinetics of phase ordering in two-phase fluids. Our results provide biologically relevant information on the strength of binding between cell adhesion molecules under near-physiological conditions. PMID:10944216

  18. Higher risk of AIDS or death in patients with lower CD4 cell counts after virally suppressive HAART

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, BO; Li, X; Palella, F; Jacobson, LP; Margolick, JB; Detels, R; Rinaldo, CR; Phair, JP

    2009-01-01

    Background The clinical implications of a failure to achieve high CD4 cell counts while receiving virally suppressive highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are uncertain. Methods We analysed data from HIV-infected men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) to elucidate associations between CD4 cell counts achieved during virally suppressive HAART and risks of AIDS or death. Inclusion criteria were: CD4 cell count <200 cells/?L before HAART initiation; ? viral load (VL) determinations after HAART initiation; and sustained viral suppression, defined as all VL <50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, but allowing a single VL of 50–1000 copies/mL. Results One hundred and twenty-one men were included; median age was 42 years. After first VL <50 copies/mL, six participants had a new AIDS diagnosis and seven died. The median CD4 cell count change/year (cells/?L) after first VL <50 copies/mL was zero among patients who either developed AIDS or died vs. 39 among those who did not meet either endpoint (P = 0.119). After controlling for time from HAART initiation to first VL <50 copies/mL, age at first VL <50 copies/mL, history of AIDS and antiretroviral therapy (ART) experience before HAART, the hazard ratio for AIDS or death at CD4 cell count of ?200 vs. >350 cells/?L was 10.7 (P = 0.013), and at CD4 cell count of 201–350 vs. >350 cells/?L was 8.54 (P = 0.014). Conclusion In this cohort, lower CD4 cell count at the time of viral suppression was associated with increased risk of AIDS or death. PMID:19601997

  19. Three counting methods agree on cell and neuron number in chimpanzee primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel J.; Balaram, Pooja; Young, Nicole A.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the cellular composition of specific brain regions is crucial to our understanding of the function of neurobiological systems. It is therefore useful to identify the extent to which different methods agree when estimating the same properties of brain circuitry. In this study, we estimated the number of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the primary visual cortex (area 17 or V1) of both hemispheres from a single chimpanzee. Specifically, we processed samples distributed across V1 of the right hemisphere after cortex was flattened into a sheet using two variations of the isotropic fractionator cell and neuron counting method. We processed the left hemisphere as serial brain slices for stereological investigation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the agreement between these methods in the most direct manner possible by comparing estimates of cell density across one brain region of interest in a single individual. In our hands, these methods produced similar estimates of the total cellular population (approximately 1 billion) as well as the number of neurons (approximately 675 million) in chimpanzee V1, providing evidence that both techniques estimate the same parameters of interest. In addition, our results indicate the strengths of each distinct tissue preparation procedure, highlighting the importance of attention to anatomical detail. In summary, we found that the isotropic fractionator and the stereological optical fractionator produced concordant estimates of the cellular composition of V1, and that this result supports the conclusion that chimpanzees conform to the primate pattern of exceptionally high packing density in V1. Ultimately, our data suggest that investigators can optimize their experimental approach by using any of these counting methods to obtain reliable cell and neuron counts. PMID:24904305

  20. Oligonol Supplementation Affects Leukocyte and Immune Cell Counts after Heat Loading in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Beom; Shin, Young Oh

    2014-01-01

    Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, making it a potential promoter of immunity. This study investigates the effects of oligonol supplementation on leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in 19 healthy male volunteers. The participants took a daily dose of 200 mg oligonol or a placebo for 1 week. After a 2-week washout period, the subjects were switched to the other study arm. After each supplement, half-body immersion into hot water was made, and blood was collected. Then, complete and differential blood counts were performed. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and phenotype lymphocyte subsets. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-6 in blood samples were analyzed. Lymphocyte subpopulation variables included counts of total T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Oligonol intake attenuated elevations in IL-1? (an 11.1-fold change vs. a 13.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 12.0-fold change vs. a 12.6-fold change 1h after heating) and IL-6 (an 8.6-fold change vs. a 9.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 9.1-fold change vs. a 10.5-fold change 1h after heating) immediately and 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the placebo group. Oligonol supplementation led to significantly higher numbers of leukocytes (a 30.0% change vs. a 21.5% change immediately after heating; a 13.5% change vs. a 3.5% change 1h after heating) and lymphocytes (a 47.3% change vs. a 39.3% change immediately after heating; a 19.08% change vs. a 2.1% change 1h after heating) relative to those in the placebo group. Oligonol intake led to larger increases in T cells, B cells, and NK cells at rest (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.001, respectively) and immediately after heating (p < 0.001) in comparison to those in the placebo group. In addition, levels of T cells (p < 0.001) and B cells (p < 0.001) were significantly higher 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the placebo group. These results demonstrate that supplementation with oligonol for 1 week may enhance the immune function under heat and suggest a potential useful adjunct to chemotherapy in malignant diseases. PMID:24962480

  1. Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells in regenerative medicine research.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sunyoung; Ko, In Kap; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J; Lee, Sang Jin

    2012-02-01

    The stem cells isolated from amniotic fluid present an exciting possible contribution to the field of regenerative medicine and amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells have significant potential for research and therapeutic applications. AFS cells are multipotent, showing the ability to differentiate into cell types from all three embryonic germ layers. They express both embryonic and adult stem cell markers, expand extensively without feeder cells, double in 36 h, and are not tumorigenic. The AFS cells can be maintained for over 250 population doublings and preserve their telomere length and a normal karyotype. They differentiate easily into specific cell lineages and do not require human embryo tissue for their isolation, thus avoiding the current controversies associated with the use of human embryonic stem (ES) cells. The discovery of the AFS cells has been recent, and a great deal of work remains to be performed on the characterization and use of these cells. This review describes the various differentiated lineages that AFS cells can form and the future of these promising new stem cells in regenerative medicine research. PMID:22370781

  2. A robust generic method for grid detection in white light microscopy Malassez blade images in the context of cell counting.

    PubMed

    Marin, Ambroise; Denimal, Emmanuel; Guyot, Stéphane; Journaux, Ludovic; Molin, Paul

    2015-02-01

    In biology, cell counting is a primary measurement and it is usually performed manually using hemocytometers such as Malassez blades. This work is tedious and can be automated using image processing. An algorithm based on Fourier transform filtering and the Hough transform was developed for Malassez blade grid extraction. This facilitates cell segmentation and counting within the grid. For the present work, a set of 137 images with high variability was processed. Grids were accurately detected in 98% of these images. PMID:25510177

  3. Fluid dynamics and noise in bacterial cell-cell and cell-surface scattering

    E-print Network

    Knut Drescher; Jörn Dunkel; Luis H. Cisneros; Sujoy Ganguly; Raymond E. Goldstein

    2011-07-12

    Bacterial processes ranging from gene expression to motility and biofilm formation are constantly challenged by internal and external noise. While the importance of stochastic fluctuations has been appreciated for chemotaxis, it is currently believed that deterministic long-range fluid dynamical effects govern cell-cell and cell-surface scattering - the elementary events that lead to swarming and collective swimming in active suspensions and to the formation of biofilms. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the bacterial flow field generated by individual swimming Escherichia coli both far from and near to a solid surface. These experiments allowed us to examine the relative importance of fluid dynamics and rotational diffusion for bacteria. For cell-cell interactions it is shown that thermal and intrinsic stochasticity drown the effects of long-range fluid dynamics, implying that physical interactions between bacteria are determined by steric collisions and near-field lubrication forces. This dominance of short-range forces closely links collective motion in bacterial suspensions to self-organization in driven granular systems, assemblages of biofilaments, and animal flocks. For the scattering of bacteria with surfaces, long-range fluid dynamical interactions are also shown to be negligible before collisions; however, once the bacterium swims along the surface within a few microns after an aligning collision, hydrodynamic effects can contribute to the experimentally observed, long residence times. As these results are based on purely mechanical properties, they apply to a wide range of microorganisms.

  4. Dynamical analysis of erythrocytes under the assumption of cross-spectral coherence between blood cell counts and the Dst

    E-print Network

    Dasso, Sergio

    for the transport of oxygen, coagulation and the immune response respectively. In the healthy subject, blood cell type of blood cell are expected to reflect the intrinsic dynamics of the hematologic system and its response to various intrinsic and extrinsic perturbations. We analyze blood cell counts from two sheep over

  5. Factors influencing CD4 cell count in HIV-positive pregnant women in a secondary health center in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akinbami, Akinsegun A; Gbadegesin, Abidoye; Ajibola, Sarah O; Uche, Ebele I; Dosunmu, Adedoyin O; Adediran, Adewumi; Sobande, Adekunle

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunity in pregnancy is physiologically compromised, and this may affect CD4 count levels. It is well-established that several factors affect CD4 count level in pregnancy. This study aimed to determine the mean and reference range of CD4 count in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive pregnant women in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods A retrospective study was carried out at antenatal clinics of the Maternal and Child Center of a secondary health center in Lagos State, Nigeria. Records of HIV-positive pregnant women at various gestational ages, including CD4+ cell count at booking, packed cell volume (PCV) at booking and labor, gestational age at delivery, and infant weight and sex were retrieved. The descriptive data was given as mean ± standard deviation (SD). Pearson’s chi-squared test and correlation were used for analytical assessment. Results Data were retrieved for a total of 143 patients. The mean age was 31.15±3.78 years. The mean PCV was 31.01%±3.79% at booking and 30.49%±4.80% during labor. The mean CD4 count was 413.87±212.09 cells/?L, with a range of 40 to 1,252 cells/?L. The mean infant weight was 3.05±0.45 kg, with a range of 2 to 5 kg. Age of the mother, gestational age, and PCV at booking were not statistically significantly associated with CD4 count. Conclusion Maternal age, gestational age, and PCV at booking had no significant effects on CD4+ cell count levels in pregnancy. The mean CD4+ cell count of HIV-positive pregnant women in Lagos is 413.87±212.09 cells/?L. PMID:25914558

  6. Early natural killer cell counts in blood predict mortality in severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Host immunity should play a principal role in determining both the outcome and recovery of patients with sepsis that originated from a microbial infection. Quantification of the levels of key elements of the immune response could have a prognostic value in this disease. Methods In an attempt to evaluate the quantitative changes in the status of immunocompetence in severe sepsis over time and its potential influence on clinical outcome, we monitored the evolution of immunoglobulins (Igs) (IgG, IgA and IgM), complement factors (C3 and C4) and lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, B cells (CD19+) and natural killer (NK) cells (CD3-CD16+CD56+)) in the blood of 50 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock at day 1, day 3 and day 10 following admission to the ICU. Results Twenty-one patients died, ten of whom died within the 72 hours following admission to the ICU. The most frequent cause of death (n = 12) was multiorgan dysfunction syndrome. At day 1, survivors showed significantly higher levels of IgG and C4 than those who ultimately died. On the contrary, NK cell levels were significantly higher in the patients who died. Survivors exhibited a progressive increase from day 1 to day 10 on most of the immunological parameters evaluated (IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, CD4+, CD8+ T cells and NK cells). Multivariate Cox regression analysis, including age, sex, APACHE II score, severe sepsis or septic shock status and each one of the immunological parameters showed that NK cell counts at day 1 were independently associated with increased risk of death at 28 days (hazard ratio = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.29 to 8.64; P = 0.013). Analysis of survival curves provided evidence that levels of NK cells at day 1 (> 83 cells/mm3) were associated with early mortality. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the prognostic role of NK cells in severe sepsis and provide evidence for a direct association of early counts of these cells in blood with mortality. PMID:22018048

  7. Activities of indigenous proteolytic enzymes in caprine milk of different somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Kelly, A L; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Sevi, A

    2015-11-01

    Individual caprine milk with different somatic cell counts (SCC) were studied with the aim of investigating the percentage distribution of leukocyte cell types and the activities of indigenous proteolytic enzymes; proteolysis of casein was also studied in relation to cell type following recovery from milk. The experiment was conducted on 5 intensively managed dairy flocks of Garganica goats; on the basis of SCC, the experimental groups were denoted low (L-SCC; <700,000cells/mL), medium (M-SCC; from 701,000 to 1,500,000cells/mL), and high (H-SCC; >1,501,000cells/mL) SCC. Leukocyte distribution differed between groups; polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes were higher in M-SCC and H-SCC milk samples, the percentage macrophages was the highest in H-SCC, and levels of nonviable cells significantly decreased with increasing SCC. Activities of all the main proteolytic enzymes were affected by SCC; plasmin activity was the highest in H-SCC milk and the lowest in L-SCC, and elastase and cathepsin D activities were the highest in M-SCC. Somatic cell count influenced casein hydrolysis patterns, with less intact ?- and ?-casein in H-SCC milk. Higher levels of low electrophoretic mobility peptides were detected in sodium caseinate incubated with leukocytes isolated from L-SCC milk, independent of cell type, whereas among cells recovered from M-SCC milk, macrophages yielded the highest levels of low electrophoretic mobility peptides from sodium caseinate. The level of high electrophoretic mobility peptides was higher in sodium caseinate incubated with polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes and macrophages isolated from M-SCC, whereas the same fraction of peptides was always the highest, independent of leukocyte type, for cells recovered from H-SCC milk. In caprine milk, a level of 700,000cells/mL represented the threshold for changes in leukocyte distribution, which is presumably related to the immune status of the mammary gland. Differences in the profile of indigenous lysosomal proteolytic enzymes in caprine milk may influence the integrity of casein based on proteolysis patterns of sodium caseinate incubated with isolated and lysed leukocyte types. PMID:26342976

  8. A Multiple Parameters Biodosimetry Tool with Various Blood Cell Counts - the Hemodose Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen

    2014-01-01

    There continue to be important concerns about the possibility of the occurrence of acute radiation syndromes following nuclear and radiological terrorism or accidents that may result in mass casualties in densely populated areas. To guide medical personnel in their clinical decisions for effective medical management and treatment of the exposed individuals, biological markers are usually applied to examine radiation induced biological changes to assess the severity of radiation injury to sensitive organ systems. Among these the peripheral blood cell counts are widely used to assess the extent of radiation induced bone marrow injury. This is due to the fact that the hematopoietic system is the most vulnerable part of the human body to radiation damage. Particularly, the lymphocyte, granulocyte, and platelet cells are the most radiosensitive of the blood elements, and monitoring their changes after exposure is regarded as a practical and recommended laboratory test to estimate radiation dose and injury. Based upon years of physiological and pathophysiological investigation of mammalian hematopoietic systems, and rigorous coarse-grained bio-mathematical modeling and validation on species from mouse, to dog, monkey, and human, we have developed a set of software tools Hemodose, which can use single or serial granulocyte, lymphocyte, leukocyte, or platelet counts after exposure to estimate absorbed doses of adult victims very rapidly and accurately. Some patient data from historical accidents are utilized as examples to demonstrate the capabilities of these tools as a rapid point-of-care diagnostic or centralized high-throughput assay system in a large-scale radiological disaster scenario. Most significant to the improvement of national and local preparedness of a potential nuclear/radiological disaster, this HemoDose approach establishes robust correlations between the absorbed doses and victim's various types of blood cell counts not only in the early time window (1 or 2 days), but also in the very late phase (up to 4 weeks) after exposure.

  9. Alcohol dependence and CD4 cell count: is there a relationship?

    PubMed

    Malbergier, Andre; Amaral, Ricardo Abrantes do; Cardoso, Luciana Donola

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and other drugs use seem to be common among people infected with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Their effects on HIV progression is still in debate. This study aimed to assess the association between alcohol and drug use and an HIV disease progression biomarker (CD4 cell count) among patients on ART. A cross-sectional study was carried out at an HIV treatment center affiliated with Medical School of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Four hundred and thirty-eight HIV-positive patients on ART were interviewed by trained psychiatrists and psychologists using the following instruments: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and the Simplified Medication Adherence Questionnaire (SMAQ). In the previous month, 219 (50%) and 41 (9.3%) patients reported use of alcohol and illicit drugs, respectively. Fifty patients (12.6%) were classified as having harmful alcohol use by AUDIT. According to SCID-I, 80 patients (18.3%) were alcohol abusers, 24 (5.5%) alcohol dependents, and 21 (4.2%) had a current depressive disorder. Almost 73% (n = 319-72.8%) of the patients were adherent to ART. Alcohol dependents were nine times (p < 0.01) more likely to have CD4 cell count ?200/mm(3), and this association was independent of ART adherence. In conclusion, alcohol dependence seems to be associated with low CD4 cell count in HIV-positive patients. Based on these data, HIV health care workers should always assess alcohol consumption in the treatment setting, and patients should be advised that alcohol dependence may be linked to low CD4. PMID:25179410

  10. Computer-assisted counting of retinal cells by automatic segmentation after TV denoising

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative evaluation of mosaics of photoreceptors and neurons is essential in studies on development, aging and degeneration of the retina. Manual counting of samples is a time consuming procedure while attempts to automatization are subject to various restrictions from biological and preparation variability leading to both over- and underestimation of cell numbers. Here we present an adaptive algorithm to overcome many of these problems. Digital micrographs were obtained from cone photoreceptor mosaics visualized by anti-opsin immuno-cytochemistry in retinal wholemounts from a variety of mammalian species including primates. Segmentation of photoreceptors (from background, debris, blood vessels, other cell types) was performed by a procedure based on Rudin-Osher-Fatemi total variation (TV) denoising. Once 3 parameters are manually adjusted based on a sample, similarly structured images can be batch processed. The module is implemented in MATLAB and fully documented online. Results The object recognition procedure was tested on samples with a typical range of signal and background variations. We obtained results with error ratios of less than 10% in 16 of 18 samples and a mean error of less than 6% compared to manual counts. Conclusions The presented method provides a traceable module for automated acquisition of retinal cell density data. Remaining errors, including addition of background items, splitting or merging of objects might be further reduced by introduction of additional parameters. The module may be integrated into extended environments with features such as 3D-acquisition and recognition. PMID:24138794

  11. Alternative experiments using the geophysical fluid flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    This study addresses the possibility of doing large scale dynamics experiments using the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell. In particular, cases where the forcing generates a statically stable stratification almost everywhere in the spherical shell are evaluated. This situation is typical of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. By calculating the strongest meridional circulation expected in the spacelab experiments, and testing its stability using quasi-geostrophic stability theory, it is shown that strongly nonlinear baroclinic waves on a zonally symmetric modified thermal wind will not occur. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell does not have a deep enough fluid layer to permit useful studies of large scale planetary wave processes arising from instability. It is argued, however, that by introducing suitable meridional barriers, a significant contribution to the understanding of the oceanic thermocline problem could be made.

  12. Low blood cell counts in wild Japanese monkeys after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Hayama, Shin-ichi; Nakiri, Sachie; Nakanishi, Setsuko; Ishii, Naomi; Uno, Taiki; Kato, Takuya; Konno, Fumiharu; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Tsuchida, Shuichi; Omi, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 we carried out a 1-year hematological study on a population of wild Japanese monkeys inhabiting the forest area of Fukushima City. This area is located 70 km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), which released a large amount of radioactive material into the environment following the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011. For comparison, we examined monkeys inhabiting the Shimokita Peninsula in Aomori Prefecture, located approximately 400 km from the NPP. Total muscle cesium concentration in Fukushima monkeys was in the range of 78-1778 Bq/kg, whereas the level of cesium was below the detection limit in all Shimokita monkeys. Compared with Shimokita monkeys, Fukushima monkeys had significantly low white and red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, and the white blood cell count in immature monkeys showed a significant negative correlation with muscle cesium concentration. These results suggest that the exposure to some form of radioactive material contributed to hematological changes in Fukushima monkeys. PMID:25060710

  13. PCR-Based Multiple Species Cell Counting for In Vitro Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruijie; Zhang, Junjie; Yang, X. Frank; Gregory, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes of bacterial profiles in microbial communities are strongly associated with human health. There is an increasing need for multiple species research in vitro. To avoid high cost or measurement of a limited number of species, PCR-based multiple species cell counting (PCR-MSCC) has been conceived. Species-specific sequence is defined as a unique sequence of one species in a multiple species mixed culture. This sequence is identified by comparing a random 1000 bp genomic sequence of one species with the whole genome sequences of the other species in the same artificial mixed culture. If absent in the other genomes, it is the species-specific sequence. Species-specific primers were designed based on the species-specific sequences. In the present study, ten different oral bacterial species were mixed and grown in Brain Heart Infusion Yeast Extract with 1% sucrose for 24 hours. Biofilm was harvested and processed for DNA extraction and q-PCR amplification with the species-specific primers. By comparing the q-PCR data of each species in the unknown culture with reference cultures, in which the cell number of each species was determined by colony forming units on agar plate, the cell number of that strain in the unknown mixed culture was calculated. This technique is reliable to count microorganism numbers that are less than 100,000 fold different from other species within the same culture. Theoretically, it can be used in detecting a species in a mixed culture of over 200 species. Currently PCR-MSCC is one of the most economic methods for quantifying single species cell numbers, especially for the low abundant species, in a multiple artificial mixed culture in vitro. PMID:25970462

  14. Method of detecting and counting bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W. (inventors)

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for determining bacterial levels, especially in samples of aqueous physiological fluids. The method depends on the quantitative determination of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the presence of nonbacterial ATP. The bacterial ATP is released by cell rupture and is measured by an enzymatic bioluminescent assay. A concentration technique is included to make the method more sensitive. It is particularly useful where the fluid to be measured contains an unknown or low bacteria count.

  15. Modeling HIV-1 Dynamics and the Effects of Decreasing Activated Infected T-cell Count by Filtration

    E-print Network

    Stryker, Gabrielle A.

    Modeling HIV-1 Dynamics and the Effects of Decreasing Activated Infected T-cell Count by Filtration years mathematical models have been developed using differential equations for the progression of HIV-1 such as HAART drugs. Attempts have been made to filter HIV-1 and HIV-1-infected T-cells from the blood

  16. Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering Applications

    E-print Network

    Petsche Connell, Jennifer

    Recent research has demonstrated that a population of stem cells can be isolated from amniotic fluid removed by amniocentesis that are broadly multipotent and nontumorogenic. These amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSC) ...

  17. Laboratory adverse events and discontinuation of therapy according to CD4+ cell count at the start of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sophie; Quinn, Killian; Hill, Teresa; Leen, Clifford; Walsh, John; Hay, Phillip; Fisher, Martin; Post, Frank; Nelson, Mark; Gompels, Mark; Johnson, Margaret; Chadwick, David; Gilson, Richard; Sabin, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Few data describe antiretroviral treatment (ART)-related adverse events when treatment is initiated at CD4+ cell counts more than 350?cells/?l. We compared rates of laboratory-defined adverse events (LDAEs) according to CD4+ cell count at ART initiation. Design: Analysis of on-going cohort study. Methods: ART-naive persons initiating ART from 2000 to 2010 were included. Chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal–Wallis tests compared characteristics among those starting ART with a CD4+ cell count of 350 or less, 351–499 and at least 500?cells/?l. Time-updated Poisson regression compared rates of LDAE in the three CD4+ cell strata. Cox proportional hazard models compared risk of ART discontinuation. Results: Nine thousand, four hundred and six individuals were included: median age 37 years, 61% white, 80% men, median viral load 4.8?log copies/ml. Four hundred and forty-seven (4.9%) and 1099 (11.7%) started ART with a CD4+ cell count at least 500 and 351–499?cells/?l, respectively. One thousand, two hundred and eighty-three (13.6%) patients experienced at least one LDAE. The rate of LDAE did not differ between those starting ART with a CD4+ cell count 351–499 and less than 350?cells/?l [relative rate 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74–1.09)], but an increased risk of ART discontinuation was observed (hazard ratio 1.58, 95% CI 1.10–2.27). Those starting ART at CD4+ cell count at least 500?cells/?l had an increased rate of LDAE (relative rate 1.44, 95% CI 1.13–1.82) but were not more likely to discontinue ART (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.64–2.09). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the need to consider ART-related toxicities when initiating therapy at CD4+ cell counts at least 500?cells/?l. Whilst evidence from randomized controlled trials is awaited, the timing of ART initiation in terms of benefits and risks of ART remains an important question. PMID:24583670

  18. Quantification of cell lysis during CHO bioprocesses: Impact on cell count, growth kinetics and productivity.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Heinzel, Nicole; Kroll, Paul; Brunner, Matthias; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2015-08-10

    High cell densities and high viability are critical quality attributes for mammalian bioprocesses. Determination of living and dead cell numbers is nowadays routinely performed by automated image-based cell analyzers or flow cytometry. However, complete lysis of cells is usually neglected by these devices. We present a novel method for robust quantification of lysed cell populations over the course of a CHO bioprocess. The release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and double stranded genomic DNA in culture supernatants were used as markers for cell lysis. We considered the degradation of both markers over cultivation time, which significantly increased the amount of released LDH and DNA. For correct and robust estimation of lysed cell fractions, degradation of both markers over cultivation time was considered, where redundancy of markers allowed data reconciliation. Calculating the number of cells which were subject to complete cell lysis, we could show that this fraction makes up as much as 30% of the total produced biomass and is not described by measurements of image-based analyzers. Finally, we demonstrate that disregarding cell lysis heavily affects the calculation of biomass yields and growth rates and that increasing levels of cell lysis are related to decreased productivity. PMID:25956245

  19. Time to eligibility for antiretroviral therapy in adults with CD4 cell count > 500 cells/?L in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, N; Lessells, RJ; Newell, ML

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Understanding of progression to antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility and associated factors remains limited. The objectives of this analysis were to determine the time to ART eligibility and to explore factors associated with disease progression in adults with early HIV infection. Methods HIV-infected adults (??18 years old) with CD4 cell count >?500 cells/?l were enrolled in the study at three primary health care clinics, and a sociodemographic, behavioural and partnership-level questionnaire was administered. Participants were followed 6-monthly and ART eligibility was determined using a CD4 cell count threshold of 350 cells/?l. Kaplan???Meier and Cox proportional hazard regression modelling were used in the analysis. Results A total of 206 adults contributed 381 years of follow-up; 79 (38%) reached the ART eligibility threshold. Median time to ART eligibility was shorter for male patients (12.0 months) than for female patients (33.9 months). Male sex [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 3.13; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.82–5.39], residing in a household with food shortage in the previous year (aHR 1.58; 95% CI 0.99–2.54), and taking nutritional supplements in the first 6 months after enrolment (aHR 2.06; 95% CI 1.11–3.83) were associated with shorter time to ART eligibility. Compared with reference CD4 cell count????559 cells/?l, higher CD4 cell count was associated with longer time to ART eligibility [aHR 0.46 (95% CI 0.25–0.83) for CD4 cell count 560–632 cells/?l; aHR 0.30 (95% CI 0.16–0.57) for CD4 cell count 633–768 cells/?l; and aHR 0.17 (95% CI 0.08–0.38) for CD4 cell count?>?768 cells/?l]. Conclusions Over one in three adults with CD4 cell count?>?500 cells/?l became eligible for ART at a CD4 cell count threshold of 350 cells/?l over a median of 2 years. The shorter time to ART eligibility in male patients suggests a possible need for sex-specific pre-ART care and monitoring strategies. PMID:25959724

  20. Fluid phase biopsy for detection and characterization of circulating endothelial cells in myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethel, Kelly; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Damani, Samir; Kolatkar, Anand; Lamy, Rachelle; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Topol, Sarah; Topol, Eric J.; Kuhn, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Elevated levels of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) occur in response to various pathological conditions including myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we adapted a fluid phase biopsy technology platform that successfully detects circulating tumor cells in the blood of cancer patients (HD-CTC assay), to create a high-definition circulating endothelial cell (HD-CEC) assay for the detection and characterization of CECs. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 79 MI patients, 25 healthy controls and six patients undergoing vascular surgery (VS). CECs were defined by positive staining for DAPI, CD146 and von Willebrand Factor and negative staining for CD45. In addition, CECs exhibited distinct morphological features that enable differentiation from surrounding white blood cells. CECs were found both as individual cells and as aggregates. CEC numbers were higher in MI patients compared with healthy controls. VS patients had lower CEC counts when compared with MI patients but were not different from healthy controls. Both HD-CEC and CellSearch® assays could discriminate MI patients from healthy controls with comparable accuracy but the HD-CEC assay exhibited higher specificity while maintaining high sensitivity. Our HD-CEC assay may be used as a robust diagnostic biomarker in MI patients.

  1. Counting Gene Expression in Single Cells to Identify Stem Cells | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Using a technique that can track the expression of multiple genes in a single cell, a team of investigators from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences have demonstrated that they can identify and track individual stem cells from fixed samples of intestinal tissues. The researchers believe that this approach will be useful for studying the role of stem cells in the development of cancer.

  2. Possible Prognostic and Therapeutic Significance of c-Kit Expression, Mast Cell Count and Microvessel Density in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marech, Ilaria; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequent renal tumor and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Tumor angiogenesis is known to play a crucial role in the etiopathogenesis of RCC and over the last few years an even deeper knowledge of its contribution in metastatic RCC development has led to the development of numerous molecular targeting agents (such as sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, tivozanib, and dovitinib). The above agents are principally directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) members and also against c-Kit receptor (c-KitR). The role of c-kitR inhibition on clear cell RCC (ccRCC), the main RCC subtype, is less well established. Whether c-kitR activation through its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF) contributes significantly to the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment remains to be established. It is important to underscore that the c-KitR is expressed on mast cells (MCs) and cancer cells. After an examination of the c-KitR/SCF pathway, we review here the principal studies that have evaluated c-Kit expression in RCC. Moreover, we summarize some investigations that have observed the distribution of MCs in primary renal cancer and in adjacent normal tissue with appropriate histological immunohistochemical techniques. We also focus on few studies that have evaluated the correlation between RCC proliferation, MC count and microvessel density (MVD), as hallmarks of tumor angiogenesis. Thus, the aim of this review of the literature is to clarify if c-KitR expression, MC count and MVD could have prognostic significance and the possible predictive therapeutic implications in RCC. PMID:25056544

  3. Significance of CD4+ T-cell count in the management of appendicitis in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kumiko; Saito, Kazuhiro; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of complicated appendicitis (CA) is critical to the management of appendicitis. However, previous studies have not investigated indicators of CA among patients with HIV or whether it is safe to use conservative treatment for appendicitis in these patients. Among 322 patients with appendicitis, we identified 14 who had HIV. Six of them were operated and 8 were treated with antibiotics; CA was diagnosed in 4. Patients with HIV and CA had a significantly lower CD4+ T-cell count than those with uncomplicated appendicitis. A white blood cell count lower than 7.4 × 109/L was observed exclusively in patients with CA. No patient with HIV whose appendicitis was treated conservatively died or experienced a recurrence. We discuss our findings, which suggest the possibility of conservative treatment of appendicitis in patients with HIV and identification of CA by low CD4+ T-cell count. PMID:26424690

  4. Image-based focused counting of dividing cells for non-invasive monitoring of regenerative medicine products.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kei; Miyata, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Hiroto; Kang, Siu; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Kato, Ryuji

    2015-11-01

    Despite the growing numbers of successful applications in regenerative medicine, biotechnologies for evaluating the quality of cells remain limited. To evaluate the cultured cells non-invasively, image-based cellular assessment method holds great promise. However, although there are various image-processing algorithms, very few studies have focused to prove the effectiveness of phase contrast images with risk assessment example that reflects actual difficulties in regenerative medicine products. In this study, we developed a simple image-processing method to recognize the number of dividing cells in time-course phase-contrast microscopic images, and applied this method to assess the irregular proliferation behavior in normal cells. Practically, as a model, rapid proliferating human fibrosarcoma cells were mixed in normal human fibroblasts in the same culture dish, and their sarcoma existence was evaluated. As a result, the existence of sarcoma population in normal cell sample could be feasibly detected within earliest period of cell culture by their irregular rise of accumulated counts of dividing cells. Our image-processing technique also illustrates the technical effectiveness of combining intra-frame and inter-frame image processing to accurately count only the dividing cells. Our concept of focused counting of dividing cells shows a successful example of image-based analysis to quickly and non-invasively monitor the regular state of regenerative medicine products. PMID:25921220

  5. Effect of vitamin B2 on somatic cell counts in milk of clinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Hori, H; Okada, K

    1999-05-01

    Effects of intravenous injection of Vitamin B2 (VB2) on the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductivity of peripheral blood neutrophils and the somatic cell counts (SCC) in quarter milk of Staphylococcus aureus mastitis were investigated. The NBT reductivities of neutrophils were enhanced at 2 days after single injection of VB2 (5.0 and 2.5 mg/kg), and were also enhanced at 4 days after initial injection of continuous 3 days of VB2 (2.5 mg/kg). The SCC in quarter milk were significantly decreased at 3, 7 and 14 days after initial injection of continuous 3 days of VB2 (2.5 mg/kg), however, S. aureus in the infected quarter was not cured bacteriologically by VB2 injection. PMID:10379954

  6. Effect of mycophenolate mofetil on the white blood cell count and the frequency of infection in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Ananta; Magder, Laurence S; Petri, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    Leukopenia is a common manifestation of SLE. Addition of immunosuppressive therapy in a SLE patient who is already leukopenic is a clinical concern. It could worsen leukopenia, increase the risk of infection, or both. The aim of this study was to analyze the immediate effect of mycophenolate mofetil on the white blood cell count and the rate of infection in SLE patients. Two hundred and forty-four patients within the Hopkins Lupus Cohort who were newly started on mycophenolate mofetil were included in the study. The white blood cell count and interval infection history on the day mycophenolate mofetil was started were compared with the white blood cell count and interval infection history at the next visit. The study was based on 244 patients who began taking mycophenolate mofetil in the cohort. The study population included 47 % African Americans, 44 % Caucasians, and 9 % other ethnicities. There was a slight but not statistically significant increase in the white blood cell count (6.63 vs. 7.01), after starting mycophenolate mofetil. Patients with a baseline white blood cell count <3000/mm(3) did have a statistically significant increase in the white blood cell count after starting mycophenolate mofetil (2.57 vs. 5.13, P = 0.0047). We also found a statistically significant increase in the risk of bacterial infection (but not viral infection) after starting mycophenolate mofetil (4 vs. 9 %, P = 0.0036). Leukopenia does not worsen with mycophenolate mofetil. However, mycophenolate mofetil appears to slightly increase the rate of bacterial (but not viral) infection. PMID:25836768

  7. Efficacy of optimized in vitro predegeneration period on the cell count and purity of canine Schwann cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Niapour, Nazila; Mohammadi-Ghalehbin, Behnam; Golmohammadi, Mohammad Ghasem; Amani, Mohammad; Salehi, Hossein; Niapour, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Predegeneration is a standard technique to obtain mitotically activated and enriched cultures of Schwann cells (SCs). This study, for the first time, evaluated the impact of various duration of predegeneration on cell yield and enrichment of SCs from dog peripheral nerve. Materials and Methods: Dog sural nerves were subjected to 5, 10, 15 day-long in vitro predegeneration. The total cell yield and the purity of SCs were evaluated in each group on the first and seventh day after plating. Results: The maximum and minimum numbers of cells were counted in 15 day-long predegene-ration and control groups which underwent no predegeneration. The 10 day-long in vitro predegeneration group with 80±0.5% SCs enrichment had the best purity after plating day and could maintain its purity with elapsing on cultures. Conclusion: 10 day-long predegeneration results in the higher cell number and the better and prolonged purity of SCs in culture. PMID:25945245

  8. A robust cell counting approach based on a normalized 2D cross-correlation scheme for in-line holographic images.

    PubMed

    Ra, Ho-Kyeong; Kim, Hyungseok; Yoon, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyuk; Park, Taejoon; Moon, Sangjun

    2013-09-01

    To achieve the important aims of identifying and marking disease progression, cell counting is crucial for various biological and medical procedures, especially in a Point-Of-Care (POC) setting. In contrast to the conventional manual method of counting cells, a software-based approach provides improved reliability, faster speeds, and greater ease of use. We present a novel software-based approach to count in-line holographic cell images using the calculation of a normalized 2D cross-correlation. This enables fast, computationally-efficient pattern matching between a set of cell library images and the test image. Our evaluation results show that the proposed system is capable of quickly counting cells whilst reliably and accurately following human counting capability. Our novel approach is 5760 times faster than manual counting and provides at least 68% improved accuracy compared to other image processing algorithms. PMID:23839256

  9. Probing the nanoscale viscoelasticity of intracellular fluids in living cells.

    PubMed

    Guigas, Gernot; Kalla, Claudia; Weiss, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    We have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to determine the anomalous diffusion properties of fluorescently tagged gold beads in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of living cells. From the extracted mean-square displacement v(tau) approximately tau(alpha), we have determined the complex shear modulus G(omega) approximately omega(alpha) for both compartments. Without treatment, all tested cell lines showed a strong viscoelastic behavior of the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm, highlighting the crowdedness of these intracellular fluids. We also found a similar viscoelastic response in frog egg extract, which tended toward a solely viscous behavior upon dilution. When cells were osmotically stressed, the diffusion became less anomalous and the viscoelastic response changed. In particular, the anomality changed from alpha approximately 0.55 to alpha approximately 0.66, which indicates that the Zimm model for polymer solutions under varying solvent conditions is a good empirical description of the material properties of the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm. Since osmotic stress may eventually trigger cell death, we propose, on the basis of our observations, that intracellular fluids are maintained in a state similar to crowded polymer solutions under good solvent conditions to keep the cell viable. PMID:17416631

  10. Multilineage Potential Research of Bovine Amniotic Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuhua; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuhua; Hua, Jinlian; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The use of amnion and amniotic fluid (AF) are abundant sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can be harvested at low cost and do not pose ethical conflicts. In human and veterinary research, stem cells derived from these tissues are promising candidates for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity, and high anti-inflammatory potential. This work aimed to obtain and characterize bovine amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC). The bovine AF from the amniotic cavity of pregnant gilts in the early stages of gestation (3- and 4-m-old bovine embryos) was collected. AFMSCs exhibit a fibroblastic-like morphology only starting from the fourth passage, being heterogeneous during the primary culture. Immunofluorescence results showed that AFMSCs were positive for ?-integrin, CD44, CD73 and CD166, but negative for CD34, CD45. Meanwhile, AFMSCs expressed ES cell markers, such as Oct4, and when appropriately induced, are capable of differentiating into ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. This study reinforces the emerging importance of these cells as ideal tools in veterinary medicine; future studies aimed at a deeper evaluation of their immunological properties will allow a better understanding of their role in cellular therapy. PMID:24590129

  11. Multilineage potential research of bovine amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuhua; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuhua; Hua, Jinlian; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The use of amnion and amniotic fluid (AF) are abundant sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can be harvested at low cost and do not pose ethical conflicts. In human and veterinary research, stem cells derived from these tissues are promising candidates for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity, and high anti-inflammatory potential. This work aimed to obtain and characterize bovine amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC). The bovine AF from the amniotic cavity of pregnant gilts in the early stages of gestation (3- and 4-m-old bovine embryos) was collected. AFMSCs exhibit a fibroblastic-like morphology only starting from the fourth passage, being heterogeneous during the primary culture. Immunofluorescence results showed that AFMSCs were positive for ?-integrin, CD44, CD73 and CD166, but negative for CD34, CD45. Meanwhile, AFMSCs expressed ES cell markers, such as Oct4, and when appropriately induced, are capable of differentiating into ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. This study reinforces the emerging importance of these cells as ideal tools in veterinary medicine; future studies aimed at a deeper evaluation of their immunological properties will allow a better understanding of their role in cellular therapy. PMID:24590129

  12. Use of total and differential somatic cell counts from composite milk samples to detect mastitis in individual cows.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, I R; Meek, A H; Martin, S W; Barnum, D A

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the value of variables measured on composite milk samples as predictors of mastitis in individual cows. The standard of comparison was the results obtained from the bacteriological examination of individual quarter foremilk samples. Cows were classified as negative or positive with regard to mastitis on the basis of one quarter sampling only and cows which were impossible to classify in this manner were omitted from subsequent analyses. The variables that were examined were: the presence or absence of specific bacteria, demographic data, and logarithmically transformed total somatic cell counts and percentages of cell volume in channels 7 through 12 of a Coulter Counter. It was found that the inclusion of all variables resulted in correct classification of 95.9% of cows with regard to their mastitis status. Sequential elimination of individual variables or groups of variables in an attempt to simplify the procedure reduced the correct classification to 86.8% when only the log transformation of the total somatic cell count and the demographic data were included. The ability of a function which included the logarithm of the total somatic cell count, the logarithm of the percentage in channel 8 and demographic data, to classify cows was examined in detail and the sensitivity and specificity of the function also discussed. It is also shown that with increasing age the minimum total somatic cell count required to classify a cow as positive increased and possible explanations of this phenomenon are discussed. PMID:7272844

  13. Detection of cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells and its clinical relevance in leptomeningeal metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Sun; Melisko, Michelle E; Magbanua, Mark Jesus M; Kablanian, Andrea T; Scott, Janet H; Rugo, Hope S; Park, John W

    2015-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells are commonly observed in the peripheral blood of advanced breast cancer patients. We tested the feasibility of tumor cell detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and studied its clinical relevance in leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) of breast cancer. CSF samples were collected from 38 metastatic breast cancer patients known or suspected to have LM. Control CSF samples were collected from 14 individuals without solid tumor malignancy. We used a modified CellSearch™ assay and an alternative EPCAM-based method involving immunomagnetic enrichment followed by flow cytometry (IE/FC) to enumerate CSF tumor cells (CSFTCs). CSFTCs were assayed at time of LM diagnosis and over the course of LM-directed therapy. We analyzed a total of 102 CSF samples with modified CellSearch™. The CSFTC counts were strongly correlated with the corresponding IE/FC results (Pearson's r = 0.94). Twenty-eight out of 30 samples in which malignant cells were identified by CSF cytology were CSFTC-positive by modified CellSearch™. Baseline CSFTC levels from 21 patients eventually diagnosed with LM were significantly higher than the controls (p = 0.0202), whereas 13 patients deemed not to have LM showed CSFTC results indistinguishable from the controls. In patients with serial samples, it was possible to monitor CSFTC levels as a potential biomarker of treatment response. CSFTC detection using a modified CellSearch™ assay demonstrated high sensitivity in detecting malignant cells in CSF and may be a promising method for diagnosing LM and monitoring LM during treatment. PMID:26520840

  14. Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Shigehisa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Kishi, Tomoya; Makino, Junichi; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed. The present findings show that fluid flow stress exerts a prolonged bioactive effect on mesothelial cells after termination of fluid streaming. These findings support the hypothesis that a history of PD for a certain period could serve as a trigger of EPS after stoppage of PD.

  15. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-quare test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can yield good results for calculating the percentage of each typical normal RBC shape in a reconstructed phase image of multiple RBCs that will be favorable to the analysis of RBC-related diseases. In addition, we show that the discrimination performance for the counting of normal shapes of RBCs can be improved by using 3-D features of an RBC. PMID:25567613

  16. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can yield good results for calculating the percentage of each typical normal RBC shape in a reconstructed phase image of multiple RBCs that will be favorable to the analysis of RBC-related diseases. In addition, we show that the discrimination performance for the counting of normal shapes of RBCs can be improved by using 3-D features of an RBC.

  17. Cell detection and counting through cell lysate impedance spectroscopy in microfluidic devices{

    E-print Network

    Bashir, Rashid

    ´guez,*de Mehmet Toner*a and Rashid Bashir*b Received 3rd April 2007, Accepted 17th April 2007 First published-fluidic and quantifying cell number, can serve as a single use cartridge for a hand-held instrument to provide simple

  18. Fluid models and simulations of biological cell phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenspan, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of coated droplets are examined within the context of biofluids. Of specific interest is the manner in which the shape of a droplet, the motion within it as well as that of aggregates of droplets can be controlled by the modulation of surface properties and the extent to which such fluid phenomena are an intrinsic part of cellular processes. From the standpoint of biology, an objective is to elucidate some of the general dynamical features that affect the disposition of an entire cell, cell colonies and tissues. Conventionally averaged field variables of continuum mechanics are used to describe the overall global effects which result from the myriad of small scale molecular interactions. An attempt is made to establish cause and effect relationships from correct dynamical laws of motion rather than by what may have been unnecessary invocation of metabolic or life processes. Several topics are discussed where there are strong analogies droplets and cells including: encapsulated droplets/cell membranes; droplet shape/cell shape; adhesion and spread of a droplet/cell motility and adhesion; and oams and multiphase flows/cell aggregates and tissues. Evidence is presented to show that certain concepts of continuum theory such as suface tension, surface free energy, contact angle, bending moments, etc. are relevant and applicable to the study of cell biology.

  19. Consequence of alternative standards for bulk tank somatic cell count of dairy herds in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of dairy operations failing compliance with current US and European Union (EU) standards for bulk-tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) as well as BTSCC standards proposed by 3 national organizations were evaluated using 2 populations of US dairy herds: Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHI) ...

  20. A cell-based sensor of fluid shear stress for microfluidics

    E-print Network

    Varma, Sarvesh

    2013-01-01

    Fluid flow is an essential feature of every microsystem involving cell handling, culture or sorting. The particular application determines the relevant flow rates used in a device. Flows inevitably generate fluid shear ...

  1. Rapid, Precise, and Accurate Counts of Symbiodinium Cells Using the Guava Flow Cytometer, and a Comparison to Other Methods.

    PubMed

    Krediet, Cory J; DeNofrio, Jan C; Caruso, Carlo; Burriesci, Matthew S; Cella, Kristen; Pringle, John R

    2015-01-01

    In studies of both the establishment and breakdown of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, it is often necessary to determine the number of Symbiodinium cells relative to the quantity of host tissue. Ideally, the methods used should be rapid, precise, and accurate. In this study, we systematically evaluated methods for sample preparation and storage and the counting of algal cells using the hemocytometer, a custom image-analysis program for automated counting of the fluorescent algal cells, the Coulter Counter, or the Millipore Guava flow-cytometer. We found that although other methods may have value in particular applications, for most purposes, the Guava flow cytometer provided by far the best combination of precision, accuracy, and efficient use of investigator time (due to the instrument's automated sample handling), while also allowing counts of algal numbers over a wide range and in small volumes of tissue homogenate. We also found that either of two assays of total homogenate protein provided a precise and seemingly accurate basis for normalization of algal counts to the total amount of holobiont tissue. PMID:26291447

  2. Rapid, Precise, and Accurate Counts of Symbiodinium Cells Using the Guava Flow Cytometer, and a Comparison to Other Methods

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Carlo; Burriesci, Matthew S.; Cella, Kristen; Pringle, John R.

    2015-01-01

    In studies of both the establishment and breakdown of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, it is often necessary to determine the number of Symbiodinium cells relative to the quantity of host tissue. Ideally, the methods used should be rapid, precise, and accurate. In this study, we systematically evaluated methods for sample preparation and storage and the counting of algal cells using the hemocytometer, a custom image-analysis program for automated counting of the fluorescent algal cells, the Coulter Counter, or the Millipore Guava flow-cytometer. We found that although other methods may have value in particular applications, for most purposes, the Guava flow cytometer provided by far the best combination of precision, accuracy, and efficient use of investigator time (due to the instrument's automated sample handling), while also allowing counts of algal numbers over a wide range and in small volumes of tissue homogenate. We also found that either of two assays of total homogenate protein provided a precise and seemingly accurate basis for normalization of algal counts to the total amount of holobiont tissue. PMID:26291447

  3. Using BD Vacutainer CD4 Stabilization Tubes for Absolute Cluster of Differentiation Type 4 Cell Count Measurement on BD FacsCount and Partec Cyflow Cytometers: A Method Comparison Study from Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Florian; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Bernasconi, Andrea; Moyo, Buhlebenkosi; Havazvidi, Liberty; Bastard, Mathieu; Flevaud, Laurence; Taziwa, Fabian; Makondo, Eliphas; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood collected in conventional EDTA tubes requires laboratory analysis within 48 hours to provide valid CD4 cell count results. This restricts access to HIV care for patients from rural areas in resource-constraint settings due to sample transportation problems. Stabilization Tubes with extended storage duration have been developed but not yet evaluated comprehensively. Objective To investigate stability of absolute CD4 cell count measurement of samples in BD Vacutainer CD4 Stabilization Tubes over the course of 30 days. Methods This was a laboratory-based method comparison study conducted at a rural district hospital in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe. Whole peripheral blood from 88 HIV positive adults was drawn into BD Vacutainer CD4 Stabilization Tubes and re-tested 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 30 days after collection on BD FacsCount and Partec Cyflow cytometers in parallel. Absolute CD4 cell levels were compared to results from paired samples in EDTA tubes analysed on BD FacsCount at the day of sample collection (references methodology). Bland-Altman analysis based on ratios of the median CD4 counts was used, with acceptable variation ranges for Limits of Agreements of +/-20%. Results Differences in ratios of the medians remained below 10% until day 21 on BD FacsCount and until day 5 on Partec Cyflow. Variations of Limits of Agreement were beyond 20% after day 1 on both cytometers. Specimen quality decreased steadily after day 5, with only 68% and 40% of samples yielding results on BD FacsCount and Partec Cyflow at day 21, respectively. Conclusions We do not recommend the use of BD Vacutainer CD4 Stabilization Tubes for absolute CD4 cell count measurement on BD FacsCount or Partec Cyflow due to large variation of results and decay of specimen quality. Alternative technologies for enhanced CD4 testing in settings with limited laboratory and sample transportation capacity still need to be developed. PMID:26295802

  4. Quantification of Cells with Specific Phenotypes I: Determination of CD4+ Cell Count Per Microliter in Reconstituted Lyophilized Human PBMC Prelabeled with Anti-CD4 FITC Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Stebbings, Richard; Wang, Lili; Sutherland, Janet; Kammel, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; John, Manuela; Roemer, Bodo; Kuhne, Maren; Schneider, Rudolf J; Braun, Michael; Engel, Andrea; Dikshit, Dinesh K; Abbasi, Fatima; Marti, Gerald E; Paola Sassi, Maria; Revel, Laura; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Baradez, Marc-Olivier; Lekishvili, Tamara; Marshall, Damian; Whitby, Liam; Jing, Wang; Ost, Volker; Vonsky, Maxim; Neukammer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A surface-labeled lyophilized lymphocyte (sLL) preparation has been developed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells prelabeled with a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. The sLL preparation is intended to be used as a reference material for CD4+ cell counting including the development of higher order reference measurement procedures and has been evaluated in the pilot study CCQM-P102. This study was conducted across 16 laboratories from eight countries to assess the ability of participants to quantify the CD4+ cell count of this reference material and to document cross-laboratory variability plus associated measurement uncertainties. Twelve different flow cytometer platforms were evaluated using a standard protocol that included calibration beads used to obtain quantitative measurements of CD4+ T cell counts. There was good overall cross-platform and counting method agreement with a grand mean of the laboratory calculated means of (301.7 ± 4.9) ?L?1 CD4+ cells. Excluding outliers, greater than 90% of participant data agreed within ±15%. A major contribution to variation of sLL CD4+ cell counts was tube to tube variation of the calibration beads, amounting to an uncertainty of 3.6%. Variation due to preparative steps equated to an uncertainty of 2.6%. There was no reduction in variability when data files were centrally reanalyzed. Remaining variation was attributed to instrument specific differences. CD4+ cell counts obtained in CCQM-P102 are in excellent agreement and show the robustness of both the measurements and the data analysis and hence the suitability of sLL as a reference material for interlaboratory comparisons and external quality assessment. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25655255

  5. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  6. V?9V?2 T-Cell Polyfunctionality Is Differently Modulated in HAART-Treated HIV Patients according to CD4 T-Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Casetti, Rita; De Simone, Gabriele; Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Viola, Domenico; Agrati, Chiara; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Tumino, Nicola; Besi, Francesca; Martini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of ?? T-cell distribution and function in peripheral blood is among the earliest defects during HIV-infection. We asked whether the polyfunctional response could also be affected, and how this impairment could be associated to CD4 T-cell count. To this aim, we performed a cross-sectional study on HIV-infected individuals. In order to evaluate the polyfunctional-V?9V?2 T-cell response after phosphoantigen-stimulation, we assessed the cytokine/chemokine production and cytotoxicity by flow-cytometry in HAART-treated-HIV+ persons and healthy-donors. During HIV-infection V?9V?2-polyfunctional response quality is affected, since several V?9V?2 T-cell subsets resulted significantly lower in HIV+ patients in respect to healthy donors. Interestingly, we found a weak positive correlation between V?9V?2 T-cell-response and CD4 T-cell counts. By dividing the HIV+ patients according to CD4 T-cell count, we found that Low-CD4 patients expressed a lower number of two V?9V?2 T-cell subsets expressing MIP-1? in different combinations with other molecules (CD107a/IFN?) in respect to High-CD4 individuals. Our results show that the V?9V?2 T-cell-response quality in Low-CD4 patients is specifically affected, suggesting a direct link between innate V?9V?2 T-cells and CD4 T-cell count. These findings suggest that V?9V?2 T-cell quality may be indirectly influenced by HAART therapy and could be included in a new therapeutical strategy which would perform an important role in fighting HIV infection. PMID:26161861

  7. V?9V?2 T-Cell Polyfunctionality Is Differently Modulated in HAART-Treated HIV Patients according to CD4 T-Cell Count.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Rita; De Simone, Gabriele; Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Viola, Domenico; Agrati, Chiara; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Tumino, Nicola; Besi, Francesca; Martini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of ?? T-cell distribution and function in peripheral blood is among the earliest defects during HIV-infection. We asked whether the polyfunctional response could also be affected, and how this impairment could be associated to CD4 T-cell count. To this aim, we performed a cross-sectional study on HIV-infected individuals. In order to evaluate the polyfunctional-V?9V?2 T-cell response after phosphoantigen-stimulation, we assessed the cytokine/chemokine production and cytotoxicity by flow-cytometry in HAART-treated-HIV+ persons and healthy-donors. During HIV-infection V?9V?2-polyfunctional response quality is affected, since several V?9V?2 T-cell subsets resulted significantly lower in HIV+ patients in respect to healthy donors. Interestingly, we found a weak positive correlation between V?9V?2 T-cell-response and CD4 T-cell counts. By dividing the HIV+ patients according to CD4 T-cell count, we found that Low-CD4 patients expressed a lower number of two V?9V?2 T-cell subsets expressing MIP-1? in different combinations with other molecules (CD107a/IFN?) in respect to High-CD4 individuals. Our results show that the V?9V?2 T-cell-response quality in Low-CD4 patients is specifically affected, suggesting a direct link between innate V?9V?2 T-cells and CD4 T-cell count. These findings suggest that V?9V?2 T-cell quality may be indirectly influenced by HAART therapy and could be included in a new therapeutical strategy which would perform an important role in fighting HIV infection. PMID:26161861

  8. Effect of sensor systems for cow management on milk production, somatic cell count, and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Steeneveld, W; Vernooij, J C M; Hogeveen, H

    2015-06-01

    To improve management on dairy herds, sensor systems have been developed that can measure physiological, behavioral, and production indicators on individual cows. It is not known whether using sensor systems also improves measures of health and production in dairy herds. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of using sensor systems on measures of health and production in dairy herds. Data of 414 Dutch dairy farms with (n=152) and without (n=262) sensor systems were available. For these herds, information on milk production per cow, days to first service, first calving age, and somatic cell count (SCC) was provided for the years 2003 to 2013. Moreover, year of investment in sensor systems was available. For every farm year, we determined whether that year was before or after the year of investment in sensor systems on farms with an automatic milking system (AMS) or a conventional milking system (CMS), or whether it was a year on a farm that never invested in sensor systems. Separate statistical analyses were performed to determine the effect of sensor systems for mastitis detection (color, SCC, electrical conductivity, and lactate dehydrogenase sensors), estrus detection for dairy cows, estrus detection for young stock, and other sensor systems (weighing platform, rumination time sensor, fat and protein sensor, temperature sensor, milk temperature sensor, urea sensor, ?-hydroxybutyrate sensor, and other sensor systems). The AMS farms had a higher average SCC (by 12,000 cells/mL) after sensor investment, and CMS farms with a mastitis detection system had a lower average SCC (by 10,000 cells/mL) in the years after sensor investment. Having sensor systems was associated with a higher average production per cow on AMS farms, and with a lower average production per cow on CMS farms in the years after investment. The most likely reason for this lower milk production after investment was that on 96% of CMS farms, the sensor system investment occurred together with another major change at the farm, such as a new barn or a new milking system. Most likely, these other changes had led to a decrease in milk production that could not be compensated for by the use of sensor systems. Having estrus detection sensor systems did not improve reproduction performance. Labor reduction was an important reason for investing in sensor systems. Therefore, economic benefits from investments in sensor systems can be expected more from the reduction in labor costs than from improvements in measures of health and production in dairy herds. PMID:25841965

  9. ELISPOTs Produced by CD8 and CD4 Cells Follow Log Normal Size Distribution Permitting Objective Counting

    PubMed Central

    Karulin, Alexey Y.; Karacsony, Kinga; Zhang, Wenji; Targoni, Oleg S.; Moldovan, Ioana; Dittrich, Marcus; Sundararaman, Srividya; Lehmann, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Each positive well in ELISPOT assays contains spots of variable sizes that can range from tens of micrometers up to a millimeter in diameter. Therefore, when it comes to counting these spots the decision on setting the lower and the upper spot size thresholds to discriminate between non-specific background noise, spots produced by individual T cells, and spots formed by T cell clusters is critical. If the spot sizes follow a known statistical distribution, precise predictions on minimal and maximal spot sizes, belonging to a given T cell population, can be made. We studied the size distributional properties of IFN-?, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-17 spots elicited in ELISPOT assays with PBMC from 172 healthy donors, upon stimulation with 32 individual viral peptides representing defined HLA Class I-restricted epitopes for CD8 cells, and with protein antigens of CMV and EBV activating CD4 cells. A total of 334 CD8 and 80 CD4 positive T cell responses were analyzed. In 99.7% of the test cases, spot size distributions followed Log Normal function. These data formally demonstrate that it is possible to establish objective, statistically validated parameters for counting T cell ELISPOTs. PMID:25612115

  10. Cluster of differentiation 4+ cell count mean value, reference range and its influencing factors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-seronegative pregnant women in Lagos

    PubMed Central

    Akinbami, A. A.; Dosunmu, A. O.; Adediran, A.; Adewunmi, A. A.; Rabiu, K. A.; Osunkalu, V.; Ajibola, S.; Uche, E. I.; Adelekan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Immunity in pregnancy is physiologically compromised and this may affect cluster of differentiation four (CD4) count levels. It is well established that several factors affect CD4 count level in pregnancy. This study aims to determine the effects of maternal age, gestational age, parity and level of education as they influence CD4 count in pregnancy and also to determine the mean and reference range of CD4 count in pregnancy in Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out at Ante-natal clinics in Lagos State, Nigeria. About 5 mls of blood was collected into Ethylene Diamine Tetracetic Acid (EDTA) bottles from HIV-negative pregnant women in various gestational ages of pregnancy. CD4+ cell count and full blood count of all samples were done within 3 hours of collection. The descriptive data was given as means ± standard deviation (SD). Pearson's chi-squared test and correlation were used for analytical assessment. Results: A total of 74 pregnant women were recruited. The age range was 19–41 years and a mean age of 30.42 ± 5.34 years. The CD4+ cell count was not statistically significant when compared with participants ages P = 0.417, neither with gestational ages P = 0.323, nor with parity P = 0.247 nor level of education P = 0.96. An overall mean CD4+ cell count was 771.96 ± 250 cells/?l and the range was 193–1370 cells/?l. Conclusion: Maternal age, gestational age, parity and level of education had no significant effects on CD4+ cell count levels in pregnancy. The mean CD4+ cell count of HIV-negative pregnant women in Lagos is 771.96 ± 250 cells/?l. PMID:24791043

  11. Determination of the abundance of cosmic matter via the cell count moments of the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Marinoni, C.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate that accurate and precise information about the matter content of the universe can be retrieved via a simple cell count analysis of the 3D spatial distribution of galaxies. A new clustering statistic, the galaxy clustering ratio?, is the key to this process. This is defined as the ratio between one- and two-point second-order moments of the smoothed galaxy density distribution. The distinguishing feature of this statistic is its universality: on large cosmic scales both galaxies (in redshift space) and mass (in real space) display the same ? amplitude. This quantity, in addition, does not evolve as a function of redshift. As a consequence, the ? statistic provides insight into characteristic parameters of the real-space power spectrum of mass density fluctuations without the need to specify the galaxy biasing function, neither a model for galaxy redshift distortions, nor the growing mode of density ripples. We demonstrate the method with the luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample extracted from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 7 (DR7) catalogue. Taking weak (flat) priors of the curvature of the universe (?k) and of the constant value of the dark energy equation of state (w), and strong (Gaussian) priors of the physical baryon density ?bh2, of the Hubble constant H0, and of the spectral index of primordial density perturbations ns, we estimate the abundance of matter with a relative error of 8% (?m=0.283±0.023). We expect that this approach will be instrumental in searching for evidence of new physics beyond the standard model of cosmology and in planning future redshift surveys, such as BigBOSS or EUCLID.

  12. Decreased white blood cell counts in semiconductor manufacturing workers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Luo, J; Hsieh, L; Chang, M; Hsu, K

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the systematic health effects on the liver, kidney, and haematological function tests of workers in semiconductors in Taiwan. Methods: 926 workers of a semiconductor plant in Taiwan in July 1995 were investigated. Complete blood tests including liver, kidney, and haematological functions were available from 227 workers. Results: There was a significantly lower mean (SD) white blood cell (WBC) count in male workers of photolithography (5870 (1190)/mm3, p=0.003) and implantation (6190 (1150)/mm3, p=0.018) than that of male control workers (7350 (1660)/mm3). There was a significantly higher prevalence of leukopenia in male photolithography workers (6 of 20; 30%) than in male control workers (1 of 18; 5.6%), the crude odds ratio (OR) was 7.3 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1 to 55.6), and the multivariate adjusted OR was 8.1 (95% CI 0.83 to 78.3). The tests for serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), ? glutamyl transferase (RGT), and creatinine were not significant among male workers. Female workers in photolithography had abnormal SGPT and RGT of borderline significance, the multivariate adjusted ORs were 9.6 (95% CI 0.86 to 107) and 6.35 (95% CI 0.53 to 75.8), respectively. Conclusions: This study suggests that leukopenia is a potential health effect in male fabrication workers of the semiconductor industry. The tasks of the process, maintenance, and equipment engineers which consisted mostly of men put them at risk for intermittent short term peak exposure to glycol ethers, ionising radiation, arsenic, or other toxins. The findings of this medical surveillance are significant; however, a further investigation of the aetiological factors and the subsequent health effects is necessary. PMID:11836468

  13. Affordable CD4(+) T-cell counts on 'single-platform' flow cytometers I. Primary CD4 gating.

    PubMed

    Janossy, G; Jani, I; Göhde, W

    2000-12-01

    Here, we demonstrate the flow cytometric concept of 'primary CD4 gating' utilizing three different CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) conjugated with five different fluorochromes. CD4(+) lymphocytes were defined by an autogate in a single histogram of CD4 fluorescence intensity (FI) (y-axis) vs. side light scatter (x-axis). A wide range of absolute counts for > 600 individuals, including HIV(+) patients, were compared with those obtained by 'state-of-the-art' single-platform flow cytometers such as the volumetric Ortho CytoronAbsolute and the Becton Dickinson FACSCalibur using TruCount beads. The correlation between CD4 counts obtained with primary CD4 gating and the full test panel on the Ortho Cytoron was excellent (R(2) = 0.999). Bland-Altman statistics showed a mean difference of -2 cells/mm(3) [confidence interval (CI) 95% = -3 to -1; limits of agreement -27 to +23]. In addition to absolute CD4 counts, CD4% values and CD4/CD8 ratios are also frequently requested. To obtain these, lymphocytes need to be counted using scatter gates, and a second tube stained with a CD8 mAb to count CD8(++) lymphocytes can be incorporated. We conclude that primary CD4 gating on single-platform volumetric flow cytometers is one of the most economical and flexible technologies for routine cost-conscious service work, particularly during the follow-up of patients undergoing anti-HIV therapy and/or vaccination in the developing world. PMID:11167762

  14. A Mini Overview of Isolation, Characterization and Application of Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh-Ghalehaziz, Shiva; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Fathi, Ezzatollah; Pashaiasl, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid represents rich sources of stem cells that can be used in treatments for a wide range of diseases. Amniotic fluid- stem cells have properties intermediate between embryonic and adult mesenchymal stem cells which make them particularly attractive for cellular regeneration and tissue engineering. Furthermore, scientists are interested in these cells because they come from the amniotic fluid that is routinely discarded after birth. In this review we give a brief introduction of amniotic fluid followed by a description of the cells present within this fluid and aim to summarize the all existing isolation methods, culturing, characterization and application of these cells. Finally, we elaborate on the differentiation and potential for these cells to promote regeneration of various tissue defects, including fetal tissue, the nervous system, heart, lungs, kidneys, bones, and cartilage in the form of table. PMID:26634059

  15. A Mini Overview of Isolation, Characterization and Application of Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh-Ghalehaziz, Shiva; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Fathi, Ezzatollah; Pashaiasl, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    Amniotic fluid represents rich sources of stem cells that can be used in treatments for a wide range of diseases. Amniotic fluid- stem cells have properties intermediate between embryonic and adult mesenchymal stem cells which make them particularly attractive for cellular regeneration and tissue engineering. Furthermore, scientists are interested in these cells because they come from the amniotic fluid that is routinely discarded after birth. In this review we give a brief introduction of amniotic fluid followed by a description of the cells present within this fluid and aim to summarize the all existing isolation methods, culturing, characterization and application of these cells. Finally, we elaborate on the differentiation and potential for these cells to promote regeneration of various tissue defects, including fetal tissue, the nervous system, heart, lungs, kidneys, bones, and cartilage in the form of table. PMID:26634059

  16. Neuronal cell differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells originating from canine amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Yu, Jung; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Keun Jung; Han, Kil-Woo; Park, Kang-Sun; Lee, Dong-Soo; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-04-01

    The amniotic fluid contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and can be readily available for tissue engineering. Regenerative treatments such as tissue engineering, cell therapy, and transplantation show potential in clinical trials of degenerative diseases. Disease presentation and clinical responses in the Canis familiaris not only are physiologically similar to human compared with other traditional mammalian models but is also a suitable model for human diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether canine amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (cAF-MSCs) can differentiate into neural precursor cells in vitro when exposed to neural induction reagent. During neural differentiation, cAF-MSCs progressively acquire neuron-like morphology. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of neural-specific genes, such as NEFL, NSE, and TUBB3 (?III-tubulin) dramatically increased in the differentiated cAF-MSCs after induction. In addition, protein expression levels of nestin, ?III-tubulin, and tyrosine hydroxylase remarkably increased in differentiated cAF-MSCs. This study demonstrates that cAF-MSCs have great potential for neural precursor differentiation in vitro. Therefore, amniotic fluid may be a suitable alternative source of stem cells and can be applied to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24166061

  17. A microchip approach for practical label-free CD4+ T-cell counting of HIV-infected subjects in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Irimia, Daniel; Dixon, Meredith; Ziperstein, Joshua C; Demirci, Utkan; Zamir, Lee; Tompkins, Ronald G; Toner, Mehmet; Rodriguez, William R

    2007-07-01

    Simple affordable CD4 cell counting is urgently needed to stage and monitor HIV-infected patients in resource-limited settings. To address the limitations of current approaches, we designed a simple, label-free, and cost-effective CD4 cell counting device using microfluidic technology. We previously described the fabrication of a microfluidic system for high-efficiency isolation of pure populations of CD4+ T cells based on cell affinity chromatography operated under controlled flow. Here, we compare the performance of a microfluidic CD4 cell counting device against standard flow cytometry in 49 HIV-positive subjects over a wide range of absolute CD4 cell counts. We observed a close correlation between CD4 cell counts from the microchip device and measurements by flow cytometry, using unprocessed whole blood from HIV-positive adult subjects. Sensitivities for distinguishing clinically relevant thresholds of 200, 350, and 500 cells/microL are 0.86, 0.90, and 0.97, respectively. Specificity is 0.94 or higher at all thresholds. This device can serve as a functional cartridge for fast, accurate, affordable, and simple CD4 cell counting in resource-limited settings. PMID:17414933

  18. Lymphatic vessel development: fluid flow and valve-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Kume, Tsutomu

    2015-08-01

    Hemodynamic forces regulate many aspects of blood vessel disease and development, including susceptibility to atherosclerosis and remodeling of primary blood vessels into a mature vascular network. Vessels of the lymphatic circulatory system are also subjected to fluid flow-associated forces, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which these forces regulate the formation and maintenance of lymphatic vessels remain largely uncharacterized. This issue of the JCI includes two articles that begin to address how fluid flow influences lymphatic vessel development and function. Sweet et al. demonstrate that lymph flow is essential for the remodeling of primary lymphatic vessels, for ensuring the proper distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and for the development and maturation of lymphatic valves. Kazenwadel et al. show that flow-induced lymphatic valve development is initiated by the upregulation of GATA2, which has been linked to lymphedema in patients with Emberger syndrome. Together, these observations and future studies inspired by these results have potential to lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of lymphatic disorders. PMID:26214518

  19. Spontaneous Activity of Cochlear Hair Cells Triggered by Fluid Secretion Mechanism in Adjacent Support Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl(-) efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. Release of Cl(-) from ISCs also forces K(+) efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that supporting cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  20. Monitoring individual cow udder health in automated milking systems using online somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, L P; Bjerring, M; Løvendahl, P

    2016-01-01

    This study presents and validates a detection and monitoring model for mastitis based on automated frequent sampling of online cell count (OCC). Initially, data were filtered and adjusted for sensor drift and skewed distribution using ln-transformation. Acceptable data were passed on to a time-series model using double exponential smoothing to estimate level and trends at cow level. The OCC levels and trends were converted to a continuous (0-1) scale, termed elevated mastitis risk (EMR), where values close to zero indicate healthy cow status and values close to 1 indicate high risk of mastitis. Finally, a feedback loop was included to dynamically request a time to next sample, based on latest EMR values or errors in the raw data stream. The estimated EMR values were used to issue 2 types of alerts, new and (on-going) intramammary infection (IMI) alerts. The new alerts were issued when the EMR values exceeded a threshold, and the IMI alerts were issued for subsequent alerts. New alerts were only issued after the EMR had been below the threshold for at least 8d. The detection model was evaluated using time-window analysis and commercial herd data (6 herds, 595,927 milkings) at different sampling intensities. Recorded treatments of mastitis were used as gold standard. Significantly higher EMR values were detected in treated than in contemporary untreated cows. The proportion of detected mastitis cases using new alerts was between 28.0 and 43.1% and highest for a fixed sampling scheme aiming at 24h between measurements. This was higher for IMI alerts, between 54.6 and 89.0%, and highest when all available measurements were used. The lowest false alert rate of 6.5 per 1,000 milkings was observed when all measurements were used. The results showed that a dynamic sampling scheme with a default value of 24h between measurements gave only a small reduction in proportion of detected mastitis treatments and remained at 88.5%. It was concluded that filtering of raw data combined with a time-series model was effective in detecting and monitoring mastitis status in dairy cows when based on IMI alerts, and by using a dynamically adjusting sampling scheme almost full performance was still obtainable. However, results were less desirable when based on new alerts most likely because of the used gold standard for mastitis, which may not necessarily reflect the onset of and IMI case in contrast to a new alert. PMID:26547650

  1. MEASUREMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND FLOW-CELL SCINTILLATION COUNTING WITH PULSE SHAPE DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Fjeld; T.A. DeVol; J.D. Leyba

    2000-03-30

    Radiological characterization and monitoring is an important component of environmental management activities throughout the Department of Energy complex. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is the technology most often used for the detection of radionuclides. However, radionuclides which cannot easily be detected by gamma-ray spectroscopy, such as pure beta emitters and transuranics, pose special problems because their quantification generally requires labor intensive radiochemical separations procedures that are time consuming and impractical for field applications. This project focused on a technology for measuring transuranics and pure beta emitters relatively quickly and has the potential of being field deployable. The technology combines ion exchange liquid chromatography and on-line alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating scintillation counting to produce simultaneous alpha and beta chromatograms. The basic instrumentation upon which the project was based was purchased in the early 1990's. In its original commercial form, the instrumentation was capable of separating select activation/fission products in ionic forms from relatively pure aqueous samples. We subsequently developed the capability of separating and detecting actinides (thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) in less than 30 minutes (Reboul, 1993) and realized that the potential time savings over traditional radiochemical methods for isolating some of these radionuclides was significant. However, at that time, the technique had only been used for radionuclide concentrations that were considerably above environmental levels and for aqueous samples of relatively high chemical purity. For the technique to be useful in environmental applications, development work was needed in lowering detection limits; to be useful in applications involving non-aqueous matrices such as soils and sludges or complex aqueous matrices such as those encountered in waste samples, development work was needed in sample preparation and processing. The general goal of this project was to address the issues mentioned above, and in so doing transform an interesting laboratory technique of limited applicability into a robust field instrument suitable for environmental restoration and waste management applications. The project consisted of the following tasks: (1) development of a low background, flow-cell detector, (2) identification of sample chemical and radiological interferences, (3) development of protocols for processing waste and/or environmental samples, and (4) integration and testing of the prototype system. The scope of work associated with these tasks has been completed and the report for Tasks 1-3 was submitted previously. Presented here are the results for Task 4.

  2. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Localised convection cells in the presence of

    E-print Network

    Dawes, Jon

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Localised convection cells in the presence. (Received 16 June 2006) Thermal convection in a horizontal fluid layer heated uniformly from below usually magnetic field, convection may instead occur in vigorous isolated cells separated by regions of strong

  3. White Blood Cell Count in Women: Relation to Inflammatory Biomarkers, Haematological Profiles, Visceral Adiposity, and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Farhangi, Mahdieh Abbasalizad; Keshavarz, Seyyed-Ali; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Ostadrahimi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The role of white blood cell (WBC) count in pathogenesis of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity-related disorders has been reported earlier. Recent studies revealed that higher WBC contributes to atherosclerotic progression and impaired fasting glucose. However, it is unknown whether variations in WBC and haematologic profiles can occur in healthy obese individuals. The aim of this study is to further evaluate the influence of obesity on WBC count, inflammatory biomarkers, and metabolic risk factors in healthy women to establish a relationship among variables analyzed. The sample of the present study consisted of 84 healthy women with mean age of 35.56±6.83 years. They were categorized into two groups based on their body mass index (BMI): obese group with BMI >30 kg/m2 and non-obese group with BMI <30 kg/m2. We evaluated the relationship between WBC and platelet count (PLT) with serum interleukin 6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), angiotensin ? (Ang ?), body fat percentage (BF %), waist-circumference (WC), and lipid profile. WBC, PLT, CRP, and IL-6 in obese subjects were significantly higher than in non-obese subjects (p< 0.05). The mean WBC count in obese subjects was 6.4±0.3 (×109/L) compared to 4.4±0.3 (×109/L) in non-obese subjects (p=0.035). WBC correlated with BF% (r=0.31, p=0.004), CRP (r=0.25, P=0.03), WC (r=0.22, p=0.04), angiotensin ? (r=0.24, p=0.03), triglyceride (r=0.24, p=0.03), and atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) levels (r=0.3, p=0.028) but not with IL-6. Platelet count was also associated with WC and waist-to-hip ratio (p<0.05). Haemoglobin and haematocrit were in consistent relationship with LDL-cholesterol (p<0.05). In conclusion, obesity was associated with higher WBC count and inflammatory parameters. There was also a positive relationship between WBC count and several inflammatory and metabolic risk factors in healthy women. PMID:23617205

  4. FOXP3+ regulatory T-cell counts correlate with histological response in Crohn's colitis treated with infliximab.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Samuel; Maxwell, Perry; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Loughrey, Maurice B

    2014-12-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown aetiology. Mucosal inflammatory dysregulation is likely important, with increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF?). The chimeric monoclonal antibody, infliximab, inhibits TNF? and promotes intestinal mucosal healing. Despite this, many patients still require surgical intervention. Patients who have undergone colonic resection post-infliximab therapy, show markedly variable morphological response to treatment. FOXP3+ CD4+ regulatory T-cells have been shown to have a protective role in autoimmune/inflammatory diseases and their sequestration to the bowel is found in those treated with infliximab. We examined the immunohistochemical profile of lymphoid aggregates in tissue sections from post-infliximab Crohn's colitis resection specimens, classified as morphological responders or non-responders, defined in relation to the absence/presence of mucosal ulceration and active inflammation, and a control group. Results indicated no significant diffences in CD68-positive cell counts but increased FOXP3-positive (P?=?0.02) and CD4-positive (P?=?0.05) cell counts in responders versus non-responders. Untreated control scores were similar to non-responders. Although based on small study numbers, our results suggest an association between upregulation of FOXP3+/CD4+ regulatory T-cells and morphological response to infliximab therapy. This represents a possible quantitative methodology for monitoring therapeutic response to infliximab therapy, based on immunohistochemical evaluation of endoscopic biopsy specimens. PMID:25354875

  5. Elevated Steady State WBC and Platelet Counts Are Associated with Frequent Emergency Room Use in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Danda, Neeraja; Etzion, Zipora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia has many sequelae that result in emergency department (ED) use, but a minority of patients with sickle cell disease are frequent utilizers and make up the majority of ED visits. If patients who are likely to be frequent ED can be identified in steady state, they can be treated with disease modifying agents in an attempt to reduce ED use frequency. We sought to identify steady state markers for frequent ED use. Methods We identified all patients with SS/S?0 seen at our facilities in 2012. Health care utilization over the entire year was calculated and ED visit numbers categorized as either 0–1, 2–5, or 6 or more visits a year. Steady state and acutely active laboratory parameters were collected and analyzed using analysis of variance models and odds ratios. Results 432 adult sickle cell patients were identified, ages 18–87, 54% female, and 38% had been prescribed hydroxyurea. Of the 432 patients,192 had 0–1 visits in the year, 144 had 2–5 visits in the year, and 96 had >6 visits for a total of 2259 visits. Those who had >6 visits accounted for 1750 (77%) of the total visits for the year. When steady state laboratory markers were examined, each additional 50x109/L platelets was associated with 22% greater risk (p < .001); each 1x109/L of WBC was associated with 11% greater risk (p = .003), and each 1g/dL Hb was associated with 23% lower risk (p = .007) of >6 ED visits/year. We did not observe a relationship between baseline HbF, LDH or reticulocyte count with >6 ED visits. Conclusion Patients with elevated white blood cell counts, elevated platelet counts, and low hemoglobin levels exhibited higher risk for frequent ED utilization and could be candidates for early and aggressive therapy with disease modifying agents. PMID:26248283

  6. T E C H N I C A L R E P O R T Single-molecule transcript counting of stem-cell

    E-print Network

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    T E C H N I C A L R E P O R T Single-molecule transcript counting of stem-cell markers in the mouse the molecular identities of adult stem cells requires technologies for sensitive transcript detection in tissues distinct stem-cell populations, residing either at crypt bases or at position +4, but a detailed analysis

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Intra-Patient Variation in CD4+ T Cell Counts in Stable, Virologically-Suppressed, HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Claire L.; Cheng, Allen C.; Cameron, Paul U.; Bailey, Michael; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Mills, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Counts of absolute CD4+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ T cells) are known to be highly variable in untreated HIV-infected individuals, but there are no data in virologically-suppressed individuals. We investigated CD4+ T cell variability in stable, virologically-suppressed, HIV-1 infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Methods From a large hospital database we selected patients with stable virological suppression on cART for >3 years with >10 CD4+ T cell measurements performed over a further >2 years; and a control group of 95 patients not on cART. Results We identified 161 HIV-infected patients on cART without active HCV or HBV infection, with stable virological suppression for a median of 6.4 years. Over the study period 88 patients had reached a plateau in their absolute CD4+ T cell counts, while 65 patients had increasing and 8 patients had decreasing absolute CD4+ T cell counts. In patients with plateaued CD4+ T cell counts, variability in absolute CD4+ T cell counts was greater than in percent CD4+ T cells (median coefficient of variation (CV) 16.6% [IQR 13.8-20.1%] and CV 9.6% [IQR 7.4-13.0%], respectively). Patients with increasing CD4+ T cell counts had greater variability in absolute CD4+ T cell counts than those with plateaued CD4 T cell counts (CV 19.5% [IQR 16.1-23.8%], p<0.001) while there was no difference in percent CD4+ T cell variability between the two groups. As previously reported, untreated patients had CVs significantly higher than patients on cART (CVs of 21.1% [IQR 17.2-32.0%], p<0.001 and 15.2% (IQR 10.7-20.0%), p<0.001, respectively). Age or sex did not affect the degree of CD4+ variation. Conclusions Adults with stable, virologically-suppressed HIV infection continue to have significant variations in individual absolute CD4+ T cell and percent CD4+ T cell counts; this variation can be of clinical relevance especially around CD4+ thresholds. However, the variation seen in individuals on cART is substantially less than in untreated subjects. PMID:26110761

  8. Factors associated with short-term changes in HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in antiretroviral-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive individuals, viral load levels tend to increase and CD4+ cell counts decline over time. We sought to explore the rate of change and influence of other factors associated with these markers of HIV progression. Design: An observational cohort collaboration study. Methods: A total of 158?385 pairs of consecutive viral load and CD4+ cell count simultaneously measured from 34?384 ART-naive individuals in the COHERE database were analysed. Annual changes and factors associated with these changes were estimated using generalized estimating equations. Results: Viral load continued to rise at a mean [95% confidence interval (CI)] rate of 0.091 (0.086–0.096) log10?copies/ml per year. A faster rise in viral load was significantly associated with older age, such that for every 10 years older, it was a mean 0.022 log10?copies/ml per year greater. The mean (95% CI) CD4+ cell count change was ?78.0 (?80.1 to ?76.0) cell/?l per year and it was strongly associated with a higher current viral load: for every 1 log10?copies/ml higher, CD4+ cell count declined by an additional 37.6?cells/?l per year (P?cell count depletion than baseline viral load. Neither sex, race nor transmission by injecting drug use was associated with change in either the viral load or CD4+ cell count. Discussion: We found that in ART-naive individuals, viral load continues to increase over time and more sharply in those who are older. Our results also suggest that higher current viral load is strongly associated with ongoing rate of CD4+ cell count depletion. PMID:24959963

  9. Activated memory T helper cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with atopic asthma: relation to asthma symptoms, lung function, and bronchial responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, D S; Bentley, A M; Hartnell, A; Kay, A B; Durham, S R

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial mucosal inflammation and epithelial damage are characteristic features of asthma. Activation of T helper lymphocytes may contribute to this process by mechanisms including the release of cytokines promoting eosinophil infiltration and activation. METHODS: Bronchial washings and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were obtained from 29 atopic asthmatic patients (19 with current symptoms and 10 symptom free) and 13 normal volunteers. Flow cytometry was used to assess T cell phenotype and activation status in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peripheral blood, and differential cell counts were made on bronchial washings and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Findings were related to severity of disease as reflected by symptom scores, baseline lung function, and airway responsiveness. RESULTS: CD4 T lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood from asthmatic patients were activated by comparison with controls (CD4 CD25, median 16.8% v 8.7% for bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and 15.3% v 8.7% in blood). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid CD4 T cells from both asthmatic patients and controls were of memory phenotype (95.8% and 96.8% CD45RO and 1.7% and 0.4% CD45RA respectively), whereas both CD45RO and CD45RA T cells were present in blood. Patients with asthma and current symptoms showed increased bronchoalveolar T cell activation compared with patients without symptoms (CD4 CD25 18.7% v 12.3%). Within the asthmatic group there was a significant association between CD4 CD25 lymphocytes and asthma symptom scores (rs = 0.75), airway methacholine responsiveness (log PC20, rs = -0.43) and baseline FEV1 (rs = -0.39). A correlation was also found between CD4 CD25 lymphocytes and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (rs = 0.48). Eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were increased in asthmatic patients compared with controls and the percentage of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid correlated with asthma symptom score. A relation was found between percentage of epithelial cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and FEV1 and methacholine PC20. CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that selective activation of memory CD4 T cells contributes to eosinophil accumulation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and symptoms in asthma. PMID:8434349

  10. Satellited 4q identified in amniotic fluid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, I.; Hsieh, C.L.; Songster, G.

    1995-01-16

    Extra material was identified on the distal long arm of a chromosome 4 in an amniotic fluid specimen sampled at 16.6 weeks of gestational age. There was no visible loss of material from chromosome 4, and no evidence for a balanced rearrangement. The primary counseling issue in this case was advanced maternal age. Ultrasound findings were normal, and family history was unremarkable. The identical 4qs chromosome was observed in cells from a paternal peripheral blood specimen and appeared to be an unbalanced rearrangement. This extra material was NOR positive in lymphocytes from the father, but was negative in the fetal amniocytes. Father`s relatives were studied to verify the familial origin of this anomaly. In situ hybridization with both exon and intron sequences of ribosomal DNA demonstrated that ribosomal DNA is present at the terminus of the 4qs chromosome in the fetus, father, and paternal grandmother. This satellited 4q might have been derived from a translocation event that resulted in very little or no loss from the 4q and no specific phenotype. This derivative chromosome 4 has been inherited through at least 3 generations of phenotypically normal individuals. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Counting Quail 

    E-print Network

    Rollins, Dale; Brooks, Jason; Wilkins, Neal; Ransom, Dean

    2005-10-05

    Landowners and managers need a way of estimating quail populations to determine whether quail management practices are successful. Several direct and indirect methods of counting quail are described, including roadside counts, helicopter surveys...

  12. Estimated Costs for Delivery of HIV Antiretroviral Therapy to Individuals with CD4+ T-Cell Counts >350 cells/uL in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Chang, Wei; Byonanebye, Dathan M.; Owaraganise, Asiphas; Twinomuhwezi, Ellon; Amanyire, Gideon; Black, Douglas; Marseille, Elliot; Kamya, Moses R.; Havlir, Diane V.; Kahn, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence favoring earlier HIV ART initiation at high CD4+ T-cell counts (CD4>350/uL) has grown, and guidelines now recommend earlier HIV treatment. However, the cost of providing ART to individuals with CD4>350 in Sub-Saharan Africa has not been well estimated. This remains a major barrier to optimal global cost projections for accelerating the scale-up of ART. Our objective was to compute costs of ART delivery to high CD4+count individuals in a typical rural Ugandan health center-based HIV clinic, and use these data to construct scenarios of efficient ART scale-up. Methods Within a clinical study evaluating streamlined ART delivery to 197 individuals with CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/uL (EARLI Study: NCT01479634) in Mbarara, Uganda, we performed a micro-costing analysis of administrative records, ART prices, and time-and-motion analysis of staff work patterns. We computed observed per-person-per-year (ppy) costs, and constructed models estimating costs under several increasingly efficient ART scale-up scenarios using local salaries, lowest drug prices, optimized patient loads, and inclusion of viral load (VL) testing. Findings Among 197 individuals enrolled in the EARLI Study, median pre-ART CD4+ cell count was 569/uL (IQR 451–716). Observed ART delivery cost was $628 ppy at steady state. Models using local salaries and only core laboratory tests estimated costs of $529/$445 ppy (+/-VL testing, respectively). Models with lower salaries, lowest ART prices, and optimized healthcare worker schedules reduced costs by $100–200 ppy. Costs in a maximally efficient scale-up model were $320/$236 ppy (+/- VL testing). This included $39 for personnel, $106 for ART, $130/$46 for laboratory tests, and $46 for administrative/other costs. A key limitation of this study is its derivation and extrapolation of costs from one large rural treatment program of high CD4+ count individuals. Conclusions In a Ugandan HIV clinic, ART delivery costs—including VL testing—for individuals with CD4>350 were similar to estimates from high-efficiency programs. In higher efficiency scale-up models, costs were substantially lower. These favorable costs may be achieved because high CD4+ count patients are often asymptomatic, facilitating more efficient streamlined ART delivery. Our work provides a framework for calculating costs of efficient ART scale-up models using accessible data from specific programs and regions. PMID:26632823

  13. Fluid shear stress sensitizes cancer cells to receptor-mediated apoptosis via trimeric death receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to apoptotic agents has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlates with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increases in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis is not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress does not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments reveal that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear forces can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents.

  14. The Fluid-Kinetic Particle-in-Cell Solver for Plasma Simulations

    E-print Network

    Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni; Ronnmark, Kjell; Hamrin, Maria; Meliani, Zakaria; Laure, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    A new method that solves concurrently the multi-fluid and Maxwell's equations has been developed for plasma simulations. By calculating the stress tensor in the multi-fluid momentum equation by means of computational particles moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field, the kinetic effects are retained while solving the multi-fluid equations. The Maxwell's and multi-fluid equations are discretized implicitly in time enabling kinetic simulations over time scales typical of the fluid simulations. The fluid-kinetic Particle-in-Cell solver has been implemented in a three-dimensional electromagnetic code, and tested against the ion cyclotron resonance and magnetic reconnection problems. The new method is a promising approach for coupling fluid and kinetic methods in a unified framework.

  15. Short and Long-Term Incidence of Tuberculosis and CD4-Cell Count Dynamic on HAART in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Etard, Jean-François; Diouf, Assane; De Beaudrap, Pierre; Akoi, Koivugui; Ngom-Guèye, Ndèye Fatou; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Ecochard, René; Sow, Papa Salif; Eric, Delaporte

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Estimate tuberculosis (TB) incidence among patients receiving HAART. Compare the dynamic of the CD4-cell count and viral load before notification of the TB with the dynamic among patients remaining free of TB. Design: Prospective cohort with ascertainment of TB cases from medical records. Methods: The first 404 adults HIV-1 infected patients enrolled in the Senegalese antiretroviral drug access initiative were eligible. CD4-cell and viral load were assessed at baseline and every 6 months. Patients receiving an antituberculosis treatment at HAART initiation were excluded from analysis. Any TB case notified after the first month of HAART was considered as an incident case. Follow-up was censored at death or at the last visit before March 31, 2008. CD4-cell trajectories until TB notification were compared to non-TB developers within two distinct periods: from HAART initiation to 24 months and after. Results: Over 404 eligible patients, 352 were included in this analysis. Median follow-up reached 73 months and 1821 person-years were accrued. Half of the 42 incident cases were notified before month 19 of HAART yielding to an overall incident rate of 2.3/100 PY [1.7-3.1]. Annual incidence decreased with duration of HAART (trend in incidence: RR=0.26, p<10-4). During the first period, CD4-cell count dynamic of most TB patients was identical to the dynamic among patients remaining free of TB. Most cases of the second period occurred in a context of an immunological failure. Conclusions: This study provides an estimate of TB incidence among patients on HAART in Senegal and supports two underlying mechanisms. PMID:20148061

  16. Fluid-Phase Endocytosis in Plant Cells Ed Etxeberria, Javier Pozueta-Romero and Edurne Baroja

    E-print Network

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    Fluid-Phase Endocytosis in Plant Cells Ed Etxeberria, Javier Pozueta-Romero and Edurne Baroja uptake by fluid-phase endocytosis (FPE). Recent advances in plant endocytosis reveal that this is true. Samaj (ed.), Endocytosis in Plants, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-32463-5_5, Ó Springer-Verlag Berlin

  17. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  18. The FASEB Journal Research Communication Fluid shear stress primes mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-print Network

    Voldman, Joel

    The FASEB Journal · Research Communication Fluid shear stress primes mouse embryonic stem cells stress is a ubiquitous environmen- tal cue experienced by stem cells when they are being differentiated or expanded in perfusion cultures. How- ever, its role in modulating self-renewing stem cell phenotypes

  19. A Spore Counting Method and Cell Culture Model for Chlorine Disinfection Studies of Encephalitozoon syn. Septata intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, D. M.; Johnson, C. H.; Rice, E. W.; Marshall, M. M.; Grahn, K. F.; Plummer, C. B.; Sterling, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    The microsporidia have recently been recognized as a group of pathogens that have potential for waterborne transmission; however, little is known about the effects of routine disinfection on microsporidian spore viability. In this study, in vitro growth of Encephalitozoon syn. Septata intestinalis, a microsporidium found in the human gut, was used as a model to assess the effect of chlorine on the infectivity and viability of microsporidian spores. Spore inoculum concentrations were determined by using spectrophotometric measurements (percent transmittance at 625 nm) and by traditional hemacytometer counting. To determine quantitative dose-response data for spore infectivity, we optimized a rabbit kidney cell culture system in 24-well plates, which facilitated calculation of a 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and a minimal infective dose (MID) for E. intestinalis. The TCID50 is a quantitative measure of infectivity and growth and is the number of organisms that must be present to infect 50% of the cell culture wells tested. The MID is as a measure of a system's permissiveness to infection and a measure of spore infectivity. A standardized MID and a standardized TCID50 have not been reported previously for any microsporidian species. Both types of doses are reported in this paper, and the values were used to evaluate the effects of chlorine disinfection on the in vitro growth of microsporidia. Spores were treated with chlorine at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10 mg/liter. The exposure times ranged from 0 to 80 min at 25°C and pH 7. MID data for E. intestinalis were compared before and after chlorine disinfection. A 3-log reduction (99.9% inhibition) in the E. intestinalis MID was observed at a chlorine concentration of 2 mg/liter after a minimum exposure time of 16 min. The log10 reduction results based on percent transmittance-derived spore counts were equivalent to the results based on hemacytometer-derived spore counts. Our data suggest that chlorine treatment may be an effective water treatment for E. intestinalis and that spectrophotometric methods may be substituted for labor-intensive hemacytometer methods when spores are counted in laboratory-based chlorine disinfection studies. PMID:10742198

  20. Canine adipose-derived stromal cell viability following exposure to synovial fluid from osteoarthritic joints

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Kristina M.; O'Brien, Timothy D.; Pluhar, Elizabeth G.; Conzemius, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stem cell therapy used in clinical application of osteoarthritis in veterinary medicine typically involves intra-articular injection of the cells, however the effect of an osteoarthritic environment on the fate of the cells has not been investigated. Aims and Objectives Assess the viability of adipose derived stromal cells following exposure to osteoarthritic joint fluid. Materials and Methods Adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) were derived from falciform adipose tissue of five adult dogs, and osteoarthritic synovial fluid (SF) was obtained from ten patients undergoing surgical intervention on orthopedic diseases with secondary osteoarthritis. Normal synovial fluid was obtained from seven adult dogs from an unrelated study. ASCs were exposed to the following treatment conditions: culture medium, normal SF, osteoarthritic SF, or serial dilutions of 1:1 to 1:10 of osteoarthritic SF with media. Cells were then harvested and assessed for viability using trypan blue dye exclusion. Results There was no significant difference in the viability of cells in culture medium or normal SF. Significant differences were found between cells exposed to any concentration of osteoarthritic SF and normal SF and between cells exposed to undiluted osteoarthritic SF and all serial dilutions. Subsequent dilutions reduced cytotoxicity. Conclusions Osteoarthritic synovial fluid in this ex vivo experiment is cytotoxic to ASCs, when compared with normal synovial fluid. Current practice of direct injection of ASCs into osteoarthritic joints should be re-evaluated to determine if alternative means of administration may be more effective. PMID:26392889

  1. arXiv:astro-ph/0401559v126Jan2004 Self-Calibration of Cluster Dark Energy Studies: Counts in Cells

    E-print Network

    Hu, Wayne

    constraints on the dark energy equation of state by a factor of 2 or more to (w) = 0.06 for a deep 4000 deg2arXiv:astro-ph/0401559v126Jan2004 Self-Calibration of Cluster Dark Energy Studies: Counts in Cells of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 Cluster number counts can constrain the properties of dark energy if and only

  2. Fluid and cell behaviors along a 3D printed alginate/gelatin/fibrin channel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yufan; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell manipulation is available with the integration of microfluidic technology and rapid prototyping techniques. High-Fidelity (Hi-Fi) constructs hold enormous therapeutic potential for organ manufacturing and regenerative medicine. In the present paper we introduced a quasi-three-dimensional (Q3D) model with parallel biocompatible alginate/gelatin/fibrin hurdles. The behaviors of fluids and cells along the microfluidic channels with various widths were studied. Cells inside the newly designed microfluidic channels attached and grew well. Morphological changes of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D milieu were found on the printed constructs. Endothelialization occurred with the co-cultures of ADSCs and hepatocytes. This study provides insights into the interactions among fluids, cells and biomaterials, the behaviors of fluids and cells along the microfluidic channels, and the applications of Q3D techniques. PMID:25727058

  3. Method for filling the cavities of cells with a chromogenic fluid

    DOEpatents

    Tonazzi, J.C.L.; Kucharczyk, J.E. Jr.; Agrawal, A.

    1999-01-05

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for filling a cell cavity positioned between a first substrate and a second substrate with a cell filling liquid. The method entails forming at least one evacuation cavity encompassing at least a portion of an outer surface of each of the first and second substrates of a cell containing a cell cavity and isolating the cell cavity from the evacuation cavity; reducing a pressure in each of the evacuation cavity and the cell cavity; and dispensing the cell filling fluid into the cell cavity. The application is to the fabrication of electrochromic windows. 22 figs.

  4. Method for filling the cavities of cells with a chromogenic fluid

    DOEpatents

    Tonazzi, Juan C. Lopez (Tucson, AZ); Kucharczyk, Jr., Joseph E. (Tucson, AZ); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for filling a cell cavity positioned between a first substrate and a second substrate with a cell filling liquid. The method entails forming at least one evacuation cavity encompassing at least a portion of an outer surface of each of the first and second substrates of a cell containing a cell cavity and isolating the cell cavity from the evacuation cavity; reducing a pressure in each of the evacuation cavity and the cell cavity; and dispensing the cell filling fluid into the cell cavity.

  5. Apparatus for filling the cavities of cells and laminated substrates with a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lopez Tonazzi, Juan C. (Tucson, AZ); Kucharczyk, Jr., Joseph E. (Tucson, AZ); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for filling a cell cavity positioned between a first substrate and a second substrate with a cell filling liquid. The method entails forming at least one evacuation cavity encompassing at least a portion of an outer surface of each of the first and second substrates of a cell containing a cell cavity and isolating the cell cavity from the evacuation cavity; reducing a pressure in each of the evacuation cavity and the cell cavity; and dispensing the cell filling fluid into the cell cavity.

  6. Somatic Cell Counts of Milk from Dairy Herd Improvement Herds during 2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2006 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing some AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to ...

  7. SOMATIC CELL COUNTS OF MILK FROM DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT HERDS DURING 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2005 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to somat...

  8. Somatic Cell Counts of Milk from Dairy Herd Improvement Herds during 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2007 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing some AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to ...

  9. SOMATIC CELL COUNTS OF MILK FROM DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT HERDS DURING 2001

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2001 was examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to somati...

  10. Development of Microelectrode Arrays Using Electroless Plating for CMOS-Based Direct Counting of Bacterial and HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Ota, Shoko; Gamo, Kohei; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The development of two new types of high-density, electroless plated microelectrode arrays for CMOS-based high-sensitivity direct bacteria and HeLa cell counting are presented. For emerging high-sensitivity direct pathogen counting, two technical challenges must be addressed. One is the formation of a bacteria-sized microelectrode, and the other is the development of a high-sensitivity and high-speed amperometry circuit. The requirement for microelectrode formation is that the gold microelectrodes are required to be as small as the target cell. By improving a self-aligned electroless plating technique, the dimensions of the microelectrodes on a CMOS sensor chip in this work were successfully reduced to 1.2 ?m × 2.05 ?m. This is 1/20th of the smallest size reported in the literature. Since a bacteria-sized microelectrode has a severe limitation on the current flow, the amperometry circuit has to have a high sensitivity and high speed with low noise. In this work, a current buffer was inserted to mitigate the potential fluctuation. Three test chips were fabricated using a 0.6- ?m CMOS process: two with 1.2 ?m × 2.05 ?m (1024 × 1024 and 4 × 4) sensor arrays and one with 6- ?m square (16 × 16) sensor arrays; and the microelectrodes were formed on them using electroless plating. The uniformity among the 1024 × 1024 electrodes arranged with a pitch of 3.6 ?m × 4.45 ?m was optically verified. For improving sensitivity, the trenches on each microelectrode were developed and verified optically and electrochemically for the first time. Higher sensitivity can be achieved by introducing a trench structure than by using a conventional microelectrode formed by contact photolithography. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements obtained using the 1.2 ?m × 2.05 ?m 4 × 4 and 6- ?m square 16 × 16 sensor array with electroless-plated microelectrodes successfully demonstrated direct counting of the bacteria-sized microbeads and HeLa cells. PMID:26561481

  11. Morbidity and Mortality According to Latest CD4+ Cell Count among HIV Positive Individuals in South Africa Who Enrolled in Project Phidisa

    PubMed Central

    Maduna, Patrick H.; Dolan, Matt; Kondlo, Lwando; Mabuza, Honey; Dlamini, Judith N.; Polis, Mike; Mnisi, Thabo; Orsega, Susan; Maja, Patrick; Ledwaba, Lotty; Molefe, Thuthukile; Sangweni, Phumelele; Malan, Lisette; Matchaba, Gugu; Khabo, Paul; Grandits, Greg; Neaton, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-term morbidity and mortality rates for HIV positive soldiers in the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) would inform decisions about deployment and HIV disease management. Risks were determined according to the latest CD4+ cell count and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV positive individuals in the SANDF and their dependents. Methods and Findings A total of 7,114 participants were enrolled and followed for mortality over a median of 4.7 years (IQR: 1.9, 7.1 years). For a planned subset (5,976), progression of disease (POD) and grade 4, potentially life-threatening events were also ascertained. CD4+ count and viral load were measured every 3 to 6 months. Poisson regression was used to compare event rates by latest CD4+ count (<50, 50–99, 100–199, 200–349, 350–499, 500+) with a focus on upper three strata, and to estimate relative risks (RRs) (ART/no ART). Median entry CD4+ was 207 cells/mm3. During follow-up over 70% were prescribed ART. Over follow-up 1,226 participants died; rates ranged from 57.6 (< 50 cells) to 0.8 (500+ cells) per 100 person years (py). Compared to those with latest CD4+ 200–349 (2.2/100py), death rates were significantly lower (p<0.001), as expected, for those with 350–499 (0.9/100py) and with 500+ cells (0.8/100py). The composite outcome of death, POD or grade 4 events occurred in 2,302 participants (4,045 events); rates were similar in higher CD4+ count strata (9.4 for 350–499 and 7.9 for 500+ cells) and lower than those with counts 200–349 cells (13.5) (p<0.001). For those with latest CD4+ 350+ cells, 63% of the composite outcomes (680 of 1,074) were grade 4 events. Conclusion Rates of morbidity and mortality are lowest among those with CD4+ count of 350 or higher and rates do not differ for those with counts of 350–499 versus 500+ cells. Grade 4 events are the predominant morbidity for participants with CD4+ counts of 350+ cells. PMID:25856495

  12. High Transmitter CD4+ T-Cell Count Shortly after the Time of Transmission in a Study of African Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Karita, Etienne; Price, Matt A; Lakhi, Shabir; Kilembe, William; Kamali, Anatoli; Ruzagira, Eugene; Hunter, Eric; Farmer, Paul; Allen, Susan; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Welsh, Sabrina; Yang, Annie; Gilmour, Jill; Fast, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Background 2013 WHO guidelines recommend starting ART at CD4+ T-cell counts ?500 cells/?L. We present the T-cell counts from adult Africans with HIV shortly following transmission to their sexual partners. Methods HIV-discordant couples in Zambia, Uganda and Rwanda were followed prospectively and received couples counseling and condoms. HIV uninfected partners were tested for HIV at least quarterly and HIV-infected partners received HIV care and referral for ART per national guidelines. Upon diagnosis of incident HIV infection in the previously HIV-uninfected partner, a blood sample was collected from both partners to measure CD4+ T-cells and perform viral linkage. The estimated date of infection (EDI) of the incident case was calculated based on testing history. EDI was unknown for suspected transmitting partners. Results From 2006–2011, 4,705 HIV-discordant couples were enrolled in this cohort, and 443 cases of incident HIV infection were documented. Virus linkage analysis was performed in 374 transmission pairs, and 273 (73%) transmissions were linked genetically. CD4 counts in the transmitting partner were measured a median of 56 days after EDI (mean:90.5, min:10, max:396). The median CD4 count was 339 cells/?l (mean:386.4, min:15, max:1,434), and the proportion of partners with a CD4+ T-cell count above 500/?l was 25% (95% CI:21, 31). Conclusions In our cohort of discordant couples, 73% of HIV transmissions occurred within the relationship, and the transmitter CD4+ T cell count shortly after the transmission event was frequently higher than the WHO 2013 ART-initiation guidelines. PMID:26291456

  13. Automatic Counting of Microglial Cells in Healthy and Glaucomatous Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; de Hoz, Rosa; Salazar, Juan J.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of microglial cells has been considered a sign of glial activation and a hallmark of ongoing neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia activation is analyzed in animal models of different eye diseases. Numerous retinal samples are required for each of these studies to obtain relevant data of statistical significance. Because manual quantification of microglial cells is time consuming, the aim of this study was develop an algorithm for automatic identification of retinal microglia. Two groups of adult male Swiss mice were used: age-matched controls (naïve, n = 6) and mice subjected to unilateral laser-induced ocular hypertension (lasered; n = 9). In the latter group, both hypertensive eyes and contralateral untreated retinas were analyzed. Retinal whole mounts were immunostained with anti Iba-1 for detecting microglial cell populations. A new algorithm was developed in MATLAB for microglial quantification; it enabled the quantification of microglial cells in the inner and outer plexiform layers and evaluates the area of the retina occupied by Iba-1+ microglia in the nerve fiber-ganglion cell layer. The automatic method was applied to a set of 6,000 images. To validate the algorithm, mouse retinas were evaluated both manually and computationally; the program correctly assessed the number of cells (Pearson correlation R = 0.94 and R = 0.98 for the inner and outer plexiform layers respectively). Statistically significant differences in glial cell number were found between naïve, lasered eyes and contralateral eyes (P<0.05, naïve versus contralateral eyes; P<0.001, naïve versus lasered eyes and contralateral versus lasered eyes). The algorithm developed is a reliable and fast tool that can evaluate the number of microglial cells in naïve mouse retinas and in retinas exhibiting proliferation. The implementation of this new automatic method can enable faster quantification of microglial cells in retinal pathologies. PMID:26580208

  14. Flow Cytometry Total Cell Counts: A Field Study Assessing Microbiological Water Quality and Growth in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, G.; Van der Mark, E. J.; Verberk, J. Q. J. C.; Van Dijk, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-year sampling program was carried out in two distribution systems in The Netherlands. Results demonstrated that, in both systems, the biomass differences measured by ATP were not significant. TCC differences were also not significant in treatment plant 1, but decreased slightly in treatment plant 2. TCC values were found to be higher at temperatures above 15°C than at temperatures below 15°C. The correlation study of parameters describing biostability found no relationship among TCC, heterotrophic plate counts, and Aeromonas. Also no relationship was found between TCC and ATP. Some correlation was found between the subgroup of high nucleic acid content bacteria and ATP (R2 = 0.63). Overall, the results demonstrated that TCC is a valuable parameter to assess the drinking water biological quality and regrowth; it can directly and sensitively quantify biomass, detect small changes, and can be used to determine the subgroup of active HNA bacteria that are related to ATP. PMID:23819117

  15. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids—Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 ?m spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 ?m diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  16. Single-molecule transcript counting of stem-cell markers in the mouse intestine

    E-print Network

    Itzkovitz, Shaul Shalev

    Determining the molecular identities of adult stem cells requires technologies for sensitive transcript detection in tissues. In mouse intestinal crypts, lineage-tracing studies indicated that different genes uniquely mark ...

  17. Analysis of Fluid Dynamics and Reactant Consumption in Microchannel Based Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalessandro, Joseph; Fodor, Petru

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the fluid dynamics within a membraneless microchannel fuel cell is analyzed computationally. The membraneless design is a result of the laminar nature of the fluid flow at small Reynolds numbers, restricting the fuel and oxidant to the vicinity of the corresponding electrodes, without the need of a proton exchange membrane (PEM). The performance of such cells is limited by the mass transport near the electrodes, with much of the reactants leaving the channel without coming in contact with the catalytic surfaces. We use various strategies similar with those used in grooved micromixers to overcome this limitation. While the flow is still laminar in nature, the addition of ridges to the top and bottom of the cell introduce a transverse element to the fluid flow, increasing reactant consumption and overall cell efficiency. The characteristics of the cells are investigated as a function of the Peclet number.

  18. Elevated White Blood Cell Count Is Associated with Higher Risk of Glucose Metabolism Disorders in Middle-Aged and Elderly Chinese People

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Yan, Wen-Hua; Li, Chan-Juan; Wang, An-Ping; Dou, Jing-Tao; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    White blood cell (WBC) count has been associated with diabetic risk, but whether the correlation is independent of other risk factors has hardly been studied. Moreover, very few such studies with large sample sizes have been conducted in Chinese. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between WBC count and glucose metabolism in china. We also examined the relevant variables of WBC count. A total of 9,697 subjects (mean age, 58.0 ± 9.1 years) were recruited. The subjects were classified into four groups, including subjects with normal glucose tolerance, isolated impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We found that WBC count increased as glucose metabolism disorders exacerbated. WBC count was also positively correlated with waist hip ratio, body mass index, smoking, triglycerides, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and 2-h postprandial glucose. In addition, high density lipoprotein and the female gender were inversely correlated with WBC levels. In patients with previously diagnosed T2DM, the course of T2DM was not correlated with WBC count. Our findings indicate that elevated WBC count is independently associated with worsening of glucose metabolism in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. In addition, loss of weight, smoking cessation, lipid-modifying therapies, and control of postprandial plasma glucose and HbA1c may ameliorate the chronic low-grade inflammation. PMID:24852600

  19. Effect of cooling rate on eutectic cell count, grain size, microstructure, and ultimate tensile strength of hypoeutectic cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hemanth, J.; Rao, K.V.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-08-01

    This article describes a series of microstructural and strength studies performed on hypoeutectic cast iron, which was sand cast using a variety of end chills (metallic, nonmetallic, water-cooled, and subzero, respectively). The effects of cooling rate on the eutectic cell count (ECC), grain size, and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) were evaluated. Attempts were also made to explain these effects and to correlate the UTS with ECC. It was found that subzero chilled and water-cool, chilled cast iron exhibit severe undercooling compared to normal sand cast iron. It was concluded from this investigation that nucleation conditions are completely altered but growth conditions prevail as usual. Therefore, undercooling during solidification is considered to be responsible for variation in ECC, grain size, and microstructure, and tensile strength.

  20. ?? versus ?? fate choice: counting the T-cell lineages at the branch point

    PubMed Central

    Kreslavsky, Taras; Gleimer, Michael; Garbe, Annette I; von Boehmer, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Summary Both ?? and ?? T cells develop in the thymus from a common progenitor. Historically distinguished by their T-cell receptor (TCR), these lineages are now defined on the basis of distinct molecular programs. Intriguingly, in many transgenic and knockout systems these programs are mismatched with the TCR type, leading to the development of ?? lineage cells driven by ??TCR and vice versa. These puzzling observations were recently explained by the demonstration that TCR signal strength, rather than TCR type per se, instructs lineage fate, with stronger TCR signal favoring ?? and weaker signal favoring ?? lineage fates. These studies also highlighted the ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase)-Egr (early growth response)-Id3 (inhibitor of differentiation 3) axis as a potential molecular switch downstream of TCR that determines lineage choice. Indeed, removal of Id3 was sufficient to redirect TCR?? transgenic cells to the ?? lineage, even in the presence of strong TCR signal. However, in TCR non-transgenic Id3 knockout mice the overall number of ?? lineage cells was increased due to an outgrowth of a V?1V?6.3 subset, suggesting that not all ?? T cells depend on this molecular switch for lineage commitment. Thus, the ?? lineage may in fact be a collection of two or more lineages not sharing a common molecular program and thus equipollent to the ?? lineage. TCR signaling is not the only factor that is required for development of ?? and ?? lineage cells; other pathways, such as signaling from Notch and CXCR4 receptors, cooperate with the TCR in this process. PMID:20969592

  1. Osteogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their bone regeneration potential

    PubMed Central

    Pipino, Caterina; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2015-01-01

    In orthopedics, tissue engineering approach using stem cells is a valid line of treatment for patients with bone defects. In this context, mesenchymal stromal cells of various origins have been extensively studied and continue to be a matter of debate. Although mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow are already clinically applied, recent evidence suggests that one may use mesenchymal stromal cells from extra-embryonic tissues, such as amniotic fluid, as an innovative and advantageous resource for bone regeneration. The use of cells from amniotic fluid does not raise ethical problems and provides a sufficient number of cells without invasive procedures. Furthermore, they do not develop into teratomas when transplanted, a consequence observed with pluripotent stem cells. In addition, their multipotent differentiation ability, low immunogenicity, and anti-inflammatory properties make them ideal candidates for bone regenerative medicine. We here present an overview of the features of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their potential in the osteogenic differentiation process. We have examined the papers actually available on this regard, with particular interest in the strategies applied to improve in vitro osteogenesis. Importantly, a detailed understanding of the behavior of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their osteogenic ability is desirable considering a feasible application in bone regenerative medicine. PMID:26029340

  2. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  3. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    E-print Network

    Qin, Boyang; Yang, Jing; Gollub, Jerry P; Arratia, Paulo E

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes.

  4. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    E-print Network

    Boyang Qin; Arvind Gopinath; Jing Yang; Jerry P Gollub; Paulo E Arratia

    2015-11-02

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes.

  5. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-03-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes.

  6. H Netten, I.T. Young, M. Prins, L.J. van Vliet, H. Tanke, J. Vrolijk, W. Sloos, Automation of dot counting in cell nuclei, in: Proc. 12th

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    counting in cell nuclei, in: Proc. 12th IAPR International Conference on Pattern Recognition, Jerusalem, Israel, 1994, 84-87. Automation of Fluorescent Dot Counting in Cell Nuclei Hans Netten1, Ian T. Young1 system that can examine 500 cells in approximately 20 minutes to determine the number of labeled

  7. H Netten, I.T. Young, M. Prins, L.J. van Vliet, H. Tanke, J. Vrolijk, W. Sloos, Automation of dot counting in cell nuclei, in: Proc. 12 th IAPR International Conference on Pattern Recognition, Jerusalem, Israel, 1994, 8487.

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    counting in cell nuclei, in: Proc. 12 th IAPR International Conference on Pattern Recognition, Jerusalem, Israel, 1994, 84­87. Automation of Fluorescent Dot Counting in Cell Nuclei Hans Netten 1 , Ian T. Young 1 microscope system that can examine 500 cells in approximately 20 minutes to determine the number of labeled

  8. Plasma Levels of Neopterin and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in Tuberculosis (TB) with and without HIV Coinfection in Relation to CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Skogmar, Sten; Schön, Thomas; Balcha, Taye Tolera; Sturegård, Erik; Jansson, Marianne; Björkman, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background While the risk of TB is elevated in HIV-positive subjects with low CD4 cell counts, TB may in itself be associated with CD4 lymphocytopenia. We investigated markers of immune activation (neopterin) and inflammation (CRP) in TB patients with and without HIV coinfection and their association with CD4 cell levels, and determined their predictive capacity as alternative markers of advanced immunosuppression. Methods Participants selected from a cohort of adults with TB at Ethiopian health centers (195 HIV+/TB+, 170 HIV-/TB+) and 31 controls were tested for plasma levels of neopterin and CRP. Baseline levels of neopterin and CRP were correlated to CD4 cell count before and after anti-TB treatment (ATT). The performance to predict CD4 cell strata for both markers were investigated using receiver operating curves. Results Levels of both biomarkers were elevated in TB patients (neopterin: HIV+/TB+ 54 nmol/l, HIV-/TB+ 23 nmol/l, controls 3.8 nmol/l; CRP: HIV+/TB+ 36 ?g/ml, HIV-/TB+ 33 ?g/ml, controls 0.5 ?g/ml). Neopterin levels were inversely correlated (-0.53, p<0.001) to CD4 cell count, whereas this correlation was weaker for CRP (-0.25, p<0.001). Neither of the markers had adequate predictive value for identification of subjects with CD4 cell count <100 cells/mm3 (area under the curve [AUC] 0.64 for neopterin, AUC 0.59 for CRP). Conclusion Neopterin levels were high in adults with TB, both with and without HIV coinfection, with inverse correlation to CD4 cell count. This suggests that immune activation may be involved in TB-related CD4 lymphocytopenia. However, neither neopterin nor CRP showed promise as alternative tests for immunosuppression in patients coinfected with HIV and TB. PMID:26630153

  9. Automated counting of cell bodies using Nissl stained cross-sectional images 

    E-print Network

    D'Souza, Aswin Cletus

    2009-05-15

    ............................................................................................. 51 39 Fifteen standard cases used in 3D marching cubes [42] ............................ 51 40 Representation of a stack of 10 type A images, where each cell has a random color... .................................................................................................. 33 24 Sorting data structure ................................................................................. 34 25 Watershed algorithm in progress (a) h = 0 (b) h = 80 (c) h = 130 ............ 35 26 2D image of image 3 in the stack...

  10. Absolute Reticulocyte Count Acts as a Surrogate for Fetal Hemoglobin in Infants and Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Emily Riehm; Byrnes, Colleen; Weissman, Maxine; Lee, Y. Terry; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin switching is largely complete in humans by six months of age. Among infants with sickle cell anemia (HbSS, SCA), reticulocytosis begins early in life as fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is replaced by sickle hemoglobin (HbS). The objective of this study was to determine if absolute reticulocyte count (ARC) is related to HbF levels in a cohort of pediatric SCA patients. A convenience sample of 106 children with SCA between the ages of 1 month and 20 years who were not receiving hydroxyurea or monthly blood transfusions were enrolled in this observational study. Hematologic data, including ARC and HbF levels, were measured at steady state. F-cells were enumerated by flow cytometry. Initial studies compared infants with ARC greater than or equal to 200 K/?L (ARC ? 200) based upon the previously reported utility of this threshold as a predictive marker for SCA severity. Mean HbF and F-cell levels were significantly lower in the ARC ? 200 group when compared to the ARC < 200 group. Both HbF and F-cell percentages were negatively correlated to ARC in infants and in children between the ages of 1 and 9 years. However, the inverse relationship was lost after the age of 10 years. Overall, decreased expression and distribution of HbF during childhood SCA is well-correlated with increased reticulocyte production and release into the peripheral blood. As such, these data further support the clinical use of reticulocyte enumeration as a disease severity biomarker for childhood sickle cell anemia. PMID:26366562

  11. Analysis of cell centred finite volume methods for incompressible fluid flows

    E-print Network

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    on the analysis of cell centred finite volume schemes for incompressible fluid flows. We first recall the cell centred finite volume scheme for convection di#usion equations, and give the mathematical tools which gradient. #12; Contents 1 Introduction 2 1.1 Finite volume schemes for conservation laws

  12. Analysis of cell centred finite volume methods for incompressible fluid flows

    E-print Network

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    on the analysis of cell centred finite volume schemes for incompressible fluid flows. We first recall the cell centred finite volume scheme for convection diffusion equations, and give the mathematical tools which gradient. #12;Contents 1 Introduction 2 1.1 Finite volume schemes for conservation laws

  13. Effect of a 12-week walking exercise program on body composition and immune cell count in patients with breast cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Jeong; Shin, Yun A; Suk, Min Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 12-week walking exercise program on body composition and immune cell count in patients with breast cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy. Methods Twenty patients (age, 47.8 ± 3.12) participated in the study. Body composition (weight, body mass index, muscle weight, body fat mass, and percent body fat) and the cell counts for immune cells (white blood corpuscles, lymphocytes, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, natural killer cells, and natural killer T cells) were measured before and after the 12-week walking exercise program. SPSS 17.0 statistical software was used. The two-way repeated ANOVA with post hoc was used to determine the difference between time and interaction. Results There were significant reductions in the weight (p < .05), BMI (p < .01), and percent body fat (p < .05) after the 12-week walking exercise program. However, the immune cell counts did not change significantly. Conclusion These results indicated that the 12-week walking exercise program had an effect on the balances among weight, BMI and percent body fat in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26525495

  14. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Justin R; Rother, Gernot; Browning, Jim; Ankner, John Francis; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David

    2012-01-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300 473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.

  15. Interstitial Fluid Flow: The Mechanical Environment of Cells and Foundation of Meridians

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wei; Ding, Guanghong

    2012-01-01

    Using information from the deep dissection, microobservation, and measurement of acupoints in the upper and lower limbs of the human body, we developed a three-dimensional porous medium model to simulate the flow field using FLUENT software and to study the shear stress on the surface of interstitial cells (mast cells) caused by interstitial fluid flow. The numerical simulation results show the following: (i) the parallel nature of capillaries will lead to directional interstitial fluid flow, which may explain the long interstitial tissue channels or meridians observed in some experiments; (ii) when the distribution of capillaries is staggered, increases in the velocity alternate, and the velocity tends to be uniform, which is beneficial for substance exchange; (iii) interstitial fluid flow induces a shear stress, with magnitude of several Pa, on interstitial cell membranes, which will activate cells and lead to a biological response; (iv) capillary and interstitial parameters, such as capillary density, blood pressure, capillary permeability, interstitial pressure, and interstitial porosity, affect the shear stress on cell surfaces. The numerical simulation results suggest that in vivo interstitial fluid flow constitutes the mechanical environment of cells and plays a key role in guiding cell activities, which may explain the meridian phenomena and the acupuncture effects observed in experiments. PMID:23365601

  16. The importance of endometrial nerve fibers and macrophage cell count in the diagnosis of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Cihan; Serdaroglu, Hasan; Tuzlali, Sitki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a disease that is hard to diagnose without the gold standard method, laparoscopy. An easier diagnostic method is needed. Objective: The aim of the study is to determine whether the number of macrophage cells in the endometrium and/or the detection of nerve fibers can be used in the diagnosis of endometriosis. Materials and Methods: Endometrial sampling was done to 31 patients prior to laparoscopy (L/S) or laparotomy (L/T) at Istanbul University Istanbul School of Medicine Hospital between January 2010 February 2011. Also 34 patients who were retrospectively chosen from their files were added to the study. 5 patients were excluded from the study. Totally, 31 patients were placed in the endometriosis and 29 patients in the control group. Endometrial samples were evaluated immunohistochemically with the markers protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and neurofilament (NF) for nerve fibers and CD68 for macrophages. Results: None of the samples were stained with PGP 9.5 and NF. As for CD68+cells, no statistically significant difference was observed between groups (endometriosis: 216.10±104.41; control: 175.93±43.05, p=0.06). Results were also evaluated in the subgroups of menstruel phases and disease stages. Only in the proliferative phase there was a significant increase in the endometriosis group (p=0.03). No significant difference was observed between the stages. Conclusion: The detection of nerve fibers in the eutopic endometrium with the markers of PGP 9.5 and NF is not found to be helpful in the diagnosis of endometriosis. Macrophage cells may be helpful in the diagnosis only in the proliferative phase. PMID:24639773

  17. Finger behavior of a shear thinning fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell

    E-print Network

    Eugenia Corvera Poire; Martine Ben Amar

    1998-07-23

    We make a theoretical study of the behavior of a simple fluid displacing a shear thinning fluid confined in a Hele-Shaw cell. To study the Saffman-Taylor instability when the displaced fluid is non Newtonian we face the problem of having a field which is non laplacian. By means of an hodographic transformation we are able to solve the problem in the case of weak shear thinning while taking into account the non laplacian character of the equation. Our results predict that the finger width decreases towards zero for small values of the surface tension parameter which is inversely proportional to the finger velocity.

  18. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  19. Determinants, reproducibility, and seasonal variation of bacterial cell wall components and viable counts in house dust.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, H K; Täubel, M; Roponen, M; Vepsäläinen, A; Rantakokko, P; Pekkanen, J; Nevalainen, A; von Mutius, E; Hyvärinen, A

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to assess the determinants that affect concentrations of the bacterial cell wall components 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) and muramic acid and of total viable bacteria and actinomycetes in house dust; and (ii) to examine the seasonal variation and reproducibility of these bacterial cell wall components in house dust. A number of lifestyle and environmental factors, mostly not consistent for different bacterial measures but commonly including the type of dwelling and farming (number of livestock), explained up to 37% of the variation of the bacterial concentrations in 212 homes in Eastern Finland. The reproducibility of 3-OH FAs and muramic acid measurements in house dust were studied in five urban homes and were found to be generally high (ICC 74-84%). Temporal variation observed in repeated sampling of the same home throughout a year was more pronounced for 3-OH FAs determinations (ICC 22%) than for muramic acid (ICC 55-66%). We conclude that determinants vary largely for different types of bacterial measurements in house dust; the measured parameters represent different aspects of the bacterial content indoors. More than one sample is needed to describe bacterial concentrations in house dust in the home environment due to large temporal variation. PMID:24992650

  20. Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-cell scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A.; Roane, J.E.; Leyba, J.D.; Branton, S.D.

    1996-12-31

    Principal conclusions are: CsI(Tl) provides sufficient pulse shape discrimination for use in the flow-cell detector. However, an improved method of coating is needed to extend the useful life of a detection cell. Of the activation/fission products investigated, only the co-elution of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 63}Ni produced a radiological interference. Tritium (and presumably other non-ionic radioisotopes) can be separated during the loading of the solution onto the pre- concentration column. Natural U (and/or decay products) produced a radiological interference with {sup 90}Sr. This is a potential problem. No potential radiological interferences were observed with {sup 223}Th. Chemical interferences were observed to some degree for all the chemicals tested except for the chloride solutions, NaCl and KCl, and the sulfate solution, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The specific interference effects were decreased detection efficiencies and changes in peak elution times. The NEL`s (non-observable effects loadings) are tentative targets for development of sample processing protocols, which is the next phase of the work.

  1. Emergent long-range couplings in arrays of fluid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Douglas Bruce

    2014-08-07

    We present a system exhibiting extraordinarily long-range cooperative effects, on a length scale far exceeding the bulk correlation length. We give a theoretical explanation of these phenomena based on the mesoscopic picture of phase coexistence in finite systems, which is confirmedly Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies. Our work demonstrates that such action-at-a-distance can occur in classical systems involving simple or complex fluids, such as colloid-polymer mixtures, or ferromagnets.

  2. Modulation of dendritic cell differentiation and cytokine secretion by the hydatid cyst fluid of Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, João H C; Chain, Benjamin M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic infection by Echinococcus granulosus results in establishment of fluid-filled cysts (hydatid cysts) in liver or lungs of infected hosts, which can escape destruction by the host immune system for long periods. This study explores the modulation by hydatid cyst fluid of the in vitro human monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) transition induced by granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Addition of the fluid to adherent peripheral blood monocytes cultured in GM-CSF/IL-4 stimulates release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-6. Exposure of differentiating DC to the fluid during the 7-day culture in GM-CSF/IL-4 impairs their subsequent ability to secrete IL-12, IL-6 or PGE2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. This inhibition is not dependent on the initial release of PGE2. The presence of hydatid cyst fluid also modulates the phenotype of the cells generated during culture, resulting in increased CD14 expression and decreased expression of CD1a. Finally, hydatid fluid can stimulate predifferentiated DC to mature, as evidenced by release of IL-12 and IL-6, and by up-regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex and CD86. The possible role of dendritic cell modulation in regulating the host immune response to hydatid cysts is discussed. PMID:16771863

  3. The relationship between virus load response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and change in CD4 cell counts: A report from the Women's interagency HIV study.

    PubMed

    DeHovitz, J A; Kovacs, A; Feldman, J G; Anastos, K; Young, M; Cohen, M; Gange, S J; Melnick, S; Greenblatt, R M

    2000-11-01

    The relationship between the pattern of virus load response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and CD4 lymphocyte response was assessed in a cohort of 249 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected women at 3 times: 1 before and 2 after initiation of therapy, with follow-up of 6-12 months. Patients with a durable response to HAART (i.e., >1 log decrease in HIV-1 RNA sustained for the study periods) had a continuous and significant increase in CD4 cell counts over time, whereas those with no response (<0.5 log decrease in HIV-1 RNA) had a slight decline. Patients with a mixed response (initial decrease >1 log, followed by a subsequent decrease <0.5 log) had an increase in CD4 cell count, followed by a plateau. The trend in CD4 cell count differed significantly by response to HAART, with those patients who experienced a durable response having significantly higher CD4 cell counts than others. PMID:11010840

  4. Lamin A/C deficiency reduces circulating tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael J; Denais, Celine; Chan, Maxine F; Wang, Zhexiao; Lammerding, Jan; King, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths and is initiated when cancer cells detach from the primary tumor, invade the basement membrane, and enter the circulation as circulating tumor cells (CTCs). While metastasis is viewed as an inefficient process with most CTCs dying within the bloodstream, it is evident that some CTCs are capable of resisting hemodynamic shear forces to form secondary tumors in distant tissues. We hypothesized that nuclear lamins A and C (A/C) act as key structural components within CTCs necessary to resist destruction from elevated shear forces of the bloodstream. Herein, we show that, compared with nonmalignant epithelial cells, tumor cells are resistant to elevated fluid shear forces in vitro that mimic those within the bloodstream, as evidenced by significant decreases in cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Knockdown of lamin A/C significantly reduced tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress, with significantly increased cell death compared with parental tumor cell and nontargeting controls. Interestingly, lamin A/C knockdown increased shear stress-induced tumor cell apoptosis, but did not significantly affect cellular necrosis. These data demonstrate that lamin A/C is an important structural component that enables tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress-mediated death in the bloodstream, and may thus facilitate survival and hematogenous metastasis of CTCs. PMID:26447202

  5. A scanning acoustic microscope discriminates cancer cells in fluid

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) discriminates lesions in sections by assessing the speed of sound (SOS) or attenuation of sound (AOS) through tissues within a few minutes without staining; however, its clinical use in cytological diagnosis is unknown. We applied a thin layer preparation method to observe benign and malignant effusions using SAM. Although SAM is inferior in detecting nuclear features than light microscopy, it can differentiate malignant from benign cells using the higher SOS and AOS values and large irregular cell clusters that are typical features of carcinomas. Moreover, each single malignant cell exhibits characteristic cytoplasmic features such as a large size, irregular borders and secretory or cytoskeletal content. By adjusting the observation range, malignant cells are differentiated from benign cells easily using SAM. Subtle changes in the functional and structural heterogeneity of tumour cells were pursuable with a different digital data of SAM. SAM can be a useful tool for screening malignant cells in effusions before light microscopic observation. Higher AOS values in malignant cells compared with those of benign cells support the feasibility of a novel sonodynamic therapy for malignant effusions. PMID:26477839

  6. A scanning acoustic microscope discriminates cancer cells in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) discriminates lesions in sections by assessing the speed of sound (SOS) or attenuation of sound (AOS) through tissues within a few minutes without staining; however, its clinical use in cytological diagnosis is unknown. We applied a thin layer preparation method to observe benign and malignant effusions using SAM. Although SAM is inferior in detecting nuclear features than light microscopy, it can differentiate malignant from benign cells using the higher SOS and AOS values and large irregular cell clusters that are typical features of carcinomas. Moreover, each single malignant cell exhibits characteristic cytoplasmic features such as a large size, irregular borders and secretory or cytoskeletal content. By adjusting the observation range, malignant cells are differentiated from benign cells easily using SAM. Subtle changes in the functional and structural heterogeneity of tumour cells were pursuable with a different digital data of SAM. SAM can be a useful tool for screening malignant cells in effusions before light microscopic observation. Higher AOS values in malignant cells compared with those of benign cells support the feasibility of a novel sonodynamic therapy for malignant effusions.

  7. A scanning acoustic microscope discriminates cancer cells in fluid.

    PubMed

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) discriminates lesions in sections by assessing the speed of sound (SOS) or attenuation of sound (AOS) through tissues within a few minutes without staining; however, its clinical use in cytological diagnosis is unknown. We applied a thin layer preparation method to observe benign and malignant effusions using SAM. Although SAM is inferior in detecting nuclear features than light microscopy, it can differentiate malignant from benign cells using the higher SOS and AOS values and large irregular cell clusters that are typical features of carcinomas. Moreover, each single malignant cell exhibits characteristic cytoplasmic features such as a large size, irregular borders and secretory or cytoskeletal content. By adjusting the observation range, malignant cells are differentiated from benign cells easily using SAM. Subtle changes in the functional and structural heterogeneity of tumour cells were pursuable with a different digital data of SAM. SAM can be a useful tool for screening malignant cells in effusions before light microscopic observation. Higher AOS values in malignant cells compared with those of benign cells support the feasibility of a novel sonodynamic therapy for malignant effusions. PMID:26477839

  8. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and cerebrospinal fluid cells from patients with multiple sclerosis for detection of JC virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    lacobaeus, E; Ryschkewitsch, C; Gravell, M; Khademi, M; Wallstrom, E; Olsson, T; Brundin, L; Major, EO

    2009-01-01

    Objective 1) To determine whether JC virus (JCV) DNA was present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in comparison with controls and 2) to find out if our clinical material, based on presence of JCV DNA, included any patient at risk for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Methods The prevalence of JCV DNA was analyzed in CSF and plasma from 217 patients with MS, 86 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), and 212 patients with other neurological diseases (OND). In addition, we analyzed CSF cells, the first report of JCV DNA in CSF cells in a single sample, and peripheral blood cells in a subgroup of MS (n = 49), CIS (n = 14) and OND (n = 53). Results A low copy number of JCV DNA was detected in one MS cell free CSF sample and in one MS CSF cell samples. None of these had any signs of PML or developed this disease during follow-up. In addition, two OND plasma samples were JCV DNA positive, whereas all the other samples had no detectable virus. Conclusion A low copy number of JCV DNA may occasionally be observed both in MS and other diseases and may occur as part of the normal biology of JC virus in humans. This study does not support the hypothesis that patients with MS would be at increased risk to develop PML, and consequently screening of CSF as a measurable risk for PML is not useful. PMID:18805840

  9. Changes in B-Cell Counts and Percentages during Primary HIV Infection Associated with Disease Progression in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chen; Jiang, Yongjun; Zhang, Zining; Hu, Qinghai; Chu, Zhenxing; Xu, Junjie; Zhao, Bin; Ding, Haibo; Liu, Jing; Han, Xiaoxu; Cao, Yaming; Shang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Numerous anomalies in B-cell phenotypes and functions have been described in HIV-infected individuals. However, the actual relationship between B cells and disease progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated B-cell counts/percentages during a 12-month infection period in HIV-infected individuals that eventually developed into typical progressors (TPs) or rapid progressors (RPs). We found, after 12 months of infection, the baseline B-cell counts/percentages correlated positively with CD4+ T-cell counts (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.026) and negatively with HIV viral set points (P = 0.014 and P = 0.002). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high baseline B-cell counts/percentages were associated with a slow CD4-cell decline. B-cell kinetics indicated the baseline B-cell counts/percentages could be factors distinguishing between TPs and RPs. The combination of the baseline B-cell counts and percentages was associated with rapid disease progression (a 80.7% predictive value as measured by the area under the curve). These results indicate that the baseline B-cell counts/percentages might be associated with HIV disease progression. PMID:26436092

  10. Simulations of Cell Geometry Effects of ac Plasma Display Panel with Fluid and Hybrid codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Shon Chae; Kyo, Shin Young; Woong, Kim; Ho, Kang Jin; Koo, Lee Jae

    1999-10-01

    The simulation of new Plasma Display Panel (PDP) cell geometry was carried out by two different codes. One is a fluid-type code[1] and the other is a hybrid type which uses fluid equation for ions and particle-in-cell, Monte-Carlo collision model[2] for electrons. Self consistent electron energy distribution function (EEDF) can be obtained from the hybrid code instead of assumed one as in the fluid code. We obtain various plasma characteristics (density, potential, power consumption, electron temperature, and others) of PDP cell using these codes. We also implemented a simple radiation transport model in these codes to calculate the amount of visible light at the front window. The new cells, hollow cathode and ditched surface discharges, are simulated with these codes. These cells show somewhat different characteristics compared with coplanar-type PDP cells. The plasma distributions of these cells are broader than the usual coplanar-type PDP cells. [1] Y.K. Shin, J.K. Lee, and W. Kim, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 38(1999) pp. L174-177. [2] Y.K. Shin, C.H.Shon, H.S. Lee, W. Kim, and J.K. Lee, Proc. 18th Int. Display Research Conf. Asia '98, p. 609 (1998), Vahid Vahedi and G. DiPeso, J. Comp. Phys. 131, p149-163 (1997).

  11. Modeling CD4+ cell count increase over a six-year period in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in Senegal.

    PubMed

    De Beaudrap, Pierre; Etard, Jean-François; Diouf, Assane; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Guèye, Ndèye Fatou; Guèye, Pape Mandoumbé; Sow, Papa Salif; Mboup, Souleymane; Ndoye, Ibra; Ecochard, René; Eric, Delaporte

    2009-06-01

    To assess the extents and determinants of long-term CD4 cell increases after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), changes in CD4 cell counts were analyzed in a cohort of HIV-1-infected Senegalese using a mixed-effects model. After a median follow-up of 54 months, an average of 483 CD4 cells/mm3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 331; 680) was reached. The average asymptote level was approximately 421 cells/mm3 (95% CI = 390; 454) in patients with < 200 cells/mm3 at baseline and approximately 500 cells/mm3 in patients with > 200 cells/mm3. The independent predictors of long-term CD4 cell reconstitution were the baseline CD4 cell count and the monthly average viral load over the entire follow-up. This good long-term immune reconstitution, optimal in subjects with low average viral loads and > 200 CD4 cells/mm3 at baseline, argues in favor of the earliest possible access to ART and underlines the importance of strict compliance with the treatment. PMID:19478274

  12. Symptomatic Illness and Low CD4 Cell Count at HIV Seroconversion as Markers of Severe Primary HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Sara; Fisher, Martin; Phillips, Andrew; De Luca, Andrea; Ghosn, Jade; Malyuta, Ruslan; Zangerle, Robert; Moreno, Santiago; Vanhems, Philippe; Boufassa, Faroudy; Guiguet, Marguerite; Porter, Kholoud

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk/benefit of initiating ART in primary HIV infection (PHI) is unclear. The benefits are more likely to outweigh the risks in patients with severe PHI. An accepted definition of severe PHI is, however, lacking. Methods CASCADE patients with HIV test interval <6 months were classified as severe and non-severe PHI based on whether the following traits were recorded in the first 6 months following seroconversion: severe specific pre-defined symptoms, central nervous system-implicated illness, and ?1, ?2 CD4<350 (and <500) cells/mm3. For each definition, we used Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox survival models to compare time to AIDS/death, censoring at the earlier of last clinic visit or 1/1/1997, when combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) became available. Results Among 1108 included patients mostly males (85%) infected through sex between men (71%), 366 were diagnosed with AIDS/died. The risk of AIDS/death was significantly higher for individuals with severe symptoms, those with ?1 CD4<350 cells/mm3 or ?2 CD4 <500 cells/mm3 in the first 6 months [aHR (95% confidence interval) 2.1 (1.4,3.2), 2.0 (1.5,2.7), and 2.3, (1.5–3.5) respectively]. Median [interquantile range] survival for patients with ?2, ?1 and no CD4<350 cells/mm3 within 6 months of seroconversion was 3.9 [2.7,6.5], 5.4 [4.5,8.4] and 8.1 [4.3,10.3] years, respectively. The diagnosis of CNS-implicated symptoms was rare and did not appear to be prognostic. Conclusion One CD4 count <350 or two <500 cells/mm3 within 6 months of seroconversion and/or severe illness in PHI may be useful early indicators of individuals at high risk of disease progression. PMID:24244330

  13. Fluorescent intensity-based differential counting of FITC-doped silica nanoparticles: applications of CD4+ T-cell detection in microchip-type flowcytometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hoyoung; Bang, Hyunwoo; Lee, Won Gu; Lim, Hyunchang; Park, Junha; Lee, Joonmo; Riaz, Asif; Cho, Keunchang; Chung, Chanil; Han, Dong-Chul; Chang, Jun Keun

    2007-12-01

    Although CD4+ T-cells are an important target of HIV detection, there have been still major problems in making a diagnosis and monitoring in the third world and the region with few medical facilities. Then, it is necessary to use portable diagnosis devices at low cost when you put an enumeration of CD4+ T-cells. In general, the counting of CD4 below 200cells/uL makes it necessary to initiate antiretroviral treatment in adults (over 13 years old). However, lymphocyte subsets (including CD4 counts) of infants and young children are higher than those of adults. This fact shows the percentage of CD4+ T-cells of blood subsets, i.e., CD4/CD45%, CD4/CD8% or CD4/CD3% means a more reliable indicator of HIV infection than absolute counts in children. To know the percentage of CD4+ T-cell by using two fluorescent dyes of different emission wavelength, at least, one laser and two PMT detectors are in general needed. Then, it is so hard to develop a portable device like a 'toaster size' because this makes such a device more complex including many peripheral modules. In this study, we developed a novel technique to control the intensity of fluorescent dye-doped silica nanoparticles. I synthesized FITC-doped silica nanoparticles conjugated CD4 antibody 10 times brighter than FITC-conjugated CD45 antibody. With the difference of intensity of two fluorescent dyes, we measured two parameters by using only a single detector and laser. Most experiments were achieved with uFACS (microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter) on an inverted microscope (IX71, Olympus). In conclusion, this method enables us to discriminate the difference between CD4 and CD45 in an intensity domain simultaneously. Furthermore, this technique would make it possible develop much cheaper and smaller devices which can count the number of CD4 T-cells.

  14. Effect of storage temperature on prokaryotic cell counts and community composition analysis from fixed and filtered seawater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Christine; Moss, Shaun M.; Azam, Farooq

    2008-06-01

    Marine, pelagic prokaryotes commonly are visualized and enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy after staining with fluorescent, DNA-binding dyes and sample preparation and storage has a major influence on obtaining reliable estimates. However, sampling often takes place in remote locations and the recommended continuous sample storage at -20°C until further sample evaluation is often logistically challenging or infeasible. We investigated the effect of storage temperature on fixed and filtered seawater samples for subsequent enumeration of total prokaryotic cells and community composition analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Prokaryotic abundance in surface seawater was not significantly different after 99 days when filters were stored either at room temperature (RT) or at -20°C. Furthermore, there was no loss in detection rates of phylotypes by FISH from filters stored at RT or -20°C for 28-30 days. We conclude that fixed and filtered seawater samples intended for total prokaryote counts or for FISH may be maintained long-term at room temperature, and this should logistically facilitate diverse studies of prokaryote ecology, biogeography, and the occurrence of human and fish/shellfish pathogens.

  15. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous fluids under pressure with a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Ni, Huaiwei; Chen, Qi; Keppler, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Electrical conductivity data of aqueous fluids under pressure can be used to derive the dissociation constants of electrolytes, to assess the effect of ionic dissociation on mineral solubility, and to interpret magnetotelluric data of earth's interior where a free fluid phase is present. Due to limitation on the tensile strength of the alloy material of hydrothermal autoclaves, previous measurements of fluid conductivity were mostly restricted to less than 0.4 GPa and 800?°C. By adapting a Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell, we have developed a new method for acquiring electrical conductivity of aqueous fluids under pressure. Our preliminary results for KCl solutions using the new method are consistent with literature data acquired with the conventional method, but the new method has great potential for working in a much broader pressure range. PMID:25430149

  16. Association of White Blood Cell Count and Differential with the Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Misialek, Jeffrey R.; Bekwelem, Wobo; Chen, Lin Y.; Loehr, Laura R.; Agarwal, Sunil K.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Norby, Faye L.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Background Although inflammation is involved in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), the association of white blood cell (WBC) count and differential with AF has not been thoroughly examined in large cohorts with extended follow-up. Methods We studied 14,500 men and women (25% blacks, 55% women, mean age 54) free of AF at baseline (1987–89) from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, a community-based cohort in the United States. Incident AF cases through 2010 were identified from study electrocardiograms, hospital discharge records and death certificates. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for AF associated with WBC count and differential. Results Over a median follow-up time of 21.5 years for the entire cohort, 1928 participants had incident AF. Higher total WBC count was associated with higher AF risk independent of AF risk factors and potential confounders (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04–1.15 per 1-standard deviation [SD] increase). Higher neutrophil and monocyte counts were positively associated with AF risk, while an inverse association was identified between lymphocyte count and AF (multivariable adjusted HRs 1.16, 95% CI 1.09–1.23; 1.05, 95% CI 1.00–1.11; 0.91, 95% CI 0.86–0.97 per 1-SD, respectively). No significant association was identified between eosinophils or basophils and AF. Conclusions High total WBC, neutrophil, and monocyte counts were each associated with higher AF risk while lymphocyte count was inversely associated with AF risk. Systemic inflammation may underlie this association and requires further investigation for strategies to prevent AF. PMID:26313365

  17. High Goblet Cell Count Is Inversely Associated with Ploidy Abnormalities and Risk of Adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Carissa A.; Liu, Karen; Fong, Pui Yee; Li, Xiaohong; Cowan, David S.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Reid, Brian J.; Blount, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Goblet cells may represent a potentially successful adaptive response to acid and bile by producing a thick mucous barrier that protects against cancer development in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between goblet cells (GC) and risk of progression to adenocarcinoma, and DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities, in BE patients. Experimental Design Baseline mucosal biopsies (N=2988) from 213 patients, 32 of whom developed cancer during the follow up period, enrolled in a prospective dynamic cohort of BE patients were scored in a blinded fashion, for the total number (#) of GC, mean # of GC/crypt (GC density), # of crypts with ? 1 GC, and the proportion of crypts with ?1 GC, in both dysplastic and non-dysplastic epithelium separately. The relationship between these four GC parameters and DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities and adenocarcinoma outcome was compared, after adjustment for age, gender, and BE segment length. Results High GC parameters were inversely associated with DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities, such as aneuploidy, ploidy >2.7N, and an elevated 4N fraction > 6%, and with risk of adenocarcinoma. However, a Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the total # of GC and the total # crypts with ?1 GC were the only significant GC parameters (p<0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions The results of this study show, for the first time, an inverse relationship between high GC counts and flow cytometric abnormalities and risk of adenocarcinoma in BE. Further studies are needed to determine if GC depleted foci within esophageal columnar mucosa are more prone to neoplastic progression or whether loss of GC occurs secondary to underlying genetic abnormalities. PMID:26230607

  18. Antibody-Functionalized Fluid-Permeable Surfaces for Rolling Cell Capture at High Flow Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sukant; Wong, Ian Y.; Deen, William M.; Toner, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion-based cell capture on surfaces in microfluidic devices forms the basis of numerous biomedical diagnostics and in vitro assays. However, the performance of these platforms is partly limited by interfacial phenomena that occur at low Reynolds numbers. In contrast, cell homing to porous vasculature is highly effective in vivo during inflammation, stem cell trafficking, and cancer metastasis. Here, we show that a porous, fluid-permeable surface functionalized with cell-specific antibodies promotes efficient and selective cell capture in vitro. This architecture is advantageous due to enhanced transport as streamlines are diverted toward the surface. Moreover, specific cell-surface interactions are promoted due to reduced shear, allowing gentle cell rolling and arrest. Together, these synergistic effects enable highly effective cell capture at flow rates more than an order of magnitude larger than those provided by existing devices with solid surfaces. PMID:22385842

  19. Exploring the characteristics and dynamics of Ontario dairy herds experiencing increases in bulk milk somatic cell count during the summer.

    PubMed

    Shock, D A; LeBlanc, S J; Leslie, K E; Hand, K; Godkin, M A; Coe, J B; Kelton, D F

    2015-06-01

    Regionally aggregated bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) data from around the world shows a repeatable cyclicity, with the highest levels experienced during warm, humid seasons. No studies have evaluated this seasonal phenomenon at the herd level. The objectives of this study were to define summer seasonality in BMSCC on an individual herd basis, and subsequently to describe the characteristics and dynamics of herds with increased BMSCC in the summer. The data used for this analysis were from all dairy farms in Ontario, Canada, between January 2000 and December 2011 (n?4,000 to 6,000 herds/yr). Bulk milk data were obtained from the milk marketing board and consisted of bulk milk production, components (fat, protein, lactose, other solids), and quality (BMSCC, bacterial count, inhibitor presence, freezing point), total milk quota of the farm, and milk quota and incentive fill percentage. A time-series linear mixed model, with random slopes and intercepts, was constructed using sine and cosine terms as predictors to describe seasonality, with herd as a random effect. For each herd, seasonality was described with reference to 1 cosine function of variable amplitude and phase shift. The predicted months of maximal and minimal BMSCC were then calculated. Herds were assigned as low, medium, and high summer increase (LSI, MSI, and HSI, respectively) based on percentiles of amplitude in BMSCC change for each of the 4 seasons. Using these seasonality classifications, 2 transitional repeated measures logistic regression models were built to assess the characteristics of MSI and HSI herds, using LSI herds as controls. Based on the analyses performed, a history of summer BMSCC increases increased the odds of experiencing a subsequent increase. As herd size decreased, the odds of experiencing HSI to MSI in BMSCC increased. Herds with more variability in daily BMSCC were at higher odds of experiencing MSI and HSI in BMSCC, as were herds with lower annual mean BMSCC. Finally, a negative association was noted between filling herd production targets and experiencing MSI to HSI in BMSCC. These findings provide farm advisors direction for predicting herds likely to experience increases in SCC over the summer, allowing them to proactively focus udder health prevention strategies before the high-risk summer period. PMID:25864052

  20. Seminal fluid factors regulate activin A and follistatin synthesis in female cervical epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, David J; Schjenken, John E; Mottershead, David G; Robertson, Sarah A

    2015-12-01

    Seminal fluid induces pro-inflammatory cytokines and elicits an inflammation-like response in the cervix. Here, Affymetrix microarray and qPCR was utilised to identify activin A (INHBA) and its inhibitor follistatin (FST) amongst the cytokines induced by seminal plasma in Ect1 ectocervical epithelial cells, and a similar response was confirmed in primary ectocervical epithelial cells. TGFB is abundant in seminal plasma and all three TGFB isoforms induced INHBA in Ect1 and primary cells, and neutralisation of TGFB in seminal plasma suppressed the INHBA response. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide in seminal plasma also elicited INHBA, but potently suppressed FST production. There was moderate reciprocal inhibition between FST and INHBA, and cross-attenuating effects were seen. These data identify TGFB and potentially LPS as factors mediating seminal plasma-induced INHBA synthesis in cervical cells. INHBA and FST induced by seminal fluid in cervical tissues may thus contribute to regulation of the post-coital response in women. PMID:26415587

  1. Baseline CD4+ T lymphocyte cell counts, hepatitis B and C viruses seropositivity in adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection at a tertiary hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adekunle, Ajayi Ebenezer; Oladimeji, Ajayi Akande; Temi, Adegun Patrick; Adeseye, Ajayi Iyiade; Akinyeye, Ojo Abiodun; Taiwo, Raimi Hussean

    2011-01-01

    Background Ekiti State of Nigeria is known to have the lowest prevalence of HIV in Nigeria. University Teaching Hospital (UTH), Ado Ekiti was recently upgraded to serve as one of the three centres for HIV/AIDS referral, diagnosis and treatment in Ekiti State. We evaluated the baseline immunologic and biochemical parameters of patients presenting at the ART clinic of University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State. Methods All HIV seropositive patients not yet on antiretroviral therapy, who presented at the ART Clinic within the study period had at the first visit to the clinic, their blood sample taken for CD4 cell counts estimation, HBsAg and anti- HCV screening, ALT, AST as well as hemoglobin estimation as part of the routine workup to assess their disease health status and need for antiretroviral therapy. Statistical significance was taken as p< 0.05. Results A total of 273 patients comprising 79 (28.9%) males and 194 (71.1%) females were included in the study (F:M = 2.46: 1). The mean age of the study population was 36.21± 10.20 years with mean age of males (39.52 ± 9.95years) significantly higher than females (34.88 ± 10.02; p=0.001). The overall prevalence of HBsAg in the study population was 6.6% with a sex specific prevalence of 8.1% and 6% for males and females, respectively. No statistically significance difference in the mean serum alanine transaminase, serum aspartate transaminase, hemoglobin and CD4+ T- Lymphocytes cell count of those who had HBsAg negative status compared to those who had HBsAg positive status. Two (0.7%) of the patients had positive serum anti HCV antibodies. The CD4+ T- Lymphocytes cell count ranged between 5 – 1050 cells/µl with a mean of 286.19 ± 233.31 cells/µl. The majority of patients (71.8%) had a CD4+ T- Lymphocytes cell count < 350 cells/µl. Conclusion At the time of presentation, majority of our patients had a CD4+ T- Lymphocytes cell count less than 350 cells/µl consistent with significant immune-suppression. More sustained and vigorous awareness campaigns still need to be done in Ekiti State to diagnose this disease early. There is also a need to accelerate the integration of hepatitis B virus screening and treatment programme into HIV/AIDS programme because of the morbidity and mortality implication of HBV and HIV co-infection. PMID:22145054

  2. FluidNet: A Flexible Cloud-based Radio Access Network for Small Cells

    E-print Network

    Krishnamurthy, Srikanth

    FluidNet: A Flexible Cloud-based Radio Access Network for Small Cells Karthikeyan Sundaresan NEC Labs America, Inc. karthiks@nec-labs.com Mustafa Y. Arslan NEC Labs America, Inc. marslan@nec-labs.com Shailendra Singh UC Riverside singhs@cs.ucr.edu Sampath Rangarajan NEC Labs America, Inc. sampath@nec

  3. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  4. Women Count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Dana M.

    2014-11-01

    I am a counter by nature. I count things as an effective way to occupy my mind. How many people are in this room? How many are women? How many are wearing glasses? How many people are using a Mac versus a PC?

  5. Counting Penguins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  6. Herd management and social variables associated with bulk tank somatic cell count in dairy herds in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Schewe, R L; Kayitsinga, J; Contreras, G A; Odom, C; Coats, W A; Durst, P; Hovingh, E P; Martinez, R O; Mobley, R; Moore, S; Erskine, R J

    2015-11-01

    The ability to reduce somatic cell counts (SCC) and improve milk quality depends on the effective and consistent application of established mastitis control practices. The US dairy industry continues to rely more on nonfamily labor to perform critical tasks to maintain milk quality. Thus, it is important to understand dairy producer attitudes and beliefs relative to management practices, as well as employee performance, to advance milk quality within the changing structure of the dairy industry. To assess the adoption rate of mastitis control practices in United States dairy herds, as well as assess social variables, including attitudes toward employees relative to mastitis control, a survey was sent to 1,700 dairy farms in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Florida in January and February of 2013. The survey included questions related to 7 major areas: sociodemographics and farm characteristics, milking proficiency, milking systems, cow environment, infected cow monitoring and treatment, farm labor, and attitudes toward mastitis and related antimicrobial use. The overall response rate was 41% (21% in Florida, 39% in Michigan, and 45% in Pennsylvania). Herd size ranged from 9 to 5,800 cows. Self-reported 3-mo geometric mean bulk tank SCC (BTSCC) for all states was 194,000cells/mL. Multivariate analysis determined that proven mastitis control practices such as the use of internal teat sealants and blanket dry cow therapy, and not using water during udder preparation before milking, were associated with lower BTSCC. Additionally, farmer and manager beliefs and attitudes, including the perception of mastitis problems and the threshold of concern if BTSCC is above 300,000cells/mL, were associated with BTSCC. Ensuring strict compliance with milking protocols, giving employees a financial or other penalty if BTSCC increased, and a perceived importance of reducing labor costs were negatively associated with BTSCC in farms with nonfamily employees. These findings highlight the need for a comprehensive approach to managing mastitis, one that includes the human dimensions of management to maintain the practice of scientifically validated mastitis control practices. PMID:26298763

  7. Stokes flow of a micropolar fluid past an assemblage of spheroidal particle-in-cell models with slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherief, H. H.; Faltas, M. S.; Ashmawy, E. A.; Nashwan, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    In a cell model it is assumed that the three-dimensional assemblage may be considered to consist of a number of identical unit cells, each of which contains a particle surrounded by a fluid envelope with a fictitious surface (free surface) containing a volume of fluid sufficient to make the fractional void volume in the cell identical to that in the entire assemblage. The quasi-steady axisymmetric translational motion of a spherical or spheroidal cell of an incompressible micropolar fluid is investigated utilizing the cell model method. The inner particle of the cell is assumed to be solid and the outer to be fictitious. Linear velocity and microrotation slip boundary conditions on the surface of the solid particle are proposed. Normalized mobility is obtained for both spherical and spheroidal particles in the cell model and is represented graphically. Expressions for the superficial fluid velocity through an assemblage of spherical and spheroidal particles are obtained.

  8. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by

  9. Flow cytometric analysis of T cell subsets in paired samples of cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood from patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Maxeiner, Horst-G; Rojewski, Markus Thomas; Schmitt, Anita; Tumani, Hayrettin; Bechter, Karl; Schmitt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest inflammatory mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders (MPD). T cells play a major role during inflammation, but little is known about T cell subpopulations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We investigated the frequency of cells positive for the surface markers CD4, CD8, CD25, CD45, CD69, and CD127 in 45 paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) samples by multiparameter flow cytometry from patients with MPD of the schizophrenic and affective spectrum with normal CSF cell counts and compared them with those from patients with non-inflammatory (NIND), chronic inflammatory (CIND) neurological disorders, and meningitis (MEN). In MEN patients, CD4+ cell frequency in PB, but not in CSF, was significantly increased as compared to CIND and NIND. No difference between patient groups was observed for CD8+. CD4+CD45RO+ double positive cells in PB were significantly lower in CIND than in MEN or NIND. The frequency of CD4+CD25+ cells in PB was significantly higher in MEN than in MPD or CIND. For CSF, the percentage of CD4+CD127(dim) cells was significantly lower in MEN than in MPD. CD4+CD127(dim) in PB and CSF showed overlapping characteristic clusters between MPD and CIND and MEN patients. Overall, the hypothesis of low degree inflammation in a subgroup of MPD is supported. The analysis of lymphocyte subsets in PB and CSF constitutes a novel promising tool to understand underlying pathomechanisms in psychiatric and neurological disorders on an individual case level. PMID:18771722

  10. Effect of Varying Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability & Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun; Dozier, David; Triantafillu, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Cancer stem cells cultured in vitro in stirred bioreactors are exposed to shear stress. By observing the effect of shear stress on cancer stem cell viability, laboratory cell growth could be optimized. In addition, metastasized cancer stem cells in vivo are naturally exposed to shear stress, a factor influencing stem cell differentiation, while circulating in the bloodstream. Changes in protein expression after exposure to shear stress could allow for identification and targeting of circulating cancer cells. In this study, blood flow through capillaries was simulated by using a syringe pump to inject suspensions of Kasumi-1 leukemia stem cells into model blood vessels composed of PEEK tubing 125 microns in diameter. The Hagen-Poisseuille equation was used to solve for operating flow rates based on specified amounts of shear stress. After exposure, cell counts and viabilities were observed using an optical microscope and proteins were analyzed using Western blotting. It was observed that at a one minute exposure to stress, cell viability increased as the amount of shear was increased from 10 to 60 dynes per square centimeter. Results from this research are applicable to optimization of large-scale stem cell growth in bioreactors as well as to the design of targeted cancer therapies. Funding from NSF REU grant #1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. The effect of pulsation ratio on teat condition, milk somatic cell count and productivity in dairy cows in automatic milking.

    PubMed

    Ferneborg, Sabine; Svennersten-Sjaunja, Kerstin

    2015-11-01

    The pulsation ratio of a milking machine affects milk flow and milking time, and has also been reported to influence teat condition and milk somatic cell count (SCC). However, most studies comparing pulsation ratios have been performed on conventional cluster milking (whole-udder level), where effects such as deteriorated teat end condition and increased milk SCC are likely to be caused by over-milking on teats that are emptied faster than the other teats. When the teat cups are detached from each udder quarter separately which can be done in automatic milking systems (AMS), the risk of over-milking, especially in front teats, may be significantly reduced. This study investigated the effects of pulsation ratio on teat end condition, milk SCC, milk yield, milking time and milk flow in an automatic milking system where each udder quarter is milked separately. In total, 356 cows on five commercial farms were included in a split-udder design experiment comparing three pulsation ratios (60:40, 70:30 and 75:25) with the standard pulsation ratio (65:35) during 6 weeks. Pulsation rate was 60 cycles/min and vacuum level 46 kPa. The 70:30 and 75:25 ratios increased peak and average milk flow and the machine-on time was shorter with 75:25, while both peak and average milk flows were lower and machine-on time was longer with the 60:40 ratio. No negative effects on teat condition or milk SCC were observed with any of the pulsation ratios applied during the study. Thus it is possible that increased pulsation ratio can be used to increase milking efficiency in AMS where quarter milking is applied. PMID:26411595

  12. Evaluation of a Method for Estimating Retinal Ganglion Cell Counts Using Visual Fields and Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ali S.; Hood, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the accuracy and generalizability of a published model that derives estimates of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) counts and relates structural and functional changes due to glaucoma. Methods. Both the Harwerth et al. nonlinear model (H-NLM) and the Hood and Kardon linear model (HK-LM) were applied to an independent dataset of frequency-domain optical coherence tomography and visual fields, consisting of 48 eyes of 48 healthy controls, 100 eyes of 77 glaucoma patients and suspects, and 18 eyes of 14 nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) patients with severe vision loss. Using the coefficient of determination R2, the models were compared while keeping constant the topographic maps, specifically a map by Garway-Heath et al. and a separate map by Harwerth et al., which relate sensitivity test stimulus locations to corresponding regions around the optic disc. Additionally, simulations were used to evaluate the assumptions of the H-NLM. Results. Although the predictions of the HK-LM with the anatomically-derived Garway-Heath et al. map were reasonably good (R2 = 0.31–0.64), the predictions of the H-NLM were poor (R2 < 0) regardless of the map used. Furthermore, simulations of the H-NLM yielded results that differed substantially from RGC estimates based on histology from human subjects. Finally, the value-added of factors increasing the relative complexity of the H-NLM, such as assumptions regarding age- and stage-dependent corrections to structural measures, was unclear. Conclusions. Several of the assumptions underlying the H-NLM should be revisited. Studies and models relying on the RGC estimates of the H-NLM should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25604684

  13. Mapping the osteocytic cell response to fluid flow using RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Govey, Peter M; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Donahue, Henry J

    2015-12-16

    Bone adaptation to mechanical loading is regulated via signal transduction by mechano-sensing osteocytes. Mineral-embedded osteocytes experience strain-induced interstitial fluid flow and fluid shear stress, and broad shifts in gene expression are key components in the signaling pathways that regulate bone turnover. RNA sequencing analysis, or RNA-Seq, enables more complete characterization of mechano-responsive transcriptome regulation than previously possible. We hypothesized that RNA-Seq of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells reveals both expected and novel gene transcript regulation in cells previously fluid flowed and analyzed using gene microarrays. MLO-Y4 cells were flowed for 2h with 1Pa oscillating fluid shear stress and post-incubated 2h. RNA-Seq of original samples detected 55 fluid flow-regulated gene transcripts (p-corrected <0.05), the same number previously detected by microarray. However, RNA-Seq demonstrated greater dynamic range, with all 55 transcripts increased >1.5-fold or decreased <0.67-fold whereas 10 of 55 met this cut-off by microarray. Analyses were complimentary in patterns of regulation, though only 6 transcripts were significant in both RNA-Seq and microarray analyses: Cxcl5, Cxcl1, Zc3h12a, Ereg, Slc2a1, and Egln1. As part of a broad inflammatory response inferred by gene ontology analyses, we again observed greatest up-regulation of inflammatory C-X-C motif chemokines, and newly implicated HIF-1? and AMPK signaling pathways. Importantly, we detected both expected fluid flow-sensitive transcripts (e.g. Nos2 [iNOS], Ptgs2 [COX-2], Ccl7) and transcripts not previously identified as flow-sensitive, e.g. Ccl2. We found RNA-Seq advantageous over microarrays because of its greater dynamic range and ability to analyze unbiased estimation of gene expression, informing our understanding of osteocyte signaling. PMID:26573903

  14. Effect of supplements: Probiotics and probiotic plus honey on blood cell counts and serum IgA in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Tehrani, Hajar-Alsadat; Rabbani-Khorasgani, Mohammad; Hosseini, Sayyed Mohsen; Mokarian, Fariborz; Mahdavi, Hoda; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy is frequently used in treatment approaches of pelvic malignancies. Nevertheless, it has some known systemic effects on blood cells and the immune system that possibly results in their susceptibility to infection. Probiotics are live microbial food ingredients that provide a health advantage to the consumer. Honey has prebiotic properties. The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate probable effects of probiotic or probiotics plus honey on blood cell counts and serum IgA levels in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Sixty-seven adult patients with pelvic cancer were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either: (1) Probiotic capsules (including: Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, and Streptococcus thermophiles) (n = 22), (2) probiotic capsules plus honey (n = 21) or (3) placebo capsules (n = 24) all for 6 weeks. Blood and serum samples were collected for one week before radiotherapy and 24-72 h after the end of radiotherapy. Results: White blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), platelet counts, and serum IgA level were not significantly changed in patients taking probiotic (alone or plus honey) during pelvic radiotherapy. The mean decrease in RBC count was 0.52, 0.18, and 0.23 × 106 cells/?L, WBC count was 2.3, 1.21, and 1.34 × 103 cells/?L and platelet count was, 57.6, 53.3, and 66.35 × 103 cells/?L for the probiotic, probiotic plus honey, and placebo groups, respectively. The mean decrease of serum IgA was 22.53, 29.94, and 40.73 mg/dL for the probiotic, probiotic plus honey, and placebo groups, respectively. Conclusion: The observed nonsignificant effect of probiotics may be in favor of local effects of this product in the gut rather than systemic effects, however, as a trend toward a benefit was indicated, further studies are necessary in order to extract effects of probiotics or probiotic plus honey on hematologic and immunologic parameters in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy. PMID:26622258

  15. Cytologic features of ovarian granulosa cell tumors in pleural and ascitic fluids.

    PubMed

    Omori, Makiko; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yuminamochi, Tsutomu; Nakazawa, Kumiko; Ishii, Yoshio; Fukasawa, Hiroko; Hashi, Akihiko; Hirata, Shuji

    2015-07-01

    Adult granulosa cell tumor (AGCT) is an uncommon neoplasm of the ovary with potential for aggressive behavior and late recurrence. The most important prognostic factor for AGCT is tumor stage. Thus, cytological assessment of pleural or ascitic fluids is crucial for initial staging and subsequent patient management. We report herein two cases of ovarian AGCT presenting with exfoliated tumor cells in pleural and ascitic fluid. The first case involved a 61-year-old woman who presented with stage Ic (a) AGCT. Seven years after initial diagnosis, pleural effusion and pleural dissemination were identified. The second case involved a 50-year-old woman who presented with stage IV AGCT with massive ascites and right pleural effusion. Fluid cytology from both cases showed cohesive or loose clusters of small uniform neoplastic cells with round-to-oval nuclei, coffee-bean-shaped nuclear grooves, small nucleoli, and scant cytoplasm. Call-Exner bodies were also observed in these cytologic specimens. In the differential diagnosis of small monomorphic tumor cells in pleural effusion or ascites, coffee-bean-shaped nuclear grooves and cell clusters forming Call-Exner bodies are diagnostic clues of AGCT. PMID:25605680

  16. Atypical manifestation of progressive outer retinal necrosis in AIDS patient with CD4+ T-cell counts more than 100 cells/microL on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Reeponmahar, Somporn; Tantisiriwat, Woraphot

    2009-06-01

    Typical progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is an acute ocular infectious disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with extremely low CD4+ T-cell counts. It is a form of the Varicella- zoster virus (VZV) infection. This destructive infection has an extremely rapid course that may lead to blindness in affected eyes within days or weeks. Attempts at its treatment have had limited success. We describe the case of a bilateral PORN in an AIDS patient with an initial CD4+ T-cell count >100 cells/microL that developed after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A 29-year-old Thai female initially diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 1998, presented with bilaterally decreased visual acuity after initiating HAART two months earlier. Multiple yellowish spots appeared in the deep retina without evidence of intraocular inflammation or retinal vasculitis. Her CD4+ T-cell count was 127 cells/microL. She was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and positive VZV in the aqueous humor and vitreous by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Despite combined treatment with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreous ganciclovir, the patient's visual acuity worsened with no light-perception in either eye. This case suggests that PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of reduced visual acuity in AIDS patients initiating HAART with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. PORN may be a manifestation of the immune reconstitution syndrome. PMID:19702067

  17. A Higher Correlation of HCV Core Antigen with CD4+ T Cell Counts Compared with HCV RNA in HCV/HIV-1 Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yuanlin; Cao, Guanghua; Zhi, Yuhong; Wang, Shuiwang; Xu, Chunhui; Wei, Lai; Lu, Fengmin; Zhuang, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Development of HCV infection is typically followed by chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in most patients, while spontaneous HCV viral clearance (SVC) occurs in only a minority of subjects. Compared with the widespread application of HCV RNA testing by quantitative RT-PCR technique, HCV core antigen detection may be an alternative indicator in the diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infections and in monitoring the status of infectious individuals. However, the correlation and differences between these two indicators in HCV infection need more investigation, especially in patients coinfected by HIV-1. In this study, a total of 354 anti-HCV and/or anti-HIV serum positive residents from a village of central China were enrolled. Besides HCV-related hepatopathic variables including clinical status, ALT, AST, anti-HCV Abs, as well as the altered CD4+/CD8+ T cell counts, HCV core antigen and HCV viral load were also measured. The concentration of serum HCV core antigen was highly correlated with level of HCV RNA in CHC patients with or without HIV-1 coinfection. Of note, HCV core antigen concentration was negatively correlated with CD4+ T cell count, while no correlation was found between HCV RNA level and CD4+ T cell count. Our findings suggested that quantitative detection of plasma HCV core antigen may be an alternative indicator of HCV RNA qPCR assay when evaluating the association between HCV replication and host immune status in HCV/HIV-1 coinfected patients. PMID:21858166

  18. Renal ?-intercalated cells maintain body fluid and electrolyte balance

    PubMed Central

    Gueutin, Victor; Vallet, Marion; Jayat, Maximilien; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Cornière, Nicolas; Leviel, Françoise; Sohet, Fabien; Wagner, Carsten A.; Eladari, Dominique; Chambrey, Régine

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of the B1 proton pump subunit (ATP6V1B1) in intercalated cells (ICs) leads to type I distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), a disease associated with salt- and potassium-losing nephropathy. Here we show that mice deficient in ATP6V1B1 (Atp6v1b1–/– mice) displayed renal loss of NaCl, K+, and water, causing hypovolemia, hypokalemia, and polyuria. We demonstrated that NaCl loss originated from the cortical collecting duct, where activity of both the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the pendrin/Na+-driven chloride/bicarbonate exchanger (pendrin/NDCBE) transport system was impaired. ENaC was appropriately increased in the medullary collecting duct, suggesting a localized inhibition in the cortex. We detected high urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and ATP levels in Atp6v1b1–/– mice. Inhibition of PGE2 synthesis in vivo restored ENaC protein levels specifically in the cortex. It also normalized protein levels of the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel and the water channel aquaporin 2, and improved polyuria and hypokalemia in mutant mice. Furthermore, pharmacological inactivation of the proton pump in ?-ICs induced release of PGE2 through activation of calcium-coupled purinergic receptors. In the present study, we identified ATP-triggered PGE2 paracrine signaling originating from ?-ICs as a mechanism in the development of the hydroelectrolytic imbalance associated with dRTA. Our data indicate that in addition to principal cells, ICs are also critical in maintaining sodium balance and, hence, normal vascular volume and blood pressure. PMID:24051376

  19. The interaction between a solid body and viscous fluid by marker-and-cell method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    A computational method for solving nonlinear problems relating to impact and penetration of a rigid body into a fluid type medium is presented. The numerical techniques, based on the Marker-and-Cell method, gives the pressure and velocity of the flow field. An important feature in this method is that the force and displacement of the rigid body interacting with the fluid during the impact and sinking phases are evaluated from the boundary stresses imposed by the fluid on the rigid body. A sample problem of low velocity penetration of a rigid block into still water is solved by this method. The computed time histories of the acceleration, pressure, and displacement of the block show food agreement with experimental measurements. A sample problem of high velocity impact of a rigid block into soft clay is also presented.

  20. Hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell: Application to studies of geologic fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming

    2003-01-01

    The hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) was designed to simulate the geologic conditions of crustal processes in the presence of water or other fluids. The HDAC has been used to apply external pressure to both synthetic and natural fluid inclusions in quartz to minimize problems caused by stretching or decrepitation of inclusions during microthermometric analysis. When the HDAC is loaded with a fluid sample, it can be considered as a large synthetic fluid inclusion and therefore, can be used to study the PVTX properties as well as phase relations of the sample fluid. Because the HDAC has a wide measurement pressure-temperature range and also allows in-situ optical observations, it has been used to study critical phenomena of various chemical systems, such as the geologically important hydrous silicate melts. It is possible, when the HDAC is combined with synchrotron X-ray sources, to obtain basic information on speciation and structure of metal including rare-earth elements (REE) complexes in hydrothermal solutions as revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Recent modifications of the HDAC minimize the loss of intensity of X-rays due to scattering and absorption by the diamonds. These modifications are especially important for studying elements with absorption edges below 10 keV and therefore particularly valuable for our understanding of transport and deposition of first-row transition elements and REE in hydrothermal environments.

  1. Direct demonstration of tubular fluid flow sensing by macula densa cells

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells in the cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL) detect variations in tubular fluid composition and transmit signals to the afferent arteriole (AA) that control glomerular filtration rate [tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF)]. Increases in tubular salt at the MD that normally parallel elevations in tubular fluid flow rate are well accepted as the trigger of TGF. The present study aimed to test whether MD cells can detect variations in tubular fluid flow rate per se. Calcium imaging of the in vitro microperfused isolated JGA-glomerulus complex dissected from mice was performed using fluo-4 and fluorescence microscopy. Increasing cTAL flow from 2 to 20 nl/min (80 mM [NaCl]) rapidly produced significant elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in AA smooth muscle cells [evidenced by changes in fluo-4 intensity (F); F/F0 = 1.45 ± 0.11] and AA vasoconstriction. Complete removal of the cTAL around the MD plaque and application of laminar flow through a perfusion pipette directly to the MD apical surface essentially produced the same results even when low (10 mM) or zero NaCl solutions were used. Acetylated ?-tubulin immunohistochemistry identified the presence of primary cilia in mouse MD cells. Under no flow conditions, bending MD cilia directly with a micropipette rapidly caused significant [Ca2+]i elevations in AA smooth muscle cells (fluo-4 F/F0: 1.60 ± 0.12) and vasoconstriction. P2 receptor blockade with suramin significantly reduced the flow-induced TGF, whereas scavenging superoxide with tempol did not. In conclusion, MD cells are equipped with a tubular flow-sensing mechanism that may contribute to MD cell function and TGF. PMID:20719981

  2. Hematopoietic progenitor cell collection after autologous transplant for multiple myeloma: low platelet count predicts for poor collection and sole use of resulting graft enhances risk of myelodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, X; Rosenbaum, ER; Tyler, LN; Sawyer, J; Heuck, CJ; Barlogie, B; Cottler-Fox, M

    2014-01-01

    Collection of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) after previous autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant (aHCT) was studied in 221 patients with multiple myeloma (MM). With a total of 333 collections, the median number of CD34 cells collected was 4.7 × 106 CD34 + cells/kg, and 74% of the patients collected ?2.5 × 106 CD34 + cells/kg. Among 26 variables examined, the strongest predictor for poor collection was a platelet count <100 × 106/l before mobilization (P<0.001). A subsequent aHCT was performed in 154 of the 221 patients. Sole use of HPC procured after aHCT in 86 patients was associated with delayed platelet recovery (P<0.001) and linked to development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-associated cytogenetic abnormalities (MDS-CA; P = 0.027, odds ratio (OR) 10.34) and a tendency towards clinical MDS/acute myeloid leukemia (AML; P = 0.091, OR 3.57). However, treatment-related mortality (P = 0.766) and time to absolute neutrophil count recovery ?0.5 × 109/l (P = 0.879) were similar to when a pre-aHCT graft was used. Indeed, adding HPC collected before any aHCT neutralized the risk of MDS-CA or MDS/AML. Therefore, we advise generous initial HPC collection to broaden the salvage armamentarium for patients with MM. PMID:23852547

  3. Effect of dexamethasone in feed on intestinal permeability, differential white blood cell counts, and immune organs in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Vicuña, E A; Kuttappan, V A; Galarza-Seeber, R; Latorre, J D; Faulkner, O B; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G; Bielke, L R

    2015-09-01

    We have previously shown that intestinal barrier function can be adversely affected by poorly digested diets or feed restriction, resulting in increased intestinal inflammation-associated permeability. Three experiments were conducted in broilers to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) treatment on systemic fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-D; 3-5 kDa) levels, indicative of increased gut epithelial leakage. Experiment 1 compared DEX injections of 1 mg/kg, once per day on d 3, 5, and 9, with feed administration at 0.57, 1.7, or 5.1 ppm d 4 to 10, with FITC-D serum concentrations 2.5 h after gavage with 4.16 mg/kg FITC-D. All DEX treatments resulted in marked (2 to 6X; P<0.05) increased serum FITC-D levels. Feed DEX administration resulted in greater (P<0.05) gut permeability than injection at any dose, with numerically optimal effects at the lowest dose tested. In experiments 2 and 3, chicks were randomly assigned to a starter ration containing either control (CON) or DEX treated feed (0.57 ppm/kg; d 3 to 10 experiment 2, d 4 to 10 experiment 3). At d 10, all chicks were treated by oral gavage with FITC-D and serum samples were obtained as described above. Samples of the liver were aseptically collected, homogenized, diluted 1:4 wt/vol in sterile saline, and serial dilutions were plated on tryptic soy agar to evaluate total numbers of aerobic bacteria in the liver as an index of bacterial translocation (BT). In both experiments, FITC-D absorption was significantly enhanced (P<0.05) in DEX-treated chicks, again indicating increased paracellular leakage across the gut epithelium associated with dissolution of tight junctions. Experiment 2 differential cell counts showed an increased heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, and immune organ (spleen and bursa of Fabricius) weights for experiments 2 and 3 were decreased (P<0.05) from controls. In experiments 2 and 3, dietary DEX administration resulted in numerically (experiment 2) or significantly (P<0.05) increased enteric BT to the liver, supporting the observation that dietary DEX causes a stress-like inflammatory GI response, which may contribute to subclinical or clinical disease, and may be a useful model for ongoing disease mitigation research related to stress-related diseases of GIT origin. PMID:26195804

  4. Different screening tests and milk somatic cell count for the prevalence of subclinical bovine mastitis in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Md Nazmul; Das, Ziban Chandra; Talukder, Anup Kumar; Alam, Mohammad Shah; Rahman, Abu Nasar Md Aminoor

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cows with subclinical mastitis (SCM) is an important tool for sustainable dairying and implementing effective mastitis control strategies. A total of 892 quarters milk samples from 228 lactating cows were screened by California mastitis test (CMT), White side test (WST), Surf field mastitis test (SFMT), and somatic cell count (SCC) to study the prevalence of bovine SCM in some selected areas of Bangladesh. Out of 228 cows, 148 (64.9%), 138 (60.5%), 132 (57.9%), and 164 (71.9%) were found positive for SCM by CMT, WST, SFMT, and SCC, respectively. The prevalence of bovine SCM was diagnosed 45.7, 40.2, 36.6, and 29.6% in Chittagong, Sirajgonj, Mymensingh, and Gazipur districts, respectively, based on a combination of all tests. The overall quarter-wise prevalence of SCM was 45.7, 43.5, 41.2, and 55.0% for CMT, WST, SFMT, and SCC. Single quarters and left front quarters were more prone to SCM (P?CMT>WST>SFMT). Thus, CMT was concluded to be the most accurate (r?=?0.782) field diagnostic test after laboratory test like SCC (r?=?0.924). However, the use of any single test may not be reliable in diagnosing SCM, while the result of CMT supported by SCC might be used effectively to pinpoint diagnosis of SCM in dairy animals than alone. PMID:25326717

  5. Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Petsche Connell, Jennifer; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that a population of stem cells can be isolated from amniotic fluid removed by amniocentesis that are broadly multipotent and nontumorogenic. These amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSC) could potentially provide an autologous cell source for treatment of congenital defects identified during gestation, particularly cardiovascular defects. In this review, the various methods of isolating, sorting, and culturing AFSC are compared, along with techniques for inducing differentiation into cardiac myocytes and endothelial cells. Although research has not demonstrated complete and high-yield cardiac differentiation, AFSC have been shown to effectively differentiate into endothelial cells and can effectively support cardiac tissue. Additionally, several tissue engineering and regenerative therapeutic approaches for the use of these cells in heart patches, injection after myocardial infarction, heart valves, vascularized scaffolds, and blood vessels are summarized. These applications show great promise in the treatment of congenital cardiovascular defects, and further studies of isolation, culture, and differentiation of AFSC will help to develop their use for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and cardiovascular therapies. PMID:23350771

  6. White Blood Cell, Neutrophil, and Lymphocyte Counts in Individuals in the Evacuation Zone Designated by the Government After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident: The Fukushima Health Management Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Akira; Ohira, Tetsuya; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Ohtsuru, Akira; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kobashi, Gen; Ozasa, Kotaro; Yasumura, Seiji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Lymphocytes are susceptible to damage from radiation, and the white blood cell (WBC) count, including counts of neutrophils and lymphocytes, is a useful method of dosimetry. According to the basic survey of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS), among 13 localities where evacuation was recommended, Iitate and Namie had more individuals with external radiation exposure of more than 5 mSv than the other evacuation areas. We analyzed whether or not WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts decreased after the disaster. Methods The subjects of this study were 45 278 men and women aged 20 to 99 years (18 953 men and 26 325 women; mean age 56 years) in the evacuation zone who participated in the Comprehensive Health Check (CHC) from June 2011 to the end of March 2012. Results Significant differences were detected in the mean values of WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts, and for the proportion of individuals under the minimum standard for WBC and neutrophil counts, among the 13 localities. However, the distribution of individuals at each 200-cell/µL increment in lymphocyte count were similar in these areas, and the WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts did not decrease in Iitate or Namie specifically. Conclusions No marked effects of radiation exposure on the distribution of WBC counts, including neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were detected within one year after the disaster in the evacuation zone. PMID:25311030

  7. Polymer dynamics and fluid flow in actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theriot, Julie

    2005-03-01

    In living cells, nonequilibrium protein polymerization reactions are frequently used to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy and thereby generate useful force for cellular movements. We have examined the polymer and fluid dynamics in two biological cases where the assembly of branched actin filament networks generates force: the intracellular movement of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, and the extension of the leading edge of skin epithelial cells during wound-healing. In both cases, net actin filament assembly occurs at the front of the network structure and net disassembly occurs at the rear. Actin protein subunits and other network components must be recycled through the fluid phase to the front of the polymerizing network in order for forward movement to continue at steady state. For actin-based movement of Listeria monocytogenes, we have found that actin recycling is not rate-limiting; instead, the speed of movement is governed by the cooperative dissociation of groups of noncovalent protein-protein bonds attaching the filamentous network to the bacterial surface. In contrast, rapid actin-based extension at the leading edge of moving epithelial cells is associated with unusual perturbations in intracellular fluid flow.

  8. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall. PMID:24032936

  9. Time-dependent deformations in bone cells exposed to fluid flow in vitro: investigating the role of cellular deformation in fluid flow-induced signaling.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ronald Y; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2007-01-01

    Numerous experiments have shown fluid flow to be a potent stimulator of bone cells in vitro, suggesting that fluid flow is an important physical signal in bone mechanotransduction. In fluid flow experiments, bone cells are exposed to both time-dependent (e.g., oscillating or pulsing) and time-independent (e.g., steady) flow profiles. Interestingly, the signaling response of bone cells shows dependence on loading frequency and/or rate that has been postulated to be due to viscoelastic behavior. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the time-dependent deformations of bone cells exposed to fluid flow in vitro. Specifically, our goal was to characterize the mechanical response of bone cells exposed to oscillatory flow from 0.5 to 2.0 Hz and steady flow, since these flow profiles have previously been shown to induce different morphological and biochemical responses in vitro. By tracking cell-bound sulfate and collagen coated fluorescent beads of varying sizes, we quantified the normalized peak deformation (peak displacement normalized by the maximum peak displacement observed for all frequencies) and phase lag in bone cells exposed to 1.0 Pa oscillating flow at frequencies of 0.5-2.0 Hz. The phase lag was small (3-10 degrees ) and frequency dependent, while the normalized peak displacements decreased as a weak power law of frequency ( approximately f(-0.2)). During steady flow, the cells exhibited a nearly instantaneous deformation, followed by creep. Our results suggest that while substantial viscous deformation may occur during steady flow (compared to oscillating flow at approximately 1 Hz), bone cells behave primarily as elastic bodies when exposed to flow at frequencies associated with habitual loading. PMID:17559856

  10. Ocular Fluid As a Replacement for Serum in Cell Cryopreservation Media

    PubMed Central

    Venna, Naresh Kumar; Murthy, Ch Lakshmi N.; Idris, Mohammed M.; Goel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Cryostorage is of immense interest in biomedical research, especially for stem cell-based therapies and fertility preservation. Several protocols have been developed for efficient cryopreservation of cells and tissues, and a combination of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) is commonly used. However, there is a need for an alternative to FBS because of ethical reasons, high cost, and risk of contamination with blood-borne diseases. The objective of the present study was to examine the possibility of using buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) ocular fluid (BuOF) to replace FBS in cryomedia. Frozen–thawed cells, which were cryopreserved in a cryomedia with BuOF, were assessed for viability, early and late apoptosis, and proliferation. Three cell lines (CHO, HEK, and C18-4), mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, and primary cells, such as mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs), and mouse bone marrow cells (mBMCs), were cryopreserved in cryomedia containing 10% DMSO (D10) with 20% FBS (D10S20) or D10 with 20% BuOF (D10O20). For all three cell lines and mES cells cryopreserved in either D10S20 or D10O20, thawed cells showed no difference in cell viability or cell recovery. Western blot analysis of frozen–thawed-cultured cells revealed that the expression of Annexin V and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins, and the ratio of BAX/BCL2 proteins were similar in all three cell lines, mES cells, and hPBMCs cryopreserved in D10S20 and D10O20. However, initial cell viability, cell recovery after culture, and PCNA expression were significantly lower in MEF cells, and the BAX/BCL2 protein ratio was elevated in mBMCs cryopreserved in D10O20. Biochemical and proteomic analysis of BuOF showed the presence of several components that may have roles in imparting the cryoprotective property of BuOF. These results encourage further research to develop an efficient serum-free cryomedia for several cell types using BuOF. PMID:26135924

  11. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows surface-linked ligands to diffuse freely in two dimensions. Ligands can become reorganized beneath cells, by reaction-diffusion processes, and may also adopt spatial configurations reflecting those of their cognate receptors on the cell surface (Figure 1B). This provides a significant benefit over conventional cell signaling and culturing systems that present inflexible distributions of signaling molecules. In this study, we observe marked differences in the response of cells to membrane surface displayed soluble ligands as a function of membrane fluidity. Tethering of soluble signaling molecules to fluid supported membranes opens up opportunities to use already developed membrane fabrication technologies to present soluble components within a surface array format.

  12. Helicobacter pylori Infection Is Associated with Higher CD4 T Cell Counts and Lower HIV-1 Viral Loads in ART-Naïve HIV-Positive Patients in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Eberhardt, Kirsten Alexandra; Dompreh, Albert; Kuffour, Edmund Osei; Soltau, Mareike; Schachscheider, Marei; Drexler, Jan Felix; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria; Häussinger, Dieter; Oteng-Seifah, Emelia Efua; Bedu-Addo, George; Phillips, Richard Odame; Norman, Betty; Burchard, Gerd; Feldt, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Background Worldwide, there is a high co-endemicity of HIV and H. pylori infection and there is growing evidence that H. pylori co-infection is associated with parameters of HIV disease progression. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infection, and the association with clinical, immunological and virological parameters in a large cohort of HIV-infected individuals and uninfected controls in a West African country. Methods HIV-patients (n = 1,095) and HIV-negative individuals (n = 107) were recruited at a university hospital in Ghana. H. pylori status was determined using stool antigen testing. HIV-related, clinical and socio-demographic parameters were recorded and analyzed according to H. pylori status. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly lower in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative individuals (51.5 vs. 88%, p<0.0001). In HIV patients, H. pylori prevalence decreased in parallel with CD4+ T cell counts. In ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals, but not in those taking ART, H. pylori infection was associated with higher CD4 cell counts (312 vs. 189 cells/?L, p<0.0001) and lower HIV-1 viral loads (4.92 vs. 5.21 log10 copies/mL, p = 0.006). The findings could not be explained by socio-demographic confounders or reported use of antibiotics. Having no access to tap water and higher CD4+ T cell counts were identified as risk factors for H. pylori infection. Conclusions H. pylori prevalence was inversely correlated with the degree of immunosuppression. In ART-naïve individuals, H. pylori infection is associated with favorable immunological and virological parameters. The underlying mechanisms for this association are unclear and warrant investigation. PMID:26599971

  13. APOBEC3G Expression is Dysregulated in Primary HIV-1 Infection and a Polymorphic Variant Influences CD4+ T Cell Counts and Plasma Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kavidha; Winkler, Cheryl; Werner, Lise; Mlisana, Koleka; Karim, Salim Abdool; Ndung’u, Thumbi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In the absence of HIV-1 Vif, cellular cytosine deaminases such as APOBEC3G, inhibit the virus by inducing hypermutations on viral DNA, among other mechanisms of action. We investigated the association of APOBEC3G mRNA levels and APOBEC3G genetic variants on HIV-1 susceptibility, and early disease pathogenesis using viral load and CD4+ T cell counts as outcomes. Methods Study subjects were 250 South African females at high risk for HIV-1C infection. We used quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of APOBEC3G in HIV?ve and HIV+ve primary infection samples. APOBEC3G variants were identified by DNA re-sequencing and TaqMan genotyping. Results We found no correlation between APOBEC3G expression levels and plasma viral loads (r=0.053, p=0.596) or CD4+ T cell counts (r=0.030, p=0.762) in 32 seroconverters. However, APOBEC3G expression levels were significantly higher in HIV?ve individuals compared to HIV+ve individuals (p<0.0001), including matched pre- and post infection samples from the same individuals (n=13, p<0.0001). 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), nine of which were novel, were identified within APOBEC3G by re-sequencing followed by genotyping of 168 individuals. The H186R mutation, a codon changing variant in exon 4, was associated with high viral loads (p=0.0097) and decreased CD4+ T cell levels (p=0.0081). Conclusions These data suggest that APOBEC3G transcription is rapidly downregulated upon HIV-1 infection. During primary infection, APOBEC3G expression levels in PBMCs do not correlate with viral loads or CD4+ T cell counts. However, structural variation of APOBEC3G may significantly affect early HIV-1 pathogenesis, although the mechanism remains unclear and warrants further investigation. PMID:19996938

  14. High-pressure and high-temperature neutron reflectometry cell for solid-fluid interface studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Lerner, A. H.; Taylor, M.; Baldwin, J. K.; Grubbs, R. K.; Majewski, J.; Hickmott, D. D.

    2012-07-01

    A new high pressure-temperature ( P - T Neutron Reflectometry (NR) cell developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is described that significantly extends the capabilities of solid/fluid interface investigations up to 200MPa ( ensuremath ˜ 30000 psi) and 200 ° C. The cell's simple aluminum construction makes it light and easy to operate while thinned neutron windows allow up to 74% neutron transmission. The wide-open neutron window geometry provides a maximum theoretical ensuremath Qz range of 0.31Å-1. Accurate T and P controls are integrated on the cell's control panel. Built-in powder wells provide the ability to saturate fluids with reactive solids, producing aqueous species and/or decomposing into gaseous phases. The cell is designed for samples up to 50.8mm in diameter and 10.0mm in thickness. An experiment investigating the high P - T corrosion behavior of aluminum on LANL's Surface ProfilE Analysis Reflectometer (SPEAR) is presented, demonstrating the functioning and capability of the cell. Finally, outlooks on high P - T NR applications and perspectives on future research are discussed.

  15. Application of Fluid Mechanical Force to Embryonic Sources of Hemogenic Endothelium and Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Diaz, Miguel F.; Wenzel, Pamela L.

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, hemodynamic forces caused by blood flow support vascular remodeling, arterialization of luminal endothelium, and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) emergence. Previously, we reported that fluid shear stress plays a key role in stimulating nitric oxide (NO) signaling in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) and is essential for definitive hematopoiesis. We employed a Dynamic Flow System modified from a cone-and-plate assembly to precisely regulate in vitro exposure of AGM cells to a defined pattern of laminar shear stress. Here, we present the design of a microfluidic platform accessible to any research group that requires small cell numbers and allows for recirculation of paracrine signaling factors with minimal damage to nonadherent hematopoietic progenitors and stem cells. We detail the assembly of the microfluidic platform using commercially available components and provide specific guidance in the use of an emerging standard in the measurement of embryonic HSC potential, intravenous neonatal transplantation. PMID:25063503

  16. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  17. Necrosis and apoptosis of polymorphonuclear cells exposed to peritoneal dialysis fluids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cendoroglo, M; Sundaram, S; Groves, C; Ucci, A A; Jaber, B L; Pereira, B J

    1997-12-01

    Conventional peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids are known to inhibit polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) phagocytosis, oxidative burst and enzyme release. However, the relative contributions of apoptosis and/or necrosis to this dysfunction have not been examined. We investigated the effects of osmolality, glucose concentration and heat-sterilization of PD fluids on necrosis and apoptosis of PMN. Polymorphonuclear cells were isolated from 8 healthy volunteers and exposed to different PD fluids for four hours. PMN were then double-stained with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to study the proportion of viable, apoptotic and necrotic cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to confirm the results obtained with flow cytometry. The fluids studied were conventionally heat-sterilized 1.5% Dianeal (1.5% D), conventionally heat-sterilized 4.25% Dianeal (4.25% D), 1.5% D in which the osmolality was increased to that of 4.25% D by adding mannitol (1.5% D + M), a filter-sterilized version of 4.25% D (4.25% D-F) and a 1.1% amino acid PD fluid (AA) (Nutrineal PD4). All PD fluids had their pH equilibrated (pH = 7.4) by the addition of sodium bicarbonate. Compared to PMN exposed to culture medium, a significantly higher proportion of necrosis was observed in PMN exposed to 1.5% D (P = 0.04). The 4.25% D induced greater necrosis than 1.5% D (P = 0.001), and the 4.25% D also induced significantly more necrosis (P = 0.002) compared to 4.25% D-F. These data suggest that the consequences of heat-sterilization, rather than high glucose concentration are responsible for the necrosis observed. Indeed, the proportion of necrotic PMN with 4.25% D-F was not significantly different from 1.5% D. The 1.5% D + M and AA induced significantly more apoptosis compared to 1.5% D (P = 0.006 and P < 0.05, respectively), suggesting that apoptosis can be induced by the high osmolality of PD fluids. However, 1.5% D +/- M also induced significantly more apoptosis (P = 0.007) compared to 4.25% D-F. This suggests that the apoptosis effect is specific for the osmolyte present in PD fluids, and that mannitol and amino acids induce more apoptosis than glucose. In summary, the different non-physiological components of conventional PD fluids evaluated in this study had a differential effect on PMN survival. Heat sterilization of high glucose-containing PD fluids was associated predominantly with necrosis of PMN, and high osmolality with apoptosis. PMID:9407510

  18. A fictitious domain method with a hybrid cell model for simulating motion of cells in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Wenrui; Xu, Zhiliang; Liu, Chun; Lin, Guang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we develop a hybrid model to represent membranes of biological cells and use the distributed-Lagrange-multiplier/fictitious-domain (DLM/FD) formulation for simulating the fluid/cell interactions. The hybrid model representing the cellular structure consists of a continuum representation of the lipid bilayer, from which the bending force is calculated through energetic variational approach, a discrete cytoskeleton model utilizing the worm-like chain to represent network filament, and area/volume constraints. For our computational scheme, a formally second-order accurate fractional step scheme is employed to decouple the entire system into three sub-systems: a fluid problem, a solid problem and a Lagrange multiplier problem. The flow problem is solved by the projection method; the solid problem based on the cell model is solved by a combination of level set method, ENO reconstruction, and the Newton method; and the Lagrange multiplier problem is solved by immerse boundary interpolation. The incompressibility of the material is implemented with the penalty function method. Numerical results compare favorably with previously reported numerical and experimental results, and show that our method is suited to the simulation of the cell motion in flow.

  19. Proteomic analysis of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm cells grown under physiologically relevant fluid shear stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The biofilm forming bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for maladies ranging from severe skin infection to major diseases such as bacteremia, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. A flow displacement system was used to grow S. aureus biofilms in four physiologically relevant fluid shear rates (50, 100, 500 and 1000 s-1) to identify proteins that are associated with biofilm. Results Global protein expressions from the membrane and cytosolic fractions of S. aureus biofilm cells grown under the above shear rate conditions are reported. Sixteen proteins in the membrane-enriched fraction and eight proteins in the cytosolic fraction showed significantly altered expression (p?fluid shear. These 24 proteins were identified using nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS. They were found to be associated with various metabolic functions such as glycolysis / TCA pathways, protein synthesis and stress tolerance. Increased fluid shear stress did not influence the expression of two important surface binding proteins: fibronectin-binding and collagen-binding proteins. Conclusions The reported data suggest that while the general metabolic function of the sessile bacteria is minimal under high fluid shear stress conditions, they seem to retain the binding capacity to initiate new infections. PMID:24855455

  20. Application of multiple levels of fluid shear stress to endothelial cells plated on polyacrylamide gels†

    PubMed Central

    Galie, P. A.; van Oosten, A.; Chen, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of endothelial cell response to fluid shear stress have previously been performed on unphysiologically rigid substrates. We describe the design and implementation of a microfluidic device that applies discrete levels of shear stress to cells plated on hydrogel-based substrates of physiologicallyrelevant stiffness. The setup allows for measurements of cell morphology and inflammatory response to the combined stimuli, and identifies mechanisms by which vascular stiffening leads to pathological responses to blood flow. We found that the magnitude of shear stress required to affect endothelial cell morphology and inflammatory response depended on substrate stiffness. Endothelial cells on 100 Pa substrates demonstrate a greater increase in cell area and cortical stiffness and decrease in NF-?B nuclear translocation in response to TNF-? treatment compared to controls than cells plated on 10 kPa substrates. The response of endothelial cells on soft substrates to shear stress depends on the presence of hyaluronan (HA). These results emphasize the importance of substrate stiffness on endothelial function, and elucidate a means by which vascular stiffening in aging and disease can impact the endothelium. PMID:25573790

  1. Reliable and Accurate CD4+ T Cell Count and Percent by the Portable Flow Cytometer CyFlow MiniPOC and “CD4 Easy Count Kit-Dry”, as Revealed by the Comparison with the Gold Standard Dual Platform Technology

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, Milena; De Biasi, Sara; Bianchini, Elena; Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Scacchetti, Tiziana; Trenti, Tommaso; Borghi, Vanni; Mussini, Cristina; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background An accurate and affordable CD4+ T cells count is an essential tool in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Flow cytometry (FCM) is the “gold standard” for counting such cells, but this technique is expensive and requires sophisticated equipment, temperature-sensitive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and trained personnel. The lack of access to technical support and quality assurance programs thus limits the use of FCM in resource-constrained countries. We have tested the accuracy, the precision and the carry-over contamination of Partec CyFlow MiniPOC, a portable and economically affordable flow cytometer designed for CD4+ count and percentage, used along with the “CD4% Count Kit-Dry”. Materials and Methods Venous blood from 59 adult HIV+ patients (age: 25–58 years; 43 males and 16 females) was collected and stained with the “MiniPOC CD4% Count Kit-Dry”. CD4+ count and percentage were then determined in triplicate by the CyFlow MiniPOC. In parallel, CD4 count was performed using mAbs and a CyFlow Counter, or by a dual platform system (from Beckman Coulter) based upon Cytomic FC500 (“Cytostat tetrachrome kit” for mAbs) and Coulter HmX Hematology Analyzer (for absolute cell count). Results The accuracy of CyFlow MiniPOC against Cytomic FC500 showed a correlation coefficient (CC) of 0.98 and 0.97 for CD4+ count and percentage, respectively. The accuracy of CyFlow MiniPOC against CyFlow Counter showed a CC of 0.99 and 0.99 for CD4 T cell count and percentage, respectively. CyFlow MiniPOC showed an excellent repeatability: CD4+ cell count and percentage were analyzed on two instruments, with an intra-assay precision below ±5% deviation. Finally, there was no carry-over contamination for samples at all CD4 values, regardless of their position in the sequence of analysis. Conclusion The cost-effective CyFlow MiniPOC produces rapid, reliable and accurate results that are fully comparable with those from highly expensive dual platform systems. PMID:25622041

  2. Locus BoLA-DRB3 is just an ordinary site of the polygene when explaining genetic variance of somatic cell count and milk yield.

    PubMed

    Oprzadek, Jolanta; Sender, Grazyna; Pawlik, Adrianna; Lukaszewicz, Marek

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed at clarifying the problem of the hitherto contradictory results regarding usefulness of BoLA-DRB3 locus as a marker in selection against mastitis and for milk yield. Treating the BoLA-DRB3 locus effect as random was proposed in place of considering it fixed. Somatic cell counts and milk yields recorded monthly on a test day (22 424) of 619 Polish Holstein cows genotyped for BoLA-DRB3 were analysed with an animal model including a random effect for genotype at this locus. The BoLA-DRB3 alleles were defined as restriction patterns obtained with three endonucleases. Two alternative BoLA-DRB3 additive genotype (co)variance structures were constructed for 161 genotypes recorded. One was based on the allelic similarity of the genotypes resulting in element values of 0 (no common allele), 0·5 (one allele in common), and 1 (diagonal). The other considered restriction site similarity (up to 3 in 1 allele) giving element values of 0 (no common restriction sites) and then increasingly in steps of 1/6 up to 6/6 (diagonal), where the numerator represents the number of common sites between genotypes. The DRB3 variance component for the natural logarithm of somatic cell count did not exceed 0·006 of the polygenic additive component or 0·003 for milk yield. Hence, unless we fail to detect the causative site or to properly define traits being the projection of a site, the effect of the genotype at the BoLA-DRB3 locus does not explain variation in somatic cell count and milk yield at a degree expected of a genetic marker. PMID:26333653

  3. Performance Evaluation of the Plateletworks® in the Measurement of Blood Cell Counts as compared to the Beckman Coulter Unicel DXH 800

    PubMed Central

    McNair, Erick; Qureshi, A. Mabood; Bally, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Prior to undergoing cardiac surgery many patients may have impaired platelet function due to platelet inhibition. Point of care testing (POCT) that produces quick results of platelet counts and function allow earlier clinician interpretation, diagnosis and treatment. Before being adopted for routine clinical use, a POCT device’s performance must be evaluated by standard laboratory techniques to ensure high quality results. The purpose of this study is to determine the performance of the Plateletworks® BC 3200 automated hematology analyzer by correlating its precision, accuracy and linearity for the measurement of blood counts to our hospital central laboratory analyzer (Beckman Coulter Unicel DXH 800). The study utilizes well described methods for Within-Run and Day-to-Day precision, comparison of methods (bias), and linearity. Control samples from the manufacturer were used for the precision studies, blood samples from 115 cardiac surgical subjects were used for comparison of methods and accuracy, and pre-diluted control samples from the manufacturer were used for the linearity studies. The precision of the Plateletworks® analyzer was acceptable. The overall coefficient of variation (CV) for the measured parameters at all levels of control for Within-Run precision was acceptable ranging from 0.65–6.4%. Likewise, the CV for the measured parameters at all levels of control for Day-to-Day precision was acceptable ranging from 1.45% to 6.7%. The correlation and accuracy between the two analyzers for the evaluated parameters (platelets, red blood cells, white blood cells, and hemoglobin) was acceptable. The linearity for the measured parameters was also acceptable with a range between 98–100%. The performance of the Plateletworks® analyzer was acceptable for providing blood cell counts as compared to our central hospital laboratory analyzer. PMID:26405360

  4. [Differentiation of human amniotic fluid stem cells into cardiomyocytes through embryonic body formation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Shuai; Cheng, Xiang; Dou, Zhongying; Wang, Huayan

    2008-09-01

    To isolate human amniotic fluid stem cells (hASCs) and induce hASCs into cardiomyocytes after forming the embryonic bodies. We cultivated hASCs isolated from the amniotic fluid continually for over 42 passages. The biological characteristics of hASCs were detected by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and flow cytometer, hASCs at 10-15th passage were suspension cultured to form embryonic bodies that were induced to cardiomyocytes. Fibroblastoid-type hASCs were obtained. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that hASCs were positive for some specific makers of the embryonic stem cell. hASCs could form embryonic bodies that were alkaline-phosphatase positive and expressed fgf5, zeta-globin and alpha-fetoprotein. The embryonic bodies could differentiate into cardiomyocytes showing alpha-actin positive and Tbx5, Nkx2.5, GATA4 and alpha-MHC positive. We conclued that hASCs obtained from human amniotic fluid could differentiate into cardiomyocytes through the formation of embryonic bodies. PMID:19160841

  5. Fuel cell assembly unit for promoting fluid service and electrical conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NY)

    1999-01-01

    Fluid service and/or electrical conductivity for a fuel cell assembly is promoted. Open-faced flow channel(s) are formed in a flow field plate face, and extend in the flow field plate face between entry and exit fluid manifolds. A resilient gas diffusion layer is located between the flow field plate face and a membrane electrode assembly, fluidly serviced with the open-faced flow channel(s). The resilient gas diffusion layer is restrained against entering the open-faced flow channel(s) under a compressive force applied to the fuel cell assembly. In particular, a first side of a support member abuts the flow field plate face, and a second side of the support member abuts the resilient gas diffusion layer. The support member is formed with a plurality of openings extending between the first and second sides of the support member. In addition, a clamping pressure is maintained for an interface between the resilient gas diffusion layer and a portion of the membrane electrode assembly. Preferably, the support member is spikeless and/or substantially flat. Further, the support member is formed with an electrical path for conducting current between the resilient gas diffusion layer and position(s) on the flow field plate face.

  6. A compact 7-cell Si-drift detector module for high-count rate X-ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, K.; Reckleben, C.; Diehl, I.; Klär, H.

    2015-01-01

    A new Si-drift detector module for fast X-ray spectroscopy experiments was developed and realized. The Peltier-cooled module comprises a sensor with 7 × 7-mm2 active area, an integrated circuit for amplification, shaping and detection, storage, and derandomized readout of signal pulses in parallel, and amplifiers for line driving. The compactness and hexagonal shape of the module with a wrench size of 16mm allow very short distances to the specimen and multi-module arrangements. The power dissipation is 186mW. At a shaper peaking time of 190 ns and an integration time of 450 ns an electronic rms noise of ~11 electrons was achieved. When operated at 7 °C, FWHM line widths around 260 and 460 eV (Cu-K?) were obtained at low rates and at sum-count rates of 1.7 MHz, respectively. The peak shift is below 1% for a broad range of count rates. At 1.7-MHz sum-count rate the throughput loss amounts to 30%. PMID:26366028

  7. Human ovarian tumor ascites fluids rapidly and reversibly inhibit T cell receptor-induced NF-?B and NFAT signaling in tumor-associated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Loyall, Jenni L.; Lehman, Heather K.; Barnas, Jennifer L.; Minderman, Hans; O’Loughlin, Kieran L.; Wallace, Paul K.; George, Thaddeus C.; Peng, Peng; Kelleher, Raymond J.; Odunsi, Kunle; Bankert, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Human memory T cells present in ovarian tumor ascites fluids fail to respond normally to stimulation via the T cell receptor (TCR). This immunosuppression is manifested by decreases in NF-?B and NFAT activation, IFN-? production, and cell proliferation in response to TCR stimulation with immobilized antibodies to CD3 and CD28. The anergy of the tumor-associated T cells (TATs) is mediated by soluble factors present in ovarian tumor ascites fluids. The non-responsiveness of the T cells is quickly reversed when the cells are assayed in the absence of the ascites fluid, and is rapidly reestablished when a cell-free ascites fluid is added back to the T cells. Based upon the observed normal phosphorylation patterns of the TCR proximal signaling molecules, the inhibition of NF-?B, and NFAT activation in response to TCR stimulation, as well as the ability of the diacylglycerol analog PMA and the ionophore ionomycin to bypass the ascites fluid-induced TCR signaling arrest, the site of the arrest in the activation cascade appears to be at or just upstream of PLC-?. An identical TCR signaling arrest pattern was observed when T cells derived from normal donor peripheral blood were incubated with either malignant or nonmalignant (cirrhotic) ascites fluids. The immunosuppressive activity of ascites fluids reported here suggests that soluble factors acting directly or indirectly upon T cells present within tumors contribute to the anergy that has previously been observed in T cells derived from malignant and nonmalignant inflammatory microenvironments. The soluble immunosuppressive factors represent potential therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. PMID:23882159

  8. Surface force confinement cell for neutron reflectometry studies of complex fluids under nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Hie J; Smith, Gregory S; Hamilton, William A; Mulder, Dennis J; Kuhl, Tonya L; Mays, Jimmy

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we describe the construction of a new neutron surface force confinement cell (NSFCC). The NSFCC is equipped with hydraulically powered in situ, temporally stable, force control system for simultaneous neutron reflectometry studies of nanoconfined complex fluid systems. Test measurements with deuterated toluene confined between two opposing diblock copolymer (polystyrene+poly 2-vinylpyridine) coated quartz substrates demonstrate the capabilities of the NSFCC. With increasing hydraulically applied force, a series of well-defined decreasing separations were observed from neutron reflectivity measurements. No noticeable changes in the hydraulic pressure used for controlling the surface separation were observed during the measurements, demonstrating the high stability of the apparatus. This newly designed NSFCC introduces a higher level of control for studies of confinement and consequent finite size effects on nanoscale structure in a variety of complex fluid and soft condensed matter systems. PMID:19044730

  9. Characteristics of silicone fluid as a pressure transmitting medium in diamond anvil cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongrong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Pravica, Michael; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2004-11-01

    The properties of a silicone fluid with initial viscosity of 1 cst as a pressure transmitting medium for diamond anvil cells have been determined by ruby R1 line broadening and R1-R2 separation measurements to 64 GPa at ambient temperature. By these criteria, the silicone fluid is as good a pressure medium as a 4:1 methanol:ethanol mixture at low pressures to about 20 GPa, and is better than the mixture at higher pressures. Although argon media are better than the silicone at pressures to 30 GPa, this silicone behaves as well as argon at higher pressures. Furthermore, the silicone is easier to load than argon and is almost chemically inert.

  10. Zebrafish cerebrospinal fluid mediates cell survival through a retinoid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jessica T; Lehtinen, Maria K; Sive, Hazel

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) includes conserved factors whose function is largely unexplored. To assess the role of CSF during embryonic development, CSF was repeatedly drained from embryonic zebrafish brain ventricles soon after their inflation. Removal of CSF increased cell death in the diencephalon, indicating a survival function. Factors within the CSF are required for neuroepithelial cell survival as injected mouse CSF but not artificial CSF could prevent cell death after CSF depletion. Mass spectrometry analysis of the CSF identified retinol binding protein 4 (Rbp4), which transports retinol, the precursor to retinoic acid (RA). Consistent with a role for Rbp4 in cell survival, inhibition of Rbp4 or RA synthesis increased neuroepithelial cell death. Conversely, ventricle injection of exogenous human RBP4 plus retinol, or RA alone prevented cell death after CSF depletion. Zebrafish rbp4 is highly expressed in the yolk syncytial layer, suggesting Rbp4 protein and retinol/RA precursors can be transported into the CSF from the yolk. In accord with this suggestion, injection of human RBP4 protein into the yolk prevents neuroepithelial cell death in rbp4 loss-of-function embryos. Together, these data support the model that Rbp4 and RA precursors are present within the CSF and used for synthesis of RA, which promotes embryonic neuroepithelial survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 75-92, 2016. PMID:25980532

  11. Effect of Tamarindus indica L. leaves' fluid extract on human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Escalona-Arranz, J C; Garcia-Diaz, J; Perez-Rosés, R; De la Vega, J; Rodríguez-Amado, J; Morris-Quevedo, H J

    2014-01-01

    Tamarind leaves are edible; however, their saponin content could be toxic to human blood cells. In this article, the effect of tamarind leaf fluid extract (TFE) on human blood cells was evaluated by using several tests. Results revealed that TFE did not cause significant haemolysis on human red blood cells even at the lowest evaluated concentration (20 mg/mL). Blood protein denaturalisation ratio was consistently lower than in control at TFE concentrations greater than 40 mg/mL. Erythrocyte membrane damage caused by the action of oxidative H2O2 displayed a steady reduction with increasing TFE concentrations. In the reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement by using flow cytometry assay, leucocyte viability was over 95% at tested concentrations, and a high ROS inhibition was also recorded. Protective behaviour found in TFE should be attributed to its polyphenol content. Thus, tamarind leaves can be regarded as a potential source of interesting phytochemicals. PMID:24773365

  12. Shifts in the concentrations of magnesium and calcium in early porcine and rat wound fluids activate the cell migratory response.

    PubMed Central

    Grzesiak, J J; Pierschbacher, M D

    1995-01-01

    Accruing evidence indicates that the levels of extracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ can have a distinct impact on the adhesive and migratory activities of many cell types. The physiological relevance of these observations, however, has remained largely unexplored. In the present study, wound fluids collected throughout the early stages of cutaneous wound repair were examined for possible Mg2+ and Ca2+ fluctuations. Early in the process, when cell migration into the wound site is initiated, Mg2+ is elevated and Ca2+ is reduced (Mg2+:Ca2+ = 1). As wound healing progresses, wound fluid concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+ begin to return to normal plasma levels (Mg2+:Ca2+ = 0.4). When macrophages, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells were exposed to dialyzed wound fluid, the migration stimulated by undialyzed wound fluid was lost. Addition back to dialyzed wound fluid of 24 h, postinjury concentrations of Mg2+ and Ca2+ restored all migratory stimulus. This observed migration is approximately twofold greater than when normal plasma Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations are present. Changes in the levels of Mg2+ and Ca2+ in wound fluid occur during the same period that inflammatory cells, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and neovasculature have been shown to migrate during wound healing in vivo. Together, these data suggest that the impact of these changes on integrins and E-cadherin may play a direct role in the activation and maintenance of the migratory phenotypes of the cells involved in the wound healing process. PMID:7814620

  13. Total Lymphocyte Count and Haemoglobin Concentration Combined as a Surrogate Marker for Initiating Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in a Resource-limited Setting as against CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Dhamangaonkar, AC; Mathew, A; Pazare, AR

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To find a sensitive and low-cost surrogate marker for CD4 count for initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) [CD4 < 200 /mm3], in the form of total lymphocyte count (TLC) < 1200 /mm3 combined with haemoglobin (Hb) with multiple Hb cut-offs. Method: Two hundred and three consecutive treatment-naïve adult HIV positive outpatients attending the virology clinic in World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage 1, 2 or 3 were enrolled in the study. Their complete blood counts and CD4 counts were done. Descriptive statistics was done by two methods correlating TLC alone with CD4 and the other using combined marker of TLC and Hb with CD4 count. Result: Total lymphocyte count alone did not correlate well with CD4 counts (r = 0.13; p = 0.065). Sensitivity of TLC < 1200 /mm3 to predict CD4 < 200 /mm3 was low (23.27%) and the sensitivity of the combined marker (TLC + Hb) increased with higher Hb cut-offs. Conclusion: Adding Hb to TLC markedly improved the sensitivity of the marker to predict CD4 count < 200/mm3. We also recommend a trade-off Hb cut-off of 10.5 g/dL for optimum sensitivity and specificity in this population subset. PMID:25781283

  14. WHO Multicenter Evaluation of FACSCount CD4 and Pima CD4 T-Cell Count Systems: Instrument Performance and Misclassification of HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Daneau, Géraldine; Aboud, Said; Vercauteren, Gaby H.; Urassa, Willy S. K.; Kestens, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Background: CD4+ T-cell counts are used to screen and follow-up HIV-infected patients during treatment. As part of the World Health Organization prequalification program of diagnostics, we conducted an independent multicenter evaluation of the FACSCount CD4 and the Pima CD4, using the FACSCalibur as reference method. Methods: A total of 440 paired capillary and venous blood samples were collected from HIV-infected patients attending the HIV outpatient clinic in Antwerp, Belgium, and the HIV care and treatment center in Dar es Salam, Tanzania. Capillary blood was run on Pima analyzer, whereas venous blood was analyzed on FACSCount, Pima, and FACSCalibur instruments. Precision and agreement between methods were assessed. Results: The FACSCount CD4 results were in agreement with the FACSCalibur results with relative bias of 0.4% and 3.1% on absolute CD4 counts and an absolute bias of ?0.6% and ?1.1% on CD4% in Antwerp and Dar es Salam, respectively. The Pima CD4 results were in agreement with the FACSCalibur results with relative bias of ?4.1% and ?9.4% using venous blood and of ?9.5% and ?0.9% using capillary blood in Antwerp and Dar es Salam, respectively. At the threshold of 350 cells per microliter, the FACSCount CD4 and Pima CD4 using venous and capillary blood misclassified 7%, 9%, and 13% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The FACSCount CD4 provides reliable CD4 counts and CD4% and is suitable for monitoring adult and pediatric HIV patients in moderate-volume settings. The Pima CD4 is more suitable for screening eligible adult HIV patients for antiretroviral treatment initiation in low-volume laboratories. PMID:24853304

  15. Membrane with internal passages to permit fluid flow and an electrochemical cell containing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan J. (Inventor); Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides an improved proton exchange membrane for use in electrochemical cells having internal passages parallel to the membrane surface, an apparatus and process for making the membrane, membrane and electrode assemblies fabricated using the membrane, and the application of the membrane and electrode assemblies to a variety of devices, both electrochemical and otherwise. The passages in the membrane extend from one edge of the membrane to another and allow fluid flow through the membrane and give access directly to the membrane for purposes of hydration.

  16. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Is a Prognostic Factor in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving First-Line Chemotherapy Plus Bevacizumab: A Spanish Cooperative Group for the Treatment of Digestive Tumors Study

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, M. Luisa; Gómez-España, Auxiliadora; Rivera, Fernando; Valladares, Manuel; Massuti, Bartomeu; Benavides, Manuel; Gallén, Manuel; Marcuello, Eugenio; Abad, Albert; Arrivi, Antonio; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; González, Encarnación; Tabernero, Josep M.; Vidaurreta, Marta; Aranda, Enrique; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background. The Maintenance in Colorectal Cancer trial was a phase III study to assess maintenance therapy with single-agent bevacizumab versus bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. An ancillary study was conducted to evaluate the circulating tumor cell (CTC) count as a prognostic and/or predictive marker for efficacy endpoints. Patients and Methods. One hundred eighty patients were included. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and after three cycles. CTC enumeration was carried out using the CellSearch® System (Veridex LLC, Raritan, NJ). Computed tomography scans were performed at cycle 3 and 6 and every 12 weeks thereafter for tumor response assessment. Results. The median progression-free survival (PFS) interval for patients with a CTC count ?3 at baseline was 7.8 months, versus the 12.0 months achieved by patients with a CTC count <3 (p = .0002). The median overall survival (OS) time was 17.7 months for patients with a CTC count ?3, compared with 25.1 months for patients with a lower count (p = .0059). After three cycles, the median PFS interval for patients with a low CTC count was 10.8 months, significantly longer than the 7.5 months for patients with a high CTC count (p = .005). The median OS time for patients with a CTC count <3 was significantly longer than for patients with a CTC count ?3, 25.1 months versus 16.2 months, respectively (p = .0095). Conclusions. The CTC count is a strong prognostic factor for PFS and OS outcomes in metastatic colorectal cancer patients. PMID:22643538

  17. In utero therapy for congenital disorders using amniotic fluid stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Durrgah L.; Shaw, Steven S. W.; Shangaris, Panicos; Loukogeorgakis, Stavros; Guillot, Pascale V.; Coppi, Paolo De; David, Anna L.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diseases are responsible for over a third of all pediatric hospital admissions. Advances in prenatal screening and molecular diagnosis have allowed the detection of many life-threatening genetic diseases early in gestation. In utero transplantation (IUT) with stem cells could cure affected fetuses but so far in humans, successful IUT using allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), has been limited to fetuses with severe immunologic defects and more recently IUT with allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, has improved phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta. The options of preemptive treatment of congenital diseases in utero by stem cell or gene therapy changes the perspective of congenital diseases since it may avoid the need for postnatal treatment and reduce future costs. Amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been isolated and characterized in human, mice, rodents, rabbit, and sheep and are a potential source of cells for therapeutic applications in disorders for treatment prenatally or postnatally. Gene transfer to the cells with long-term transgenic protein expression is feasible. Recently, pre-clinical autologous transplantation of transduced cells has been achieved in fetal sheep using minimally invasive ultrasound guided injection techniques. Clinically relevant levels of transgenic protein were expressed in the blood of transplanted lambs for at least 6 months. The cells have also demonstrated the potential of repair in a range of pre-clinical disease models such as neurological disorders, tracheal repair, bladder injury, and diaphragmatic hernia repair in neonates or adults. These results have been encouraging, and bring personalized tissue engineering for prenatal treatment of genetic disorders closer to the clinic. PMID:25566071

  18. Human Amniotic Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Second- and Third-Trimester Amniocentesis: Differentiation Potential, Molecular Signature, and Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Savickiene, Jurate; Treigyte, Grazina; Baronaite, Sandra; Valiuliene, Giedre; Kaupinis, Algirdas; Valius, Mindaugas; Arlauskiene, Audrone; Navakauskiene, Ruta

    2015-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid stem cells have become an attractive stem cell source for potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to characterize amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) from second- and third-trimester of gestation. Using two-stage protocol, MSCs were successfully cultured and exhibited typical stem cell morphological, specific cell surface, and pluripotency markers characteristics. AF-MSCs differentiated into adipocytes, osteocytes, chondrocytes, myocytes, and neuronal cells, as determined by morphological changes, cell staining, and RT-qPCR showing the tissue-specific gene presence for differentiated cell lineages. Using SYNAPT G2 High Definition Mass Spectrometry technique approach, we performed for the first time the comparative proteomic analysis between undifferentiated AF-MSCs from late trimester of gestation and differentiated into myogenic, adipogenic, osteogenic, and neurogenic lineages. The analysis of the functional and expression patterns of 250 high abundance proteins selected from more than 1400 demonstrated the similar proteome of cultured and differentiated AF-MSCs but the unique changes in their expression profile during cell differentiation that may help the identification of key markers in differentiated cells. Our results provide evidence that human amniotic fluid of second- and third-trimester contains stem cells with multilineage potential and may be attractive source for clinical applications. PMID:26351462

  19. Exocytosis of pinocytosed fluid in cultured cells: kinetic evidence for rapid turnover and compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The uptake and fate of pinocytosed fluid were investigated in monolayers of pulmonary alveolar macrophages and fetal lung fibroblasts using the fluid-phase marker, [14C]sucrose. Initial experiments revealed that cellular accumulation of chromatographically repurified [14C]sucrose was not linear with incubation time. Deviation from linearity was shown to be due to constant exocytosis of accumulating marker. Chromatographic analysis revealed that the cells were unable to metabolize sucrose and were releasing it intact by a process that was temperature-sensitive but not dependent on extracellular calcium and magnesium. A detailed analysis of the kinetics of exocytosis was undertaken by preloading cells with [14C]sucrose for various lengths of time and then monitoring the appearance of radioactivity into isotope- free medium. Results indicated that modeling the process of fluid-phase pinocytosis and subsequent exocytosis required at least two intracellular compartments in series, one compartment being of small size and turning over very rapidly (t1/2 = 5 min in macrophages, 6--8 min in fibroblasts) and the other compartment being apparently larger in size and turning over very slowly (t1/2 = 180 min in macrophages, 430--620 min in fibroblasts). Computer-simulation based on this model confirmed that the kinetics of efflux faithfully reflected the kinetics of influx and that the rate of efflux completely accounted for the deviation from linearity of accumulation kinetics. Moreover, the sizes of the compartments and magnitude of the intercompartment fluxes were such that the majority of fluid internalized in pinocytic vesicles was rapidly returned to the extracellular space via exocytosis. This result provides direct experimental evidence for a process previously thought necessary based solely on morphological and theoretical considerations. Furthermore, the turnover of pinocytosed fluid was so dynamic that accumulation deviated from linearity even within the first few minutes of incubation. We were able to show that the kinetics of exocytosis allowed calculation of the actual pinocytic rate, a rate that was nearly 50% greater than the apparent initial rate obtained from the slope of the uptake curve over the first 10 min. PMID:7328118

  20. Nuclear Nox4 Role in Stemness Power of Human Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maraldi, Tullia; Guida, Marianna; Zavatti, Manuela; Resca, Elisa; Bertoni, Laura; La Sala, Giovanni B.; De Pol, Anto

    2015-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) are an attractive source for cell therapy due to their multilineage differentiation potential and accessibility advantages. However the clinical application of human stem cells largely depends on their capacity to expand in vitro, since there is an extensive donor-to-donor heterogeneity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular oxidative stress are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes of stem cells, including pluripotency, proliferation, differentiation, and stress resistance. The mode of action of ROS is also dependent on the localization of their target molecules. Thus, the modifications induced by ROS can be separated depending on the cellular compartments they affect. NAD(P)H oxidase family, particularly Nox4, has been known to produce ROS in the nucleus. In the present study we show that Nox4 nuclear expression (nNox4) depends on the donor and it correlates with the expression of transcription factors involved in stemness regulation, such as Oct4, SSEA-4, and Sox2. Moreover nNox4 is linked with the nuclear localization of redox sensitive transcription factors, as Nrf2 and NF-?B, and with the differentiation potential. Taken together, these results suggest that nNox4 regulation may have important effects in stem cell capability through modulation of transcription factors and DNA damage. PMID:26273418

  1. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created for detailed analysis of a high-temperature electrolysis stack (solid oxide fuel cells operated as electrolyzers). Inlet and outlet plenum flow distributions are discussed. Maldistribution of plena flow show deviations in per-cell operating conditions due to non-uniformity of species concentrations. Models have also been created to simulate experimental conditions and for code validation. Comparisons between model predictions and experimental results are discussed. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the electrolysis mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution, and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition.

  2. Coupled thermal, electrical, and fluid flow analyses of AMTEC multitube cell with adiabatic side wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, A.; Or, C.; Noravian, H.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes a novel OSC-generated methodology for analyzing the performance of multitube AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electrical Conversion) cells, which are under development by AMPS (Advanced Modular Power Systems, Inc.) for the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL) and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), for possible application to the Pluto Express and other space missions. The OSC study was supported by the Department of Energy (DOE), and was strongly encouraged by JPL, AFPL, and AMPS. It resulted in an iterative procedure for the coupled solution of the interdependent thermal, electrical, and fluid flow differential and integral equations governing the performance of AMTEC cells and generators. The paper clarifies the OSC procedure by presenting detailed results of its application to an illustrative example of a converter cell with an adiabatic side wall, including the non-linear axial variation of temperature, pressure, open-circuit voltage, interelectrode voltage, current density, axial current, sodium mass flow, and power density. The next paper in these proceedings describes parametric results obtained by applying the same procedure to variations of the baseline adiabatic converter design, culminating in an OSC-recommended revised cell design. A subsequent paper in these proceedings extends the procedure to analyze a variety of OSC-designed radioisotope-heated generators employing non-adiabatic multitube AMTEC cells.

  3. Coupled thermal, electrical, and fluid flow analyses of AMTEC multitube cell with adiabatic side wall

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, A.; Or, C.; Noravian, H.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes a novel OSC-generated methodology for analyzing the performance of multitube AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electrical Conversion) cells, which are under development by AMPS (Advanced Modular Power Systems, Inc.) for the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL) and NASA{close_quote}s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), for possible application to the Pluto Express and other space missions. The OSC study was supported by the Department of Energy (DOE), and was strongly encouraged by JPL, AFPL, and AMPS. It resulted in an iterative procedure for the coupled solution of the interdependent thermal, electrical, and fluid flow differential and integral equations governing the performance of AMTEC cells and generators. The paper clarifies the OSC procedure by presenting detailed results of its application to an illustrative example of a converter cell with an adiabatic side wall, including the non-linear axial variation of temperature, pressure, open-circuit voltage, interelectrode voltage, current density, axial current, sodium mass flow, and power density. The next paper in these proceedings describes parametric results obtained by applying the same procedure to variations of the baseline adiabatic converter design, culminating in an OSC-recommended revised cell design. A subsequent paper in these proceedings extends the procedure to analyze a variety of OSC-designed radioisotope-heated generators employing non-adiabatic multitube AMTEC cells. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Investigating the fluid mechanics behind red blood cell-induced lateral platelet motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Fogelson, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in blood clotting; they adhere to damaged tissue and release chemicals that activate other platelets. Yet in order to adhere, platelets must first come into contact with the injured vessel wall. Under arterial flow conditions, platelets have an enhanced concentration near blood vessel walls. This non-uniform cell distribution depends on the fluid dynamics of blood as a heterogeneous medium. We use a parallelized lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method to solve the flow dynamics of red cells and platelets in a periodic 2D vessel with no-slip boundary conditions. Red cells are treated as biconcave immersed boundary objects with isotropic Skalak membrane tension and an internal viscosity five times that of the surrounding plasma. Using this method we analyze the influence of shear rate, hematocrit, and red cell membrane properties on lateral platelet motion. We find that the effective diffusion of platelets is significantly lower near the vessel wall compared to the center of the vessel. Insight gained from this work could lead to significant improvements to current models for platelet adhesion where the presence of red blood cells is neglected due to computational intensity.

  5. Number and activity of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in asthma and their relation to airway responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, C; Ward, C; Stenton, C S; Bird, G; Hendrick, D J; Walters, E H

    1988-01-01

    Bronchial responsiveness to inhaled methacholine was measured four to six days before fibreoptic bronchoscopy in 22 asthmatic patients (10 smokers) and 20 control subjects (12 smokers). The asthmatic patients had a baseline FEV1 greater than 60% predicted and a PD20FEV1 (provocative dose of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV1) of 0.006-3.7 mg. The 20 control subjects had normal pulmonary function and a PD20FEV1 above the maximum cumulative dose of methacholine of 6.4 mg. Bronchoalveolar lavage of a middle lobe segment (lingula in four subjects) was performed with three sequential 60 ml aliquots of sterile saline. Cellular metabolic activity was stimulated with latex in aliquots of resuspended cells, and measured by means of luminol enhanced chemiluminescence to assess neutrophil activity and lucigenin enhanced chemiluminescence to assess macrophage activity. Mean absolute total cell counts were similar in the asthmatic and control groups but there were differences in differential cell counts, with a significant increase in eosinophil (p less than 0.05) and lymphocyte (p less than 0.005) counts in asthma. PD20FEV1 was negatively correlated with percentage neutrophil counts (p less than 0.005). Luminol enhanced chemiluminescence/1000 neutrophils was increased about twofold in asthmatic subjects (p less than 0.001), but was not correlated with PD20FEV1 Lucigenin enhanced chemiluminescence/1000 macrophages was increased nearly fourfold in asthmatic patients (p less than 0.001) and showed a negative correlation with PD20FEV1 (p less than 0.01). The macrophage count was increased twofold in current smokers in both groups, but other cell numbers were not altered significantly. Smoking did not affect cellular metabolic activity in either group. This study supports the idea that an inflammatory process is present in the airways of those with asthma, and suggests a relation between bronchial responsiveness and both neutrophil numbers and macrophage activity. PMID:3194874

  6. Mathematical modeling of the fluid dynamics in the flow-through cell.

    PubMed

    Kakhi, Maziar

    2009-07-01

    The fluid dynamics in the flow-through cell (USP apparatus 4) has been predicted using the mathematical modeling approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The degree to which flow structures in this apparatus can be qualified as 'ideal' both spatially and temporally has been assessed. The simulations predict the development of the velocity field in this apparatus for configurations with and without beads during the discharge stroke of the pump. When the cell is operated only with the red ruby bead ('open column' mode), highly non-uniform flow is predicted just downstream of the bead in the latter stages of the pump's pulse. In contrast, a strong degree of profile uniformity and symmetry is predicted throughout the entire pulse in the region of the tablet holder for both standard configurations involving beads. However, noticeable differences in the tablet shear stress distribution are predicted at times when the same instantaneous inlet flow rates are being pumped through the apparatus. This effect is caused by flow separation in the velocity boundary layer formed around the tablet under the influence of an adverse pressure gradient, an effect not predicted with constant (non-pulsating) flow. While the degree of tablet erosion correlates with the average flow rate, during a particular pulse both the free-stream velocity and the boundary layer thickness are also influential. PMID:19375490

  7. Avian leucocyte counting using the hemocytometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F.J.; Wilson, A.; Fischer, D.; Langenberg, P.

    1994-01-01

    Automated methods for counting leucocytes in avian blood are not available because of the presence of nucleated erythrocytes and thrombocytes. Therefore, total white blood cell counts are performed by hand using a hemocytometer. The Natt and Herrick and the Unopette methods are the most common stain and diluent preparations for this procedure. Replicate hemocytometer counts using these two methods were performed on blood from four birds of different species. Cells present in each square of the hemocytometer were counted. Counting cells in the corner, side, or center hemocytometer squares produced statistically equivalent results; counting four squares per chamber provided a result similar to that obtained by counting nine squares; and the Unopette method was more precise for hemocytometer counting than was the Natt and Herrick method. The Unopette method is easier to learn and perform but is an indirect process, utilizing the differential count from a stained smear. The Natt and Herrick method is a direct total count, but cell identification is more difficult.

  8. Rapid separation and concentration of food-borne pathogens in food samples prior to quantification by viable-cell counting and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Katsube, Kazunori; Hata, Yukiko; Kishi, Ryoko; Fujiwara, Satomi

    2007-01-01

    Buoyant density gradient centrifugation has been used to separate bacteria from complex food matrices, as well as to remove compounds that inhibit rapid detection methods, such as PCR, and to prevent false-positive results due to DNA originating from dead cells. Applying a principle of buoyant density gradient centrifugation, we developed a method for rapid separation and concentration following filtration and low- and high-speed centrifugation, as well as flotation and sedimentation buoyant density centrifugation, for 12 food-borne pathogens (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Campylobacter jejuni, Vibrio cholerae O139, Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3K6, Vibrio vulnificus, Providencia alcalifaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Clostridium perfringens) in 13 different food homogenates. This method can be used prior to real-time quantitative PCR (RTi-qPCR) and viable-cell counting. Using this combined method, the target organisms in the food samples theoretically could be concentrated 250-fold and detected at cell concentrations as low as 10(1) to 10(3) CFU/g using the RTi-qPCR assay, and amounts as small as 10(0) to 10(1) CFU/g could be isolated using plate counting. The combined separation and concentration methods and RTi-qPCR confirmed within 3 h the presence of 10(1) to 10(2) CFU/g of Salmonella and C. jejuni directly in naturally contaminated chicken and the presence of S. aureus directly in remaining food items in a poisoning outbreak. These results illustrated the feasibility of using these assays for rapid inspection of bacterial food contamination during a real-world outbreak. PMID:17056684

  9. Tethered cells in fluid flows--beyond the Stokes' drag force approach.

    PubMed

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of tethered cells in viscous sub-layers are frequently performed using the Stokes' drag force, but without taking into account contributions from surface corrections, lift forces, buoyancy, the Basset force, the cells' finite inertia, or added mass. In this work, we investigate to what extent such contributions, under a variety of hydrodynamic conditions, influence the force at the anchor point of a tethered cell and the survival probability of a bacterium that is attached to a host by either a slip or a catch bond via a tether with a few different biomechanical properties. We show that a consequence of not including some of these contributions is that the force to which a bond is exposed can be significantly underestimated; in general by ?32-46%, where the influence of the surface corrections dominate (the parallel and normal correction coefficients contribute ?5-8 or ?23-26%, respectively). The Basset force is a major contributor, up to 20%, for larger cells and shear rates. The lift force and inertia contribute when cells with radii >3 ?m have shear rates >2000 s(-1). Buoyancy contributes significantly for cells with radii >3 ?m for shear rates <10 s(-1). Since the lifetime of a bond depends strongly on the force, both the level of approximation and the biomechanical model of the tether significantly affect the survival probability of tethered bacteria. For a cell attached by a FimH-mannose bond and an extendable tether with a shear rate of 3000 s(-1), neglecting the surface correction coefficients or the Basset force can imply that the survival probability is overestimated by more than an order of magnitude. This work thus shows that in order to quantitatively assess bacterial attachment forces and survival probabilities, both the fluid forces and the tether properties need to be modeled accurately. PMID:26331992

  10. Tethered cells in fluid flows—beyond the Stokes’ drag force approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of tethered cells in viscous sub-layers are frequently performed using the Stokes’ drag force, but without taking into account contributions from surface corrections, lift forces, buoyancy, the Basset force, the cells’ finite inertia, or added mass. In this work, we investigate to what extent such contributions, under a variety of hydrodynamic conditions, influence the force at the anchor point of a tethered cell and the survival probability of a bacterium that is attached to a host by either a slip or a catch bond via a tether with a few different biomechanical properties. We show that a consequence of not including some of these contributions is that the force to which a bond is exposed can be significantly underestimated; in general by ˜32-46%, where the influence of the surface corrections dominate (the parallel and normal correction coefficients contribute ˜5-8 or ˜23-26%, respectively). The Basset force is a major contributor, up to 20%, for larger cells and shear rates. The lift force and inertia contribute when cells with radii >3 ?m have shear rates >2000 s-1. Buoyancy contributes significantly for cells with radii >3 ?m for shear rates <10 s-1. Since the lifetime of a bond depends strongly on the force, both the level of approximation and the biomechanical model of the tether significantly affect the survival probability of tethered bacteria. For a cell attached by a FimH-mannose bond and an extendable tether with a shear rate of 3000 s-1, neglecting the surface correction coefficients or the Basset force can imply that the survival probability is overestimated by more than an order of magnitude. This work thus shows that in order to quantitatively assess bacterial attachment forces and survival probabilities, both the fluid forces and the tether properties need to be modeled accurately.

  11. Why Mouse Airway Submucosal Gland Serous Cells Do Not Secrete Fluid in Response to cAMP Stimulation*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Airway submucosal glands are important sites of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride (Cl?) channel expression and fluid secretion in the airway. Whereas both mouse and human submucosal glands and their serous acinar cells express CFTR, human glands and serous cells secrete much more robustly than mouse cells/glands in response to cAMP-generating agonists such as forskolin and vasoactive intestinal peptide. In this study, we examined mouse and human serous acinar cells to explain this difference and reveal further insights into the mechanisms of serous cell secretion. We found that mouse serous cells possess a robust cAMP-activated CFTR-dependent Cl? permeability, but they lack cAMP-activated calcium (Ca2+) signaling observed in human cells. Similar to human cells, basal K+ conductance is extremely small in mouse acinar cells. Lack of cAMP-activated Ca2+ signaling in mouse cells results in the absence of K+ conductances required for secretion. However, cAMP activates CFTR-dependent fluid secretion during low-level cholinergic stimulation that fails to activate secretion on its own. Robust CFTR-dependent fluid secretion was also observed when cAMP stimulation was combined with direct pharmacological activation of epithelial K+ channels with 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (EBIO). Our data suggest that mouse serous cells lack cAMP-mediated Ca2+ signaling to activate basolateral membrane K+ conductance, resulting in weak cAMP-driven serous cell fluid secretion, providing the likely explanation for reduced cAMP-driven secretion observed in mouse compared with human glands. PMID:22989883

  12. Interstitial Fluid Flow Increases Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Invasion through CXCR4/CXCL12 and MEK/ERK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer (~80%), and it is one of the few cancer types with rising incidence in the United States. This highly invasive cancer is very difficult to detect until its later stages, resulting in limited treatment options and low survival rates. There is a dearth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms associated with the effects of biomechanical forces such as interstitial fluid flow (IFF) on hepatocellular carcinoma invasion. We hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow enhanced hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion through chemokine-mediated autologous chemotaxis. Utilizing a 3D in vitro invasion assay, we demonstrated that interstitial fluid flow promoted invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma derived cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that autologous chemotaxis influences this interstitial fluid flow-induced invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma derived cell lines via the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) signaling axis. We also demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling affects interstitial fluid flow-induced invasion; however, this pathway was separate from CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the potential role of interstitial fluid flow in hepatocellular carcinoma invasion. Uncovering the mechanisms that control hepatocellular carcinoma invasion will aid in enhancing current liver cancer therapies and provide better treatment options for patients. PMID:26560447

  13. Association of KIR3DL1/S1 and HLA-Bw4 with CD4 T cell counts in HIV-infected Mexican mestizos.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ramírez, Daniel; Esparza-Pérez, Mario A; Ramirez-Garcialuna, José L; Arguello, J Rafael; Mandeville, Peter B; Noyola, Daniel E; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A

    2015-08-01

    Certain genotypic combinations of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and human leukocyte antigens (HLA) have been associated with favourable outcomes after exposure to human immunodeficiency virus in Caucasoid and African populations. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by a rapid exhaustion of CD4 cells, which results in impaired cellular immunity. During this early phase of infection, it is thought that the natural killer (NK) cells represent the main effector arm of the host immune response to HIV. This study investigates whether KIR and HLA factors are associated to CD4 T cell numbers after HIV infection in Mexican mestizos as assessed at the time of initial medical evaluation and subsequent clinical follow-up. KIR and HLA-B gene carrier frequency differences were compared between groups of patients stratified by CD4 T cell numbers as assessed during their first medical evaluation (a point in time at which all patients were anti-retroviral therapy naïve). In addition, the influence that these genetic factors have on averaged historical CD4 cell counts in patients subjected to follow-up (mostly therapy-experienced) was also evaluated. Our results suggest a protective role for the HLA-Bw4 and KIR3D?+?Bw4 combination in both therapy-naïve and therapy-experienced patients. This report furthers our understanding on the way that immune genes modulate HIV disease progression in less-studied human populations such as the Mexican mestizos with a special focus on CD4 T cell number and behaviour. PMID:26033692

  14. Rapid, low-cost and instrument-free CD4+ cell counting for HIV diagnostics in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Macdara T; Kinahan, David J; Ducrée, Jens

    2014-08-01

    We present a novel, user-friendly and widely autonomous point-of-care diagnostic to enable HIV monitoring in resource-poor regions where the current pandemic is most prevalent. To specifically isolate magnetically tagged CD4+ cells directly from patient blood, the low-cost and disposable microfluidic chip operates by dual-force CD4+ cell magnetophoresis; whereby the interplay of flow and magnetic fields governs the trajectory of target cells depending on whether the cell binds to a magnetic microbead. Instrument-free pumping is implemented by a finger-actuated elastic membrane; tagged beads are laterally deflected by a small and re-useable permanent magnet. The single-depth and monolithic microfluidic structure can easily be fabricated in a single casting step. After their magnetophoretic isolation from whole blood, estimation of CD4+ cell concentrations is then measured by bright-field inspection of the capture chamber. In addition, an optional fluorescence measurement can be used for confirmation of the bright-field result if required. On-chip CD4+ estimation produces a linear response over the full range of medically relevant CD4+ cell concentrations. Our technology combines high-efficiency capture (93.0 ± 3.3%) and cell enumeration. PMID:24911165

  15. Transcriptional network profile on synovial fluid T cells in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fiocco, Ugo; Martini, Veronica; Accordi, Benedetta; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Facco, Monica; Boso, Daniele; Gatto, Mariele; Felicetti, Mara; Frallonardo, Paola; Ramonda, Roberta; Piva, Lucia; Zambello, Renato; Agostini, Carlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Basso, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the study was to quantify the transcriptional profile, as the main T cell lineage-transcription factors on synovial fluid (SF) T cells, in relation to SF cytokines and T cell frequencies (%) of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Reverse phase protein array was employed to identify interleukin (IL)-23Rp19-, FOXP3- and related orphan receptor gamma T (ROR?t)- protein and Janus associated tyrosine kinases 1 (JAK1), signal transducer and activator and transcription 1 (STAT1), STAT3 and STAT5 phosphoproteins in total T cell lysates from SF of PsA patients. IL-1?, IL-2, IL-6, IL-21 and interferon (INF)-? were measured using a multiplex bead immunoassay in SF from PsA patients and peripheral blood (PB) from healthy controls (HC). Frequencies of CD4(+)CD25(-), CD4(+)CD25(high) FOXP3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(high) CD127(low) Treg, and either mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of FOXP3(+) on CD4(+) Treg or MFI of classic IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) ? expression on CD4(+)CD25(-) helper/effector T cells (Th/eff) and Treg cells, were quantified in SF of PsA patients and in PB from HC by flow cytometry (FC). In PsA SF samples, IL-2, IL-21 and IFN-? were not detectable, whereas IL-6 and IL-1? levels were higher than in SF of non-inflammatory osteoarthritis patients. Higher levels of IL-23R-, FOXP3- and ROR?t proteins and JAK1, STAT1, STAT3 and STAT5 were found in total T cells from SF of PsA patients compared with PB from HC. Direct correlations between JAK1 Y1022/Y1023 and STAT5 Y694, and STAT3 Y705 and IL6, were found in SF of PsA patients. Increased proportion of CD4(+)CD25(high) FOXP3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(high) CD127(low) Treg cells and brighter MFI of IL-6R? were observed both on CD4(+)CD25(high)- and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells in PsA SF. The study showed a distinctive JAK1/STAT3/STAT5 transcriptional network on T cells in the joint microenvironment, outlining the interplay of IL-6, IL-23, IL-1? and ?C cytokines in the polarization and plasticity of Th17 and Treg cells, which might participate in the perpetuation of joint inflammation in PsA patients. PMID:26152611

  16. An efficient and simple method for measuring (226)Ra using the scintillation cell in a delayed coincidence counting system (RaDeCC).

    PubMed

    Waska, Hannelore; Kim, Seolwon; Kim, Guebuem; Peterson, Richard N; Burnett, William C

    2008-12-01

    A delayed coincidence counter (RaDeCC), developed to determine ultra-low levels of (223)Ra (half life = 11.1 days) and (224)Ra (half life = 3.6 days) in seawater, was adapted to measure (226)Ra (half life = 1622 years). After pre-concentration of Ra from seawater onto MnO(2)-coated fiber we show in this study that the (226)Ra activity can be determined using the RaDeCC's ability to record alpha decay of its daughters as total counts. For sufficient ingrowth of (222)Rn, the Mn-fiber is hermetically sealed in a column for a few days. Then, the ingrown (222)Rn is circulated through the RaDeCC air-loop system followed by shutting down of the pump and closure of the scintillation cell for equilibration. Counting may be completed within a few hours for seawater samples. Sample measurements with this method agreed well with data obtained using gamma-ray spectrometry. This proves that a set of Ra isotopes ((223)Ra, (224)Ra, and (226)Ra), commonly used for geophysical studies such as mixing rates of different water masses and submarine groundwater discharge, can be efficiently and rapidly measured using the RaDeCC. PMID:18950907

  17. Effects of periodontal therapy on white blood cell count and levels of transforming growth factor beta in serum of subjects with severe periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leite, A C E; Carneiro, V M A; Morandini, A C; Ramos-Junior, E S; Guimarães, M C M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on white blood cell (WBC) count and levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGF—?) in serum from subjects with severe periodontitis. Serum from 28 subjects with periodontitis (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9—12 months). A well—controlled periodontal treatment protocol was established in three stages: mechanical periodontal therapy (scaling and root planning), reinstrumentation of dental sites, and supportive periodontal therapy. Periodontal and systemic parameters such as the total number of WBCs and TGF—? levels, accessed by enzyme—linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were included. After therapy, all clinical periodontal parameters decreased (p<0.0001). There were no statistical differences in WBC count between experimental and control groups before or after therapy. However, after therapy, the mean value of lymphocytes in patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) was statistically higher than that of patients with generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP) (p<0.0357). Additionally, TGF—? levels in LAgP and GCP patients were higher compared to controls before therapy (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). In LAgP patients, periodontal therapy was associated with increased number of lymphocytes. PMID:25817350

  18. Biotechnological promises of Fe-filled CNTs for cell shepherding and magnetic fluid hyperthermia applications.

    PubMed

    Pineux, Florent; Marega, Riccardo; Stopin, Antoine; La Torre, Alessandro; Garcia, Yann; Devlin, Eamonn; Michiels, Carine; N Khlobystov, Andrei; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-12-01

    Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (Fe@CNTs) recently emerged as an effective class of hybrid nanoparticles for biotechnological applications, such as magnetic cell sorting and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Aiming at studying the effects of both the Fe loading and the magnetocrystalline characteristics in these applications, we describe herein the preparation of Fe@CNTs containing different Fe phases that, upon functionalization with the antibody Cetuximab (Ctxb), allow the targeting of cancer cells. Our experimental findings reveal that an optimal Ctxb/Fe weight ratio of 1.2 is needed for efficient magnetic cell shepherding, whereas enhanced MFH-induced mortality (70 vs. 15%) can be reached with hybrids enriched in the coercive Fe3C phase. These results suggest that a synergistic effect between the Ab loading and the Fe distribution in each nanotube exists, for which the maximum shepherding and hyperthermia effects are observed when higher densities of Fe@CNTs featuring the more coercive phase are interfaced with the cells. PMID:26583487

  19. Spontaneous generation of functional osteoclasts from synovial fluid mononuclear cells as a model of inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greisen, Stinne R; Einarsson, Halldór Bjarki; Hvid, Malene; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Deleuran, Bent; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    In osteoimmunology, osteoclastogenesis is understood in the context of the immune system. Today, the in vitro model for osteoclastogenesis necessitates the addition of recombinant human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The peripheral joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) are characterized by an immune-mediated inflammation that can lead to bone destruction. Here, we evaluate spontaneous in vitro osteoclastogenesis in cultures of synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) activated only in vivo. SFMCs were isolated and cultured for 21 days at 0.5-1.0 × 10(6) cells/mL in culture medium. SFMCs and healthy control peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with RANKL and M-CSF as controls. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinucleated cells were found in the SFMC cultures after 21 days. These cells expressed the osteoclast genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and integrin ?3, formed lacunae on dentin plates and secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and TRAP. Adding RANKL and M-CSF potentiated this secretion. In conclusion, we show that SFMCs from inflamed peripheral joints can spontaneously develop into functionally active osteoclasts ex vivo. Our study provides a simple in vitro model for studying inflammatory osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26121915

  20. Identification of T-cell stimulatory antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis using synovial fluid-derived T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Reynolds, D J; Deacon, M; Gaston, J S; Pearce, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of sexually transmitted disease, infertility and reactive arthritis in the Western world, and of trachoma in the developing world. There is evidence that the chronic inflammatory reaction seen in diseases associated with chlamydiae represents a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to chlamydial antigens. Little is known about which chlamydial antigens elicit T-cell responses yet such information could have important implications in terms of both immunopathological understanding of these diseases and immunoprophylaxis design. In this study, 61 chlamydia-specific T-cell clones have been produced from the synovial fluid of an individual with sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA). Ten clones have been characterized in detail and used to identify T-cell stimulatory antigens of chlamydiae by means of T-cell immunoblotting. Two distinct antigenic fractions have been identified, one recognized by three of the clones (molecular weight 18,000), the other recognized by six of the clones (molecular weight 30,000). The fractions are distinct from the major outer membrane protein, the 57,000 MW stress protein and the 60,000 MW cysteine-rich membrane protein of chlamydiae. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction of the response to these antigens differed: clones recognizing the 18,000 MW antigen required antigen-presenting cells expressing DR1 subtype DRB1*0101 or DRB1*0102 which only differ at amino acids 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain; by contrast clones recognizing the 30,000 MW antigen were presented to only by antigen-presenting cells from DRB1*0101 individuals, reflecting extreme sensitivity of these clones to the polymorphism at positions 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain. Images Figure 4 PMID:7691730

  1. Stem cells from human amniotic fluid exert immunoregulatory function via secreted indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase1

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Rita; Pirisinu, Irene; Calvitti, Mario; Pallotta, Maria Teresa; Gargaro, Marco; Bistoni, Giovanni; Vacca, Carmine; Di Michele, Alessandro; Orabona, Ciriana; Rosati, Jessica; Pirro, Matteo; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Matino, Davide; Prontera, Paolo; Rosi, Gabriella; Grohmann, Ursula; Talesa, Vincenzo N; Donti, Emilio; Puccetti, Paolo; Fallarino, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Although human amniotic fluid does contain different populations of foetal-derived stem cells, scanty information is available on the stemness and the potential immunomodulatory activity of in vitro expanded, amniotic fluid stem cells. By means of a methodology unrequiring immune selection, we isolated and characterized different stem cell types from second-trimester human amniotic fluid samples (human amniotic fluid stem cells, HASCs). Of those populations, one was characterized by a fast doubling time, and cells were thus designated as fHASCs. Cells maintained their original phenotype under prolonged in vitro passaging, and they were able to originate embryoid bodies. Moreover, fHASCs exhibited regulatory properties when treated with interferon (IFN)-?, including induction of the immunomodulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). On coculture with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, IFN-?–treated fHASCs caused significantly decreased T-cell proliferation and increased frequency in CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Both effects required an intact IDO1 function and were cell contact-independent. An unprecedented finding in our study was that purified vesicles from IFN-?–treated fHASCs abundantly expressed the functional IDO1 protein, and those vesicles were endowed with an fHASC-like regulatory function. In vivo, fHASCs were capable of immunoregulatory function, promoting allograft survival in a mouse model of allogeneic skin transplantation. This was concurrent with the expansion of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T cells in graft-draining lymph nodes from recipient mice. Thus fHASCs, or vesicles thereof, may represent a novel opportunity for immunoregulatory maneuvers both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25783564

  2. Stem cells from human amniotic fluid exert immunoregulatory function via secreted indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase1.

    PubMed

    Romani, Rita; Pirisinu, Irene; Calvitti, Mario; Pallotta, Maria Teresa; Gargaro, Marco; Bistoni, Giovanni; Vacca, Carmine; Di Michele, Alessandro; Orabona, Ciriana; Rosati, Jessica; Pirro, Matteo; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Matino, Davide; Prontera, Paolo; Rosi, Gabriella; Grohmann, Ursula; Talesa, Vincenzo N; Donti, Emilio; Puccetti, Paolo; Fallarino, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    Although human amniotic fluid does contain different populations of foetal-derived stem cells, scanty information is available on the stemness and the potential immunomodulatory activity of in vitro expanded, amniotic fluid stem cells. By means of a methodology unrequiring immune selection, we isolated and characterized different stem cell types from second-trimester human amniotic fluid samples (human amniotic fluid stem cells, HASCs). Of those populations, one was characterized by a fast doubling time, and cells were thus designated as fHASCs. Cells maintained their original phenotype under prolonged in vitro passaging, and they were able to originate embryoid bodies. Moreover, fHASCs exhibited regulatory properties when treated with interferon (IFN)-?, including induction of the immunomodulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). On coculture with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, IFN-?-treated fHASCs caused significantly decreased T-cell proliferation and increased frequency in CD4(+)  CD25(+)  FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells. Both effects required an intact IDO1 function and were cell contact-independent. An unprecedented finding in our study was that purified vesicles from IFN-?-treated fHASCs abundantly expressed the functional IDO1 protein, and those vesicles were endowed with an fHASC-like regulatory function. In vivo, fHASCs were capable of immunoregulatory function, promoting allograft survival in a mouse model of allogeneic skin transplantation. This was concurrent with the expansion of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  Foxp3(+) T cells in graft-draining lymph nodes from recipient mice. Thus fHASCs, or vesicles thereof, may represent a novel opportunity for immunoregulatory maneuvers both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25783564

  3. Prevention of Infection in Patients With Hematologic Cancer and Persistent Fever Caused by a Low White Blood Cell Count

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-09-20

    Bone Marrow Suppression; Fever, Sweats, and Hot Flashes; Infection; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Development & experimental validation of a SINDA/FLUINT thermal/fluid/electrical model of a multi-tube AMTEC cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, T.J.; Borkowski, C.A.; Huang, C.

    1998-01-01

    AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion) cell development has received increased attention and funding in the space power community because of several desirable performance characteristics compared to current radioisotope thermoelectric generation and solar photovoltaic (PV) power generation. AMTEC cell development is critically dependent upon the ability to predict thermal, fluid dynamic and electrical performance of an AMTEC cell which has many complex thermal, fluid dynamic and electrical processes and interactions occurring simultaneously. Development of predictive capability is critical to understanding the complex processes and interactions within the AMTEC cell, and thereby creating the ability to design high-performance, cost-effective AMTEC cells. A flexible, sophisticated thermal/fluid/electrical model of an operating AMTEC cell has been developed using the SINDA/FLUINT analysis software. This model can accurately simulate AMTEC cell performance at any hot side and cold side temperature combination desired, for any voltage and current conditions, and for a broad range of cell design parameters involving the cell dimensions, current collector and electrode design, electrode performance parameters, and cell wall and thermal shield emissivity. The model simulates the thermal radiation network within the AMTEC cell using RadCAD thermal radiation analysis; hot side, cold side and cell wall conductive and radiative coupling; BASE (Beta Alumina Solid Electrode) tube electrochemistry, including electrode over-potentials; the fluid dynamics of the low-pressure sodium vapor flow to the condenser and liquid sodium flow in the wick; sodium condensation at the condenser; and high-temperature sodium evaporation in the wick. The model predicts the temperature profiles within the AMTEC cell walls, the BASE tube temperature profiles, the sodium temperature profile in the artery return, temperature profiles in the evaporator, thermal energy flows throughout the AMTEC cell, all sodium pressure drops from hot BASE tubes to the condenser, the current, voltage, and power output from the cell, and the cell efficiency. This AMTEC cell model is so powerful and flexible that it is used in radioisotope AMTEC power system design, solar AMTEC power system design, and combustion-driven power system design on several projects at Advanced Modular Power Systems, Inc. (AMPS). The model has been successfully validated against actual cell experimental data and its performance predictions agree very well with experimental data on PX-5B cells and other test cells at AMPS. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Development & experimental validation of a SINDA/FLUINT thermal/fluid/electrical model of a multi-tube AMTEC cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Borkowski, Chris A.; Huang, Chendong

    1998-01-01

    AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion) cell development has received increased attention and funding in the space power community because of several desirable performance characteristics compared to current radioisotope thermoelectric generation and solar photovoltaic (PV) power generation. AMTEC cell development is critically dependent upon the ability to predict thermal, fluid dynamic and electrical performance of an AMTEC cell which has many complex thermal, fluid dynamic and electrical processes and interactions occurring simultaneously. Development of predictive capability is critical to understanding the complex processes and interactions within the AMTEC cell, and thereby creating the ability to design high-performance, cost-effective AMTEC cells. A flexible, sophisticated thermal/fluid/electrical model of an operating AMTEC cell has been developed using the SINDA/FLUINT analysis software. This model can accurately simulate AMTEC cell performance at any hot side and cold side temperature combination desired, for any voltage and current conditions, and for a broad range of cell design parameters involving the cell dimensions, current collector and electrode design, electrode performance parameters, and cell wall and thermal shield emissivity. The model simulates the thermal radiation network within the AMTEC cell using RadCAD thermal radiation analysis; hot side, cold side and cell wall conductive and radiative coupling; BASE (Beta Alumina Solid Electrode) tube electrochemistry, including electrode over-potentials; the fluid dynamics of the low-pressure sodium vapor flow to the condenser and liquid sodium flow in the wick; sodium condensation at the condenser; and high-temperature sodium evaporation in the wick. The model predicts the temperature profiles within the AMTEC cell walls, the BASE tube temperature profiles, the sodium temperature profile in the artery return, temperature profiles in the evaporator, thermal energy flows throughout the AMTEC cell, all sodium pressure drops from hot BASE tubes to the condenser, the current, voltage, and power output from the cell, and the cell efficiency. This AMTEC cell model is so powerful and flexible that it is used in radioisotope AMTEC power system design, solar AMTEC power system design, and combustion-driven power system design on several projects at Advanced Modular Power Systems, Inc. (AMPS). The model has been successfully validated against actual cell experimental data and its performance predictions agree very well with experimental data on PX-5B cells and other test cells at AMPS.

  6. Microbial Metabolism in Serpentinite Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Medina, M.; Brazelton, W. J.; Twing, K. I.; Kubo, M.; Hoehler, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization is the process in which ultramafic rocks, characteristic of the upper mantle, react with water liberating mantle carbon and reducing power to potenially support chemosynthetic microbial communities. These communities may be important mediators of carbon and energy exchange between the deep Earth and the surface biosphere. Our work focuses on the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in Northern California where subsurface fluids are accessible through a series of wells. Preliminary analyses indicate that the highly basic fluids (pH 9-12) have low microbial diversity, but there is limited knowledge about the metabolic capabilities of these communties. Metagenomic data from similar serpentine environments [1] have identified Betaproteobacteria belonging to the order Burkholderiales and Gram-positive bacteria from the order Clostridiales as key components of the serpentine microbiome. In an effort to better characterize the microbial community, metabolism, and geochemistry at CROMO, fluids from two representative wells (N08B and CSWold) were sampled during recent field campaigns. Geochemical characterization of the fluids includes measurements of dissolved gases (H2, CO, CH4), dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, volatile fatty acids, and nutrients. The wells selected can be differentiated in that N08B had higher pH (10-11), lower dissolved oxygen, and cell counts ranging from 105-106 cells mL-1 of fluid, with an abundance of the betaproteobacterium Hydrogenophaga. In contrast, fluids from CSWold have slightly lower pH (9-9.5), DO, and conductivity, as well as higher TDN and TDP. CSWold fluid is also characterized for having lower cell counts (~103 cells mL-1) and an abundance of Dethiobacter, a taxon within the phylum Clostridiales. Microcosm experiments were conducted with the purpose of monitoring carbon fixation, methanotrophy and metabolism of small organic compounds, such as acetate and formate, while tracing changes in fluid chemistry and microbial community composition. These experiments are expected to provide insight into the biogeochemical dynamics of the serpentinite subsurface at CROMO and represent a first step for developing metatranscriptomic and RNA-based Stable Isotope Probing (RNA-SIP) experiments to trace microbial activity at this site. [1] Brazelton et al. (2012) Frontiers in Microbiology 2:268

  7. End plate assembly having a two-phase fluid-filled bladder and method for compressing a fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Carlstrom, Jr., Charles M. (Clifton Park, NY)

    2001-01-01

    An end plate assembly is disclosed for use in a fuel cell assembly in which the end plate assembly includes a housing having a cavity, and a bladder receivable in the cavity and engageable with the fuel cell stack. The bladder includes a two-phase fluid having a liquid portion and a vapor portion. Desirably, the two-phase fluid has a vapor pressure between about 100 psi and about 600 psi at a temperature between about 70 degrees C. to about 110 degrees C.

  8. Comparison of Auditory Brainstem Response in HIV-1 exposed and unexposed newborns and their correlation with the maternal viral load and CD4 cell counts

    PubMed Central

    FASUNLA, Ayotunde James; OGUNBOSI, Babatunde Oluwatosin; ODAIBO, Georgina Njideka; NWAORGU, Onyekwere George Benjamin; TAIWO, Babafemi; OLALEYE, David Olufemi; OSINUSI, Kikelomo; MURPHY, Robert Leo; ADEWOLE, Isaac Folorunso; AKINYINKA, Olusegun Olusina

    2014-01-01

    Objective The effects of maternal HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy on hearing of HIV-exposed newborns in sub-Saharan Africa have not been investigated. We determined the prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss among HIV-exposed newborns and the association between the hearing threshold and maternal & newborn parameters. Design A cohort audiometric study of newborns between October 2012 and April 2013. Settings Secondary and tertiary hospital based study. Participants Consecutive 126 HIV-exposed and 121 HIV-unexposed newborns. Intervention Hearing screening of the newborns were done with Auditory Brainstem Response and compared with maternal HAART, CD4 cell counts, RNA viral loads and newborn CD4 percent. Main outcome measure Hearing threshold levels of both groups were measured and analyzed. Results 11.1% of HIV-exposed and 6.6% of unexposed newborns had hearing impairment (p=0.2214). 6.4% of HIV-exposed and 2.5% HIV-unexposed newborns had hearing threshold >20dBHL (p = 0.1578). There was no significant association between the hearing thresholds of HIV-exposed newborns and maternal CD4 cell counts (p = 0.059) but there was with maternal viral load (p=0.034). There was significant difference between the hearing thresholds of HIV-exposed newborns with CD4 % of ?25 and >25. This study showed significant difference in the hearing of the 119 HAART-exposed newborns and 7 unexposed newborns (p=0.002; RR=0.13 [0.05–0.32]). Conclusion There was a trend towards more hearing loss in HIV-exposed newborns. However, hearing thresholds increase with increasing mothers’ viral load. This background information supports the need for further studies on the role of in-utero exposure to HIV and HAART in newborn hearing loss. PMID:25313584

  9. Successful fabrication of a convex platform PMMA cell-counting slide using a high-precision perpendicular dual-spindle CNC machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shun-Tong; Chang, Chih-Hsien

    2013-12-01

    This study presents a novel approach to the fabrication of a biomedical-mold for producing convex platform PMMA (poly-methyl-meth-acrylate) slides for counting cells. These slides allow for the microscopic examination of urine sediment cells. Manufacturing of such slides incorporates three important procedures: (1) the development of a tabletop high-precision dual-spindle CNC (computerized numerical control) machine tool; (2) the formation of a boron-doped polycrystalline composite diamond (BD-PCD) wheel-tool on the machine tool developed in procedure (1); and (3) the cutting of a multi-groove-biomedical-mold array using the formed diamond wheel-tool in situ on the developed machine. The machine incorporates a hybrid working platform providing wheel-tool thinning using spark erosion to cut, polish, and deburr microgrooves on NAK80 steel directly. With consideration given for the electrical conductive properties of BD-PCD, the diamond wheel-tool is thinned to a thickness of 5 µm by rotary wire electrical discharge machining. The thinned wheel-tool can grind microgrooves 10 µm wide. An embedded design, which inserts a close fitting precision core into the biomedical-mold to create step-difference (concave inward) of 50 µm in height between the core and the mold, is also proposed and realized. The perpendicular dual-spindles and precision rotary stage are features that allow for biomedical-mold machining without the necessity of uploading and repositioning materials until all tasks are completed. A PMMA biomedical-slide with a plurality of juxtaposed counting chambers is formed and its usefulness verified.

  10. All about Carbohydrate Counting

    MedlinePLUS

    Toolkit No. 14 All About Carbohydrate Counting What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting is a way to plan your meals. It can help ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 2/14 Toolkit No. 14: All About Carbohydrate Counting continued The chart at the ...

  11. [Subclinical staphylococcal intramammary infections: within-herd prevalence and effects on milk yield and somatic cell counts in Thuringian dairy herds].

    PubMed

    Heinze, Juliane; Donat, Karsten; Brandt, Horst R; Wehrend, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Basic data for calculating the economic losses of subclinical staphylococcal intramammary infections are the reduction in milk yield and the within-herd prevalences. This study aimed to determine these parameters in selected herds. Quarter foremilk samples were taken from all lactating cows without clinical mastitis of 34 Thuringian dairy herds twice with an interval of five to nine months A total of 81 567 samples from 14 157 cows were cultured and screened for Staphylococci, Streptococci and Enterobacteriaceae. For statistical analysis a multifactorial variance analysis which included the factors farm, quarter, days in lactation and number of lactation was used. Least square means of the within-herd prevalence were 3.14% for Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and 6.64% for Coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS). The highest frequency of S. aureus-infections was detected at 201-250 days in milk. The risk of S. aureus-infections increased with increasing lactation number, whereas the frequency of CNS-infections decreased with lactation number (p < 0.001). Compared to not infected cows, S. aureus infected cows showed no differences in milk yield or milk components, but had a higher somatic cell count (SCC) (219 000 cells/ml, p < 0.001). The SCC by CNS infected cows was 89 000 cells/ml (p = 0.049). High SCCs were associated with low milk yield. Subclinical intramammary infections with S. aureus and CNS result in a higher SCC. There is a direct association between SCC and milk yield. PMID:25876286

  12. Instability of displacement of Oldroyd-B fluid by air in a Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    2014-03-01

    We study the displacement of an Oldroyd-B fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell when driven by air. In particular, we explicitly obtain an analytical expression for the growth rate of instability which depends on the relaxation and retardation (time) constants, denoted by ?, and ?1 respectively, appearing in the Oldroyd-B constitutive relations. When these two constants are zero, we recover the classical Saffman-Taylor result for a Newtonian liquid displaced by air. Our results show that this displacement process is more unstable than the case when a Newtonian fluid is displaced by air. The analytical results are plotted and compared with numerical results on this unstable displacement process available in the literature. The agreement is found to be excellent. In particular, results show that the non-Newtonian case (i.e., Oldroyd-B) is more unstable than the Newtonian case. Supported by an NPRP Grant # 08-777-1-141 from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of the Qatar Foundation). The statements made herein are solely the responsibility of the author.

  13. Uncertainty of nuclear counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommé, S.; Fitzgerald, R.; Keightley, J.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear counting is affected by pulse pileup and system dead time, which induce rate-related count loss and alter the statistical properties of the counting process. Fundamental equations are presented to predict deviations from Poisson statistics due to non-random count loss in nuclear counters and spectrometers. Throughput and dispersion of counts are studied for systems with pileup, extending and non-extending dead time, before and also after compensation for count loss. Equations are provided for random fractions of the output events, applicable to spectrometry applications. Methods for loss compensation are discussed, including inversion of the throughput equation, live-time counting and loss-free counting. Secondary effects in live-time counting are addressed: residual interference from pileup in systems with imposed dead times and errors due to varying count rate when measuring short-lived radionuclides.

  14. Stem cells and fluid flow drive cyst formation in an invertebrate excretory organ.

    PubMed

    Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Rink, Jochen C; McKinney, Sean A; McClain, Melainia; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Alexander, Richard; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases (CKDs) affect millions of people worldwide. The defining pathological features are fluid-filled cysts developing from nephric tubules due to defective flow sensing, cell proliferation and differentiation. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood, and the derived excretory systems of established invertebrate models (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) are unsuitable to model CKDs. Systematic structure/function comparisons revealed that the combination of ultrafiltration and flow-associated filtrate modification that is central to CKD etiology is remarkably conserved between the planarian excretory system and the vertebrate nephron. Consistently, both RNA-mediated genetic interference (RNAi) of planarian orthologues of human CKD genes and inhibition of tubule flow led to tubular cystogenesis that share many features with vertebrate CKDs, suggesting deep mechanistic conservation. Our results demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of animal excretory systems and establish planarians as a novel and experimentally accessible invertebrate model for the study of human kidney pathologies. PMID:26057828

  15. Direct Visualization of the Hydration Layer on Alumina Nanoparticles with the Fluid Cell STEM in situ

    PubMed Central

    Firlar, Emre; Ç?nar, Simge; Kashyap, Sanjay; Akinc, Mufit; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Rheological behavior of aqueous suspensions containing nanometer-sized powders is of relevance to many branches of industry. Unusually high viscosities observed for suspensions of nanoparticles compared to those of micron size powders cannot be explained by current viscosity models. Formation of so-called hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles in water was hypothesized, but never observed experimentally. We report here on the direct visualization of aqueous suspensions of alumina with the fluid cell in situ. We observe the hydration layer formed over the particle aggregates and show that such hydrated aggregates constitute new particle assemblies and affect the flow behavior of the suspensions. We discuss how these hydrated nanoclusters alter the effective solid content and the viscosity of nanostructured suspensions. Our findings elucidate the source of high viscosity observed for nanoparticle suspensions and are of direct relevance to many industrial sectors including materials, food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical among others employing colloidal slurries with nanometer-scale particles. PMID:25996055

  16. Fluid preconditioning for Newton–Krylov-based, fully implicit, electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.; Leibs, C.A.; Knoll, D.A.; Taitano, W.

    2014-02-01

    A recent proof-of-principle study proposes an energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in one dimension [9]. The algorithm in the reference employs an unpreconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method, which ensures nonlinear convergence at every timestep (resolving the dynamical timescale of interest). Kinetic enslavement, which is one key component of the algorithm, not only enables fully implicit PIC as a practical approach, but also allows preconditioning the kinetic solver with a fluid approximation. This study proposes such a preconditioner, in which the linearized moment equations are closed with moments computed from particles. Effective acceleration of the linear GMRES solve is demonstrated, on both uniform and non-uniform meshes. The algorithm performance is largely insensitive to the electron–ion mass ratio. Numerical experiments are performed on a 1D multi-scale ion acoustic wave test problem.

  17. Direct visualization of the hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles with the fluid cell STEM in situ

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Firlar, Emre; Ç?nar, Simge; Kashyap, Sanjay; Akinc, Mufit; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-05-21

    Rheological behavior of aqueous suspensions containing nanometer-sized powders is of relevance to many branches of industry. Unusually high viscosities observed for suspensions of nanoparticles compared to those of micron size powders cannot be explained by current viscosity models. Formation of so-called hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles in water was hypothesized, but never observed experimentally. We report here on the direct visualization of aqueous suspensions of alumina with the fluid cell in situ. We observe the hydration layer formed over the particle aggregates and show that such hydrated aggregates constitute new particle assemblies and affect the flow behavior of the suspensions.more »We discuss how these hydrated nanoclusters alter the effective solid content and the viscosity of nanostructured suspensions. Our findings elucidate the source of high viscosity observed for nanoparticle suspensions and are of direct relevance to many industrial sectors including materials, food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical among others employing colloidal slurries with nanometer-scale particles.« less

  18. Morphological stability of an interface between two non-Newtonian fluids moving in a Hele-Shaw cell.

    PubMed

    Martyushev, L M; Birzina, A I

    2015-01-01

    The problem of the morphological stability of an interface in the case of the displacement of one non-Newtonian fluid by another non-Newtonian fluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell has been considered. Both fluids have been described by the two-parameter Ostwald-de Waele power-law model. The nonzero viscosity of the displacing fluid has been taken into account. A generalized Darcy's law for the system under consideration, as well as an equation for the determination of the critical size of morphological stability with respect to harmonic perturbations (linear analysis), has been derived. Morphological phase diagrams have been constructed, and the region of the parameters in which nonequilibrium reentrant morphological transitions are possible has been revealed. PMID:25679705

  19. Rab11a-positive compartments in proximal tubule cells sort fluid-phase and membrane cargo.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Polly E; Raghavan, Venkatesan; Rbaibi, Youssef; Baty, Catherine J; Weisz, Ora A

    2014-03-01

    The proximal tubule (PT) reabsorbs the majority of sodium, bicarbonate, and chloride ions, phosphate, glucose, water, and plasma proteins from the glomerular filtrate. Despite the critical importance of endocytosis for PT cell (PTC) function, the organization of the endocytic pathway in these cells remains poorly understood. We have used immunofluorescence and live-cell imaging to dissect the itinerary of apically internalized fluid and membrane cargo in polarized primary cultures of PTCs isolated from mouse kidney cortex. Cells from the S1 segment could be distinguished from those from more distal PT segments by their robust uptake of albumin and comparatively low expression of ?-glutamyltranspeptidase. Rab11a in these cells is localized to variously sized spherical compartments that resemble the apical vacuoles observed by electron microscopy analysis of PTCs in vivo. These Rab11a-positive structures are highly dynamic and receive membrane and fluid-phase cargo. In contrast, fluid-phase cargoes are largely excluded from Rab11a-positive compartments in immortalized kidney cell lines. The unusual morphology and sorting capacity of Rab11a compartments in primary PTCs may reflect a unique specialization of these cells to accommodate the functional demands of handling a high endocytic load. PMID:24153428

  20. The study on the preparation and characterization of gene-loaded immunomagnetic albumin nanospheres and their anti-cell proliferative effect combined with magnetic fluid hyperthermia on GLC-82 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Hou, Xinxin; Lin, Mei; Wang, Ling; Li, Hongbo; Yuan, Chenyan; Liang, Chen; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most common malignant tumors, the clinical and socio-economic consequences of lung cancer are significant. Currently, surgery is the main treatment strategy for this disease, but the survival rates of lung cancer patients are not ideal due to the high recurrence rate of the disease. Therefore, many researchers are exploring new specific therapeutic methods that are highly curative and minimally cytotoxic to healthy tissues. To this end, albumin nanospheres simultaneously were loaded with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (as gene vector and anticancer gene), and plasmid pDONR223-IFNG, and modified with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab as therapy. Targeting agents, namely gene-loaded immunomagnetic albumin nanospheres (cetuximab [C225]-IFNG-IMANS), were prepared for targeted lung carcinoma cells (GLC-82 cell lines). Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the C225-IFNG-IMANS were successfully prepared, and the ability of the nanospheres to target GLC-82 cells in vitro was confirmed by Prussian blue staining, immunofluorescence experiments, and magnetic resonance imaging. Transfection photographs and agarose gel electrophoresis proved that pDONR223-IFNG could be encased in the albumin nanospheres. A Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that the combination therapy group had significantly more therapeutic effects on GLC-82 cells than other therapy groups. A flow cytometry assay showed that the apoptotic index of the combined treatment group was 67.68%, whereas the indices of the C225 group, gene therapy group, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia group were 12.2%, 16.34%, and 20.04% respectively. Therefore, the combination of thermal treatment, molecular targeted treatment, and gene treatment synergistically targets GLC-82 cells, and the use of C225-IFNG-IMANS as a gene or drug carrier offers a novel and promising approach for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26719671

  1. New Membrane Concept Applied to the Analysis of Fluid Shear- and Micropipette-Deformed Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional elastomer material concept of the red cell membrane is applied to the analysis of fluid shear-deformed, point-attached red cells and micropipette aspiration of red cell disks. The elastic constant (corresponding to the “shear” modulus multiplied by the membrane thickness) is of the order 10-2 dyn/cm for both cases. Additional experimental observations are in agreement with the membrane model, e.g. teardrop and “tether” formation of the sheared disks, pressure difference vs. aspirated length of the cell for micropipette experiments, etc PMID:4733701

  2. Formulation, Implementation and Validation of a Two-Fluid model in a Fuel Cell CFD Code

    SciTech Connect

    Kunal Jain, Vernon Cole, Sanjiv Kumar and N. Vaidya

    2008-11-01

    Water management is one of the main challenges in PEM Fuel Cells. While water is essential for membrane electrical conductivity, excess liquid water leads to ooding of catalyst layers. Despite the fact that accurate prediction of two-phase transport is key for optimal water management, understanding of the two-phase transport in fuel cells is relatively poor. Wang et. al. [1], [2] have studied the two-phase transport in the channel and diffusion layer separately using a multiphase mixture model. The model fails to accurately predict saturation values for high humidity inlet streams. Nguyen et. al. [3] developed a two-dimensional, two-phase, isothermal, isobaric, steady state model of the catalyst and gas diffusion layers. The model neglects any liquid in the channel. Djilali et. al. [4] developed a three-dimensional two-phase multicomponent model. The model is an improvement over previous models, but neglects drag between the liquid and the gas phases in the channel. In this work, we present a comprehensive two- fluid model relevant to fuel cells. Models for two-phase transport through Channel, Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) and Channel-GDL interface, are discussed. In the channel, the gas and liquid pressures are assumed to be same. The surface tension effects in the channel are incorporated using the continuum surface force (CSF) model. The force at the surface is expressed as a volumetric body force and added as a source to the momentum equation. In the GDL, the gas and liquid are assumed to be at different pressures. The difference in the pressures (capillary pressure) is calculated using an empirical correlations. At the Channel-GDL interface, the wall adhesion affects need to be taken into account. SIMPLE-type methods recast the continuity equation into a pressure-correction equation, the solution of which then provides corrections for velocities and pressures. However, in the two-fluid model, the presence of two phasic continuity equations gives more freedom and more complications. A general approach would be to form a mixture continuity equation by linearly combining the phasic continuity equations using appropriate weighting factors. Analogous to mixture equation for pressure correction, a difference equation is used for the volume/phase fraction by taking the difference between the phasic continuity equations. The relative advantages of the above mentioned algorithmic variants for computing pressure correction and volume fractions are discussed and quantitatively assessed. Preliminary model validation is done for each component of the fuel cell. The two-phase transport in the channel is validated using empirical correlations. Transport in the GDL is validated against results obtained from LBM and VOF simulation techniques. The Channel-GDL interface transport will be validated against experiment and empirical correlation of droplet detachment at the interface. References [1] Y. Wang S. Basu and C.Y. Wang. Modeling two-phase flow in pem fuel cell channels. J. Power Sources, 179:603{617, 2008. [2] P. K. Sinha and C. Y. Wang. Liquid water transport in a mixed-wet gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Chem. Eng. Sci., 63:1081-1091, 2008. [3] Guangyu Lin and Trung Van Nguyen. A two-dimensional two-phase model of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 153(2):A372{A382, 2006. [4] T. Berning and N. Djilali. A 3d, multiphase, multicomponent model of the cathode and anode of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 150(12):A1589{A1598, 2003.

  3. Six weeks daily ingestion of whole blueberry powder increases natural killer cell counts and reduces arterial stiffness in sedentary males and females.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Lisa S; Collier, Scott R; Landram, Michael J; Whittaker, D Stanton; Isaacs, Sydeena E; Klemka, Jason M; Cheek, Sarah L; Arms, Jennifer C; McAnulty, Steven R

    2014-07-01

    Evidence suggests that berries contain bioactive compounds, which reduce certain cancers and hypertension. Our hypothesis was that daily blueberry (BB) consumption would increase natural killer (NK) cells and plasma redox capacity and reduce blood pressure, augmentation index (AIx), central pulse wave velocity, and aortic systolic pressures (ASPs). Twenty-five men and postmenopausal women aged 18 to 50 years were recruited and randomized to BB (n, 13) or placebo groups (n, 12). Participants were provided with BB (equivalent to 250 g berries) or placebo powders each day for 6 weeks. Blood pressure, vascular performance testing, and blood samples were taken at baseline (presupplementation). Participants returned after 6 weeks and repeated all procedures. Presupplementation to postsupplementation comparisons for the main effects of treatment, time, and treatment-time interaction were made using a 2 (treatment) × 2 (times) repeated-measures analysis of variance for all vascular measures, redox status, and NK cell counts. Anthropometric measures were compared using t tests. Body mass, composition, and overall blood pressures were not affected in either group. Overall, AIx and ASPs were decreased in BB (treatment effect, P = .024 and P = .046, respectively). Plasma redox was not affected. Absolute NK cells were increased in BB (time, P = .001 and interaction, P = .012). Subjects (n, 9) with prehypertensive pressures (?120/80 mm Hg, respectively) were examined as a subset using t tests and exhibited significant reductions in diastolic pressure (P = .038) from presupplementation to postsupplementation in BB. We conclude that BB ingestion for 6 weeks increases NK cells and reduces AIx, ASP, and diastolic pressures in sedentary males and females. PMID:25150116

  4. Accuracy and Feasibility of Point-Of-Care White Blood Cell Count and C-Reactive Protein Measurements at the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Pia; Mertsola, Jussi; Peltola, Ville

    2015-01-01

    Background Several point-of-care (POC) tests are available for evaluation of febrile patients, but the data about their performance in acute care setting is sparse. We investigated the analytical accuracy and feasibility of POC tests for white blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein (CRP) at the pediatric emergency department (ED). Methods In the first part of the study, HemoCue WBC and Afinion AS100 CRP POC analyzers were compared with laboratory’s routine WBC (Sysmex XE-2100) and CRP (Modular P) analyzers in the hospital central laboratory in 77 and 48 clinical blood samples, respectively. The POC tests were then adopted in use at the pediatric ED. In the second part of the study, we compared WBC and CRP levels measured by POC and routine methods during 171 ED patient visits by 168 febrile children and adolescents. Attending physicians performed POC tests in capillary fingerprick samples. Results In parallel measurements in the laboratory both WBC and CRP POC analyzers showed good agreement with the reference methods. In febrile children at the emergency department (median age 2.4 years), physician performed POC determinations in capillary blood gave comparable results with those in venous blood analyzed in the laboratory. The mean difference between POC and reference test result was 1.1 E9/L (95% limits of agreement from -6.5 to 8.8 E9/L) for WBC and -1.2 mg/L (95% limits of agreement from -29.6 to 27.2 mg/L) for CRP. Conclusions POC tests are feasible and relatively accurate methods to assess CRP level and WBC count among febrile children at the ED. PMID:26034987

  5. Analysis of raw milk quality at reception and during cold storage: combined effects of somatic cell counts and psychrotrophic bacteria on lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Ahmed; Hamed, Houda; Elfeki, Abdelfettah

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the article was to analyze the influence of psychrotrophic bacteria counts (PBCs) and somatic cell counts (SCCs) on the extent of lipolysis in bulk samples of cow's milk at reception and during cold storage. Samples of milk were analyzed on the day of sampling and subsequently during cold storage. The acidity, fat, density, chloride content, electrical conductivity (EC), bulk milk SCCs (BMSCC), and PBC values were analyzed on the day of sampling and the levels of acidity, EC, SCC, and PBC were analyzed during cold storage at 4 °C for 72 h. The SCC value 869 × 10(3) mL(-1) was higher than the recommended threshold. Lipolysis level at sampling day was related more closely with SCC than with PBC. There was no significant correlation between milk acidity and PBC among others parameters, while the milk mean density was only significant (P < 0.01) correlated with the fat content. The EC and chloride content were consistently correlated (P < 0.001) with BMSCC that allowed them to be used as indicators of mammary gland infection. The milk acidity, EC, PBC, and lipolysis levels increased in relation to the storage time at 4 °C. The lipolysis level during storage was in closer relation to the SCC, but not relation to the PBC. Effects of SCC and PBC on lipolysis decreased throughout the chilling period. It was concluded that initial lipolysis level and intrinsic milk lipoprotein lipase appear more effective than SCC and PBC on the development of lipolysis during storage. PMID:23914979

  6. Particle Counting in Semiconductor Processing Gas and Apparatus with a New Flow-Cell-Type Laser Particle Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichijo, Kazuo; Kondo, Kaoru; Hoshina, Tamio; Tsubouchi, Kazuo; Masu, Kazuya

    1990-12-01

    A new flow-cell-type laser particle counter has been developed in order to measure particles at low and high pressure or in flammable and toxic gases. The minimum detectable particle diameter was 0.17 ?m. The helium leak rate of this particle counter was lower than 2× 10-11 atm\\cdotcm3/s by using a double O-ring seal structure. We have successfully measured particles in a CVD apparatus at low pressure and in SiH4 gases.

  7. Invitro toxicity test and searching the possibility of cancer cell line extermination by magnetic heating with using Fe3O4 magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoai Linh, Pham; Thuan, Nguyen Chi; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Van Thach, Pham; Cong Yen, Tran; Thi Quy, Nguyen; Nhung, Hoang Thi My; Thi Xuyen, Phi; Phuc, Nguyen Xuan; Van Hong, Le

    2009-09-01

    A Fe3O4 based magnetic fluid with different concentrations ranged between 0.15 ng/cell to 10 ng/cell (nano gram/cell) was used in the in vitro toxicity test on several cancer cell lines, Sarcoma 180, HeLa and H358. It shows that the fluid with a concentration of Fe3O4 below 1.2 ng/cell is completely non-toxic for these cell lines. Even through in the presence of the highest concentration of 10 ng/cell, the cell viability still reaches more than 60%. The magnetic fluid with Fe3O4 concentration of about 0.1 ng/cell was also used to search ex-vivo the possibility of Sarcoma 180 extermination by magnetic heating with an AC field of 120Oe and 184 KHz. The result shows that after a heat treatment for 30 min., 40% of Sarcoma 180 cells was killed.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Obtained from Synovial Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells on a Matrigel Coating Exhibited Enhanced Proliferation and Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Liu, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Wen-Yu; Zheng, You-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) serve as a promising source for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, optimal methods for transforming iPSCs into MSCs and the characteristics of iPSC-MSCs obtained from different methods remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed a one-step method for obtaining iPSC-MSCs (CD146+STRO-1+ MSCs) from human synovial fluid MSC-derived induced iPSCs (SFMSC-iPSCs). CD146-STRO-1-SFMSCs were reprogrammed into iPSCs by transduction with lentivirus-mediated Sox2, Oct-3/4, klf4, and c-Myc. SFMSC-iPSCs were maintained with mTeSR1 medium in Matrigel-coated culture plates. Single dissociated cells were obtained by digesting the SFMSC-iPSCs with trypsin. The dissociated cells were then plated into Matrigel-coated culture plate with alpha minimum essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 1× Glutamax, and the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. Cells were then passaged in standard cell culture plates with alpha minimum essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1× Glutamax. After passaging in vitro, the cells showed a homogenous spindle-shape similar to their ancestor cells (SFMSCs), but with more robust proliferative activity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed typical MSC surface markers, including expression of CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD44 and lack of CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19, and HLA-DR. However, these cells were positive for CD146 and stro-1, which the ancestor cells were not. Moreover, the cells could also be induced to differentiate in osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages in vitro. The differentiation potential was improved compared with the ancestor cells in vitro. The cells were not found to exhibit oncogenicity in vivo. Therefore, the method presented herein facilitated the generation of STRO-1+CD146+ MSCs from SFMSC-iPSCs exhibiting enhanced proliferation and differentiation potential. PMID:26649753

  9. Feeding-dependent activation of enteric cells and sensory neurons by lymphatic fluid: evidence for a neurolymphocrine system

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Daniel P.; Lee, Mike; Tso, Patrick; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Yo, Sek Jin; Lieu, TinaMarie; Shiu, Amy; Wang, Jen-Chywan; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic fluid is a plasma filtrate that can be viewed as having biological activity through the passive accumulation of molecules from the interstitial fluid. The possibility that lymphatic fluid is part of an active self-contained signaling process that parallels the endocrine system, through the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), has remained unexplored. We show that the GPCR lysophosphatidic acid 5 (LPA5) is found in sensory nerve fibers expressing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that innervate the lumen of lymphatic lacteals and enteric nerves. Using LPA5 as a model for nutrient-responsive GPCRs present on sensory nerves, we demonstrate that dietary protein hydrolysate (peptone) can induce c-Fos expression in enterocytes and nerves that express LPA5. Mesenteric lymphatic fluid (MLF) mobilizes intracellular calcium in cell models expressing LPA5 upon feeding in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Primary cultured neurons of the dorsal root ganglia expressing CGRP are activated by MLF, which is enhanced upon LPA5 overexpression. Activation is independent of the known LPA5 agonists, lysophosphatidic acid and farnesyl pyrophosphate. These data bring forth a pathway for the direct stimulation of sensory nerves by luminal contents and interstitial fluid. Thus, by activating LPA5 on sensory nerves, MLF provides a means for known and yet to be identified constituents of the interstitial fluid to act as signals to comprise a “neurolymphocrine” system. PMID:24578341

  10. Enumeration of islets by nuclei counting and light microscopic analysis

    E-print Network

    Pisania, Anna

    Islet enumeration in impure preparations by conventional dithizone staining and visual counting is inaccurate and operator dependent. We examined nuclei counting for measuring the total number of cells in islet preparations, ...

  11. Optimization of a miniaturized fluid array device for cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kirsten; Jin, Shouguang; Fan, Z Hugh

    2015-12-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS), which entails synthesizing proteins outside of intact cells, is conducted in several formats with the continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF) format generally having the greatest protein expression yields. With this format, continuous chemical exchange occurs through a dialysis membrane separating a reaction solution from a feeding solution containing supplemental nutrient/energy molecules. Here, we describe the optimization of the miniaturized fluid array device (µFAD) by studying the effects of structural and experimental parameters responsible for the heightened chemical exchange across the dialysis membranes and enhanced protein expression capabilities of the high-throughput device. The interface area and number between the reaction and feeding solutions have a direct impact on protein expression, with a 1.6% enhancement in protein expression yield with each square millimeter increase in area and a 20% decrease with each additional interface. For nutrient/energy availability, an increasing solution volume ratio and height difference increase protein expression yield until the expression yield plateaus at a volume ratio of 20 to 1 (feeding to reaction solution) and a solution height difference of 2?mm. This yield can be further increased by 7% every 30?min with feeding solution replacement. Of the studied experimental factors (feeding solution stirring, device shaking, and temperature increase), feeding solution stirring has a significant effect on protein expression in this device. In the optimized system, green fluorescent protein (GFP), ß-glucuronidase (GUS), ß-galactosidase (LacZ), luciferase, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) expression increased 77.8-, 212-, 3.66-, 463-, and 5.43-fold, respectively, compared to the conventional batch format in a standard microplate. These results highlight the significance of structural/experimental conditions on the productive expression of proteins in the CECF format. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 2459-2467. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26037852

  12. CD90+ mesothelial-like cells in peritoneal fluid promote peritoneal metastasis by forming a tumor permissive microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Joji; Emoto, Shigenobu; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishigami, Hironori; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The peritoneal cavity is a common target of metastatic gastrointestinal and ovarian cancer cells, but the mechanisms leading to peritoneal metastasis have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined the roles of cells in peritoneal fluids on the development of peritoneal metastasis. We found that a minor subset of human intraperitoneal cells with CD90(+)/CD45(-) phenotype vigorously grew in culture with mesothelial-like appearance. The mesothelial-like cells (MLC) displayed the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cell, such as differentiating into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes, and suppressing T cell proliferation. These cells highly expressed type I collagen, vimentin, ?-smooth muscle actin and fibroblast activated protein-? by the stimulation with TGF-?, which is characteristic of activated myofibroblasts. Intraperitoneal co-injection of MLCs with the human gastric cancer cell line, MKN45, significantly enhanced the rate of metastatic formation in the peritoneum of nude mice. Histological examination revealed that many MLCs were engrafted in metastatic nodules and were mainly located at the fibrous area. Dasatinib, a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor, strongly inhibited the proliferation of MLCs but not MKN45 in vitro. Nevertheless, oral administration of Dasatinib significantly inhibited the development of peritoneal metastasis of MKN45, and resulted in reduced fibrillar formation of metastatic nodules. These results suggest floating MLCs in the peritoneal fluids support the development of peritoneal metastasis possibly through the production of the permissive microenvironment, and thus the functional blockade of MLCs is a reasonable strategy to treat recurrent abdominal malignancies. PMID:24466130

  13. Impact of Admission White Blood Cell Count on Short- and Long-term Mortality in Patients With Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohan; Huang, Bi; Lu, Haisong; Zhao, Zhenhua; Lu, Zhinan; Yang, Yanmin; Zhang, Shu; Hui, Rutai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Studies have shown inflammation is involved in the development of acute aortic dissection (AAD). The hypothesis that white blood cell count (WBCc) on admission may have an impact on the short- and long-term outcomes of type A AAD was tested in a large-scale, prospective observational cohort study. From 2008 to 2010, a total of 570 consecutive patients with type A AAD in Fuwai hospital were enrolled and were followed up. Baseline characteristics and WBCc on admission were collected. The primary outcomes were 30-day and long-term all-cause mortality. During a median of 1.89 years of follow-up, the 30-day and long-term all-cause mortality were 10.7% and 6.5%, respectively. Univariate Cox regression analysis identified admission WBCc as an independent predictor of 30-day mortality when considered as a continuous variable or as a categorical variable using the cutoff of 11.0??×?109?cells/L (all P?11.0?×?109?cells/L) remained an independent predictor of 30-day mortality of AAD (hazard ratio?=?3.31, 95% confidence interval 1.38–7.93, P?=?0.007). No impact of admission WBCc was observed on the long-term all-cause mortality. In conclusion, elevated admission WBCc may be valuable as a predictor of 30-day mortality, and may be useful in the risk stratification of type A AAD during hospitalization. PMID:26496299

  14. The Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell (HDAC) for raman spectroscopic studies of geologic fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Christian; Chou, I-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC), which is specifically designed for experiments on systems with aqueous fluids to temperatures up to ?~1000ºC and pressures up to a few GPa to tens of GPa. This cell permits optical observation of the sample and the in situ determination of properties by ‘photon-in photon-out’ techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. Several methods for pressure measurement are discussed in detail including the Raman spectroscopic pressure sensors a-quartz, berlinite, zircon, cubic boron nitride (c-BN), and 13C-diamond, the fluorescence sensors ruby (?-Al2O3:Cr3+), Sm:YAG (Y3Al5O12:Sm3+) and SrB4O7:Sm2+, and measurements of phase-transition temperatures. Furthermore, we give an overview of published Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids to high pressures and temperatures, in which diamond anvil cells were applied.

  15. Chapter 7: The hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) for Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Christian; Chou, I-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC), which is specifically designed for experiments on systems with aqueous fluids to temperatures up to ~1000ºC and pressures up to a few GPa to tens of GPa. This cell permits optical observation of the sample and the in situ determination of properties by ‘photon-in photon-out’ techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. Several methods for pressure measurement are discussed in detail including the Raman spectroscopic pressure sensors a-quartz, berlinite, zircon, cubic boron nitride (c-BN), and 13C-diamond, the fluorescence sensors ruby (?-Al2O3:Cr3+), Sm:YAG (Y3Al5O12:Sm3+) and SrB4O7:Sm2+, and measurements of phase-transition temperatures. Furthermore, we give an overview of published Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids to high pressures and temperatures, in which diamond anvil cells were applied.

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Quantitative C-Reactive Protein, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and White Blood Cell Count in Urinary Tract Infections among Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    AYAZI, Parviz; MAHYAR, Abolfazl; DANESHI, Mohammad Mahdi; JAHANI HASHEMI, Hassan; PIROUZI, Mahdieh; ESMAILZADEHHA, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the quantitative C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and white blood cell (WBC) count in urinary tract infections (UTI) among hospitalised infants and children in Qazvin, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 127 hospitalised children ranging in age from 2 months to 12 years old 31.79 months (SD 30.73) who were suspected of having a UTI and who did not receive antibiotics prior to being seen at a Qazvin teaching children’s hospital between 2005 and 2006. A urine analysis (U/A) and urine culture (U/C) were performed. The blood was taken for CRP, ESR and WBC analyses. U/C has been considered the gold standard test for a UTI and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy (DMSA) as the gold standard for an upper UTI (pyelonephritis). These tests were used to determine the diagnostic accuracy, which is represented as the percent of correct results. Results: Within the study population, 72 patients (56.7%) were younger than two years old 9.86 months (SD 4.56) and 55 (43.3%) were older than two years old 63.58 months (SD 30.96). One hundred and two patients (80.3%) were female. There were 100 cases that had a positive U/C. Of the patients with a positive U/C, 81 had pyuria (WBC more than 5/hpf), 71 had a peripheral WBC count of more than 10 000 /mL, 95 had a CRP of more than 10 mg/L and 82 had an ESR > 10 mm/h. The sensitivity and specificity as well as the positive and negative predictive values and the accuracy of CRP when using U/C as the gold standard were, respectively, 96%, 11.1%, 80.2%, 50%, and 78%; when using ESR as the gold standard were, respectively, 55%, 40%, 77.6%, 17.2%, and 52%; and when using WBC counts as the gold standard were, respectively, 69%, 52%, 86.6%, 35.6%, and 65%. The accuracy of CRP, ESR and WBC counts when considering the DMSA as the gold standard were 58.3%, 62.8%, and 64.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Although acute phase reactants can help in the diagnosis of a UTI, they are not pathognomonic. CRP, ESR and WBC were neither completely sensitive nor specific for detecting a UTI and its localisation site in Iranian children. Therefore, in a country where advanced clinical diagnostic tests are available, the advanced test should be used in conjunction with CRP, ESR and WBC analyses. Finally, a combination of laboratory tests along with history and exact clinical examination are needed for the diagnosis of a UTI and its localisation site. PMID:24643248

  17. Metabolic and structural changes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Achromobacter CDC and Agrobacterium radiobacter cells injured in parenteral fluids.

    PubMed

    Papapetropoulou, M; Papageorgakopoulou, N

    1994-01-01

    The long term metabolic changes of three oxidase positive microorganisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Agrobacterium radiobacter and Achromobacter CDC) all isolated from aquatic environment, were defined after they were inoculated in three parenteral fluids: Lactated Ringer's solution, Sodium Chloride 0.9% and Dextrose 5%. The number of microorganisms introduced into the parenteral products was adjusted to 10(5) bacteria/ml and left at room temperature (20-22 degrees C) for 30 days. Their enzymatic and protein profile as compared with their initial characteristics after they were grown in broth, were measured using API 20NE batteries of tests and gel electrophoresis. In L-R and NaCl 0.9% fluids, P. aeruginosa and Ag. radiobacter lost the ability to hydrolyse urea while Ac CDC retained this ability. In Dextrose 5% fluid the microorganisms lost most of their metabolic characters. The protein patterns in SDS-PAGE of samples prepared from cells of the tested microorganisms showed marked differences (in P. aeruginosa) to minor differences (in Ag. radiobacter and Ac CDC) while new proteins with M(r) > 66KDa revealed Ag. radiobacter cells. The gelatinolytic zymogram shows also differences between bacterial cells grown in nutrient broth and those that remained in parenteral fluids. These changes reflect the stress of the tested bacteria in an unfavorable condition. The alterations of injured bacteria could render them unable to grow on routine, for sterilization testing, culture media. PMID:7850451

  18. Pt and Pt-Ru/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid as Electrocatalysts for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Cui, Xiaoli; Wang, Jun; Yen, Clive; Wai, Chien M.

    2006-06-01

    In recent years, the use of supercritical fluids (SCFs) for the synthesis and processing of nanomaterials has proven to be a rapid, direct, and clean approach to develop nanomaterials and nanocomposites. The application of supercritical fluid technology can result in products (and processes) that are cleaner, less expensive, and of higher quality than those that are produced using conventional technologies and solvents. In this work, carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Pt and Pt-Ru nanoparticles catalysts have been synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). The experimental results demonstrate that Pt, Pt-Ru/CNT nanocomposites synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide are effective electrocatalysts for low-temperature fuel cells.

  19. Taking the Count 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    The counting of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) used as alpha particle detectors is made quick and easy through a computer-assisted counting program. The software was developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The use...

  20. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  1. Bicarbonate-dependent chloride transport drives fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jiajie; Liao, Jie; Huang, Junwei; Robert, Renaud; Palmer, Melissa L; Fahrenkrug, Scott C; O'Grady, Scott M; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-01-01

    Anion and fluid secretion are both defective in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, the transport mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, Cl? and HCO3? secretion was measured using genetically matched CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient and CFTR-expressing cell lines derived from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. Forskolin stimulated the short-circuit current (Isc) across voltage-clamped monolayers, and also increased the equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) calculated under open-circuit conditions. Isc was equivalent to the HCO3? net flux measured using the pH-stat technique, whereas Ieq was the sum of the Cl? and HCO3? net fluxes. Ieq and HCO3? fluxes were increased by bafilomycin and ZnCl2, suggesting that some secreted HCO3? is neutralized by parallel electrogenic H+ secretion. Ieq and fluid secretion were dependent on the presence of both Na+ and HCO3?. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide abolished forskolin stimulation of Ieq and HCO3? secretion, suggesting that HCO3? transport under these conditions requires catalysed synthesis of carbonic acid. Cl? was the predominant anion in secretions under all conditions studied and thus drives most of the fluid transport. Nevertheless, 50–70% of Cl? and fluid transport was bumetanide-insensitive, suggesting basolateral Cl? loading by a sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1)-independent mechanism. Imposing a transepithelial HCO3? gradient across basolaterally permeabilized Calu-3 cells sustained a forskolin-stimulated current, which was sensitive to CFTR inhibitors and drastically reduced in CFTR-deficient cells. Net HCO3? secretion was increased by bilateral Cl? removal and therefore did not require apical Cl?/HCO3? exchange. The results suggest a model in which most HCO3? is recycled basolaterally by exchange with Cl?, and the resulting HCO3?-dependent Cl? transport provides an osmotic driving force for fluid secretion. PMID:22777674

  2. Micro/macroscopic fluid flow in open cell fibrous structures and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayol, Ali

    Fibrous porous materials are involved in a wide range of applications including composite fabrication, filtration, compact heat exchangers, fuel cell technology, and tissue engineering to name a few. Fibrous structures, such as metalfoams, have unique characteristics such as low weight, high porosity, high mechanical strength, and high surface to volume ratio. More importantly, in many applications the fibrous microstructures can be tailored to meet a range of requirements. Therefore, fibrous materials have the potential to be used in emerging sustainable energy conversion applications. The first step for analyzing transport phenomena in porous materials is to determine the micro/macroscopic flow-field inside the medium. In applications where the porous media is confined in a channel, the system performance is tightly related to the flow properties of the porous medium and its interaction with the channel walls, i.e., macroscopic velocity distribution. Therefore, the focus of the study has been on: developing new mechanistic model(s) for determining permeability and inertial coefficient of fibrous porous materials; investigating the effects of microstructural and mechanical parameters such as porosity, fiber orientation, mechanical compression, and fiber distribution on the flow properties and pressure drop of fibrous structures; determining the macroscopic flow-field in confined porous media where the porous structure fills the channel cross-section totally or partially. A systematic approach has been followed to study different aspects of the flow through fibrous materials. The complex microstructure of real materials has been modelled using unit cells that have been assumed to be repeated throughout the media. Implementing various exact and approximate analytical techniques such as integral technique, point matching, blending rules, and scale analysis the flow properties of such media have been modelled; the targeted properties include permeability and inertial coefficient. In addition, fluid flow through microchannels, fully and partially filled with porous media, has been modelled using a volume-averaged equation, which is a novel approach in Microfluidics. To verify the developed models, several testbeds have been designed and experimental studies have been conducted with various fluids and porous materials. The proposed models have been verified with the measured data and the experimental results reported by others. Keywords: Fibrous porous media; Permeability; Inertial coefficient; Theoretical modeling; Numerical simulation; Experimental verification; Confined porous media; Metalfoams; Gas diffusion layers; Sustainable energy; Transport phenomena.

  3. Genotype-specific risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus in Swiss dairy herds with an elevated yield-corrected herd somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Berchtold, B; Bodmer, M; van den Borne, B H P; Reist, M; Graber, H U; Steiner, A; Boss, R; Wohlfender, F

    2014-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a frequent problem in Swiss dairy herds. One of the main pathogens causing significant economic loss is Staphylococcus aureus. Various Staph. aureus genotypes with different biological properties have been described. Genotype B (GTB) of Staph. aureus was identified as the most contagious and one of the most prevalent strains in Switzerland. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with the herd-level presence of Staph. aureus GTB and Staph. aureus non-GTB in Swiss dairy herds with an elevated yield-corrected herd somatic cell count (YCHSCC). One hundred dairy herds with a mean YCHSCC between 200,000 and 300,000cells/mL in 2010 were recruited and each farm was visited once during milking. A standardized protocol investigating demography, mastitis management, cow husbandry, milking system, and milking routine was completed during the visit. A bulk tank milk (BTM) sample was analyzed by real-time PCR for the presence of Staph. aureus GTB to classify the herds into 2 groups: Staph. aureus GTB-positive and Staph. aureus GTB-negative. Moreover, quarter milk samples were aseptically collected for bacteriological culture from cows with a somatic cell count ?150,000cells/mL on the last test-day before the visit. The culture results allowed us to allocate the Staph. aureus GTB-negative farms to Staph. aureus non-GTB and Staph. aureus-free groups. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression models were built to identify risk factors associated with the herd-level presence of Staph. aureus GTB and Staph. aureus non-GTB. The prevalence of Staph. aureus GTB herds was 16% (n=16), whereas that of Staph. aureus non-GTB herds was 38% (n=38). Herds that sent lactating cows to seasonal communal pastures had significantly higher odds of being infected with Staph. aureus GTB (odds ratio: 10.2, 95% CI: 1.9-56.6), compared with herds without communal pasturing. Herds that purchased heifers had significantly higher odds of being infected with Staph. aureus GTB (rather than Staph. aureus non-GTB) compared with herds without purchase of heifers. Furthermore, herds that did not use udder ointment as supportive therapy for acute mastitis had significantly higher odds of being infected with Staph. aureus GTB (odds ratio: 8.5, 95% CI: 1.6-58.4) or Staph. aureus non-GTB (odds ratio: 6.1, 95% CI: 1.3-27.8) than herds that used udder ointment occasionally or regularly. Herds in which the milker performed unrelated activities during milking had significantly higher odds of being infected with Staph. aureus GTB (rather than Staph. aureus non-GTB) compared with herds in which the milker did not perform unrelated activities at milking. Awareness of 4 potential risk factors identified in this study guides implementation of intervention strategies to improve udder health in both Staph. aureus GTB and Staph. aureus non-GTB herds. PMID:24881801

  4. Evidence That HIV-1 CRF01_AE Is Associated with Low CD4+T Cell Count and CXCR4 Co-Receptor Usage in Recently Infected Young Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaolei; Wang, Xuqin; Zhen, Xiaohong; Zhang, Wei; Ning, Zhen; Yue, Qing; Fu, Jie; Shen, Fangwei; Gai, Jing; Xu, Yuqing; Mao, Jiawen; Gao, Xianming; Shen, Xiaopei; Kang, Laiyi; Vanham, Guido; Cheng, Hua; Wang, Ying; Zhuang, Minghua; Zhuang, Xun; Pan, Qichao; Zhong, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have recently accounted for an alarmingly increasing proportion of HIV-1 transmission in China. In order to investigate the immune status as a result of CRF01_AE infection and CXCR4 co-receptor usage in a young Shanghai-based HIV-1-infected MSM population in Shanghai, 364 HIV-1-infected MSM with average age of 22.7 years old, newly diagnosed between Jan 2009 and Jul 2013 were analyzed for CD4+T cell count, subtyping using phylogenetic analysis, and viral co-receptor tropism using Geno2pheno and webPSSM in combination. A total of 276 individuals were identified as recently infected. Subtype assignment were as follows: 176 (63.8%) CRF01_AE, 77 (27.9%) CRF07_BC, and 23 (8.3%) subtype B. Besides, 24 second-generation recombinant strains were identified. A lower CD4+T cell count at baseline survey was observed among CRF01_AE strain-infected individuals, compared to those who were infected with CRF07_BC (P<0.01). The frequency of baseline CD4+T cell count <200 was higher and the frequency of CD4 T counts >500 lower in CRF01_AE infection than CRF07_BC infection. It is worth noting that 32.4%–40.9% of CRF01_AE strain-infected individuals were predicted to carry CXCR4-tropic viruses whereas none of CRF07_BC and subtype B were found to be as CXCR4-tropic viruses (P<0.001). As could be expected CXCR4 tropism was associated with lower CD4 T counts. This study revealed that CRF01_AE strains with high frequency of CXCR4 tropism are prevailing in the young MSM population in China and could potentially cause a severe loss of CD4+T cell count and rapid disease progression. A regular surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes, CD4+T cell count and viral co-receptor usage would be greatly beneficial for effectively monitoring disease progression, improvement of antiretroviral therapy strategy and prompt intervention of transmission. PMID:24586795

  5. Diagnostic Value of T-Cell Interferon-? Release Assays on Cerebrospinal Fluid for Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yueqiu; Shi, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) remains a challenge. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of T-SPOT.TB test on cerebrospinal fluid mononuclear cells (CSFMCs) for suspected TBM patients. 43 consecutive patients with suspected TBM were enrolled in the study from June 2011 to September 2014. T-SPOT.TB was performed on both CSFMCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The final diagnosis of TBM was independent of the T-SPOT.TB result. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and likelihood ratio of T-SPOT.TB on CSFMCs and PBMCs were analyzed. Of the 43 patients, 12 (27.9%) were finally diagnosed with TBM, 28 (65.1%) with non-TBM, and 3 (7.0%) with indeterminate diagnoses. Of 40 cases with definite diagnoses, the sensitivity and specificity were 92.0% and 96.0% for T-SPOT.TB on CSFMCs, and 83.0% and 82.0% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of T-SPOT.TB on CSFMCs were 85.0% and 96.0%, respectively. The PPV and NPV were 67.0% and 92.0% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs. The difference of T-SPOT.TB between CSFMCs and PBMCs was not significant so far as sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were concerned (P>0.05 for each). However, T-SPOT.TB on CSFMC and CSFMC: PBMC in TBM cases seemed higher than that in non-TBM cases. Our study further showed that T-SPOT.TB on CSFMCs might be a rapid and accurate diagnostic test for TBM. CSFMC: PBMC T-SPOT.TB ratio might be useful for the early diagnosis of TBM. PMID:26545256

  6. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  7. An Adiabatic Fluid Electron Particle-in-Cell Code for Simulating Ion-Driven Parametric Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.

    1996-03-01

    A hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) method is presented in which the electrons are modeled as an adiabatic fluid with an arbitrary ratio of specific heats ?. The electromagnetic field model is based on a temporal Wentzel-Krammers-Brillouin approximation. The method is a new tool for simulating ion-driven parametric instabili?ties which often exist in laser-produced plasmas. The method is general and does not depend on the number of spatial dimensions. The method will model the plasma behavior correctly even in situations where the electron Debye shielding is not negligible. Test simulations of ion Landau damping in both one and two dimensions are performed, and the results are in excellent agreement with linear Vlasov theory. Test simulations of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in one and two dimensions are performed, and the results indicate that when the intensity of the driving electromagnetic field is sufficiently high, backscatter SBS is dominant at early time while side-scatter SBS is dominant at late time. For the test cases in which a high-frequency driving electromagnetic field is present, our hybrid PIC method offers a substantial saving in computational time over explicit PIC methods that require the time scale of the driving electromagnetic field to be resolved.

  8. Actuation of flexoelectric membranes in viscoelastic fluids with applications to outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Valencia, E E; Rey, Alejandro D

    2014-11-28

    Liquid crystal flexoelectric actuation uses an imposed electric field to create membrane bending, and it is used by the outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the inner ear, whose role is to amplify sound through generation of mechanical power. Oscillations in the OHC membranes create periodic viscoelastic flows in the contacting fluid media. A key objective of this work on flexoelectric actuation relevant to OHCs is to find the relations and impact of the electromechanical properties of the membrane, the rheological properties of the viscoelastic media, and the frequency response of the generated mechanical power output. The model developed and used in this work is based on the integration of: (i) the flexoelectric membrane shape equation applied to a circular membrane attached to the inner surface of a circular capillary and (ii) the coupled capillary flow of contacting viscoelastic phases, such that the membrane flexoelectric oscillations drive periodic viscoelastic capillary flows, as in OHCs. By applying the Fourier transform formalism to the governing equation, analytical expressions for the transfer function associated with the curvature and electrical field and for the power dissipation of elastic storage energy were found. PMID:25332388

  9. A new multiphysics model for the physiological responses of vascular endothelial cells to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Goo; Shim, Eun Bo; Chang, Keun-Shik

    2007-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) responds to wall shear stress that has not only spatial variation, but also temporal gradient. To simplify the problem, we first studied how the calcium dynamics of VEC responded to the steady wall shear stress of varying magnitude in a stenosed artery. We then studied how the VEC responded to the periodic shear stress that had temporal variation, as in the pulsatile blood flow. To investigate the multiphysics model of VEC in vitro, we used a mathematical model for intracellular calcium dynamics and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for arterial wall shear stress, either steady or periodic. The CFD results showed that for the steady stenotic flow, the wall shear stress in the recirculating flow was lower than the threshold value, 4 dyne/cm(2), at two particular points: flow separation and flow reattachment. For these subthreshold shear stresses, the peak value of the transient calcium response did not hit the normal saturated level, but reached a reduced magnitude. We investigated the effect of severity of stenosis (SOS) of the stenosed artery. For the pulsatile flow, the so-called shear stress slew rate or the temporal gradient of the first upsurge of the periodic flow was an important factor for the VEC calcium dynamics. The calcium response had a finite range of parameter for SOS and shear stress slew rate in which the calcium response was more sensitive than elsewhere, showing a sigmoid pattern. PMID:17963593

  10. A Cell Dynamical System Model for Simulation of Continuum Dynamics of Turbulent Fluid Flows

    E-print Network

    A. M. Selvam; S. Fadnavis

    2006-07-21

    Atmospheric flows exhibit long-range spatiotemporal correlations manifested as the fractal geometry to the global cloud cover pattern concomitant with inverse power-law form for power spectra of temporal fluctuations of all scales ranging from turbulence (millimeters-seconds) to climate (thousands of kilometers-years). Long-range spatiotemporal correlations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and are identified as signatures of self-organized criticality. Standard models for turbulent fluid flows in meteorological theory cannot explain satisfactorily the observed multifractal (space-time) structures in atmospheric flows. Numerical models for simulation and prediction of atmospheric flows are subject to deterministic chaos and give unrealistic solutions. Deterministic chaos is a direct consequence of round-off error growth in iterative computations. Round-off error of finite precision computations doubles on an average at each step of iterative computations. Round-off error will propagate to the mainstream computation and give unrealistic solutions in numerical weather prediction and climate models which incorporate thousands of iterative computations in long-term numerical integration schemes. A recently developed non-deterministic cell dynamical system model for atmospheric flows predicts the observed self-organized criticality as intrinsic to quantumlike mechanics governing flow dynamics. Further, the fractal space-time structure to the stringlike atmospheric flow trajectory is resolved into a continuum of eddies. The eddy circulations obey Kepler third law of planetary motion and therefore eddy inertial masses obey Newton inverse square law of gravitation on all scales from microscopic to macroscale.

  11. Direct visualization of the hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles with the fluid cell STEM in situ

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Firlar, Emre; Ç?nar, Simge; Kashyap, Sanjay; Akinc, Mufit; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-05-21

    Rheological behavior of aqueous suspensions containing nanometer-sized powders is of relevance to many branches of industry. Unusually high viscosities observed for suspensions of nanoparticles compared to those of micron size powders cannot be explained by current viscosity models. Formation of so-called hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles in water was hypothesized, but never observed experimentally. We report here on the direct visualization of aqueous suspensions of alumina with the fluid cell in situ. We observe the hydration layer formed over the particle aggregates and show that such hydrated aggregates constitute new particle assemblies and affect the flow behavior of the suspensions.more »We discuss how these hydrated nanoclusters alter the effective solid content and the viscosity of nanostructured suspensions. As a result, our findings elucidate the source of high viscosity observed for nanoparticle suspensions and are of direct relevance to many industrial sectors including materials, food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical among others employing colloidal slurries with nanometer-scale particles.« less

  12. Actuation of flexoelectric membranes in viscoelastic fluids with applications to outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Valencia, E. E.; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid crystal flexoelectric actuation uses an imposed electric field to create membrane bending, and it is used by the outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the inner ear, whose role is to amplify sound through generation of mechanical power. Oscillations in the OHC membranes create periodic viscoelastic flows in the contacting fluid media. A key objective of this work on flexoelectric actuation relevant to OHCs is to find the relations and impact of the electromechanical properties of the membrane, the rheological properties of the viscoelastic media, and the frequency response of the generated mechanical power output. The model developed and used in this work is based on the integration of: (i) the flexoelectric membrane shape equation applied to a circular membrane attached to the inner surface of a circular capillary and (ii) the coupled capillary flow of contacting viscoelastic phases, such that the membrane flexoelectric oscillations drive periodic viscoelastic capillary flows, as in OHCs. By applying the Fourier transform formalism to the governing equation, analytical expressions for the transfer function associated with the curvature and electrical field and for the power dissipation of elastic storage energy were found. PMID:25332388

  13. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming Behavior of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Paulo; Yang, Jing; Gollub, Jerry

    2013-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. In this talk, we experimentally investigate the effects of fluid elasticity on both the flagella kinematics and swimming dynamics of the microscopic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find that the flagellar beating frequency and wave speed are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Interestingly, the swimming speeds during the alga power and recovery strokes are enhanced by fluid elasticity for De>1. Despite such enhancements, however, the alga net forward speed is hindered by fluid elasticity by as much as 30% compared to Newtonian fluids of similar shear viscosities. The motility enhancements could be explained by the mechanism of stress accumulation in the viscoelastic fluid. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation - DMR-1104705.

  14. Response Of Mineralizing And Non-Mineralizing Bone Cells To Fluid Flow: An In Vitro Model For Mechanotransruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makuch, Lauren A.

    2004-01-01

    Humans reach peak bone mass at age 30. After this point, we lose 1 to 2 percent of bone mass each decade. In the microgravity environment of space, astronauts lose bone mass at an accelerated rate of 1 to 2 percent each month. When astronauts travel to Mars, they may be in space for as long as 3 years. During this time, they may lose about half of their bone mass from weight-bearing bones. This loss may be irreversible. The drastic loss in bone that astronauts experience in space makes them much more vulnerable to fractures. In addition, the corresponding removal of calcium from bone results in higher levels of calcium in the blood, which increases the risk of developing kidney stones. Currently, studies are being conducted which investigate factors governing bone adaptation and mechanotransduction. Bone is constantly adapting in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased mechanical loading stimulates bone formation and suppresses bone resorption. Reduction in mechanical loading caused by bedrest, disuse, or microgravity results in decreased bone formation and possibly increased bone resorption. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts are the two main cell types that participate in bone remodeling. Osteoblasts are anabolic (bone-forming) cells and osteoclasts are catabolic (bone-resorbing) cells. In microgravity, the activity of osteoblasts slows down and the activity of osteoclasts may speed up, causing a loss of bone density. Mechanotransduction, the molecular mechanism by which mechanical stimuli are converted to biochemical signals, is not yet understood. Exposure of cells to fluid flow imposes a shear stress on the cells. Several studies have shown that the shear stress that results from fluid flow induces a cellular response similar to that induced by mechanical loading. Thus, fluid flow can be used as an in vitro model to simulate the mechanical stress that bone cells experience in vivo. Previous in vitro studies have shown that fluid flow induces several responses in osteoblasts, including increased proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and production of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and osteopontin. Several proteins have been implicated in osteoblastic mechanotransduction including Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2), parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor, osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and alkaline phosphatase (AP). We will characterize relative levels of each protein in mineralizing or non-mineralizing MC3T3 osteoblastic cells that have been exposed to fluid flow compared to non-fluid flow using immunofluorescent staining and two- photon laser microscopy as well as western blotting. Because calcium-mediated pathways are important in osteoblastic signaling, we will transfect MC3T3 cells with cameleon probes for Ca2+ containing YFP and CFP. Results will be analyzed using FRET/FLIM to study differential release of intracellular Ca(2+) in response to fluid flow and conditions inducing matrix mineralization. In addition, we plan to conduct several microarray experiments to determine differential gene expression in MC3T3 cells in response to fluid flow and conditions inducing mineralization.

  15. Surfactant Protein D Is Present in Human Tear Fluid and the Cornea and Inhibits Epithelial Cell Invasion by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Minjian; Evans, David J.; Hawgood, Samuel; Anders, E. Margot; Sack, Robert A.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that human tear fluid protects corneal epithelial cells against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo and that protection does not depend upon tear bacteriostatic activity. We sought to identify the responsible tear component(s). The hypothesis tested was that collectins (collagenous calcium-dependent lectins) were involved. Reflex tear fluid was collected from healthy human subjects and examined for collectin content by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot with antibody against surfactant protein D (SP-D), SP-A, or mannose-binding lectin (MBL). SP-D, but not SP-A or MBL, was detected by ELISA of human reflex tear fluid. Western blot analysis of whole tears and of high-performance liquid chromatography tear fractions confirmed the presence of SP-D, most of which eluted in the same fraction as immunoglobulin A. SP-D tear concentrations were calculated at ?2 to 5 ?g/ml. Depletion of SP-D with mannan-conjugated Sepharose or anti-SP-D antibody reduced the protective effect of tears against P. aeruginosa invasion. Recombinant human or mouse SP-D used alone reduced P. aeruginosa invasion of epithelial cells without detectable bacteriostatic activity or bacterial aggregation. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed SP-D antibody labeling throughout the corneal epithelium of normal, but not gene-targeted SP-D knockout mice. SP-D was also detected in vitro in cultured human and mouse corneal epithelial cells. In conclusion, SP-D is present in human tear fluid and in human and mouse corneal epithelia. SP-D is involved in human tear fluid protection against P. aeruginosa invasion. Whether SP-D plays other roles in the regulation of other innate or adaptive immune responses at the ocular surface, as it does in the airways, remains to be explored. PMID:15784557

  16. Strong vortical flows generated by the collective motion of magnetic particle chains rotating in a fluid cell.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Beerens, Jasper; van Reenen, Alexander; Hulsen, Martien A; de Jong, Arthur M; Prins, Menno W J; den Toonder, Jaap M J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic microparticles, assembled into chains that are actuated with rotating magnetic fields, can be used as microstirrers to promote fluid transport and biochemical reactions in microfluidic systems. We show that, within a certain range of magnetic field rotation frequency, the microstirrers exhibit a coherent collective motion: the rotating magnetic particle chains move throughout the volume of a flat fluid cell and generate very strong (~1 mm s(-1)) and global (9 mm) vortical fluid flows, with many eddy-type substructures that fluctuate continuously in time, resembling turbulent flow. The collective motion makes the microstirrers not only defy gravity, but also move against magnetic field gradients. The induced fluid flow is directly related to the stirring rate and the amount of magnetic particle chains. The observed behavior is caused by the magnetic and hydrodynamic interactions between the magnetic microparticles and the fluid. We utilized the phenomenon of swarming particles to enhance biochemical assays with magnetic capture particles (4000 ?L(-1)) and IgG targets (500 pM). When compared to a reference system of sedimented magnetic capture particles, magnetic actuation leads to both a ~9 times increase in the initial assay kinetics as well as a ~7 times increase of target capture signal after 30 minutes. PMID:25380482

  17. Inhibition of autophagy in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by vaginal fluid from women with a malignant adnexal mass.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Doulaveris, Georgios; Holcomb, Kevin; Jeong, Jiyeon M; Sisti, Giovanni; Kanninen, Tomi T; Caputo, Thomas A; Gupta, Divya; Witkin, Steven S

    2015-12-15

    Inhibition of autophagy is a characteristic of ovarian cancer. We determined whether inhibition of autophagy by vaginal fluid could provide a non-invasive test for cancer risk stratification in women presenting with an adnexal mass. Vaginal fluid supernatants from 90 women undergoing evaluation for a suspicious adnexal mass were incubated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy women under conditions that induce autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, was added to some cultures. After 48 hr the cells were collected, lysed and assayed by ELISA for intracellular p62 concentration. p62 is a cytoplasmic protein that is consumed during autophagy induction. Its concentration is inversely proportional to the extent of autophagy induction. Clinical information including pathological diagnoses was obtained after completion of laboratory studies. Mean p62 levels were 9.4 ng/ml in the 21 women with a subsequent malignant diagnosis, 4.5 ng/ml in the eight women with a borderline tumor diagnosis and 3.6 ng/ml in the 61 women with benign disease (p?fluid-PBMC co-incubation, p62 levels in samples from women with a malignant diagnosis decreased to 3.3 ng/ml, a level comparable to what was observed with the nonmalignant samples. Vaginal fluid inhibition of autophagy can differentiate between women with malignant and benign adnexal masses. PMID:26132572

  18. Cross-Omics Comparison of Stress Responses in Mesothelial Cells Exposed to Heat- versus Filter-Sterilized Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Kratochwill, Klaus; Bender, Thorsten O.; Lichtenauer, Anton M.; Herzog, Rebecca; Tarantino, Silvia; Bialas, Katarzyna; Jörres, Achim; Aufricht, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that cytoprotective responses, such as expression of heat-shock proteins, might be inadequately induced in mesothelial cells by heat-sterilized peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids. This study compares transcriptome data and multiple protein expression profiles for providing new insight into regulatory mechanisms. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) based proteomics and topic defined gene expression microarray-based transcriptomics techniques were used to evaluate stress responses in human omental peritoneal mesothelial cells in response to heat- or filter-sterilized PD fluids. Data from selected heat-shock proteins were validated by 2D western-blot analysis. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data discriminated differentially regulated protein abundance into groups depending on correlating or noncorrelating transcripts. Inadequate abundance of several heat-shock proteins following exposure to heat-sterilized PD fluids is not reflected on the mRNA level indicating interference beyond transcriptional regulation. For the first time, this study describes evidence for posttranscriptional inadequacy of heat-shock protein expression by heat-sterilized PD fluids as a novel cytotoxic property. Cross-omics technologies introduce a novel way of understanding PDF bioincompatibility and searching for new interventions to reestablish adequate cytoprotective responses. PMID:26495307

  19. The Unenlarged Lymph Nodes of HIV-1–infected, Asymptomatic Patients with High CD4 T Cell Counts Are Sites for Virus Replication and CD4 T Cell Proliferation. The Impact of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tenner-Racz, Klara; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; van Lunzen, Jan; Schneider, Claus; Jacobs, Jan-Peter; Raschdorff, Birgit; Großschupff, Gudrun; Steinman, Ralph M.; Racz, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The efficacy of triple drug therapy for HIV-1 infection encourages its early use to prevent damage to the immune system. We monitored the effects of such therapy on 12 patients with 14–75-mo histories of minimal disease, i.e., CD4+ counts constantly >500/?l and little or no lymph node enlargement. In this way, we could first determine the extent of viral replication and immunoarchitectural changes in unenlarged nodes early in disease, and second follow the response to triple therapy in plasma and lymphoid tissue in tandem. As is known for lymph nodes with more advanced disease, the germinal centers showed productively infected T cells, i.e., CD4+CD1a?CD68? cells labeling intensely for HIV-1 RNA after in situ hybridization. The unenlarged nodes also showed extensive HIV-1 RNA retention on a well-preserved, follicular dendritic cell (FDC) network, and the follicles were abnormal. There were numerous CD8+ cells, many expressing TIA-1 granule antigen. Also, in contrast to normal follicles, CD4+ T cell proliferation was active, with marked increases in the number of cycling, Ki-67+CD4+CD45R0+ cells. After 28 d and 3 mo of therapy, productively infected T cells decreased dramatically and often were not apparent. The labeling of the FDC network for viral RNA also decreased, but not for gag protein. We conclude that HIV-1 replicates and accumulates in lymphoid organs before damage of the immune system, that at this stage of disease de novo production of T cells occurs in the lymphoid tissue, and that the infection is sensitive to triple drug therapy in both plasma and lymph nodes. PMID:9500797

  20. Comparison of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous tooth pulp.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Y; Koyama, N; Nakao, K; Osawa, K; Ikeno, M; Yamanaka, S; Okubo, Y; Fujimura, K; Bessho, K

    2016-01-01

    Populations of pluripotent stem cells were isolated from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous teeth and their multipotentiality properties compared. Osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation potentials were examined. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and synovial fluid-derived cells (SFCs) showed the highest levels of osteogenesis as expressed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (0.54±0.094U/mg protein and 0.57±0.039U/mg protein, respectively; P=0.60) and by osteocalcin (BGLAP; determined by real-time RT-PCR). SFCs showed the highest levels of chondrogenesis as expressed by ALP activity (1.75±0.097U/mg protein) and of COL2A1 and COL10A1 by real-time PCR. In terms of adipogenesis, lipid vesicles were observed in the BMMSCs and SFCs. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) exhibited neurogenesis potential, as shown by increases in expression of class III ?-tubulin (TUBB3) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on RT-PCR. Variability was found in the differentiation potential corresponding to the tendency of the original tissue to differentiate. It is suggested that the cell type should be selected depending on the regenerative treatment regimen. PMID:26235629

  1. Circulating Tumor Cell Counts Are Prognostic of Overall Survival in SWOG S0421: A Phase III Trial of Docetaxel With or Without Atrasentan for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goldkorn, Amir; Ely, Benjamin; Quinn, David I.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Fink, Louis M.; Xu, Tong; Twardowski, Przemyslaw; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Carducci, Michael A.; Monk, J. Paul; Datar, Ram H.; Garzotto, Mark; Mack, Philip C.; Lara, Primo; Higano, Celestia S.; Hussain, Maha; Thompson, Ian Murchie; Cote, Richard J.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration has not been prospectively validated in standard first-line docetaxel treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We assessed the prognostic value of CTCs for overall survival (OS) and disease response in S0421, a phase III trial of docetaxel plus prednisone with or without atrasentan. Patients and Methods CTCs were enumerated at baseline (day 0) and before cycle two (day 21) using CellSearch. Baseline counts and changes in counts from day 0 to 21 were evaluated for association with OS, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and RECIST response using Cox regression as well as receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) analysis, and regression trees. Results Median day-0 CTC count was five cells per 7.5 mL, and CTCs < versus ? five per 7.5 mL were significantly associated with baseline PSA, bone pain, liver disease, hemoglobin, alkaline phosphatase, and subsequent PSA and RECIST response. Median OS was 26 months for < five versus 13 months for ? five CTCs per 7.5 mL at day 0 (hazard ratio [HR], 2.74 [adjusting for covariates]). ROC curves had higher areas under the curve for day-0 CTCs than for PSA, and IDI analysis showed that adding day-0 CTCs to baseline PSA and other covariates increased predictive accuracy for survival by 8% to 10%. Regression trees yielded new prognostic subgroups, and rising CTC count from day 0 to 21 was associated with shorter OS (HR, 2.55). Conclusion These data validate the prognostic utility of CTC enumeration in a large docetaxel-based prospective cohort. Baseline CTC counts were prognostic, and rising CTCs at 3 weeks heralded significantly worse OS, potentially serving as an early metric to help redirect and optimize therapy in this clinical setting. PMID:24616308

  2. Fluid shear stress stimulates prostaglandin and nitric oxide release in bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, T. N.; Du, T.; Frangos, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Bone is a porous tissue that is continuously perfused by interstitial fluid. Fluid flow, driven by both vascular pressure and mechanical loading, may generate significant shear stresses through the canaliculi as well as along the bone lining at the endosteal surface. Both osteoblasts and osteocytes produce signaling factors such as prostaglandins and nitric in response to fluid shear stress (FSS); however, these humoral agents appear to have more profound affects on osteoclast activity at the endosteal surface. We hypothesized that osteoclasts and preosteoclasts may also be mechanosensitive and that osteoclast-mediated autocrine signaling may be important in bone remodeling. In this study, we investigated the effect of FSS on nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and prostacyclin (PGI(2)) release by neonatal rat bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells. These cells were tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive, weakly nonspecific esterase (NSE) positive, and capable of fusing into calcitonin-responsive, bone-resorbing, multinucleated cells. Bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells exposed for 6 h to a well-defined FSS of 16 dynes/cm(2) produced NO at a rate of 7.5 nmol/mg protein/h, which was 10-fold that of static controls. This response was completely abolished by 100 microM N(G)-amino-L-arginine (L-NAA). Flow also stimulated PGE(2) production (3.9 microg/mg protein/h) and PGI(2) production (220 pg/mg protein/h). L-NAA attenuated flow-induced PGE(2) production by 30%, suggesting that NO may partially modulate PGE(2) production. This is the first report demonstrating that marrow derived cells are sensitive to FSS and that autocrine signaling in these cells may play an important role in load-induced remodeling and signal transduction in bone. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Synovium Fragment-Derived Cells Exhibit Characteristics Similar to Those of Dissociated Multipotent Cells in Synovial Fluid of the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang-peng; Zheng, You-hua; Liu, Wen-jing; Zheng, Yu-liang; Zhang, Zhi-guang

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) found in the synovial fluid (SFMSCs) of the tempromandibular joint (TMJ) remain poorly understood. During TMJ arthrocentesis, we discovered that synovial fluid collected from some patients with TMJ disorders contained not only SFMSCs but also synovium fragments (SFs). In this study, we attempted to characterize both the SFMSCs and SF-derived cells (SFCs) in order to further understand the role of MSCs in the synovial fluid of the TMJ. The SFs were membranous and translucent and consisted of several cell layers, indicating that their origin was only from the intima. SFCs were obtained by digestion of the SFs and subsequently expanded in vitro. SFMSCs were enriched by centrifugation of the synovial fluid and expanded in vitro. SFCs and SFMSCs displayed a similar fibroblast-like, spindle-shaped morphology, and we observed that some SFMSCs grew out of small tissue masses in culture. Flow cytometric analysis showed that both groups of cells expressed similar surface markers, including CD90, CD44, CD105, and CD73. However, both were negative for Stro-1, CD146, CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19, and HLA-DR. Immunofluorescent staining showed that both SFs and SFMSCs expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Both SFCs and SFMSCs could be induced to differentiate down osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic lineages in vitro. Together, our results indicate that the intima is the most likely tissue origin of SFMSCs in the TMJ. Moreover, the SFs are composed of only intima and thus offer an improved source of synovium-derived MSCs compared to synovium specimens obtained by surgery, which contain both intima and subintima. PMID:25003199

  4. Evaluation of selective dry cow treatment following on-farm culture: Milk yield and somatic cell count in the subsequent lactation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, M; Keefe, G P; Roy, J-P; Stryhn, H; Dohoo, I R; McKenna, S L

    2015-04-01

    Compared with blanket dry cow therapy (DCT), the selective antimicrobial treatment of cows based upon on-farm culture results has the potential to reduce the amount of antimicrobials used in dairy production. The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of a Petrifilm (3M Canada, London, Ontario) on-farm culture-based selective DCT program on milk yield and somatic cell count (SCC) in the following lactation. A total of 729 low-SCC (<200,000 cells/mL) cows from 16 commercial dairy herds with a low bulk tank SCC (<250,000 cells/mL) were randomly assigned to receive either blanket DCT or Petrifilm-based selective DCT. Cows belonging to the blanket DCT group were infused with a commercial DCT product and an internal teat sealant (ITS) at drying off. Using composite milk samples collected on the day before drying off, cows in the selective DCT group were treated at drying off based on the results obtained by the Petrifilm on-farm culture system with DCT and ITS (Petrifilm culture positive) or ITS alone (Petrifilm culture negative). Milk test-day records for the following lactation were obtained from Dairy Herd Improvement for all cows enrolled in the trial. Repeated measures linear mixed models were used to assess the effect of study group (blanket or selective DCT) on test-day milk production and natural logarithm of SCC over the first 180 d of the subsequent lactation. According to the final multivariable models, when low-SCC cows were selectively treated with DCT at drying off based on results obtained using the Petrifilm on-farm culture system, no effect on milk production (least squares means for blanket DCT = 39.3 kg vs. selective DCT = 39.0 kg) or natural logarithm of SCC (least squares means for blanket DCT = 3.95 vs. selective DCT = 3.97) was observed in the subsequent lactation when compared with cows receiving blanket DCT. The results of this study indicate that selective DCT based on results obtained by the Petrifilm on-farm culture system enabled a reduction in the use of DCT without negatively affecting milk production and milk quality. PMID:25648799

  5. [Effect of fluid shear stress on the cellular morphology and tight junction of laryngeal squamous carcinoma Hep2 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fating; Yin, Hongmei; Liu, Shuangfeng; Shen, Yang; Hong, Jinyong; Xia, Qing; Liu, Xiaocheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper is aimed to investigate the effect of fluid shear stress on the tight junction of laryngeal squamous carcinoma (Hep2) cells and to explore the potential molecular mechanism. Hep2 cells were selected and subjected to the fluid shear stress of 1.4 dyn/cm2 for different time, respectively. The morphological changes of Hep2 cells under shear stress were observed using inverted microscope. The cell-cell junctions were examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The expressions of tight junction proteins (including Occludin, Claudin-5 and ZO-1) and the distribution of Claudin-5 were examined by Western blot assay and laser scanning confocal microscope, respectively. The results indicated that Hep2 cells turned to spindle-like shapes after exposed to shear stress, and showed the trend of the recovering to original shapes when the shear stress was cancelled. The cell-cell junctions were tight under the shear flow condition, and the permeability was reduced under the condition of 1.4 dyn/cm shear flow. The expressions of tight junction proteins were enhanced with increased duration of shear flow, but reduced after removing shear flow. The result of Claudin-5 expression by immufluorescence assay was consistent with that by Western blot. The Claudin-5 mainly distributed in the cytoplasm under static condition, while it located at the intercellular after shear flow stimulation, and it appeared intercellular and cytoplasm after stopping shear flow stimulation. Therefore, it can be concluded that shear stress changes the morphology of laryngeal squamous carcinoma Hep2 cells, and upregulates the tight junction. PMID:25997275

  6. Mechanical disruption of mammalian cells in a microfluidic system and its numerical analysis based on computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Matthias; Zeng, An-Ping

    2012-03-21

    The lysis of mammalian cells is an essential part of different lab-on-a-chip sample preparation methods, which aim at the release, separation, and subsequent analysis of DNA, proteins, or metabolites. Particularly for the analysis of compartmented in vivo metabolism of mammalian cells, such a method must be very fast compared to the metabolic turnover-rates, it should not affect the native metabolite concentrations, and should ideally leave cell organelles undamaged. So far, no such a method is available. We have developed a microfluidic system for the effective rapid mechanical cell disruption and established a mathematical model to describe the efficiency of the system. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were disrupted with high efficiency by passing through two consecutive micronozzle arrays. Simultaneous cell compression and shearing led to a disruption rate of ?90% at a sample flow rate of Q = 120 ?L min(-1) per nozzle passage, which corresponds to a mean fluid velocity of 13.3 m s(-1) and a mean Reynolds number of 22.6 in the nozzle gap. We discussed the problem of channel clogging by cellular debris and the resulting flow instability at the micronozzle arrays. The experimental results were compared to predictions from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and the critical energy dissipation rate for the disruption of the CHO cell population with known size distribution was determined to be 4.7 × 10(8) W m(-3). Our model for the calculation of cell disruption on the basis of CFD-data could be applied to other microgeometries to predict intended disruption or undesired cell damage. PMID:22311121

  7. In situ vascularization of injectable fibrin/poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels by human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Omar M; Brooks, Abigail R; Cho, Sung Kyung; Petsche Connell, Jennifer; Ruano, Rodrigo; Jacot, Jeffrey G

    2015-08-01

    One of the greatest challenges in regenerative medicine is generating clinically relevant engineered tissues with functional blood vessels. Vascularization is a key hurdle faced in designing tissue constructs larger than the in vivo limit of oxygen diffusion. In this study, we utilized fibrin-based hydrogels to serve as a foundation for vascular formation, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to modify fibrinogen and increase scaffold longevity, and human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSC) as a source of vascular cell types (AFSC-EC). AFSC hold great potential for use in regenerative medicine strategies, especially those involving autologous congenital applications, and we have shown previously that AFSC-seeded fibrin-PEG hydrogels have the potential to form three-dimensional vascular-like networks in vitro. We hypothesized that subcutaneously injecting these hydrogels in immunodeficient mice would both induce a fibrin-driven angiogenic host response and promote in situ AFSC-derived neovascularization. Two weeks postinjection, hydrogels were sectioned, and the following was demonstrated: the average maximum invasion distance of host murine cells into the subcutaneous fibrin/PEG scaffold was 147?±?90 µm after 1 week and 395?±?138 µm after 2 weeks; the average number of cell-lined lumen per square millimeter was significantly higher in hydrogels seeded with stem cells or cocultures containing stem cells (MSC, 36.5?±?11.4; AFSC, 47.0?±?18.9; AFSC/AFSC-EC, 32.8?±?11.6; and MSC/HUVEC, 43.1?±?25.1) versus endothelial cell types alone (AFSC-EC, 9.7?±?6.1; HUVEC, 14.2?±?8.8); and a subset of these lumen were characterized by the presence of red blood cells. Select areas of cell-seeded hydrogels contained CD31(+) lumen surrounded by ?-smooth muscle cell support cells, whereas control hydrogels with no cells only showed infiltration of ?-smooth muscle cell-positive host cells. PMID:25631778

  8. Prospective Immune Dynamics during the First 24 Weeks of Efavirenz Based-Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-1-Infected Subjects, According to CD4+ T-Cell Counts at Presentation: The IMMUNEF Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Alessandro; Trabattoni, Daria; Squillace, Nicola; Rainone, Veronica; Gnudi, Federica; Clerici, Mario; Gori, Andrea; Bandera, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Longitudinal characterization of immune recovery in the first-phase of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is poorly described. We compared immune kinetics in individuals who were diagnosed early or late with HIV-1 infection, (thus commencing ART with different CD4+ T-cell counts), in order to investigate possible mechanisms involved in subsequent poor immune recovery. Methods Immunophenotyping, immune activation, proliferation, apoptosis, regulatory T-cells and intracellular cytokine production were compared at baseline and during 24-week follow-up in two groups of HIV-1-infected patients initiating the same ART (tenofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz) and divided according to baseline CD4+ T-cell counts (late: ?200/?L; early: >200/?L). Wilcoxon-rank sum test and analysis for repeated measures were used to evaluate differences between groups over time. Results Twenty-four out of 30 enrolled subjects were evaluable for the analysis, 13 late and 11 early presenters. Significantly lower CD4+ naïve and memory T-cells, and higher plasma viral load, as well as augmented percentages of activated (CD4+/CD25+ cells), apoptotic (CD4+/AnnexinV+/7AAD?, CD4+/caspase 8+ and CD4+/caspase 9+), and proliferating (CD8+/Ki67+ cells) lymphocytes were present at baseline in late presenters; ART resulted in a reduction of apoptotic and proliferating lymphocytes within the follow-up period. Conclusions A skewing towards memory/activated/apoptotic phenotype is seen in HIV-1-infected subjects starting ART at low CD4+ T-cell counts; ART results in early (24 weeks) trend towards normalization of these parameters. Antiretroviral therapy may play a role in rapidly limiting aberrant immune exhaustion even in late presenters, while requiring more time for re-population of highly depleted naïve T-cells. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trial Register EUDRACT number 2008-006188-35 https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/trial/2008-006188-35/IT PMID:25671649

  9. Telomere Length Is Not Related to Established Cardiovascular Risk Factors but Does Correlate with Red and White Blood Cell Counts in a German Blood Donor Population

    PubMed Central

    Kelsch, Reinhard; Jäger, Kathrin; Brüggmann, Nina; van der Harst, Pim; Walter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is considered a marker of biological aging and has been associated with the presence of various coronary risk factors in patients. Much less is known about the relationships between TL and classic coronary risk factors in other populations. We measured TL in peripheral blood leukocytes of 343 middle-aged blood donors (mean age 40.2 ± 12.4 years; 201 men, 142 women) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Median TL was 0.86 (range: 0.48–1.85) relative TL units. In linear regression analyses with natural log-transformed T to S ratio as the dependent variable, there was a significant association with age (per year: beta = -0.007, p<0.001) and sex (males vs. females: beta = 0.075, p = 0.007) with longer telomeres in men. After adjusting for these two variables, we observed no association of TL with classic coronary risk factors including cholesterol (p = 0.36), triglyceride (p = 0.09), HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.26), LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.36), smoking (p = 0.97), and personal (p = 0.46) or family history (p = 0.63) of cardiovascular disease. However, we did find a significant positive association with white (p = 0.011) and red blood cell count (p = 0.031), hemoglobin (p = 0.014) and hematocrit (p = 0.013); we also found a borderline positive association with thrombocytes (p = 0.074). Positive associations remained significant for hemoglobin (p = 0.017), hematocrit (p = 0.023), and leukocytes (p = 0.009) in a subgroup with no reported vascular disease; associations were of borderline significance for erythrocytes (p = 0.053) and thrombocytes (p = 0.088) in this subgroup. The data do not support the concept that classic coronary risk factors contribute to telomere attrition in a blood donor population. However, telomere attrition may be a marker for reduced proliferation reserve in hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:26445269

  10. A three-dimensional numerical simulation of cell behavior in a flow chamber based on fluid-solid interaction.

    PubMed

    Bai, Long; Cui, Yuhong; Zhang, Yixia; Zhao, Na

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of blood cells in the vessels has a close relationship with the physical characteristics of the blood and the cells. In this paper, a numerical simulation method was proposed to understand a single-blood cell's behavior in the vessels based on fluid-solid interaction method, which was conducted under adaptive time step and fixed time step, respectively. The main programme was C++ codes, which called FLUENT and ANSYS software, and UDF and APDL acted as a messenger to connect FLUENT and ANSYS for exchanging data. The computing results show: (1) the blood cell moved towards the bottom of the flow chamber in the beginning due to the influence of gravity, then it began to jump up when reached a certain height rather than touching the bottom. It could move downwards again after jump up, the blood cell could keep this way of moving like dancing continuously in the vessels; (2) the blood cell was rolling and deforming all the time; the rotation had oscillatory changes and the deformation became conspicuously when the blood cell was dancing. This new simulation method and results can be widely used in the researches of cytology, blood, cells, etc. PMID:25226968

  11. Diagnosis of lymphomatous leptomeningitis by cerebrospinal fluid lymphocyte cell surface markers.

    PubMed

    Goodson, J D; Strauss, G M

    1979-06-01

    We present a patient with metastatic lymphomatous leptomeningitis in whom the diagnosis was made on the basis of cerebrospinal fluid lymphocyte surface markers and later confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid cytology. The diagnosis of metastatic leptomeningitis can be elusive, and the differential includes a wide variety of infectious and noninfectious processes. We propose that lymphocyte surface marker studies can be a useful technique in expediting the evaluation of certain patients with lymphoma who have evidence of central nervous sytem involvement. PMID:110146

  12. mTORC1 Is Essential for Early Steps during Schwann Cell Differentiation of Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells and Regulates Lipogenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schörghofer, David; Kinslechner, Katharina; Schütz, Birgit; Thi Thanh Pham, Ha; Rosner, Margit; Joo, Gabor Jozsef; Röhrl, Clemens; Weichhart, Thomas; Stangl, Herbert; Lubec, Gert; Hengstschläger, Markus; Mikula, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cell development is hallmarked by the induction of a lipogenic profile. Here we used amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells and focused on the mechanisms occurring during early steps of differentiation along the Schwann cell lineage. Therefore, we initiated Schwann cell differentiation in AFS cells and monitored as well as modulated the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, the major regulator of anabolic processes. Our results show that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity is essential for glial marker expression and expression of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP) target genes. Moreover, SREBP target gene activation by statin treatment promoted lipogenic gene expression, induced mTORC1 activation and stimulated Schwann cell differentiation. To investigate mTORC1 downstream signaling we expressed a mutant S6K1, which subsequently induced the expression of the Schwann cell marker S100b, but did not affect lipogenic gene expression. This suggests that S6K1 dependent and independent pathways downstream of mTORC1 drive AFS cells to early Schwann cell differentiation and lipogenic gene expression. In conclusion our results propose that future strategies for peripheral nervous system regeneration will depend on ways to efficiently induce the mTORC1 pathway. PMID:25221943

  13. Counting Sheep in Basque

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Frank P.

    1975-01-01

    Demonstrates the interplay of a cognitive system, the Basque numerative system, and a behavioral one, counting sheep. The significant features of the Basque numerative system are analyzed; then it is shown how use of these features facilitates the counting of sheep on open ranges by Basque sheep farmers in California. (Author/RM)

  14. The Impact of Different CD4 Cell-Count Monitoring and Switching Strategies on Mortality in HIV-Infected African Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: An Application of Dynamic Marginal Structural Models

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Deborah; Robins, James M.; Petersen, Maya L.; Gibb, Diana M.; Gilks, Charles F.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Grosskurth, Heiner; Hakim, James; Katabira, Elly; Babiker, Abdel G.; Walker, A. Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is delivered with limited laboratory monitoring, often none. In 2003–2004, investigators in the Development of Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa (DART) Trial randomized persons initiating ART in Uganda and Zimbabwe to either laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM) or clinically driven monitoring (CDM). CD4 cell counts were measured every 12 weeks in both groups but were only returned to treating clinicians for management in the LCM group. Follow-up continued through 2008. In observational analyses, dynamic marginal structural models on pooled randomized groups were used to estimate survival under different monitoring-frequency and clinical/immunological switching strategies. Assumptions included no direct effect of randomized group on mortality or confounders and no unmeasured confounders which influenced treatment switch and mortality or treatment switch and time-dependent covariates. After 48 weeks of first-line ART, 2,946 individuals contributed 11,351 person-years of follow-up, 625 switches, and 179 deaths. The estimated survival probability after a further 240 weeks for post-48-week switch at the first CD4 cell count less than 100 cells/mm3 or non-Candida World Health Organization stage 4 event (with CD4 count <250) was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 0.97) with 12-weekly CD4 testing, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.95, 0.97) with 24-weekly CD4 testing, 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) with a single CD4 test at 48 weeks (baseline), and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.94) with no CD4 testing. Comparing randomized groups by 48-week CD4 count, the mortality risk associated with CDM versus LCM was greater in persons with CD4 counts of <100 (hazard ratio = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.3) than in those with CD4 counts of ?100 (hazard ratio = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.7; interaction P = 0.04). These findings support a benefit from identifying patients immunologically failing first-line ART at 48 weeks. PMID:26316598

  15. The Impact of Different CD4 Cell-Count Monitoring and Switching Strategies on Mortality in HIV-Infected African Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: An Application of Dynamic Marginal Structural Models.

    PubMed

    Ford, Deborah; Robins, James M; Petersen, Maya L; Gibb, Diana M; Gilks, Charles F; Mugyenyi, Peter; Grosskurth, Heiner; Hakim, James; Katabira, Elly; Babiker, Abdel G; Walker, A Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is delivered with limited laboratory monitoring, often none. In 2003-2004, investigators in the Development of Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa (DART) Trial randomized persons initiating ART in Uganda and Zimbabwe to either laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM) or clinically driven monitoring (CDM). CD4 cell counts were measured every 12 weeks in both groups but were only returned to treating clinicians for management in the LCM group. Follow-up continued through 2008. In observational analyses, dynamic marginal structural models on pooled randomized groups were used to estimate survival under different monitoring-frequency and clinical/immunological switching strategies. Assumptions included no direct effect of randomized group on mortality or confounders and no unmeasured confounders which influenced treatment switch and mortality or treatment switch and time-dependent covariates. After 48 weeks of first-line ART, 2,946 individuals contributed 11,351 person-years of follow-up, 625 switches, and 179 deaths. The estimated survival probability after a further 240 weeks for post-48-week switch at the first CD4 cell count less than 100 cells/mm(3) or non-Candida World Health Organization stage 4 event (with CD4 count <250) was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 0.97) with 12-weekly CD4 testing, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.95, 0.97) with 24-weekly CD4 testing, 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) with a single CD4 test at 48 weeks (baseline), and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.94) with no CD4 testing. Comparing randomized groups by 48-week CD4 count, the mortality risk associated with CDM versus LCM was greater in persons with CD4 counts of <100 (hazard ratio = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.3) than in those with CD4 counts of ?100 (hazard ratio = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.7; interaction P = 0.04). These findings support a benefit from identifying patients immunologically failing first-line ART at 48 weeks. PMID:26316598

  16. Low local blood perfusion, high white blood cell and high platelet count are associated with primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in a 4T1 mouse breast cancer metastasis model

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHUAN; CHEN, YING-GE; GAO, JIAN-LI; LYU, GUI-YUAN; SU, JIE; ZHANG, QI; JI, XIN; YAN, JI-ZHONG; QIU, QIAO-LI; ZHANG, YUE-LI; LI, LIN-ZI; XU, HAN-TING; CHEN, SU-HONG

    2015-01-01

    It was originally thought that no single routine blood test result would be able to indicate whether or not a patient had cancer; however, several novel studies have indicated that the median survival and prognosis of cancer patients were markedly associated with the systemic circulation features of cancer patients. In addition, certain parameters, such as white blood cell (WBC) count, were largely altered in malignant tumors. In the present study, routine blood tests were performed in order to observe the change of blood cells in tumor-bearing mice following the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into the mammary fat pad; in addition, blood flow in breast tumor sites was measured indirectly using laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), in an attempt to explain the relevance between the blood circulation features and the growth or metastasis of breast cancer in mice model. The LDPI and blood test results indicated that the implantation of 4T1 breast cancer cells into BALB/c mice led to thrombosis as well as high WBC count, high platelet count, high plateletcrit and low blood perfusion. Following implantation of the 4T1 cells for four weeks, the lung metastatic number was determined and the Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that the number of visceral lung metastatic sites had a marked negative association with the ratio of basophils (BASO%; r=-0.512; P<0.01) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin was significantly correlated with primary tumor weight (r=0.425; P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that tumor growth led to thrombosis and acute anemia in mice; in addition, when blood BASO% was low, an increased number of lung metastases were observed in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26622565

  17. Neurocognitive decline in HIV patients is associated with ongoing T-cell activation in the cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Grauer, Oliver M; Reichelt, Doris; Grüneberg, Ute; Lohmann, Hubertus; Schneider-Hohendorf, Tilman; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Gross, Catharina C; Meuth, Sven G; Wiendl, Heinz; Husstedt, Ingo W

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain a challenge despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Immune cell activation has been implicated to play a major role in the development of HAND. Methods In this study, we used multicolor flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples to determine the expression of HLA-DR and programmed death-1 (PD-1) on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in patients with chronic HIV infection. Expression levels were correlated with HI virus load in PB and CSF, classification of HAND and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal abnormalities. Results In a cohort of 86 HIV patients we found that the grade of neurocognitive impairment and the severity of MRI signal abnormalities correlated with decreasing CD4/CD8-ratios and increased frequencies of HLA-DR expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells reaching the highest values in the CSF samples. Importantly, HLA-DR upregulation was still detectable in virologically suppressed HIV patients. Further, T-cell subpopulation analysis of 40 HIV patients showed a significant shift from naïve to effector memory (EM) T cells that was negatively correlated with the grade of neurocognitive impairment in the PB samples. Moreover, PD-1 was significantly increased on CD4+ memory T cells with highest levels on EM T cells in HIV patients with mild or severe neurocognitive alterations. Interpretation The CD4/CD8 ratio, the proportion of EM to naïve T cells and the immune activation profile of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in PB and CSF might be useful parameters to monitor the efficacy of cART and to identify HIV patients at risk of further neurocognitive deterioration. PMID:26401512

  18. High Reproducibility of ELISPOT Counts from Nine Different Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Srividya; Karulin, Alexey Y.; Ansari, Tameem; BenHamouda, Nadine; Gottwein, Judith; Laxmanan, Sreenivas; Levine, Steven M.; Loffredo, John T.; McArdle, Stephanie; Neudoerfl, Christine; Roen, Diana; Silina, Karina; Welch, Mackenzie; Lehmann, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of immune monitoring with ELISPOT is to measure the number of T cells, specific for any antigen, accurately and reproducibly between different laboratories. In ELISPOT assays, antigen-specific T cells secrete cytokines, forming spots of different sizes on a membrane with variable background intensities. Due to the subjective nature of judging maximal and minimal spot sizes, different investigators come up with different numbers. This study aims to determine whether statistics-based, automated size-gating can harmonize the number of spot counts calculated between different laboratories. We plated PBMC at four different concentrations, 24 replicates each, in an IFN-? ELISPOT assay with HCMV pp65 antigen. The ELISPOT plate, and an image file of the plate was counted in nine different laboratories using ImmunoSpot® Analyzers by (A) Basic Count™ relying on subjective counting parameters set by the respective investigators and (B) SmartCount™, an automated counting protocol by the ImmunoSpot® Software that uses statistics-based spot size auto-gating with spot intensity auto-thresholding. The average coefficient of variation (CV) for the mean values between independent laboratories was 26.7% when counting with Basic Count™, and 6.7% when counting with SmartCount™. Our data indicates that SmartCount™ allows harmonization of counting ELISPOT results between different laboratories and investigators. PMID:25585297

  19. Vacuum-assisted Fluid Flow in Microchannels to Pattern Substrates and Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrirao, Anil B.; Kung, Frank H.; Yip, Derek; Cho, Cheul H.; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Substrate and cell patterning are widely used techniques in cell biology to study cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions. Conventional patterning techniques work well only with simple shapes, small areas and selected bio-materials. This paper describes a method to distribute cell suspensions as well as substrate solutions into complex, long, closed (dead-end) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels using negative pressure. Our method builds upon a previous vacuum-assisted method used for micromolding (Jeon, Choi et al. 1999) and successfully patterned collagen-I, fibronectin and Sal-1 substrates on glass and polystyrene surfaces, filling microchannels with lengths up to 120 mm and covering areas up to 13 × 10 mm2. Vacuum-patterned substrates were subsequently used to culture mammalian PC12 and fibroblast cells and amphibian neurons. Cells were also patterned directly by injecting cell suspensions into microchannels using vacuum. Fibroblast and neuronal cells patterned using vacuum showed normal growth and minimal cell death indicating no adverse effects of vacuum on cells. Our method fills reversibly sealed PDMS microchannels. This enables the user to remove the PDMS microchannel cast and access the patterned biomaterial or cells for further experimental purposes. Overall, this is a straightforward technique that has broad applicability for cell biology. PMID:24989641

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiated One Week after Tuberculosis Therapy in Patients with CD4 Counts < 200 Cells/?L: TB-HAART Study, a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amogne, Wondwossen; Aderaye, Getachew; Habtewold, Abiy; Yimer, Getnet; Makonnen, Eyasu; Worku, Alemayhu; Sonnerborg, Anders; Aklillu, Eleni; Lindquist, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the high death rate the first two months of tuberculosis (TB) therapy in HIV patients, it is critical defining the optimal time to initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Methods A randomized, open-label, clinical trial comparing efficacy and safety of efavirenz-based cART initiated one week, four weeks, and eight weeks after TB therapy in patients with baseline CD4 count < 200 cells/?L was conducted. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality rate at 48 weeks. The secondary endpoints were hepatotoxicity-requiring interruption of TB therapy, TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, new AIDS defining illnesses, CD4 counts, HIV RNA levels, and AFB smear conversion rates. All analyses were intention-to-treat. Results We studied 478 patients with median CD4 count of 73 cells/?L and 5.2 logs HIV RNA randomized to week one (n = 163), week four (n = 160), and week eight (n = 155). Sixty-four deaths (13.4%) occurred in 339.2 person-years. All-cause mortality rates at 48 weeks were 25 per 100 person-years in week one, 18 per 100 person-years in week four and 15 per 100 person-years in week eight (P = 0.2 by the log-rank test). All-cause mortality incidence rate ratios in subgroups with CD4 count below 50 cells/?L versus above were 2.8 in week one (95% CI 1.2–6.7), 3.1 in week four (95% CI 1.2–8.6) and 5.1 in week eight (95% CI 1.8–16). Serum albumin < 3gms/dL (adjusted HR, aHR = 2.3) and CD4 < 50 cells/?L (aHR = 2.7) were independent predictors of mortality. Compared with similar subgroups from weeks four and eight, first-line TB treatment interruption was high in week one deaths (P = 0.03) and in the CD4 subgroup <50 cells/?L (P = 0.02). Conclusions Antiretroviral therapy one week after TB therapy doesn’t improve overall survival. Despite increased mortality with CD4 < 50 cells/?L, we recommend cART later than the first week of TB therapy to avoid serious hepatotoxicity and treatment interruption. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 01315301 PMID:25966339

  1. Comparison of multi-fluid moment models with particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Hakim, Ammar H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an extensible multi-fluid moment model in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. This model evolves full Maxwell equations and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like electron inertia and pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor for each species. We first demonstrate analytically and numerically that the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple local closure towards a nonlocal fully three-dimensional closure are also discussed.

  2. Quality Counts Exhibitor Card 

    E-print Network

    Chilek, Kevin; Gregory, Elizabeth

    2004-01-27

    This exhibitor card identifies young livestock exhibitors as participants in the Quality Counts! program. The card is printed with a leather-style background on heavy card stock. It features the 4-H clover and the FFA logo, ...

  3. Counting Knights and Knaves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin,Oscar; Roberts, Gerri M.

    2013-01-01

    To understand better some of the classic knights and knaves puzzles, we count them. Doing so reveals a surprising connection between puzzles and solutions, and highlights some beautiful combinatorial identities.

  4. Effects of Kagocel® on the Counts of Multipotent Stromal Cells, Expression of Cytokine Genes in Primary Cultures of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells, and Serum Cytokine Concentrations in CBA Mice.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Grabko, V I; Konopleva, M V; Suslov, A P; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-06-01

    The efficiency of cloning of bone marrow multipotent stromal cells (ECF-MSC) from CBA mice and the MSC counts in the femoral bone increased 24 h after a single in vivo (but not in vitro) injection of kagocel (active substance of antiviral drug Kagocel (®) ) 1.4 times (in response to 50-80 ?g) and 4.6 times (in response to 250 ?g). The maximum increase of ECF-MSC in response to 50 ?g per mouse was detected just 1 h after Kagocel injection to intact mice and to mice previously receiving the drug for 3 days (2 and 1.7 times, respectively). The increase of ECF-MSC was 3-fold less intense in response to oral Kagocel in a dose of 250 ?g/mouse vs. intraperitoneal Kagocel, ECF-MSC corresponding to its level in response to oral Poly (I:C). In vivo Kagocel led to emergence of proinflammatory cytokine IFN-?, IL-1?, and IL-8 mRNA in primary cultures of bone marrow stromal cells. Serum concentrations of IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, GM-CSF, IFN-?, TNF-?, IL-4, and IL-12 increased 1.5 and 2 times just 1 h after Kagocel injection in doses of 30-50 and 250 ?g, respectively, to intact mice and to animals previously treated with the drug for 3 days. The cytokine concentrations normalized after 3 h and increased again after 24 h, though did not reach the levels recorded 1 h after the drug injection. These data indicated that the therapeutic and preventive effects of Kagocel, together with its previously demonstrated stimulation of ?- and ?-interferon production during several days, could be due to the capacity of this drug to increase the bone marrow ECF-MSC, serum cytokine concentrations, and induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes in the bone marrow stromal cells 1 h after its injection. PMID:26087752

  5. Coupled thermal, electrical, and fluid flow analyses of AMTEC converters, with illustrative application to OSC`s cell design

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, A.; Noravian, H.; Or, C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the background and introduction to the OSC AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electrical Conversion) studies, which were conducted for the Department of energy (DOE) and NASA`s jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). After describing the basic principle of AMTEC, the paper describes and explains the operation of multi-tube vapor/vapor cells, which have been under development by AMPS (Advance Modular Power Systems, Inc.) for the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL) and JPL for possible application to the Europa Orbiter, Pluto Express, and other space missions. It then describes a novel OSC-generated methodology for analyzing the performance of such cells. This methodology consists of an iterative procedure for the coupled solution of the interdependent thermal, electrical, and fluid flow differential and integral equations governing the performance of AMTEC cells and generators, taking proper account of the non-linear axial variations of temperature, pressure, open-circuit voltage, inter-electrode voltages, current density, axial current, sodium mass flow rate, and power density. The paper illustrates that analytical procedure by applying it to OSC`s latest cell design and by presenting detailed analytical results for that design. The OSC-developed analytic methodology constitutes a unique and powerful tool for accurate parametric analyses and design optimizations of the multi-tube AMTEC cells and of radioisotope power systems. This is illustrated in two companion papers in these proceedings. The first of those papers applies the OSC-derived program to determine the effect of various design parameters on the performance of single AMTEC cells with adiabatic side walls, culminating in an OSC-recommended revised cell design. And the second describes a number of OSC-generated AMTEC generator designs consisting of 2 and 3 GPHS heat source modules, 16 multi-tube converter cells, and a hybrid insulation design, and presents the results of applying the above analysis program to determine the applicability of those generators to possible future missions under consideration by NASA.

  6. Potential role of N-benzylcinnamide in inducing neuronal differentiation from human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Thangnipon, Wipawan; Puangmalai, Nicha; Suwanna, Nirut; Soi-Ampornkul, Rungtip; Phonchai, Ruchee; Kotchabhakdi, Naiphinich; Mukda, Sujira; Phermthai, Tatsanee; Julavijitphong, Suphakde; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Nobsathian, Saksit

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by chronic and progressive loss of neurons in structure and function related to aging, such as Alzheimer's disease, the latter characterized by the degeneration of cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain connected to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) have been proposed as one of the candidates for stem cell therapy of nervous system disorders. This study demonstrates that incubation of AF-MSCs, obtained from 16 to 20 week pregnant women, with 10ng/ml bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-9 for 48h in conditioned medium resulted in transdifferentiation to cholinergic neuronal-like cells. This phenomenon could also be obtained with N-benzylcinnamide (PT-3). Pre-treatment for 1h with 10nM PT-3 augmented BMP-9 transdifferentiation effect, elevated ?III-tubulin cell numbers and fluorescence intensity of immunoreactive ChAT, ameliorated BMP-9-related production of reactive oxygen species and enhanced anti-apoptosis status of the neuronal-like cells. The transdiffirentiation process was accompanied by increased p53 but decreased Notch1 and SIRT1 (p53 deacetylase) levels, and activation of p38, ERK1/2 MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways, in concert with inactivation of JNK, all of which were accentuated by PT-3 pre-treatment. These findings suggest that N-benzylcinnamide may provide a useful adjuvant in BMP-9-induced transdifferentiation of AFMSCs into ultimately cholinergic neurons. PMID:26518243

  7. Characterization of CD30/CD30L(+) Cells in Peripheral Blood and Synovial Fluid of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Dolcino, Marzia; Tinazzi, Elisa; Rigo, Antonella; Argentino, Giuseppe; Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Ottria, Andrea; Beri, Ruggero; Puccetti, Antonio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The CD30/CD30L signalling system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), soluble CD30 (sCD30) levels reflect the recruitment of CD30(+) T cells into the inflamed joints and correlate with a positive response to immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of our report was to clarify the role of CD30/CD30L signalling system in the pathogenesis of RA. Our analysis of the CD30L(+) T cell subsets in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients and of the related cytokine profiles suggests the involvement of CD30/CD30L signalling in polarization of T cells towards a Th17 phenotype with proinflammatory features. Moreover, in RA SF nearly 50% of Treg cells express CD30, probably as an attempt to downmodulate the ongoing inflammation. We also show here that the engagement of CD30L on neutrophils stimulated with CD30/Fc chimera may play a crucial role in RA inflammation since activated neutrophils release IL-8, thus potentially amplifying the local inflammatory damage. In conclusion, the results obtained suggest that the complex CD30/CD30L signalling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of RA synovitis through a concerted action on several immune effector cells. PMID:26090498

  8. Fluid dilution and efficiency of Na+ transport in a mathematical model of a thick ascending limb cell

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Chris; Marcano, Mariano; Layton, Anita T.; Layton, Harold E.; Moore, Leon C.

    2013-01-01

    Thick ascending limb (TAL) cells are capable of reducing tubular fluid Na+ concentration to as low as ?25 mM, and yet they are thought to transport Na+ efficiently owing to passive paracellular Na+ absorption. Transport efficiency in the TAL is of particular importance in the outer medulla where O2 availability is limited by low blood flow. We used a mathematical model of a TAL cell to estimate the efficiency of Na+ transport and to examine how tubular dilution and cell volume regulation influence transport efficiency. The TAL cell model represents 13 major solutes and the associated transporters and channels; model equations are based on mass conservation and electroneutrality constraints. We analyzed TAL transport in cells with conditions relevant to the inner stripe of the outer medulla, the cortico-medullary junction, and the distal cortical TAL. At each location Na+ transport efficiency was computed as functions of changes in luminal NaCl concentration ([NaCl]), [K+], [NH4+], junctional Na+ permeability, and apical K+ permeability. Na+ transport efficiency was calculated as the ratio of total net Na+ transport to transcellular Na+ transport. Transport efficiency is predicted to be highest at the cortico-medullary boundary where the transepithelial Na+ gradient is the smallest. Transport efficiency is lowest in the cortex where luminal [NaCl] approaches static head. PMID:23097469

  9. Six month tracking of microbial growth in a metalworking fluid after system cleaning and recharging.

    PubMed

    Veillette, Marc; Thorne, Peter S; Gordon, Terry; Duchaine, Caroline

    2004-08-01

    Large volumes of metalworking fluids (MWFs) are used in manufacturing industries for cooling and lubrication of metal pieces and tools during machining. MWFs accumulate microbial growth through continuous recirculation and reuse. We studied the progression of microbial contamination for 6 months after dumping, cleaning and recharging (DCR) of a large semi-synthetic MWF system managed with several biocides. Fresh, uncontaminated fluid was added to the system after extensive cleaning. The following samples were collected and analyzed: pre-DCR fluid (before system cleaning); neat fluid diluted to 6% with water; in use MWF 12 h and 1, 3 and 6 months post-DCR. Samples were analyzed for total microorganism concentrations by direct counting using fluorescence microscopy and by plate counting on various media (R2A, BHI, Middlebrooks and rose bengal under aerobic conditions). In addition, PCR was performed for the detection of mycobacteria. There was a rapid progression in the total bacterial counts as determined by fluorescence microscopy: 5.7 x 10(7) cells/ml in the pre-DCR used fluid, no measurable bacteria in the neat fluid, 6.9 x 10(6) cells/ml after 12 h and 2.2 x 10(6), 3.6 x 10(8) and 6.1 x 10(8) cells/ml after 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. On average, only 0.2% of the direct count organisms were quantified on R2A cultures. PCR showed the presence of mycobacteria in the used MWF at 3 and 6 months. Mycobacteria were also identified from cultures on Middlebrooks and R2A. This study demonstrates that standard methods for cleaning MWF systems are inadequate since residual bacteria in the system can rapidly repopulate the newly charged MWF. PMID:15280164

  10. U.S. Trends in Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV RNA Plasma Viral Loads, and CD4 T-Lymphocyte Cell Counts Among HIV-Infected Persons, 2000 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Keri N.; Buchacz, Kate; Hall, H. Irene; Zhang, Jinbing; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Gange, Stephen J.; Moore, Richard D.; Kitahata, Mari; Gebo, Kelly A.; Martin, Jeffrey; Justice, Amy C.; Horberg, Michael; Hogg, Robert S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Cescon, Angela; Klein, Marina B.; Thorne, Jennifer; Crane, Heidi; Mugavero, Michael J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kirk, Gregory D.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Brooks, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The U.S. National HIV/AIDS Strategy targets for 2015 include increasing access to care and improving health outcomes for persons living with HIV in the United States (PLWH-US). Objective To demonstrate the utility of the NA-ACCORD (North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design) for monitoring trends in the HIV epidemic in the United States and to present trends in HIV treatment and related health outcomes. Design Trends from annual cross-sectional analyses comparing patients from pooled, multicenter, prospective, clinical HIV cohort studies with PLWH-US, as reported to national surveillance systems in 40 states. Setting U.S. HIV outpatient clinics. Patients HIV-infected adults with 1 or more HIV RNA plasma viral load (HIV VL) or CD4 T-lymphocyte (CD4) cell count measured in any calendar year from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008. Measurements Annual rates of antiretroviral therapy use, HIV VL, and CD4 cell count at death. Results 45 529 HIV-infected persons received care in an NA-ACCORD–participating U.S. clinical cohort from 2000 to 2008. In 2008, the 26 030 NA-ACCORD participants in care and the 655 966 PLWH-US had qualitatively similar demographic characteristics. From 2000 to 2008, the proportion of participants prescribed highly active antiretroviral therapy increased by 9 percentage points to 83% (P < 0.001), whereas the proportion with suppressed HIV VL (?2.7 log10 copies/mL) increased by 26 percentage points to 72% (P < 0.001). Median CD4 cell count at death more than tripled to 0.209 × 109 cells/L (P < 0.001). Limitation The usual limitations of observational data apply. Conclusion The NA-ACCORD is the largest cohort of HIV-infected adults in clinical care in the United States that is demographically similar to PLWH-US in 2008. From 2000 to 2008, increases were observed in the percentage of prescribed HAART, the percentage who achieved a suppressed HIV VL, and the median CD4 cell count at death. Primary Funding Source National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian HIV Trials Network, and the government of British Columbia, Canada. PMID:22944874

  11. Identification and quantitation of Vesivirus 2117 particles in bioreactor fluids from infected Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yongchang; Jones, Nathan; Busch, Michelle; Pan, Peng; Keegan, Jesse; Zhou, Weichang; Plavsic, Mark; Hayes, Michael; McPherson, John M; Edmunds, Tim; Zhang, Kate; Mattaliano, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    The prevention of adventitious agent contamination is a top priority throughout the entire biopharmaceutical production process. For example, although viral contamination of cell banks or cell cultures is rare, it can result in serious consequences (e.g., shutdown and decontamination of manufacturing facilities). To ensure virus free production, numerous in vivo and in vitro adventitious agent assays and biophysical characterizations such as electron microscopy are conducted on cell banks, raw materials, process materials, and drug substances throughout the manufacturing process. Molecular assays such as PCR and other nucleotide-based techniques are also routinely used for screening and identification of any viral agents. However, modern techniques in protein identification of complex protein mixtures have not yet been effectively integrated throughout the industry into current viral testing strategies. Here, we report the identification and quantitation of Vesivirus 2117 particles in bioreactor fluid from infected Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures by global protein sequencing using mass spectrometry in combination with multi-dimensional liquid-chromatography. Following mass spectrometric data acquisition and rigorous data analysis, six virus specific peptides were identified. These peptides were fragments of two structural proteins, capsid protein pre-cursor (four unique peptides) and small structural protein (two unique peptides), from the same species: Vesivirus 2117. Using stable heavy isotope-labeled peptides as internal standards, we also determined the absolute concentration of Vesivirus particles in the bioreactor fluid and the ratio of two capsid proteins (VP1:VP2) in the particles as approximately 9:1. The positive identification of Vesivirus 2117 was subsequently confirmed by RT-PCR. PMID:23184768

  12. Measurement of oxidized and reduced coenzyme Q in biological fluids, cells, and tissues: an HPLC-EC method.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peter H; Miles, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    Direct measure of coenzyme Q (CoQ) in biological specimens may provide important advantages. Precise and selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods with electrochemical (EC) detection have been developed for the measurement of reduced (ubiquinol) and oxidized (ubiquinone) CoQ in biological fluids, cells, and tissues. EC detection is preferred for measurement of CoQ because of its high sensitivity. Reduced and oxidized CoQ are first extracted from biological specimens using 1-propanol. After centrifugation, the 1-propanol supernatant is directly injected into HPLC and monitored at a dual-electrode. The EC reactions occur at the electrode surface. The first electrode transforms ubiquinone into ubiquinol, and the second electrode measures the current produced by the oxidation of the hydroquinone group of ubiquinol. The methods described provide rapid, precise, and simple procedures for determination of reduced and oxidized CoQ in biological fluids, cells, and tissues. The methods have been successfully adapted to meet regulatory requirements for clinical laboratories, and have been proven reliable for analysis of clinical and research samples for clinical trials and animal studies involving large numbers of specimens. PMID:22215546

  13. Dispersion of atmospheric fine particulate matters in simulated lung fluid and their effects on model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiuhua; Wang, Lixin; Cao, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Xuehua; Yang, Fan; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zhenhua; Hu, Jingtian; Ding, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected to investigate its dispersion in simulated lung fluid (SLF) and its interaction with model cell membranes. Organic acids, NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were detected in PM2.5 soluble fraction, and heavy metals were detected from the total mass. The insoluble fraction contained kaolinite, CaCO3, aliphatic carbons, aromatic rings, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups reflected by the infrared spectra. Proteins dispersed PM2.5 in SLF, resulted in smaller hydrodynamic diameter (dH) and slower sedimentation rate. Conversely, phospholipids increased dH value and accelerated sedimentation rate. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were used as model cell membranes. PM2.5 adhered on and disrupted the membrane containing positively-charged lipids but not the membrane containing neutrally- and negatively-charged lipids, which was monitored by microscopy and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The cationic sites on membrane were necessary for PM2.5 adhesion, but membrane should be disrupted by the combined action of electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds between PM2.5 oxygen containing groups and the lipid phosphate groups. Our results specified the roles of proteins and phospholipids in PM2.5 dispersion and transport, highly suggested that the health hazard of PM2.5 was related to the biomolecules in the lung fluid and the particle surface groups. PMID:26519565

  14. Supplementary Figure S1: Plot of total cell fluorescence versus RNA in the cell. Total cell fluorescence is directly proportional to the RNA count in the cells and can be used to

    E-print Network

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    obtained after plasmid integration of the construct into the rDNA array. They have the RNA reporter integrated at different positions on the rDNA array. #12;Supplementary Figure S3: (A) Northern blot analysis of RNAs in cells with high transcription. Background subtraction is done by subtracting the mean

  15. A cryogenic high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, J. R.; Diallo, S. O.

    2013-01-01

    We present our new development of a high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of helium at ultra-low temperatures. The cell has a large sample volume of ˜140 cm3 and a working pressure of ˜7 MPa, with a relatively thin wall-thickness (1.1 mm)—thanks to the high yield strength aluminum used in the design. Two variants of this cell have been developed. The first cell is permanently joined components using electron-beam welding and explosion welding, methods that have little or no impact on the global heat treatment of the cell. The second cell discussed has modular and interchangeable components, which includes a capacitance pressure gauge, that can be sealed using the traditional indium wire technique. The performance of the cells have been tested in recent measurements on superfluid liquid helium near the solidification line.

  16. A cryogenic high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, J R; Diallo, S O

    2013-01-01

    We present our new development of a high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of helium at ultra-low temperatures. The cell has a large sample volume of ~140 cm(3) and a working pressure of ~7 MPa, with a relatively thin wall-thickness (1.1 mm)--thanks to the high yield strength aluminum used in the design. Two variants of this cell have been developed. The first cell is permanently joined components using electron-beam welding and explosion welding, methods that have little or no impact on the global heat treatment of the cell. The second cell discussed has modular and interchangeable components, which includes a capacitance pressure gauge, that can be sealed using the traditional indium wire technique. The performance of the cells have been tested in recent measurements on superfluid liquid helium near the solidification line. PMID:23387689

  17. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) CD8+ T-Cells That Express Interferon-Gamma Contribute to HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Rachel D.; Hong, Suzi; Crescini, Melanie; Ellis, Ronald; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Spina, Celsa; Letendre, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continue to affect cognition and everyday functioning despite anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Previous studies focused on mechanisms related to monocyte/macrophage mediated inflammation. However, in the ART era, there is increasing evidence for the involvement of CD8+ T-cells in CNS pathogenesis. Methods To investigate the relationship between T-cell responses and neurocognitive impairment (NCI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell intracellular cytokine (IFN?, IL-2, TNF?) and lytic marker (CD107a) expression were assessed in HIV infected subjects who underwent comprehensive neurocognitive (NC) evaluation and either initiated or changed ART. Results Data were collected from 31 participants at 70 visits. The frequency of cytokine expressing T-cells in CSF was significantly higher than in peripheral blood for CD4+T-cells: TNF?, IL-2, IFN? and CD8+T-cells: IL-2 and IFN?. Analysis of T-cell activity and NCI as a function of CSF HIV RNA levels suggested a general association between NCI, high CSF CD8+ (but not CD4+T-cell) cytokine expression and CSF HIV RNA <103 copies/ml (p<0.0001). Specifically, CSF CD8+ T-cell IFN? expression correlated with severity of NCI (r = 0.57, p = 0.004). Multivariable analyses indicated that CSF CD8+T-cell IFN? and myeloid activation (CD163) contributed equally and independently to cognitive status and a composite variable produced the strongest correlation with NCI (r = 0.83, p = 0.0001). In contrast, CD8+ cytolytic activity (CD107a expression) was negatively correlated with NCI (p = 0.05) but was dependent on CD4 levels >400/?l and low CSF HIV RNA levels (<103 copies/ml). In our longitudinal analysis of 16 subjects, higher CSF CD8+IFN? expression at baseline predicted NC decline at follow-up (p = 0.02). Severity of NCI at follow-up correlated with level of residual HIV RNA in CSF. Conclusions Presence of IFN? expressing CD8+ T-cells, absence of cytolytic CD8+ T-cells, high myeloid activation, and failure of ART to suppress HIV replication in CSF contribute to increased risk of HAND. PMID:25719800

  19. Mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A expression in body fluid and gastrointestinal tract associated with drug-related fatal anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiang-Jie; Wang, Ying-Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Yue; Jin, Qian-Qian; Gao, Cai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A in drug-related fatal anaphylaxis. METHODS: The expression of mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A in 15 autopsy cases of drug-related fatal anaphylaxis and 20 normal autopsy cases were detected. First, the expression of mast cell tryptase was determined in stomach, jejunum, lung, heart, and larynx by immunofluorescence. Different tissues were removed and fixed in paraformaldehyde solution, then paraffin sections were prepared for immunofluorescence. Using specific mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A antibodies, the expression of tryptase and carboxypeptidase A in gastroenterology tract and other tissues were observed using fluorescent microscopy. The postmortem serum and pericardial fluid were collected from drug-related fatal anaphylaxis and normal autopsy cases. The level of mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A in postmortem serum and pericardial fluid were measured using fluor enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (FEIA) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay. The expression of mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A was analyzed in drug-related fatal anaphylaxis cases and compared to normal autopsy cases. RESULTS: The expression of carboxypeptidase A was less in the gastroenterology tract and other tissues from anaphylaxis-related death cadavers than normal controls. Immunofluorescence revealed that tryptase expression was significantly increased in multiple organs, especially the gastrointestinal tract, from anaphylaxis-related death cadavers compared to normal autopsy cases (46.67 ± 11.11 vs 4.88 ± 1.56 in stomach, 48.89 ± 11.02 vs 5.21 ± 1.34 in jejunum, 33.72 ± 5.76 vs 1.30 ± 1.02 in lung, 40.08 ± 7.56 vs 1.67 ± 1.03 in larynx, 7.11 ± 5.67 vs 1.10 ± 0.77 in heart, P < 0.05). Tryptase levels, as measured with FEIA, were significantly increased in both sera (43.50 ± 0.48 ?g/L vs 5.40 ± 0.36 ?g/L, P < 0.05) and pericardial fluid (28.64 ± 0.32 ?g/L vs 4.60 ± 0.48 ?g/L, P < 0.05) from the anaphylaxis group in comparison with the control group. As measured by ELISA, the concentration of carboxypeptidase A was also increased more than 2-fold in the anaphylaxis group compared to control (8.99 ± 3.91 ng/mL vs 3.25 ± 2.30 ng/mL in serum, 4.34 ± 2.41 ng/mL vs 1.43 ± 0.58 ng/mL in pericardial fluid, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Detection of both mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A could improve the forensic identification of drug-related fatal anaphylaxis. PMID:26715811

  20. Minimizing ultraviolet noise due to mis-matches between detector flow cell and post column mobile phase temperatures in supercritical fluid chromatography: effect of flow cell design.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2014-10-17

    A mis-match between the post-column mobile phase temperature and the UV detector flow cell temperature can cause significant UV noise in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Deviations as little as 5 °C can increase noise as much as 5 times, making the detector unsuited for trace analysis. Two approaches were used to minimize this noise. When a flow cell was in direct thermal contact (metal on metal) with the detector optical bench, the mobile phase temperature was actively controlled to the measured flow cell temperature, by using one of the heat exchangers (HX) in the column compartment. However, with some older, but still widely used flow cell designs, this required repeated, hourly monitoring of the flow cell temperature and repeated manual adjustment of the heat exchanger temperature, due to thermal drift. Flow cell design had a strong influence on susceptibility to this thermally induced noise. Thermally insulating the flow cell from the optical bench made some cells much less susceptible to such thermally induced noise. Five different flow cells, some insulated, some un-insulated, were evaluated. Most had a truncated conical flow path, but one had a cylindrical flow path. Using either approach, the ASTM noise, with a 10mm, 13 ?L conical flow cell, could be optimized to ?0.007 mAU at 2.5 Hz, in SFC, which is very near the 0.006 mAU manufacturer's specification for HPLC. The insulated version of this flow cell required far less optimization, compared to the un-insulated version. At 150 bar, an experimental 3mm, 2 ?L flow cell, with only one side insulated, yielded noise slightly too high (?0.16-0.18 mAU) for trace analysis, at 80 Hz. However, at 200 bar, noise at 80 Hz was <0.06 mAU, which should allow quantification of a 1 mAU tall trace component with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) >10. Even partially un-insulated, this flow cell design was much less susceptible to thermally induced noise. Further insulating this flow cell design failed to improve performance. PMID:25189330

  1. Quantitative morphodynamics of endothelial cells within confluent cultures in response to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, P; Odenthal-Schnittler, M; Mrowietz, C; Krämer, M; Sasse, L; Oberleithner, H; Schnittler, H J

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate shear stress-induced effects on cultured cells we have extended the mechanical setup of a multichannel in vitro rheological system and developed software allowing entire processing control and image data analysis. The values of cell motility, degree of orientation (alignment), and cell elongation were correlated as a function of time (morphodynamics). Collective and individual endothelial cells within confluent cultures displayed a shear stress-dependent characteristic phase behavior of the following time course: resting conditions (phase I), change of motility (phase II), onset of alignment (phase III), and finally cell elongation (phase IV). Especially cell motility was characterized by a randomized zigzag movement around mean trajectories (fluctuations) together with mean cell locomotion. Onset of shear stress caused a down-regulation of fluctuations of 30% within <10 min and simultaneously increased locomotion velocities preferring the flow direction (phase II). After a lag period of 10 to 20 min cells orientated in the direction of flow (phase III) without significant cell elongation, which finally occurs within hours (phase IV). These data provide first evidence that cells within confluent endothelial monolayers respond to shear stress with a characteristic phase behavior. PMID:10968992

  2. CD4+ Cells Regulate Fibrosis and Lymphangiogenesis in Response to Lymphatic Fluid Stasis

    PubMed Central

    Elhadad, Sonia; Avraham, Tomer; Weitman, Evan; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Lymphedema is a chronic disorder that occurs commonly after lymph node removal for cancer treatment and is characterized by swelling, fibrosis, inflammation, and adipose deposition. Although previous histological studies have investigated inflammatory changes that occur in lymphedema, the precise cellular make up of the inflammatory infiltrate remains unknown. It is also unclear if this inflammatory response plays a causal role in the pathology of lymphedema. The purpose of this study was therefore to characterize the inflammatory response to lymphatic stasis and determine if these responses are necessary for the pathological changes that occur in lymphedema. Methods We used mouse-tail lymphedema and axillary lymph node dissection (ANLD) models in order to study tissue inflammatory changes. Single cell suspensions were created and analyzed using multi-color flow cytometry to identify individual cell types. We utilized antibody depletion techniques to analyze the causal role of CD4+, CD8+, and CD25+ cells in the regulation of inflammation, fibrosis, adipose deposition, and lymphangiogenesis. Results Lymphedema in the mouse-tail resulted in a mixed inflammatory cell response with significant increases in T-helper, T-regulatory, neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cell populations. Interestingly, we found that ALND resulted in significant increases in T-helper cells suggesting that these adaptive immune responses precede changes in macrophage and dendritic cell infiltration. In support of this we found that depletion of CD4+, but not CD8 or CD25+ cells, significantly decreased tail lymphedema, inflammation, fibrosis, and adipose deposition. In addition, depletion of CD4+ cells significantly increased lymphangiogenesis both in our tail model and also in an inflammatory lymphangiogenesis model. Conclusions Lymphedema and lymphatic stasis result in CD4+ cell inflammation and infiltration of mature T-helper cells. Loss of CD4+ but not CD8+ or CD25+ cell inflammation markedly decreases the pathological changes associated with lymphedema. In addition, CD4+ cells regulate lymphangiogenesis during wound repair and inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:23185491

  3. A fiber-reinforced-fluid model of anisotropic plant root cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Oliver E.; Dyson, Rosemary J.

    2009-11-01

    We present a theoretical model of a single cell in the expansion zone of the primary root of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The cell undergoes rapid elongation with approximately constant radius. Growth is driven by high internal turgor pressure causing viscous stretching of the cell wall, with embedded cellulose microfibrils providing the wall with strongly anisotropic properties. We represent the cell as a thin cylindrical fiber-reinforced viscous sheet between rigid end plates. Asymptotic reduction of the governing equations, under simple sets of assumptions about fiber and wall properties, yields variants of the traditional Lockhart equation that relates the axial cell growth rate to the internal pressure. The model provides insights into the geometric and biomechanical parameters underlying bulk quantities such as wall extensibility and shows how either dynamical changes in wall material properties or passive fibre reorientation may suppress cell elongation.

  4. Cytotoxic Activity of Kenaf Seed Oils from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extraction towards Human Colorectal Cancer (HT29) Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Abd Ghafar, Siti Aisyah; Ismail, Maznah; Saiful Yazan, Latifah; Fakurazi, Sharida; Ismail, Norsharina; Chan, Kim Wei; Md Tahir, Paridah

    2013-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) from the family Malvaceae, is a valuable fiber plant native to India and Africa and is currently planted as the fourth commercial crop in Malaysia. Kenaf seed oil contains alpha-linolenic acid, phytosterol such as ? -sitosterol, vitamin E, and other antioxidants with chemopreventive properties. Kenaf seeds oil (KSO) was from supercritical carbon dioxide extraction fluid (SFE) at 9 different permutations of parameters based on range of pressures from 200 to 600 bars and temperature from 40 to 80°C. They were 200/40, 200/60, 200/80, 400/40, 400/60, 400/80, 600/40, 600/60, and 600/80. Extraction from 9 parameters of KSO-SFE was screened for cytotoxicity towards human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29) and mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell lines using MTS assay. KSO-SFE at 600/40 showed the strongest cytotoxicity towards HT29 with IC50 of 200?µg/mL. The IC50 for NIH/3T3 was not detected even at highest concentration employed. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in the accumulation of KSO-SFE-treated cells at sub-G1 phase, indicating the induction of apoptosis by KSO-SFE. Further apoptosis induction was confirmed by Annexin V/PI and AO/PI staining. PMID:23606884

  5. [ICAM-1 expression of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells caused by fluid shear force].

    PubMed

    Song, X Y; Zeng, Y J; Li, C X; Liao, D H; Hu, J L; Hao, Y L

    2001-02-01

    We studied the effect of shear stress (SS) on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMECs) using the parallel plate flow chamber method. It was demonstrated that RBMECs showed a time-dependent, but not a force-dependent, upregulation in ICAM-1 expression. Endothelial cell surface expression of ICAM-1 in the supernatants of RBMECs exposed to SS was not changed, thus excluding the possibility that the upregulated expression is due to the factors synthesized by these cells. These data throw light on understanding the signal transduction pathway inside the endothelial cells under the effect of SS. PMID:11354790

  6. Effect of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on volume and albumin content of respiratory tract fluid but not on epithelial secretory cell number in "smoking" rats.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N; Brattsand, R; Dahlbäck, M

    1990-03-01

    This study was designed to look at the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on epithelial secretory cells and the respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content from the lower airways of "bronchitic" rats. Rats were exposed either to tobacco smoke (TS), TS and NAC, or NAC alone. TS caused a significant increase in epithelial secretory cell number which was not reduced by concomitant NAC administration; NAC alone had no effect on cell numbers. TS increased respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content by a small but non-significant amount, whereas TS and NAC increased the volume and albumin content by a greater and significant amount; NAC alone was also shown to significantly increase both fluid volume and albumin content. PMID:2340888

  7. Chymase in exocytosed rat mast cell granules effectively proteolyzes apolipoprotein AI-containing lipoproteins, so reducing the cholesterol efflux-inducing ability of serum and aortic intimal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Lindstedt, L; Lee, M; Castro, G R; Fruchart, J C; Kovanen, P T

    1996-01-01

    Degranulated mast cells are present in human fatty streaks. Chymase in granules released from degranulated rat serosal mast cells, i.e., in granule remnants, proteolyzes human high density lipoprotein3 (HDL3), and so reduces its ability to induce cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in vitro. In this study we found that remnant chymase, by proteolyzing human serum and human aortic intimal fluid, prevents these two physiologic fluids from effectively inducing cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophage foam cells. Inhibition was strongest when remnants were added to apolipoprotein AI (apoAI)-containing lipoproteins; the remnants had no effect on the weaker efflux produced by apoAI-deficient serum. Western blot analysis showed that granule remnants degrade apoAI in serum and in internal fluid. When released from remnants, chymase lost its ability to proteolyze HDL3 in the presence of serum. Thus, remnant chymase (but not isolated chymase) was able to resist the natural protease inhibitors present in serum and in intimal fluid. The results imply participation of exocytosed mast cell granules in foam cell formation in atherogenesis. PMID:8636396

  8. Test characteristics of acridine orange, Gram, and May-Grünwald-Giemsa stains for enumeration of intracellular organisms in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    De Brauwer, E; Jacobs, J; Nieman, F; Bruggeman, C; Drent, M

    1999-02-01

    For enumeration of intracellular organisms (ICO) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples, the May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) stain displayed higher interobserver agreement than the acridine orange and Gram stains. The MGG stain offered a reliable enumeration of ICO when 200 cells were counted by one observer. PMID:9889233

  9. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, J.E.

    1985-03-05

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a /sup 3/He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  10. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a .sup.3 He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output ) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  11. Lowering of interstitial fluid pressure after neurogenic inflammation in mouse skin is partly dependent on mast cells.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Tine V; Bletsa, Athanasia; Gjerde, Eli-Anne B; Reed, Rolf K

    2007-04-01

    Neurogenic inflammation is known to induce lowering of interstitial fluid pressure (P(if)) in mouse skin. This study examined the possible role of mast cell activation secondary to neuropeptide release in lowering of P(if) by using Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) mice, which are devoid of mast cells, including connective tissue mast cells (CTMCs). P(if) was measured in paw skin of anesthetized (fentanyl-fluanison and midazolam, 1:1) mice with glass capillaries connected to a servo-controlled counterpressure system. In contrast to wild-type mice, intravenous administration of mast cell-activating compound 48/80 induced no lowering of P(if) in Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) mice. Intravenous challenge with substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), or capsaicin induced a significant (P < 0.05) lowering of P(if) in wild-type mice to -2.16 +/- 0.28, -1.96 +/- 0.11, and -2.22 +/- 0.19 mmHg, respectively, compared with vehicle (-0.49 +/- 0.11 mmHg). In Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) mice the P(if) response to SP was completely abolished (-0.53 +/- 0.32 mmHg) while the response to CGRP and capsaicin was attenuated (-1.33 +/- 0.13 and -1.42 +/- 0.13 mmHg, respectively) although significantly (P < 0.05) lowered compared with vehicle. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed no difference in distribution or density of SP- and CGRP-immunoreactive fibers in paws of Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) compared with wild-type mice. We conclude that lowering of P(if) normally depends on mast cells. However, the sensory nerves can also elicit a lowering of P(if) that is independent of mast cells. PMID:17158654

  12. A cryogenic high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of quantum fluids and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Justin R; Omar Diallo, Souleymane

    2013-01-01

    We present our new development of a high pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering measurements of helium at ultra-low temperatures. The cell has a large sample volume of ~140 cm3, and a working pressure of ~70 bar, with a relatively thin wall-thickness (1.1 mm) - thanks to the high yield strength aluminum used in the design. Two variants of this cell have been developed; one with permanently joined components using electron-beam welding and explosion welding, methods that have little or no impact on the global heat treatment of the cell, and another with modular and interchangeable components, which include a capacitance pressure gauge, that can be sealed using traditional indium wire technique. The performance of the cell has been tested in recent measurements on superfluid liquid helium near the solidification line.

  13. Integrin ?v?3 on human endothelial cells binds von Willebrand factor strings under fluid shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Acutely secreted von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers adhere to endothelial cells, support platelet adhesion, and may induce microvascular thrombosis. Immunofluorescence microscopy of live human umbilical vein endothelial cells showed that VWF multimers rapidly formed strings several hundred micrometers long on the cell surface after stimulation with histamine. Unexpectedly, only a subset of VWF strings supported platelet binding, which depended on platelet glycoprotein Ib. Electron microscopy showed that VWF strings often consisted of bundles and networks of VWF multimers, and each string was tethered to the cell surface by a limited number of sites. Several approaches implicated P-selectin and integrin ?v?3 in anchoring VWF strings. An RGDS peptide or a function-blocking antibody to integrin ?v?3 reduced the number of VWF strings formed. In addition, integrin ?v decorated the VWF strings by immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, lentiviral transduction of shRNA against the ?v subunit reduced the expression of cell-surface integrin ?v?3 and impaired the ability of endothelial cells to retain VWF strings. Soluble P-selectin reduced the number of platelet-decorated VWF strings in the absence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ but had no effect in the presence of these cations. These results indicate that VWF strings bind specifically to integrin ?v?3 on human endothelial cells. PMID:18927433

  14. Counting digital filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, S. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Several embodiments of a counting digital filter of the non-recursive type are disclosed. In each embodiment two registers, at least one of which is a shift register, are included. The shift register received j sub x-bit data input words bit by bit. The kth data word is represented by the integer.

  15. Complete Blood Count

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Test: Hemoglobin Blood Culture Anemia Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Helping Kids Deal With Injections and Blood Tests All About Allergies Word! Complete Blood Count (CBC) Medical Tests and Procedures (Video Landing Page) Getting a ...

  16. What Counts as Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  17. Antibody-Functionalized Fluid-Permeable Surfaces for Rolling Cell Capture at High Flow Rates

    E-print Network

    Mittal, Sukant

    Adhesion-based cell capture on surfaces in microfluidic devices forms the basis of numerous biomedical diagnostics and in vitro assays. However, the performance of these platforms is partly limited by interfacial phenomena ...

  18. Death ligand TRAIL, secreted by CD1a+ and CD14+ cells in blister fluids, is involved in killing keratinocytes in toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Elisabeth; Dessirier, Valérie; Laprée, Geneviève; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Ortonne, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Efstathios N; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Tsapis, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is characterized by an acute detachment and destruction of keratinocytes, affecting large areas of the skin. It is often related to adverse drug reactions. Previous studies have shown that effector CD8+ T cells, which accumulate in the blister fluid, are functionally cytotoxic and act through a classical perforin/granzyme B pathway. It has recently been shown that these cytotoxic T cells also secrete granulysin peptide, which is lethal to keratinocytes. These cytotoxic T cells exert their killer activity against autologous keratinocytes in the presence of the drug. However, they are unlikely to be the only effectors of TEN. We therefore searched for soluble death factors in the blister fluids that might kill keratinocytes. We found that the amounts of interferon-?, TRAIL and TNF-? proteins were significantly greater in TEN blister fluids than in all controls (normal sera, TEN sera, burns and Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis blister fluids) and TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) amounts are also greater in all controls except burns. We showed that these proteins acted in synergy to induce the death of keratinocytes in vitro. We also found that TRAIL and TWEAK were secreted by CD1a+ and CD14+ cells present in the blister fluids. Thus, in addition to MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), which lyse keratinocytes, ligands secreted by non-lymphoid cells capable of inducing keratinocyte death in an MHC class I-independent manner, also seem to be present in the blister fluids of patients with TEN. PMID:21255088

  19. Antibodies produced by clonally expanded plasma cells in multiple sclerosis cerebrospinal fluid cause demyelination of spinal cord explants.

    PubMed

    Blauth, Kevin; Soltys, John; Matschulat, Adeline; Reiter, Cory R; Ritchie, Alanna; Baird, Nicholas L; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Owens, Gregory P

    2015-12-01

    B cells are implicated in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Intrathecal IgG synthesis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) oligoclonal bands and lesional IgG deposition suggest a role for antibody-mediated pathology. We examined the binding of IgG1 monoclonal recombinant antibodies (rAbs) derived from MS patient CSF expanded B cell clones to central nervous system (CNS) tissue. MS rAbs displaying CNS binding to mouse and human CNS tissue were further tested for their ability to induce complement-mediated tissue injury in ex vivo spinal cord explant cultures. The staining of CNS tissue, primary human astrocytes and human neurons revealed a measurable bias in MS rAb binding to antigens preferentially expressed on astrocytes and neurons. MS rAbs that recognize myelin-enriched antigens were rarely detected. Both myelin-specific and some astrocyte/neuronal-specific MS rAbs caused significant myelin loss and astrocyte activation when applied to spinal cord explant cultures in the presence of complement. Overall, the intrathecal B cell response in multiple sclerosis binds to both glial and neuronal targets and produces demyelination in spinal cord explant cultures implicating intrathecal IgG in MS pathogenesis. PMID:26511623

  20. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  1. Stability of carbon nanotube yarn biofuel cell in human body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lee, Jae Ah; Choi, Young-Bong; Kim, Hyug-Han; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-07-01

    High performance with stability, easy-handling electrodes, and biofluid-flow controllable system with mechanical strength of the biofuel cell can be considered as the critical issues for future human body implant. These three challenges are sufficiently considered by using the effective platform regarding the high surface area from multi-walled carbon nanotube-conducting polymer with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), and size/shape dependent flexible yarn electrodes for the implantation of biofuel cell. High power biofuel cell of mW cm-2 range in physiological condition (low glucose-containing phosphate buffered saline solution and human blood serum) controlling the stirring degree is also first demonstrated for future implantation in this study. Biofuel cells for future implantation in human body vitally require long-term stability and high power outputs. We have demonstrated that a high-surface area yarn-based biofuel cell retained over 70% of its initial power output after an extended 20 days period of continuous operation in human blood serum, while delivering a power density of ?1.0 mW cm-2. Subsequently, our enhanced enzymatic biofuel cell system would be potentially used as an innovative power source for the next generation implantable electronics.

  2. A high-order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for two-dimensional compressible fluid flows on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Pierre-Henri

    2009-04-01

    We present a high-order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving the two-dimensional gas dynamics equations on unstructured meshes. A node-based discretization of the numerical fluxes for the physical conservation laws allows to derive a scheme that is compatible with the geometric conservation law (GCL). Fluxes are computed using a nodal solver which can be viewed as a two-dimensional extension of an approximate Riemann solver. The first-order scheme is conservative for momentum and total energy, and satisfies a local entropy inequality in its semi-discrete form. The two-dimensional high-order extension is constructed employing the generalized Riemann problem (GRP) in the acoustic approximation. Many numerical tests are presented in order to assess this new scheme. The results obtained for various representative configurations of one and two-dimensional compressible fluid flows show the robustness and the accuracy of our new scheme.

  3. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.

  4. Integration of semiconductor quantum dots into nano-bio-chip systems for enumeration of CD4+ T cell counts at the point-of-need†‡

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Simmons, Glennon W.; McDevitt, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Recent humanitarian efforts have led to the widespread release of antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of the more than 33 million HIV afflicted people living in resource-scarce settings. Here, the enumeration of CD4+ T lymphocytes is required to establish the level at which the immune system has been compromised. The gold standard method used in developed countries, based on flow cytometry, though widely accepted and accurate, is precluded from widespread use in resource-scarce settings due to its high expense, high technical requirements, difficulty in operation-maintenance and the lack of portability for these sophisticated laboratory-confined systems. As part of continuing efforts to develop practical diagnostic instrumentation, the integration of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QDs) into a portable microfluidic-based lymphocyte capture and detection device is completed. This integrated system is capable of isolating and counting selected lymphocyte sub-populations (CD3+CD4+) from whole blood samples. By combining the unique optical properties of the QDs with the sample handling capabilities and cost effectiveness of novel microfluidic systems, a practical, portable lymphocyte measurement modality that correlates nicely with flow cytometry (R2 = 0.97) has been developed. This QD-based system reduces the optical requirements significantly relative to molecular fluorophores and the mini-CD4 counting device is projected to be suitable for use in both point-of-need and resource-scarce settings. PMID:19023471

  5. Increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood of patients with multiple sclerosis: Reactivity, cytotoxicity, and T cell receptor V gene rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Stinissen, P.; Vandevyver, C.; Medaer, R.

    1995-05-01

    Infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells are potentially involved in the central nervous system demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). To further study this hypothesis, we analyzed the frequency and functional properties of {gamma}{delta} T cells in peripheral blood (PB) and paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS and control subjects, including patients with other neurologic diseases (OND) and healthy individuals. The frequency analysis was performed under limiting dilution condition using rIL-2 and PHA. After PHA stimulation, a significantly increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells was observed in PB and in CSF of MS patients as compared with PB and CSF of patients with OND. The frequency was represented equally in OND patients and normal individuals. Similarly, the IL-2-responsive {gamma}{delta} T cells occurred at a higher frequency in PB of MS than of control subjects. Forty-three percent of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones isolates from PB and CSF of MS patients responded to heat shock protein (HSP70) but not HSP65, whereas only 2 of 30 control {gamma}{delta} T cell clones reacted to the HSP. The majority of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones were able to induce non-MHC-restricted cytolysis of Daudi cells. All clones displayed a substantial reactivity to bacterial superantigens staphylococcal enterotoxin B and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, irrespective of their {gamma}{delta} V gene usage. Furthermore, the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones expressed predominantly TCRDV2 and GV2 genes, whereas the clones derived from CSF of MS patients expressed either DV1 or DV2 genes. The obtained {gamma}{delta} clones, in general, represented rather heterogeneous clonal origins, even though a predominant clonal origin was found in a set of 10 {gamma}{delta} clones derived from one patient with MS. The present study provides new evidence supporting a possible role of {gamma}{delta} T cells in the secondary inflammatory processes in MS. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Fuel cell assembly fluid flow plate having conductive fibers and rigidizing material therein

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, Michael M. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01

    A fluid flow plate is preferably formed with three initial sections, for instance, two layers of conductive (e.g., metal) fibers and a barrier material (e.g., metal foil) which is interposed between the two layers. For example, sintering of these three sections can provide electrical path(s) between outer faces of the two layers. Then, the sintered sections can be, for instance, placed in a mold for forming of flow channel(s) into one or more of the outer faces. Next, rigidizing material (e.g., resin) can be injected into the mold, for example, to fill and/or seal space(s) about a conductive matrix of the electrical path(s). Preferably, abrading of surface(s) of the outer face(s) serves to expose electrical contact(s) to the electrical path(s).

  7. Single cell rheometry with a microfluidic constriction: Quantitative control of friction and fluid leaks between cell and channel walls

    E-print Network

    Bico,José

    leaks between cell and channel walls Pascal Preira, Marie-Pierre Valignat, José Bico, and Olivier://bmf.aip.org/ Journal Information: http://bmf.aip.org/about/about_the_journal Top downloads: http://bmf.aip.org/features/most_downloaded Information for Authors: http://bmf.aip.org/authors Downloaded 23 Apr 2013 to 193.54.81.16. This article

  8. Improved Neurological Outcome by Intramuscular Injection of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in a Muscle Denervation Model

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hong-Lin; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Lu, Zong-Han; Chiang, Chien-Yi; Yang, Dar-Yu; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The skeletal muscle develops various degrees of atrophy and metabolic dysfunction following nerve injury. Neurotrophic factors are essential for muscle regeneration. Human amniotic fluid derived stem cells (AFS) have the potential to secrete various neurotrophic factors necessary for nerve regeneration. In the present study, we assess the outcome of neurological function by intramuscular injection of AFS in a muscle denervation and nerve anastomosis model. Materials and Methods Seventy two Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200–250 gm were enrolled in this study. Muscle denervation model was conducted by transverse resection of a sciatic nerve with the proximal end sutured into the gluteal muscle. The nerve anastomosis model was performed by transverse resection of the sciatic nerve followed by four stitches reconnection. These animals were allocated to three groups: control, electrical muscle stimulation, and AFS groups. Results NT-3 (Neurotrophin 3), BDNF (Brain derived neurotrophic factor), CNTF (Ciliary neurotrophic factor), and GDNF (Glia cell line derived neurotrophic factor) were highly expressed in AFS cells and supernatant of culture medium. Intra-muscular injection of AFS exerted significant expression of several neurotrophic factors over the distal end of nerve and denervated muscle. AFS caused high expression of Bcl-2 in denervated muscle with a reciprocal decrease of Bad and Bax. AFS preserved the muscle morphology with high expression of desmin and acetylcholine receptors. Up to two months, AFS produced significant improvement in electrophysiological study and neurological functions such as SFI (sciatic nerve function index) and Catwalk gait analysis. There was also significant preservation of the number of anterior horn cells and increased nerve myelination as well as muscle morphology. Conclusion Intramuscular injection of AFS can protect muscle apoptosis and likely does so through the secretion of various neurotrophic factors. This protection furthermore improves the nerve regeneration in a long term nerve anastomosis model. PMID:25945496

  9. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in human endothelial cells: regulation by fluid shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Daniel E.; Sakurai, Yumiko; Weiss, Daiana; Vega, J. David; Taylor, W. Robert; Jo, Hanjoong; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Marcus, Craig B.; McIntire, Larry V.

    2009-01-01

    Aims CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, members of the cytochrome P450 protein family, are regulated by fluid shear stress. This study describes the effects of duration, magnitude and pattern of shear stress on CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expressions in human endothelial cells, towards the goal of understanding the role(s) of these genes in pro-atherogenic or anti-atherogenic endothelial cell functions. Methods and results We investigated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expressions under different durations, levels, and patterns of shear stress. CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity were maximally up-regulated at ?24 h of arterial levels of shear stress (15–25 dynes/cm2). Expression of both genes was significantly attenuated by reversing shear stress when compared with 15 dynes/cm2 steady shear stress. Small interfering RNA knockdown of CYP1A1 resulted in significantly reduced CYP1B1 and thrombospondin-1 expression, genes regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Immunostaining of human coronary arteries showed constitutive CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 protein expressions in endothelial cells. Immunostaining of mouse aorta showed nuclear localization of AhR and increased expression of CYP1A1 in the descending thoracic aorta, whereas reduced nuclear localization of AhR and attenuated CYP1A1 expression were observed in the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Conclusion CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene and protein expressions vary with time, magnitude, and pattern of shear stress. Increased CYP1A1 gene expression modulates AhR-regulated genes. Based on our in vitro reversing flow data and in vivo immunostained mouse aorta, we suggest that increased expression of both genes reflects an anti-atherogenic endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:19126602

  10. 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    1/96 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics (internal flows, external flows) Ron and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland 2/96 6.1 Fluid statics Åbo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/96 Fluid statics, static pressure /1 Two types

  11. Fluid-phase endocytosis in Citrus juice cells is independent from vacuolar pH and inhibited by chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of PI-3

    E-print Network

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    Fluid-phase endocytosis in Citrus juice cells is independent from vacuolar pH and inhibited by chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of PI-3 kinases and clathrin-mediated endocytosis By E. ETXEBERRIA1*, P. GONZÁLEZ1-mediated endocytosis inhibitor, chlorpromazine, but not by the caveolin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor, filipin

  12. Loading and testing a light scattering cell with a binary fluid mixture near its critical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Donald T.; Becker, James S.

    1993-06-01

    Critical phenomena has been the subject of physics research for many years. However, only in recent years has the research effort become intense. The current intensity has caused the study of critical phenomena to be grouped into a previous older era and a present contemporary era. Turbidity cell filling with methanol cyclohexane is one of the first steps toward a further understanding of critical phenomena. Work performed during the research period is outlined. During this period, research was spent developing apparatus and techniques that will make it possible to study critical phenomena through turbidity measurements on methanol cyclohexane. Topics covered range from the orientation of turbidity cell parts for assembly to the filling apparatus and procedure used when th cell is built. The last section will briefly cover some of the observations made when viewing the cell in a controlled water bath. However, before mention is made of the specifics of the summer research, a short introduction to critical phenomena and turbidity and how they relate to this experiment is provided.

  13. Loading and testing a light scattering cell with a binary fluid mixture near its critical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Donald T.; Becker, James S.

    1993-01-01

    Critical phenomena has been the subject of physics research for many years. However, only in recent years has the research effort become intense. The current intensity has caused the study of critical phenomena to be grouped into a previous older era and a present contemporary era. Turbidity cell filling with methanol cyclohexane is one of the first steps toward a further understanding of critical phenomena. Work performed during the research period is outlined. During this period, research was spent developing apparatus and techniques that will make it possible to study critical phenomena through turbidity measurements on methanol cyclohexane. Topics covered range from the orientation of turbidity cell parts for assembly to the filling apparatus and procedure used when th cell is built. The last section will briefly cover some of the observations made when viewing the cell in a controlled water bath. However, before mention is made of the specifics of the summer research, a short introduction to critical phenomena and turbidity and how they relate to this experiment is provided.

  14. Automatic counting and classification of bacterial colonies using hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection and counting of bacterial colonies on agar plates is a routine microbiology practice to get a rough estimate of the number of viable cells in a sample. There have been a variety of different automatic colony counting systems and software algorithms mainly based on color or gray-scale pictu...

  15. every moment countS Our Highlights 2013/14

    E-print Network

    Bentley, Katie

    , by diagnosing more cancers at a point when they can be successfully treated. Thank you for your support. Youevery moment countS Our Highlights 2013/14 #12;FOR EVERYONE TOUCHED BY CANCER, EVERY MOMENT COUNTS. ONE DAY WE WILL BEAT CANCER. THROUGH RESEARCH WE WILL MAKE IT SOONER. #12;BEATING CANCER SOONER Half

  16. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease , the body cannot get rid of unneeded fluids. The body may lose too much fluid due to diarrhea , ... hypokalemia , hyperkalemia ), and other chemicals that help regulate body fluids. Medicines can also affect fluid balance. The most ...

  17. Purification of monoclonal antibodies from clarified cell culture fluid using Protein A capture continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Amit K; Tran, Travis; Napadensky, Boris; Teella, Achyuta; Brookhart, Gary; Ropp, Philip A; Zhang, Ada W; Tustian, Andrew D; Zydney, Andrew L; Shinkazh, Oleg

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies using simple model systems have demonstrated that continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography (CCTC) has the potential to overcome many of the limitations of conventional Protein A chromatography using packed columns. The objective of this work was to optimize and implement a CCTC system for monoclonal antibody purification from clarified Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell culture fluid using a commercial Protein A resin. Several improvements were introduced to the previous CCTC system including the use of retentate pumps to maintain stable resin concentrations in the flowing slurry, the elimination of a slurry holding tank to improve productivity, and the introduction of an "after binder" to the binding step to increase antibody recovery. A kinetic binding model was developed to estimate the required residence times in the multi-stage binding step to optimize yield and productivity. Data were obtained by purifying two commercial antibodies from two different manufactures, one with low titer (?0.67g/L) and one with high titer (?6.9g/L), demonstrating the versatility of the CCTC system. Host cell protein removal, antibody yields and purities were similar to those obtained with conventional column chromatography; however, the CCTC system showed much higher productivity. These results clearly demonstrate the capabilities of continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography for the commercial purification of monoclonal antibody products. PMID:25747172

  18. Cloned calves derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos cultured in chemically defined medium or modified synthetic oviduct fluid

    PubMed Central

    Hong, So Gun

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is considered to be a critical tool for propagating valuable animals. To determine the productivity calves resulting from embryos derived with different culture media, enucleated oocytes matured in vitro were reconstructed with fetal fibroblasts, fused, and activated. The cloned embryos were cultured in modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) or a chemically defined medium (CDM) and developmental competence was monitored. After 7 days of culturing, the blastocysts were transferred into the uterine horn of estrus-synchronized recipients. SCNT embryos that were cultured in mSOF or CDM developed to the blastocysts stages at similar rates (26.6% vs. 22.5%, respectively). A total of 67 preimplantational stage embryos were transferred into 34 recipients and six cloned calves were born by caesarean section, or assisted or natural delivery. Survival of transferred blastocysts to live cloned calves in the mSOF and the CDM was 18.5% (to recipients), 9.6% (to blastocysts) and 42.9% (to recipients), 20.0% (to blastocysts), respectively. DNA analysis showed that all cloned calves were genetically identical to the donor cells. These results demonstrate that SCNT embryos cultured in CDM showed higher viability as judged by survival of the calves that came to term compared to blastocysts derived from mSOF cultures. PMID:21368567

  19. Seismicity and fluid geochemistry at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California: Evidence for two circulation cells in the hydrothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; McLaren, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270 ??C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature fumarolic areas, and has a plume of degassed reservoir liquid that flows southward to emerge at Growler and Morgan Hot Springs. The second cell originates SSE to SE of Lassen Peak and flows southeastward along inferred faults of the Walker Lane belt (WLB) where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (220-240 ??C) that boils beneath Devils Kitchen and Boiling Springs Lake, and has an outflow plume of degassed liquid that boils again beneath Terminal Geyser. Three distinct seismogenic zones (identified as the West, Middle, and East seismic clusters) occur at shallow depths (< 6 km) in Lassen Volcanic National Park, SW to SSE of Lassen Peak and adjacent to areas of high-temperature (??? 161 ??C) fumarolic activity (Sulphur Works, Pilot Pinnacle, Little Hot Springs Valley, and Bumpass Hell) and an area of cold, weak gas emissions (Cold Boiling Lake). The three zones are located within the inferred Rockland caldera in response to interactions between deeply circulating meteoric water and hot brittle rock that overlies residual magma associated with the Lassen Volcanic Center. Earthquake focal mechanisms and stress inversions indicate primarily N-S oriented normal faulting and E-W extension, with some oblique faulting and right lateral shear in the East cluster. The different focal mechanisms as well as spatial and temporal earthquake patterns for the East cluster indicate a greater influence by regional tectonics and inferred faults within the WLB. A fourth, deeper (5-10 km) seismogenic zone (the Devils Kitchen seismic cluster) occurs SE of the East cluster and trends NNW from Sifford Mountain toward the Devils Kitchen thermal area where fumarolic temperatures are ??? 123 ??C. Lassen fumaroles discharge geothermal gases that indicate mixing between a N2-rich, arc-type component and gases derived from air-saturated meteoric recharge water. Most gases have relatively weak isotopic indicators of upper mantle or volcanic components, except for gas from Sulphur Works where ??13C-CO2, ??34S-H2S, and ??15N-N2 values indicate a contribution from the mantle and a subducted sediment source in an arc volcanic setting.

  20. Assessment of cells in the ascitic fluid of women with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: the clinical implications for subsequent ovarian malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although some studies have reported a potential connection between ovulation induction therapy (OIT) and malignant ovarian diseases, the results have been inconclusive. In the present study, we sought to determine whether women undergoing OIT at our in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic, especially those with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and suspicious cytologic findings, were at risk for developing malignant ovarian tumours after treatment. Methods Patients who underwent OIT at our IVF clinic were enrolled in this study and assessed for any evidence of malignant ovarian tumours. Patients who developed severe OHSS as a result of OIT were treated with a culdocentesis. Cells from the ascitic fluid were cytologically scored for abnormality and malignancy. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from patients with severe OHSS to determine serum levels of the tumour markers (CA-125 and HE4) that were used to calculate the Risk for Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm (ROMA) index. Results Follow-up data were available for 1,353 of the 1,587 patients (85%) who underwent OIT at our IVF clinic between January 2006 and December 2012. Twenty-three patients (1.4%) were hospitalized with OHSS. Culdocentesis was performed 16 times in nine patients with severe OHSS (age range, 23–34 years; mean, 27.1 years). Although cytological examination of the ascitic cells of these patients suggested malignant ovarian neoplasia, over the course of the observation period, the ovarian volume gradually decreased and became normal. Subsequent cytological and histological examinations failed to find evidence of any malignant tumours in these nine patients. None of the 1,353 participants who underwent OIT developed any malignant ovarian tumours during the study period. Moreover, none of the 462 patients who were in our ovarian tumour registry were also participants in the IVF program. Conclusions The presence of atypical cells in the ascitic fluid of women with severe OHSS does not likely indicate malignancy; therefore, radical surgical intervention is not justified. The risk of malignancy is minimal shortly after OIT. At our centre, OIT has not been associated with any cases of ovarian tumour. PMID:24028152

  1. Dosimetric model for antibody targeted radionuclide therapy of tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, W.T.; Barrett, A. )

    1990-02-01

    Although encouraging results have been obtained using systemic radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of cancer, it is likely that regional applications may prove more effective. One such strategy is the treatment of central nervous system leukemia in children by intrathecal instillation of targeting or nontargeting beta particle emitting radionuclide carriers. The beta particle dosimetry of the spine is assessed, assuming that the spinal cord and the cerebrospinal fluid compartment can be adequately represented by a cylindrical annulus. The radionuclides investigated were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 67}Cu, and {sup 199}Au. It is shown that the radiation dose to the cord can be significantly reduced using short range beta particle emitters and that there is little advantage in using targeting carriers with these radionuclides. {sup 199}Au and {sup 67}Cu also have the advantage of having a suitable gamma emission for imaging, permitting pretherapy imaging and dosimetric calculations to be undertaken prior to therapy. If these methods prove successful, it may be possible to replace the external beam component used in the treatment of central nervous system leukemia in children by intrathecal radionuclide therapy, thus reducing or avoiding side effects such as growth and intellectual impairment.

  2. Amoeboid Swimming: A Generic Self-Propulsion of Cells in Fluids by Means of Membrane Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farutin, Alexander; Rafaï, Salima; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Duperray, Alain; Peyla, Philippe; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2013-11-01

    Microorganisms, such as bacteria, algae, or spermatozoa, are able to propel themselves forward thanks to flagella or cilia activity. By contrast, other organisms employ pronounced changes of the membrane shape to achieve propulsion, a prototypical example being the Eutreptiella gymnastica. Cells of the immune system as well as dictyostelium amoebas, traditionally believed to crawl on a substratum, can also swim in a similar way. We develop a model for these organisms: the swimmer is mimicked by a closed incompressible membrane with force density distribution (with zero total force and torque). It is shown that fast propulsion can be achieved with adequate shape adaptations. This swimming is found to consist of an entangled pusher-puller state. The autopropulsion distance over one cycle is a universal linear function of a simple geometrical dimensionless quantity A/V2/3 (V and A are the cell volume and its membrane area). This study captures the peculiar motion of Eutreptiella gymnastica with simple force distribution.

  3. Mid-infrared spectroscopy-based antibody aggregate quantification in cell culture fluids.

    PubMed

    Capito, Florian; Skudas, Romas; Kolmar, Harald; Hunzinger, Christian

    2013-08-01

    Therapeutic antibody purification involves several steps which potentially induce antibody aggregation. Currently, aggregate monitoring mainly employs chromatographic, SDS-PAGE and light scattering techniques. In this study, the feasibility of mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR) for the quantification of soluble antibody aggregates was investigated. Several multivariate models were evaluated to quantify antibody aggregation in chromatography elution streams and in clarified CHO cell culture supernatants (a surrogate for bioreactor output). A general model was established that is applicable for aggregate quantification directly from different cell culture solutions. Real-process samples and process-sample mimics were used to verify the general aggregate quantification model using two different antibodies. Results showed good prediction ability down to 1% aggregate content. Together with recently published results using MIR for host cell protein and target protein quantification, the results presented here indicate that MIR could provide multi-parameter process information from a single, fast, cost-effective and straightforward measurement. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that MIR is suitable for aggregate quantification in therapeutic antibody purification processes. PMID:23712876

  4. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Cell-Free Fetal RNA from Amniotic Fluid and RNA from Amniocytes in Uncomplicated Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Y. W.; Shim, S. H.; Sung, S. R.; Park, J. E.; Cha, D. H.; Ahn, E. H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to compare tissue-specific expression profiles and biological pathways of RNA from amniocytes and amniotic fluid supernatant (AFS) from second-trimester pregnancies by using transcriptome analysis. Additionally, we wanted to explore whether cell-free RNA from AFS exhibits a unique gene expression signature that more adequately reflects the fetal developmental process than amniocyte RNA. Methods Amniotic fluid samples were prospectively collected in the second trimester of pregnancy from euploid fetuses. Total RNA was extracted from amniocytes and AFS and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip Human Arrays. Significantly differentially expressed transcripts between amniocytes and AFS were obtained by using Welch’s t-test. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was used to visualize overall expression characteristics and differences in transcripts between AFS and amniocytes. The biological functions of selected genes were analyzed using various online Gene Ontology databases. Results A total of 3,072 and 15,633 transcripts were detected in the second-trimester AFS and amniocytes, respectively. Hierarchical clustering revealed differential transcript expression between AFS and amniocytes. We found 353 genes that were specifically enriched in the AFS only, and tissue expression analysis showed enrichment of brain-specific genes in the AFS. Biological pathway analysis revealed that AFS-specific transcripts were mainly involved in embryonic development, cardiovascular development, and cellular morphology pathways. Conclusion This study demonstrated differential tissue-specific gene expression profiles and biological pathways between AFS and amniocytes. The results suggested that AFS is the preferred RNA source to investigate potential biomarkers of fetal neurodevelopment. PMID:26181329

  5. Elevated Levels of Cytokines Associated with Th2 and Th17 Cells in Vitreous Fluid of Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Masaru; Sato, Tomohito; Tanaka, Atsushi; Muraoka, Tadashi; Taguchi, Manzo; Sakurai, Yutaka; Karasawa, Yoko; Ito, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in low-grade inflammation in diabetes, and play pathogenic roles in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) by producing proinflammatory cytokines. T cells as well as other cells are also activated by proinflammatory cytokines, and infiltration into the vitreous of patients with PDR has been shown. In this study, we measured helper T (Th) cell-related cytokines in the vitreous of PDR patients to define the characteristics of Th-mediated immune responses associated with PDR. The study group consisted of 25 type 2 diabetic patients (25 eyes) with PDR. The control group consisted of 27 patients with epiretinal membrane (ERM), 26 patients with idiopathic macular hole (MH), and 26 patients with uveitis associated with sarcoidosis. Vitreous fluid was obtained at the beginning of vitrectomy, and centrifuging for cellular removals was not performed. Serum was also collected from PDR patients. IL-1?, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23, IL-25, IL-31, IL-33, IFN-?, soluble sCD40L, and TNF? in the vitreous and serum samples were measured. Both percent detectable and levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-21, IL-22, and TNF? in the vitreous were significantly higher than those in the serum in PDR patients. Vitreous levels of these cytokines and IL-31 were significantly higher in PDR than in ERM or MH patients. Vitreous levels of IL-4, IL-17A, IL-22, IL-31, and TNF? in PDR patients were also significantly higher than those of sarcoidosis patients. In PDR patients, vitreous IL-17A level correlated significantly with vitreous levels of IL-22 and IL-31, and especially with IL-4 and TNF?. Although it is unclear whether these cytokines play facilitative roles or inhibitory roles for the progression of PDR, the present study indicated that Th2- and Th17-related immune responses are involved in the pathogenesis of PDR. PMID:26352837

  6. Characterization of protein factor(s) in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid that enhance insulin transport via transcytosis across primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Bahhady, Rana; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D.; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize factor(s) in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) that enhance(s) insulin transport across primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECM) in primary culture. BALF was concentrated 7.5-fold using the Centricon device and the retentate was used to characterize the factor(s) involved in enhancing apical-to-basolateral transport of intact 125I-insulin across various epithelial cell monolayers. These factor(s) enhanced transport of intact insulin across type II cell-like RAECM (3-fold increase) and type I cell-like RAECM (2-fold increase), but not across Caco-2 or MDCK cell monolayers. The insulin transport-enhancing factor(s) were temperature- and trypsin-sensitive. The mechanism of enhancement did not seem to involve paracellular transport or fluid-phase endocytosis, since fluxes of sodium fluorescein and FITC-dextran (70 kDa) were not affected by the factor(s) in the apical bathing fluid. BALF enhancement of intact 125I-insulin transport was abolished at 4°C and in the presence of monensin, suggesting involvement of transcellular pathways. Sephacryl S-200 purification of BALF retentate, followed by LC-MS/MS, indicated that the high molecular weight (>100 kDa) fractions (which show some homology to alpha-1-inhibitor III, murinoglobulin gamma 2, and pregnancy-zone protein) appear to facilitate transcellular transport of insulin across RAECM. PMID:18406118

  7. Effect of simulated microgravity on nitric oxide synthase activity of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lian-Wen; Yang, Xiao; Fan, Yu-Bo

    It is well known that microgravity could induce bone loss. However, the mechanism remains poorly understood. Osteocytes are extremely sensitive to fluid shear stress, even more than osteobleasts. The effect of simulated microgravity on osteocytes in response to fluid shear was investigated in this study in order to see if the mechanosensibility of osteocytes changed under simulated microgravity. The osteocyte-like cell line, MLO-Y4, was cultured and divided into four groups, including control (CON), control and shear (CONS), rotary (RT), rotary and shear (RTS). In RT and RTS, the cells were cultured in the rotary cell culture system to simulate microgravity condition. After 5 days, the cells in RTS and CONS were subjected to flow shear for 15 min. Then nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the cells was measured using assay kit. The results showed that NOS activity in respond to fluid shear decreased significantly in RTS compared with CONS. In addition, there was significant difference in NOS activity between CONS and CON while no significant difference between RTS and RT. These indicates that the mechanosensibility of osteocytes decreased under simulated microgravity and this maybe the partly causes of the poor effect of exercise to counter microgravity-induced-bone loss. However, further research need to be done to support this finding.

  8. Cytokine levels in pleural fluid as markers of acute rejection after lung transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Priscila Cilene León Bueno; Afonso, José Eduardo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Acencio, Milena Marques Pagliarelli; Antonangelo, Leila; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF, as well as the total and differential cell counts, in the pleural fluid of lung transplant recipients, correlating those levels with the occurrence and severity of rejection. We analyzed pleural fluid samples collected from 18 patients at various time points (up to postoperative day 4). The levels of IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF tended to elevate in parallel with increases in the severity of rejection. Our results suggest that these levels are markers of acute graft rejection in lung transplant recipients. PMID:25210966

  9. Effects of Perivitelline Fluid Obtained from Horseshoe Crab on The Proliferation and Genotoxicity of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Marahaini; Mohd Ali, Khadijah; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Azlina, Ahmad; Omar, Nor Shamsuria; Chatterji, Anil; Mokhtar, Khairani Idah

    2015-01-01

    Objective Perivitelline fluid (PVF) of the horseshoe crab embryo has been reported to possess an important role during embryogenesis by promoting cell proliferation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of PVF on the proliferation, chromosome aberration (CA) and mutagenicity of the dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Materials and Methods This is an in vitro experimental study. PVF samples were collected from horseshoe crabs from beaches in Malaysia and the crude extract was prepared. DPSCs were treated with different concentrations of PVF crude extract in an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay (cytotoxicity test). We choose two inhibitory concentrations (IC50 and IC25) and two PVF concentrations which produced more cell viability compared to a negative control (100%) for further tests. Quantitative analysis of the proliferation activity of PVF was studied using the AlamarBlue®assay for 10 days. Population doubling times (PDTs) of the treatment groups were calculated from this assay. Genotoxicity was evaluated based on the CA and Ames tests. Statistical analysis was carried out using independent t test to calculate significant differences in the PDT and mitotic indices in the CA test between the treatment and negative control groups. Significant differences in the data were P<0.05. Results A total of four PVF concentrations retrieved from the MTT assay were 26.887 mg/ml (IC50), 14.093 mg/ml (IC25), 0.278 mg/ml (102% cell viability) and 0.019 mg/ml (102.5% cell viability). According to the AlamarBlue®assay, these PVF groups produced comparable proliferation activities compared to the negative (untreated) control. PDTs between PVF groups and the negative control were insignificantly different (P>0.05). No significant aberrations in chromosomes were observed in the PVF groups and the Ames test on the PVF showed the absence of significant positive results. Conclusion PVF from horseshoe crabs produced insignificant proliferative activity on treated DPSCs. The PVF was non-genotoxic based on the CA and Ames tests. PMID:26199904

  10. Hair-cell counts and afferent innervation patterns in the cristae ampullares of the squirrel monkey with a comparison to the chinchilla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, C.; Lysakowski, A.; Goldberg, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The numbers of type I and type II hair cells were estimated by dissector techniques applied to semithin, stained sections of the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae in the squirrel monkey and the chinchilla. 2. The crista in each species was divided into concentrically arranged central, intermediate, and peripheral zones of equal areas. The three zones can be distinguished by the sizes of individual hair cells and calyx endings, by the density of hair cells, and by the relative frequency of calyx endings innervating single or multiple type I hair cells. 3. In the monkey crista, type I hair cells outnumber type II hair cells by a ratio of almost 3:1. The ratio decreases from 4-5:1 in the central and intermediate zones to under 2:1 in the peripheral zone. For the chinchilla, the ratio is near 1:1 for the entire crista and decreases only slightly between the central and peripheral zones. 4. Nerve fibers supplying the cristae in the squirrel monkey were labeled by extracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve. Peripheral terminations of individual fibers were reconstructed and related to the zones of the cristae they innervated and to the sizes of their parent axons. Results were similar for the horizontal, superior, and posterior cristae. 5. Axons seldom bifurcate below the neuroepithelium. Most fibers begin branching shortly after crossing the basement membrane. Their terminal arbors are compact, usually extending no more than 50-100 microns from the parent exon. A small number of long intraepithelial fibers enter the intermediate and peripheral zones of the cristae near its base, then run unbranched for long distances through the neuroepithelium to reach the central zone. 6. There are three classes of afferent fibers innervating the monkey crista. Calyx fibers terminate exclusively on type I hair cells, and bouton fibers end only on type II hair cells. Dimorphic fibers provide a mixed innervation, including calyx endings to type I hair cells and bouton endings to type II hair cells. Long intraepithelial fibers are calyx and dimorphic units, whose terminal fields are similar to those of other fibers. The central zone is innervated by calyx and dimorphic fibers; the peripheral zone, by bouton and dimorphic fibers; and the intermediate zone, by all three kinds of fibers. Internal (axon) diameters are largest for calyx fibers and smallest for bouton fibers. Of the entire sample of 286 labeled fibers, 52% were dimorphic units, 40% were calyx units, and 8% were bouton units.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

  11. Oocyte environment: follicular fluid and cumulus cells are critical for oocyte health.

    PubMed

    Dumesic, Daniel A; Meldrum, David R; Katz-Jaffe, Mandy G; Krisher, Rebecca L; Schoolcraft, William B

    2015-02-01

    Bidirectional somatic cell-oocyte signaling is essential to create a changing intrafollicular microenvironment that controls primordial follicle growth into a cohort of growing follicles, from which one antral follicle is selected to ovulate a healthy oocyte. Such intercellular communications allow the oocyte to determine its own fate by influencing the intrafollicular microenvironment, which in turn provides the necessary cellular functions for oocyte developmental competence, which is defined as the ability of the oocyte to complete meiosis and undergo fertilization, embryogenesis, and term development. These coordinated somatic cell-oocyte interactions attempt to balance cellular metabolism with energy requirements during folliculogenesis, including changing energy utilization during meiotic resumption. If these cellular mechanisms are perturbed by metabolic disease and/or maternal aging, molecular damage of the oocyte can alter macromolecules, induce mitochondrial mutations, and reduce adenosine triphosphate production, all of which can harm the oocyte. Recent technologies are now exploring transcriptional, translational, and post-translational events within the human follicle with the goal of identifying biomarkers that reliably predict oocyte quality in the clinical setting. PMID:25497448

  12. Fast time-domain modeling of fluid-coupled cMUT cells: from the single cell to the 1-D linear array element.

    PubMed

    Sénégond, Nicolas; Boulmé, Audren; Plag, Camille; Teston, Franck; Certon, Dominique

    2013-07-01

    We report a fast time-domain model of fluid-coupled cMUTs developed to predict the transient response-i.e., the impulse pressure response--of an element of a linear 1-D array. Mechanical equations of the cMUT diaphragm are solved with 2-D finite-difference schemes. The time-domain solving method is a fourth--order Runge-Kutta algorithm. The model takes into account the electrostatic nonlinearity and the contact with the bottom electrode when the membrane is collapsed. Mutual acoustic coupling between cells is introduced through the numerical implementation of analytical solutions of the impulse diffraction theory established in the case of acoustic sources with rectangular geometry. Processing times are very short: they vary from a few minutes for a single cell to a maximum of 30 min for one element of an array. After a description of the model, the impact of the nonlinearity and the pull-in/pull-out phenomena on the dynamic behavior of the cMUT diaphragm is discussed. Experimental results of mechanical displacements obtained by interferometric measurements and the acoustic pressure field are compared with simulations. Different excitation signals-high-frequency bandwidth pulses and toneburst excitations of varying central frequency-were chosen to comp