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Sample records for fluid cell count

  1. Cell counting.

    PubMed

    Phelan, M C; Lawler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents protocols for counting cells using either a hemacytometer or electronically using a Coulter counter. Cell counting with a hemacytometer permits effective discrimination of live from dead cells using trypan blue exclusion. In addition, the procedure is less subject to errors arising from cell clumping or size heterogeneity. Counting cells is more quickly and easily performed using an electronic counter, but live-dead discrimination is unreliable. Cell populations containing large numbers of dead cells and/or cell clumps are difficult to count accurately. In addition, electronic counting requires resetting of the instrument for cell populations of different sizes; heterogeneous populations can give rise to inaccurate counts, and resting and activated cells may require counting at separate settings. In general, electronic cell counting is best performed on fresh peripheral blood cells. PMID:18770655

  2. Use of the Cell-Dyn Sapphire hematology analyzer for automated counting of blood cells in body fluids.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Dieter; Van Moer, Guy; Martens, Geert A; Nanos, Nikolaos; Smet, Lutgarde; Jochmans, Kristin; De Waele, Marc

    2010-02-01

    The enumeration and identification of blood cells in body fluids offers important information for the diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. Manual microscopic methods (hemacytometer total cell count and cytocentrifuged differential count) have inherent analytic and economic disadvantages but are still considered the "gold standard" methods. We evaluated the analytic and clinical performance of the Cell-Dyn Sapphire hematology analyzer (Abbott Diagnostics Division, Santa Clara, CA) for automated blood cell counting and leukocyte differential counting in cerebrospinal fluid, serous fluid (peritoneal and pleural fluid), and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid, and we compared the performance with the respective manual methods. In the present article, we describe its applicability for the distinct body fluids, and we highlight limitations and caveats. PMID:20093239

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid white cell count: discriminatory or otherwise for enteroviral meningitis in infants and young children?

    PubMed

    Tan, Natalie Woon Hui; Lee, Elis Yuexian; Khoo, Gloria Mei Chin; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Krishnamoorthy, Subramania; Choong, Chew Thye

    2016-04-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses (EV) are the most common viruses causing aseptic meningitis in children. We aim to evaluate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics of neonates and children with EV meningitis with a view to determine whether it could be discriminatory or otherwise in making a positive diagnosis. We performed a 3-year (July 2008-July 2011) retrospective study of children ?16years, treated at a tertiary children's hospital, with positive CSF EV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and negative blood and CSF bacterial cultures. A total of 206 children were studied. The median CSF white cell count was 79cells/mm(3) (range 0-4608cells/mm(3)). CSF pleocytosis was observed in 99/150 (66%) aged ?90days, 3/4 (75%) aged 90days-1year, and 49/52 (94%) children ?3years. There was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ?90days, where 34% of them had no pleocytosis, while in 66%, a wide range of pleocytosis that might even suggest bacterial meningitis was noted. CSF red cells were low, and protein or sugar values were not discriminatory. CSF pleocytosis in relation to increasing age was found to be statistically significant (p?

  4. White blood cell counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a prototype white blood cell counting system for use in the Skylab IMSS are presented. The counting system consists of a sample collection subsystem, sample dilution and fluid containment subsystem, and a cell counter. Preliminary test results show the sample collection and the dilution subsystems are functional and fulfill design goals. Results for the fluid containment subsystem show the handling bags cause counting errors due to: (1) adsorption of cells to the walls of the container, and (2) inadequate cleaning of the plastic bag material before fabrication. It was recommended that another bag material be selected.

  5. A multicenter evaluation of the Iris iQ200 automated urine microscopy analyzer body fluids module and comparison with hemacytometer cell counts.

    PubMed

    Butch, Anthony W; Wises, Porntip K; Wah, David T; Gornet, Terrie G; Fritsche, Herbert A

    2008-03-01

    Manual hemacytometer cell counting of body fluids is labor-intensive and requires skilled testing personnel. We performed a multicenter evaluation of the Iris iQ200 automated microscopy analyzer Body Fluids Module (Iris Diagnostics, Chatsworth, CA) and compared 350 iQ200 body fluid cell counts with manual hemacytometer cell counts. Within-run imprecision, expressed as coefficient of variation (CV), ranged from 2.6% to 5.9% for RBC counts between 875 and 475 x 10(6)/L and from 4.2% to 6.5% for nucleated cell counts between 820 and 590 x 10(6)/L. The lower limits of detection, based on a CV of 20% or less, were 30 and 35 x 10(6)/L for RBCs and nucleated cells, respectively. There was very good agreement between automated iQ200 and manual body fluid cell counts based on slopes and r2 values. The iQ200 has satisfactory performance for enumerating RBCs and nucleated cells in most body fluids, with the exception of cerebrospinal fluid specimens that contain low cell numbers. PMID:18285268

  6. CSF cell count

    MedlinePLUS

    ... red and white blood cells that are in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF is a clear fluid that in ... cells indicates infection, inflammation, or bleeding into the cerebrospinal fluid. Some causes include: Abscess Encephalitis Hemorrhage Meningitis Multiple ...

  7. Comparative evaluation of the Iris iQ200 body fluid module with manual hemacytometer count.

    PubMed

    Walker, Teanya J; Nelson, Lydia D; Dunphy, Brian W; Anderson, Danna M; Kickler, Thomas S

    2009-03-01

    Manual cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and body fluid cell counts done using a hemacytometer are labor-intensive and time-consuming. The automated Iris iQ200 with the Body Fluids Module (Iris Diagnostics, Chatsworth, CA) counts RBCs and nucleated cells in CSF and other body fluids using flow cell digital imaging. We compared the cell counts from the iQ200 and the hemacytometer. CSF and body fluid samples were first analyzed in duplicate using the Neubauer hemacytometer. We then counted the samples on the iQ200. CSF samples for RBC counts of 0 to 6.7 x 10(5)/microL and nucleated cell counts of 0 to 1,707/microL resulted in r = 0.996 and r = 0.998, respectively. Body fluid samples for RBC counts of 0 to 2.7 x 10(5)/microL and nucleated cell counts of 0 to 1.1 x 10(4)/microL resulted in r = 0.988 and r = 0.987, respectively. Day-to-day precision with quality control yielded coefficients of variation of 12.5% and 13.3% for RBC counts and 9.4% and 12.3% for nucleated cell counts. Linearity studies yielded slopes of 0.99 and 1.010 for RBC and nucleated cell counts, respectively. The results from the iQ200 correlate well with the manual hemacytometer method. PMID:19228639

  8. A method for counting monosodium urate crystals in synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Montagna, P; Brizzolara, R; Ferrone, C; Cutolo, M; Paolino, S; Cimmino, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to standardize the technique for counting monosodium urate (MSU) crystals in the synovial fluid (SF) of patients with gout. A total of 52 SF specimens were examined under a polarized light microscope. The amount of SF ranged between 0.1 and 45 mL (median 3 mL). MSU crystals were counted in four areas with the same size at 400x magnification. Cytological examination of the same specimens was also performed. Median leukocyte count was 400 cells/mm3 (range 50-14,000 cells/mm3), with a median percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocytes of 9% (range 0%-98%). Median crystal count was 179.5 (range 3-1600). Inter- reader and intra-reader agreement in crystal counting were good with a weighed k of 0.89 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85-0.94] and 0.89 (95% CI 0.84-0.93), respectively. Our data indicate that the SF MSU crystal count is a feasible and highly reliable technique. PMID:26150273

  9. T-cell count

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to: Cancer, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia or multiple myeloma Infections, such as hepatitis or mononucleosis Lower than normal T-cell levels may be due to: Acute viral infections Aging ... diseases, such as HIV/AIDS Radiation therapy Steroid treatment

  10. Counting human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Steven; Flanagan, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the exact number of viable cells in a given volume of a cell suspension is required for many routine tissue culture manipulations, such as plating cells for immunocytochemistry or for cell transfections. This protocol describes a straightforward and fast method for differentiating between live and dead cells and quantifying the cell concentration and total cell number using a hemacytometer. This procedure first requires detaching cells from a growth surface and resuspending them in media. Next, the cells are diluted in a solution of Trypan blue (ideally to a concentration that will give 20-50 cells per quadrant) and placed in the hemacytometer. Finally, averaging the counts of viable cells in several randomly selected quadrants, dividing the average by the volume of one 1 mm(2) quadrant (0.1 microl) and multiplying by the dilution factor gives the number of cells per l. Multiplying this cell concentration by the total volume in microl gives the total cell number. This protocol describes counting human neural stem/precursor cells (hNSPCs), but can also be used for many other cell types. PMID:18989433

  11. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  12. Somatic Cell Counts in Bovine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, I. R.; Meek, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Factors which influence somatic cell counts in bovine milk are reviewed and guidelines for their interpretation are presented. It is suggested that the thresholds of 300 000 and 250 000 cells/mL be used to identify infected quarters and cows respectively. However, it is stressed that somatic cell counts are general indicators of udder health which are subject to the influence of many factors. Therefore the evaluation of several successive counts is preferable to the interpretation of an individual count. Relationships between somatic cell counts and both milk production and milk composition are discussed. Subclinical mastitis reduces milk quality and decreases yield although the relationship between production loss and somatic cell count requires clarification. Finally the availability of somatic cell counting programs in Canada is presented. PMID:17422127

  13. White blood cell count - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Interfering factors: Acute emotional or physical stress can increase WBC counts. There are various types of white blood cells (WBCs) that normally appear in the blood: neutrophils (polymorphonuclear ...

  14. White blood cell counts: reference methodology.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Richards, Devon S; George, Tracy I

    2015-03-01

    Modern hematology laboratories use automated hematology analyzers to perform cell counts. These instruments provide accurate, precise, low-cost differential counts with fast turnaround times. Technologies commonly used include electrical impedance, radiofrequency conductivity, laser light scattering, and cytochemistry. This article reviews the principles of these methodologies and possible sources of error, provides guidance for selecting flagging criteria, and discusses novel, clinically relevant white blood cell parameters provided by new instruments, including immature granulocyte count and granularity index. PMID:25676369

  15. Automated counting of mammalian cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Barber, P R; Vojnovic, B; Kelly, J; Mayes, C R; Boulton, P; Woodcock, M; Joiner, M C

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the effect of low-dose radiation exposure on cells using assays of colony-forming ability requires large cell samples to maintain statistical accuracy. Manually counting the resulting colonies is a laborious task in which consistent objectivity is hard to achieve. This is true especially with some mammalian cell lines which form poorly defined or 'fuzzy' colonies, typified by glioma or fibroblast cell lines. A computer-vision-based automated colony counter is presented in this paper. It utilizes novel imaging and image-processing methods involving a modified form of the Hough transform. The automated counter is able to identify less-discrete cell colonies typical of these cell lines. The results of automated colony counting are compared with those from four manual (human) colony counts for the cell lines HT29, A172, U118 and IN1265. The results from the automated counts fall well within the distribution of the manual counts for all four cell lines with respect to surviving fraction (SF) versus dose curves, SF values at 2 Gy (SF2) and total area under the SF curve (Dbar). From the variation in the counts, it is shown that the automated counts are generally more consistent than the manual counts. PMID:11197679

  16. Automated counting of mammalian cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Paul R.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Kelly, Jane; Mayes, Catherine R.; Boulton, Peter; Woodcock, Michael; Joiner, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the effect of low-dose radiation exposure on cells using assays of colony-forming ability requires large cell samples to maintain statistical accuracy. Manually counting the resulting colonies is a laborious task in which consistent objectivity is hard to achieve. This is true especially with some mammalian cell lines which form poorly defined or `fuzzy' colonies, typified by glioma or fibroblast cell lines. A computer-vision-based automated colony counter is presented in this paper. It utilizes novel imaging and image-processing methods involving a modified form of the Hough transform. The automated counter is able to identify less-discrete cell colonies typical of these cell lines. The results of automated colony counting are compared with those from four manual (human) colony counts for the cell lines HT29, A172, U118 and IN1265. The results from the automated counts fall well within the distribution of the manual counts for all four cell lines with respect to surviving fraction (SF) versus dose curves, SF values at 2 Gy (SF2) and total area under the SF curve (Dbar). From the variation in the counts, it is shown that the automated counts are generally more consistent than the manual counts.

  17. Trapping cells in paper for white blood cell count.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Jianhao; Wu, Hong; Ying, Jackie Y

    2015-07-15

    White blood cell count is an important indicator of each individual's health condition. An abnormal white blood cell count usually results from an infection, cancer, or other conditions that trigger systemic inflammation responses. White blood cell count also provides predictive information on the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes. Therefore, monitoring white blood cell count on a regular basis can potentially help individuals to take preventive measures and improve healthcare outcomes. Currently, white blood cell count is primarily conducted in centralized laboratories, and it requires specialized equipment and dedicated personnel to perform the test and interpret the results. So far there has been no rapid test that allows white blood cell count in low-resource settings. In this study, we have demonstrated a vertical flow platform that quantifies white blood cells by trapping them in the paper. White blood cells were tagged with gold nanoparticles, and flowed through the paper via a small orifice. The white blood cell count was determined by measuring the colorimetric intensity of gold nanoparticles on the surface of white blood cells that were trapped in the paper mesh. Using this platform, we were able to quantify white blood cells in 15 μL of blood, and visually differentiate the abnormal count of white blood cells from the normal count. The proposed platform enabled rapid white blood cell count in low resource settings with a small sample volume requirement. Its low-cost, instrument-free operations would be attractive for point-of-care applications. PMID:25721975

  18. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  19. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  20. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  1. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  2. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  3. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis with a very high leukocyte count in ascitic fluid caused by Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Tarek; Khoury, Safie; Veitsman, Ella; Baruch, Yaacov; Raz-Pasteur, Ayelet

    2013-01-01

    We report on a case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) due to Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) in an elderly patient with alcoholic cirrhosis. The patient presented with a 5 day history of fever, cough, and fatigue. Abdominal paracentesis revealed a very high neutrophil count (134,800 cells/μL). Secondary peritonitis and abdominal abscess were ruled out. Peritoneal fluid culture displayed the growth of H. influenzae. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone and showed signs of improvement. Eventually, the patient died due to septic shock caused by other organisms. H. influenzae is a very rare cause of SBP. This case report demonstrates that (1) H. influenzae should be considered a potential cause of SBP, and (2) a very high leukocyte count in ascitic fluid can be found in patients with SBP. PMID:23983486

  4. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  5. Photon Counts Statistics in Leukocyte Cell Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, Eduard; van der Greef, Jan; van Wijk, Roeland

    2011-12-01

    In the present experiment ultra-weak photon emission/ chemiluminescence from isolated neutrophils was recorded. It is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the "respiratory burst" process which can be activated by PMA (Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate). Commonly, the reaction is demonstrated utilizing the enhancer luminol. However, with the use of highly sensitive photomultiplier equipment it is also recorded without enhancer. In that case, it can be hypothesized that photon count statistics may assist in understanding the underlying metabolic activity and cooperation of these cells. To study this hypothesis leukocytes were stimulated with PMA and increased photon signals were recorded in the quasi stable period utilizing Fano factor analysis at different window sizes. The Fano factor is defined by the variance over the mean of the number of photon within the observation time. The analysis demonstrated that the Fano factor of true signal and not of the surrogate signals obtained by random shuffling increases when the window size increased. It is concluded that photon count statistics, in particular Fano factor analysis, provides information regarding leukocyte interactions. It opens the perspective to utilize this analytical procedure in (in vivo) inflammation research. However, this needs further validation.

  6. Smart and Fast Blood Counting of Trace Volumes of Body Fluids from Various Mammalian Species Using a Compact, Custom-Built Microscope Cytometer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tingjuan; Smith, Zachary J; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Carrade Holt, Danielle; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Dwyre, Denis M; Hood, James; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    We report an accurate method to count red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells, as well as to determine hemoglobin in the blood of humans, horses, dogs, cats, and cows. Red and white blood cell counts can also be performed on human body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and peritoneal fluid. The approach consists of using a compact, custom-built microscope to record large field-of-view, bright-field, and fluorescence images of samples that are stained with a single dye and using automatic algorithms to count blood cells and detect hemoglobin. The total process takes about 15 min, including 5 min for sample preparation, and 10 min for data collection and analysis. The minimum volume of blood needed for the test is 0.5 ?L, which allows for minimally invasive sample collection such as using a finger prick rather than a venous draw. Blood counts were compared to gold-standard automated clinical instruments, with excellent agreement between the two methods as determined by a Bland-Altman analysis. Accuracy of counts on body fluids was consistent with hand counting by a trained clinical lab scientist, where our instrument demonstrated an approximately 100-fold lower limit of detection compared to current automated methods. The combination of a compact, custom-built instrument, simple sample collection and preparation, and automated analysis demonstrates that this approach could benefit global health through use in low-resource settings where central hematology laboratories are not accessible. PMID:26496235

  7. Counting and determining the viability of cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Richard; Phelan, Katy

    2008-01-01

    Determining the number of cells in culture is important in standardization of culture conditions and in performing accurate quantitation experiments. A hemacytometer is a thick glass slide with a central area designed as a counting chamber. Cell suspension is applied to a defined area and counted so cell density can be calculated. PMID:19066550

  8. Method of detecting and counting bacteria in body fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A novel method is reported for determining bacterial levels in urine samples, which method depends on the quantitative determination of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the presence of non-bacterial ATP. After the removal of non-bacterial ATP, the bacterial ATP is released by cell rupture and is measured by an enzymatic bioluminescent assay using an enzyme obtained from the firefly.

  9. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  10. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  12. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  13. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  14. Fluid Flow in Cell Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Cheng, Eric; Ahmadi, Ali; Cheung, Karen; Stoeber, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Inkjet drop-on-demand (DOD) dispensing of cells has numerous applications including cell-based assays and tissue engineering. In our experiments, using a transparent inkjet nozzle, high speed camera, and a shadowgraphy technique, we have observed three different characteristic cell behaviors during droplet ejection: 1) traveling toward the nozzle tip, 2) ejection from the nozzle, and 3) reflection away from the nozzle tip, where the reflection is an unwanted effect which contributes to the unpredictability of current cell printing systems. To understand the reflection mechanisms, we use numerical simulation to resolve the fluid motion inside the nozzle in presence of a cell during drop formation. For this purpose an adaptive finite volume method is employed. To track the interfaces (cell-liquid, gas-liquid) a volume of fluid (VOF) method is used, where the cell is modeled as an immiscible fluid droplet with different physical properties from the suspending fluid. It is shown that after a short period of time, a recirculation zone close to the nozzle tip is generated due to droplet pinch-off. This causes a reverse flow (velocity away from the nozzle) in the center of the nozzle. This dynamic flow field inside the nozzle causes a cell to show one of the three behaviors described above depending on its initial position. Moreover, it is shown that, depending on the size, deformability, and location of the cell, the drop formation process may be influenced.

  15. The cytospin technique improves the detection of calcium pyrophosphate crystals in synovial fluid samples with a low leukocyte count.

    PubMed

    Robier, Christoph; Quehenberger, Franz; Neubauer, Manfred; Stettin, Mariana; Rainer, Franz

    2014-06-01

    In synovial fluids (SF) with low leukocyte or/and crystal counts, important features may be missed, if exclusively smears are examined by polarized microscopy. That may be overcome by cytocentrifuges, which use low-speed centrifugal force to concentrate cells onto a glass slide and thus enhance the number of cells per high power field (HPF). We compared the calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystal counts in cytospin preparations with those in common smears of SF. The number of CPP crystals was counted in 50 SF samples by polarized microscopy, and statistical comparisons of the mean values of the cytospin and smear preparations were performed using the Wilcoxon test. The reproducibility within the slides of the cytocentrifuge and smear samples was determined by Spearman's rank correlation. The crystal counts were significantly higher in the cytospin than in the smear preparations (median 96/10 HPF vs. 2.5/10 HPF, p < 0.0001). The correlation in the crystal count between the slides 1 and 2 was significantly higher within the cytocentrifuge than in the smear group (0.97 vs. 0.73, p = 0.0004). CPP-negative cytospin preparations in initially smear-positive slides were not observed. We confirmed that the cytospin technique significantly enhances the number of examinable crystals per HPF, compared to common smears. PMID:23388697

  16. Somatic cell counts: associated factors and relationship to production.

    PubMed Central

    Salsberg, E; Meek, A H; Martin, S W

    1984-01-01

    Factors affecting somatic cell counts and the association between somatic cell counts and milk production were evaluated. Data were collected from 748 Ontario Dairy Herd Improvement Corporation supervised herds that were on production and somatic cell count programs between April 1981 and March 1983. Two data files were created; one, the lactation summary file, contained one record per cow on each of 9406 Holsteins and the other, the test day file, included results of all tests during the complete lactation on each of the above cows. The latter file contained 85,236 records. Multiple curvilinear least squares regression was used to create five separate models. The dependent variables used in the models were natural logarithms (Loge) of the geometric mean of the somatic cell count for the lactation, 305 day milk production and breed class average for milk from the lactation summary file, and loge of the 24 hour somatic cell count and 24 hour milk production from the test day file. The somatic cell count at both the lactation and test day level increased with age up to approximately ten years and thereafter slowly decreased. The variable "days in milk" was not significantly associated with the lactation average somatic cell count. A curvilinear relationship was found between days in lactation at the time of test and the somatic cell count of 24 hour milk production. The somatic cell count increased until approximately 250 days in lactation and thereafter slowly decreased. It was found that the highest cell counts occurred in summer and the lowest in winter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6478296

  17. Amniotic fluid lamellar body count as a novel biochemical marker for timing elective caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Kart, C; Guven, S; Guvendag Guven, E S; Armangil, D; Mentese, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of amniotic fluid lamellar body count (LBC) on the timing of elective caesarean delivery (CS) at ? 39 weeks. After allocating the study group (group I, transient tachypnoea of newborn (TTN), n = 14), an age-matched control group (group II, no TTN, n = 79) was selected for amniotic fluid LBC analysis. The median amniotic fluid LBC levels in group I were significantly lower than in the control group. Furthermore, the median values of mean lamellar body volume, median lamellar body distribution width and lamellar bodycrit in group I were also significantly lower than in group II. The best amniotic fluid LBC value to predict TTN was 40.15 10(3)/?l, with 82.3% sensitivity and 64.3% specificity. The favourable sensitivity and specificity values to predict the TTN for amniotic fluid LBC may suggest using it as an elective caesarean delivery-time scheduling marker. PMID:25383563

  18. CD4 Cell Count: Declining Value for Antiretroviral Therapy Eligibility.

    PubMed

    Ying, Roger; Granich, Reuben M; Gupta, Somya; Williams, Brian G

    2016-04-15

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) policy for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has historically been based on clinical indications, such as opportunistic infections and CD4 cell counts. Studies suggest that CD4 counts early in HIV infection do not predict relevant public health outcomes such as disease progression, mortality, and HIV transmission in people living with HIV. CD4 counts also vary widely within individuals and among populations, leading to imprecise measurements and arbitrary ART initiation. To capture the clinical and preventive benefits of treatment, the global HIV response now focuses on increasing HIV diagnosis and ART coverage. CD4 counts for ART initiation were necessary when medications were expensive and had severe side effects, and when the impact of early ART initiation was unclear. However, current evidence suggests that although CD4 counts may still play a role in guiding clinical care to start prophylaxis for opportunistic infections, CD4 counts should cease to be required for ART initiation. PMID:26826372

  19. HIV-1 outcompetes HIV-2 in dually infected Senegalese individuals with low CD4+ cell counts

    PubMed Central

    Raugi, Dana N.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Sow, Papa S.; Toure, Macoumba; Sall, Fatima; Gaye, Awa; Ndoye, Ibra; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dual infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2, which is not uncommon in West Africa, has implications for transmission, progression, and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Few studies have examined viral dynamics in this setting. Our objective was to directly compare HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads and to examine whether this relationship is associated with CD4+ cell count. Study design This is a retrospective analysis of data from observational cohort studies. Methods We compared HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads from 65 dually infected, ART-naive Senegalese individuals. Participants provided blood, oral fluid, and cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) or semen samples for virologic and immunologic testing. We assessed relationships between HIV-1 and HIV-2 levels using linear regression with generalized estimating equations to account for multiple study visits. Results After adjusting for CD4+ cell count, age, sex, and commercial sex work, HIV-1 RNA levels were significantly higher than HIV-2 levels in semen, CVL, and oral fluids. Despite similar peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA levels among individuals with CD4+ cell counts above 500 cells/l, individuals with CD4+ cell counts below 500 cells/l had higher HIV-1 and lower HIV-2 DNA levels. Individuals with high CD4+ cell counts had higher mean HIV-1 plasma RNA viral loads than HIV-2, with HIV-1 levels significantly higher and HIV-2 levels trending toward lower mean viral loads among individuals with low CD4+ cell counts. Conclusion Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that with disease progression, HIV-1 outcompetes HIV-2 in dually infected individuals. This finding helps explain differences in prevalence and outcomes between HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-dual infection. PMID:23665777

  20. Somatic cells count in cow's bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Olechnowicz, Jan; Ja?kowski, Jedrzej M

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was therefore to present factors affecting somatic cell counts in bovine bulk milk as a result of intramammary infections as well as non-infectious factors. The paper presents also the impact of on-farm management practices on the level of bulk milk somatic cell counts and presents quality indicators in bulk tank milk. At the farm level bulk milk bacterial infection takes place through three main sources: bacterial contamination from the external surface of the udder and teats, from the surface of the milking equipment, and from mastitis microorganisms within the udder. The threshold of 200,000 cells/ml identifies bacteriological negative quarters of the udder. The counts of mammary pathogens in bulk tank milk are relatively low, on average not exceeding 1,000 cfu/ml. Environmental pathogens predominate in bulk tank milk samples with somatic cells count <300 10(3) ml. PMID:22230979

  1. Sample to answer visualization pipeline for low-cost point-of-care blood cell counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne; Naidoo, Thegaran; Davies, Emlyn; Fourie, Louis; Nxumalo, Zandile; Swart, Hein; Marais, Philip; Land, Kevin; Roux, Pieter

    2015-03-01

    We present a visualization pipeline from sample to answer for point-of-care blood cell counting applications. Effective and low-cost point-of-care medical diagnostic tests provide developing countries and rural communities with accessible healthcare solutions [1], and can be particularly beneficial for blood cell count tests, which are often the starting point in the process of diagnosing a patient [2]. The initial focus of this work is on total white and red blood cell counts, using a microfluidic cartridge [3] for sample processing. Analysis of the processed samples has been implemented by means of two main optical visualization systems developed in-house: 1) a fluidic operation analysis system using high speed video data to determine volumes, mixing efficiency and flow rates, and 2) a microscopy analysis system to investigate homogeneity and concentration of blood cells. Fluidic parameters were derived from the optical flow [4] as well as color-based segmentation of the different fluids using a hue-saturation-value (HSV) color space. Cell count estimates were obtained using automated microscopy analysis and were compared to a widely accepted manual method for cell counting using a hemocytometer [5]. The results using the first iteration microfluidic device [3] showed that the most simple - and thus low-cost - approach for microfluidic component implementation was not adequate as compared to techniques based on manual cell counting principles. An improved microfluidic design has been developed to incorporate enhanced mixing and metering components, which together with this work provides the foundation on which to successfully implement automated, rapid and low-cost blood cell counting tests.

  2. Protein Counting in Single Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Stephanie M; Walter, Stephanie R; Manesse, Mael; Walt, David R

    2016-03-01

    The cell is the basic unit of biology and protein expression drives cellular function. Tracking protein expression in single cells enables the study of cellular pathways and behavior but requires methodologies sensitive enough to detect low numbers of protein molecules with a wide dynamic range to distinguish unique cells and quantify population distributions. This study presents an ultrasensitive and automated approach for quantifying phenotypic responses with single cell resolution using single molecule array (SiMoA) technology. We demonstrate how prostate specific antigen (PSA) expression varies over several orders of magnitude between single prostate cancer cells and how PSA expression shifts with genetic drift. Single cell SiMoA introduces a straightforward process that is capable of detecting both high and low protein expression levels. This technique could be useful for understanding fundamental biology and may eventually enable both earlier disease detection and targeted therapy. PMID:26813414

  3. A system for counting fetal and maternal red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ji; Gong, Zheng; Chen, Jun; Liu, Jun; Nguyen, John; Yang, Zongyi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Kleihauer-Betke (KB) test is the standard method for quantitating fetal-maternal hemorrhage in maternal care. In hospitals, the KB test is performed by a certified technologist to count a minimum of 2000 fetal and maternal red blood cells (RBCs) on a blood smear. Manual counting suffers from inherent inconsistency and unreliability. This paper describes a system for automated counting and distinguishing fetal and maternal RBCs on clinical KB slides. A custom-adapted hardware platform is used for KB slide scanning and image capturing. Spatial-color pixel classification with spectral clustering is proposed to separate overlapping cells. Optimal clustering number and total cell number are obtained through maximizing cluster validity index. To accurately identify fetal RBCs from maternal RBCs, multiple features including cell size, roundness, gradient, and saturation difference between cell and whole slide are used in supervised learning to generate feature vectors, to tackle cell color, shape, and contrast variations across clinical KB slides. The results show that the automated system is capable of completing the counting of over 60,000 cells (versus ∼2000 by technologists) within 5 min (versus ∼15 min by technologists). The throughput is improved by approximately 90 times compared to manual reading by technologists. The counting results are highly accurate and correlate strongly with those from benchmarking flow cytometry measurement. PMID:24879644

  4. Development of a stained cell nuclei counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timilsina, Niranjan; Moffatt, Christopher; Okada, Kazunori

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel cell counting system which exploits the Fast Radial Symmetry Transformation (FRST) algorithm [1]. The driving force behind our system is a research on neurogenesis in the intact nervous system of Manduca Sexta or the Tobacco Hornworm, which was being studied to assess the impact of age, food and environment on neurogenesis. The varying thickness of the intact nervous system in this species often yields images with inhomogeneous background and inconsistencies such as varying illumination, variable contrast, and irregular cell size. For automated counting, such inhomogeneity and inconsistencies must be addressed, which no existing work has done successfully. Thus, our goal is to devise a new cell counting algorithm for the images with non-uniform background. Our solution adapts FRST: a computer vision algorithm which is designed to detect points of interest on circular regions such as human eyes. This algorithm enhances the occurrences of the stained-cell nuclei in 2D digital images and negates the problems caused by their inhomogeneity. Besides FRST, our algorithm employs standard image processing methods, such as mathematical morphology and connected component analysis. We have evaluated the developed cell counting system with fourteen digital images of Tobacco Hornworm's nervous system collected for this study with ground-truth cell counts by biology experts. Experimental results show that our system has a minimum error of 1.41% and mean error of 16.68% which is at least forty-four percent better than the algorithm without FRST.

  5. Single proton counting at the RIKEN cell irradiation facility.

    PubMed

    Mckel, V; Puttaraksa, N; Kobayashi, T; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-08-01

    We present newly developed tapered capillaries with a scintillator window, which enable us to count single protons at the RIKEN cell irradiation setup. Their potential for performing single proton irradiation experiments at our beamline setup is demonstrated with CR39 samples, showing a single proton detection fidelity of 98%. PMID:26329229

  6. Somatic cell counts in bovine milk: relationships to production and clinical episodes of mastitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, I R; Meek, A H; Martin, S W

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between somatic cell counts, milk production and episodes of clinical mastitis were evaluated using data collected between 1979 and 1981 in 32 southern Ontario Holstein herds. Somatic cell counts were logarithmically transformed and the distribution of the resulting counts is presented. The seasonal pattern in cell counts was evaluated using a formal statistical procedure. Counts were lowest in the winter and spring and highest in the early fall but the differences amongst monthly geometric mean cell counts were small. Assuming a linear relationship between log somatic cell counts and test day milk production it was found that a unit increase in the log count resulted in a loss of 1.44 kg of milk. Regression analyses within specific log cell count ranges indicated that the previous estimate may underestimate losses at low cell counts and overestimate losses at higher cell counts. The relationships between cell counts and episodes of mild or acute clinical mastitis were evaluated by comparing counts preceding and following the clinical episodes to comparable counts in matched control cows. Mild cases of mastitis were preceded by higher cell counts than were found in control cows but the same phenomenon was not observed in acute cases of mastitis. Both mild and acute cases were followed by higher cell counts than were found in control cows. PMID:6722642

  7. Acid-Fast Staining and Petroff Hausser Chamber Counting of Mycobacterial Cells in Liquid Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Treuer, Robin; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and rapid cell counts of mycobacterial species in culture are difficult to obtain. Here, a method using modified Kinyoun acid-fast staining was adapted for use with a Petroff-Hausser sperm and bacteria cell counting chamber by using a liquid suspension staining technique. Cell counts obtained by this method were compared to viable cell counts by agar plate counting, revealing accurate correlation. PMID:21400674

  8. Laser rastering flow cytometry: fast cell counting and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacca, G.; Junnarkar, M. R.; Goldblatt, N. R.; Yee, M. W.; Van Slyke, B. M.; Briese, T. C.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the concept of laser rastering flow cytometry, where a rapidly scanning laser beam allows counting and classification of cells at much higher rates than currently possible. Modifications to existing flow cytometers to implement the concept include an acousto-optic deflector, fast analog-to-digital conversion, and a two-step digital-signal-processing scheme that handles the high data rates and provides key assay information. Results are shown that prove the concept, demonstrating the ability to resolve closely spaced cells and to measure cells at rates more than an order of magnitude faster than on conventional flow-cytometer-based hematology analyzers.

  9. Metabolic activity of bacterial cells enumerated by direct viable count

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporating radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included (methyl-tritium thymidine or (Uranium-Carbon 14) glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate.

  10. An optical counting technique with vertical hydrodynamic focusing for biological cells.

    PubMed

    Chiavaroli, Stefano; Newport, David; Woulfe, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    A BARRIER IN SCALING LABORATORY PROCESSES INTO AUTOMATED MICROFLUIDIC DEVICES HAS BEEN THE TRANSFER OF LABORATORY BASED ASSAYS: Where engineering meets biological protocol. One basic requirement is to reliably and accurately know the distribution and number of biological cells being dispensed. In this study, a novel optical counting technique to efficiently quantify the number of cells flowing into a microtube is presented. REH, B-lymphoid precursor leukemia, are stained with a fluorescent dye and frames of moving cells are recorded using a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The basic principle is to calculate the total fluorescence intensity of the image and to divide it by the average intensity of a single cell. This method allows counting the number of cells with an uncertainty +/-5%, which compares favorably to the standard biological methodology, based on the manual Trypan Blue assay, which is destructive to the cells and presents an uncertainty in the order of 20%. The use of a microdevice for vertical hydrodynamic focusing, which can reduce the background noise of out of focus cells by concentrating the cells in a thin layer, has further improved the technique. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation and confocal laser scanning microscopy images have shown an 82% reduction in the vertical displacement of the cells. For the flow rates imposed during this study, a throughput of 100-200 cellss is achieved. PMID:20697579

  11. Cell detection and counting through cell lysate impedance spectroscopy in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Liu, Yi-shao; Irimia, Daniel; Demirci, Utkan; Yang, Liju; Zamir, Lee; Rodrguez, William R.; Toner, Mehmet; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based microfluidic devices have attracted interest for a wide range of applications. While optical cell counting and flow cytometry-type devices have been reported extensively, sensitive and efficient non-optical methods to detect and quantify cells attached over large surface areas within microdevices are generally lacking. We describe an electrical method for counting cells based on the measurement of changes in conductivity of the surrounding medium due to ions released from surface-immobilized cells within a microfluidic channel. Immobilized cells are lysed using a low conductivity, hypotonic media and the resulting change in impedance is measured using surface patterned electrodes to detect and quantify the number of cells. We found that the bulk solution conductance increases linearly with the number of isolated cells contributing to solution ion concentration. The method of cell lysate impedance spectroscopy is sensitive enough to detect 20 cells ?L1, and offers a simple and efficient method for detecting and enumerating cells within microfluidic devices for many applications including measurement of CD4 cell counts in HIV patients in resource-limited settings. To our knowledge, this is the most sensitive approach using non-optical setups to enumerate immobilized cells. The microfluidic device, capable of isolating specific cell types from a complex bio-fluidic and quantifying cell number, can serve as a single use cartridge for a hand-held instrument to provide simple, fast and affordable cell counting in point-of-care settings. PMID:17538717

  12. Gravitational clustering of galaxies: Distribution of galaxy counts in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yin

    1990-09-01

    The probability distribution of galaxy counts in cells has been emphasized recently as an important statistical measure of galaxy clustering since it contains information on correlation functions of all orders. A simple analytic formula for this distribution has been proposed by Saslaw and Hamilton from the view point of gravitational thermodynamics considered for a statistically homogeneous and isotropic gravitating system (the universe) of identical particles (galaxies). It appears that gravitational thermodynamic theory may not account for the accuracy of Saslaw and Hamilton's formula, as found numerically by N-body simulations. The intriguing problem of why the formula is so accurate is at least partially resolved by showing that the formula is consistent with all the relevant predictions of gravitational clustering theory. Comparison of the formula with the observations suggests that galaxy clustering is mainly an inevitable consequence of gravitational instability occurring in a statistically homogeneous and isotropic gravitating system started with a zero or small peculiar velocity field and a random or nearly random spatial distribution of galaxies. Saslaw and Hamilton's formula has also been reported to be sufficient for describing counts of galaxy clusters in cells. This is consistent with the usual hierarchical clustering scenario in which galaxy clusters formed from galaxies as bound dynamical entities and started to cluster under their mutual gravitational attractions with essentially the same initial conditions as galaxies. It is shown that the observed mass function of galaxy clusters is also consistent with such a clustering scenario.

  13. WBC count

    MedlinePLUS

    Leukocyte count; White blood cell count ... is 4,500 to 10,000 white blood cells per microliter (mcL). Normal value ranges may vary ... LOW WHITE BLOOD CELL (WBC) COUNT A low number of WBCs is called leukopenia. A WBC count below 4500 is below normal One ...

  14. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify L. pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoebae hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 134...

  15. CELLCOUNTER: Novel Open-Source Software for Counting Cell Migration and Invasion In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongshun; Zhu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Transwell Boyden chamber based migration/invasion assay is a simple and extensively used approach for the characterization of cell motility in vitro. Cell motility is quantified by counting the number of cells that pass through the filter membrane. The counting is usually performed manually, which is laborious and error prone. We have therefore developed CELLCOUNTER, an application that is capable of recognizing and counting the total number of cells through an intuitive graphical user interface. The counting can be performed in batch, and the counting results can be visualized and further curated manually. CELLCOUNTER will be helpful in streamlining the experimental process and improving the reliability of the data acquisition. PMID:25054152

  16. Combined use of alphafetoprotein and amniotic fluid cell morphology in early prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Gosden, C; Brock, D J

    1978-01-01

    The combined use of alphafetoprotein (AFP) measurement and amniotic fluid cell morphology was assessed in 217 pregnancies with normal outcome (including 12 where an anterior placenta was traversed), and 52 where there was a fetal defect (25 cases of anencephaly, 21 of open spina bifida, 2 of exomphalos, 2 of urogenital atresia, and 2 of intrauterine death). In each case maternal serum and amniotic fluid AFP was measured. Total, viable, and rapidly adherent cells were counted and amniotic fluid cell morphology was examined. On the basis of this experience a scheme is suggested for more precise antenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities. Images PMID:81877

  17. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  18. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  19. Application of a non-hazardous vital dye for cell counting with automated cell counters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo In; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Ho-Jae; Lee, Kiwon; Hong, Dongpyo; Lim, Hyunchang; Cho, Keunchang; Jung, Neoncheol; Yi, Yong Weon

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in automated cell counters enable us to count cells more easily with consistency. However, the wide use of the traditional vital dye trypan blue (TB) raises environmental and health concerns due to its potential teratogenic effects. To avoid this chemical hazard, it is of importance to introduce an alternative non-hazardous vital dye that is compatible with automated cell counters. Erythrosin B (EB) is a vital dye that is impermeable to biological membranes and is used as a food additive. Similarly to TB, EB stains only nonviable cells with disintegrated membranes. However, EB is less popular than TB and is seldom used with automated cell counters. We found that cell counting accuracy with EB was comparable to that with TB. EB was found to be an effective dye for accurate counting of cells with different viabilities across three different automated cell counters. In contrast to TB, EB was less toxic to cultured HL-60cells during the cell counting process. These results indicate that replacing TB with EB for use with automated cell counters will significantly reduce the hazardous risk while producing comparable results. PMID:26399556

  20. CD117+ amniotic fluid stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cananzi, Mara; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Broadly multipotent stem cells can be isolated from amniotic fluid by selection for the expression of the membrane stem cell factor receptor c-Kit, a common marker for multipotential stem cells. They have clonogenic capability and can be directed into a wide range of cell types representing the three primary embryonic lineages. Amniotic fluid stem cells maintained for over 250 population doublings retained long telomeres and a normal karyotype. Clonal human lines verified by retroviral marking were induced to differentiate into cell types representing each embryonic germ layer, including cells of adipogenic, osteogenic, myogenic, endothelial, neuronal and hepatic lineages. AFS cells could be differentiate toward cardiomyogenic lineages, when co-cultured with neonatal cardiomyocytes, and have the potential to generate myogenic and hematopoietic lineages both in vitro and in vivo. Very recently first trimester AFS cells could be reprogrammed without any genetic manipulation opening new possibilities in the field of fetal/neonatal therapy and disease modeling. In this review we are aiming to summarize the knowledge on amniotic fluid stem cells and highlight the most promising results. PMID:23037870

  1. A method to estimate the somatic cell count of milk from a mastitic quarter using composite somatic cell count.

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, M C

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the extent to which one quarter could be inflamed relative to the other three quarters of a cow, given that knowledge only of the composite milk somatic cell count (SCC) was available. An algebraic relationship, which incorporated the parameters of composite milk SCC, production loss associated with composite milk SSC, SCC of milk from an inflamed quarter, and SCC from three non-inflamed quarters, was used to derive hypothetical estimates of the SCC in one inflamed quarter. A simple case was considered in which one quarter was mastitic, the SCC in milk of the noninflamed quarters was equal, and there was no production compensation by the noninflamed quarters. Previously published estimates were used for production loss associated with composite milk SCC. For moderate composite milk SCC (300,000-500,000 cells/mL) and low-to-moderate SCC in milk of noninflamed quarters (100,000 cells/mL), the SCC of milk from one inflamed quarter was predicted to be very high, ranging from about 1.26 million (log10 SCC = 6.1) to 6.3 million (log10 SCC = 6.8) cells/mL, and compatible with signs of clinical mastitis. These results suggest that in order to screen cows with clinical mastitis in only one quarter, composite milk SCC should be considerably lower than values presented previously by other investigators. PMID:2306671

  2. Determination of mammalian cell counts, cell size and cell health using the Moxi Z mini automated cell counter.

    PubMed

    Dittami, Gregory M; Sethi, Manju; Rabbitt, Richard D; Ayliffe, H Edward

    2012-01-01

    Particle and cell counting is used for a variety of applications including routine cell culture, hematological analysis, and industrial controls(1-5). A critical breakthrough in cell/particle counting technologies was the development of the Coulter technique by Wallace Coulter over 50 years ago. The technique involves the application of an electric field across a micron-sized aperture and hydrodynamically focusing single particles through the aperture. The resulting occlusion of the aperture by the particles yields a measurable change in electric impedance that can be directly and precisely correlated to cell size/volume. The recognition of the approach as the benchmark in cell/particle counting stems from the extraordinary precision and accuracy of its particle sizing and counts, particularly as compared to manual and imaging based technologies (accuracies on the order of 98% for Coulter counters versus 75-80% for manual and vision-based systems). This can be attributed to the fact that, unlike imaging-based approaches to cell counting, the Coulter Technique makes a true three-dimensional (3-D) measurement of cells/particles which dramatically reduces count interference from debris and clustering by calculating precise volumetric information about the cells/particles. Overall this provides a means for enumerating and sizing cells in a more accurate, less tedious, less time-consuming, and less subjective means than other counting techniques(6). Despite the prominence of the Coulter technique in cell counting, its widespread use in routine biological studies has been prohibitive due to the cost and size of traditional instruments. Although a less expensive Coulter-based instrument has been produced, it has limitations as compared to its more expensive counterparts in the correction for "coincidence events" in which two or more cells pass through the aperture and are measured simultaneously. Another limitation with existing Coulter technologies is the lack of metrics on the overall health of cell samples. Consequently, additional techniques must often be used in conjunction with Coulter counting to assess cell viability. This extends experimental setup time and cost since the traditional methods of viability assessment require cell staining and/or use of expensive and cumbersome equipment such as a flow cytometer. The Moxi Z mini automated cell counter, described here, is an ultra-small benchtop instrument that combines the accuracy of the Coulter Principle with a thin-film sensor technology to enable precise sizing and counting of particles ranging from 3-25 microns, depending on the cell counting cassette used. The M type cassette can be used to count particles from with average diameters of 4 - 25 microns (dynamic range 2 - 34 microns), and the Type S cassette can be used to count particles with and average diameter of 3 - 20 microns (dynamic range 2 - 26 microns). Since the system uses a volumetric measurement method, the 4-25 microns corresponds to a cell volume range of 34 - 8,180 fL and the 3 - 20 microns corresponds to a cell volume range of 14 - 4200 fL, which is relevant when non-spherical particles are being measured. To perform mammalian cell counts using the Moxi Z, the cells to be counted are first diluted with ORFLO or similar diluent. A cell counting cassette is inserted into the instrument, and the sample is loaded into the port of the cassette. Thousands of cells are pulled, single-file through a "Cell Sensing Zone" (CSZ) in the thin-film membrane over 8-15 seconds. Following the run, the instrument uses proprietary curve-fitting in conjunction with a proprietary software algorithm to provide coincidence event correction along with an assessment of overall culture health by determining the ratio of the number of cells in the population of interest to the total number of particles. The total particle counts include shrunken and broken down dead cells, as well as other debris and contaminants. The results are presented in histogram format with an automatic curve fit, with gates that can

  3. Determination of Mammalian Cell Counts, Cell Size and Cell Health Using the Moxi Z Mini Automated Cell Counter

    PubMed Central

    Dittami, Gregory M.; Sethi, Manju; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Ayliffe, H. Edward

    2012-01-01

    Particle and cell counting is used for a variety of applications including routine cell culture, hematological analysis, and industrial controls1-5. A critical breakthrough in cell/particle counting technologies was the development of the Coulter technique by Wallace Coulter over 50 years ago. The technique involves the application of an electric field across a micron-sized aperture and hydrodynamically focusing single particles through the aperture. The resulting occlusion of the aperture by the particles yields a measurable change in electric impedance that can be directly and precisely correlated to cell size/volume. The recognition of the approach as the benchmark in cell/particle counting stems from the extraordinary precision and accuracy of its particle sizing and counts, particularly as compared to manual and imaging based technologies (accuracies on the order of 98% for Coulter counters versus 75-80% for manual and vision-based systems). This can be attributed to the fact that, unlike imaging-based approaches to cell counting, the Coulter Technique makes a true three-dimensional (3-D) measurement of cells/particles which dramatically reduces count interference from debris and clustering by calculating precise volumetric information about the cells/particles. Overall this provides a means for enumerating and sizing cells in a more accurate, less tedious, less time-consuming, and less subjective means than other counting techniques6. Despite the prominence of the Coulter technique in cell counting, its widespread use in routine biological studies has been prohibitive due to the cost and size of traditional instruments. Although a less expensive Coulter-based instrument has been produced, it has limitations as compared to its more expensive counterparts in the correction for "coincidence events" in which two or more cells pass through the aperture and are measured simultaneously. Another limitation with existing Coulter technologies is the lack of metrics on the overall health of cell samples. Consequently, additional techniques must often be used in conjunction with Coulter counting to assess cell viability. This extends experimental setup time and cost since the traditional methods of viability assessment require cell staining and/or use of expensive and cumbersome equipment such as a flow cytometer. The Moxi Z mini automated cell counter, described here, is an ultra-small benchtop instrument that combines the accuracy of the Coulter Principle with a thin-film sensor technology to enable precise sizing and counting of particles ranging from 3-25 microns, depending on the cell counting cassette used. The M type cassette can be used to count particles from with average diameters of 4 - 25 microns (dynamic range 2 - 34 microns), and the Type S cassette can be used to count particles with and average diameter of 3 - 20 microns (dynamic range 2 - 26 microns). Since the system uses a volumetric measurement method, the 4-25 microns corresponds to a cell volume range of 34 - 8,180 fL and the 3 - 20 microns corresponds to a cell volume range of 14 - 4200 fL, which is relevant when non-spherical particles are being measured. To perform mammalian cell counts using the Moxi Z, the cells to be counted are first diluted with ORFLO or similar diluent. A cell counting cassette is inserted into the instrument, and the sample is loaded into the port of the cassette. Thousands of cells are pulled, single-file through a "Cell Sensing Zone" (CSZ) in the thin-film membrane over 8-15 seconds. Following the run, the instrument uses proprietary curve-fitting in conjunction with a proprietary software algorithm to provide coincidence event correction along with an assessment of overall culture health by determining the ratio of the number of cells in the population of interest to the total number of particles. The total particle counts include shrunken and broken down dead cells, as well as other debris and contaminants. The results are presented in histogram format with an automatic curve fit, with gates that can be adjusted manually as

  4. Image analysis for accurately counting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in human tissue.

    PubMed

    Diem, Kurt; Magaret, Amalia; Klock, Alexis; Jin, Lei; Zhu, Jia; Corey, Lawrence

    2015-09-15

    In situ detection of specific cells offers a unique perspective on the spatial interactions between host immune cells and specific viral pathogens or cancers. Most immunohistochemistry techniques require manual cell counting on biopsied and fixed tissue sections. The availability of sophisticated software packages for analyzing fluorescently labeled tissue has made it possible to quickly and accurately quantitate the number of positive cells on such slides. Manual cell counting was compared to automatic cell counting using the program CellProfiler. The two techniques were used to count CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in human genital skin biopsies from herpesvirus type 2 (HSV-2) infected subjects. Manual counting and CellProfiler demonstrated high correlation both in cell counting as well as detection of immune cell "clustering" in tissue, an important visceral component of localized inflammation and characteristic of most chronic infections. Overall, CellProfiler is an effective and accurate method in addition to or replacement of manual cell counting of fluorescently labeled biopsies. PMID:26073660

  5. Significance of Maternal and Cord Blood Nucleated Red Blood Cell Count in Pregnancies Complicated by Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Misha, Mehak; Rai, Lavanya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effect of preeclampsia on the cord blood and maternal NRBC count and to correlate NRBC count and neonatal outcome in preeclampsia and control groups. Study Design. This is a prospective case control observational study. Patients and Methods. Maternal and cord blood NRBC counts were studied in 50 preeclamptic women and 50 healthy pregnant women. Using automated cell counter total leucocyte count was obtained and peripheral smear was prepared to obtain NRBC count. Corrected WBC count and NRBC count/100 leucocytes in maternal venous blood and in cord blood were compared between the 2 groups. Results. No significant differences were found in corrected WBC count in maternal and cord blood in cases and controls. Significant differences were found in mean cord blood NRBC count in preeclampsia and control groups (40.0 85.1 and 5.9 6.3, P = 0.006). The mean maternal NRBC count in two groups was 2.4 9.0 and 0.8 1.5, respectively (P = 0.214). Cord blood NRBC count cut off value ?13 could rule out adverse neonatal outcome with a sensitivity of 63% and specificity of 89%. Conclusion. Cord blood NRBC are significantly raised in preeclampsia. Neonates with elevated cord blood NRBC counts are more likely to have IUGR, low birth weight, neonatal ICU admission, respiratory distress syndrome, and assisted ventilation. Below the count of 13/100 leucocytes, adverse neonatal outcome is quite less likely. PMID:24734183

  6. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Ohlsen, D.; Kittleman, S.; Borhani, N.; Leslie, F.; Miller, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment performed visualizations of thermal convection in a rotating differentially heated spherical shell of fluid. In these experiments dielectric polarization forces are used to generate a radially directed buoyancy force. This enables the laboratory simulation of a number of geophysically and astrophysically important situations in which sphericity and rotation both impose strong constraints on global scale fluid motions. During USML-2 a large set of experiments with spherically symmetric heating were carried out. These enabled the determination of critical points for the transition to various forms of nonaxisymmetric convection and, for highly turbulent flows, the transition latitudes separating the different modes of motion. This paper presents a first analysis of these experiments as well as data on the general performance of the instrument during the USML-2 flight.

  7. A novel approach to automated cell counting for studying human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bandekar, Namrata; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David; Gorbet, Maud

    2011-01-01

    A novel automated cell counting technique for cell sample images used to study the side-effects of lens cleaning solutions on human corneal epithelial cells is developed. The proposed multi-step approach integrates non-maximum suppression, seeded region growing, connected component analysis, and adaptive thresholding to produce segmentation and classification results that are robust to background illumination variation and clustering of cells. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient, and experimental results show that the average detection rate of nucleated cells is greater than 90% with the proposed technique as opposed to the state-of-the-art level set method which gives an accuracy of less than 65%. PMID:22255706

  8. Counting White Blood Cells from a Blood Smear Using Fourier Ptychographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    White blood cell (WBC) count is a valuable metric for assisting with diagnosis or prognosis of various diseases such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, or infection. Counting WBCs can be done either manually or automatically. Automatic methods are capable of counting a large number of cells to give a statistically more accurate reading of the WBC count of a sample, but the specialized equipment tends to be expensive. Manual methods are inexpensive since they only involve a conventional light microscope setup. However, it is more laborious and error-prone because the small field-of-view (FOV) of the microscope necessitates mechanical scanning of a specimen for counting an adequate number of WBCs. Here, we investigate the use of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to bypass these issues of the manual methods. With a 2x objective, FPM can provide a FOV of 120 mm2 with enhanced resolution comparable to that of a 20x objective, which is adequate for non-differentially counting WBCs in just one FOV. A specialist was able to count the WBCs in FPM images with 100% accuracy compared to the count as determined from conventional microscope images. An automatic counting algorithm was also developed to identify WBCs from FPM’s captured images with 95% accuracy, paving the way for a cost-effective WBC counting setup with the advantages of both the automatic and manual counting methods. PMID:26186353

  9. Counting White Blood Cells from a Blood Smear Using Fourier Ptychographic Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jaebum; Ou, Xiaoze; Kulkarni, Rajan P; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    White blood cell (WBC) count is a valuable metric for assisting with diagnosis or prognosis of various diseases such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, or infection. Counting WBCs can be done either manually or automatically. Automatic methods are capable of counting a large number of cells to give a statistically more accurate reading of the WBC count of a sample, but the specialized equipment tends to be expensive. Manual methods are inexpensive since they only involve a conventional light microscope setup. However, it is more laborious and error-prone because the small field-of-view (FOV) of the microscope necessitates mechanical scanning of a specimen for counting an adequate number of WBCs. Here, we investigate the use of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to bypass these issues of the manual methods. With a 2x objective, FPM can provide a FOV of 120 mm2 with enhanced resolution comparable to that of a 20x objective, which is adequate for non-differentially counting WBCs in just one FOV. A specialist was able to count the WBCs in FPM images with 100% accuracy compared to the count as determined from conventional microscope images. An automatic counting algorithm was also developed to identify WBCs from FPM's captured images with 95% accuracy, paving the way for a cost-effective WBC counting setup with the advantages of both the automatic and manual counting methods. PMID:26186353

  10. Ten-year treatment outcomes including blood cell count disturbances in patients with simple renal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Bryniarski, Piotr; Kaletka, Zbigniew; ?yczkowski, Marcin; Prokopowicz, Grzegorz; Muska?a, Bartosz; Paradysz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Background The simple renal cyst is the most common benign kidney disease. It may cause pain and hypertension, especially if significantly enlarged. As in polycystic kidney disease, blood cell count disturbances are frequently observed in simple renal cysts. The aim of our study was to assess such disturbances, changes in blood pressure, and complication rate in our patients undergoing surgery due to simple renal cyst in the last 10 years. Material/Methods 210 patients with simple renal cysts were underwent surgery between 2002 and 2012. Two different kinds of operation were conducted: aspiration of cyst fluid with injection of sclerosing agent, and laparoscopic/retroperitoneoscopic decortications of the cyst wall. A control group comprised 134 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia. The following data were obtained: cyst burden, hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cells, thrombocytes, occurrence of pain, and blood pressure before and after the operation. Complications were collected and presented in Clavien score. Results Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and red blood cells were significantly increased in the experimental group. A positive correlation was observed between cyst burden and the parameters mentioned above. Of 91 patients with hypertension, 56 (61.7%) had blood pressure reduction after the operation. Treatment relieved the loin pain in 132 (88%) patients. Complications occurred in 15 (7.4%) patients. Conclusions Patients with simple renal cysts have high values of red blood cells, hematocrit, and hemoglobin. Treatment decreases blood pressure in patients with hypertension. Complications after treatment are rare and mild. PMID:23811552

  11. Automatic cell counting in vivo in the larval nervous system of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Forero, Manuel G.; Kato, Kentaro; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Identification and counting of cells is necessary to test biological hypotheses, for instance of nervous system formation, disease, degeneration, injury and regeneration, but manual counting is time-consuming, tedious, and subject to bias. The fruit-fly Drosophila is a widely used model organism to analyse gene function, and most research is carried out in the intact animal or in whole organs, rather than in cell culture. Inferences on gene function require that cell counts are known from these sample types. Image processing and pattern recognition techniques are appropriate tools to automate cell counting. However, counting cells in Drosophila is a complex task: variations in immunohistochemical markers and developmental stages result in images of very different properties, rendering it challenging to identify true cells. Here, we present a technique for counting automatically larval glial cells in 3D, from confocal microscopy serial optical sections. Local outlier thresholding and domes are combined to find the cells. Shape descriptors extracted from a data set are used to characterise cells and avoid over-segmentation. Morphological operators are employed to divide cells that could otherwise be missed. The method is accurate and very fast, and treats all samples equally and objectively, rendering all data comparable across specimens. Our method is also applicable to identify cells labelled with other nuclear markers and in sections of mouse tissues. PMID:22429405

  12. Accurate cell counts in live mouse embryos using optical quadrature and differential interference contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; Newmark, Judith A.; Zhao, Bing; Warner, Carol M.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2006-02-01

    Present imaging techniques used in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics are unable to produce accurate cell counts in developing embryos past the eight-cell stage. We have developed a method that has produced accurate cell counts in live mouse embryos ranging from 13-25 cells by combining Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) and Optical Quadrature Microscopy. Optical Quadrature Microscopy is an interferometric imaging modality that measures the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. The phase is transformed into an image of optical path length difference, which is used to determine the maximum optical path length deviation of a single cell. DIC microscopy gives distinct cell boundaries for cells within the focal plane when other cells do not lie in the path to the objective. Fitting an ellipse to the boundary of a single cell in the DIC image and combining it with the maximum optical path length deviation of a single cell creates an ellipsoidal model cell of optical path length deviation. Subtracting the model cell from the Optical Quadrature image will either show the optical path length deviation of the culture medium or reveal another cell underneath. Once all the boundaries are used in the DIC image, the subtracted Optical Quadrature image is analyzed to determine the cell boundaries of the remaining cells. The final cell count is produced when no more cells can be subtracted. We have produced exact cell counts on 5 samples, which have been validated by Epi-Fluorescence images of Hoechst stained nuclei.

  13. Impact of weight on immune cell counts among HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Roediger, Mollie; Eberly, Lynn E; Ganesan, Anuradha; Weintrob, Amy; Johnson, Erica; Agan, Brian K

    2011-06-01

    Prior studies have shown that weight may impact immune cell counts. However, few data exist about the relationship of weight and immune cell counts among HIV-infected patients. We examined documented HIV seroconverters (mean window, 15.7 months) in a prospective U.S. Military HIV Natural History Study (1 January 1986 to 20 January 2010). We estimated the association of the time-updated body mass index (BMI) category with changes in immune cell counts from HIV diagnosis across time (mean follow-up of 5.1 years) using multiply adjusted longitudinal linear mixed-effects models. Of 1,097 HIV seroconverters, 448 (41%) were overweight and 93 (8%) were obese at HIV diagnosis. Immune cell counts at HIV diagnosis did not significantly differ by BMI category. In the longitudinal models for those diagnosed before the advent of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, mean postdiagnosis decreases in the white cell count, total lymphocyte count, CD4 count, CD4 percentage, and CD4/CD8 ratio were less as the BMI category increased (all with P values of <0.05). Among HIV seroconverters diagnosed in the HAART era, obese compared to normal-weight patients had significantly smaller increases in CD4 counts, CD4 percentages, and the CD4/CD8 ratio (all with P values of <0.05). Similar findings were also noted among underweight versus normal-weight patients. In conclusion, although BMI was not associated with immune cell levels at the time of HIV diagnosis, weight appears to affect immune cells counts over the course of infection. In the HAART era, being either underweight or obese was associated with smaller increases in several important immune cell levels, including the CD4/CD8 ratio. PMID:21525303

  14. Current automated 3D cell detection methods are not a suitable replacement for manual stereologic cell counting

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Christoph; Eastwood, Brian S.; Tappan, Susan J.; Glaser, Jack R.; Peterson, Daniel A.; Hof, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Stereologic cell counting has had a major impact on the field of neuroscience. A major bottleneck in stereologic cell counting is that the user must manually decide whether or not each cell is counted according to three-dimensional (3D) stereologic counting rules by visual inspection within hundreds of microscopic fields-of-view per investigated brain or brain region. Reliance on visual inspection forces stereologic cell counting to be very labor-intensive and time-consuming, and is the main reason why biased, non-stereologic two-dimensional (2D) cell counting approaches have remained in widespread use. We present an evaluation of the performance of modern automated cell detection and segmentation algorithms as a potential alternative to the manual approach in stereologic cell counting. The image data used in this study were 3D microscopic images of thick brain tissue sections prepared with a variety of commonly used nuclear and cytoplasmic stains. The evaluation compared the numbers and locations of cells identified unambiguously and counted exhaustively by an expert observer with those found by three automated 3D cell detection algorithms: nuclei segmentation from the FARSIGHT toolkit, nuclei segmentation by 3D multiple level set methods, and the 3D object counter plug-in for ImageJ. Of these methods, FARSIGHT performed best, with true-positive detection rates between 38 and 99% and false-positive rates from 3.6 to 82%. The results demonstrate that the current automated methods suffer from lower detection rates and higher false-positive rates than are acceptable for obtaining valid estimates of cell numbers. Thus, at present, stereologic cell counting with manual decision for object inclusion according to unbiased stereologic counting rules remains the only adequate method for unbiased cell quantification in histologic tissue sections. PMID:24847213

  15. High Current CD4+ T Cell Count Predicts Suboptimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alexander O; de Bruin, Marijn; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; Prins, Jan M

    2015-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are necessary for achieving and maintaining optimal virological suppression, as suboptimal adherence leads to therapy failure and disease progression. It is well known that adherence to ART predicts therapy response, but it is unclear whether clinical outcomes of ART predict adherence. To examine the predictive power of current CD4+ T cell count for adherence of HIV-infected individuals to ART, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of 133 Dutch HIV patients with electronically measured adherence. In a multivariate analysis adjusting for a number of sociodemographic and clinical variables, high current CD4+ T cell count (>660 cells/mm3) was most strongly associated with lower adherence to ART (assessed as a continuous variable) during a two-month period immediately following the measurements of variables (P = 0.008). The twice-per-day (versus once-per-day) dosing regimen was also significantly associated with lower adherence (P = 0.014). In a second multivariate analysis aimed at determining the predictors of suboptimal (<100% of the doses taken) adherence, high current CD4+ T cell count was again the strongest independent predictor of suboptimal adherence to ART (P = 0.015), and the twice-per-day dosing regimen remained associated with suboptimal adherence (P = 0.025). The association between suboptimal adherence and virological suppression was significant in patients with high CD4+ T cell counts, but not in patients with low or intermediate CD4+ T cell counts (P = 0.036 and P = 0.52, respectively; P = 0.047 for comparison of the effects of adherence on virological suppression between patients with high vs. low or intermediate CD4+ T cell counts), suggesting that apart from promoting suboptimal adherence, high CD4+ T cell count also strengthens the effect of adherence on virological suppression. Therefore, sustained efforts to emphasize continued adherence are necessary, especially for patients with high CD4+ T cell counts. PMID:26468956

  16. High Current CD4+ T Cell Count Predicts Suboptimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Alexander O.; de Bruin, Marijn; Bakker, Margreet

    2015-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are necessary for achieving and maintaining optimal virological suppression, as suboptimal adherence leads to therapy failure and disease progression. It is well known that adherence to ART predicts therapy response, but it is unclear whether clinical outcomes of ART predict adherence. To examine the predictive power of current CD4+ T cell count for adherence of HIV-infected individuals to ART, we performed a cross-sectional analysis of 133 Dutch HIV patients with electronically measured adherence. In a multivariate analysis adjusting for a number of sociodemographic and clinical variables, high current CD4+ T cell count (>660 cells/mm3) was most strongly associated with lower adherence to ART (assessed as a continuous variable) during a two-month period immediately following the measurements of variables (P = 0.008). The twice-per-day (versus once-per-day) dosing regimen was also significantly associated with lower adherence (P = 0.014). In a second multivariate analysis aimed at determining the predictors of suboptimal (<100% of the doses taken) adherence, high current CD4+ T cell count was again the strongest independent predictor of suboptimal adherence to ART (P = 0.015), and the twice-per-day dosing regimen remained associated with suboptimal adherence (P = 0.025). The association between suboptimal adherence and virological suppression was significant in patients with high CD4+ T cell counts, but not in patients with low or intermediate CD4+ T cell counts (P = 0.036 and P = 0.52, respectively; P = 0.047 for comparison of the effects of adherence on virological suppression between patients with high vs. low or intermediate CD4+ T cell counts), suggesting that apart from promoting suboptimal adherence, high CD4+ T cell count also strengthens the effect of adherence on virological suppression. Therefore, sustained efforts to emphasize continued adherence are necessary, especially for patients with high CD4+ T cell counts. PMID:26468956

  17. Optimization of a Cell Counting Algorithm for Mobile Point-of-Care Testing Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, DaeHan; Kim, Nam Sung; Moon, SangJun; Park, Taejoon; Son, Sang Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    In a point-of-care (POC) setting, it is critically important to reliably count the number of specific cells in a blood sample. Software-based cell counting, which is far faster than manual counting, while much cheaper than hardware-based counting, has emerged as an attractive solution potentially applicable to mobile POC testing. However, the existing software-based algorithm based on the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) method is too time- and, thus, energy-consuming to be deployed for battery-powered mobile POC testing platforms. In this paper, we identify inefficiencies in the NCC-based algorithm and propose two synergistic optimization techniques that can considerably reduce the runtime and, thus, energy consumption of the original algorithm with negligible impact on counting accuracy. We demonstrate that an Android smart phone running the optimized algorithm consumes 11.5 less runtime than the original algorithm. PMID:25195851

  18. KI and WU Polyomaviruses and CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-1infected Patients, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Farchi, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Cavallo, Rossana; Adorno, Gaspare; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2010-01-01

    To investigate an association between KI and WU polyomavirus (KIPyV and WUPyV) infections and CD4+ cell counts, we tested HIV-1positive patients and blood donors. No association was found between cell counts and virus infections in HIV-1positive patients. Frequency of KIPyV infection was similar for both groups. WUPyV was more frequent in HIV-1positive patients. PMID:20735940

  19. Mathematical modelling of adult hippocampal neurogenesis: effects of altered stem cell dynamics on cell counts and bromodeoxyuridine-labelled cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziebell, Frederik; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In the adult hippocampus, neurogenesis—the process of generating mature granule cells from adult neural stem cells—occurs throughout the entire lifetime. In order to investigate the involved regulatory mechanisms, knockout (KO) experiments, which modify the dynamic behaviour of this process, were conducted in the past. Evaluating these KOs is a non-trivial task owing to the complicated nature of the hippocampal neurogenic niche. In this study, we model neurogenesis as a multicompartmental system of ordinary differential equations based on experimental data. To analyse the results of KO experiments, we investigate how changes of cell properties, reflected by model parameters, influence the dynamics of cell counts and of the experimentally observed counts of cells labelled by the cell division marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). We find that changing cell proliferation rates or the fraction of self-renewal, reflecting the balance between symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions, may result in multiple time phases in the response of the system, such as an initial increase in cell counts followed by a decrease. Furthermore, these phases may be qualitatively different in cells at different differentiation stages and even between mitotically labelled cells and all cells existing in the system. PMID:24598209

  20. Declines in highly active antiretroviral therapy initiation at CD4 cell counts ? 200 cells/L and the contribution of diagnosis of HIV at CD4 cell counts ? 200 cells/L in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Loureno, L; Samji, H; Nohpal, A; Chau, W; Colley, G; Lepik, K; Barrios, R; Lima, V; Hogg, RS; Montaner, JSG; Kesselring, S; Moore, DM

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to examine trends in initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with a CD4 count ? 200 cells/L and the contribution of having a CD4 count ? 200 cells/L at the time of diagnosis to these trends, in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We included in the analysis treatment-nave BC residents aged ? 19 years who initiated HAART from 2003 to 2012. Participants were classified as follows: Group 1: diagnosed and initiated HAART with a CD4 count > 200 cells/L; Group 2: diagnosed with a CD4 count > 200 cells/L and initiated HAART with a CD4 count ? 200 cells/L; and Group 3: diagnosed and initiated HAART with a CD4 count ? 200 cells/L. We measured trends in initiating HAART with a CD4 count ? 200 cells/L and used logistic regression models to measure factors associated with initiating HAART with a CD4 count ? 200 cells/L, stratified by having a CD4 count ? 200 cells/L or > 200 cells/L at the time of diagnosis. Results Between 2003 and 2012, 3506 BC residents initiated HAART. Of these, 44% (1558 of 3506) initiated HAART with a CD4 count ? 200 cells/L. This proportion declined from 69% (198 of 287) in 2003 to 21% (81 of 330) in 2012 (P < 0.001). The proportion of those in Group 3 increased from 49% (97 of 198) in 2003 to 69% (56 of 81) in 2012 (P < 0.001). Overall, 56% (1948), 22% (776) and 22% (782) made up Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In adjusted analyses, seeing a specialist was significantly associated with being in Group 3. Using injection drugs and seeing a specialist were associated with being in Group 2. Conclusions In recent years, among individuals who ever initiated HAART in BC, being diagnosed with low CD4 cell counts has become a greater contributor to initiating HAART with low CD4 cell counts. PMID:25721157

  1. Acute Lung Injury Edema Fluid Decreases Net Fluid Transport across Human Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae W.; Fang, Xiaohui; Dolganov, Gregory; Fremont, Richard D.; Bastarache, Julie A.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Most patients with acute lung injury (ALI) have reduced alveolar fluid clearance that has been associated with higher mortality. Several mechanisms may contribute to the decrease in alveolar fluid clearance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that pulmonary edema fluid from patients with ALI might reduce the expression of ion transport genes responsible for vectorial fluid transport in primary cultures of human alveolar epithelial type II cells. Following exposure to ALI pulmonary edema fluid, the gene copy number for the major sodium and chloride transport genes decreased. By Western blot analyses, protein levels of ?ENaC, ?1Na,K-ATPase, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator decreased as well. In contrast, the gene copy number for several inflammatory cytokines increased markedly. Functional studies demonstrated that net vectorial fluid transport was reduced for human alveolar type II cells exposed to ALI pulmonary edema fluid compared with plasma (0.020.05 versus 1.310.56 ?l/cm2/h, p<0.02). An inhibitor of p38 MAPK phosphorylation (SB202190) partially reversed the effects of the edema fluid on net fluid transport as well as gene and protein expression of the main ion transporters. In summary, alveolar edema fluid from patients with ALI induced a significant reduction in sodium and chloride transport genes and proteins in human alveolar epithelial type II cells, effects that were associated with a decrease in net vectorial fluid transport across human alveolar type II cell monolayers. PMID:17580309

  2. Consequence for dairy herds in the United States of imposing different standards for somatic cell count

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New European Union (E.U.) regulations may require that a somatic cell count (SCC) limit of 400,000 cells/mL for milk be met by every farm that contributes to pooled milk exported to Europe. In the United States, the standard is 750,000 cells/mL. Because bulk tank SCC is not readily available through...

  3. Somatic cell counts of milk from Dairy Herd Improvement herds during 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2010 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to somatic cell count (SCC) for calculating herd and State averages. The ...

  4. CD8+ T-Cells Count in Acute Myocardial Infarction in HIV Disease in a Predominantly Male Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chung-Chou; So-Armah, Kaku A.; Baker, Jason V.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gordon, Adam J.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Goetz, Matthew B.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Bedimo, Roger; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Deeks, Steven G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freiberg, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus- (HIV-) infected persons have a higher risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than HIV-uninfected persons. Earlier studies suggest that HIV viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and antiretroviral therapy are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Whether CD8+ T-cell count is associated with CVD risk is not clear. We investigated the association between CD8+ T-cell count and incident AMI in a cohort of 73,398 people (of which 97.3% were men) enrolled in the U.S. Veterans Aging Cohort Study-Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC). Compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with high baseline CD8+ T-cell counts (>1065?cells/mm3) had increased AMI risk (adjusted HR = 1.82, P < 0.001, 95% CI: 1.46 to 2.28). There was evidence that the effect of CD8+ T-cell tertiles on AMI risk differed by CD4+ T-cell level: compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with CD4+ T-cell counts ?200?cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with high CD8+ T-cell count, while those with CD4+ T-cell counts <200?cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with low CD8+ T-cell count. CD8+ T-cell counts may add additional AMI risk stratification information beyond that provided by CD4+ T-cell counts alone. PMID:25688354

  5. A cell counting/sorting system incorporated with a microfabricated flow cytometer chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Yi; Hsiung, Suz-Kai; Hung, Yung-Ching; Chang, Chen-Min; Liao, Teh-Lu; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2006-07-01

    Flow cytometry is a popular technique for counting and sorting individual cells. This study presents and demonstrates a new cell counting/sorting system integrated with several essential components including a micromachined flow cytometer chip device, an optical detection system and a data analysis and control system to achieve the functions of cell sample injection, optical signal detection and cell collection. By using MEMS technology, we have integrated several microfluidic components such as micro pneumatic pumps/valves onto a polymer-based chip device. Three pneumatic micropumps are used to provide the hydrodynamic driving force for both sample and sheath flows such that hydrodynamic flow focusing can be achieved, and a micro flow switch device comprising three pneumatic microvalves located downstream of the micro sample flow channel is used for cell collection. Cell samples of human lung cancer cells labelled with commercially available fluorescent dyes have been detected and collected successfully utilizing the developed device. The real-time image of dye-labelled cell samples being excited and detected can be monitored and observed through the LCD panel by a custom designed CCD/APD holder and moving stage. Finally, micro flow switch devices were used to successfully sort the cells into the desired outlet channel, and the counting results of the specific cell samples were monitored through the counting panel. The current study focuses on the setup of the overall system. The proposed flow cytometer system has several advantages such as portability, low cost and easy operation process. The size of the system is 37 cm × 16 cm × 18 cm and the weight is 3.5 kg. The error rate of counting and sorting was 1.5% and 2%, respectively. The sorting frequency of the microvalve device is calculated to be 120 cells min-1. The developed microfluidic chip device could be a promising tool for cell-based application fields such as profiling, counting and sorting.

  6. A microfluidic biochip for complete blood cell counts at the point-of-care

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, U.; Reddy, B.; Damhorst, G.; Sonoiki, O.; Ghonge, T.; Yang, C.; Bashir, R.

    2016-01-01

    Complete blood cell counts (CBCs) are one of the most commonly ordered and informative blood tests in hospitals. The results from a CBC, which typically include white blood cell (WBC) counts with differentials, red blood cell (RBC) counts, platelet counts and hemoglobin measurements, can have implications for the diagnosis and screening of hundreds of diseases and treatments. Bulky and expensive hematology analyzers are currently used as a gold standard for acquiring CBCs. For nearly all CBCs performed today, the patient must travel to either a hospital with a large laboratory or to a centralized lab testing facility. There is a tremendous need for an automated, portable point-of-care blood cell counter that could yield results in a matter of minutes from a drop of blood without any trained professionals to operate the instrument. We have developed microfluidic biochips capable of a partial CBC using only a drop of whole blood. Total leukocyte and their 3-part differential count are obtained from 10 μL of blood after on-chip lysing of the RBCs and counting of the leukocytes electrically using microfabricated platinum electrodes. For RBCs and platelets, 1 μL of whole blood is diluted with PBS on-chip and the cells are counted electrically. The total time for measurement is under 20 minutes. We demonstrate a high correlation of blood cell counts compared to results acquired with a commercial hematology analyzer. This technology could potentially have tremendous applications in hospitals at the bedside, private clinics, retail clinics and the developing world. PMID:26909365

  7. Atmospheric remote sensing to detect effects of temperature inversions on sputum cell counts in airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Julie; Nair, Parameswaran; Kanaroglou, Pavlos

    2010-08-01

    Temperature inversions result in the accumulation of air pollution, often to levels exceeding air quality criteria. The respiratory response may be detectable in sputum cell counts. This study investigates the effect of boundary layer temperature inversions on sputum cell counts. Total and differential cell counts of neutrophils, eosinophils, macrophages and lymphocytes were quantified in sputum samples of patients attending an outpatient clinic. Temperature inversions were identified using data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, an atmospheric sensor on the Aqua spacecraft which was launched in 2002 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. On inversion days, a statistically significant increase in the percent of cells that were neutrophils was observed in stable patients. There was also a statistically significant increase in the percent of cells that were macrophages, in exacerbated patients. Multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the relationship between temperature inversions and cell counts, controlling patients' age, smoking status, medications and meteorological variables of temperature and humidity. The analyses indicate that, in the stable and exacerbated groups, percent neutrophils and macrophages increased by 12.6% and 2.5%, respectively, on inversion days. These results suggest that temperature inversions need consideration as an exacerbating factor in bronchitis and obstructive airway disease. The effects of air pollutants, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, fine particulate matter and ozone, were investigated. We identified no significant associations with any pollutant. However, we found that monthly averages of total cell counts were strongly correlated with monthly nitrogen dioxide concentrations, an association not previously identified in the literature. PMID:20704033

  8. Automatic counting of FISH spots in interphase cells for prenatal characterization of aneuploidies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravkin, Ilya; Temov, Vladimir

    1999-06-01

    Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) is becoming an accepted technique for identification of aneuploidies in interphase fetal cells obtained by either CVS (chorionic villus sampling) or amniocentesis. Currently the analysis is done manually by a skilled operator and is a lengthy and fatiguing process. Applied Imaging is developing an automated procedure for counting FISH spots in these samples. Spot counting involves slide preparation, probe hybridization, filter selection, FISH image acquisition, image analysis, operator verification, and analysis of count distributions. We concentrate on the tasks starting with image acquisition. The following topics are covered: selection of appropriate cells, acquisition and processing of Z-stacks of FISH images for presentation and spot counting, background removal, formation of segmentation tree and selection of spot markers, growing of spot markers by means of constrained watershed, detection of irregular spots and flagging them for the user, time and accuracy compared with manual method, and applicability to a clinical research setting.

  9. Nucleated Red Blood Cells Count in Pregnancies with Idiopathic Intra-Uterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, Mahbod; Nemati, Somayeh; Javadian, Pouya; Salmanian, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    Objective Elevated nucleated red blood cell (NRBC) count is introduced as a potential marker of intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR). To investigate the probable association regardless of any known underlying disease, we aimed to study disturbances in NRBC count in infants experiencing idiopathic IUGR. Materials and methods Twenty three infants regarded IUGR without any known cause were chosen to be compared to 48 normal neonates. Blood samples were collected instantly after birth and the same measurements were done in both groups. Results NRBC count/100 white blood cells was significantly higher in the IUGR group (P value < 0.001). pH measurements did not reveal any significant difference. Conclusion Increased NRBC count in cases of idiopathic IUGR in absence of chronic hypoxia could strengthen its predictive value suggested in previous studies. It could help early IUGR detection and beneficial intervention. PMID:24971139

  10. Counting and sizing of epidermal cells in normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Bergstresser, P R; Pariser, R J; Taylor, J R

    1978-05-01

    During keratinocyte maturation, individual cells undergo an orderly succession of biochemical and structural changes. In certain skin disorders alterations in keratinocyte numbers, volumes, and epidermal skin thickness occur. To assess such alterations and to provide base line values for normal human epidermis, a computer assisted histologic technique was developed. Skin biopsies were taken from normal skin on the forearm, back and thigh of 6 adult men. Whole specimens of epidermis were separated from the dermis with collagenase, fixed, stained, and mounted for microscopic examination. From the three dimensional coordinates of epidermal nuclei, epidermal cell volumes, surface density of epidermal cells, and epidermal thickness were determined. Measurement of cell volumes in this way compared favorably with electronic cell sizing of disaggregated epidermal cells in matched samples. The mean densities of nucleated cells per 10(4) mu2 surface area were 452, 483, and 487 for the forearm, back and thigh respectively. This technique will be used to make similar assessments in disorders of abnormal keratinocyte maturation. PMID:641379

  11. Response of sheep lymphocytes to PHA: quantitation by nuclear volume measurement and cell counts (40764)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.

    1980-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin response of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of sheep was studied. Assessment of proliferative response was performed by determination of nuclear volumes and cell counts in cultures from 14 sheep and by incorporation of tritiated thymidine in cultures in four additional sheep. PBL of sheep were found to transform and proliferate with PHA similarly to human peripheral blood lymphocytes with minor differences. Quantitation of the proliferative response by determining the cell count and nuclear volumes provided more information on cell kinetics in culture than the commonly used isotope-labeled thymidine incorporation method.

  12. Standardisation of platelet counting accuracy in blood banks by reference to an automated immunoplatelet procedure: comparative evaluation of Cell-Dyn CD4000 impedance and optical platelet counts.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, B; Haugen, T; Scott, C S

    2001-10-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic platelet transfusions are increasingly used for patients with conditions associated with thrombocytopenia in order to prevent the development of potentially life threatening bleeding. These clinical strategies have led to a significant expansion in platelet unit manufacture, and this now represents a major resource and cost commitment for blood banks. As part of the manufacturing process, blood banks are required to implement control procedures, and the determination of platelet counts in particular is necessary to confirm that the quality of platelet unit production meets the standards defined by national or international guidelines. Apart from linearity analysis and comparisons of platelet counts given by different instruments, there has been no systematic standardisation of platelet counting methods in blood bank practice because to date there has been no suitable reference method for counting platelets in citrate anticoagulants. The recent introduction of an automated immunoplatelet procedure on the Cell-Dyn CD4000 provides a means of determining a true platelet count that is unaffected by changes induced either by storage or anticoagulant. The CD4000 in its routine configuration also provides simultaneous impedance and optical platelet counts and this study was therefore undertaken in order to compare all three different platelet counting methods in parallel with a representative series of platelet units. Platelet counts determined after sub-sampling of platelet units into EDTA vs plain non-anticoagulated tubes revealed no differences in impedance or immunoplatelet counts but generally lower optical counts when aliquoted into tubes that did not contain EDTA. This study therefore routinely used EDTA for platelet unit sub-samples. Comparative results of platelet counts for buffy coat platelet units (n = 36) aliquoted into EDTA indicated that the impedance count was higher than the reference immunoplatelet count by a mean factor of 1.25 while the optical count was lower by a mean factor of 0.87. The degree of impedance count overestimation was particularly consistent while the optical count underestimation was more variable. Linearity studies of 10 fresh platelet units showed no deviation in the range 0-2305 x 10(9) l(-1) for impedance and 0 to 1420 x 10(9) l(-1) for the optical counts, and the relative numerical relationships between impedance and optical counts were conserved throughout the range of dilutions tested. In the CD4000 optical analysis, blood samples anticoagulated with EDTA showed a distinctive elliptical population distribution that fell within the system thresholds. In contrast, the optical pattern observed for platelet units (in CPD) and ACD-anticoagulated venous blood showed a wider 90 degrees scatter with a population of platelet events above the upper parallel discriminator. As these were excluded from the optical count (but were still identified as platelets by the immunoplatelet method) it meant that the optical counts of samples in citrate-based anticoagulants were systematically lower than immunoplatelet counts. Platelet units (n = 15) analysed daily over a seven day period of storage revealed that the greatest decline in platelet counts was with the optical measurement while the most stable value was obtained by impedance analysis. The results of the immunoplatelet analysis further suggested a progressive increase in small platelets with increasing storage time. The use in this study of a standardised immunoplatelet reference method to examine the question of analyser suitability for determining platelet counts/yields of platelet units thus provided a number of important findings. An impedance platelet counting method is utilised by the great majority of haematology instruments in current use, and in common with the CD4000 analyser, a correction factor is employed to take account of RBC/platelet coincidence. This study found that when analysed samples such as platelet units were RBC-free, that an inappropriate correction factor was applied. Consequently, the CD4000

  13. [Cell count of the milk from sheep in machine milking].

    PubMed

    Vitkov, M; Vitanov, S

    1980-01-01

    A number of microbiological and parallel direct and indirect cytological studies were carried out on sheep milk, obtained by machine-milking. It was established that the sheep milk containing up to 183,000 somatic cells per cm3 showed a negative reaction if Bernburg's mastite test was applied. Samples of cellular elements from 200,000 up to 400,000 per cm3 showed a weak positive reaction of the test, and above 420,000 per cm3 proved to be strongly positive. Polynuclear heterophils and a high percentage of infected samples were found in a quantity of cells above 500,000 per cm3. The data obtained showed good correlation between the bacterial find and the cell contents and are a reliable prerequisite for the application of Bernburg's test in studying sheep milk. PMID:7193942

  14. Consequence of changing standards for somatic cell count on US Dairy Herd Improvement herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consequence of noncompliance with European Union (EU) and current US standards for somatic cell count (SCC) as well as SCC standards proposed by the National Milk Producers Federation was examined for US herds. Somatic cell scores (SCS) from 14,854 Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) herds were analyzed. H...

  15. Pericardial Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fluid protein or albumin level, cell count, and appearance) is used to differentiate between the two types ... heart size on chest X-ray Abnormal pericardial appearance on echocardiogram ^ Back to top What does the ...

  16. Low Counts of B Cells, Natural Killer Cells, Monocytes, Dendritic Cells, Basophils, and Eosinophils are Associated withPostengraftment Infections after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Podgorny, Peter J; Pratt, Laura M; Liu, Yiping; Dharmani-Khan, Poonam; Luider, Joanne; Auer-Grzesiak, Iwona; Mansoor, Adnan; Williamson, Tyler S; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Khan, Faisal M; Larratt, Loree; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Stewart, Douglas A; Russell, James A; Daly, Andrew; Storek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are immunocompromised and thus predisposed to infections. We set out to determine the deficiency of which immune cell subset(s) may predispose to postengraftment infections. We determined day 28, 56, 84, and 180 blood counts of multiple immune cell subsets in 219 allogeneic transplant recipients conditioned with busulfan, fludarabine, and Thymoglobulin. Deficiency of a subset was considered to be associated with infections if the low subset count was significantly associated with subsequent high infection rate per multivariate analysis in both discovery and validation cohorts. Low counts of monocytes (total and inflammatory) and basophils, and low IgA levels were associated with viral infections. Low plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) counts were associated with bacterial infections. Low inflammatory monocyte counts were associated with fungal infections. Low counts of total and naive Bcells, total and CD56(high) natural killer (NK) cells, total and inflammatory monocytes, myeloid dendritic cells (MDCs), PDCs, basophils and eosinophils, and low levels of IgA were associated with any infections (due to any pathogen or presumed). In conclusion, deficiencies of Bcells, NK cells, monocytes, MDCs, PDCs, basophils, eosinophils, and/or IgA plasma cells appear to predispose to postengraftment infections. PMID:26363444

  17. Concomitant spuriously elevated white blood cell count, a previously underestimated phenomenon in EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yufei; Xu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The proportion and potential risk of concomitant spuriously elevated white blood cell count (SEWC) are underestimated in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP). The proportion, kinetics and prevention of SEWC remain poorly understood. A total of 25 patients with EDTA-dependent PTCP were enrolled in this study. With the hematology analyzer Coulter LH 750, we determined the time courses of WBC count, WBC differential and platelet count in EDTA- and sodium citrate-anticoagulated blood, respectively. Blood smears were prepared to inspect the presence of platelet clumps using light microscopy. The effect of automatic instrumental correction on the extent of SEWC was evaluated. The proportion of SEWC was 92% in EDTA-dependent PTCP and 73.9% of SEWCs were within the normal range. The development of SEWC was time-dependent, and neutrophils and lymphocytes were the main subpopulations involved in SEWC. A strong and significant correlation (r = 0.9937, p < 0.001) was found between the increased WBC count and the decreased platelet count. Both corrected and uncorrected WBC counts at 15 minutes or later after blood collection in EDTA were significantly higher than their basal counts, respectively, p < 0.05. Interestingly, in citrated blood, WBC counts after blood collection were not significantly different from its basal counts, p > 0.05. A high proportion of concomitant SEWCs, which are mainly within normal range, are present in patients with EDTA-dependent PTCP. Proper interpretation of SEWC is crucial to avoid clinic errors. SEWC develops in a time-dependent pattern, although the Coulter LH 750 only partly mitigates the extent of SEWC, sodium citrate is able to effectively prevent SEWC. PMID:25275874

  18. The Application of Bulk Tank Somatic Cell Counts to Monitoring Mastitis Levels in Dairy Herds

    PubMed Central

    Meek, A.H.; Barnum, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of developing a system whereby measurements taken on bulk tank milk samples could be used to monitor the level of subclinical mastitis in dairy herds. The variables that were examined were the logarithmically transformed total somatic cell counts and percentages of cell volume in channel 8 (volumes from 89.2 to 178.3 m3), the presence or absence of Streptococcus agalactiae and various husbandry/management factors including herdsize and the use of teat dips. Each of the use of actual monthly and rolling average bulk tank cell count determinations was investigated. It was found that the inclusion of all variables resulted in a correct classification of approximately 85% of herds and that no improvement was achieved by the use of rolling as opposed to actual monthly values. The inclusion of various husbandry/management practices improved the percentage correct classification to some extent over that achieved by the sole use of total somatic cell counts and percentages of cell volume in channel 8 when the herds were grouped on the basis of quarter infection rate (<10%, >10%) but not in the case of the cow infection rate categories (<20%, >20%). The use of both total cell counts and percentages of cell volume in channel 8 did not improve the overall predictive value over that achieved by the sole use of percentage of cell volume in channel 8 in the case of the quarter infection rate groupings but did to some extent in the case of the cow infection rate groupings. When the classification functions were applied prospectively and considering combinations of the two cell count determinations only, it was found that they were able to correctly classify, on the basis of the quarter infection rate groupings, approximately 75% of the study herds. It is concluded that the system described herein has limited application as a basis for selecting problem herds. PMID:7042053

  19. Complete blood cell count in psittaciformes by using high-throughput image cytometry: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Beaufrre, Hugues; Ammersbach, Mlanie; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-09-01

    The avian hemogram is usually performed in veterinary diagnostic laboratories by using manual cell counting techniques and differential counts determined by light microscopy. There is no standard automated technique for avian blood cell count and differentiation to date. These shortcomings in birds are primarily because erythrocytes and thrombocytes are nucleated, which precludes the use of automated analyzers programmed to perform mammal complete blood cell counts. In addition, there is no standard avian antibody panel, which would allow cell differentiation by immunophenotyping across all commonly seen bird species. We report an alternative hematologic approach for quantification and differentiation of avian blood cells by using high-throughput image cytometry on blood smears in psittacine bird species. A pilot study was designed with 70 blood smears of different psittacine bird species stained with a Wright-Giemsa stain. The slides were scanned at 0.23 microm/pixel. The open-source softwares CellProfiler and CellProfiler Analyst were used for analyzing and sorting each cell by image cytometry. A "pipeline" was constructed in the CellProfiler by using different modules to identify and export hundreds of measures per cell for shape, intensity, and texture. Rules for classifying the different blood cell phenotypes were then determined based on these measurements by iterative feedback and machine learning by using CellProfiler Analyst. Although this approach shows promises, avian Leukopet results could not be duplicated when using this technique as is. Further studies and more standardized prospective investigations may be needed to refine the "pipeline" strategy and the machine learning algorithm. PMID:24344512

  20. Somatic cell counts, mastitis and milk production in selected Ontario dairy herds.

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, D A; Meek, A H

    1982-01-01

    Somatic cell counts were performed monthly on bulk tank milk samples for all producers in the Ontario counties of Hastings, Lennox/Addington and Prince Edward throughout 1978 and 1979. Other data were obtained via a structured questionnaire and from the records of the Ontario Milk Marketing Board. Many producers have not adopted practices that have been advocated for the integrated control of mastitis. For example, 43.3% of producers surveyed used single service paper towels, 63.3% regularly used teat dip and 56.5% dry cow therapy. The mean of the average monthly somatic cell count for all producers for 1978 was 621.1 x 10(3) cells/mL. This latter value was used to divide the producers into case (higher than average) and control (lower than average) groups. Control herds averaged 95.9 liters more shipped milk per cow per month than case herds. Milk from control herds averaged 0.22 percentage points higher than case herds for each of average fat and lactose, and 0.16 percentage points higher for protein. The linear regression of monthly shipped milk on the respective monthly bulk tank somatic cell count indicated a loss of 13.26 L/cow/month for each 100,000 increase in somatic cell count. PMID:7200385

  1. Genetic influences on peripheral blood cell counts: a study in baboons

    PubMed Central

    Mahaney, Michael C.; Brugnara, Carlo; Lease, Loren R.; Platt, Orah S.

    2005-01-01

    Interperson differences in peripheral blood cell counts in healthy individuals result from genetic and environmental influences. We used multivariate genetic analyses to assess the relative impact of genes and environment on baseline blood cell counts and indices using a pedigreed colony of baboons, an animal with well-documented analogies to human blood physiology. After accounting for age, sex, and weight, we found that genetic influences explain a significant proportion of the remaining variability, ranging from a low of 13.7% for mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) to a high of 72.4% for red blood cell (RBC) number. Genes influence 38.5% of the variation in baseline white blood cell (WBC) count, a characteristic that correlates with mortality in both the general human population and clinically defined subgroups such as individuals with sickle-cell disease. We examined the interaction between pairs of traits and identified those that share common genetic influences (pleiotropy). We unexpectedly observed that the same gene or group of genes influences both WBC count and mean platelet volume (MPV). We anticipate that this approach will ultimately lead to discovery of novel insights into the biology of related traits, and ultimately identify important genes that affect hematopoiesis. PMID:15870178

  2. Raman-activated cell counting for profiling carbon dioxide fixing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengqiu; Ashok, Praveen C; Dholakia, Kishan; Huang, Wei E

    2012-06-28

    Raman microspectroscopy is a label-free and nondestructive technique to measure the intrinsic chemical profile of single cells. The naturally weak Raman signals hampered the application of Raman spectroscopy for high-throughput measurements. Nearly all photosynthetic microorganisms contain carotenoids that are active molecules for resonance Raman at a 532 nm excitation wavelength. Hence, the acquisition time for a single photosynthetic microorganism can be as short as 1 ms. The carotenoid bands in Raman spectra of photosynthetic microorganisms utilizing (13)CO(2) shifted when compared to the spectra of cells utilizing (12)CO(2). Here, a mixture of (12)C- and (13)C-cyanobacterial cells were counted using a microfluidic-device-based Raman-activated cell counting procedure to prove the concept that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a high-throughput method to profile a cell population. PMID:22320431

  3. Effect of leukaemic sera & cell-extracts on splenic colony counts (CFU-S).

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Sood, S K

    1991-08-01

    Sera and leukaemic cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemia were evaluated for their effect on the repopulating ability of the pluripotent stem cells and erythroid differentiation by an in vivo splenic colony count (CFU-S) technique. Normal donor marrow cells of mice were treated with sera and cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemic and healthy controls and injected in the recipient mice. The CFU-S performed on the seventh day to assess repopulating ability of the stem cell showed consistently lower CFU-S counts in the test groups, with leukaemic sera (P less than 0.01) as well as leukaemic cell-extracts (P less than 0.001). The erythroid differentiation assessed by 59Fe uptake by the spleens also showed significantly reduced counts in the two test groups (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.001 respectively). The results indicate that both leukaemic sera and cell-extracts exert a significant suppressive effect on the repopulating ability of the stem cells and on their erythroid differentiation. PMID:1959961

  4. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G. (Albany, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  5. High leptospiremia is associated with low gamma-delta T cell counts.

    PubMed

    Raffray, Loic; Giry, Claude; Thirapathi, Yoga; Binois, François; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Lagrange-Xelot, Marie; Ferrandiz, Dominique; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Gasque, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    The role of innate immune cells either to mount appropriate defense mechanisms or to drive uncontrolled tissue injuries during acute leptospirosis is poorly understood. This study aimed at characterizing the selective mobilization of innate immune cells and the level of target organ injuries in response to leptospiremia. We focused on gamma-delta (γ-δ) T cells. Patients were prospectively assessed for cell count by cytometry, for bacterial load by PCR in plasma samples and for levels of soluble acute phase tissue enzymes. We found that the level of γ-δ T cells was low and inversely correlated to liver injuries and leptospiremia. PMID:25899947

  6. Somatic Cell Count in Milk of Goats Enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement Program in 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of breed, parity, stage of lactation (month), herd size, and regions/states on somatic cell count (SCC) and production of milk from dairy goats enrolled in the Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) program in the United States in 2007 were investigated to monitor the current status of SCC and to ...

  7. EFFECT OF YEAR, STAGE OF LACTATION, PARITY, BREED AND REGION ON GOAT MILK SOMATIC CELL COUNTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The milk somatic cell count (MSCC) forms the basis of abnormal milk control programs world wide for goats, cows and sheep. To better understand factors that contribute to elevations in MSCC, the effects of stage of lactation, parity, breed and state/area in the United States (US) on goat MSCC were ...

  8. Analysis of the distribution of the brain cells of the fruit fly by an automatic cell counting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takashi; Kato, Kentaro; Kamikouchi, Azusa; Ito, Kei

    2005-05-01

    The fruit fly is the smallest brain-having model animal. Its brain is said to consist only of about 250,000 neurons, whereas it shows the rudiments of consciousness in addition to its high abilities such as learning and memory. As the starting point of the exhaustive analysis of its brain-circuit information, we have developed a new algorithm of counting cells automatically from source 2D/3D figures. In our algorithm, counting cells is realized by embedding objects (typically, disks/balls), each of which has exclusive volume. Using this method, we have succeeded in counting thousands of cells accurately. This method provides us the information necessary for the analysis of brain circuits: the precise distribution of the whole brain cells.

  9. FISH and chips: automation of fluorescent dot counting in interphase cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Netten, H; Young, I T; van Vliet, L J; Tanke, H J; Vroljik, H; Sloos, W C

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization allows the enumeration of chromosomal abnormalities in interphase cell nuclei. This process is called dot counting. To estimate the distribution of chromosomes per cell, a large number of cells have to be analyzed, especially when the frequency of aberrant cells is low. Automation of dot counting is required because manual counting is tedious, fatiguing, and time-consuming. We developed a completely automated fluorescence microscope system that can examine 500 cells in approximately 15 min to determine the number of labeled chromosomes (seen as dots) in each cell nucleus. This system works with two fluorescent dyes, one for the DNA hybridization dots and one for the cell nucleus. After the stage has moved to a new field, the image is automatically focused, acquired by a Photometrics KAF 1400 camera (Photometrics Ltd., Tuscon, AZ, USA), and then analyzed on a Macintosh Quadra 840AV (Apple Computer, Inc., Cupertino, CA, USA) computer. After the required number of cells has been analyzed, the user may interact to correct the computer by working with a gallery of the cell images. The automated dot counter has been tested on a number of normal specimens where 4,'6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) was used for the nucleus counterstain and a centromeric 8 probe was used to mark the desired chromosome. The slides contained lymphocytes from cultured blood. We compared the results of the dot counter with manual counting. Manually obtained results, published in the literature, were used as the "ground truth." For a normal specimen, 97.5% of cells will have two dots. Fully automated scanning of 13 slides showed that an average of 89% of all nuclei were counted correctly. In other words, an average of 11% has to be interactively corrected, using a monitor display. The machine accuracies, after interactive correction, are comparable to panels of human experts (manual). The fully automatically obtained results are biased with respect to manual counting. An error analysis is given, and different causes are discussed. PMID:9136750

  10. The Positive Association between Peripheral Blood Cell Counts and Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hwa Young; Park, In Young; Choi, Jin Man; Kim, Min; Jang, Ho Jin; Hwang, Se-Min

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Accumulating evidence has shown a close connection between hematopoiesis and bone formation. Our aim was to evaluate the association between peripheral blood cell counts and bone mineral density (BMD) in a sample of postmenopausal women. Materials and Methods Three hundreds thirty eight healthy postmenopausal women who underwent BMD measurement during their health check-up were investigated. BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray asorptiometry at L1-L4 spine, femoral neck and total proximal femur. BMD was expressed as a T-score: among T-scores obtained from three different sites (L1-L4 spine, femoral neck and total proximal femur), the lowest T-score was considered to be the subject's T-score. Results The prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis diagnosed by T-score in the study participants were 49.4% (167/338) and 5.0% (17/338), respectively. Peripheral blood white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC) and platelet counts had significant positive correlations with T-scores (p<0.001) upon simple linear regression analysis. A multiple linear regression analysis, after controlling of confounders including age, body weight, systolic blood pressure, alkaline phosphatase and creatinine, showed that WBC (β=0.127; standard error=0.043; p=0.014), RBC (β=0.192; standard error=0.139; p<0.001) and platelet (β=0.097; standard error=0.001; p=0.050) counts still had significant positive association with T-scores. Conclusion The study results showed a positive relationship between blood cell counts and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, supporting the idea of a close connection between hematopoiesis and bone formation. The study results also suggest that blood cell counts could be a putative marker for estimating BMD in postmenopausal women. PMID:21786437

  11. Longitudinal trends of total white blood cell and differential white blood cell counts of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wan-Ling; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Neriishi, Kazuo; Yamada, Michiko; Cologne, John; Fujiwara, Saeko

    2010-01-01

    In studying the late health effects of atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors, earlier findings were that white blood cell (WBC) count increased with radiation dose in cross-sectional studies. However, a persistent effect of radiation on WBC count and other risk factors has yet to be confirmed. The objectives of the present study were 1) to examine the longitudinal relationship between A-bomb radiation dose and WBC and differential WBC counts among A-bomb survivors and 2) to investigate the potential confounding risk factors (such as age at exposure and smoking status) as well as modification of the radiation dose-response. A total of 7,562 A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were included in this study from 1964-2004. A linear mixed model was applied using the repeated WBC measurements. During the study period, a secular downward trend of WBC count was observed. Radiation exposure was a significant risk factor for elevated WBC and differential WBC counts over time. A significant increase of WBC counts among survivors with high radiation dose (> 2 Gy) was detected in men exposed below the age of 20 and in women regardless of age at exposure. Effects on WBC of low dose radiation remain unclear, however. Cigarette smoking produced the most pronounced effect on WBC counts and its impact was much larger than that of radiation exposure. PMID:20543527

  12. Automatic Ki-67 counting using robust cell detection and online dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fuyong; Su, Hai; Neltner, Janna; Yang, Lin

    2014-03-01

    Ki-67 proliferation index is a valid and important biomarker to gauge neuroendocrine tumor (NET) cell progression within the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. Automatic Ki-67 assessment is very challenging due to complex variations of cell characteristics. In this paper, we propose an integrated learning-based framework for accurate automatic Ki-67 counting for NET. The main contributions of our method are: 1) A robust cell counting and boundary delineation algorithm that is designed to localize both tumor and nontumor cells. 2) A novel online sparse dictionary learning method to select a set of representative training samples. 3) An automated framework that is used to differentiate tumor from nontumor cells (such as lymphocytes) and immunopositive from immunonegative tumor cells for the assessment of Ki-67 proliferation index. The proposed method has been extensively tested using 46 NET cases. The performance is compared with pathologists' manual annotations. The automatic Ki-67 counting is quite accurate compared with pathologists' manual annotations. This is much more accurate than existing methods. PMID:24557687

  13. HEMODOSE: A Biodosimetry Tool Based on Multi-type Blood Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaowen; Blakely, William F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral blood cell counts are important biomarkers of radiation exposure. In this work, a simplified compartmental modeling approach is applied to simulate the perturbation of the hematopoiesis system in humans after radiation exposure, and HemoDose software is reported to estimate individuals’ absorbed doses based on multi-type blood cell counts. Testing with patient data in some historical accidents indicates that either single or serial granulocyte, lymphocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts after exposure can be robust indicators of the absorbed doses. In addition, such correlation exists not only in the early time window (1 or 2 d) but also in the late phase (up to 4 wk) after exposure, when the four types of cell counts are combined for analysis. These demonstrate the capability of HemoDose as a rapid point-of-care diagnostic or centralized high-throughput assay system for personnel exposed to unintended high doses of radiation, especially in large-scale nuclear/radiological disaster scenarios involving mass casualties. PMID:26011498

  14. Impulsivity-related Traits Are Associated with Higher White Blood Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Sutin, Angelina R.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Cannas, Alessandra; Ferrucci, Luigi; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Zonderman, Alan B.; Terracciano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A chronically elevated white blood cell (WBC) count is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality. The present research tests whether facets of impulsivity impulsiveness, excitement-seeking, self-discipline, and deliberation are associated with chronically elevated WBC counts. Community-dwelling participants (N=5,652) from Sardinia, Italy, completed a standard personality questionnaire and provided blood samples concurrently and again three years later. Higher scores on impulsivity, in particular impulsiveness and excitement-seeking, were related to higher total WBC counts and higher lymphocyte counts at both time points. Impulsiveness was a predictor of chronic inflammation: For every standard deviation difference in this trait, there was an almost 25% higher risk of elevated WBC counts at both time points (OR=1.23, 95% CI=1.101.38). These associations were mediated, in part, by smoking and body mass index. The findings demonstrate that links between psychological processes and immunity are not limited to acute stressors; stable personality dispositions are associated with a chronic inflammatory state. PMID:22190235

  15. A comparative study of white blood cell counts and disease risk in carnivores.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Charles L; Gittleman, John L; Antonovics, Janis

    2003-01-01

    In primates, baseline levels of white blood cell (WBC) counts are related to mating promiscuity. It was hypothesized that differences in the primate immune system reflect pathogen risks from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Here, we test for the generality of this result by examining hypotheses involving behavioural, ecological and life-history factors in carnivores. Again, we find a significant correlation in carnivores between mating promiscuity and elevated levels of WBC counts. In addition, we find relationships with measures of sociality, substrate use and life-history parameters. These comparative results across independent taxonomic orders indicate that the evolution of the immune system, as represented by phylogenetic differences in basal levels of blood cell counts, is closely linked to disease risk involved with promiscuous mating and associated variables. We found only limited support for an association between the percentage of meat in the diet and WBC counts, which is consistent with the behavioural and physiological mechanisms that carnivores use to avoid parasite transmission from their prey. We discuss additional comparative questions related to taxonomic differences in disease risk, modes of parasite transmission and implications for conservation biology. PMID:12639313

  16. Sample stability for complete blood cell count using the Sysmex XN haematological analyser

    PubMed Central

    Daves, Massimo; Zagler, Elmar M.; Cemin, Roberto; Gnech, Flora; Joos, Alexandra; Platzgummer, Stefan; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Sample stability is a crucial aspect for the quality of results of a haematology laboratory. This study was conducted to investigate the reliability of haematological testing using Sysmex XN in samples stored for up to 24 h at different temperatures. Materials and methods Haematological tests were performed on whole blood samples collected from 16 ostensibly healthy outpatients immediately after collection and 3 h, 6 h or 24 h afterwards, with triple aliquots kept at room temperature, 4 C or 37 C. Results No meaningful bias was observed after 3 h under different storage conditions, except for red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and platelet count (impedance technique, PLT-I) at 37 C. After 6 h, meaningful bias was observed for mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) at room temperature, red blood cell (RBC) count, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), MCH, MCV and PLT-I at 4 C, and RBC, RDW, MCHC, MCH and PLT-I at 37 C. After 24 h, a meaningful bias was observed for MCHC, MCV, platelet count (fluorescent technique, PLT-F) and mean platelet volume (MPV) at room temperature, MCHC, MCV, PLT-I and MPV at 4 C, and all parameters except RBC count and MPV at 37 C. Discussion Great caution should be observed when analysing results of haematological tests conducted more than 3 h after sample collection. PMID:26057491

  17. Handheld 2-channel impedimetric cell counting system with embedded real-time processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottigni, A.; Carminati, M.; Ferrari, G.; Vahey, M. D.; Voldman, J.; Sampietro, M.

    2011-05-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems have been attracting a growing attention for the perspective of miniaturization and portability of bio-chemical assays. Here we present a the design and characterization of a miniaturized, USB-powered, self-contained, 2-channel instrument for impedance sensing, suitable for label-free tracking and real-time detection of cells flowing in microfluidic channels. This original circuit features a signal generator based on a direct digital synthesizer, a transimpedance amplifier, an integrated square-wave lock-in coupled to a ?? ADC converter, and a digital processing platform. Real-time automatic peak detection on two channels is implemented in a FPGA. System functionality has been tested with an electronic resistance modulator to simulate 1% impedance variation produced by cells, reaching a time resolution of 50?s (enabling a count rate of 2000 events/s) with an applied voltage as low as 200mV. Biological experiments have been carried out counting yeast cells. Statistical analysis of events is in agreement with the expected amplitude and time distributions. 2-channel yeast counting has been performed with concomitant dielectrophoretic cell separation, showing that this novel and ultra compact sensing system, thanks to the selectivity of the lock-in detector, is compatible with other AC electrical fields applied to the device.

  18. Evaluation of a citrate-based anticoagulant with platelet inhibitory activity for feline blood cell Counts.

    PubMed

    Norman, Elizabeth J.; Barron, Ronnie C. J.; Nash, Andrew S.; Clampitt, Roger BB.

    2001-01-01

    Aggregation of feline platelets in vitro results in difficulty assessing platelet number. A citrate-based anticoagulant containing the platelet inhibitors theophylline, adenosine, and dipyridamole (CTAD; Diatube-H, Becton Dickinson, Oxford, UK) has been developed for use in human platelet studies and heparin assays. To evaluate the efficacy of CTAD in reducing platelet aggregation in feline blood samples, aliquots of blood from 51 cats were anticoagulated with EDTA, CTAD, and for 12 samples, citrate solution. Samples preserved in CTAD had significantly higher (Pcounts, as determined by an impedance counter, hemacytometer, and smear estimation, than samples preserved in EDTA. In addition, subjective assessment of blood smears showed significantly fewer platelet aggregates (P<.001) in CTAD-treated samples compared with EDTA samples. Although values were similar, automated platelet counts and smear estimates of platelet number were significantly higher (P<.05) and platelet aggregation was significantly less (P<.05) in CTAD samples than in citrate samples. These results suggest that the platelet inhibitory activity of CTAD reduced feline platelet aggregation. Automated total WBC counts in CTAD samples were significantly lower (P<.001) than automated counts in EDTAsamples but were similar to manual WBC counts in EDTAsamples. Differences in both platelet and WBC counts between CTAD and EDTA or citrate samples were clinically relevant. Mean platelet volume and MCV were significantly lower (P<.05) in CTAD samples than in EDTA samples. No effect was seen on cell morphology or staining characteristics. The anticoagulant CTAD offers an advantage over both EDTA and cit-rate for feline hematologic analysis, by decreasing pseudothrombocytopenia and pseudoleukocytosis. PMID:12024311

  19. Relationship among specific bacterial counts and total bacterial and somatic cell counts and factors influencing their variation in ovine bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    de Garnica, M L; Linage, B; Carriedo, J A; De La Fuente, L F; Garca-Jimeno, M C; Santos, J A; Gonzalo, C

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the relationship among the counts of different organisms and total bacterial count (BTTBC) and somatic cell count (BTSCC) as determined in dairy laboratories in ovine bulk tank milk, 751 bulk tank milk samples from 205 dairy sheep flocks belonging to Consortium for Ovine Promotion (CPO) were collected between January and December 2011. Four samplings were carried out in each flock, once per season, throughout 1 yr. Variables analyzed were bulk tank counts of thermoduric, psychrotrophic, coliform, and gram-positive catalase-negative cocci (GPCNC) bacterial groups. Thermoduric, psychrotrophic, and coliform species were significantly related to BTTBC, whereas GPCNC were correlated with both BTTBC and BTSCC variables. Highest counts were for psychrotroph and coliform groups, and a moderate to high correlation (r=0.51) was found between both variables, indicating that poor cleaning practices in the flocks tend to select for less-resistant organisms, such as gram-negative rods. In addition, BTTBC correlated with BTSCC (r=0.42). Some variation factors for specific bacterial counts, such as breed, season, milking type, dry therapy, and milk yield, were also analyzed. Flock information was collected from flock books, annual audits, and the CPO traceability system. Psychrotrophs and coliforms had elevated counts in winter, whereas GPCNC were higher in summer and in hand-milked flocks. Dry therapy contributed to the reduction in psychrotrophic bacteria; therefore, some strains of mammary pathogens could also be psychrotrophic bacteria. Results of this study would be helpful for troubleshooting milk quality problems and developing premium payment systems in dairy sheep. PMID:23200475

  20. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays. PMID:26848849

  1. Low Counts of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells after Engraftment Are Associated with High Early Mortality after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Matheus Vescovi; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Kimura, Eliza Yurico Sugano; Colturato, Vergílio Antônio Rensi; de Souza, Mair Pedro; Mauad, Marcos; Ikoma, Maura Valerio; Novis, Yana; Rocha, Vanderson; Ginani, Valeria Cortez; Wanderley de Oliveira Felix, Olga Margareth; Seber, Adriana; Kerbauy, Fabio Rodrigues; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Orfao, Alberto; Rodrigues, Celso Arrais

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that drive immune responses and tolerance and are divided in different subsets: myeloid DCs (mDCs: lineage-; HLA-DR+, 11c+), plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs: HLA-DR+, CD123+), and monocyte-derived DCs (moDC: lineage-, 11c+, 16+). After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), low DC counts in the recipients' peripheral blood (PB) have been associated with worse outcomes, but the relevance of DC graft content remains unclear, and there are few data in the setting of unrelated donor HSCT. We evaluated the DC graft content and monitored DC recovery in PB from 111 HSCT recipients (median age, 17 years; range 1 to 74), who received bone marrow (46%), umbilical cord blood (32%), or PB (22%) from unrelated (81%) or related donors (19%). In 86 patients with sustained allogeneic recovery, patients with higher counts of all DC subsets (pDC, mDC, and moDC) 3 weeks after engraftment had lower incidence of nonrelapse mortality (NMR) and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) and better survival. pDC counts were associated with more striking results: patients with higher pDC counts had much lower incidences of NRM (3% versus 47%, P < .0001), lower incidence of aGVHD (24% versus 67%, P < .0001), and better overall survival (92% versus 45%, P < .0001). In contrast, higher pDC counts in the graft was associated with an increased risk of aGVHD (55% versus 26%, P = .02). Our results indicate that DC counts are closely correlated with HSCT outcomes and warrant further prospective evaluation and possible early therapeutic interventions to ameliorate severe aGVHD and decrease mortality. PMID:25792371

  2. Fungus spores as uniform reference particles for use in absolute cell counts.

    PubMed

    KLAPPER, B F

    1962-11-01

    Spores of several different fungi were tested as microspheres in a recently described method of making absolute cell counts of bone-marrow cells. For a particular fungus to qualify for use in the counting method, it must be readily obtained and must produce large quantities of spores that are highly uniform in size. Thus far, the most satisfactory microspheres we prepared were the basidiospores of Calvatia gigantea, the giant puffball. This common field organism is a prolific spore producer. A simple procedure for obtaining spore suspensions was devised. Another source of microspheres is the conidia of species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. These widespread organisms were easily grown in the laboratory and also provided heavy spore harvests. It was suggested that conidia of these or additional species of fungi may be found useful in other kinds of research requiring small, highly uniform particles. PMID:14033277

  3. Fungus Spores as Uniform Reference Particles for Use in Absolute Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Klapper, Betty F.

    1962-01-01

    Spores of several different fungi were tested as microspheres in a recently described method of making absolute cell counts of bone-marrow cells. For a particular fungus to qualify for use in the counting method, it must be readily obtained and must produce large quantities of spores that are highly uniform in size. Thus far, the most satisfactory microspheres we prepared were the basidiospores of Calvatia gigantea, the giant puffball. This common field organism is a prolific spore producer. A simple procedure for obtaining spore suspensions was devised. Another source of microspheres is the conidia of species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. These widespread organisms were easily grown in the laboratory and also provided heavy spore harvests. It was suggested that conidia of these or additional species of fungi may be found useful in other kinds of research requiring small, highly uniform particles. Images FIG. 2 PMID:14033277

  4. Blood cell counting and classification by nonflowing laser light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye; Zhang, Zhenxi; Yang, Xinhui; Jiang, Dazong; Yeo, Joon Hock

    1999-11-01

    A new non-flowing laser light scattering method for counting and classifying blood cells is presented. A linear charge- coupled device with 1024 elements is used to detect the scattered light intensity distribution of the blood cells. A pinhole plate is combined with the CCD to compete the focusing of the measurement system. An isotropic sphere is used to simulate the blood cell. Mie theory is used to describe the scattering of blood cells. In order to inverse the size distribution of blood cells from their scattered light intensity distribution, Powell method combined with precision punishment method is used as a dependent model method for measurement red blood cells and blood plates. Non-negative constraint least square method combined with Powell method and precision punishment method is used as an independent model for measuring white blood cells. The size distributions of white blood cells and red blood cells, and the mean diameter of red blood cells are measured by this method. White blood cells can be divided into three classes: lymphocytes, middle-sized cells and neutrocytes according to their sizes. And the number of blood cells in unit volume can also be measured by the linear dependence of blood cells concentration on scattered light intensity.

  5. Metabolic activity of bacterial cell enumerated by direct viable count. [Escherichia coli; Salmonella enteritidis

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporation radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included (methyl-/sup 3/H) thymidine or (U-/sup 14/C) glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca. 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate.

  6. Effect of Occupational Exposure on Blood Cell Counts, Electrocardiogram and Blood Pressure in Rice Mill Workers

    PubMed Central

    Aithala, Manjunatha; Das, Kusal Kanti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Under normal conditions, parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems interact to regulate the heart rate of about 70 beats per minute. Activation of sympathetic nervous system by emotional or physical stress increases heart rate and the force of heart beat. There are many factors which alter the heart rate. The chemical and mechanical stimulation of receptors can also cause change in blood pressure through autonomic nervous system. Exposure to dust also causes alteration in blood cell counts. This can be due to allergic reactions and inflammation which in turn evoked by dust entering the lungs. Objectives Aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of occupational exposure on haematological and cardiovascular parameters of rice mill workers by analysing Blood Cell Counts, ECG and Blood Pressure. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was carried on 134 rice mill workers and an equal number of age and sex matched healthy individual. The blood cell counts were determined by automated cell counter machine, ECG was recorded by using ECG machine and Blood Pressure was measured by using mercurial sphygmomanometer. Results Neurtrophil, Eosinophil and Lymphocyte count among haematological parameters were significantly increased in exposed individuals. Marked variation was seen in ECG and Blood pressure among cardiovascular parameters of exposed individuals compared with control group. Conclusion The findings of our study clearly indicate that the rice mill workers are under high level of dust exposure which has deleterious effects on their blood and tissues. It is due to high oxidative stress. There are abnormalities seen in cardiovascular system. PMID:26674852

  7. An Automated High-Throughput Counting Method for Screening Circulating Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mengxia; Schiro, Perry G.; Kuo, Jason S.; Koehler, Karen M.; Sabath, Daniel E.; Popov, Viorica; Feng, Qinghua; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has proved valuable for early detection and prognosis in cancer treatment. This paper describes an automated high-throughput counting method for CTCs based on microfluidics and line-confocal microscopy. Peripheral blood was directly labeled with multiple antibodies, each conjugated with a different fluorophore, pneumatically pumped through a microfluidic channel and interrogated by a line-confocal microscope. Based on the fluorescence signals and labeling schemes, the count of CTCs was automatically reported. Due to the high flow rate, 1 mL of whole blood can be analyzed in less than 30 minutes. We applied this method in analyzing CTCs from 90 stage IV breast-cancer patient samples, and performed a side-by-side comparison with the results of the CellSearch assay, which is the only method approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at present for enumeration of CTCs. This method has a recovery rate for cultured breast cancer cells of 94% (n=9), with an average of 1.2 counts/mL of background level of detected CTCs from healthy donors. It detected CTCs from breast-cancer patients, ranging from 15 to 3375 counts/7.5 mL. Using this method, we also demonstrate the ability to enumerate CTCs from breast-cancer patients that were positive for Her2 or CD44+/CD24?, which is a putative cancer stem cell marker. This automated method can enumerate CTCs from peripheral blood with high throughput and sensitivity. It could potentially benefit the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. PMID:23387387

  8. Association Between White Blood Cell Count Following Radiation Therapy With Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chad; Gomez, Daniel R.; Wang, Hongmei; Levy, Lawrence B.; Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an inflammatory response to radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the association between RP and white blood cell (WBC) count, an established metric of systemic inflammation, after RT for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received ?60 Gy as definitive therapy. The primary endpoint was whether WBC count after RT (defined as 2 weeks through 3 months after RT completion) was associated with grade ?3 or grade ?2 RP. Median lung volume receiving ?20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 31%, and post-RT WBC counts ranged from 1.7 to 21.2 10{sup 3} WBCs/?L. Odds ratios (ORs) associating clinical variables and post-RT WBC counts with RP were calculated via logistic regression. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to define optimal post-RT WBC count cut points. Results: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly higher in patients with grade ?3 RP than without (P<.05). Optimal cut points for post-RT WBC count were found to be 7.4 and 8.0 10{sup 3}/?L for grade ?3 and ?2 RP, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between post-RT WBC count and grade ?3 (n=46, OR=2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4?4.9, P=.003) and grade ?2 RP (n=164, OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01). This association held in a stepwise multivariate regression. Of note, V{sub 20} was found to be significantly associated with grade ?2 RP (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01) and trended toward significance for grade ?3 RP (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=.06). Conclusions: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly and independently associated with RP and have potential utility as a diagnostic or predictive marker for this toxicity.

  9. Assembly of bionanostructures onto beta-cyclodextrin molecular printboards for antibody recognition and lymphocyte cell counting.

    PubMed

    Ludden, Manon J W; Li, Xiao; Greve, Jan; van Amerongen, Aart; Escalante, Maryana; Subramaniam, Vinod; Reinhoudt, David N; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2008-06-01

    The assembly of complex bionanostructures onto beta-cyclodextrin (betaCD) monolayers has been investigated with the aims of antibody recognition and cell adhesion. The formation of these assemblies relies on host-guest, protein-ligand, and protein-protein interactions. The buildup of a structure consisting of a divalent bis(adamantyl)-biotin linker, streptavidin (SAv), biotinylated protein A (bt-PA), and an Fc fragment of a human immunoglobin G (IgG-Fc) was studied with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Patterns of this bionanostructure were obtained via microcontact printing of the divalent linker at the molecular printboard, followed by the subsequent attachment of the proteins. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the buildup of these bionanostructures on the betaCD monolayers is highly specific. On the basis of these results, bionanostructures were made in which whole antibodies (ABs) were used instead of the IgG-Fc. These ABs were bound to the SAv layer via biotinylated protein G (bt-PG) or via a biotinylated AB. These constructions yielded specifically bound ABs with a less than maximal density, as shown by SPR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Finally, the immobilization of ABs to the molecular printboard was used to create platforms for lymphocyte cell count purposes. Monoclonal ABs (MABs) were attached to the SAv layer using bt-PG, an engineered biotin functionality, or through nonspecific adsorption. The binding specificity of the immobilized cells was the highest on the buildup made from bt-PG, which is attributed to an optimized orientation of the antibodies. An approximately linear relationship between the numbers of seeded cells and counted cells was demonstrated, rendering the platform potentially suitable for lymphocyte cell counting. PMID:18461928

  10. Composition, indigenous proteolytic enzymes and coagulating behaviour of ewe milk as affected by somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, Marzia; Santillo, Antonella; Caroprese, Mariangela; Schena, Laura; Russo, Donatella Esterina; Sevi, Agostino

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of somatic cell count in ewe milk on i) composition and hygienic traits; ii) plasmin, cathepsin and elastase activities; iii) leukocyte differential count; iv) renneting parameters. Individual ewe milk samples were grouped according to somatic cell count (SCC) into five classes: SC300 (<300 000 cells/ml), SC500 (from 301 000 to 500 000 cells/ml), SC1000 (from 501 000 to 1 000 000 cells/ml), SC2000 (from 1 001 000 to 2 000 000 cells/ml) and SC>2000 (>2 001 000 cells/ml). Individual milk samples were analysed for pH, chemical composition, microbial features, indigenous proteolytic enzymes, differential leukocyte population, and renneting parameters. Milk yield, lactose, protein, non casein nitrogen, microbial features were affected by SCC level. Plasmin and elastase activities were the highest in samples with more than 1 000 000 cells/ml; plasmin had intermediate values in samples with 300 000 to 1 000 000 cells/ml and the lowest in samples with less than 300 000 cells/ml of milk. Cathepsin D showed significantly lower values in SC300 and SC1000 classes than in SC500, SC2000 and SC>2000 classes. The highest percentages of lymphocyte were found in samples with less than 1 000 000 cells/ml, while the highest levels of polymorphonuclear leukocyte were found in samples with more than 1 000 000 cells/ml of milk. Longer clotting time was found in SC>2000 samples, while reduced clot firmness was observed in SC500 and SC>2000 samples. Results on milk yield and on compositional parameters evidenced an impairment of udder efficiency in ewe milk samples starting from 300 000 cells/ml. Plasmin activity in milk can be considered as a marker of the synthetic and secreting ability of the mammary gland; furthermore plasmin and elastase were consistent with the health status of the udder. Finally cathepsin D played a role in the worsening of renneting properties of ewe milk. PMID:21871142

  11. Abuse resistant active metal anode/fluid cathode depolarized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Barrella, J.N.

    1980-12-09

    An abuse resistant electrochemical cell having an active metal anode, a fluid cathode depolarizer, an inert cathode and an electrolyte solution is described. The cell components are arranged in terms of relative capacities and configuration such that a sufficient amount of the dischargeable anode metal is utilized prior to the cell reaching zero volts (caused by deactivation of the cathode) whereby, upon forced discharge, polarization of both anode and cathode and deep cell reversal occur within a short period of time thereafter. This short period of time is no greater than 15% of the initial discharge time to zero volts. The cell additionally contains sufficient fluid depolarizer such that a portion thereof remains at the time of such deep cell reversal.

  12. Correlation of striatal dopamine transporter imaging with post mortem substantia nigra cell counts.

    PubMed

    Kraemmer, Julia; Kovacs, Gabor G; Perju-Dumbrava, Laura; Pirker, Susanne; Traub-Weidinger, Tatiana; Pirker, Walter

    2014-12-01

    Dopamine transporter imaging is widely used for the differential diagnosis of parkinsonism. Only limited data are available on the relationship between striatal dopamine transporter binding and dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra (SN). We analyzed postmortem SN cell counts in patients who had previously undergone dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Pathological diagnoses included Parkinson's disease (n?=?1), dementia with Lewy bodies (n?=?2), multiple system atrophy (n?=?1), corticobasal degeneration (n?=?2), atypical parkinsonism with multiple pathological conditions (n?=?1), Alzheimer's disease (n?=?1), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (n?=?1). [(12) (3) I]?-CIT SPECT had been performed in all subjects using a standardized protocol on the same triple-head gamma camera. The density of neuromelanin-containing and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive substantia nigra neurons/mm(2) was evaluated in paraffin-embedded tissue sections by morphometric methods. Mean disease duration at the time of dopamine transporter imaging was 2.3 years, and the mean interval from imaging to death was 29.3 months (range, 4-68 months). Visual analysis of dopamine transporter images showed reduced striatal uptake in all seven patients with neurodegenerative parkinsonism, but not in Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease cases. Averaged [(right+left)/2] striatal uptake was highly correlated with averaged SN cell counts (rs ?=?0.98, P?cells). Similar strong correlations were found in separate analyses for the right and left sides. Striatal dopamine transporter binding highly correlated with postmortem SN cell counts, confirming the validity of dopamine transporter imaging as an excellent in vivo marker of nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration. PMID:25048738

  13. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy at high CD4+ cell counts is associated with positive treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D.; Reuter, Anja; Harrigan, P. Richard; Loureno, Lillian; Chau, William; Hull, Mark; Mackenzie, Lauren; Guillemi, Silvia; Hogg, Robert S.; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is limited research investigating the possible mechanisms of how starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) at a higher CD4+ cell count decreases mortality. This study investigated the association between initiating cART with short-term and long-term achievement of viral suppression; emergence of any drug resistance and of an AIDS-defining illness (ADI); long-term treatment adherence; and all-cause mortality. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 4120 naive patients who initiated cART between 2000 and 2012. Patients were followed until 2013, death or until the last contact date (varied by outcome). The main exposure was the interaction between period of cART initiation (20002006 and 20072012) and CD4+ cell count at cART initiation (<500 versus ?500 cells/?l). We considered both baseline and longitudinal covariates. We fitted different multivariable models using cross-sectional and longitudinal statistical methods, depending on the outcome. Results Patients who initiated cART with a CD4+ cell count at least 500 cells/?l in 20072012 had an increased likelihood of achieving viral suppression at 9 months and of maintaining an adherence level of at least 95% over time, and the lowest probability of developing any resistance and an ADI during follow-up. These patients were not the ones with the highest likelihood of maintaining viral suppression over time, most likely due to viral load blips experienced during the follow-up. Conclusion The outcomes in this study likely play an important role in explaining the positive impact of early cART initiation on mortality. These results should alleviate some of the concerns clinicians may have when initiating cART in patients with high CD4+s as recommended by current treatment guidelines. PMID:26165354

  14. Analysis of white blood cell counts in mice after gamma- or proton-radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Maks, Casey J; Wan, X Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H; Romero-Weaver, Ana L; Sanzari, Jenine K; Wilson, Jolaine M; Rightnar, Steve; Wroe, Andrew J; Koss, Peter; Gridley, Daila S; Slater, James M; Kennedy, Ann R

    2011-08-01

    In the coming decades human space exploration is expected to move beyond low-Earth orbit. This transition involves increasing mission time and therefore an increased risk of radiation exposure from solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Acute radiation effects after exposure to SPE radiation are of prime importance due to potential mission-threatening consequences. The major objective of this study was to characterize the dose-response relationship for proton and ? radiation delivered at doses up to 2 Gy at high (0.5 Gy/min) and low (0.5 Gy/h) dose rates using white blood cell (WBC) counts as a biological end point. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent decrease in WBC counts in mice exposed to high- and low-dose-rate proton and ? radiation, suggesting that astronauts exposed to SPE-like radiation may experience a significant decrease in circulating leukocytes. PMID:21476859

  15. Design, fabrication, and applications of in situ fluid cell TEM.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Nielsen, Michael H; De Yoreo, James J

    2013-01-01

    In situ fluid cell TEM is a powerful new tool for understanding dynamic processes during liquid phase chemical reactions, including mineral formation. This technique, which operates in the high vacuum of a TEM chamber, provides information on crystal structure, phase, morphology, size, aggregation/segregation, and crystal growth mechanisms in real time. In situ TEM records both crystal structure and morphology at spatial resolutions down to the atomic level with high temporal resolution of up to 10(-6)s per image, giving it distinct advantages over other in situ techniques such as optical microscopy, AFM, or X-ray scattering or diffraction. This chapter addresses the design, fabrication, and assembly of TEM fluid cells and applications of fluid cell TEM to understanding mechanisms of mineralization. PMID:24188766

  16. Accuracy of WHO CD4 cell count criteria for virological failure of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Olivia; MacPhail, Patrick; Boulle, Andrew; Wood, Robin; Schechter, Mauro; Dabis, Franois; Sprinz, Eduardo; Egger, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Summary OBJECTIVES To examine the accuracy of the World Health Organization immunological criteria for virological failure of antiretroviral treatment. METHODS Analysis of 10 treatment programmes in Africa and South America that monitor both CD4 cell counts and HIV-1 viral load. Adult patients with at least two CD4 counts and viral load measurements between month 6 and 18 after starting a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen were included. WHO immunological criteria include CD4 counts persistently <100 cells/?l, a fall below the baseline CD4 count, or a fall of >50% from the peak value. Virological failure was defined as two measurements ?10 0000 copies/ml (higher threshold) or ?500 copies/ml (lower threshold). Measures of accuracy with exact binomial 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. RESULTS A total of 2009 patients were included. During 1856 person-years of follow up 63 patients met the immunological criteria and 35 patients (higher threshold) and 95 patients (lower threshold) met the virological criteria. Sensitivity [95% confidence interval (CI)] was 17.1% (6.633.6%) for the higher and 12.6% (6.721.0%) for the lower threshold. Corresponding results for specificity were 97.1% (96.397.8%) and 97.3% (96.598.0%), for positive predictive value 9.5% (3.619.6%) and 19.0% (10.230.9%) and for negative predictive value 98.5% (97.999.0%) and 95.7% (94.796.6%). CONCLUSIONS The positive predictive value of the WHO immunological criteria for virological failure of antiretroviral treatment in resource-limited settings is poor, but the negative predictive value is high. Immunological criteria are more appropriate for ruling out than for ruling in virological failure in resource-limited settings. PMID:19624478

  17. Stimulation of amniotic fluid cells by fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Chettur, L; Christensen, E; Philip, J

    1978-10-01

    Amniotic fluid cells were grown in modified Dulbecco's medium with and without the following additives in different combinations: fibroblast growth factor (FGF), dexamethasone (DME), insulin and cyclic GMP under controlled conditions. Experiments were also conducted with varying amounts of foetal calf serum and FGF to establish optimum levels. Comparative growth, determined by measuring 3H-thymidine uptake, showed that the combination of FGF, DME and insulin in medium with 20% foetal calf serum produced the highest growth rate. These experiments indicate that the culture time of amniotic fluid cells for chromosome studies could be reduced by 25%. FGF did not have any deleterious effect on the chromosomes. PMID:212239

  18. Increased levels of Treg cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and induced sputum of patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective It has recently been described that circulatory and BAL regulatory T-cells (Tregs), defined as CD4+CD25highCD127low are increased in patients with active sarcoidosis compared with other interstitial lung diseases. Materials and methods We studied prospectively 17 patients (10 women, 7 men) of median age 39 years (range 27-65) with active granulomatous lung diseases (GLD) (10 patients with sarcoidosis (BBS), and 7 with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), and 9 healthy controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and induced sputum Treg counts, CD4+, CD8+, CD25+ cells were quantified by flow cytometry. Disease activity was measured by ACE serum level. Pulmonary function tests were performed using an Elite DL Medgraphics body box. Results We found Treg cells count significantly elevated in induced sputum from active GLD (38.3% vs. 7.1% and 5.3% in BBS, HP, and control, respectively). A significantly higher percentage of Treg cells characterized BAL cells from HP patients (2.27%; 9.5%; 2.1%, in BBS, HP and control, respectively). There was a strong correlation with ACE serum level and Treg cell count in BAL fluid of BBS patients, with no such correlation within HP patient group, nor Treg cell count and pulmonary function tests. Conclusions Our data suggest a potential role of CD4+CD25 high CD127 low induced sputum and BAL lymphocytes from patients with active granulomatous lung diseases and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. An increased number of Treg cells in active GLD may be involved in immune regulation in active granulomatous lung diseases. The results indicate that analysis of these cells could be useful as markers of disease activity in granulomatous lung diseases. PMID:20156750

  19. A more appropriate white blood cell count for estimating malaria parasite density in Plasmodium vivax patients in northeastern Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaie; Feng, Guohua; Zeng, Weilin; Li, Xiaomei; Bai, Yao; Deng, Shuang; Ruan, Yonghua; Morris, James; Li, Siman; Yang, Zhaoqing; Cui, Liwang

    2016-04-01

    The conventional method of estimating parasite densities employ an assumption of 8000 white blood cells (WBCs)/μl. However, due to leucopenia in malaria patients, this number appears to overestimate parasite densities. In this study, we assessed the accuracy of parasite density estimated using this assumed WBC count in eastern Myanmar, where Plasmodium vivax has become increasingly prevalent. From 256 patients with uncomplicated P. vivax malaria, we estimated parasite density and counted WBCs by using an automated blood cell counter. It was found that WBC counts were not significantly different between patients of different gender, axillary temperature, and body mass index levels, whereas they were significantly different between age groups of patients and the time points of measurement. The median parasite densities calculated with the actual WBC counts (1903/μl) and the assumed WBC count of 8000/μl (2570/μl) were significantly different. We demonstrated that using the assumed WBC count of 8000 cells/μl to estimate parasite densities of P. vivax malaria patients in this area would lead to an overestimation. For P. vivax patients aged five years and older, an assumed WBC count of 5500/μl best estimated parasite densities. This study provides more realistic assumed WBC counts for estimating parasite densities in P. vivax patients from low-endemicity areas of Southeast Asia. PMID:26802490

  20. A secreted cell number counting factor represses intracellular glucose levels to regulate group size in dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Jang, Wonhee; Chiem, Binh; Gomer, Richard H

    2002-10-18

    Developing Dictyostelium cells form evenly sized groups of approximately 2 x 10(4) cells. A secreted 450-kDa protein complex called counting factor (CF) regulates group size by repressing cell-cell adhesion and myosin polymerization and by increasing cAMP-stimulated cAMP production, actin polymerization, and cell motility. We find that CF regulates group size in part by repressing internal glucose levels. Transformants lacking bioactive CF and wild-type cells with extracellular CF depleted by antibodies have high glucose levels, whereas transformants oversecreting CF have low glucose levels. A component of CF, countin, affects group size in a manner similar to CF, and a 1-min exposure of cells to countin decreases glucose levels. Adding 1 mm exogenous glucose negates the effect of high levels of extracellular CF on group size and mimics the effect of depleting CF on glucose levels, cell-cell adhesion, cAMP pulse size, actin polymerization, myosin assembly, and motility. These results suggest that glucose is a downstream component in part of the CF signaling pathway and may be relevant to the observed role of the insulin pathway in tissue size regulation in higher eukaryotes. PMID:12161440

  1. Enhanced cell viability via strain stimulus and fluid flow in magnetically actuated scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mack, Julia J; Corrin, Abigail A; dos Santos e Lucato, Sergio L; Dunn, James C Y; Wu, Benjamin W; Cox, Brian N

    2013-03-01

    A novel magnetically actuated scaffold was used to explore the effects of strain stimulus on the proliferation and spatial distribution of smooth muscle cells and improve cell viability in the scaffold interior by pumping nutrients throughout the structure. Magnetically actuable scaffolds were fabricated in a tube shape by winding electrospun sheets of a biodegradable polymer modified with magnetic Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles. Prior to rolling, the sheets were seeded with smooth muscle cells and wound into tubes with diameter 5.2 mm and wall thickness 0.2 mm. The tubular scaffolds were actuated by a magnetic field to induce a cyclic crimping deformation, which applies strain stimulus to the cells and pumps nutrient fluid through the porous tube walls. Comparison with non-actuated controls shows that magnetic actuation increases the total cell count throughout the scaffold after 14 days of incubation. Furthermore, whereas cell density as a function of position through the tube wall thickness showed a minimum in the mid-interior in the controls after 14 days due to cell starvation, the actuated scaffolds displayed a maximum cell density. Comparison of cell distributions with the expected spatial variations in strain amplitude and nutrient flux implies that both strain stimulus and nutrient pumping are significant factors in cell proliferation. PMID:23042257

  2. Effects of season, milking routine and cow cleanliness on bacterial and somatic cell counts of bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Zucali, Maddalena; Bava, Luciana; Tamburini, Alberto; Brasca, Milena; Vanoni, Laura; Sandrucci, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of season, cow cleanliness and milking routine on bacterial and somatic cell counts of bulk tank milk. A total of 22 dairy farms in Lombardy (Italy) were visited three times in a year in different seasons. During each visit, samples of bulk tank milk were taken for bacterial and somatic cell counts; swabs from the teat surface of a group of cows were collected after teat cleaning and before milking. Cow cleanliness was assessed by scoring udder, flanks and legs of all milking cows using a 4-point scale system. Season affected cow cleanliness with a significantly higher percentage of non-clean (NC) cows during Cold compared with Mild season. Standard plate count (SPC), laboratory pasteurization count (LPC), coliform count (CC) and somatic cell count, expressed as linear score (LS), in milk significantly increased in Hot compared with Cold season. Coagulase-positive staphylococci on teat swabs showed higher counts in Cold season in comparison with the other ones. The effect of cow cleanliness was significant for SPC, psychrotrophic bacterial count (PBC), CC and Escherichia coli in bulk tank milk. Somatic cell count showed a relationship with udder hygiene score. Milking operation routine strongly affected bacterial counts and LS of bulk tank milk: farms that accomplished a comprehensive milking scheme including two or more operations among forestripping, pre-dipping and post-dipping had lower teat contamination and lower milk SPC, PBC, LPC, CC and LS than farms that did not carry out any operation. PMID:21843397

  3. Amniotic fluid stem cells increase embryo survival following injury.

    PubMed

    Prasongchean, Weerapong; Bagni, Marinella; Calzarossa, Cinzia; De Coppi, Paolo; Ferretti, Patrizia

    2012-03-20

    Although amniotic fluid cells can differentiate into several mesenchymal lineages and have been proposed as a valuable therapeutic cell source, their ability to undergo terminal neuronal differentiation remains a cause of controversy. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuronal differentiation ability of the c-Kit-positive population from GFP-transgenic rat amniotic fluid, amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells, and to assess how they affected injury response in avian embryos. AFS cells were found to express several neural stem/progenitor cell markers. However, no overt neuronal differentiation was apparent after either treatment with small molecules known to stimulate neuronal differentiation, attempts to differentiate AFS cell-derived embryoid body-like structures, or grafting AFS cells into environments known to support neuronal differentiation (organotypic rat hippocampal cultures, embryonic chick nervous system). Nonetheless, AFS cells significantly reduced hemorrhage and increased survival when grafted at the site of an extensive thoracic crush injury in E2.5 chick embryos. Increased embryo survival was induced neither by desmopressin treatment, which also reduced hemorrhage, nor by grafting other mesenchymal or neural cells, indicating a specific effect of AFS cells. This was found to be mediated by soluble factors in a transwell coculture model. Altogether, this study shows that AFS cells reduce tissue damage and increase survival in injured embryos, providing a potentially valuable tool as therapeutic agents for tissue repair, particularly prenatal/perinatal repair of defects diagnosed during gestation, but this effect is mediated via paracrine mechanisms rather than the ability of AFS cells to fully differentiate into neuronal cells. PMID:21905920

  4. A Multiple Parameters Biodosimetry Tool with Various Blood Cell Counts - the Hemodose Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen

    2014-01-01

    There continue to be important concerns about the possibility of the occurrence of acute radiation syndromes following nuclear and radiological terrorism or accidents that may result in mass casualties in densely populated areas. To guide medical personnel in their clinical decisions for effective medical management and treatment of the exposed individuals, biological markers are usually applied to examine radiation induced biological changes to assess the severity of radiation injury to sensitive organ systems. Among these the peripheral blood cell counts are widely used to assess the extent of radiation induced bone marrow injury. This is due to the fact that the hematopoietic system is the most vulnerable part of the human body to radiation damage. Particularly, the lymphocyte, granulocyte, and platelet cells are the most radiosensitive of the blood elements, and monitoring their changes after exposure is regarded as a practical and recommended laboratory test to estimate radiation dose and injury. Based upon years of physiological and pathophysiological investigation of mammalian hematopoietic systems, and rigorous coarse-grained bio-mathematical modeling and validation on species from mouse, to dog, monkey, and human, we have developed a set of software tools Hemodose, which can use single or serial granulocyte, lymphocyte, leukocyte, or platelet counts after exposure to estimate absorbed doses of adult victims very rapidly and accurately. Some patient data from historical accidents are utilized as examples to demonstrate the capabilities of these tools as a rapid point-of-care diagnostic or centralized high-throughput assay system in a large-scale radiological disaster scenario. Most significant to the improvement of national and local preparedness of a potential nuclear/radiological disaster, this HemoDose approach establishes robust correlations between the absorbed doses and victim's various types of blood cell counts not only in the early time window (1 or 2 days), but also in the very late phase (up to 4 weeks) after exposure.

  5. Higher risk of AIDS or death in patients with lower CD4 cell counts after virally suppressive HAART

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, BO; Li, X; Palella, F; Jacobson, LP; Margolick, JB; Detels, R; Rinaldo, CR; Phair, JP

    2009-01-01

    Background The clinical implications of a failure to achieve high CD4 cell counts while receiving virally suppressive highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are uncertain. Methods We analysed data from HIV-infected men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) to elucidate associations between CD4 cell counts achieved during virally suppressive HAART and risks of AIDS or death. Inclusion criteria were: CD4 cell count <200 cells/?L before HAART initiation; ? viral load (VL) determinations after HAART initiation; and sustained viral suppression, defined as all VL <50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, but allowing a single VL of 501000 copies/mL. Results One hundred and twenty-one men were included; median age was 42 years. After first VL <50 copies/mL, six participants had a new AIDS diagnosis and seven died. The median CD4 cell count change/year (cells/?L) after first VL <50 copies/mL was zero among patients who either developed AIDS or died vs. 39 among those who did not meet either endpoint (P = 0.119). After controlling for time from HAART initiation to first VL <50 copies/mL, age at first VL <50 copies/mL, history of AIDS and antiretroviral therapy (ART) experience before HAART, the hazard ratio for AIDS or death at CD4 cell count of ?200 vs. >350 cells/?L was 10.7 (P = 0.013), and at CD4 cell count of 201350 vs. >350 cells/?L was 8.54 (P = 0.014). Conclusion In this cohort, lower CD4 cell count at the time of viral suppression was associated with increased risk of AIDS or death. PMID:19601997

  6. Alternative experiments using the geophysical fluid flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    This study addresses the possibility of doing large scale dynamics experiments using the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell. In particular, cases where the forcing generates a statically stable stratification almost everywhere in the spherical shell are evaluated. This situation is typical of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. By calculating the strongest meridional circulation expected in the spacelab experiments, and testing its stability using quasi-geostrophic stability theory, it is shown that strongly nonlinear baroclinic waves on a zonally symmetric modified thermal wind will not occur. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell does not have a deep enough fluid layer to permit useful studies of large scale planetary wave processes arising from instability. It is argued, however, that by introducing suitable meridional barriers, a significant contribution to the understanding of the oceanic thermocline problem could be made.

  7. Telomere Length in Elderly Caucasians Weakly Correlates with Blood Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Witecka, Joanna; Koscinska-Marczewska, Justyna; Szwed, Malgorzata; Owczarz, Magdalena; Mossakowska, Malgorzata; Milewicz, Andrzej; Zejda, Jan; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Background. Age-related decrease in bone marrow erythropoietic capacity is often accompanied by the telomere length shortening in peripheral white blood cells. However, limited and conflicting data hamper the conclusive opinion regarding this relationship. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess an association between telomere length and peripheral blood cell count parameters in the Polish elderly population. Material and Methods. The substudy included 1573 of 4981 subjects aged 65 years or over, participants of the population-based PolSenior study. High-molecular-weight DNA was isolated from blood mononuclear cells. Telomere length (TL) was measured by QRT-PCR as abundance of telomere template versus a single gene copy encoding acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein P0. Results. Only white blood count (WBC) was significantly different in TL tertile subgroups in all subjects (P = 0.02) and in men (P = 0.01), but not in women. Merely in men significant but weak positive correlations were found between TL and WBC (r = 0.11, P < 0.05) and RBC (r = 0.08, P < 0.05). The multiple regression analysis models confirmed a weak, independent contribution of TL to both RBC and WBC. Conclusions. In the elderly, telomere shortening limits hematopoiesis capacity to a very limited extent. PMID:24453794

  8. Automated counting of morphologically normal red blood cells by using digital holographic microscopy and statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu; Yi, Faliu

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we overview a method to automatically count morphologically normal red blood cells (RBCs) by using off-axis digital holographic microscopy and statistical methods. Three kinds of RBC are used as training and testing data. All of the RBC phase images are obtained with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) that is robust to transparent or semitransparent biological cells. For the determination of morphologically normal RBCs, the RBC's phase images are first segmented with marker-controlled watershed transform algorithm. Multiple features are extracted from the segmented cells. Moreover, the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test is conducted to show that the 3D features from 3D imaging method can improve the discrimination performance for counting of normal shapes of RBCs. Finally, the classifier is designed by using statistical Bayesian algorithm and the misclassification rates are measured with leave-one-out technique. Experimental results show the feasibility of the classification method for calculating the percentage of each typical normal RBC shape.

  9. Computer-assisted counting of retinal cells by automatic segmentation after TV denoising

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative evaluation of mosaics of photoreceptors and neurons is essential in studies on development, aging and degeneration of the retina. Manual counting of samples is a time consuming procedure while attempts to automatization are subject to various restrictions from biological and preparation variability leading to both over- and underestimation of cell numbers. Here we present an adaptive algorithm to overcome many of these problems. Digital micrographs were obtained from cone photoreceptor mosaics visualized by anti-opsin immuno-cytochemistry in retinal wholemounts from a variety of mammalian species including primates. Segmentation of photoreceptors (from background, debris, blood vessels, other cell types) was performed by a procedure based on Rudin-Osher-Fatemi total variation (TV) denoising. Once 3 parameters are manually adjusted based on a sample, similarly structured images can be batch processed. The module is implemented in MATLAB and fully documented online. Results The object recognition procedure was tested on samples with a typical range of signal and background variations. We obtained results with error ratios of less than 10% in 16 of 18 samples and a mean error of less than 6% compared to manual counts. Conclusions The presented method provides a traceable module for automated acquisition of retinal cell density data. Remaining errors, including addition of background items, splitting or merging of objects might be further reduced by introduction of additional parameters. The module may be integrated into extended environments with features such as 3D-acquisition and recognition. PMID:24138794

  10. Activities of indigenous proteolytic enzymes in caprine milk of different somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Kelly, A L; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Sevi, A

    2015-11-01

    Individual caprine milk with different somatic cell counts (SCC) were studied with the aim of investigating the percentage distribution of leukocyte cell types and the activities of indigenous proteolytic enzymes; proteolysis of casein was also studied in relation to cell type following recovery from milk. The experiment was conducted on 5 intensively managed dairy flocks of Garganica goats; on the basis of SCC, the experimental groups were denoted low (L-SCC; <700,000 cells/mL), medium (M-SCC; from 701,000 to 1,500,000 cells/mL), and high (H-SCC; >1,501,000 cells/mL) SCC. Leukocyte distribution differed between groups; polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes were higher in M-SCC and H-SCC milk samples, the percentage macrophages was the highest in H-SCC, and levels of nonviable cells significantly decreased with increasing SCC. Activities of all the main proteolytic enzymes were affected by SCC; plasmin activity was the highest in H-SCC milk and the lowest in L-SCC, and elastase and cathepsin D activities were the highest in M-SCC. Somatic cell count influenced casein hydrolysis patterns, with less intact ?- and ?-casein in H-SCC milk. Higher levels of low electrophoretic mobility peptides were detected in sodium caseinate incubated with leukocytes isolated from L-SCC milk, independent of cell type, whereas among cells recovered from M-SCC milk, macrophages yielded the highest levels of low electrophoretic mobility peptides from sodium caseinate. The level of high electrophoretic mobility peptides was higher in sodium caseinate incubated with polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes and macrophages isolated from M-SCC, whereas the same fraction of peptides was always the highest, independent of leukocyte type, for cells recovered from H-SCC milk. In caprine milk, a level of 700,000 cells/mL represented the threshold for changes in leukocyte distribution, which is presumably related to the immune status of the mammary gland. Differences in the profile of indigenous lysosomal proteolytic enzymes in caprine milk may influence the integrity of casein based on proteolysis patterns of sodium caseinate incubated with isolated and lysed leukocyte types. PMID:26342976

  11. Raised herd somatic cell count due to Staphylococcus aureus following the failure of an automatic teat spraying system.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, P W

    2012-03-01

    This study describes the failure of a single jet exit race automatic teat spray (ATS) system resulting in the spread of Staphylococcus aureus infection in a 135-cow dairy herd, which showed an increased herd somatic cell count from 91,000/ml to 554,000/ml over a nine-month period. S aureus was isolated from 34 of 46 high cell count cows. The milking procedures were modified and manual teat spraying was restarted. Bacteriology was used to identify S aureus positive high cell count cows, and first and second lactation cows were treated during lactation. If their cell counts were not reduced, these were then culled. High cell count S aureus cows in lactation three or above were culled. The three-month geometric mean cell count fell to below 150,000/ml within five months. As all replacements were home-bred, S aureus infection must have spread from within the herd itself. All other causes have been eliminated, and this spread is attributed to the failure of the ATS to carry out effective postmilking teat disinfection. The advantages and disadvantages of ATS systems are discussed, especially in relation to robotic or voluntary milking systems. PMID:22278636

  12. Straw blood cell count, growth, inhibition and comparison to apoptotic bodies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yonnie; Henry, David C; Heim, Kyle; Tomkins, Jeffrey P; Kuan, Cheng-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Background Mammalian cells transform into individual tubular straw cells naturally in tissues and in response to desiccation related stress in vitro. The transformation event is characterized by a dramatic cellular deformation process which includes: condensation of certain cellular materials into a much smaller tubular structure, synthesis of a tubular wall and growth of filamentous extensions. This study continues the characterization of straw cells in blood, as well as the mechanisms of tubular transformation in response to stress; with specific emphasis placed on investigating whether tubular transformation shares the same signaling pathway as apoptosis. Results There are approximately 100 billion, unconventional, tubular straw cells in human blood at any given time. The straw blood cell count (SBC) is 45 million/ml, which accounts for 6.9% of the bloods dry weight. Straw cells originating from the lungs, liver and lymphocytes have varying nodules, hairiness and dimensions. Lipid profiling reveals severe disruption of the plasma membrane in CACO cells during transformation. The growth rates for the elongation of filaments and enlargement of rabbit straw cells is 0.6~1.1 (?m/hr) and 3.8 (?m3/hr), respectively. Studies using apoptosis inhibitors and a tubular transformation inhibitor in CACO2 cells and in mice suggested apoptosis produced apoptotic bodies are mediated differently than tubular transformation produced straw cells. A single dose of 0.01 mg/kg/day of p38 MAPK inhibitor in wild type mice results in a 30% reduction in the SBC. In 9 domestic animals SBC appears to correlate inversely with an animal's average lifespan (R2 = 0.7). Conclusion Straw cells are observed residing in the mammalian blood with large quantities. Production of SBC appears to be constant for a given animal and may involve a stress-inducible protein kinase (P38 MAPK). Tubular transformation is a programmed cell survival process that diverges from apoptosis. SBCs may be an important indicator of intrinsic aging-related stress. PMID:18492269

  13. Low blood cell counts in wild Japanese monkeys after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Hayama, Shin-ichi; Nakiri, Sachie; Nakanishi, Setsuko; Ishii, Naomi; Uno, Taiki; Kato, Takuya; Konno, Fumiharu; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Tsuchida, Shuichi; Omi, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 we carried out a 1-year hematological study on a population of wild Japanese monkeys inhabiting the forest area of Fukushima City. This area is located 70 km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), which released a large amount of radioactive material into the environment following the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011. For comparison, we examined monkeys inhabiting the Shimokita Peninsula in Aomori Prefecture, located approximately 400 km from the NPP. Total muscle cesium concentration in Fukushima monkeys was in the range of 78-1778 Bq/kg, whereas the level of cesium was below the detection limit in all Shimokita monkeys. Compared with Shimokita monkeys, Fukushima monkeys had significantly low white and red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, and the white blood cell count in immature monkeys showed a significant negative correlation with muscle cesium concentration. These results suggest that the exposure to some form of radioactive material contributed to hematological changes in Fukushima monkeys. PMID:25060710

  14. Benchmarks for evaluation and comparison of udder health status using monthly individual somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, Vronique; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Scholl, Daniel T; Bouchard, mile

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to propose benchmarks for the interpretation of herd udder health using monthly individual somatic cell counts (SCC) from dairy herds in Quebec, Canada and to evaluate the association of risk factors with intramammary infection (IMI) dynamics relative to these benchmarks. The mean and percentiles of indices related to udder infection status [e.g., proportion of healthy or chronically infected cows, cows cured and new IMI (NIMI) rate] during lactation and over the dry period were calculated using a threshold of ? 200 000 cells/mL at test day. Mean NIMI proportion and proportion of cows cured during lactation were 0.11 and 0.27. Benchmarks of 0.70 and 0.03 for healthy and chronically infected cows over the dry period were proposed. Season and herd mean SCC were risk factors influencing IMI dynamics during lactation and over the dry period. PMID:25082989

  15. Benchmarks for evaluation and comparison of udder health status using monthly individual somatic cell count

    PubMed Central

    Fauteux, Vronique; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Scholl, Daniel T.; Bouchard, mile

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to propose benchmarks for the interpretation of herd udder health using monthly individual somatic cell counts (SCC) from dairy herds in Quebec, Canada and to evaluate the association of risk factors with intramammary infection (IMI) dynamics relative to these benchmarks. The mean and percentiles of indices related to udder infection status [e.g., proportion of healthy or chronically infected cows, cows cured and new IMI (NIMI) rate] during lactation and over the dry period were calculated using a threshold of ? 200 000 cells/mL at test day. Mean NIMI proportion and proportion of cows cured during lactation were 0.11 and 0.27. Benchmarks of 0.70 and 0.03 for healthy and chronically infected cows over the dry period were proposed. Season and herd mean SCC were risk factors influencing IMI dynamics during lactation and over the dry period. PMID:25082989

  16. Amniotic fluid stem cells are cardioprotective following acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bollini, Sveva; Cheung, King K; Riegler, Johannes; Dong, Xuebin; Smart, Nicola; Ghionzoli, Marco; Loukogeorgakis, Stavros P; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Dub, Karina N; Riley, Paul R; Lythgoe, Mark F; De Coppi, Paolo

    2011-11-01

    In recent years, various types of stem cells have been characterized and their potential for cardiac regeneration has been investigated. We have previously described the isolation of broadly multipotent cells from amniotic fluid, defined as amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of human AFS cells (hAFS) in a model of acute myocardial infarction. Wistar rats underwent 30?min of ischemia by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, followed by administration of hAFS cells and 2?h of reperfusion. Infarct size was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and planimetry. hAFS cells were also analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect secretion of putative paracrine factors, such as the actin monomer-binding protein thymosin ?4 (T?4). The systemic injection of hAFS cells and their conditioned medium (hAFS-CM) was cardioprotective, improving myocardial cell survival and decreasing the infarct size from 53.9%2.3% (control animals receiving phosphate-buffered saline injection) to 40.0%3.0% (hAFS cells) and 39.7%2.5% (hAFS-CM, P<0.01). In addition, hAFS cells were demonstrated to secrete T?4, previously shown to be both cardioprotective and proangiogenic. Our results suggest that AFS cells have therapeutic potential in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, which may be mediated through paracrine effectors such as T?4. Therefore, AFS cells might represent a novel source for cell therapy and cell transplantation strategies in repair following ischemic heart disease, with a possible paracrine mechanism of action and a potential molecular candidate for acute cardioprotection. PMID:21534857

  17. PCR-Based Multiple Species Cell Counting for In Vitro Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruijie; Zhang, Junjie; Yang, X. Frank; Gregory, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes of bacterial profiles in microbial communities are strongly associated with human health. There is an increasing need for multiple species research in vitro. To avoid high cost or measurement of a limited number of species, PCR-based multiple species cell counting (PCR-MSCC) has been conceived. Species-specific sequence is defined as a unique sequence of one species in a multiple species mixed culture. This sequence is identified by comparing a random 1000 bp genomic sequence of one species with the whole genome sequences of the other species in the same artificial mixed culture. If absent in the other genomes, it is the species-specific sequence. Species-specific primers were designed based on the species-specific sequences. In the present study, ten different oral bacterial species were mixed and grown in Brain Heart Infusion Yeast Extract with 1% sucrose for 24 hours. Biofilm was harvested and processed for DNA extraction and q-PCR amplification with the species-specific primers. By comparing the q-PCR data of each species in the unknown culture with reference cultures, in which the cell number of each species was determined by colony forming units on agar plate, the cell number of that strain in the unknown mixed culture was calculated. This technique is reliable to count microorganism numbers that are less than 100,000 fold different from other species within the same culture. Theoretically, it can be used in detecting a species in a mixed culture of over 200 species. Currently PCR-MSCC is one of the most economic methods for quantifying single species cell numbers, especially for the low abundant species, in a multiple artificial mixed culture in vitro. PMID:25970462

  18. PCR-Based Multiple Species Cell Counting for In Vitro Mixed Culture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruijie; Zhang, Junjie; Yang, X Frank; Gregory, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Changes of bacterial profiles in microbial communities are strongly associated with human health. There is an increasing need for multiple species research in vitro. To avoid high cost or measurement of a limited number of species, PCR-based multiple species cell counting (PCR-MSCC) has been conceived. Species-specific sequence is defined as a unique sequence of one species in a multiple species mixed culture. This sequence is identified by comparing a random 1000 bp genomic sequence of one species with the whole genome sequences of the other species in the same artificial mixed culture. If absent in the other genomes, it is the species-specific sequence. Species-specific primers were designed based on the species-specific sequences. In the present study, ten different oral bacterial species were mixed and grown in Brain Heart Infusion Yeast Extract with 1% sucrose for 24 hours. Biofilm was harvested and processed for DNA extraction and q-PCR amplification with the species-specific primers. By comparing the q-PCR data of each species in the unknown culture with reference cultures, in which the cell number of each species was determined by colony forming units on agar plate, the cell number of that strain in the unknown mixed culture was calculated. This technique is reliable to count microorganism numbers that are less than 100,000 fold different from other species within the same culture. Theoretically, it can be used in detecting a species in a mixed culture of over 200 species. Currently PCR-MSCC is one of the most economic methods for quantifying single species cell numbers, especially for the low abundant species, in a multiple artificial mixed culture in vitro. PMID:25970462

  19. Method of detecting and counting bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for determining bacterial levels, especially in samples of aqueous physiological fluids. The method depends on the quantitative determination of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the presence of nonbacterial ATP. The bacterial ATP is released by cell rupture and is measured by an enzymatic bioluminescent assay. A concentration technique is included to make the method more sensitive. It is particularly useful where the fluid to be measured contains an unknown or low bacteria count.

  20. Accurate measurement of peripheral blood mononuclear cell concentration using image cytometry to eliminate RBC-induced counting error.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Laverty, Daniel J; Smith, Tim; Nejad, Parham; Hei, Hillary; Gandhi, Roopali; Kuksin, Dmitry; Qiu, Jean

    2013-02-28

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have been widely researched in the fields of immunology, infectious disease, oncology, transplantation, hematological malignancy, and vaccine development. Specifically, in immunology research, PBMCs have been utilized to monitor concentration, viability, proliferation, and cytokine production from immune cells, which are critical for both clinical trials and biomedical research. The viability and concentration of isolated PBMCs are traditionally measured by manual counting with trypan blue (TB) using a hemacytometer. One of the common issues of PBMC isolation is red blood cell (RBC) contamination. The RBC contamination can be dependent on the donor sample and/or technical skill level of the operator. RBC contamination in a PBMC sample can introduce error to the measured concentration, which can pass down to future experimental assays performed on these cells. To resolve this issue, RBC lysing protocol can be used to eliminate potential error caused by RBC contamination. In the recent years, a rapid fluorescence-based image cytometry system has been utilized for bright-field and fluorescence imaging analysis of cellular characteristics (Nexcelom Bioscience LLC, Lawrence, MA). The Cellometer image cytometry system has demonstrated the capability of automated concentration and viability detection in disposable counting chambers of unpurified mouse splenocytes and PBMCs stained with acridine orange (AO) and propidium iodide (PI) under fluorescence detection. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of Cellometer image cytometry system to accurately measure PBMC concentration, despite RBC contamination, by comparison of five different total PBMC counting methods: (1) manual counting of trypan blue-stained PBMCs in hemacytometer, (2) manual counting of PBMCs in bright-field images, (3) manual counting of acetic acid lysing of RBCs with TB-stained PBMCs, (4) automated counting of acetic acid lysing of RBCs with PI-stained PBMCs, and (5) AO/PI dual staining method. The results show comparable total PBMC counting among all five methods, which validate the AO/PI staining method for PBMC measurement in the image cytometry method. PMID:23201386

  1. Quantification of cell lysis during CHO bioprocesses: Impact on cell count, growth kinetics and productivity.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Heinzel, Nicole; Kroll, Paul; Brunner, Matthias; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2015-08-10

    High cell densities and high viability are critical quality attributes for mammalian bioprocesses. Determination of living and dead cell numbers is nowadays routinely performed by automated image-based cell analyzers or flow cytometry. However, complete lysis of cells is usually neglected by these devices. We present a novel method for robust quantification of lysed cell populations over the course of a CHO bioprocess. The release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and double stranded genomic DNA in culture supernatants were used as markers for cell lysis. We considered the degradation of both markers over cultivation time, which significantly increased the amount of released LDH and DNA. For correct and robust estimation of lysed cell fractions, degradation of both markers over cultivation time was considered, where redundancy of markers allowed data reconciliation. Calculating the number of cells which were subject to complete cell lysis, we could show that this fraction makes up as much as 30% of the total produced biomass and is not described by measurements of image-based analyzers. Finally, we demonstrate that disregarding cell lysis heavily affects the calculation of biomass yields and growth rates and that increasing levels of cell lysis are related to decreased productivity. PMID:25956245

  2. Fluid and Cell Transport Through a Microfabricated Flow Chamber.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, James Patrick

    We use silicon processing techniques to construct microfabricated fluid flow chambers. Custom designed silicon wafers with feature sizes of 1-10 ?m and etch depths from 0.5-5 ?m are anodically bonded to Pyrex glass to create a hermetically sealed chamber. A pressure gradient is placed across the chamber to induce bulk fluid flow. Properties of fluid flow and red blood cells are recorded using video microscopy. The human red blood cell is ideal for studying cellular membranes. It is an 8 ?m diameter biconcave disc containing a membrane and associated cytoskeleton which surrounds a thick solution of hemoglobin. The material properties of individual red blood cells have been extensively studied in the past using micropipettes. However, we can get statistics on hundreds of red blood cells by fabricating an array of narrow channels 4 mu m x 4 ?m in cross-section (the diameter of the smallest capillaries in the human body) and 13 ?m long. These narrow channels are followed by an open space. This geometry forces red cells to repeatedly fold and unfold. Using these arrays, we show that the shear modulus of the membrane does not have a unique value, but has a distribution that ranges from 3-12 times 10 ^{-6} N/m. The surprisingly wide distribution is not due to cell size or cell age. It does seem to be correlated with intracellular Ca^ {2+}<=vels, leading us to believe that cell rigidity is controlled by some active process. We also report observations on red blood cells changing their rigidity by factors of fifty over tens of seconds. These microfabricated flow chambers are ideal for studying fluid flow through porous media. We construct custom designed two-dimensional environments with micron size features. These environments can be described by simple analytical theories which also attempt to describe flow through rock. For example, we image viscous imbibition of water into a percolation grid with 5 mu m edges in real time, and measure the permeability as a function of concentration for a simple rectangular array geometry.

  3. Bioactive amines in Mozzarella cheese from milk with varying somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Ubaldo, Juliana Cristina Sampaio Rigueira; Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Fonseca, Leorges Moraes; Glória, Maria Beatriz Abreu

    2015-07-01

    The influence of somatic cells counts (SCC) in milk on bioactive amines in Mozzarella cheese was investigated. High SCC milk had lower lactose and higher pH compared to low and medium SCC. Low spermine levels were found in milk irrespective of SCC. The cheeses had similar characteristics, but the extension and depth of proteolysis increased with SCC. Cheese from all SCC categories contained spermine; whereas tyramine and tryptamine were only detected in cheese from high SCC milk. During 60-days refrigerated storage, significant positive effects were observed between SCC and proteolysis, storage time and pH and storage time and proteolysis. There was a significant positive effect of storage time on spermine and serotonin levels. Only cheese from high SCC milk showed significantly higher serotonin levels. Tyramine and tryptamine were found in cheese from high SCC milk. PMID:25704706

  4. Effect of vitamin B2 on somatic cell counts in milk of clinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Hori, H; Okada, K

    1999-05-01

    Effects of intravenous injection of Vitamin B2 (VB2) on the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductivity of peripheral blood neutrophils and the somatic cell counts (SCC) in quarter milk of Staphylococcus aureus mastitis were investigated. The NBT reductivities of neutrophils were enhanced at 2 days after single injection of VB2 (5.0 and 2.5 mg/kg), and were also enhanced at 4 days after initial injection of continuous 3 days of VB2 (2.5 mg/kg). The SCC in quarter milk were significantly decreased at 3, 7 and 14 days after initial injection of continuous 3 days of VB2 (2.5 mg/kg), however, S. aureus in the infected quarter was not cured bacteriologically by VB2 injection. PMID:10379954

  5. Imaging cytometry for counting circulating tumor cells: comparative analysis of the CellSearch vs ImageStream systems.

    PubMed

    Lpez-Riquelme, Natividad; Minguela, Alfredo; Villar-Permuy, Flori; Ciprian, Daniel; Castillejo, Adela; lvarez-Lpez, Mara-Rocio; Soto, Jos-Luis

    2013-12-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration is important clinically for identifying prognostic and predictive factors in patients with solid cancers. The CellSearch device (Veridex) is an immunomagnetic CTC selection and enumeration system used in clinical practice. The ImageStream (Amnis) combines the strengths of flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy in a single platform and has potential application for CTC counting. The performance in CTC enumeration was compared between the ImageStream and CellSearch systems. Various numbers of PANC-1 tumor cells were spiked into 7.5 mL of peripheral blood from a healthy donor. Before cell analysis by the ImageStream, tumor cell enrichment was performed by immunomagnetic selection with anti-EpPCAM. Anti-CD45 and anti-CK markers were used to discriminate between tumor cells and leukocytes. The ratios of tumor cells recovered from each dilution were calculated for both methods. The Wilcoxon rank test was applied to compare the results of the two methods and the reference value. The results of the two tested methods differed significantly from the reference value, but did not differ between them. Nevertheless, lower level of trueness and precision was observed in ImageStream when fewer numbers of CTCs were analyzed. Our results suggest that ImageStream platform for CTC enumeration has a potential value for the early diagnosis of disseminated disease, but needs an improvement of precision for the enumeration of low number of CTC. PMID:23510386

  6. Laboratory adverse events and discontinuation of therapy according to CD4+ cell count at the start of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sophie; Quinn, Killian; Hill, Teresa; Leen, Clifford; Walsh, John; Hay, Phillip; Fisher, Martin; Post, Frank; Nelson, Mark; Gompels, Mark; Johnson, Margaret; Chadwick, David; Gilson, Richard; Sabin, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Few data describe antiretroviral treatment (ART)-related adverse events when treatment is initiated at CD4+ cell counts more than 350?cells/?l. We compared rates of laboratory-defined adverse events (LDAEs) according to CD4+ cell count at ART initiation. Design: Analysis of on-going cohort study. Methods: ART-naive persons initiating ART from 2000 to 2010 were included. Chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and KruskalWallis tests compared characteristics among those starting ART with a CD4+ cell count of 350 or less, 351499 and at least 500?cells/?l. Time-updated Poisson regression compared rates of LDAE in the three CD4+ cell strata. Cox proportional hazard models compared risk of ART discontinuation. Results: Nine thousand, four hundred and six individuals were included: median age 37 years, 61% white, 80% men, median viral load 4.8?log copies/ml. Four hundred and forty-seven (4.9%) and 1099 (11.7%) started ART with a CD4+ cell count at least 500 and 351499?cells/?l, respectively. One thousand, two hundred and eighty-three (13.6%) patients experienced at least one LDAE. The rate of LDAE did not differ between those starting ART with a CD4+ cell count 351499 and less than 350?cells/?l [relative rate 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.741.09)], but an increased risk of ART discontinuation was observed (hazard ratio 1.58, 95% CI 1.102.27). Those starting ART at CD4+ cell count at least 500?cells/?l had an increased rate of LDAE (relative rate 1.44, 95% CI 1.131.82) but were not more likely to discontinue ART (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.642.09). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the need to consider ART-related toxicities when initiating therapy at CD4+ cell counts at least 500?cells/?l. Whilst evidence from randomized controlled trials is awaited, the timing of ART initiation in terms of benefits and risks of ART remains an important question. PMID:24583670

  7. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells and Their Application in Cell-Based Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Jahangir, Shahrbanoo

    2012-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biotechnology hold great promise in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Of interest are marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In addition, amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) have attracted attention as a viable choice following the search for an alternative stem cell source. Investigators are interested in these cells because they come from the amniotic fluid that is routinely discarded after birth. There have been multiple investigations conducted worldwide in an attempt to better understand AF-SCs in terms of their potential use in regenerative medicine. In this review we give a brief introduction of amniotic fluid followed by a description of the cells present within this fluid. Their history related to stem cell discovery in the amniotic fluid as well as the main characteristics of AF-SCs are discussed. Finally, we elaborate on the potential for these cells to promote regeneration of various tissue defects, including fetal tissue, the nervous system, heart, lungs, kidneys, bones, and cartilage. PMID:24520432

  8. Amniotic fluid stem cells and their application in cell-based tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Jahangir, Shahrbanoo

    2012-10-01

    Advances in stem cell biotechnology hold great promise in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Of interest are marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In addition, amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) have attracted attention as a viable choice following the search for an alternative stem cell source. Investigators are interested in these cells because they come from the amniotic fluid that is routinely discarded after birth. There have been multiple investigations conducted worldwide in an attempt to better understand AF-SCs in terms of their potential use in regenerative medicine. In this review we give a brief introduction of amniotic fluid followed by a description of the cells present within this fluid. Their history related to stem cell discovery in the amniotic fluid as well as the main characteristics of AF-SCs are discussed. Finally, we elaborate on the potential for these cells to promote regeneration of various tissue defects, including fetal tissue, the nervous system, heart, lungs, kidneys, bones, and cartilage. PMID:24520432

  9. Fluid phase biopsy for detection and characterization of circulating endothelial cells in myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethel, Kelly; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Damani, Samir; Kolatkar, Anand; Lamy, Rachelle; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Topol, Sarah; Topol, Eric J.; Kuhn, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Elevated levels of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) occur in response to various pathological conditions including myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we adapted a fluid phase biopsy technology platform that successfully detects circulating tumor cells in the blood of cancer patients (HD-CTC assay), to create a high-definition circulating endothelial cell (HD-CEC) assay for the detection and characterization of CECs. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 79 MI patients, 25 healthy controls and six patients undergoing vascular surgery (VS). CECs were defined by positive staining for DAPI, CD146 and von Willebrand Factor and negative staining for CD45. In addition, CECs exhibited distinct morphological features that enable differentiation from surrounding white blood cells. CECs were found both as individual cells and as aggregates. CEC numbers were higher in MI patients compared with healthy controls. VS patients had lower CEC counts when compared with MI patients but were not different from healthy controls. Both HD-CEC and CellSearch® assays could discriminate MI patients from healthy controls with comparable accuracy but the HD-CEC assay exhibited higher specificity while maintaining high sensitivity. Our HD-CEC assay may be used as a robust diagnostic biomarker in MI patients.

  10. Elevated white cell count in acute coronary syndromes: relationship to variants in inflammatory and thrombotic genes

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Connie E; Fitzgerald, Anthony; Cannon, Christopher P; Fitzgerald, Desmond J; Shields, Denis C

    2004-01-01

    Background Elevated white blood cell counts (WBC) in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) increase the risk of recurrent events, but it is not known if this is exacerbated by pro-inflammatory factors. We sought to identify whether pro-inflammatory genetic variants contributed to alterations in WBC and C-reactive protein (CRP) in an ACS population. Methods WBC and genotype of interleukin 6 (IL-6 G-174C) and of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN intronic repeat polymorphism) were investigated in 732 Caucasian patients with ACS in the OPUS-TIMI-16 trial. Samples for measurement of WBC and inflammatory factors were taken at baseline, i.e. Within 72 hours of an acute myocardial infarction or an unstable angina event. Results An increased white blood cell count (WBC) was associated with an increased C-reactive protein (r = 0.23, p < 0.001) and there was also a positive correlation between levels of ?-fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (r = 0.42, p < 0.0001). IL1RN and IL6 genotypes had no significant impact upon WBC. The difference in median WBC between the two homozygote IL6 genotypes was 0.21/mm3 (95% CI = -0.41, 0.77), and -0.03/mm3 (95% CI = -0.55, 0.86) for IL1RN. Moreover, the composite endpoint was not significantly affected by an interaction between WBC and the IL1 (p = 0.61) or IL6 (p = 0.48) genotype. Conclusions Cytokine pro-inflammatory genetic variants do not influence the increased inflammatory profile of ACS patients. PMID:15171792

  11. Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Shigehisa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Kishi, Tomoya; Makino, Junichi; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed. The present findings show that fluid flow stress exerts a prolonged bioactive effect on mesothelial cells after termination of fluid streaming. These findings support the hypothesis that a history of PD for a certain period could serve as a trigger of EPS after stoppage of PD.

  12. Probing the Nanoscale Viscoelasticity of Intracellular Fluids in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guigas, Gernot; Kalla, Claudia; Weiss, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    We have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to determine the anomalous diffusion properties of fluorescently tagged gold beads in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of living cells. From the extracted mean-square displacement v(τ) ∼ τα, we have determined the complex shear modulus G(ω) ∼ ωα for both compartments. Without treatment, all tested cell lines showed a strong viscoelastic behavior of the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm, highlighting the crowdedness of these intracellular fluids. We also found a similar viscoelastic response in frog egg extract, which tended toward a solely viscous behavior upon dilution. When cells were osmotically stressed, the diffusion became less anomalous and the viscoelastic response changed. In particular, the anomality changed from α ≈ 0.55 to α ≈ 0.66, which indicates that the Zimm model for polymer solutions under varying solvent conditions is a good empirical description of the material properties of the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm. Since osmotic stress may eventually trigger cell death, we propose, on the basis of our observations, that intracellular fluids are maintained in a state similar to crowded polymer solutions under good solvent conditions to keep the cell viable. PMID:17416631

  13. Multilineage potential research of bovine amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuhua; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuhua; Hua, Jinlian; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The use of amnion and amniotic fluid (AF) are abundant sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can be harvested at low cost and do not pose ethical conflicts. In human and veterinary research, stem cells derived from these tissues are promising candidates for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity, and high anti-inflammatory potential. This work aimed to obtain and characterize bovine amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSC). The bovine AF from the amniotic cavity of pregnant gilts in the early stages of gestation (3- and 4-m-old bovine embryos) was collected. AFMSCs exhibit a fibroblastic-like morphology only starting from the fourth passage, being heterogeneous during the primary culture. Immunofluorescence results showed that AFMSCs were positive for β-integrin, CD44, CD73 and CD166, but negative for CD34, CD45. Meanwhile, AFMSCs expressed ES cell markers, such as Oct4, and when appropriately induced, are capable of differentiating into ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. This study reinforces the emerging importance of these cells as ideal tools in veterinary medicine; future studies aimed at a deeper evaluation of their immunological properties will allow a better understanding of their role in cellular therapy. PMID:24590129

  14. Significance of CD4+ T-cell count in the management of appendicitis in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kumiko; Saito, Kazuhiro; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of complicated appendicitis (CA) is critical to the management of appendicitis. However, previous studies have not investigated indicators of CA among patients with HIV or whether it is safe to use conservative treatment for appendicitis in these patients. Among 322 patients with appendicitis, we identified 14 who had HIV. Six of them were operated and 8 were treated with antibiotics; CA was diagnosed in 4. Patients with HIV and CA had a significantly lower CD4+ T-cell count than those with uncomplicated appendicitis. A white blood cell count lower than 7.4 109/L was observed exclusively in patients with CA. No patient with HIV whose appendicitis was treated conservatively died or experienced a recurrence. We discuss our findings, which suggest the possibility of conservative treatment of appendicitis in patients with HIV and identification of CA by low CD4+ T-cell count. PMID:26424690

  15. Effect of exercise on erythrocyte count and blood activity concentration after technetium-99m in vivo red blood cell labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Konstom, M.A.; Tu'meh, S.; Wynne, J.; Beck, J.R.; Kozlowski, J.; Holman, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    The effects of exercise on blood radiotracer concentration after technetium-99m in vivo red blood cell labeling was studied. After red blood cell labeling, 13 subjects underwent maximal supine bicycle exercise. Radioactivity, analyzed with a well counter, was measured in heparinized venous blood samples drawn at rest and during peak exercise. Changes in activity were compared with changes in erythrocyte count. Activity and erythrocyte counts increased in erythrocyte count (r=0.78), but did not correlate with either duration of exercise or maximal heart rate. Twenty minutes after termination of exercise, activity and erythrocyte count had decreased from peak exercise values but remained higher than preexercise values. In nine nonexercised control subjects, samples drawn 20 minutes apart showed no change in activity or in erythrocyte count. It was concluded that exercise increases blood activity, primarily because of an increase in erythrocyte count. During radionuclide ventriculography, blood activity must be measured before and after any intervention, particularly exercise, before a change in left ventricular activity can be attributed to a change in left ventricular volume.

  16. Red blood cell count as an indicator of microvascular complications in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhan-Sheng; Song, Zhan-Chun; Bai, Jing-Hui; Li, Fei; Wu, Tao; Qi, Ji; Hu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Background Rheological disorders of red blood cells (RBC) and decreased RBC deformability have been involved in the development of diabetic microangiopathy. However, few studies have evaluated the association of RBC count with microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of RBC count with microvascular complications in patients with T2DM. Methods This study involved 369 patients with T2DM: 243 with one or more microvascular complications and 126 without microvascular complications. Anticoagulated blood was collected and analyzed in an automated blood cell counter. The presence of risk factors for microvascular complications was determined. Results The proportion of patients with microvascular complications increased as the RBC count decreased (P < 0.001). After adjustment for known risk factors for microvascular complications by logistic regression analysis, lower quartiles of RBC count were associated with a higher risk of microvascular complications compared with the reference group composed of the highest quartile (first quartile, odds ratio 4.98, 95% confidence interval 1.54–6.19, P = 0.008; second quartile, odds ratio 3.21, 95% confidence interval 1.17–5.28, P = 0.024). Conclusion A decreased RBC count is associated with microvascular complications in Chinese patients with T2DM. The RBC count is a potential marker to improve further the ability to identify diabetic patients at high risk of microvascular complications. PMID:23690689

  17. [Isolation and gene modification of amniotic fluid derived progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenmin; Fan, Shuyue; Tang, Huixiang; Gong, Zhijuan; Gong, Xiuli; Ren, Zhaorui; Zeng, Fanyi

    2014-03-01

    We established methods to isolate human amniotic fluid-derived progenitor cells (hAFPCs), and analyze the ability of hAFPCs to secrete human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) after gene modification. The hAFPCs were manually isolated by selection for attachment to gelatin coated culture dish. hFIX cDNA was transfected into hAPFCs by using a lentiviral vector. The hFIX protein concentration and activity produced from hAFPCs were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and clotting assay. The isolated spindle-shaped cells showed fibroblastoid morphology after three culture passages. The doubling time in culture was 39.05 hours. Immunocytochemistry staining of the fibroblast-like cells from amniotic fluid detected expression of stem cell markers such as SSEA4 and TRA1-60. Quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 mRNAs. Transfected hAFPCs could produce and secrete hFIX into the culture medium. The observed concentration of secreted hFIX was 20.37% +/- 2.77% two days after passage, with clotting activity of 16.42% +/- 1.78%. The amount of hFIX:Ag reached a plateau of 50.35% +/- 5.42%, with clotting activity 45.34% +/- 4.67%. In conclusion, this study established method to isolate and culture amniotic fluid progenitor cells. Transfected hAFPCs can produce hFIX at stable levels in vitro, and clotting activity increases with higher hFIX concentration. Genetically engineered hAFPC are a potential method for prenatal treatment of hemophilia B. PMID:25007585

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Wharton's Jelly and Amniotic Fluid.

    PubMed

    Joerger-Messerli, Marianne S; Marx, Caterina; Oppliger, Byron; Mueller, Martin; Surbek, Daniel V; Schoeberlein, Andreina

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in perinatal sources, such as the amniotic fluid (AF) and the umbilical connective tissue, the so-called Wharton's jelly (WJ), has transformed them into promising stem cell grafts for the application in regenerative medicine. The advantages of AF-MSCs and WJ-MSCs over adult MSCs, such as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), include their minimally invasive isolation procedure, their more primitive cell character without being tumourigenic, their low immunogenicity and their potential autologous application in congenital disorders and when cryopreserved in adulthood. This chapter gives an overview of the biology of AF-MSCs and WJ-MSCs, and their regenerative potential based on the results of recent preclinical and clinical studies. In the end, open questions concerning the use of WJ-MSCs and AF-MSCs in regenerative medicine will be emphasized. PMID:26482184

  19. Soft agarose colony formation assay for human renal cell carcinoma: comparison of optical colony counting versus tritiated thymidine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, Y.; Tsukamoto, T.; Lieber, M.M.

    1986-11-01

    Use of the Hamburger-Salmon soft agar assay method for in vitro chemotherapy sensitivity testing of samples of renal cell carcinoma has been somewhat limited by a relatively low proliferation/evaluability rate for this tumor type (approximately 50%). The tritiated thymidine ((/sup 3/H)-TdR) incorporation assay method of Tanigawa et al. (Cancer Res., 42: 2159, 1982) was compared to a standard optical colony counting assay technique. Fifty-seven different primary and five metastatic fresh samples of human renal cell carcinoma were studied. Evaluability rate by the (/sup 3/H)-TdR assay was 90% (greater than or equal to 300 cpm control). In comparison, evaluability rate by optical colony counting was 43% for this group of tumors. (/sup 3/H)-TdR incorporation increased with increasing tumor grade and increasing stage. Spindle cell tumors showed significantly higher cpm than other cell types. Twenty-three primary tumors were evaluable by both (/sup 3/H)-TdR and colony counting methods. The correlation coefficient (r) for regression lines for drug sensitivity data points (optical counting vs. (/sup 3/H)-TdR) of these individual experiments ranged from 0.50 to 0.99 with a mean r +/- S.D. of 0.76 +/- 0.15. For all 260 paired drug response observations of 23 tumors exposed to different drugs, the correlation was very good with r = 0.71. Since the (/sup 3/H)-TdR assay has an evaluability rate of approximately 90% for renal cell carcinoma, gives drug sensitivity information which correlates well with the colony counting endpoint and yields chemotherapy sensitivity information four days after sample accession, the (/sup 3/H)-TdR assay may be a more useful method for study of human renal cell carcinoma in vitro chemotherapy sensitivity testing than standard colony counting techniques.

  20. Relationship between seminal white blood cell counts and oxidative stress in men treated at an infertility clinic.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Pasqualotto, A E; Nelson, D R; Thomas, A J; Agarwal, A

    2001-01-01

    In semen, granulocytes are major producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage sperm. The diagnosis of leukocytospermia is usually based on the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of 1 x 10(6) white blood cells per milliliter, but controversy remains over the minimum leukocyte level that impairs fertility. The goals of this study were to clarity the relationship between leukocyte count and oxidative stress and to establish the minimum leukocyte count associated with oxidative stress. To do so, we compared oxidative stress in semen samples with different leukocyte counts (by the Endtz test) after a simple wash-and-resuspend procedure and determined the correlation between leukocyte counts and oxidative stress (expressed as ROS-TAC score, a composite score calculated from ROS levels and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), both measured with chemiluminescence assays). ROS-TAC decreases as oxidative stress rises. We compared specimens from 271 men attending an infertility clinic and 28 healthy controls. About 9% of patients had WHO-defined leukocytospermia and an additional 16% had some leukocytes. Samples with no seminal leukocytes had significantly lower ROS levels and significantly higher ROS-TAC scores than samples with any seminal leukocytes, even very low levels. Oxidative stress was correlated with rising white blood cell (WBC) count (r = .39; P < .001). Receiver operating characteristics curves showed that ROS-TAC score would be fairly accurate at distinguishing between patients with any leukocytes and those with no leukocytes (area under the curve, 75%). In conclusion, oxidative stress occurs even in patients with very low seminal WBC counts (between 0 and 1 x 10(6)/mL) and rises with an increase in WBC count. Therefore, we are unable to determine a safe minimum WBC count; the presence of any WBCs is associated with oxidative stress and may therefore impair fertility. Complete removal of WBCs from semen samples used for assisted reproduction may help reduce oxidative stress. PMID:11451354

  1. Time to eligibility for antiretroviral therapy in adults with CD4 cell count > 500 cells/?L in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, N; Lessells, RJ; Newell, ML

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Understanding of progression to antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility and associated factors remains limited. The objectives of this analysis were to determine the time to ART eligibility and to explore factors associated with disease progression in adults with early HIV infection. Methods HIV-infected adults (??18 years old) with CD4 cell count >?500 cells/?l were enrolled in the study at three primary health care clinics, and a sociodemographic, behavioural and partnership-level questionnaire was administered. Participants were followed 6-monthly and ART eligibility was determined using a CD4 cell count threshold of 350 cells/?l. Kaplan???Meier and Cox proportional hazard regression modelling were used in the analysis. Results A total of 206 adults contributed 381 years of follow-up; 79 (38%) reached the ART eligibility threshold. Median time to ART eligibility was shorter for male patients (12.0 months) than for female patients (33.9 months). Male sex [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 3.13; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.825.39], residing in a household with food shortage in the previous year (aHR 1.58; 95% CI 0.992.54), and taking nutritional supplements in the first 6 months after enrolment (aHR 2.06; 95% CI 1.113.83) were associated with shorter time to ART eligibility. Compared with reference CD4 cell count????559 cells/?l, higher CD4 cell count was associated with longer time to ART eligibility [aHR 0.46 (95% CI 0.250.83) for CD4 cell count 560632 cells/?l; aHR 0.30 (95% CI 0.160.57) for CD4 cell count 633768 cells/?l; and aHR 0.17 (95% CI 0.080.38) for CD4 cell count?>?768 cells/?l]. Conclusions Over one in three adults with CD4 cell count?>?500 cells/?l became eligible for ART at a CD4 cell count threshold of 350 cells/?l over a median of 2 years. The shorter time to ART eligibility in male patients suggests a possible need for sex-specific pre-ART care and monitoring strategies. PMID:25959724

  2. Fluid models and simulations of biological cell phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenspan, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of coated droplets are examined within the context of biofluids. Of specific interest is the manner in which the shape of a droplet, the motion within it as well as that of aggregates of droplets can be controlled by the modulation of surface properties and the extent to which such fluid phenomena are an intrinsic part of cellular processes. From the standpoint of biology, an objective is to elucidate some of the general dynamical features that affect the disposition of an entire cell, cell colonies and tissues. Conventionally averaged field variables of continuum mechanics are used to describe the overall global effects which result from the myriad of small scale molecular interactions. An attempt is made to establish cause and effect relationships from correct dynamical laws of motion rather than by what may have been unnecessary invocation of metabolic or life processes. Several topics are discussed where there are strong analogies droplets and cells including: encapsulated droplets/cell membranes; droplet shape/cell shape; adhesion and spread of a droplet/cell motility and adhesion; and oams and multiphase flows/cell aggregates and tissues. Evidence is presented to show that certain concepts of continuum theory such as suface tension, surface free energy, contact angle, bending moments, etc. are relevant and applicable to the study of cell biology.

  3. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-quare test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can yield good results for calculating the percentage of each typical normal RBC shape in a reconstructed phase image of multiple RBCs that will be favorable to the analysis of RBC-related diseases. In addition, we show that the discrimination performance for the counting of normal shapes of RBCs can be improved by using 3-D features of an RBC. PMID:25567613

  4. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can yield good results for calculating the percentage of each typical normal RBC shape in a reconstructed phase image of multiple RBCs that will be favorable to the analysis of RBC-related diseases. In addition, we show that the discrimination performance for the counting of normal shapes of RBCs can be improved by using 3-D features of an RBC.

  5. Human amniotic fluid: a source of stem cells for possible therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Dziadosz, Margaret; Basch, Ross S; Young, Bruce K

    2016-03-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells with the capacity for differentiation. Amniotic fluid cells have emerged only recently as a possible source of stem cells for clinical purposes. There are no ethical or sampling constraints for the use of amniocentesis as a standard clinical procedure for obtaining an abundant supply of amniotic fluid cells. Amniotic fluid cells of human origin proliferate rapidly and are multipotent with the potential for expansion invitro to multiple cell lines. Tissue engineering technologies that use amniotic fluid cells are being explored. Amniotic fluid cells may be of clinical benefit for fetal therapies, degenerative disease, and regenerative medicine applications. We present a comprehensive review of the evolution of human amniotic fluid cells as a possible modality for therapeutic use. PMID:26767797

  6. How to count cells: the advantages and disadvantages of the isotropic fractionator compared with stereology.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; von Bartheld, Christopher S; Miller, Daniel J; Kaas, Jon H

    2015-04-01

    The number of cells comprising biological structures represents fundamental information in basic anatomy, development, aging, drug tests, pathology and genetic manipulations. Obtaining unbiased estimates of cell numbers, however, was until recently possible only through stereological techniques, which require specific training, equipment, histological processing and appropriate sampling strategies applied to structures with a homogeneous distribution of cell bodies. An alternative, the isotropic fractionator (IF), became available in 2005 as a fast and inexpensive method that requires little training, no specific software and only a few materials before it can be used to quantify total numbers of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in a whole organ such as the brain or any dissectible regions thereof. This method entails transforming a highly anisotropic tissue into a homogeneous suspension of free-floating nuclei that can then be counted under the microscope or by flow cytometry and identified morphologically and immunocytochemically as neuronal or non-neuronal. We compare the advantages and disadvantages of each method and provide researchers with guidelines for choosing the best method for their particular needs. IF is as accurate as unbiased stereology and faster than stereological techniques, as it requires no elaborate histological processing or sampling paradigms, providing reliable estimates in a few days rather than many weeks. Tissue shrinkage is also not an issue, since the estimates provided are independent of tissue volume. The main disadvantage of IF, however, is that it necessarily destroys the tissue analyzed and thus provides no spatial information on the cellular composition of biological regions of interest. PMID:25740200

  7. Use of total and differential somatic cell counts from composite milk samples to detect mastitis in individual cows.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, I R; Meek, A H; Martin, S W; Barnum, D A

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the value of variables measured on composite milk samples as predictors of mastitis in individual cows. The standard of comparison was the results obtained from the bacteriological examination of individual quarter foremilk samples. Cows were classified as negative or positive with regard to mastitis on the basis of one quarter sampling only and cows which were impossible to classify in this manner were omitted from subsequent analyses. The variables that were examined were: the presence or absence of specific bacteria, demographic data, and logarithmically transformed total somatic cell counts and percentages of cell volume in channels 7 through 12 of a Coulter Counter. It was found that the inclusion of all variables resulted in correct classification of 95.9% of cows with regard to their mastitis status. Sequential elimination of individual variables or groups of variables in an attempt to simplify the procedure reduced the correct classification to 86.8% when only the log transformation of the total somatic cell count and the demographic data were included. The ability of a function which included the logarithm of the total somatic cell count, the logarithm of the percentage in channel 8 and demographic data, to classify cows was examined in detail and the sensitivity and specificity of the function also discussed. It is also shown that with increasing age the minimum total somatic cell count required to classify a cow as positive increased and possible explanations of this phenomenon are discussed. PMID:7272844

  8. A case of myeloproliferative neoplasm with a normal complete blood cell count: A novel problem of the JAK2 era

    PubMed Central

    YE, XIU-PENG; BAO, SHEN; GAO, HUAN-MIN; GUO, YING; WEI, YU-PING

    2016-01-01

    The present study reported a case of a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) in a patient with a normal complete blood cell count. Bone marrow biopsy showed bone marrow hyperplasia, an elevated megakaryocyte count, megakaryocytic dysplasia and pleomorphic changes, multiple megakaryocyte clusters and focal reticulin fiber hyperplasia. Furthermore, genetic analysis revealed that the patient was positive for the JAK2-V617F mutation, and negative for the JAK2 exon 12 and 13 mutations and the BCR-ABL (p210) fusion gene. The patient's condition was basically stable and at the time of writing, the patient remained in a stable condition with no specific symptoms of disease. The present study also analyzed the diagnostic and clinical features of MPNs, and a literature review was performed. MPN with a normal complete blood cell count is a rare disease, and attention should be focused on this entity in the clinic. PMID:26998136

  9. Assessment of interobserver variability in mitotic figure counting in different histological grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yadav, K Shailaja; Gonuguntla, Sudhir; Ealla, Kranti Kiran Reddy; Velidandla, Surekha Reddy; Reddy, C R Charan; Prasanna, M D; Bommu, Sanjay Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic counting is often used for classification, grading and prognosis of tumors. The count usually stands as a decision point for treatment as well. The easiest way of counting the number of mitoses is done by screening routine H&E stained slides. However, for proper mitotic counting, certain strict protocols should be taken into consideration. This study on 30 cases of different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma was undertaken to determine the interobserver variations in two different groups: Group1 (A1, A2), who were given certain criteria to be followed during the counting of the mitotic figures and group 2 investigators (B1, B2) who were unaware of such criteria. The paired t-test gives a correlation of 0.988 and a significant difference of 0.000 between the two investigators in group 1. The correlation was 0.650 with a significant difference of 0.058 between two investigators in-group 2, indicating that group 1 observers exhibit good interobserver agreement. The results emphasize that following of strict protocols are of great help in determining the accuracy of mitotic counting. PMID:22918007

  10. Risk of non-hematologic cancer in individuals with high-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B M; Chaffee, K G; Moreira, J; Schwager, S M; Cerhan, J R; Call, T G; Kay, N E; Slager, S L; Shanafelt, T D

    2016-02-01

    It is unknown whether individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) are at risk for adverse outcomes associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), such as the risk of non-hematologic cancer. We identified all locally residing individuals diagnosed with high-count MBL at Mayo Clinic between 1999 and 2009 and compared their rates of non-hematologic cancer with that of patients with CLL and two control cohorts: general medicine patients and patients who underwent clinical evaluation with flow cytometry but who had no hematologic malignancy. After excluding individuals with prior cancers, there were 107 high-count MBL cases, 132 CLL cases, 589 clinic controls and 482 flow cytometry controls. With 4.6 years median follow-up, 14 (13%) individuals with high-count MBL, 21 (4%) clinic controls (comparison MBL P<0.0001), 18 (4%) flow controls (comparison MBL P=0.0001) and 16 (12%) CLL patients (comparison MBL P=0.82) developed non-hematologic cancer. On multivariable Cox regression analysis, individuals with high-count MBL had higher risk of non-hematologic cancer compared with flow controls (hazard ratio (HR)=2.36; P=0.04) and borderline higher risk compared with clinic controls (HR=2.00; P=0.07). Patients with high-count MBL appear to be at increased risk for non-hematologic cancer, further reinforcing that high-count MBL has a distinct clinical phenotype despite low risk of progression to CLL. PMID:26310541

  11. Evaluation of Tumor Cell Proliferation by Ki-67 Expression and Mitotic Count in Lymph Node Metastases from Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Sura; Wik, Elisabeth; Davidsen, Benedicte; Aas, Hans; Aas, Turid; Akslen, Lars A.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have addressed the risk of recurrence by assessing proliferation markers in lymph node metastasis from breast cancer. Here, we aimed to examine Ki-67 expression and mitotic count in lymph nodes in comparison with primary tumors. A cohort of node positive breast cancer (n = 168) was studied as a part of the prospective Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (1996–2009). The percentage of Ki-67 positivity was counted per 500 tumor cells in hot-spot areas (x630). Mitotic count was conducted in the most cellular and mitotic active areas in 10 high power fields (x400). Our results showed that Ki-67 and mitotic count were significantly correlated between primary tumor and lymph nodes (Spearman`s correlation 0. 56 and 0.46, respectively) and were associated with most of the histologic features of the primary tumor. Univariate survival analysis (log-rank test) showed that high Ki-67 and mitotic count in the primary tumor and lymph node metastasis significantly predicted risk of recurrence. In multivariate analysis, mitotic count in the lymph node metastasis was an independent predictor of tumor recurrence. In conclusion, proliferation markers in lymph node metastases significantly predicted disease free survival in node positive breast cancer. PMID:26954367

  12. Efficacy of optimized in vitro predegeneration period on the cell count and purity of canine Schwann cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Niapour, Nazila; Mohammadi-Ghalehbin, Behnam; Golmohammadi, Mohammad Ghasem; Amani, Mohammad; Salehi, Hossein; Niapour, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Predegeneration is a standard technique to obtain mitotically activated and enriched cultures of Schwann cells (SCs). This study, for the first time, evaluated the impact of various duration of predegeneration on cell yield and enrichment of SCs from dog peripheral nerve. Materials and Methods: Dog sural nerves were subjected to 5, 10, 15 day-long in vitro predegeneration. The total cell yield and the purity of SCs were evaluated in each group on the first and seventh day after plating. Results: The maximum and minimum numbers of cells were counted in 15 day-long predegene-ration and control groups which underwent no predegeneration. The 10 day-long in vitro predegeneration group with 800.5% SCs enrichment had the best purity after plating day and could maintain its purity with elapsing on cultures. Conclusion: 10 day-long predegeneration results in the higher cell number and the better and prolonged purity of SCs in culture. PMID:25945245

  13. Neuroprotective effects of GDNF-expressing human amniotic fluid cells.

    PubMed

    Jezierski, Anna; Rennie, Kerry; Zurakowski, Bogdan; Ribecco-Lutkiewicz, Maria; Haukenfrers, Julie; Ajji, Abdellah; Gruslin, Andre; Sikorska, Marianna; Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud

    2014-04-01

    Brain injury continues to be one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Despite decades of research, there is currently no pharmacologically effective treatment for preventing neuronal loss and repairing the brain. As a result, novel therapeutic approaches, such as cell-based therapies, are being actively pursued to repair tissue damage and restore neurological function after injury. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective potential of amniotic fluid (AF) single cell clones, engineered to secrete glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (AF-GDNF), both in vitro and in a surgically induced model of brain injury. Our results show that pre-treatment with GDNF significantly increases cell survival in cultures of AF cells or cortical neurons exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Since improving the efficacy of cell transplantation depends on enhanced graft cell survival, we investigated whether AF-GDNF cells seeded on polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds could enhance graft survival following implantation into the lesion cavity. Encouragingly, the AF-GDNF cells survived longer than control AF cells in serum-free conditions and continued to secrete GDNF both in vitro and following implantation into the injured motor cortex. AF-GDNF implantation in the acute period following injury was sufficient to activate the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway in host neural cells in the peri-lesion area, potentially boosting endogenous neuroprotective pathways. These results were complemented with promising trends in beam walk tasks in AF-GDNF/PGA animals during the 7day timeframe. Further investigation is required to determine whether significant behavioural improvement can be achieved at a longer timeframe. PMID:24415130

  14. Coupling EELS/EFTEM Imaging with Environmental Fluid Cell Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Insight into dynamically evolving electrochemical reactions and mechanisms encountered in electrical energy storage (EES) and conversion technologies (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors), materials science (corrosion and oxidation), and materials synthesis (electrodeposition) remains limited due to the present lack of in situ high-resolution characterization methodologies. Electrochemical fluid cell microscopy is an emerging in-situ method that allows for the direct, real-time imaging of electrochemical processes within a fluid environment. This technique is facilitated by the use of MEMS-based biasing microchip platforms that serve the purpose of sealing the highly volatile electrolyte between two electron transparent SiNx membranes and interfacing electrodes to an external potentiostat for controlled nanoscale electrochemislly experiments [!]. In order to elucidate both stmctural and chemical changes during such in situ electrochemical experiments, it is impmtant to first improve upon the spatial resolution by utilizing energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) (to minimize chromatic aben ation), then to detennine the chemical changes via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). This presents a formidable challenge since the overall thickness through which electrons are scattered through the multiple layers of the cell can be on the order of hundreds of nanometers to microns, scattering through which has the deleterious effect of degrading image resolution and decreasing signal-to noise for spectroscopy [2].

  15. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  16. Estimated retinal ganglion cell counts in glaucomatous eyes with localized retinal nerve fiber layer defects

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Andrew J.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To estimate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) losses associated with visible glaucomatous localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects. Design Observational cross-sectional study. Methods A multicenter study of 198 normal eyes (138 subjects) and 66 glaucomatous eyes (55 subjects) recruited from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study and African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study. All eyes had standard automated perimetry (SAP), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundus stereophotographs within 6 months. Glaucomatous eyes were included if localized RNFL defects were detected by masked grading of stereophotographs. The number of RGCs in each sector of a structure-function map was estimated using a previously published model combining RGC estimates from SAP and SD-OCT. The estimated percentage loss of RGCs (combined structure function index) was calculated. Results In glaucomatous eyes there were 136 sectors with visible RNFL defects and 524 sectors without visible RNFL defects. The commonest sectors with visible RNFL defects were inferior and inferotemporal sectors, followed by superior and superotemporal sectors. Eyes with visible RNFL defects had a mean estimated RGC count of 657,172 cells versus 968,883 cells in healthy eyes (P<0.001). The average combined structure function index in sectors with a visible RNFL defect (5921%) was significantly higher than in sectors without a visible RNFL defect in glaucomatous eyes (1529%, P<0.001) and higher than in healthy eyes (113%, P<0.001). Conclusions Although visible localized RNFL defects are often considered an early sign of glaucoma this study indicates that they are likely to be associated with large neuronal losses. PMID:23746612

  17. The effects of transport by pneumatic tube system on blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation and coagulation tests

    PubMed Central

    Koak, Fatma Emel; Yntem, Mustafa; Ycel, zlem; ilo, Mustafa; Gen, zlem; Meral, Ayfer

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Today, the pneumatic tube transport system (PTS) is used frequently because of its advantages related to timing and speed. However, the impact of various types of PTS on blood components is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of PTS on the quality of routine blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation, and certain blood coagulation tests. Materials and methods: Paired blood samples were obtained from each of 45 human volunteers and evaluated by blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation, and several coagulation tests, including prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Blood samples were divided into 2 groups: Samples from group 1 were transported to the laboratory via the PTS, and samples from group 2 were transported to the laboratory manually. Both groups were evaluated immediately by the tests listed above. Results: The blood sample test results from groups 1 and 2 were evaluated and compared. No statistically significant differences were observed (P = 0.0690.977). Conclusion: The PTS yielded no observable effects on blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation, or PT and aPTT test results. We concluded that the PTS can be used to transport blood samples and yield reliable results for blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation, and several coagulation tests. PMID:23894866

  18. Consequence of alternative standards for bulk tank somatic cell count of dairy herds in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of dairy operations failing compliance with current US and European Union (EU) standards for bulk-tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) as well as BTSCC standards proposed by 3 national organizations were evaluated using 2 populations of US dairy herds: Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHI) ...

  19. Counting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the spleen: a novel in vivo method for assessing biomaterial immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Shyh-Jou; Varkey, Prashanth; Chen, Po-Yang; Chang, Su-Ya; Huang, Lynn L.H.

    2014-01-01

    As immunotoxicity assessments of newly developed biomaterials are often restricted to use in assessment of local tissue response at the implantation site, they do not always show an immune response acceptable to qualify them for clinical use. We tested a new method to assess systemic toxicity: counting the CD4+ and CD8+ cells in the spleen. Three different biomaterials were subcutaneously implanted in three groups of rats for the same time period. After 31 days, their spleens were harvested, and CD4+ and CD8+ cells were counted. The mean CD4+/CD8+ cell counts were 24.5 3.6/19.8 4.0 (porous collagen matrix group), 25.5 7.1/21.6 3.8 [synthetic collagen matrix (Duragen) group] and 28.1 4.1/19.6 3.7 (porcine dermis group). Differences in cell counts were not significant. The immunotoxic response generated against porous collagen matrix was comparable to that produced by a similar biomaterial already used clinically. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study on cytotoxic lymphocytes in the spleen to quantify systemic immune response to a biomaterial; however, such studies have been conducted with bacterial and viral antigens, and with vaccines. We believe that the present study provides a viable method for larger studies to confirm our current findings. PMID:26816621

  20. Automatic choroid cells segmentation and counting based on approximate convexity and concavity of chain code in fluorescence microscopic image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weihua; Chen, Xinjian; Zhu, Weifang; Yang, Lei; Cao, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Haoyu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we proposed a method based on the Freeman chain code to segment and count rhesus choroid-retinal vascular endothelial cells (RF/6A) automatically for fluorescence microscopy images. The proposed method consists of four main steps. First, a threshold filter and morphological transform were applied to reduce the noise. Second, the boundary information was used to generate the Freeman chain codes. Third, the concave points were found based on the relationship between the difference of the chain code and the curvature. Finally, cells segmentation and counting were completed based on the characteristics of the number of the concave points, the area and shape of the cells. The proposed method was tested on 100 fluorescence microscopic cell images, and the average true positive rate (TPR) is 98.13% and the average false positive rate (FPR) is 4.47%, respectively. The preliminary results showed the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  1. Microparticle and cell counting with digital microfluidic compact disc using standard CD drive.

    PubMed

    Imaad, Syed M; Lord, Nathan; Kulsharova, Gulsim; Liu, Gang Logan

    2011-04-21

    Lab-on-chip medical diagnostics in a global health setting would greatly benefit from highly portable, cost effective and readily available devices. Digital compact disc (CD) and the corresponding detection device-CD drives-for personal computers are extremely affordable and distributable worldwide, therefore they can be immediately used in global health applications if empowered with molecular and cellular biosensing functions. Here we present a novel digital microfluidic CD device derived from conventional music or data CD and demonstrate its preliminary application of counting polystyrene microparticles and living cells in minute-volume fluidic samples. No other detection instruments except for a standard CD drive in a personal computer is used for reading and decoding the quantitative liquid sample information from the digital microfluidic CD. The results presented herein are the first step towards creating a truly portable, low-cost and ubiquitously accessible device-health diagnostic compact disc (HDCD)-for biosensing and health diagnostics, especially in remote or impoverished settings with limited medical infrastructure and healthcare workers. PMID:21350788

  2. Serum Uric Acid, Alanine Aminotransferase, Hemoglobin and Red Blood Cell Count Levels in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simavl?, Hseyin; Bucak, Yasin Ycel; Tosun, Mehmet; Erdurmu?, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The pathogenesis of pseudoexfoliation (PEX), the most common cause of secondary glaucoma, has not been clearly identified, but there is increasing evidence that points out the role of oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate some of the most commonly used blood parameters, hemoglobin (Hb), red blood cell count (RBC), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and uric acid (UA) levels, in subjects with PEX. Materials and Methods. This study is performed in a state hospital between November 2011 and December 2012. Retrospective chart review of subjects who underwent cataract surgery was performed. Thirty-one healthy subjects with PEX and 34 healthy subjects without PEX were evaluated. Hb, RBC, ALT, and UA levels were recorded. Student's t-test was used to compare the two groups. Results. The mean age was 73.6 14.1 years in PEX group and 70.1 12.7 in control group (p = 0.293). Hb, RBC, ALT, and UA levels did not show a statistically significant difference among PEX and control groups (p > 0.05 for all). Conclusion. Serum levels of Hb, RBC, ALT, and UA levels were similar in subjects with and without PEX. Further studies are needed to clarify the precise role of Hb, RBC, ALT, and UA in the pathogenesis of PEX. PMID:26075087

  3. Using BD Vacutainer CD4 Stabilization Tubes for Absolute Cluster of Differentiation Type 4 Cell Count Measurement on BD FacsCount and Partec Cyflow Cytometers: A Method Comparison Study from Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Florian; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Bernasconi, Andrea; Moyo, Buhlebenkosi; Havazvidi, Liberty; Bastard, Mathieu; Flevaud, Laurence; Taziwa, Fabian; Makondo, Eliphas; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood collected in conventional EDTA tubes requires laboratory analysis within 48 hours to provide valid CD4 cell count results. This restricts access to HIV care for patients from rural areas in resource-constraint settings due to sample transportation problems. Stabilization Tubes with extended storage duration have been developed but not yet evaluated comprehensively. Objective To investigate stability of absolute CD4 cell count measurement of samples in BD Vacutainer CD4 Stabilization Tubes over the course of 30 days. Methods This was a laboratory-based method comparison study conducted at a rural district hospital in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe. Whole peripheral blood from 88 HIV positive adults was drawn into BD Vacutainer CD4 Stabilization Tubes and re-tested 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 30 days after collection on BD FacsCount and Partec Cyflow cytometers in parallel. Absolute CD4 cell levels were compared to results from paired samples in EDTA tubes analysed on BD FacsCount at the day of sample collection (references methodology). Bland-Altman analysis based on ratios of the median CD4 counts was used, with acceptable variation ranges for Limits of Agreements of +/-20%. Results Differences in ratios of the medians remained below 10% until day 21 on BD FacsCount and until day 5 on Partec Cyflow. Variations of Limits of Agreement were beyond 20% after day 1 on both cytometers. Specimen quality decreased steadily after day 5, with only 68% and 40% of samples yielding results on BD FacsCount and Partec Cyflow at day 21, respectively. Conclusions We do not recommend the use of BD Vacutainer CD4 Stabilization Tubes for absolute CD4 cell count measurement on BD FacsCount or Partec Cyflow due to large variation of results and decay of specimen quality. Alternative technologies for enhanced CD4 testing in settings with limited laboratory and sample transportation capacity still need to be developed. PMID:26295802

  4. Increased counts and degranulation of duodenal mast cells and eosinophils in functional dyspepsia- a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Song, Shijun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Haishan; Li, Gaiqin; Li, Xiaopei; Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    The above article published in Medicinski Glasnik online on 26 June 2014 by the Medical Association of Zenica-Doboj Canton (http://www.ljkzedo.com.ba/index.php/u-sljedecem-broju) and in Volume 11, Issue 2, pages 276-282, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Professor Selma Uzunovi?, and the Medical Association of Zenica-Doboj Canton. The reasons for this retraction are as follows: The work reported in the paper was about the role of duodenal eosinophils and mast cells in the pathogenesis of functional dyspepsia. Most of the experiments were carried out by a former member of the authors' team named Yuan Haipeng, who has left the team for more than two years. A high proportion of data in the paper had been reported in the doctoral dissertation of Yuan Haipeng in 2012, and the paper was published without the knowledge or permission of Yuan. Besides the data previously reported in the doctoral dissertation of Yuan Haipeng, the authors calculated the other data in the paper before the submission. However, it has come to the authors' attention that they had made quite a few mistakes due to a loss of the original data, which was not described in details in the dissertation. REFERENCE Shijun Song, Yan Song, Haishan Zhang, Gaiqin Li, Xiaopei Li, Xiaohong Wang, Zhen Liu. Increased counts and degranulation of duodenal mast cells and eosinophils in functional dyspepsia- a clinical study. Med Glas (Zenica) 2014; 11(2):276-82. PMID:25669347

  5. A proteomic perspective on the changes in milk proteins due to high somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Boeren, S; van Hooijdonk, A C M; Vervoort, J M; Hettinga, K A

    2015-08-01

    Although cows with subclinical mastitis have no difference in the appearance of their milk, milk composition and milk quality are altered because of the inflammation. To know the changes in milk quality with different somatic cell count (SCC) levels, 5 pooled bovine milk samples with SCC from 10(5) to 10(6) cells/mL were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using both one-dimension sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE and filter-aided sample preparation coupled with dimethyl labeling, both followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Minor differences were found on the qualitative level in the proteome from milk with different SCC levels, whereas the concentration of milk proteins showed remarkable changes. Not only immune-related proteins (cathelicidins, IGK protein, CD59 molecule, complement regulatory protein, lactadherin), but also proteins with other biological functions (e.g., lipid metabolism: platelet glycoprotein 4, butyrophilin subfamily 1 member A1, perilipin-2) were significantly different in milk from cows with high SCC level compared with low SCC level. The increased concentration of protease inhibitors in the milk with higher SCC levels may suggest a protective role in the mammary gland against protease activity. Prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase showed a linear relation with SCC, which was confirmed with an ELISA. However, the correlation coefficient was lower in individual cows compared with bulk milk. These results indicate that prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase may be used as an indicator to evaluate bulk milk quality and thereby reduce the economic loss in the dairy industry. The results from this study reflect the biological phenomena occurring during subclinical mastitis and in addition provide a potential indicator for the detection of bulk milk with high SCC. PMID:26094216

  6. Micro Flow Cytometer Chip Integrated with Micro-Pumps/Micro-Valves for Multi-Wavelength Cell Counting and Sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chen-Min; Hsiung, Suz-Kai; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-05-01

    Flow cytometry is a popular technique for counting and sorting of individual cells. This study presents a new chip-based flow cytometer capable of cell injection, counting and switching in an automatic format. The new microfluidic system is also capable of multi-wavelength detection of fluorescence-labeled cells by integrating multiple buried optical fibers within the chip. Instead of using large-scale syringe pumps, this study integrates micro-pumps and micro-valves to automate the entire cell injection and sorting process. By using pneumatic serpentine-shape (S-shape) micro-pumps to drive sample and sheath flows, the developed chip can generate hydrodynamic focusing to allow cells to pass detection regions in sequence. Two pairs of optical fibers are buried and aligned with the microchannels, which can transmit laser light sources with different wavelengths and can collect induced fluorescence signals. The cells labeled with different fluorescent dyes can be excited by the corresponding light source at different wavelengths. The fluorescence signals are then collected by avalanche photodiode (APD) sensors. Finally, a flow switching device composed of three pneumatic micro-valves is used for cell sorting function. Experimental data show that the developed flow cytometer can distinguish specific cells with different dye-labeling from mixed cell samples in one single process. The target cell samples can be also switched into appropriate outlet channels utilizing the proposed microvalve device. The developed microfluidic system is promising for miniature cell-based biomedical applications.

  7. Rapid, Precise, and Accurate Counts of Symbiodinium Cells Using the Guava Flow Cytometer, and a Comparison to Other Methods.

    PubMed

    Krediet, Cory J; DeNofrio, Jan C; Caruso, Carlo; Burriesci, Matthew S; Cella, Kristen; Pringle, John R

    2015-01-01

    In studies of both the establishment and breakdown of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, it is often necessary to determine the number of Symbiodinium cells relative to the quantity of host tissue. Ideally, the methods used should be rapid, precise, and accurate. In this study, we systematically evaluated methods for sample preparation and storage and the counting of algal cells using the hemocytometer, a custom image-analysis program for automated counting of the fluorescent algal cells, the Coulter Counter, or the Millipore Guava flow-cytometer. We found that although other methods may have value in particular applications, for most purposes, the Guava flow cytometer provided by far the best combination of precision, accuracy, and efficient use of investigator time (due to the instrument's automated sample handling), while also allowing counts of algal numbers over a wide range and in small volumes of tissue homogenate. We also found that either of two assays of total homogenate protein provided a precise and seemingly accurate basis for normalization of algal counts to the total amount of holobiont tissue. PMID:26291447

  8. Rapid, Precise, and Accurate Counts of Symbiodinium Cells Using the Guava Flow Cytometer, and a Comparison to Other Methods

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Carlo; Burriesci, Matthew S.; Cella, Kristen; Pringle, John R.

    2015-01-01

    In studies of both the establishment and breakdown of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, it is often necessary to determine the number of Symbiodinium cells relative to the quantity of host tissue. Ideally, the methods used should be rapid, precise, and accurate. In this study, we systematically evaluated methods for sample preparation and storage and the counting of algal cells using the hemocytometer, a custom image-analysis program for automated counting of the fluorescent algal cells, the Coulter Counter, or the Millipore Guava flow-cytometer. We found that although other methods may have value in particular applications, for most purposes, the Guava flow cytometer provided by far the best combination of precision, accuracy, and efficient use of investigator time (due to the instrument's automated sample handling), while also allowing counts of algal numbers over a wide range and in small volumes of tissue homogenate. We also found that either of two assays of total homogenate protein provided a precise and seemingly accurate basis for normalization of algal counts to the total amount of holobiont tissue. PMID:26291447

  9. Enumeration of CD4+ T-Cells Using a Portable Microchip Count Platform in Tanzanian HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moon, SangJun; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Blander, Jeffrey; Fawzi, Wafaie W.; Aboud, Said; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Background CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (CD4 count) is a standard method used to monitor HIV-infected patients during anti-retroviral therapy (ART). The World Health Organization (WHO) has pointed out or recommended that a handheld, point-of-care, reliable, and affordable CD4 count platform is urgently needed in resource-scarce settings. Methods HIV-infected patient blood samples were tested at the point-of-care using a portable and label-free microchip CD4 count platform that we have developed. A total of 130 HIV-infected patient samples were collected that included 16 de-identified left over blood samples from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), and 114 left over samples from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) enrolled in the HIV and AIDS care and treatment centers in the City of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The two data groups from BWH and MUHAS were analyzed and compared to the commonly accepted CD4 count reference method (FACSCalibur system). Results The portable, battery operated and microscope-free microchip platform developed in our laboratory (BWH) showed significant correlation in CD4 counts compared with FACSCalibur system both at BWH (r?=?0.94, p<0.01) and MUHAS (r?=?0.49, p<0.01), which was supported by the Bland-Altman methods comparison analysis. The device rapidly produced CD4 count within 10 minutes using an in-house developed automated cell counting program. Conclusions We obtained CD4 counts of HIV-infected patients using a portable platform which is an inexpensive (<$1 material cost) and disposable microchip that uses whole blood sample (<10 l) without any pre-processing. The system operates without the need for antibody-based fluorescent labeling and expensive fluorescent illumination and microscope setup. This portable CD4 count platform displays agreement with the FACSCalibur results and has the potential to expand access to HIV and AIDS monitoring using fingerprick volume of whole blood and helping people who suffer from HIV and AIDS in resource-limited settings. PMID:21754988

  10. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells from EGFP Transgenic Mice Attenuate Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cheng-Wei; Yen, Chih-Ching; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of oxygen aggravate the severity of lung injury in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Although mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to effectively attenuate various injured tissues, there is limited information regarding a role for amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) in treating acute lung injury. We hypothesized that intravenous delivery of AFSCs would attenuate lung injury in an experimental model of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. AFSCs were isolated from EGFP transgenic mice. The in vitro differentiation, surface markers, and migration of the AFSCs were assessed by specific staining, flow cytometry, and a co-culture system, respectively. The in vivo therapeutic potential of AFSCs was evaluated in a model of acute hyperoxia-induced lung injury in mice. The administration of AFSCs significantly reduced the hyperoxia-induced pulmonary inflammation, as reflected by significant reductions in lung wet/dry ratio, neutrophil counts, and the level of apoptosis, as well as reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokine (IL-1?, IL-6, and TNF-?) and early-stage fibrosis in lung tissues. Moreover, EGFP-expressing AFSCs were detected and engrafted into a peripheral lung epithelial cell lineage by fluorescence microscopy and DAPI stain. Intravenous administration of AFSCs may offer a new therapeutic strategy for acute lung injury (ALI), for which efficient treatments are currently unavailable. PMID:24040409

  11. AgNOR Count in Resting Cells (Resting NOR) Is a New Prognostic Marker in Invasive Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tomobe, Mitsuro; Shimazui, Toru; Uchida, Katsunori; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that the AgNOR count in proliferating cells is a predictor of tumor recurrence in superficial bladder tumor (J. Urol. 162 (1999), 6368). In the present study, we evaluate the type of AgNOR associated with cell cycles as a prognostic factor in invasive bladder tumor using a double staining technique employing both AgNOR and MIB-1 labelling. Materials and methods: Forty-four paraffin sections of invasive bladder tumors were stained simultaneously with AgNOR and MIB-1. The number of AgNORs in proliferating (MIB-1 positive) or resting (MIB-1 negative) cells were counted from a total of 100 nuclei. Correlations between MIB-1 associated AgNOR count and clinicopathological parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: The AgNOR count in proliferating cells (proliferating NOR) was significantly higher than that in resting cells (resting NOR) (p < 0.01). The resting NOR in tumors with distant metastases was significantly higher than that in tumors without metastases (p < 0.05). Patients with a low resting NOR tumor had a better prognosis than those with a high resting NOR tumor, whereas the proliferating NOR was not associated with survival. Survival analysis revealed that the resting NOR was the most powerful prognostic marker in patients with invasive bladder tumor (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Resting NOR had a predictive value in the prognosis of patients with invasive bladder tumor. Keywords: Transitional cell carcinoma, invasive, resting cell, AgNORs, MIB-1 PMID:11564895

  12. Effect of sensor systems for cow management on milk production, somatic cell count, and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Steeneveld, W; Vernooij, J C M; Hogeveen, H

    2015-06-01

    To improve management on dairy herds, sensor systems have been developed that can measure physiological, behavioral, and production indicators on individual cows. It is not known whether using sensor systems also improves measures of health and production in dairy herds. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of using sensor systems on measures of health and production in dairy herds. Data of 414 Dutch dairy farms with (n=152) and without (n=262) sensor systems were available. For these herds, information on milk production per cow, days to first service, first calving age, and somatic cell count (SCC) was provided for the years 2003 to 2013. Moreover, year of investment in sensor systems was available. For every farm year, we determined whether that year was before or after the year of investment in sensor systems on farms with an automatic milking system (AMS) or a conventional milking system (CMS), or whether it was a year on a farm that never invested in sensor systems. Separate statistical analyses were performed to determine the effect of sensor systems for mastitis detection (color, SCC, electrical conductivity, and lactate dehydrogenase sensors), estrus detection for dairy cows, estrus detection for young stock, and other sensor systems (weighing platform, rumination time sensor, fat and protein sensor, temperature sensor, milk temperature sensor, urea sensor, β-hydroxybutyrate sensor, and other sensor systems). The AMS farms had a higher average SCC (by 12,000 cells/mL) after sensor investment, and CMS farms with a mastitis detection system had a lower average SCC (by 10,000 cells/mL) in the years after sensor investment. Having sensor systems was associated with a higher average production per cow on AMS farms, and with a lower average production per cow on CMS farms in the years after investment. The most likely reason for this lower milk production after investment was that on 96% of CMS farms, the sensor system investment occurred together with another major change at the farm, such as a new barn or a new milking system. Most likely, these other changes had led to a decrease in milk production that could not be compensated for by the use of sensor systems. Having estrus detection sensor systems did not improve reproduction performance. Labor reduction was an important reason for investing in sensor systems. Therefore, economic benefits from investments in sensor systems can be expected more from the reduction in labor costs than from improvements in measures of health and production in dairy herds. PMID:25841965

  13. Donor lymphocyte count and thymic activity predict lymphocyte recovery and outcomes after matched-sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    McIver, Zachariah; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; Wu, Colin; Grim, Andrew; Ito, Sawa; Cho, Irene; Hensel, Nancy; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, Austin John

    2013-03-01

    Delayed immune recovery is a characteristic feature of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult recipients. Although recipient thymic T-cell neogenesis contributes to T-cell regeneration after transplantation, thymic recovery in the transplant recipient decreases with increasing age, and is diminished by intensive preconditioning regimens and graft-versus-host disease. In adult recipients, most events that determine transplant success or failure occur during the period when the majority of circulating T cells is derived from the donor's post thymic T-cell repertoire. As a result, the make-up of the donor lymphocyte compartment may strongly influence immune recovery and transplant outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine donor lymphocyte counts in a series of patients undergoing an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant to identify the potential contribution of donor regulatory and conventional T lymphocyte populations to immune recovery and transplant outcomes. We examined donor lymphocyte subset counts in relation to post-transplant lymphocyte recovery and transplant events in 220 consecutive myeloablative, T-cell-depleted, HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with hematologic malignancies. In a multivariate analysis, absolute numbers of donor CD4(+) recent thymic emigrants were associated with overall survival (P=0.032). The donors' absolute lymphocyte count and thymic production of regulatory T cells were both associated with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (P=0.002 and P=0.022, respectively). In conclusion, these results identify donor immune characteristics that are associated with lymphocyte recovery, extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease, and survival in the recipient following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study reported here was performed using peripheral blood samples drawn from donors and patients enrolled in the ClinicalTrials.gov-registered trials NCT00001623, NCT00001873, NCT00353860, NCT00066300, NCT00079391, and NCT00398346. PMID:23065508

  14. Relationship between the somatic cell count in milk and reproductive function in peripartum dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    ISOBE, Naoki; IWAMOTO, Chihiro; KUBOTA, Hirokazu; YOSHIMURA, Yukinori

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the somatic cell count (SCC) in milk on reproductive performance, such as pregnancy status in the prepartum period and ovarian function in the postpartum period, in dairy cows. Blood samples were collected every week from one month prepartum to parturition in order to measure the concentrations of 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGF2? (PGFM), estrone sulfate (E1S) and progesterone. Milk samples were collected three times per week in both the prepartum (for one month before the dry period) and postpartum periods (for 3 months immediately after parturition) to measure the SCC. Progesterone was also determined in the whole milk of postpartum cows to define the day of the first ovulation. In the prepartum period, the maximum SCC negatively correlated with the pregnancy period (r = 0.77), but not the calf birth weight. Positive and negative correlations were observed between the average SCC and PGFM or progesterone concentrations in plasma, respectively (r = 0.84 or 0.92, respectively), at 39 weeks of pregnancy. In the postpartum period, a correlation was observed between the day of the first ovulation and both the average and maximum SCC (r = 0.74 and 0.75, respectively), whereas days open was not related to the SCC. These results suggest that a high SCC in the prepartum period may advance parturition by increasing PGF2? and decreasing progesterone and that the first ovulation in the postpartum period was affected by a high SCC. PMID:25196356

  15. Quantification of Cells with Specific Phenotypes I: Determination of CD4+ Cell Count Per Microliter in Reconstituted Lyophilized Human PBMC Prelabeled with Anti-CD4 FITC Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Stebbings, Richard; Wang, Lili; Sutherland, Janet; Kammel, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; John, Manuela; Roemer, Bodo; Kuhne, Maren; Schneider, Rudolf J; Braun, Michael; Engel, Andrea; Dikshit, Dinesh K; Abbasi, Fatima; Marti, Gerald E; Paola Sassi, Maria; Revel, Laura; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Baradez, Marc-Olivier; Lekishvili, Tamara; Marshall, Damian; Whitby, Liam; Jing, Wang; Ost, Volker; Vonsky, Maxim; Neukammer, Jrg

    2015-01-01

    A surface-labeled lyophilized lymphocyte (sLL) preparation has been developed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells prelabeled with a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. The sLL preparation is intended to be used as a reference material for CD4+ cell counting including the development of higher order reference measurement procedures and has been evaluated in the pilot study CCQM-P102. This study was conducted across 16 laboratories from eight countries to assess the ability of participants to quantify the CD4+ cell count of this reference material and to document cross-laboratory variability plus associated measurement uncertainties. Twelve different flow cytometer platforms were evaluated using a standard protocol that included calibration beads used to obtain quantitative measurements of CD4+ T cell counts. There was good overall cross-platform and counting method agreement with a grand mean of the laboratory calculated means of (301.7 4.9) ?L?1 CD4+ cells. Excluding outliers, greater than 90% of participant data agreed within 15%. A major contribution to variation of sLL CD4+ cell counts was tube to tube variation of the calibration beads, amounting to an uncertainty of 3.6%. Variation due to preparative steps equated to an uncertainty of 2.6%. There was no reduction in variability when data files were centrally reanalyzed. Remaining variation was attributed to instrument specific differences. CD4+ cell counts obtained in CCQM-P102 are in excellent agreement and show the robustness of both the measurements and the data analysis and hence the suitability of sLL as a reference material for interlaboratory comparisons and external quality assessment. 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25655255

  16. Evaluation of Endothelial Cells Differentiated from Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Omar M.; Petsche, Jennifer J.; Moise, Kenneth J.; Johnson, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Amniotic fluid holds great promise as a stem cell source, especially in neonatal applications where autologous cells can be isolated and used. This study examined chemical-mediated differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSC) into endothelial cells and verified the function of AFSC-derived endothelial cells (AFSC-EC). AFSC were isolated from amniotic fluid obtained from second trimester amnioreduction as part of therapeutic intervention from pregnancies affected with twin-twin transfusion syndrome. Undifferentiated AFSC were of normal karyotype with a subpopulation of cells positive for the embryonic stem cell marker SSEA4, hematopoietic stem cell marker c-kit, and mesenchymal stem cell markers CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105. Additionally, these cells were negative for the endothelial marker CD31 and hematopoietic differentiation marker CD45. AFSC were cultured in endothelial growth media with concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ranging from 1 to 100?ng/mL. After 2 weeks, AFSC-EC expressed von Willebrand factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, CD31, VE-cadherin, and VEGF receptor 2. Additionally, the percentage of cells expressing CD31 was positively correlated with VEGF concentration up to 50?ng/mL, with no increase at higher concentrations. AFSC-EC showed a decrease in stem cells markers c-kit and SSEA4 and were morphologically similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In functional assays, AFSC-EC formed networks and metabolized acetylated low-density lipoprotein, also characteristic of HUVEC. Nitrate levels for AFSC-EC, an indirect measure of nitric oxide synthesis, were significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and significantly lower than HUVEC. These results indicate that AFSC can differentiate into functional endothelial-like cells and may have the potential to provide vascularization for constructs used in regenerative medicine strategies. PMID:22250756

  17. Clinical utility of circulating tumor cell counting through CellSearch®: the dilemma of a concept suspended in Limbo

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Naso, Giuseppe; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-01-01

    To date, 10 years after the first demonstration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer using the US Food and Drug Administration–cleared system CellSearch®, the potential utility of CTCs in early clinical development of drugs, their role as a surrogate marker of response to therapy, and their molecular analysis for patient stratification for targeted therapies are still major unsolved questions. Great expectations are pinned on the ongoing interventional trials aimed to demonstrate that CTCs might be of value for guiding treatment of patients and predicting cancer progression. To fill the gap between theory and practice with regard to the clinical utility of CTCs, a bridge is needed, taking into account innovative design for clinical trials, a revised definition of traditional CTCs, next-generation CTC technology, the potential clinical application of CTC analysis in non-validated settings of disease, and finally, expanding the number of patients enrolled in the studies. In this regard, the results of the first European pooled analysis definitely validated the independent prognostic value of CTC counting in metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:24790460

  18. Combining optical quadrature and differential interference contrast to facilitate embryonic cell counting with fluorescence imaging for confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; Newmark, Judith A.; Chang, ChihChing; Brooks, Dana H.; Warner, Carol M.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2005-03-01

    The Multifunctional Staring Mode Microscope was developed to permit three modes of imaging for cell counting in mouse embryos: Optical Quadrature, Differential Interference Contrast (DIC), and Fluorescence Imaging. The Optical Quadrature Microscope, consisting of a modified Mach-Zender Interferometer, uses a 632.8 nm laser to measure the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. Four cameras, preceded by multiple beamsplitters, are used to read the four interferograms, which are then combined to produce an image of the complex electric field amplitude. The phase of the complex amplitude is then unwrapped using a 2-D phase unwrap algorithm and images of optical path length are produced. To combine the additional modes of DIC and Fluorescence Imaging with the Optical Quadrature Microscope, a 632.8 nm narrow bandpass beamsplitter was placed at the output of the microscope. This allows the laser light to continue through the Mach-Zender while all other wavelengths are reflected at 90 degrees to another camera. This was effective in combining the three modes as the fluorescence wavelength for the Hoechst stain is well below the bandpass window of the beamsplitter. Both live and fixed samples have been successfully imaged in all three modes. Accuracy in cell counting was achieved by using the DIC image for detecting cell boundaries and the Optical Quadrature image for phase mapping to determine where cells overlap. The final results were verified by Hoechst fluorescence imaging to count the individual nuclei. Algorithms are currently being refined so larger cell counts can be done more efficiently.

  19. Modeling centrifugal cell washers using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kellet, Beth E; Han, Binbing; Dandy, David S; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2004-11-01

    Reinfusion of shed blood during surgery could avoid the need for blood transfusions. Prior to reinfusion of the red blood cells, the shed blood must be washed in order to remove leukocytes, platelets, and other contaminants. Further, the hematocrit of the washed blood must be increased. The feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to guide the design of better centrifuges for processing shed blood is explored here. The velocity field within a centrifuge bowl and the rate of protein removal from the shed blood has been studied. The results obtained indicate that CFD could help screen preliminary centrifuge bowl designs, thus reducing the number of initial experimental tests required when developing new centrifuge bowls. Although the focus of this work is on washing shed blood, the methods developed here are applicable to the design of centrifuge bowls for other blood-processing applications. PMID:15504118

  20. Automatic detection of clinical mastitis is improved by in-line monitoring of somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, C; Sherlock, R; Jago, J; Mein, G; Hogeveen, H

    2008-12-01

    This study explored the potential value of in-line composite somatic cell count (ISCC) sensing as a sole criterion or in combination with quarter-based electrical conductivity (EC) of milk, for automatic detection of clinical mastitis (CM) during automatic milking. Data generated from a New Zealand research herd of about 200 cows milked by 2 automatic milking systems during the 2006-2007 milking season included EC, ISCC, monthly laboratory-determined SCC, and observed cases of CM that were treated with antibiotics. Milk samples for ISCC and laboratory-determined SCC were taken sequentially at the end of a cow milking. Both samples were derived from a composite cow milking obtained from the bottom of the milk receiver. Different time windows were defined in which true-positive, false-negative, and false-positive alerts were determined. Quarters suspected of having CM were visually checked and, if CM was confirmed, sampled for bacteriological culturing and treated with an antibiotic treatment. These treated quarters were considered as gold-standard positives for comparing CM detection models. Alert thresholds were adjusted to achieve a sensitivity of 80% in 3 detection models: using ISCC alone, EC alone, or a combination of these. The success rate (also known as the positive predictive value) and the false alert rate (number of false-positive alerts per 1,000 cow milkings) were used to evaluate detection performance. Normalized ISCC estimates were highly correlated with normalized laboratory-determined SCC measurements (r = 0.82) for SCC measurements >200 x 10(3) cells/mL. Using EC alone as a detection tool resulted in a range of 6.9 to 11.0% for success rate, and a range of 4.7 to 7.8 for the false alert rate. Values for the ISCC model were better than the model using EC alone with 12.7 to 15.6% for the success rate and 2.9 to 3.7 for the false alert rate. Combining sensor information to detect CM, by using a fuzzy logic algorithm, produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in the success rate (range 21.9 to 32.0%) and a 2- to 3-fold decrease in the false alert rate (range 1.2 to 2.1) compared with the models using ISCC or EC alone. Results suggest that the performance of a CM detection system improved when ISCC information was added to a detection model using EC information. PMID:19038931

  1. Somatic cell count assessment at the quarter or cow milking level.

    PubMed

    Mollenhorst, H; van der Tol, P P J; Hogeveen, H

    2010-07-01

    The aim was to investigate whether on-line somatic cell count (SCC) assessment, when combined with electrical conductivity (EC), should be implemented at the udder quarter or at the cow level. Data were collected from 3 farms with automatic milking systems, resulting in 3,191 quarter milkings used in the analyses. Visual observations of foremilk and quarter milk samples for laboratory SCC analysis were used to define 2 gold standards. One was based on visual observation only and the other was based on a combination of visual observation and SCC (using a reference value of 500,000 cells/mL), which means that a quarter milking must have visually abnormal milk as well as an increased SCC to be categorized positive. On-line SCC assessment took place at the quarter level during the first part of the milking. Composite cow level samples were used for laboratory SCC analysis and to compare the performance of SCC assessment at quarter and cow levels. The EC at the quarter level was measured by in-line sensors of the automatic milking system. Alerts for SCC indicators were calculated based on straightforward reference values. Alerts for EC were based on straightforward reference values, or on interquarter ratios. The latter was calculated by dividing the value of a given quarter by the average value of the 2 lowest quarters of that milking. The EC and SCC indicators were combined with either a Boolean "and" or "or" function. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to visually present results using different threshold values. Sensitivity, specificity, and success rate at the quarter level and false alert rate per 1,000 cow milkings were used to compare indicators at given sensitivity or specificity levels. Quarter level SCC assessment was superior to cow level assessment (transformed partial area under the curve=0.70 vs. 0.62) when combined with EC measurement at quarter level. When aiming for the same sensitivity level (e.g., 50%) with all visual abnormal milk as the gold standard, more false alerts were generated with cow level assessment (137 per 1,000 cow milkings) compared with quarter level SCC assessment (75 per 1,000 cow milkings). As a comparison, using EC alone resulted in 292 false alerts per 1,000 cow milkings in the same situation. Therefore, it is concluded that quarter level SCC assessment was superior to cow level assessment when combined with EC measurement at quarter level. PMID:20630252

  2. Affordable CD4(+) T-cell counts on 'single-platform' flow cytometers I. Primary CD4 gating.

    PubMed

    Janossy, G; Jani, I; Ghde, W

    2000-12-01

    Here, we demonstrate the flow cytometric concept of 'primary CD4 gating' utilizing three different CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) conjugated with five different fluorochromes. CD4(+) lymphocytes were defined by an autogate in a single histogram of CD4 fluorescence intensity (FI) (y-axis) vs. side light scatter (x-axis). A wide range of absolute counts for > 600 individuals, including HIV(+) patients, were compared with those obtained by 'state-of-the-art' single-platform flow cytometers such as the volumetric Ortho CytoronAbsolute and the Becton Dickinson FACSCalibur using TruCount beads. The correlation between CD4 counts obtained with primary CD4 gating and the full test panel on the Ortho Cytoron was excellent (R(2) = 0.999). Bland-Altman statistics showed a mean difference of -2 cells/mm(3) [confidence interval (CI) 95% = -3 to -1; limits of agreement -27 to +23]. In addition to absolute CD4 counts, CD4% values and CD4/CD8 ratios are also frequently requested. To obtain these, lymphocytes need to be counted using scatter gates, and a second tube stained with a CD8 mAb to count CD8(++) lymphocytes can be incorporated. We conclude that primary CD4 gating on single-platform volumetric flow cytometers is one of the most economical and flexible technologies for routine cost-conscious service work, particularly during the follow-up of patients undergoing anti-HIV therapy and/or vaccination in the developing world. PMID:11167762

  3. Relationship between drug resistance mutations, plasma viremia, and CD4+ T-cell counts in patients with chronic HIV infection.

    PubMed

    de Mendoza, Carmen; Martn-Carbonero, Luz; Gallego, Oscar; Corral, Anglica; Gonzlez-Lahoz, Juan; Soriano, Vincent

    2005-05-01

    Transmission of drug-resistant viruses has been shown to be associated with lower virus replication capacity and higher CD4+ cell counts in recent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroconvertors. The impact of drug resistance mutations on CD4 cell counts in chronically HIV-infected patients has not been examined. A total of 825 patients whose plasma specimens were submitted to a reference laboratory for genotypic testing from 1999 to 2002 were analyzed. There was no significant difference in the median CD4+ cell count when comparing 63 drug-naive and 762 treatment-experienced patients [399 (IQR, 141-525) vs. 319 (IQR, 174-521); P = 0.8]. In contrast, the median viral load was significantly higher in drug-naive than in pre-treated patients [4.6 (IQR, 4.1-5.25) vs. 4.1 (IQR, 3.4-4.7) logs; P < 0.0001]. Overall, drug resistance mutations appeared in 81% of patients, with a median number of 9 (IQR, 5-14). The rate of drug resistance genotypes was 9.5% for drug-naive patients and 86.7% for pre-treated individuals. In the univariate analysis, a lower viral load (P < 0.0001), the presence of drug-resistant viruses (P = 0.038), and specific mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene [presence of M184V (P = 0.016) or K70R (P < 0.0001), and lack of L74V (P < 0.003)] were all associated with higher CD4+ counts. However, in the multivariate analyses, only a lower viral load and the presence of K70R were significantly associated with higher CD4+ cell counts. In summary, drug-resistant viruses are associated with lower viral loads, but after adjusting for plasma viremia, subjects carrying drug-resistant viruses do not show significantly higher CD4 cell counts. Thus, keeping on treatment HIV-infected individuals failing virologically and harboring drug-resistant viruses may ameliorate their immunological deterioration until new drugs became available. PMID:15778973

  4. Interleukin 10 Responses Are Associated With Sustained CD4 T-Cell Counts in Treated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Villacres, Maria C.; Kono, Naoko; Mack, Wendy J.; Nowicki, Marek J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Augenbraun, Michael; Liu, Chenglong; Landay, Alan; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Gange, Stephen J.; Levine, Alexandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Background.Inflammation persists in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and may contribute to an increased risk for nonAIDS-related pathologies. We investigated the correlation of cytokine responses with changes in CD4 T-cell levels and coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) during highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Methods.A total of 383 participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (212 with HIV monoinfection, 56 with HCV monoinfection, and 115 with HIV/HCV coinfection) were studied. HIV-infected women had <1000 HIV RNA copies/mL, 99.7% had >200 CD4 T cells/?L; 98% were receiving HAART at baseline. Changes in CD4 T-cell count between baseline and 24 years later were calculated. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at baseline were used to measure interleukin 1? (IL-1?), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), interleukin 12 (IL-12), and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and TLR4 stimulation. Results.Undetectable HIV RNA (<80copies/mL) at baseline and secretion of IL-10 by PBMCs were positively associated with gains in CD4 T-cell counts at follow-up. Inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-?) were also produced in TLR-stimulated cultures, but only IL-10 was significantly associated with sustained increases in CD4 T-cell levels. This association was significant only in women with HIV monoinfection, indicating that HCV coinfection is an important factor limiting gains in CD4 T-cell counts, possibly by contributing to unbalanced persistent inflammation. Conclusions.Secreted IL-10 from PBMCs may balance the inflammatory environment of HIV, resulting in CD4 T-cell stability. PMID:22693231

  5. A Mini Overview of Isolation, Characterization and Application of Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh-Ghalehaziz, Shiva; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Fathi, Ezzatollah; Pashaiasl, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid represents rich sources of stem cells that can be used in treatments for a wide range of diseases. Amniotic fluid- stem cells have properties intermediate between embryonic and adult mesenchymal stem cells which make them particularly attractive for cellular regeneration and tissue engineering. Furthermore, scientists are interested in these cells because they come from the amniotic fluid that is routinely discarded after birth. In this review we give a brief introduction of amniotic fluid followed by a description of the cells present within this fluid and aim to summarize the all existing isolation methods, culturing, characterization and application of these cells. Finally, we elaborate on the differentiation and potential for these cells to promote regeneration of various tissue defects, including fetal tissue, the nervous system, heart, lungs, kidneys, bones, and cartilage in the form of table. PMID:26634059

  6. A Mini Overview of Isolation, Characterization and Application of Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh-Ghalehaziz, Shiva; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Fathi, Ezzatollah; Pashaiasl, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    Amniotic fluid represents rich sources of stem cells that can be used in treatments for a wide range of diseases. Amniotic fluid- stem cells have properties intermediate between embryonic and adult mesenchymal stem cells which make them particularly attractive for cellular regeneration and tissue engineering. Furthermore, scientists are interested in these cells because they come from the amniotic fluid that is routinely discarded after birth. In this review we give a brief introduction of amniotic fluid followed by a description of the cells present within this fluid and aim to summarize the all existing isolation methods, culturing, characterization and application of these cells. Finally, we elaborate on the differentiation and potential for these cells to promote regeneration of various tissue defects, including fetal tissue, the nervous system, heart, lungs, kidneys, bones, and cartilage in the form of table. PMID:26634059

  7. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and the Platelet Count in Iron-deficient Children Aged 0.5-3 Years.

    PubMed

    Akkermans, M D; Uijterschout, L; Vloemans, J; Teunisse, P P; Hudig, F; Bubbers, S; Verbruggen, S; Veldhorst, M; de Leeuw, T G; van Goudoever, J B; Brus, F

    2015-11-01

    Early detection of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in young children is important to prevent impaired neurodevelopment. Unfortunately, many biomarkers of ID are influenced by infection, thus limiting their usefulness. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and the platelet count for detecting ID(A) among otherwise healthy children. A multicenter prospective observational study was conducted in the Netherlands to investigate the prevalence of ID(A) in 400 healthy children aged 0.5-3 years. ID was defined as serum ferritin (SF) <12 μg/L in the absence of infection (C-reactive protein [CRP] <5 mg/L) and IDA as hemoglobin <110 g/L combined with ID. RDW (%) and the platelet count were determined in the complete blood cell count. RDW was inversely correlated with SF and not associated with CRP. Calculated cutoff values for RDW to detect ID and IDA gave a relatively low sensitivity (53.1% and 57.1%, respectively) and specificity (64.7% and 69.9%, respectively). Anemic children with a RDW >14.3% had a 2.7 higher odds (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-6.3) to be iron deficient, compared with anemic children with a RDW <14.3%. The platelet count showed a large range in both ID and non-ID children. In conclusion, RDW can be helpful for identifying ID as the cause of anemia in 0.5- to 3-year-old children, but not as primary biomarker of ID(A). RDW values are not influenced by the presence of infection. There appears to be no role for the platelet count in diagnosing ID(A) in this group of children. PMID:26558306

  8. ELISPOTs Produced by CD8 and CD4 Cells Follow Log Normal Size Distribution Permitting Objective Counting

    PubMed Central

    Karulin, Alexey Y.; Karacsony, Kinga; Zhang, Wenji; Targoni, Oleg S.; Moldovan, Ioana; Dittrich, Marcus; Sundararaman, Srividya; Lehmann, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Each positive well in ELISPOT assays contains spots of variable sizes that can range from tens of micrometers up to a millimeter in diameter. Therefore, when it comes to counting these spots the decision on setting the lower and the upper spot size thresholds to discriminate between non-specific background noise, spots produced by individual T cells, and spots formed by T cell clusters is critical. If the spot sizes follow a known statistical distribution, precise predictions on minimal and maximal spot sizes, belonging to a given T cell population, can be made. We studied the size distributional properties of IFN-?, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-17 spots elicited in ELISPOT assays with PBMC from 172 healthy donors, upon stimulation with 32 individual viral peptides representing defined HLA Class I-restricted epitopes for CD8 cells, and with protein antigens of CMV and EBV activating CD4 cells. A total of 334 CD8 and 80 CD4 positive T cell responses were analyzed. In 99.7% of the test cases, spot size distributions followed Log Normal function. These data formally demonstrate that it is possible to establish objective, statistically validated parameters for counting T cell ELISPOTs. PMID:25612115

  9. Composition, proteolysis indices and coagulating properties of ewe milk as affected by bulk tank somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Mart-De Olives, Ana; Navarro-Ros, Mara Jess; Rubert-Alemn, Joaqun; Fernndez, Nemesio; Molina, Maria Pilar

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of ovine bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) on composition, proteose-peptone (p-p) content and casein fractions as indicating parameters for proteolysis and coagulating properties of milk. A total of 97 samples of bulk tank milk from Manchega breed ewe flocks were grouped according to somatic cell count (SCC) into four classes: fewer than 500,000 cells/ml, from 500,000 to 10,00000 cells/ml, from 10,00000 to 15,00000 and more than 15,00000 cells/ml. The casein : protein ratio and lactose content decreased with BTSCC. Proteolysis increased with BTSCC, causing a drop in ?-casein and an increase in the ?-caseins from a concentration of 500,000 cells/ml. Regarding coagulation behaviour, the rennet clotting time (RCT) and firming time (k20) rose from 10,00000-15,00000 cells/ml of milk. The results showed that the impairment of milk quality and milk ability to make cheese as affected by intramammary infection (IMI) can be inferred from the bulk tank milk of flocks with poor udder health. PMID:26104824

  10. The usefulness of counting `heat-affected' red cells as a guide to the risk of the later disappearance of red cells after burns

    PubMed Central

    Topley, Elizabeth

    1961-01-01

    The technique for counting heat-affected red cells (`microcytes') in the head of the blood film taken from patients on admission is described. Although crude, it does appear to increase the precision with which it is possible to predict the disappearance of red cells in the first 24 hours after a burn, and therefore to decide those cases in which 51Cr red cell volume estimates may be clinically useful. Images PMID:13777449

  11. Within-Subject Comparison of Word Recognition and Spiral Ganglion Cell Count in Bilateral Cochlear Implant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedi, Mohammad; Viana, Lucas M; Nadol, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although published reports have not demonstrated a positive correlation between the number of residual spiral ganglion cells (SGC) and word recognition scores in patients with unilateral multichannel cochlear implants, this study was designed to retest this hypothesis in patients with bilateral multichannel cochlear implants. Materials and Methods From a pool of 133 temporal bones, all subjects with bilateral multichannel cochlear implants who were deafened bilaterally by the same etiology were studied. A total of 12 temporal bones from 6 subjects were identified and processed after death for histology. The SGCs were counted by standard techniques. The differences between left and right SGC counts as well as the differences in word recognition scores were calculated for each subject. Correlation analysis was performed between the differences of SGC counts and the differences of word recognition scores. Results Differences in SGC counts were highly correlated with the differences in word recognition scores (R=0.934, P-value= 0.006). Conclusion This study suggests higher residual SGCs predicted better performance after implantation in a given patient. The results also support attempts to identify factors which may promote survival of SGCs. PMID:25120196

  12. Neuronal cell differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells originating from canine amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Yu, Jung; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Keun Jung; Han, Kil-Woo; Park, Kang-Sun; Lee, Dong-Soo; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-04-01

    The amniotic fluid contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and can be readily available for tissue engineering. Regenerative treatments such as tissue engineering, cell therapy, and transplantation show potential in clinical trials of degenerative diseases. Disease presentation and clinical responses in the Canis familiaris not only are physiologically similar to human compared with other traditional mammalian models but is also a suitable model for human diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether canine amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (cAF-MSCs) can differentiate into neural precursor cells in vitro when exposed to neural induction reagent. During neural differentiation, cAF-MSCs progressively acquire neuron-like morphology. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of neural-specific genes, such as NEFL, NSE, and TUBB3 (?III-tubulin) dramatically increased in the differentiated cAF-MSCs after induction. In addition, protein expression levels of nestin, ?III-tubulin, and tyrosine hydroxylase remarkably increased in differentiated cAF-MSCs. This study demonstrates that cAF-MSCs have great potential for neural precursor differentiation in vitro. Therefore, amniotic fluid may be a suitable alternative source of stem cells and can be applied to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24166061

  13. MEASUREMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND FLOW-CELL SCINTILLATION COUNTING WITH PULSE SHAPE DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Fjeld; T.A. DeVol; J.D. Leyba

    2000-03-30

    Radiological characterization and monitoring is an important component of environmental management activities throughout the Department of Energy complex. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is the technology most often used for the detection of radionuclides. However, radionuclides which cannot easily be detected by gamma-ray spectroscopy, such as pure beta emitters and transuranics, pose special problems because their quantification generally requires labor intensive radiochemical separations procedures that are time consuming and impractical for field applications. This project focused on a technology for measuring transuranics and pure beta emitters relatively quickly and has the potential of being field deployable. The technology combines ion exchange liquid chromatography and on-line alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating scintillation counting to produce simultaneous alpha and beta chromatograms. The basic instrumentation upon which the project was based was purchased in the early 1990's. In its original commercial form, the instrumentation was capable of separating select activation/fission products in ionic forms from relatively pure aqueous samples. We subsequently developed the capability of separating and detecting actinides (thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) in less than 30 minutes (Reboul, 1993) and realized that the potential time savings over traditional radiochemical methods for isolating some of these radionuclides was significant. However, at that time, the technique had only been used for radionuclide concentrations that were considerably above environmental levels and for aqueous samples of relatively high chemical purity. For the technique to be useful in environmental applications, development work was needed in lowering detection limits; to be useful in applications involving non-aqueous matrices such as soils and sludges or complex aqueous matrices such as those encountered in waste samples, development work was needed in sample preparation and processing. The general goal of this project was to address the issues mentioned above, and in so doing transform an interesting laboratory technique of limited applicability into a robust field instrument suitable for environmental restoration and waste management applications. The project consisted of the following tasks: (1) development of a low background, flow-cell detector, (2) identification of sample chemical and radiological interferences, (3) development of protocols for processing waste and/or environmental samples, and (4) integration and testing of the prototype system. The scope of work associated with these tasks has been completed and the report for Tasks 1-3 was submitted previously. Presented here are the results for Task 4.

  14. Monitoring individual cow udder health in automated milking systems using online somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, L P; Bjerring, M; Løvendahl, P

    2016-01-01

    This study presents and validates a detection and monitoring model for mastitis based on automated frequent sampling of online cell count (OCC). Initially, data were filtered and adjusted for sensor drift and skewed distribution using ln-transformation. Acceptable data were passed on to a time-series model using double exponential smoothing to estimate level and trends at cow level. The OCC levels and trends were converted to a continuous (0-1) scale, termed elevated mastitis risk (EMR), where values close to zero indicate healthy cow status and values close to 1 indicate high risk of mastitis. Finally, a feedback loop was included to dynamically request a time to next sample, based on latest EMR values or errors in the raw data stream. The estimated EMR values were used to issue 2 types of alerts, new and (on-going) intramammary infection (IMI) alerts. The new alerts were issued when the EMR values exceeded a threshold, and the IMI alerts were issued for subsequent alerts. New alerts were only issued after the EMR had been below the threshold for at least 8d. The detection model was evaluated using time-window analysis and commercial herd data (6 herds, 595,927 milkings) at different sampling intensities. Recorded treatments of mastitis were used as gold standard. Significantly higher EMR values were detected in treated than in contemporary untreated cows. The proportion of detected mastitis cases using new alerts was between 28.0 and 43.1% and highest for a fixed sampling scheme aiming at 24h between measurements. This was higher for IMI alerts, between 54.6 and 89.0%, and highest when all available measurements were used. The lowest false alert rate of 6.5 per 1,000 milkings was observed when all measurements were used. The results showed that a dynamic sampling scheme with a default value of 24h between measurements gave only a small reduction in proportion of detected mastitis treatments and remained at 88.5%. It was concluded that filtering of raw data combined with a time-series model was effective in detecting and monitoring mastitis status in dairy cows when based on IMI alerts, and by using a dynamically adjusting sampling scheme almost full performance was still obtainable. However, results were less desirable when based on new alerts most likely because of the used gold standard for mastitis, which may not necessarily reflect the onset of and IMI case in contrast to a new alert. PMID:26547650

  15. Identification of Ehrlichia chaffeensis morulae in cerebrospinal fluid mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B E; Monson, T P; Dumler, J S; Morris, C C; Westbrook, A B; Duncan, J L; Dawson, J E; Sims, K G; Anderson, B E

    1992-08-01

    We report a case of ehrlichiosis in a 72-year-old man who developed extreme lethargy, acute renal failure requiring hemodialysis, and respiratory insufficiency requiring intubation. Lumbar puncture performed on the second day of hospitalization revealed significant cellular pleocytosis. Ehrlichia morulae were tentatively identified in mononuclear cells in routinely processed Wright-stained cytospin preparations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Identification was confirmed by a specific immunocytochemical staining procedure. Subsequent identification specifically as Ehrlichia chaffeensis morulae was established by polymerase chain reaction analysis, which revealed E. chaffeensis-specific DNA in CSF, bone marrow, and blood samples; by indirect fluorescent-antibody analysis, the patient developed an antibody titer of 32,768 against E. chaffeensis antigen. The patient responded to intravenous therapy with doxycycline and dexamethasone. Subsequently, neurologic, hematologic, renal, and pulmonary status had returned to baseline at follow-up 12 weeks after admission. To our knowledge, this is the first identification of E. chaffeensis morulae in CSF cells in an infected patient. PMID:1500537

  16. Weighing of biomolecules, single cells and single nanoparticles in fluid.

    PubMed

    Burg, Thomas P; Godin, Michel; Knudsen, Scott M; Shen, Wenjiang; Carlson, Greg; Foster, John S; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R

    2007-04-26

    Nanomechanical resonators enable the measurement of mass with extraordinary sensitivity. Previously, samples as light as 7 zeptograms (1 zg = 10(-21) g) have been weighed in vacuum, and proton-level resolution seems to be within reach. Resolving small mass changes requires the resonator to be light and to ring at a very pure tone-that is, with a high quality factor. In solution, viscosity severely degrades both of these characteristics, thus preventing many applications in nanotechnology and the life sciences where fluid is required. Although the resonant structure can be designed to minimize viscous loss, resolution is still substantially degraded when compared to measurements made in air or vacuum. An entirely different approach eliminates viscous damping by placing the solution inside a hollow resonator that is surrounded by vacuum. Here we demonstrate that suspended microchannel resonators can weigh single nanoparticles, single bacterial cells and sub-monolayers of adsorbed proteins in water with sub-femtogram resolution (1 Hz bandwidth). Central to these results is our observation that viscous loss due to the fluid is negligible compared to the intrinsic damping of our silicon crystal resonator. The combination of the low resonator mass (100 ng) and high quality factor (15,000) enables an improvement in mass resolution of six orders of magnitude over a high-end commercial quartz crystal microbalance. This gives access to intriguing applications, such as mass-based flow cytometry, the direct detection of pathogens, or the non-optical sizing and mass density measurement of colloidal particles. PMID:17460669

  17. Genetic Modification of Primate Amniotic Fluid-derived Stem Cells Produces Pancreatic Progenitor Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Mack, David L.; Williams, J Koudy; Mirmalek-Sani, Sayed-Hadi; Moorefield, Emily; Chun, So-Young; Wang, Jun; Lorenzetti, Diego; Furth, Mark; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay

    2013-01-01

    Insulin therapy for Type 1 diabetes (T1D) does not prevent serious long-term complications including vascular disease, neuropathy, retinopathy and renal failure. Stem cells, including amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells--highly expansive, multipotent, and non-tumorigenic cells--could serve as an appropriate stem cell source for ?-cell differentiation. In the current study we tested whether nonhuman primate (nhp) AFS cells ectopically expressing key pancreatic transcription factors were capable of differentiating into a beta-like cell phenotype in vitro. NHPAFS cells were obtained from Cynomolgus monkey amniotic fluid by immunomagnetic selection for a CD117 (c-kit) positive population. RT-PCR for endodermal and pancreatic lineage-specific markers was performed on AFS cells after adenovirally transduced expression of PDX1, NGN3 and MAFA. Expression of MAFA was sufficient to induce insulin mRNA expression in nhpAFS cell lines, whereas a combination of MAFA, PDX1 and NGN3further induced insulin expression, as well as induced the expression of other important endocrine cell genes such as glucagon, NEUROD1, NKX2.2, ISL1 and PCSK2. Higher induction of these and other important pancreatic genes was achieved by growing the triply infected AFS cells in media supplemented with a combination of B27, betacellulin and nicotinamide, as well as culturing the cells on extra-cellular matrix coated plates. The expression of pancreatic genes such as NEUROD1, glucagon and insulin progressively decreased with the decline of adenovirally-expressed PDX1, NGN3 and MAFA. Together, these experiments suggest that forced expression of pancreatic transcription factors in primate AFS cells induces them towards the pancreatic lineage. PMID:23306211

  18. Value of tests for evaluating udder health in dairy goats: somatic cell counts, California Milk Cell Test and electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Petzer, I M; Donkin, E F; Du Preez, E; Karzis, J; van der Schans, T J; Watermeyer, J C; van Reenen, R

    2008-12-01

    The value of electric conductivity (EC), California Milk Cell Test (CMCT) and somatic cell count (SCC) as diagnostic tools was investigated in dairy goats. Conductivity colour reading correlated with SCC. Milk samples with conductivity colour red had significantly higher SCC than those with conductivity colours green and orange (P < 0.001). There were moderate positive correlations between CMCT (R2 = 0.470), and conductivity score and CMCT and conductivity colour readings (R2 = 0.597). Conductivity scores were significantly (P< 0.001) higher during and after intra-mammary treatment with Cloxamast LC and conductivity colours were significantly different between treatment and control groups (P< 0.001). There was a weak positive correlation between conductivity colour and stage of lactation (R2 = 0.317) and a moderately positive correlation between conductivity score and stage of lactation (R2 = 0.523). A moderately negative correlation was shown between milk yield and conductivity score (R2 = -0.426) and between milk yield and conductivity colour (R2 = -0.433). Moderate positive correlations were present between CMCT and SCC (R2 = 0.689) and between CMCT and stage of lactation (R2 = 0.459). CMCT ratings were significantly different (P < 0.001) for the intra-mammary treatment groups. CMCT ratings for infected and non-infected udder halves (P = 0.008) were significantly different; as were those for infected and non-infected udder halves and for left and right udder halves separately (P= 0.010). CMCT ratings for milk samples with SCC above and below 750 x 10(3) cells per ml were significantly different (P < 0.001) as well as for milk from treated and control udder halves with SCC below or above 750 x 10(3) cells per ml (P < 0.001). CMCT was found to be more accurate for indicating the absence of mastitis than for diagnosing it. There were significant differences in log SCC between treatment and control groups, during and after treatment. Infected udder halves had significantly higher log SCC than non-infected udder halves before and after treatment, but not during treatment. There was a moderate positive correlation between stage of lactation and SCC (R2 = 0.438). PMID:19294984

  19. Effect of CD4 cell count and viral suppression on risk of ischemic stroke in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Felicia C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Kim, Anthony S.; Price, Richard W.; Hsue, Priscilla Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evidence from the current era of combination antiretroviral therapy supports an association between HIV and cerebrovascular disease. In addition to traditional vascular risk factors, HIV-specific factors including immunodeficiency and viral replication may also predict stroke risk. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between CD4 cell count, viral suppression and validated ischemic stroke outcomes. Design Single-center, case-control study Methods We identified ischemic stroke cases in HIV-infected adults from an HIV clinic using International Classification of Diseases codes for cerebrovascular disease followed by validation of each case. Controls from the same HIV clinic were selected by incidence density sampling. Demographic and clinical data, including most recent CD4 count and plasma HIV RNA concentration, were abstracted from hospital and HIV clinic electronic medical records. Matched conditional logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between CD4 cell count, viral suppression and ischemic stroke. Results In an adjusted model, viral suppression decreased the odds of ischemic stroke by a factor of 0.16 (95% CI 0.05-0.50, p=0.002). This association, although attenuated (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.09-1.06, p=0.062), remained after restricting the analysis to ischemic strokes due to true atherosclerotic mechanisms (i.e., excluding infection and malignancy-related strokes). Conclusion Achieving viral suppression may reduce ischemic stroke risk, including risk of atherosclerotic strokes, in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:25160935

  20. White Blood Cell Count in Women: Relation to Inflammatory Biomarkers, Haematological Profiles, Visceral Adiposity, and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Farhangi, Mahdieh Abbasalizad; Keshavarz, Seyyed-Ali; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Ostadrahimi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The role of white blood cell (WBC) count in pathogenesis of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity-related disorders has been reported earlier. Recent studies revealed that higher WBC contributes to atherosclerotic progression and impaired fasting glucose. However, it is unknown whether variations in WBC and haematologic profiles can occur in healthy obese individuals. The aim of this study is to further evaluate the influence of obesity on WBC count, inflammatory biomarkers, and metabolic risk factors in healthy women to establish a relationship among variables analyzed. The sample of the present study consisted of 84 healthy women with mean age of 35.566.83 years. They were categorized into two groups based on their body mass index (BMI): obese group with BMI >30 kg/m2 and non-obese group with BMI <30 kg/m2. We evaluated the relationship between WBC and platelet count (PLT) with serum interleukin 6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), angiotensin ? (Ang ?), body fat percentage (BF %), waist-circumference (WC), and lipid profile. WBC, PLT, CRP, and IL-6 in obese subjects were significantly higher than in non-obese subjects (p< 0.05). The mean WBC count in obese subjects was 6.40.3 (109/L) compared to 4.40.3 (109/L) in non-obese subjects (p=0.035). WBC correlated with BF% (r=0.31, p=0.004), CRP (r=0.25, P=0.03), WC (r=0.22, p=0.04), angiotensin ? (r=0.24, p=0.03), triglyceride (r=0.24, p=0.03), and atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) levels (r=0.3, p=0.028) but not with IL-6. Platelet count was also associated with WC and waist-to-hip ratio (p<0.05). Haemoglobin and haematocrit were in consistent relationship with LDL-cholesterol (p<0.05). In conclusion, obesity was associated with higher WBC count and inflammatory parameters. There was also a positive relationship between WBC count and several inflammatory and metabolic risk factors in healthy women. PMID:23617205

  1. Reduction in Preterm Delivery and Neonatal Mortality after the Introduction of Antenatal Cotrimoxazole Prophylaxis among HIV-Infected Women with Low CD4 Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Jan; Mwiya, Mwiya; Scott, Nancy; Kasonde, Prisca; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Kauchali, Shuaib; Aldrovandi, Grace M.; Thea, Donald M.; Kuhn, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Background. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis is recommended for subgroups of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults and children to reduce all-cause morbidity and mortality. We investigated whether antenatal cotrimoxazole prophylaxis begun during pregnancy for HIV-infected pregnant women with low CD4 cell counts would affect birth outcomes. Methods. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was introduced as a routine component of antenatal care for HIV-infected women with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/?L during the course of a trial of mother-to-child HIV transmission in Lusaka, Zambia. Rates of preterm delivery, low birth weight, and neonatal mortality were compared for women with low CD4 cell counts before and after its introduction. Results. Among 255 women with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/?L, the percentage of preterm births (?34 weeks of gestation) was lower (odds ratio [OR], 0.49 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.24-0.98]) after cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was introduced than before; there was a significant decrease in neonatal mortality (9% to 0%; P = .01) and a trend toward increased birth weight (? = 114 g [95% CI, -42 to 271 g]). In contrast, there were no significant changes in these parameters over the same time interval among women with CD4 cell counts ?200 cells/?L. Conclusion. Antenatal provision of cotrimoxazole for HIV-infected pregnant women with low CD4 cell counts may have indirect benefits for neonatal health. PMID:17083035

  2. Satellited 4q identified in amniotic fluid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, I.; Hsieh, C.L.; Songster, G.

    1995-01-16

    Extra material was identified on the distal long arm of a chromosome 4 in an amniotic fluid specimen sampled at 16.6 weeks of gestational age. There was no visible loss of material from chromosome 4, and no evidence for a balanced rearrangement. The primary counseling issue in this case was advanced maternal age. Ultrasound findings were normal, and family history was unremarkable. The identical 4qs chromosome was observed in cells from a paternal peripheral blood specimen and appeared to be an unbalanced rearrangement. This extra material was NOR positive in lymphocytes from the father, but was negative in the fetal amniocytes. Father`s relatives were studied to verify the familial origin of this anomaly. In situ hybridization with both exon and intron sequences of ribosomal DNA demonstrated that ribosomal DNA is present at the terminus of the 4qs chromosome in the fetus, father, and paternal grandmother. This satellited 4q might have been derived from a translocation event that resulted in very little or no loss from the 4q and no specific phenotype. This derivative chromosome 4 has been inherited through at least 3 generations of phenotypically normal individuals. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  4. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). On the recovery of the count-in-cell probability distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Di Porto, C.; Cucciati, O.; Granett, B. R.; Iovino, A.; de la Torre, S.; Marinoni, C.; Guzzo, L.; Moscardini, L.; Cappi, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Marchetti, A.; Mellier, Y.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2016-04-01

    We compare three methods to measure the count-in-cell probability density function of galaxies in a spectroscopic redshift survey. From this comparison we found that, when the sampling is low (the average number of object per cell is around unity), it is necessary to use a parametric method to model the galaxy distribution. We used a set of mock catalogues of VIPERS to verify if we were able to reconstruct the cell-count probability distribution once the observational strategy is applied. We find that, in the simulated catalogues, the probability distribution of galaxies is better represented by a Gamma expansion than a skewed log-normal distribution. Finally, we correct the cell-count probability distribution function from the angular selection effect of the VIMOS instrument and study the redshift and absolute magnitude dependency of the underlying galaxy density function in VIPERS from redshift 0.5 to 1.1. We found a very weak evolution of the probability density distribution function and that it is well approximated by a Gamma distribution, independently of the chosen tracers. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programmes 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  5. Highly sensitive automated method for DNA damage assessment: gamma-H2AX foci counting and cell cycle sorting.

    PubMed

    Hernndez, Laia; Terradas, Mariona; Martn, Marta; Tusell, Laura; Genesc, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the H2AX protein is an early step in the double strand break (DSB) repair pathway; therefore, phosphorylated histone (?H2AX) foci scoring is widely used as a measure for DSBs. Foci scoring is performed either manually or semi-automatically using hand-operated capturing and image analysis software. In general, both techniques are laborious and prone to artifacts associated with manual scoring. While a few fully automated methods have been described in the literature, none of them have been used to quantify ?H2AX foci in combination with a cell cycle phase analysis. Adding this feature to a rapid automated ?H2AX foci quantification method would reduce the scoring uncertainty that arises from the variations in the background level of the ?H2AX signal throughout the cell cycle. The method was set up to measure DNA damage induced in human mammary epithelial cells by irradiation under a mammogram device. We adapted a FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) Spot-counting system, which has a slide loader with automatic scanning and cell capture system throughout the thickness of each cell (z-stack), to meet our assay requirements. While scanning the sample, the system classifies the selected nuclei according to the signal patterns previously described by the user. For our purposes, a double staining immunofluorescence was carried out with antibodies to detect ?H2AX and pericentrin, an integral component of the centrosome. We could thus distinguish both the number of ?H2AX foci per cell and the cell cycle phase. Furthermore, restrictive settings of the program classifier reduced the "touching nuclei" problem described in other image analysis software. The automated scoring was faster than and as sensitive as its manually performed counterpart. This system is a reliable tool for ?H2AX radio-induced foci counting and provides essential information about the cell cycle stage. It thus offers a more complete and rapid assessment of DNA damage. PMID:23903043

  6. Highly Sensitive Automated Method for DNA Damage Assessment: Gamma-H2AX Foci Counting and Cell Cycle Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Hernndez, Laia; Terradas, Mariona; Martn, Marta; Tusell, Laura; Genesc, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the H2AX protein is an early step in the double strand break (DSB) repair pathway; therefore, phosphorylated histone (?H2AX) foci scoring is widely used as a measure for DSBs. Foci scoring is performed either manually or semi-automatically using hand-operated capturing and image analysis software. In general, both techniques are laborious and prone to artifacts associated with manual scoring. While a few fully automated methods have been described in the literature, none of them have been used to quantify ?H2AX foci in combination with a cell cycle phase analysis. Adding this feature to a rapid automated ?H2AX foci quantification method would reduce the scoring uncertainty that arises from the variations in the background level of the ?H2AX signal throughout the cell cycle. The method was set up to measure DNA damage induced in human mammary epithelial cells by irradiation under a mammogram device. We adapted a FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) Spot-counting system, which has a slide loader with automatic scanning and cell capture system throughout the thickness of each cell (z-stack), to meet our assay requirements. While scanning the sample, the system classifies the selected nuclei according to the signal patterns previously described by the user. For our purposes, a double staining immunofluorescence was carried out with antibodies to detect ?H2AX and pericentrin, an integral component of the centrosome. We could thus distinguish both the number of ?H2AX foci per cell and the cell cycle phase. Furthermore, restrictive settings of the program classifier reduced the touching nuclei problem described in other image analysis software. The automated scoring was faster than and as sensitive as its manually performed counterpart. This system is a reliable tool for ?H2AX radio-induced foci counting and provides essential information about the cell cycle stage. It thus offers a more complete and rapid assessment of DNA damage. PMID:23903043

  7. Interstitial fluid flow: simulation of mechanical environment of cells in the interosseous membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; Ding, Guang-Hong

    2011-08-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that subtle fluid flow environment plays a significant role in living biological tissues, while there is no in vivo practical dynamical measurement of the interstitial fluid flow velocity. On the basis of a new finding that capillaries and collagen fibrils in the interosseous membrane form a parallel array, we set up a porous media model simulating the flow field with FLUENT software, studied the shear stress on interstitial cells' surface due to the interstitial fluid flow, and analyzed the effect of flow on protein space distribution around the cells. The numerical simulation results show that the parallel nature of capillaries could lead to directional interstitial fluid flow in the direction of capillaries. Interstitial fluid flow would induce shear stress on the membrane of interstitial cells, up to 30 Pa or so, which reaches or exceeds the threshold values of cells' biological response observed in vitro. Interstitial fluid flow would induce nonuniform spacial distribution of secretion protein of mast cells. Shear tress on cells could be affected by capillary parameters such as the distance between the adjacent capillaries, blood pressure and the permeability coefficient of capillary's wall. The interstitial pressure and the interstitial porosity could also affect the shear stress on cells. In conclusion, numerical simulation provides an effective way for in vivo dynamic interstitial velocity research, helps to set up the vivid subtle interstitial flow environment of cells, and is beneficial to understanding the physiological functions of interstitial fluid flow.

  8. Influence of Fluid Cell Design on the Frequency Response of AFM Microcantilevers in Liquid Media

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Ramin; Wood-Adams, Paula M.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the frequency response of AFM microcantilevers in liquid media contained in a commercial fluid cell is presented. Such systems exhibit complicated dynamics which are often not well described by available theories. Their dynamic behavior has a direct effect on the use of the AFM in dynamic mode while imaging in liquid or while extracting the rheological properties of the fluid. We explore the issues related to the design of the cantilever holder/fluid cell and propose an approach for evaluating, minimizing and recognizing the ultimate limitations of commercial cantilever holders. A technique for estimating the frequency response spectrum of the fluid cell itself from experimental data is presented. This spectrum can then be used to evaluate whether or not the fluid cell is suited for the desired purpose.

  9. EQUIVALENCE OF MICROBIAL BIOMASS MEASURES BASED ON MEMBRANE LIPID AND CELL WALL COMPONENTS, ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE, AND DIRECT COUNTS IN SUBSURFACE AQUIFER SEDIMENTS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An uncontaminated subsurface aquifer sediment contains a sparse microbial community consisting primarily of coccobacillary bacteria of relatively uniform size which can be counted directly with appropriate straining. The morphological simplicity and the relatively decreased cell ...

  10. The effects of fluid shear stress on proliferation and osteogenesis of human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lisha; Chen, Luoping; Chen, Yuchao; Gui, Jinpeng; Li, Qing; Huang, Yan; Liu, Meili; Jia, Xiaolin; Song, Wei; Ji, Jing; Gong, Xianghui; Shi, Ruoshi; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-29

    Shear stress is one of the main stress type produced by speech, mastication or tooth movement. The mechano-response of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells by shear stress and the mechanism are largely unknown. In our study, we investigated the effects of fluid shear stress on proliferation, migration and osteogenic potential of human PDL cells. 6dyn/cm(2) of fluid shear stress was produced in a parallel plate flow chamber. Our results demonstrated that fluid shear stress rearranged the orientation of human PDL cells. In addition, fluid shear stress inhibited human PDL cell proliferation and migration, but increased the osteogenic potential and expression of several growth factors and cytokines. Our study suggested that shear stress is involved in homeostasis regulation in human PDL cells. Inhibiting proliferation and migration potentially induce PDL cells to respond to mechanical stimuli in order to undergo osteogenic differentiation. PMID:26892895

  11. The effect of tuberculosis and antiretroviral treatment on CD4+ cell count response in HIV-positive tuberculosis patients in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) presents a serious problem in Mozambique. HIV prevalence among TB patients is estimated at 47%. A delay in having their first CD4+ cell count could lead to a missed opportunity for ART initiation due to a CD4+ cell increase above the cut-off caused by TB treatment. The objective is to describe CD4+ cell response during TB treatment and quantify the effect of TB treatment and ART on this response. Methods All new HIV?+?adult TB cases in 2007 from three TB clinics in Mozambique were included. Data on TB diagnosis and treatment and HIV parameters were collected. A general mixed model was used for CD4+ cell count response. Results 338 HIV?+?patients were notified and 252 (75%) were included in the analysis. Using TB medication was not independently associated with the CD4+ count response (19 cells/mm3; 95% CI: -40 to 79; p?=?0.529). ART-use was associated with statistically significantly higher CD4+ cells compared to no ART-use (81 cells/mm3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 12 to 151; p?=?0.022). Conclusion In this study, no independent effect of TB treatment on CD4+ cell count was found. HIV-infected TB patients on ART had a significantly higher CD4+ cell count than those not receiving ART. CD4+ cell counts for patients not on ART at TB treatment start, remained below the cut off for initiating ART during the first three months of TB treatment; therefore some delay in getting the first CD4+ cell count would not lead to missing the opportunity to start ART. PMID:22900904

  12. Intestinal Parasitosis in Relation to Anti-Retroviral Therapy, CD4(+) T-cell Count and Diarrhea in HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Sinha, Sanjeev; Panda, Ashutosh; Singh, Yogita; Joseph, Anju; Deb, Manorama

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are one of the major causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive individuals. Antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of many opportunistic infections, but parasite-related diarrhea still remains frequent and often underestimated especially in developing countries. The present hospital-based study was conducted to determine the spectrum of intestinal parasitosis in adult HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) patients with or without diarrhea with the levels of CD4(+) T-cell counts. A total of 400 individuals were enrolled and were screened for intestinal parasitosis. Of these study population, 200 were HIV seropositives, and the remaining 200 were HIV uninfected individuals with or without diarrhea. Intestinal parasites were identified by using microscopy as well as PCR assay. A total of 130 (32.5%) out of 400 patients were positive for any kinds of intestinal parasites. The cumulative number of parasite positive patients was 152 due to multiple infections. A significant association of Cryptosporidium (P<0.001) was detected among individuals with CD4(+) T-cell counts less than 200 cells/?l. PMID:26797437

  13. Intestinal Parasitosis in Relation to Anti-Retroviral Therapy, CD4+ T-cell Count and Diarrhea in HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Sinha, Sanjeev; Panda, Ashutosh; Singh, Yogita; Joseph, Anju; Deb, Manorama

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are one of the major causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive individuals. Antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of many opportunistic infections, but parasite-related diarrhea still remains frequent and often underestimated especially in developing countries. The present hospital-based study was conducted to determine the spectrum of intestinal parasitosis in adult HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) patients with or without diarrhea with the levels of CD4+ T-cell counts. A total of 400 individuals were enrolled and were screened for intestinal parasitosis. Of these study population, 200 were HIV seropositives, and the remaining 200 were HIV uninfected individuals with or without diarrhea. Intestinal parasites were identified by using microscopy as well as PCR assay. A total of 130 (32.5%) out of 400 patients were positive for any kinds of intestinal parasites. The cumulative number of parasite positive patients was 152 due to multiple infections. A significant association of Cryptosporidium (P<0.001) was detected among individuals with CD4+ T-cell counts less than 200 cells/μl. PMID:26797437

  14. Flow Cytometry Approach to Quantify the Viability of Milk Somatic Cell Counts after Various Physico-Chemical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Richoux, Romain; Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Boutinaud, Marion; Mayol, Jean-François; Gagnaire, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been used as a routine method to count somatic cells in milk, and to ascertain udder health and milk quality. However, few studies investigate the viability of somatic cells and even fewer at a subpopulation level to follow up how the cells can resist to various stresses that can be encountered during technological processes. To address this issue, a flow cytometry approach was used to simultaneously identify cell types of bovine milk using cell-specific antibodies and to measure the cell viability among the identified subpopulations by using a live/dead cell viability kit. Confirmation of the cell viability was performed by using conventional microscopy. Different physico-chemical treatments were carried out on standardized cell samples, such as heat treatment, various centrifugation rates and storage in milk or in PBS pH 7.4 for three days. Cytometry gating strategy was developed by using blood cell samples stored at 4°C in PBS and milk cell samples heat-treated at 80°C for 30 min as a control for the maximum (95.9%) and minimum (0.7%) values of cell viability respectively. Cell viability in the initial samples was 39.5% for all cells and varied for each cell population from 26.7% for PMNs, to 32.6% for macrophages, and 58.3% for lymphocytes. Regarding the physico-chemical treatments applied, somatic cells did not sustain heat treatment at 60°C and 80°C in contrast to changes in centrifugation rates, for which only the higher level, i.e. 5000×g led to a cell viability decrease, down to 9.4%, but no significant changes within the cell subpopulation distribution were observed. Finally, the somatic cells were better preserved in milk after 72h storage, in particular PMNs, that maintained a viability of 34.0 ± 2.9% compared to 4.9±1.9% in PBS, while there was almost no changes for macrophages (41.7 ± 5.7% in milk vs 31.2 ± 2.4% in PBS) and lymphocytes (25.3 ± 3.0% in milk vs 11.4 ± 3.1% in PBS). This study provides a new array to better understand milk cell biology and to establish the relationship between the cell viability and the release of their endogenous enzymes in dairy matrix. PMID:26717151

  15. Ageing & long-term CD4 cell count trends in HIV-positive patients with 5 years or more combination antiretroviral therapy experience

    PubMed Central

    WRIGHT, ST; PETOUMENOS, K; BOYD, M; CARR, A; DOWNING, S; O’CONNOR, CC; GROTOWSKI, M; LAW, MG

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this analysis is to describe the long-term changes in CD4 cell counts beyond 5 years of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). If natural ageing leads to a long-term decline in the immune system via low-grade chronic immune activation/inflammation, then one might expect to see a greater or earlier decline in CD4 counts in older HIV-positive patients with increasing duration of cART. Methods Retrospective and prospective data were examined from long-term virologically stable HIV-positive adults from the Australian HIV Observational Database. We estimated mean CD4 cell counts changes following the completion of 5 years of cART using linear mixed models. Results A total of 37,916 CD4 measurements were observed for 892 patients over a combined total of 9,753 patient years. Older patients (>50 years) at cART initiation had estimated mean(95% confidence interval) change in CD4 counts by Year-5 CD4 count strata (<500, 501–750 and >750 cells/μL) of 14(7 to 21), 3(−5 to 11) and −6(−17 to 4) cells/μL/year. Of the CD4 cell count rates of change estimated, none were indicative of long-term declines in CD4 cell counts. Conclusions Our results suggest that duration of cART and increasing age does not result in decreasing mean changes in CD4 cell counts for long-term virologically suppressed patients. Indicating that level of immune recovery achieved during the first 5 years of treatment are sustained through long-term cART. PMID:23036045

  16. Factors associated with short-term changes in HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in antiretroviral-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive individuals, viral load levels tend to increase and CD4+ cell counts decline over time. We sought to explore the rate of change and influence of other factors associated with these markers of HIV progression. Design: An observational cohort collaboration study. Methods: A total of 158?385 pairs of consecutive viral load and CD4+ cell count simultaneously measured from 34?384 ART-naive individuals in the COHERE database were analysed. Annual changes and factors associated with these changes were estimated using generalized estimating equations. Results: Viral load continued to rise at a mean [95% confidence interval (CI)] rate of 0.091 (0.0860.096) log10?copies/ml per year. A faster rise in viral load was significantly associated with older age, such that for every 10 years older, it was a mean 0.022 log10?copies/ml per year greater. The mean (95% CI) CD4+ cell count change was ?78.0 (?80.1 to ?76.0) cell/?l per year and it was strongly associated with a higher current viral load: for every 1 log10?copies/ml higher, CD4+ cell count declined by an additional 37.6?cells/?l per year (P?cell count depletion than baseline viral load. Neither sex, race nor transmission by injecting drug use was associated with change in either the viral load or CD4+ cell count. Discussion: We found that in ART-naive individuals, viral load continues to increase over time and more sharply in those who are older. Our results also suggest that higher current viral load is strongly associated with ongoing rate of CD4+ cell count depletion. PMID:24959963

  17. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids--Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert A; Shaw, J M

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest. PMID:26429474

  18. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluidsMicro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 ?m spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 ?m diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  19. Fluid shear stress sensitizes cancer cells to receptor-mediated apoptosis via trimeric death receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to apoptotic agents has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlates with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increases in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis is not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress does not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments reveal that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear forces can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents.

  20. How to count chromosomes in a cell: An overview of current and novel technologies.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Bjorn; van den Bos, Hilda; Lansdorp, Peter M; Foijer, Floris

    2015-05-01

    Aneuploidy, an aberrant number of chromosomes in a cell, is a feature of several syndromes associated with cognitive and developmental defects. In addition, aneuploidy is considered a hallmark of cancer cells and has been suggested to play a role in neurodegenerative disease. To better understand the relationship between aneuploidy and disease, various methods to measure the chromosome numbers in cells have been developed, each with their own advantages and limitations. While some methods rely on dividing cells and thus bias aneuploidy rates to that population, other, more unbiased methods can only detect the average aneuploidy rates in a cell population, cloaking cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Furthermore, some techniques are more prone to technical artefacts, which can result in over- or underestimation of aneuploidy rates. In this review, we provide an overview of several "traditional" karyotyping methods as well as the latest high throughput next generation sequencing karyotyping protocols with their respective advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25739518

  1. Activated memory T helper cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with atopic asthma: relation to asthma symptoms, lung function, and bronchial responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, D S; Bentley, A M; Hartnell, A; Kay, A B; Durham, S R

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial mucosal inflammation and epithelial damage are characteristic features of asthma. Activation of T helper lymphocytes may contribute to this process by mechanisms including the release of cytokines promoting eosinophil infiltration and activation. METHODS: Bronchial washings and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were obtained from 29 atopic asthmatic patients (19 with current symptoms and 10 symptom free) and 13 normal volunteers. Flow cytometry was used to assess T cell phenotype and activation status in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peripheral blood, and differential cell counts were made on bronchial washings and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Findings were related to severity of disease as reflected by symptom scores, baseline lung function, and airway responsiveness. RESULTS: CD4 T lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood from asthmatic patients were activated by comparison with controls (CD4 CD25, median 16.8% v 8.7% for bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and 15.3% v 8.7% in blood). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid CD4 T cells from both asthmatic patients and controls were of memory phenotype (95.8% and 96.8% CD45RO and 1.7% and 0.4% CD45RA respectively), whereas both CD45RO and CD45RA T cells were present in blood. Patients with asthma and current symptoms showed increased bronchoalveolar T cell activation compared with patients without symptoms (CD4 CD25 18.7% v 12.3%). Within the asthmatic group there was a significant association between CD4 CD25 lymphocytes and asthma symptom scores (rs = 0.75), airway methacholine responsiveness (log PC20, rs = -0.43) and baseline FEV1 (rs = -0.39). A correlation was also found between CD4 CD25 lymphocytes and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (rs = 0.48). Eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were increased in asthmatic patients compared with controls and the percentage of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid correlated with asthma symptom score. A relation was found between percentage of epithelial cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and FEV1 and methacholine PC20. CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that selective activation of memory CD4 T cells contributes to eosinophil accumulation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and symptoms in asthma. PMID:8434349

  2. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  3. Decline of CD3-positive T-cell counts by 6 months of age is associated with rapid disease progression in HIV-1infected infants

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Javier; Easley, Kirk A.; Mendez, Herman; Shearer, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Because HIV-1 infected infants with rapid progression (RP) of disease might benefit from early and intense antiretroviral therapy, the identification of predictive factors of RP becomes extremely important. Currently, the best predictive factors of RP in HIV-1 infected children are HIV-1 RNA levels and CD4-positive T-cell counts. A decrease in CD3-positive T-cell count has been identified as a predictive factor of AIDS development in HIV-1 infected adults. Our objective was to evaluate decreased number of CD3-positive T-cells as a predictive factor of RP in infants. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from HIV-1 infected infants (up to 6 months of age) were analyzed for an association of lymphocyte subsets with RP, which was defined as the occurrence of AIDS or death before 18 months of age. In infants with RP (n = 32), CD3-positive T-cell counts were 3093 cells/?L at <1 month of age, 3092 cells/?L at 1 to 3 months, and 2062 cells/?L at 3 to 6 months. Non-RP infants (n = 49) maintained their CD3-positive T-cells counts at approximately 4000 cells/?L for at least 6 months of life. CD3-positive and CD4-positive T-cell counts were significantly associated with RP. Our results suggest that a decreased CD3-positive T-cell count may be used to predict RP in HIV-1 infected infants (RR = 2.16, P = .001). PMID:11496244

  4. Estimated Costs for Delivery of HIV Antiretroviral Therapy to Individuals with CD4+ T-Cell Counts >350 cells/uL in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Chang, Wei; Byonanebye, Dathan M.; Owaraganise, Asiphas; Twinomuhwezi, Ellon; Amanyire, Gideon; Black, Douglas; Marseille, Elliot; Kamya, Moses R.; Havlir, Diane V.; Kahn, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence favoring earlier HIV ART initiation at high CD4+ T-cell counts (CD4>350/uL) has grown, and guidelines now recommend earlier HIV treatment. However, the cost of providing ART to individuals with CD4>350 in Sub-Saharan Africa has not been well estimated. This remains a major barrier to optimal global cost projections for accelerating the scale-up of ART. Our objective was to compute costs of ART delivery to high CD4+count individuals in a typical rural Ugandan health center-based HIV clinic, and use these data to construct scenarios of efficient ART scale-up. Methods Within a clinical study evaluating streamlined ART delivery to 197 individuals with CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/uL (EARLI Study: NCT01479634) in Mbarara, Uganda, we performed a micro-costing analysis of administrative records, ART prices, and time-and-motion analysis of staff work patterns. We computed observed per-person-per-year (ppy) costs, and constructed models estimating costs under several increasingly efficient ART scale-up scenarios using local salaries, lowest drug prices, optimized patient loads, and inclusion of viral load (VL) testing. Findings Among 197 individuals enrolled in the EARLI Study, median pre-ART CD4+ cell count was 569/uL (IQR 451–716). Observed ART delivery cost was $628 ppy at steady state. Models using local salaries and only core laboratory tests estimated costs of $529/$445 ppy (+/-VL testing, respectively). Models with lower salaries, lowest ART prices, and optimized healthcare worker schedules reduced costs by $100–200 ppy. Costs in a maximally efficient scale-up model were $320/$236 ppy (+/- VL testing). This included $39 for personnel, $106 for ART, $130/$46 for laboratory tests, and $46 for administrative/other costs. A key limitation of this study is its derivation and extrapolation of costs from one large rural treatment program of high CD4+ count individuals. Conclusions In a Ugandan HIV clinic, ART delivery costs—including VL testing—for individuals with CD4>350 were similar to estimates from high-efficiency programs. In higher efficiency scale-up models, costs were substantially lower. These favorable costs may be achieved because high CD4+ count patients are often asymptomatic, facilitating more efficient streamlined ART delivery. Our work provides a framework for calculating costs of efficient ART scale-up models using accessible data from specific programs and regions. PMID:26632823

  5. A spore counting method and cell culture model for chlorine disinfection studies of Encephalitozoon syn. Septata intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Wolk, D M; Johnson, C H; Rice, E W; Marshall, M M; Grahn, K F; Plummer, C B; Sterling, C R

    2000-04-01

    The microsporidia have recently been recognized as a group of pathogens that have potential for waterborne transmission; however, little is known about the effects of routine disinfection on microsporidian spore viability. In this study, in vitro growth of Encephalitozoon syn. Septata intestinalis, a microsporidium found in the human gut, was used as a model to assess the effect of chlorine on the infectivity and viability of microsporidian spores. Spore inoculum concentrations were determined by using spectrophotometric measurements (percent transmittance at 625 nm) and by traditional hemacytometer counting. To determine quantitative dose-response data for spore infectivity, we optimized a rabbit kidney cell culture system in 24-well plates, which facilitated calculation of a 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID(50)) and a minimal infective dose (MID) for E. intestinalis. The TCID(50) is a quantitative measure of infectivity and growth and is the number of organisms that must be present to infect 50% of the cell culture wells tested. The MID is as a measure of a system's permissiveness to infection and a measure of spore infectivity. A standardized MID and a standardized TCID(50) have not been reported previously for any microsporidian species. Both types of doses are reported in this paper, and the values were used to evaluate the effects of chlorine disinfection on the in vitro growth of microsporidia. Spores were treated with chlorine at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10 mg/liter. The exposure times ranged from 0 to 80 min at 25 degrees C and pH 7. MID data for E. intestinalis were compared before and after chlorine disinfection. A 3-log reduction (99.9% inhibition) in the E. intestinalis MID was observed at a chlorine concentration of 2 mg/liter after a minimum exposure time of 16 min. The log(10) reduction results based on percent transmittance-derived spore counts were equivalent to the results based on hemacytometer-derived spore counts. Our data suggest that chlorine treatment may be an effective water treatment for E. intestinalis and that spectrophotometric methods may be substituted for labor-intensive hemacytometer methods when spores are counted in laboratory-based chlorine disinfection studies. PMID:10742198

  6. A Spore Counting Method and Cell Culture Model for Chlorine Disinfection Studies of Encephalitozoon syn. Septata intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, D. M.; Johnson, C. H.; Rice, E. W.; Marshall, M. M.; Grahn, K. F.; Plummer, C. B.; Sterling, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    The microsporidia have recently been recognized as a group of pathogens that have potential for waterborne transmission; however, little is known about the effects of routine disinfection on microsporidian spore viability. In this study, in vitro growth of Encephalitozoon syn. Septata intestinalis, a microsporidium found in the human gut, was used as a model to assess the effect of chlorine on the infectivity and viability of microsporidian spores. Spore inoculum concentrations were determined by using spectrophotometric measurements (percent transmittance at 625 nm) and by traditional hemacytometer counting. To determine quantitative dose-response data for spore infectivity, we optimized a rabbit kidney cell culture system in 24-well plates, which facilitated calculation of a 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and a minimal infective dose (MID) for E. intestinalis. The TCID50 is a quantitative measure of infectivity and growth and is the number of organisms that must be present to infect 50% of the cell culture wells tested. The MID is as a measure of a system's permissiveness to infection and a measure of spore infectivity. A standardized MID and a standardized TCID50 have not been reported previously for any microsporidian species. Both types of doses are reported in this paper, and the values were used to evaluate the effects of chlorine disinfection on the in vitro growth of microsporidia. Spores were treated with chlorine at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10 mg/liter. The exposure times ranged from 0 to 80 min at 25°C and pH 7. MID data for E. intestinalis were compared before and after chlorine disinfection. A 3-log reduction (99.9% inhibition) in the E. intestinalis MID was observed at a chlorine concentration of 2 mg/liter after a minimum exposure time of 16 min. The log10 reduction results based on percent transmittance-derived spore counts were equivalent to the results based on hemacytometer-derived spore counts. Our data suggest that chlorine treatment may be an effective water treatment for E. intestinalis and that spectrophotometric methods may be substituted for labor-intensive hemacytometer methods when spores are counted in laboratory-based chlorine disinfection studies. PMID:10742198

  7. Short and Long-Term Incidence of Tuberculosis and CD4-Cell Count Dynamic on HAART in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Etard, Jean-Franois; Diouf, Assane; De Beaudrap, Pierre; Akoi, Koivugui; Ngom-Guye, Ndye Fatou; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Ecochard, Ren; Sow, Papa Salif; Eric, Delaporte

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Estimate tuberculosis (TB) incidence among patients receiving HAART. Compare the dynamic of the CD4-cell count and viral load before notification of the TB with the dynamic among patients remaining free of TB. Design: Prospective cohort with ascertainment of TB cases from medical records. Methods: The first 404 adults HIV-1 infected patients enrolled in the Senegalese antiretroviral drug access initiative were eligible. CD4-cell and viral load were assessed at baseline and every 6 months. Patients receiving an antituberculosis treatment at HAART initiation were excluded from analysis. Any TB case notified after the first month of HAART was considered as an incident case. Follow-up was censored at death or at the last visit before March 31, 2008. CD4-cell trajectories until TB notification were compared to non-TB developers within two distinct periods: from HAART initiation to 24 months and after. Results: Over 404 eligible patients, 352 were included in this analysis. Median follow-up reached 73 months and 1821 person-years were accrued. Half of the 42 incident cases were notified before month 19 of HAART yielding to an overall incident rate of 2.3/100 PY [1.7-3.1]. Annual incidence decreased with duration of HAART (trend in incidence: RR=0.26, p<10-4). During the first period, CD4-cell count dynamic of most TB patients was identical to the dynamic among patients remaining free of TB. Most cases of the second period occurred in a context of an immunological failure. Conclusions: This study provides an estimate of TB incidence among patients on HAART in Senegal and supports two underlying mechanisms. PMID:20148061

  8. 5-hydroxytryptamine strongly inhibits fluid secretion in guinea pig pancreatic duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Naruse, Satoru; Kitagawa, Motoji; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Toshiyuki; Ko, Shigeru B.H.; Yamamoto, Akiko; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Tetsuo

    2001-01-01

    We studied the distribution of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT-) containing cells in the guinea pig pancreas and examined the effects of 5-HT on fluid secretion by interlobular pancreatic ducts. The 5-HTimmunoreactive cells with morphological characteristics of enterochromaffin (EC) cells were scattered throughout the duct system and were enriched in islets of Langerhans. The fluid secretory rate in the isolated interlobular ducts was measured by videomicroscopy. Basolateral applications of 5-HT strongly but reversibly reduced HCO3-dependent, as well as secretin- and acetylcholine- (ACh-) stimulated, fluid secretion, whereas 5-HT applied into the lumen had no such effects. Secretin-stimulated fluid secretion could be inhibited by a 5-HT3 receptor agonist, but not by agonists of the 5-HT1, 5-HT2, or 5-HT4 receptors. Under the stimulation with secretin, 5-HT decreased the intracellular pH (pHi) and reduced the rate of pHi recovery after acid loading with NH4+, suggesting that 5-HT inhibits the intracellular accumulation of HCO3. The elevation of intraductal pressure in vivo reduced secretin-stimulated fluid secretion, an effect that could be attenuated by a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist. Thus, 5-HT, acting through basolateral 5-HT3 receptors, strongly inhibits spontaneous, secretin-, and ACh-stimulated fluid secretion by guinea pig pancreatic ducts. 5-HT released from pancreatic ductal EC cells on elevation of the intraductal pressure may regulate fluid secretion of neighboring duct cells in a paracrine fashion. PMID:11544281

  9. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-03-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes.

  10. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  11. Flagellar kinematics and swimming of algal cells in viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Qin, B; Gopinath, A; Yang, J; Gollub, J P; Arratia, P E

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  12. Reticulocyte count

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tumor, radiation therapy, or infection) Cirrhosis of the liver Anemia caused by low iron levels Chronic kidney disease Anemia caused by low levels of Vitamin B12 or folate Reticulocyte count may be increased during pregnancy.

  13. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePLUS

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk, soy milk, yogurt, and ice cream Beans, ...

  14. SOMATIC CELL COUNTS OF MILK FROM DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT HERDS DURING 2001

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2001 was examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to somati...

  15. Somatic cell counts of milk from Dairy Herd Improvement herds during 2009

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2009 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing some AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to ...

  16. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Lana M; Chou, Shih-Wei; McDermott, Brian M

    2016-01-18

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle's morphology and hearing. PMID:26754648

  17. Somatic Cell Counts of Milk from Dairy Herd Improvement Herds during 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2007 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing some AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to ...

  18. SOMATIC CELL COUNTS OF MILK FROM DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT HERDS DURING 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2005 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to somat...

  19. Somatic Cell Counts of Milk from Dairy Herd Improvement Herds during 2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2006 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing some AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to ...

  20. Somatic cell counts of milk from Dairy Herd Improvement herds during 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Test-day data from all herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) somatic cell testing during 2008 were examined to assess the status of national milk quality. Cows with records failing some AIPL editing procedures were excluded. Somatic cell score (SCS) is reported to AIPL and was converted to ...

  1. Canine adipose-derived stromal cell viability following exposure to synovial fluid from osteoarthritic joints

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Kristina M.; O'Brien, Timothy D.; Pluhar, Elizabeth G.; Conzemius, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stem cell therapy used in clinical application of osteoarthritis in veterinary medicine typically involves intra-articular injection of the cells, however the effect of an osteoarthritic environment on the fate of the cells has not been investigated. Aims and Objectives Assess the viability of adipose derived stromal cells following exposure to osteoarthritic joint fluid. Materials and Methods Adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) were derived from falciform adipose tissue of five adult dogs, and osteoarthritic synovial fluid (SF) was obtained from ten patients undergoing surgical intervention on orthopedic diseases with secondary osteoarthritis. Normal synovial fluid was obtained from seven adult dogs from an unrelated study. ASCs were exposed to the following treatment conditions: culture medium, normal SF, osteoarthritic SF, or serial dilutions of 1:1 to 1:10 of osteoarthritic SF with media. Cells were then harvested and assessed for viability using trypan blue dye exclusion. Results There was no significant difference in the viability of cells in culture medium or normal SF. Significant differences were found between cells exposed to any concentration of osteoarthritic SF and normal SF and between cells exposed to undiluted osteoarthritic SF and all serial dilutions. Subsequent dilutions reduced cytotoxicity. Conclusions Osteoarthritic synovial fluid in this ex vivo experiment is cytotoxic to ASCs, when compared with normal synovial fluid. Current practice of direct injection of ASCs into osteoarthritic joints should be re-evaluated to determine if alternative means of administration may be more effective. PMID:26392889

  2. CD4+ cell count recovery in nave patients initiating cART, who achieved and maintained plasma HIV-RNA suppression

    PubMed Central

    Costagliola, Dominique; Lacombe, Jean-Marc; Ghosn, Jade; Delaugerre, Constance; Pialoux, Gilles; Cuzin, Lise; Launay, Odile; Mnard, Amlie; de Truchis, Pierre; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Weiss, Laurence; Delfraissy, Jean-Franois

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A key objective of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) is to reach and maintain high CD4 cell counts to provide long-term protection against AIDS-defining opportunistic infections and malignancies, as well as other comorbidities. However, a high proportion of patients present late for care. Our objective was to assess CD4 cell count recovery up to seven years in nave patients initiating cART with at least three drugs in usual clinical care. Methods From the French Hospital Database on HIV, we selected nave individuals initiating cART from 2000 with at least two years of follow-up. Participants were further required to have achieved viral load suppression by six months after initiating cART and were censored in case of virological failure. We calculated the proportion of patients (Kaplan-Meier estimates) who achieved CD4 recovery to >500/mm3 according to baseline CD4 cell count. Results A total of 15,025 patients were analyzed with a median follow-up on ART of 65.5 months (IQR: 42.396.0). At cART initiation, the median age was 38.6 years (IQR: 32.246.0), 9734 (64.8%) were men, median CD4 cell count was 239 (IQR: 130336) and 2668 (17.8%) had a prior AIDS event. Results are presented in the Table 1. Conclusions This study shows that CD4 cell counts continue to increase seven years after cART initiation, whatever the baseline CD4 cell count. Failing to achieve CD4 recovery with continuous viral load suppression is rare for nave patients initiating cART in routine clinical practice, but takes substantially longer in patients who initiate antiretroviral therapy at low CD4 cell counts. PMID:25393990

  3. Testicular cytology indicates differences in Sertoli cell counts between "good freezer" and "poor freezer" bulls.

    PubMed

    Rajak, Shailendra Kumar; Thippeswamy, Vijetha Bajjalli; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Layek, Siddhartha Shankar; Mohanty, Tushar Kumar; Gaurav, Mukesh Kumar; Chakravarty, Atish Kumar; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; Manimaran, Ayyasamy; Prasad, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    In artificial insemination, poor quality of semen unsuitable for cryopreservation and susceptibility of spermatozoa to cryodamage in crossbred bulls have been a matter of concern. Present study was designed to identify the testicular cytology indices that might be used to predict the semen quality and cryotolerance of spermatozoa in bulls. Based on the ejaculate rejection rate and sperm cryotolerance, bulls (Holstein Friesian X Tharparkar crossbred) were classified into either good (producing good quality semen with spermatozoa having good cryotolerance; n = 4) or poor (producing poor quality semen with spermatozoa having poor cryotolerance; n = 4). Testicular cytology was studied in all the 8 bulls using fine needle aspiration technique. Testicular cytology of good bulls and poor bulls differed significantly. The proportion of Sertoli cells was significantly higher in good bulls (25.3 1.6) compared to poor bulls (11.0 0.8). The Sertoli cell index was 46.1 5.0 in good bulls while it was only 13.8 1.3 in poor bulls. The cut off values, as determined using Receiver Operating Characteristics analysis, indicate that the bulls having testicular cytogram comprising of < 15.5% Sertoli cells, < 24.3 Sertoli cell index and > 4.0 spermatogenic cells to Sertoli cell ratio might be a poor bull in terms of semen quality and cryotolerance of spermatozoa. The proportion of Sertoli cells in the testicular cytology had positive (P < 0.05) relationship with semen quality and cryotolerance of spermatozoa. PMID:26891549

  4. Fluid and cell behaviors along a 3D printed alginate/gelatin/fibrin channel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yufan; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell manipulation is available with the integration of microfluidic technology and rapid prototyping techniques. High-Fidelity (Hi-Fi) constructs hold enormous therapeutic potential for organ manufacturing and regenerative medicine. In the present paper we introduced a quasi-three-dimensional (Q3D) model with parallel biocompatible alginate/gelatin/fibrin hurdles. The behaviors of fluids and cells along the microfluidic channels with various widths were studied. Cells inside the newly designed microfluidic channels attached and grew well. Morphological changes of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D milieu were found on the printed constructs. Endothelialization occurred with the co-cultures of ADSCs and hepatocytes. This study provides insights into the interactions among fluids, cells and biomaterials, the behaviors of fluids and cells along the microfluidic channels, and the applications of Q3D techniques. PMID:25727058

  5. Automatic Counting of Microglial Cells in Healthy and Glaucomatous Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Blanca; Ramírez, Ana I.; de Hoz, Rosa; Salazar, Juan J.; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of microglial cells has been considered a sign of glial activation and a hallmark of ongoing neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia activation is analyzed in animal models of different eye diseases. Numerous retinal samples are required for each of these studies to obtain relevant data of statistical significance. Because manual quantification of microglial cells is time consuming, the aim of this study was develop an algorithm for automatic identification of retinal microglia. Two groups of adult male Swiss mice were used: age-matched controls (naïve, n = 6) and mice subjected to unilateral laser-induced ocular hypertension (lasered; n = 9). In the latter group, both hypertensive eyes and contralateral untreated retinas were analyzed. Retinal whole mounts were immunostained with anti Iba-1 for detecting microglial cell populations. A new algorithm was developed in MATLAB for microglial quantification; it enabled the quantification of microglial cells in the inner and outer plexiform layers and evaluates the area of the retina occupied by Iba-1+ microglia in the nerve fiber-ganglion cell layer. The automatic method was applied to a set of 6,000 images. To validate the algorithm, mouse retinas were evaluated both manually and computationally; the program correctly assessed the number of cells (Pearson correlation R = 0.94 and R = 0.98 for the inner and outer plexiform layers respectively). Statistically significant differences in glial cell number were found between naïve, lasered eyes and contralateral eyes (P<0.05, naïve versus contralateral eyes; P<0.001, naïve versus lasered eyes and contralateral versus lasered eyes). The algorithm developed is a reliable and fast tool that can evaluate the number of microglial cells in naïve mouse retinas and in retinas exhibiting proliferation. The implementation of this new automatic method can enable faster quantification of microglial cells in retinal pathologies. PMID:26580208

  6. The Effects of Decreasing Maternal Anxiety on Fetal Oxygenation and Nucleated Red Blood Cells Count in the Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Zahra; Akbarzadeh, Marziyeh; Vaziri, Farideh; Zare, Najaf; Ramzi, Mani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Vasoconstriction during anxiety reduces fetal oxygenation and leads to hypoxia. Hypoxia in turn results in increase of the number of nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) in the cord blood. The present study aimed to assess the effect of decreasing maternal anxiety on fetal oxygenation and NRBCs count in the cord blood. Methods:. In this study, 150 women were randomly divided into two intervention groups [supportive care and acupressure in BL32 (bladder) acupoint] and a control group (hospital routine care). The infants' cord blood was investigated regarding the number of NRBCs and the intensity of hypoxia after birth. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (v. 16) and analyzed using ANOVA, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis. Findings : The significant difference was found between the two groups regarding the number of NRBCs counted in the peripheral blood smear (P<0.001). Besides, a significant relationship was observed between the length of the first and second stages of labor and the number of NRBCs in the cord blood (P=0.01). Also, a significant association was observed between the type of delivery and the number of NRBCs in the cord blood in both intervention (P<0.001) and control groups (P=0.03). Conclusion: Doula supportive care and acupressure at BL32 point reduced the length of labor stages as well as the anxiety level. Also, nucleated red blood cells were less in the 2 groups of intervention than in control group. Regarding the fact that nucleated red blood cells cannot be the only factor for hypoxia predicting, for affirmation of this theory study with higher sample size and survey of mothers at high risk are needed. PMID:25562022

  7. A Pascal program for the semi-automation of laboratory cell counting procedures.

    PubMed

    Dowd, T A

    1992-01-01

    A program that allows a microcomputer to function as a semi-automatic multi-keyed laboratory cell counter is presented. Using a microcomputer as a cell counter allows laboratory personnel to work faster, more efficiently and more accurately than the traditional multi-keyed laboratory counter. Automatic data storage, automatic calculation of results and error trapping are also available. The program is presented in the Pascal programming language. PMID:1572165

  8. Cytolytic activity in T cell clones derived from human synovial rheumatoid membrane: inhibition by synovial fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Miltenburg, A M; Van Laar, J M; De Kuiper, P; Daha, M R; Breedveld, F C

    1990-01-01

    A panel of T cell clones was derived from the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated whether T cell clones with cytolytic properties were present and whether T cell cytotoxicity was influenced by the presence of synovial fluid. These issues were studied using anti-CD3 and lectin-induced cytotoxicity assays. The majority of the T cell clones derived from the synovial membrane showed cytotoxic properties although non-cytotoxic clones were also found. Three clones (N11, N6 and N15) showed strong cytotoxicity (more than 40% lysis at an effector-to-target cell ratio of 10:1) whereas three clones (N16, N4 and N14) were non-cytotoxic (less than 20% lysis at an effector-to-target cell ratio of 10:1). The induction of cytotoxicity in the anti-CD3-driven system was shown to be dependent on the dose of anti-CD3 present. When synovial fluid was added to these assays a strong inhibition of cytotoxicity was found. This inhibition of cytotoxicity was found with synovial fluid samples of RA patients, as well as with non-RA synovial fluids. Both anti-CD3 and lectin-dependent cytotoxicity assays were strongly inhibited. In conclusion, T cell clones with cytotoxic activity can be isolated from rheumatoid synovial membrane. In the presence of synovial fluid these cytotoxic cells are inhibited to exert their cytotoxic function. PMID:2148285

  9. Genetic parameters for faecal egg count, packed-cell volume and body-weight in Santa Ins lambs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Worm infection is one of the main factors responsible for economic losses in sheep breeding in Brazil. Random regression analysis was used to estimate genetic parameters for the factors faecal egg-count (FEC), packed-cell volume (PCV) and body weight (BW) in Santa Ins lambs. Data from 119 female, offspring of nine rams, were collected between December, 2005 and December, 2006, from the experimental flock of Embrapa Tabuleiros Costeiros, the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation located in Frei Paulo, SE, Brazil. After weaning, females were drenched until the faecal egg count had dropped to zero. Two natural challenges were undertaken. FEC heritability was extremely variable, this increasing from 0.04 to 0.27 in the first challenge and from 0.01 to 0.52 during the second. PCV heritability peaks were 0.31 and 0.12 in the first and second challenges, respectively. In the second challenge, BW heritability was close to 0.90. The genetic correlations among these traits did not differ from zero. There is the possibility of increasing parasite resistance in Santa Ins by selecting those animals with lower FEC. Selection to increase resistance will not adversely affect lamb-growth, although lambs with a slow growth-rate may be more susceptible to infection. PMID:21637682

  10. Packed cell volume Platelet count, PT, PTTK and Fibrinogen concentration of HIV positive patients on antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Osime, Evarista Odaburhine; Oresanja, Omobolaji Oluwole; Okwara, Benson Uchechukwu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This is aimed at investigating some coagulation and haematologic profile of HIV positive patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in patients attending clinic at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Methods: This is a correlation study comprising fifty (50) HIV positive patients on HAART between 6 – 12 months as test subjects and fifty (50) HIV positive patients who have not began HAART as control subjects. Five millilitres of blood was withdrawn from each group by venepuncture into ethylene diaminetetracetic and sodium citrate anticoagulant containers. Platelet counts were estimated manually using ammonium oxalate solution, packed cell volume by the microhaematocrit method while Prothrombin Time (PT), Activated partial thrombroplastin time and fibrinogen concentration were done by methods described by Monica Chessbrough. Results: This is presented as mean ± standard error of mean. There were reduction in PCV and platelet count between test and control subjects although not statistically significant (P> 0.05) while there was a significant increase in PT and PTTK between test and control groups (P<0.05). No significant change was observed in fibrinogen concentration in HIV patients on HAART and those not on HAART. Conclusion: HAART increases PT and PTTK in HIV infection. PMID:26870130

  11. Development of Microelectrode Arrays Using Electroless Plating for CMOS-Based Direct Counting of Bacterial and HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Ota, Shoko; Gamo, Kohei; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The development of two new types of high-density, electroless plated microelectrode arrays for CMOS-based high-sensitivity direct bacteria and HeLa cell counting are presented. For emerging high-sensitivity direct pathogen counting, two technical challenges must be addressed. One is the formation of a bacteria-sized microelectrode, and the other is the development of a high-sensitivity and high-speed amperometry circuit. The requirement for microelectrode formation is that the gold microelectrodes are required to be as small as the target cell. By improving a self-aligned electroless plating technique, the dimensions of the microelectrodes on a CMOS sensor chip in this work were successfully reduced to 1.2 ?m 2.05 ?m. This is 1/20th of the smallest size reported in the literature. Since a bacteria-sized microelectrode has a severe limitation on the current flow, the amperometry circuit has to have a high sensitivity and high speed with low noise. In this work, a current buffer was inserted to mitigate the potential fluctuation. Three test chips were fabricated using a 0.6- ?m CMOS process: two with 1.2 ?m 2.05 ?m (1024 1024 and 4 4) sensor arrays and one with 6- ?m square (16 16) sensor arrays; and the microelectrodes were formed on them using electroless plating. The uniformity among the 1024 1024 electrodes arranged with a pitch of 3.6 ?m 4.45 ?m was optically verified. For improving sensitivity, the trenches on each microelectrode were developed and verified optically and electrochemically for the first time. Higher sensitivity can be achieved by introducing a trench structure than by using a conventional microelectrode formed by contact photolithography. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements obtained using the 1.2 ?m 2.05 ?m 4 4 and 6- ?m square 16 16 sensor array with electroless-plated microelectrodes successfully demonstrated direct counting of the bacteria-sized microbeads and HeLa cells. PMID:26561481

  12. The BD FACSPresto Point of Care CD4 Test Accurately Enumerates CD4+ T Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Bwana, Priska; Vojnov, Lara; Adhiambo, Maureen; Akinyi, Catherine; Mwende, Joy; Prescott, Marta; Mwau, Matilu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Currently 50% of ART eligible patients are not yet receiving life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Financial constraints do not allow most developing countries to adopt a universal test and offer ART strategy. Decentralizing CD4+ T cell testing may, therefore, provide greater access to testing, ART, and better patient management. We evaluated the technical performance of a new point-of-care CD4+ T cell technology, the BD FACSPresto, in a field methods comparison study. Methods 264 HIV-positive patients were consecutively enrolled and included in the study. The BD FACSPresto POC CD4+ T cell technology was placed in two rural health care facilities and operated by health care facility staff. We compared paired finger-prick and venous samples using the BD FACSPresto and several existing reference technologies, respectively. Results The BD FACSPresto had a mean bias of 67.29 cells/ul and an r2 of 0.9203 compared to the BD FACSCalibur. At ART eligibility thresholds of 350 and 500 cells/ul, the sensitivity to define treatment eligibility were 81.5% and 77.2% and the specificities were 98.9% and 100%, respectively. Similar results were observed when the BD FACSPresto was compared to the BD FACSCount and Alere Pima. The coefficient of variation (CV) was less than 7% for both the BD FACSCalibur and BD FACSPresto. CD4+ T cell testing by nurses using the BD FACSPresto at rural health care facilities showed high technical similarity to test results generated by laboratory technicians using the BD FACSPresto in a high functioning laboratory. Conclusions The BD FACSPresto performed favorably in the laboratory setting compared to the conventional reference standard technologies; however, the lower sensitivities indicated that up to 20% of patients tested in the field in need of treatment would be missed. The BD FACSPresto is a technology that can allow for greater decentralization and wider access to CD4+ T cell testing and ART. PMID:26720601

  13. Method for filling the cavities of cells with a chromogenic fluid

    DOEpatents

    Tonazzi, J.C.L.; Kucharczyk, J.E. Jr.; Agrawal, A.

    1999-01-05

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for filling a cell cavity positioned between a first substrate and a second substrate with a cell filling liquid. The method entails forming at least one evacuation cavity encompassing at least a portion of an outer surface of each of the first and second substrates of a cell containing a cell cavity and isolating the cell cavity from the evacuation cavity; reducing a pressure in each of the evacuation cavity and the cell cavity; and dispensing the cell filling fluid into the cell cavity. The application is to the fabrication of electrochromic windows. 22 figs.

  14. Method for filling the cavities of cells with a chromogenic fluid

    DOEpatents

    Tonazzi, Juan C. Lopez (Tucson, AZ); Kucharczyk, Jr., Joseph E. (Tucson, AZ); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for filling a cell cavity positioned between a first substrate and a second substrate with a cell filling liquid. The method entails forming at least one evacuation cavity encompassing at least a portion of an outer surface of each of the first and second substrates of a cell containing a cell cavity and isolating the cell cavity from the evacuation cavity; reducing a pressure in each of the evacuation cavity and the cell cavity; and dispensing the cell filling fluid into the cell cavity.

  15. Simplified fluid-structure coupled analysis of particle movement for designing of microfluidic cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuto; Kotev, Vladimir; Yano, Ken'ich

    2015-08-01

    Recently, methods of the separation and selection of cells using a microfluidic device are receiving a lot of attention as the latest technology and those devices are called microfluidic cell sorter. Those methods have many advantages compared to conventional methods. There are a lot of researches on the microfluidic cell sorting but there isn't the automated design method of this device in spite of the necessary. To achieve the automated design of the microfluidic cell sorter, the analysis of the movement of cells in the microfluidic device and optimum design of the microfluidic cell sorter corresponding to kind of various cells are required. In the former case, the fluid-structure interaction analysis of fluid and cell movement is needed. However, it is very complex and needs a lot of computational time. Therefore, we focused on this problem in the fluid-structure interaction analysis for designing the microfluidic cell sorter. We assume cell is a sphere particle and propose the simplified fluid-structure coupled analysis which combines the CFD analysis with the motion equation of a sphere particle. PMID:26736980

  16. Effect of somatic cell count in goat milk on yield, sensory quality and fatty acid profile of semi-hard cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effect of somatic cell count (SCC) of goat milk on yield, free fatty acid (FFA) profile, and sensory quality of semi-hard cheese. Thirty kilograms of goat milk with mean SCC levels of 410,000 (Low), 770,000 (Medium), and 1,250,000 cells/mL (High) was obtained for the manu...

  17. Effect of cooling rate on eutectic cell count, grain size, microstructure, and ultimate tensile strength of hypoeutectic cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hemanth, J.; Rao, K.V.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-08-01

    This article describes a series of microstructural and strength studies performed on hypoeutectic cast iron, which was sand cast using a variety of end chills (metallic, nonmetallic, water-cooled, and subzero, respectively). The effects of cooling rate on the eutectic cell count (ECC), grain size, and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) were evaluated. Attempts were also made to explain these effects and to correlate the UTS with ECC. It was found that subzero chilled and water-cool, chilled cast iron exhibit severe undercooling compared to normal sand cast iron. It was concluded from this investigation that nucleation conditions are completely altered but growth conditions prevail as usual. Therefore, undercooling during solidification is considered to be responsible for variation in ECC, grain size, and microstructure, and tensile strength.

  18. Emergent long-range couplings in arrays of fluid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Douglas Bruce

    2014-08-07

    We present a system exhibiting extraordinarily long-range cooperative effects, on a length scale far exceeding the bulk correlation length. We give a theoretical explanation of these phenomena based on the mesoscopic picture of phase coexistence in finite systems, which is confirmedly Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies. Our work demonstrates that such action-at-a-distance can occur in classical systems involving simple or complex fluids, such as colloid-polymer mixtures, or ferromagnets.

  19. Answering the AIDS denialists: CD4 (T-cell) counts, and viral load.

    PubMed

    Mirken, B

    2000-04-21

    Organizations which say that HIV does not cause AIDS, or urge people with HIV or AIDS to reject standard medical care, often argue that T-cell and viral load tests for patients are useless. This article addresses their arguments about these tests, in the larger context of the existing medical and scientific evidence. PMID:12870454

  20. Elevated White Blood Cell Count Is Associated with Higher Risk of Glucose Metabolism Disorders in Middle-Aged and Elderly Chinese People

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Yan, Wen-Hua; Li, Chan-Juan; Wang, An-Ping; Dou, Jing-Tao; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    White blood cell (WBC) count has been associated with diabetic risk, but whether the correlation is independent of other risk factors has hardly been studied. Moreover, very few such studies with large sample sizes have been conducted in Chinese. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between WBC count and glucose metabolism in china. We also examined the relevant variables of WBC count. A total of 9,697 subjects (mean age, 58.0 9.1 years) were recruited. The subjects were classified into four groups, including subjects with normal glucose tolerance, isolated impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We found that WBC count increased as glucose metabolism disorders exacerbated. WBC count was also positively correlated with waist hip ratio, body mass index, smoking, triglycerides, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and 2-h postprandial glucose. In addition, high density lipoprotein and the female gender were inversely correlated with WBC levels. In patients with previously diagnosed T2DM, the course of T2DM was not correlated with WBC count. Our findings indicate that elevated WBC count is independently associated with worsening of glucose metabolism in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. In addition, loss of weight, smoking cessation, lipid-modifying therapies, and control of postprandial plasma glucose and HbA1c may ameliorate the chronic low-grade inflammation. PMID:24852600

  1. High Transmitter CD4+ T-Cell Count Shortly after the Time of Transmission in a Study of African Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Karita, Etienne; Price, Matt A; Lakhi, Shabir; Kilembe, William; Kamali, Anatoli; Ruzagira, Eugene; Hunter, Eric; Farmer, Paul; Allen, Susan; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Welsh, Sabrina; Yang, Annie; Gilmour, Jill; Fast, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Background 2013 WHO guidelines recommend starting ART at CD4+ T-cell counts ?500 cells/?L. We present the T-cell counts from adult Africans with HIV shortly following transmission to their sexual partners. Methods HIV-discordant couples in Zambia, Uganda and Rwanda were followed prospectively and received couples counseling and condoms. HIV uninfected partners were tested for HIV at least quarterly and HIV-infected partners received HIV care and referral for ART per national guidelines. Upon diagnosis of incident HIV infection in the previously HIV-uninfected partner, a blood sample was collected from both partners to measure CD4+ T-cells and perform viral linkage. The estimated date of infection (EDI) of the incident case was calculated based on testing history. EDI was unknown for suspected transmitting partners. Results From 20062011, 4,705 HIV-discordant couples were enrolled in this cohort, and 443 cases of incident HIV infection were documented. Virus linkage analysis was performed in 374 transmission pairs, and 273 (73%) transmissions were linked genetically. CD4 counts in the transmitting partner were measured a median of 56 days after EDI (mean:90.5, min:10, max:396). The median CD4 count was 339 cells/?l (mean:386.4, min:15, max:1,434), and the proportion of partners with a CD4+ T-cell count above 500/?l was 25% (95% CI:21, 31). Conclusions In our cohort of discordant couples, 73% of HIV transmissions occurred within the relationship, and the transmitter CD4+ T cell count shortly after the transmission event was frequently higher than the WHO 2013 ART-initiation guidelines. PMID:26291456

  2. Morbidity and Mortality According to Latest CD4+ Cell Count among HIV Positive Individuals in South Africa Who Enrolled in Project Phidisa

    PubMed Central

    Maduna, Patrick H.; Dolan, Matt; Kondlo, Lwando; Mabuza, Honey; Dlamini, Judith N.; Polis, Mike; Mnisi, Thabo; Orsega, Susan; Maja, Patrick; Ledwaba, Lotty; Molefe, Thuthukile; Sangweni, Phumelele; Malan, Lisette; Matchaba, Gugu; Khabo, Paul; Grandits, Greg; Neaton, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-term morbidity and mortality rates for HIV positive soldiers in the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) would inform decisions about deployment and HIV disease management. Risks were determined according to the latest CD4+ cell count and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV positive individuals in the SANDF and their dependents. Methods and Findings A total of 7,114 participants were enrolled and followed for mortality over a median of 4.7 years (IQR: 1.9, 7.1 years). For a planned subset (5,976), progression of disease (POD) and grade 4, potentially life-threatening events were also ascertained. CD4+ count and viral load were measured every 3 to 6 months. Poisson regression was used to compare event rates by latest CD4+ count (<50, 5099, 100199, 200349, 350499, 500+) with a focus on upper three strata, and to estimate relative risks (RRs) (ART/no ART). Median entry CD4+ was 207 cells/mm3. During follow-up over 70% were prescribed ART. Over follow-up 1,226 participants died; rates ranged from 57.6 (< 50 cells) to 0.8 (500+ cells) per 100 person years (py). Compared to those with latest CD4+ 200349 (2.2/100py), death rates were significantly lower (p<0.001), as expected, for those with 350499 (0.9/100py) and with 500+ cells (0.8/100py). The composite outcome of death, POD or grade 4 events occurred in 2,302 participants (4,045 events); rates were similar in higher CD4+ count strata (9.4 for 350499 and 7.9 for 500+ cells) and lower than those with counts 200349 cells (13.5) (p<0.001). For those with latest CD4+ 350+ cells, 63% of the composite outcomes (680 of 1,074) were grade 4 events. Conclusion Rates of morbidity and mortality are lowest among those with CD4+ count of 350 or higher and rates do not differ for those with counts of 350499 versus 500+ cells. Grade 4 events are the predominant morbidity for participants with CD4+ counts of 350+ cells. PMID:25856495

  3. Osteogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their bone regeneration potential

    PubMed Central

    Pipino, Caterina; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2015-01-01

    In orthopedics, tissue engineering approach using stem cells is a valid line of treatment for patients with bone defects. In this context, mesenchymal stromal cells of various origins have been extensively studied and continue to be a matter of debate. Although mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow are already clinically applied, recent evidence suggests that one may use mesenchymal stromal cells from extra-embryonic tissues, such as amniotic fluid, as an innovative and advantageous resource for bone regeneration. The use of cells from amniotic fluid does not raise ethical problems and provides a sufficient number of cells without invasive procedures. Furthermore, they do not develop into teratomas when transplanted, a consequence observed with pluripotent stem cells. In addition, their multipotent differentiation ability, low immunogenicity, and anti-inflammatory properties make them ideal candidates for bone regenerative medicine. We here present an overview of the features of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their potential in the osteogenic differentiation process. We have examined the papers actually available on this regard, with particular interest in the strategies applied to improve in vitro osteogenesis. Importantly, a detailed understanding of the behavior of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their osteogenic ability is desirable considering a feasible application in bone regenerative medicine. PMID:26029340

  4. CD4+ T cell counts in initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected asymptomatic individuals; controversies and inconsistencies.

    PubMed

    Maina, E K; Bonney, E Y; Bukusi, E A; Sedegah, M; Lartey, M; Ampofo, W K

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal when devising strategies to define the start of therapy in HIV infected individuals is to avoid HIV disease progression and toxicity from antiretroviral therapy (ART). Intermediate goals includes, avoiding resistance by suppressing HIV replication, reducing transmission, limiting spread and diversity of HIV within the body and protecting the immune system from harm. The question of how early or late to start ART and achieve both primary and intermediate goals has dominated HIV research. The distinction between early and late treatment of HIV infection is currently a matter of CD4+ T cells count, a marker of immune status, rather than on viral load, a marker of virus replication. Discussions about respective benefits of early or delayed therapy, as well as the best CD4+ T cell threshold during the course of HIV infection at which ART is initiated remains inconclusive. Guidelines issued by various agencies, provide different initiation recommendations. This can be confusing for clinicians and policy-makers when determining the best time to initiate therapy. Optimizing ART initiation strategies are clearly complex and must be balanced between individual and broader public health needs. This review assesses available data that contributes to the debate on optimal time to initiate therapy in HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals. We also review reports on CD4+ T cell threshold to guide initiation of ART and finally discuss arguments for and against early or late initiation of ART. PMID:26475399

  5. ICSH guidelines for the evaluation of blood cell analysers including those used for differential leucocyte and reticulocyte counting.

    PubMed

    Briggs, C; Culp, N; Davis, B; d'Onofrio, G; Zini, G; Machin, S J

    2014-12-01

    This revision is intended to update the 1994 ICSH guidelines. It is based on those guidelines but is updated to include new methods, such as digital image analysis for blood cells, a flow cytometric method intended to replace the reference manual 400 cell differential, and numerous new cell indices not identified morphologically are introduced. Haematology analysers are becoming increasingly complex and with technological advancements in instrumentation with more and more quantitative parameters are being reported in the complete blood count. It is imperative therefore that before an instrument is used for testing patient samples, it must undergo an evaluation by an organization or laboratory independent of the manufacturer. The evaluation should demonstrate the performance, advantages and limitations of instruments and methods. These evaluations may be performed by an accredited haematology laboratory where the results are published in a peer-reviewed journal and compared with the validations performed by the manufacturer. A less extensive validation/transference of the equipment or method should be performed by the local laboratory on instruments prior to reporting of results. PMID:24666725

  6. Effect of exercise on erythrocyte count and blood activity concentration after /sup 99m/Tc in vivo red blood cell labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Konstam, M.A.; Tu'meh, S.; Wynne, J.; Beck, J.R.; Kozlowski, J.; Holman, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    We studied the effect of exercise on blood radiotracer concentration after /sup 99m/Tc in vivo red blood cell labeling. After red blood cell labeling, 13 subjects underwent maximal supine bicycle exercise. Radioactivity, analyzed with a well counter, was measured in heparinized venous blood samples drawn at rest and during peak exercise. Changes in activity were compared with changes in erythrocyte count. Activity and erythrocyte counts increased during exercise in all 13 subjects. Percent increase in activity correlated with percent increase in erythrocyte count (r . -0.78), but did not correlate with either duration of exercise or maximal heart rate. Twenty minutes after termination of exercise, activity and erythrocyte count had decreased from peak exercise values but remained higher than preexercise values. In nine nonexercised control subjects, samples drawn 20 minutes apart showed no change in activity or in erythrocyte count. We conclude that exercise increases blood activity, primarily because of an increase in erythrocyte count. During radionuclide ventriculography, blood activity must be measured before and after any intervention, particularly exercise, before a change in left ventricular activity can be attributed to a change in left ventricular volume.

  7. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  8. Women Count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Dana M.

    2014-11-01

    I am a counter by nature. I count things as an effective way to occupy my mind. How many people are in this room? How many are women? How many are wearing glasses? How many people are using a Mac versus a PC?

  9. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the

  10. Counting Penguins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  11. Fluid dynamics analysis of a novel micropatterned cell bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuhong; Huo, Bo; Sun, Shujin; Yang, Fan; Gao, Yuxin; Pan, Jun; Long, Mian

    2011-05-01

    Although flow-based bioreactor has been widely used to provide sufficient mass transportation and nutrient supply for cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, the underlying mechanism of cell responses to applied flow at single cell level remains unclear. This study has developed a novel bioreactor that combines flow bioreactor with microfabrication technique to isolate individual cells onto micropatterned substrate. A mechanical model has also been developed to quantify the flow field or the microenvironment around the single cell; flow dynamics has been analyzed on five geometrically different patterns of circle-, cube-, 1:2 ellipse-, 1:3 ellipse-, and rectangle-shaped "virtual cells." The results of this study have demonstrated that the flow field is highly pattern dependent, and all the hydrodynamic development length, cell spacing, and orientation of inlet velocity vector are crucial for maintaining a fully developed flow. This study has provided a theoretical basis for optimizing the design of micropatterned flow bioreactor and a novel approach to understand the cell mechanotransduction and cell-surface interaction at single cell level. PMID:21249451

  12. Effect of Low CD4 Cell Count on Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions among HIV-Positive Women in Enugu, Southeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Enebe, Joseph Tochukwu; Nnakenyi, Emeka Francis; Ezegwui, Hyginus Uzochukwu; Ozumba, Benjamin Chukwuma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV-positive women are more likely to develop cervical neoplasm. HIV-positive women with low CD4 T-lymphocyte cell count may be more predisposed to cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs). This study aimed to determine the association between low cellular immunity of HIV positive women, and the prevalence and grade of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions. Materials and Methods Pap smear was carried out on two cohorts of Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) experienced HIV-positive women (178 per group) at the AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria-Centre for Disease Control Adult Anti-Retroviral clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria from June to November, 2012. The study group had CD4 cell count of < 200 cells/μl while the control group had CD4 cell count of ≥200 cells/μl. Results The mean CD4 cell counts of participants in the study (low CD4) group was 127.9 ± 47.49 cells/ml while that of the control (high CD4) group was 489.2 ± 186.36 cells/ml (p < 0.001). The prevalence of SIL was 10.2% (18/176) for the low CD4 group, and 5.7% (10/176) for the high CD4 group [OR = 1.9 (95% CI: 0.85, 4.22)]. The commonest category of SILs identified was Low-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion (LSIL), thus 11 (6.3%) in the study versus 7 (4.0%) in the control group (p = 0.703). Conclusion Prevalence of cervical SILs among HIV positive women on HAART in Enugu, Nigeria is low and has no significant relationship with their CD4 cell count. PMID:26674006

  13. The importance of endometrial nerve fibers and macrophage cell count in the diagnosis of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Cihan; Serdaroglu, Hasan; Tuzlali, Sitki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a disease that is hard to diagnose without the gold standard method, laparoscopy. An easier diagnostic method is needed. Objective: The aim of the study is to determine whether the number of macrophage cells in the endometrium and/or the detection of nerve fibers can be used in the diagnosis of endometriosis. Materials and Methods: Endometrial sampling was done to 31 patients prior to laparoscopy (L/S) or laparotomy (L/T) at Istanbul University Istanbul School of Medicine Hospital between January 2010 February 2011. Also 34 patients who were retrospectively chosen from their files were added to the study. 5 patients were excluded from the study. Totally, 31 patients were placed in the endometriosis and 29 patients in the control group. Endometrial samples were evaluated immunohistochemically with the markers protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and neurofilament (NF) for nerve fibers and CD68 for macrophages. Results: None of the samples were stained with PGP 9.5 and NF. As for CD68+cells, no statistically significant difference was observed between groups (endometriosis: 216.10104.41; control: 175.9343.05, p=0.06). Results were also evaluated in the subgroups of menstruel phases and disease stages. Only in the proliferative phase there was a significant increase in the endometriosis group (p=0.03). No significant difference was observed between the stages. Conclusion: The detection of nerve fibers in the eutopic endometrium with the markers of PGP 9.5 and NF is not found to be helpful in the diagnosis of endometriosis. Macrophage cells may be helpful in the diagnosis only in the proliferative phase. PMID:24639773

  14. Absolute Reticulocyte Count Acts as a Surrogate for Fetal Hemoglobin in Infants and Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Emily Riehm; Byrnes, Colleen; Weissman, Maxine; Lee, Y. Terry; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin switching is largely complete in humans by six months of age. Among infants with sickle cell anemia (HbSS, SCA), reticulocytosis begins early in life as fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is replaced by sickle hemoglobin (HbS). The objective of this study was to determine if absolute reticulocyte count (ARC) is related to HbF levels in a cohort of pediatric SCA patients. A convenience sample of 106 children with SCA between the ages of 1 month and 20 years who were not receiving hydroxyurea or monthly blood transfusions were enrolled in this observational study. Hematologic data, including ARC and HbF levels, were measured at steady state. F-cells were enumerated by flow cytometry. Initial studies compared infants with ARC greater than or equal to 200 K/μL (ARC ≥ 200) based upon the previously reported utility of this threshold as a predictive marker for SCA severity. Mean HbF and F-cell levels were significantly lower in the ARC ≥ 200 group when compared to the ARC < 200 group. Both HbF and F-cell percentages were negatively correlated to ARC in infants and in children between the ages of 1 and 9 years. However, the inverse relationship was lost after the age of 10 years. Overall, decreased expression and distribution of HbF during childhood SCA is well-correlated with increased reticulocyte production and release into the peripheral blood. As such, these data further support the clinical use of reticulocyte enumeration as a disease severity biomarker for childhood sickle cell anemia. PMID:26366562

  15. Neurexin/Neuroligin Interaction Kinetics Characterized by Counting Single Cell-Surface Attached Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Michel, Edouard; Giannone, Grgory; Choquet, Daniel; Thoumine, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We report what to our knowledge is a new method to characterize kinetic rates between cell-surface-attached adhesion molecules. Cells expressing specific membrane receptors are surface-labeled with quantum dots coated with their respective ligands. The progressive diminution in the total number of surface-diffusing quantum dots tracked over time collectively reflects intrinsic ligand/receptor interaction kinetics. The probability of quantum dot detachment is modeled using a stochastic analysis of bond formation and dissociation, with a small number of ligand/receptor pairs, resulting in a set of coupled differential equations that are solved numerically. Comparison with the experimental data provides an estimation of the kinetic rates, together with the mean number of ligands per quantum dot, as three adjustable parameters. We validate this approach by studying the calcium-dependent neurexin/neuroligin interaction, which plays an important role in synapse formation. Using primary neurons expressing neuroligin-1 and quantum dots coated with purified neurexin-1?, we determine the kinetic rates between these two binding partners and compare them with data obtained using other techniques. Using specific molecular constructs, we also provide interesting information about the effects of neurexin and neuroligin dimerization on the kinetic rates. As it stands, this simple technique should be applicable to many types of biological ligand/receptor pairs. PMID:19619462

  16. Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-cell scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A.; Roane, J.E.; Leyba, J.D.; Branton, S.D.

    1996-12-31

    Principal conclusions are: CsI(Tl) provides sufficient pulse shape discrimination for use in the flow-cell detector. However, an improved method of coating is needed to extend the useful life of a detection cell. Of the activation/fission products investigated, only the co-elution of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 63}Ni produced a radiological interference. Tritium (and presumably other non-ionic radioisotopes) can be separated during the loading of the solution onto the pre- concentration column. Natural U (and/or decay products) produced a radiological interference with {sup 90}Sr. This is a potential problem. No potential radiological interferences were observed with {sup 223}Th. Chemical interferences were observed to some degree for all the chemicals tested except for the chloride solutions, NaCl and KCl, and the sulfate solution, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The specific interference effects were decreased detection efficiencies and changes in peak elution times. The NEL`s (non-observable effects loadings) are tentative targets for development of sample processing protocols, which is the next phase of the work.

  17. Determinants, reproducibility, and seasonal variation of bacterial cell wall components and viable counts in house dust.

    PubMed

    Leppnen, H K; Tubel, M; Roponen, M; Vepslinen, A; Rantakokko, P; Pekkanen, J; Nevalainen, A; von Mutius, E; Hyvrinen, A

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to assess the determinants that affect concentrations of the bacterial cell wall components 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) and muramic acid and of total viable bacteria and actinomycetes in house dust; and (ii) to examine the seasonal variation and reproducibility of these bacterial cell wall components in house dust. A number of lifestyle and environmental factors, mostly not consistent for different bacterial measures but commonly including the type of dwelling and farming (number of livestock), explained up to 37% of the variation of the bacterial concentrations in 212 homes in Eastern Finland. The reproducibility of 3-OH FAs and muramic acid measurements in house dust were studied in five urban homes and were found to be generally high (ICC 74-84%). Temporal variation observed in repeated sampling of the same home throughout a year was more pronounced for 3-OH FAs determinations (ICC 22%) than for muramic acid (ICC 55-66%). We conclude that determinants vary largely for different types of bacterial measurements in house dust; the measured parameters represent different aspects of the bacterial content indoors. More than one sample is needed to describe bacterial concentrations in house dust in the home environment due to large temporal variation. PMID:24992650

  18. A scanning acoustic microscope discriminates cancer cells in fluid

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) discriminates lesions in sections by assessing the speed of sound (SOS) or attenuation of sound (AOS) through tissues within a few minutes without staining; however, its clinical use in cytological diagnosis is unknown. We applied a thin layer preparation method to observe benign and malignant effusions using SAM. Although SAM is inferior in detecting nuclear features than light microscopy, it can differentiate malignant from benign cells using the higher SOS and AOS values and large irregular cell clusters that are typical features of carcinomas. Moreover, each single malignant cell exhibits characteristic cytoplasmic features such as a large size, irregular borders and secretory or cytoskeletal content. By adjusting the observation range, malignant cells are differentiated from benign cells easily using SAM. Subtle changes in the functional and structural heterogeneity of tumour cells were pursuable with a different digital data of SAM. SAM can be a useful tool for screening malignant cells in effusions before light microscopic observation. Higher AOS values in malignant cells compared with those of benign cells support the feasibility of a novel sonodynamic therapy for malignant effusions. PMID:26477839

  19. A scanning acoustic microscope discriminates cancer cells in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) discriminates lesions in sections by assessing the speed of sound (SOS) or attenuation of sound (AOS) through tissues within a few minutes without staining; however, its clinical use in cytological diagnosis is unknown. We applied a thin layer preparation method to observe benign and malignant effusions using SAM. Although SAM is inferior in detecting nuclear features than light microscopy, it can differentiate malignant from benign cells using the higher SOS and AOS values and large irregular cell clusters that are typical features of carcinomas. Moreover, each single malignant cell exhibits characteristic cytoplasmic features such as a large size, irregular borders and secretory or cytoskeletal content. By adjusting the observation range, malignant cells are differentiated from benign cells easily using SAM. Subtle changes in the functional and structural heterogeneity of tumour cells were pursuable with a different digital data of SAM. SAM can be a useful tool for screening malignant cells in effusions before light microscopic observation. Higher AOS values in malignant cells compared with those of benign cells support the feasibility of a novel sonodynamic therapy for malignant effusions.

  20. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and cerebrospinal fluid cells from patients with multiple sclerosis for detection of JC virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    lacobaeus, E; Ryschkewitsch, C; Gravell, M; Khademi, M; Wallstrom, E; Olsson, T; Brundin, L; Major, EO

    2009-01-01

    Objective 1) To determine whether JC virus (JCV) DNA was present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in comparison with controls and 2) to find out if our clinical material, based on presence of JCV DNA, included any patient at risk for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Methods The prevalence of JCV DNA was analyzed in CSF and plasma from 217 patients with MS, 86 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), and 212 patients with other neurological diseases (OND). In addition, we analyzed CSF cells, the first report of JCV DNA in CSF cells in a single sample, and peripheral blood cells in a subgroup of MS (n = 49), CIS (n = 14) and OND (n = 53). Results A low copy number of JCV DNA was detected in one MS cell free CSF sample and in one MS CSF cell samples. None of these had any signs of PML or developed this disease during follow-up. In addition, two OND plasma samples were JCV DNA positive, whereas all the other samples had no detectable virus. Conclusion A low copy number of JCV DNA may occasionally be observed both in MS and other diseases and may occur as part of the normal biology of JC virus in humans. This study does not support the hypothesis that patients with MS would be at increased risk to develop PML, and consequently screening of CSF as a measurable risk for PML is not useful. PMID:18805840

  1. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  2. Genetic variants associated with the white blood cell count in 13,923 subjects in the eMERGE Network.

    PubMed

    Crosslin, David R; McDavid, Andrew; Weston, Noah; Nelson, Sarah C; Zheng, Xiuwen; Hart, Eugene; de Andrade, Mariza; Kullo, Iftikhar J; McCarty, Catherine A; Doheny, Kimberly F; Pugh, Elizabeth; Kho, Abel; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Pretel, Stephanie; Saip, Alexander; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Crawford, Dana C; Crane, Paul K; Newton, Katherine; Li, Rongling; Mirel, Daniel B; Crenshaw, Andrew; Larson, Eric B; Carlson, Chris S; Jarvik, Gail P

    2012-04-01

    White blood cell count (WBC) is unique among identified inflammatory predictors of chronic disease in that it is routinely measured in asymptomatic patients in the course of routine patient care. We led a genome-wide association analysis to identify variants associated with WBC levels in 13,923 subjects in the electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network. We identified two regions of interest that were each unique to subjects of genetically determined ancestry to the African continent (AA) or to the European continent (EA). WBC varies among different ancestry groups. Despite being ancestry specific, these regions were identifiable in the combined analysis. In AA subjects, the region surrounding the Duffy antigen/chemokine receptor gene (DARC) on 1q21 exhibited significant association (p value = 6.71e-55). These results validate the previously reported association between WBC and of the regulatory variant rs2814778 in the promoter region, which causes the Duffy negative phenotype (Fy-/-). A second missense variant (rs12075) is responsible for the two principal antigens, Fya and Fyb of the Duffy blood group system. The two variants, consisting of four alleles, act in concert to produce five antigens and subsequent phenotypes. We were able to identify the marginal and novel interaction effects of these two variants on WBC. In the EA subjects, we identified significantly associated SNPs tagging three separate genes in the 17q21 region: (1) GSDMA, (2) MED24, and (3) PSMD3. Variants in this region have been reported to be associated with WBC, neutrophil count, and inflammatory diseases including asthma and Crohn's disease. PMID:22037903

  3. Plasma Levels of Neopterin and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in Tuberculosis (TB) with and without HIV Coinfection in Relation to CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Skogmar, Sten; Schn, Thomas; Balcha, Taye Tolera; Sturegrd, Erik; Jansson, Marianne; Bjrkman, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background While the risk of TB is elevated in HIV-positive subjects with low CD4 cell counts, TB may in itself be associated with CD4 lymphocytopenia. We investigated markers of immune activation (neopterin) and inflammation (CRP) in TB patients with and without HIV coinfection and their association with CD4 cell levels, and determined their predictive capacity as alternative markers of advanced immunosuppression. Methods Participants selected from a cohort of adults with TB at Ethiopian health centers (195 HIV+/TB+, 170 HIV-/TB+) and 31 controls were tested for plasma levels of neopterin and CRP. Baseline levels of neopterin and CRP were correlated to CD4 cell count before and after anti-TB treatment (ATT). The performance to predict CD4 cell strata for both markers were investigated using receiver operating curves. Results Levels of both biomarkers were elevated in TB patients (neopterin: HIV+/TB+ 54 nmol/l, HIV-/TB+ 23 nmol/l, controls 3.8 nmol/l; CRP: HIV+/TB+ 36 ?g/ml, HIV-/TB+ 33 ?g/ml, controls 0.5 ?g/ml). Neopterin levels were inversely correlated (-0.53, p<0.001) to CD4 cell count, whereas this correlation was weaker for CRP (-0.25, p<0.001). Neither of the markers had adequate predictive value for identification of subjects with CD4 cell count <100 cells/mm3 (area under the curve [AUC] 0.64 for neopterin, AUC 0.59 for CRP). Conclusion Neopterin levels were high in adults with TB, both with and without HIV coinfection, with inverse correlation to CD4 cell count. This suggests that immune activation may be involved in TB-related CD4 lymphocytopenia. However, neither neopterin nor CRP showed promise as alternative tests for immunosuppression in patients coinfected with HIV and TB. PMID:26630153

  4. Modulation of dendritic cell differentiation and cytokine secretion by the hydatid cyst fluid of Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Joo H C; Chain, Benjamin M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic infection by Echinococcus granulosus results in establishment of fluid-filled cysts (hydatid cysts) in liver or lungs of infected hosts, which can escape destruction by the host immune system for long periods. This study explores the modulation by hydatid cyst fluid of the in vitro human monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) transition induced by granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Addition of the fluid to adherent peripheral blood monocytes cultured in GM-CSF/IL-4 stimulates release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-6. Exposure of differentiating DC to the fluid during the 7-day culture in GM-CSF/IL-4 impairs their subsequent ability to secrete IL-12, IL-6 or PGE2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. This inhibition is not dependent on the initial release of PGE2. The presence of hydatid cyst fluid also modulates the phenotype of the cells generated during culture, resulting in increased CD14 expression and decreased expression of CD1a. Finally, hydatid fluid can stimulate predifferentiated DC to mature, as evidenced by release of IL-12 and IL-6, and by up-regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex and CD86. The possible role of dendritic cell modulation in regulating the host immune response to hydatid cysts is discussed. PMID:16771863

  5. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Justin R.; Rother, Gernot; Browning, James F.; Ankner, John F.; Banuelos, Jose L.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Wesolowski, David J.; Cole, David R.

    2012-04-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300-473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.

  6. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Justin R; Rother, Gernot; Browning, James F; Ankner, John F; Banuelos, Jose L; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2012-04-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300-473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO(2) in contact with quartz and Si/SiO(2) wafers are also shown. PMID:22559577

  7. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Justin R; Rother, Gernot; Browning, Jim; Ankner, John Francis; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David

    2012-01-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300 473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.

  8. Intracellular calcium response of Sf-9 insect cells exposed to intense fluid forces.

    PubMed

    Aloi, L E; Cherry, R S

    1994-03-15

    Suspension cell cultures are exposed to periodic high intensity, short duration fluid forces by circulating them through a flow loop containing a capillary, which simulates what a cell experiences in a stirred bioreactor. Sf-9 insect cells exhibit an increase in intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i when exposed to these cyclic fluid forces. Flow through the capillary spans both the laminar and turbulent regime and the calcium response is not dependent on the transition to turbulence. The calcium response is a nearly linear function of the rate of energy dissipation per mass of fluid in the capillary. The source of the increased calcium ions in the cell cytosol is within the cell itself, indicating that the calcium response is a cellular response to fluid forces and not a matter of increased plasma membrane permeability to Ca2+ ions. Flow cytometry on hydrodynamically stimulated and unstimulated cells reveals that the increase in the intracellular calcium concentration averaged over the cell population is due to an increase in intracellular calcium concentration in only a small sub-population of the entire suspension. PMID:7764722

  9. Isolation of granulosa cells from follicular fluid; applications in biomedical and molecular biology experiments

    PubMed Central

    Aghadavod, Esmat; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Farzadi, Laya; Zare, Mina; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Nouri, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, a lot of research has been conducted to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the low quality of oocytes with granulosa cells (GCs). GCs are one of the major cell types found in follicular fluid and purification of these cells from the follicular fluid is very important for further studies. Although, there are different techniques of purification, a method for separation of highly-pure and minimally-damaged cells is necessary. In this paper, we presented a novel method for high purification of GCs with a large quantity and high purity. Materials and Methods: Follicular fluid was collected from patients who referred for in vitro fertilization and GCs in follicular fluid were extracted by Ficoll, Percoll and Red blood cell lysing buffer (RLB) methods. Then purity of extracted GCs was assessed by flow cytometry and morphological properties of GCs were observed by differential interference contrast microscopy. The purity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid extracts was examined by NanoDrop 1000, pre-restriction fragment length polymorphism and electrophoresis techniques. Quality and quantity of extracting GCs were affected during the cell separation procedures. Results: Our results showed that each of purification method can affect quality and quantity of extracted cells. Conclusion: RLB method for extraction of GCs was shown to be a convenient procedure in comparison with Ficoll and Percoll methods.

  10. Gallium-67 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Trauth, H.A.; Heimes, K.; Schubotz, R.; von Wichert, P.

    1986-01-01

    Roentgenograms and gallium-67 scans and gallium-67 counts of BAL fluid samples, together with differential cell counts, have proved to be useful in assessing activity and lung involvement in sarcoidosis. In active pulmonary sarcoidosis gallium-67 scans are usually positive. Quantitation of gallium-67 uptake in lung scans, however, may be difficult. Because gallium-67 uptake and cell counts in BAL fluid may be correlated, we set out to investigate gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid recovered from patient of different groups. Sixteen patients with recently diagnosed and untreated sarcoidosis, nine patients with healthy lungs, and five patients with CFA were studied. Gallium-67 uptake of the lung, gallium-67 activity in the lavage fluid, SACE and LACE levels, and alpha 1-AT activity were measured. Significantly more gallium-67 activity was found in BAL fluid from sarcoidosis patients than in that from CFA patients (alpha = .001) or patients with healthy lungs (alpha = .001). Gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid could be well correlated with the number of lymphocytes in BAL fluid, but poorly with the number of macrophages. Subjects with increased levels of SACE or serum alpha 1-AT showed higher lavage gallium-67 activity than did normals, but no correlation could be established. High gallium-67 activity in lavage fluid may be correlated with acute sarcoidosis or physiological deterioration; low activity denotes change for the better. The results show that gallium-67 counts in BAL fluid reflects the intensity of gallium-67 uptake and thus of activity of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  11. Local synthesis of both macrophage and T cell cytokines by synovial fluid cells from children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, B A; Laxer, R M; Andersson, U; Silverman, E D

    1994-01-01

    The production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta and IL-6 in synovial fluid was studied in 50 samples of synovial fluid from 44 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) by identifying cytokine production at a single-cell level. Post Ficoll-separated synovial fluid mononuclear cells were permeabilized and then intracellular TNF-alpha, TNF-beta and IL-6 protein production was examined using indirect immunofluorescence and murine anti-cytokine MoAbs. All three cytokines were measured in 37 of the 50 samples. In 25 of the 37 samples there was complete concordance; all three cytokines were present in six and absent in 19 samples. At least one cytokine was present in 27/50 (54%) of synovial fluid samples. Overall, TNF-alpha was detected in 22/49 (45%) samples, TNF-beta in 15/41 (37%) and IL-6 in 16/45 (36%) samples. Five patients had serial arthrocentesis, and in these samples there were two patients who had initially positive cytokine production, which on subsequent measurement was negative; in the other three patients there was no change from the previous cytokine production. We provide evidence that synovial fluid mononuclear cells produce monocyte and T cell cytokines in JRA. These findings suggest a role for both T cell and macrophage products in the pathogenesis of JRA, and the potential for modulation of cytokine production as a target for therapeutic intervention. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8187333

  12. Sex and species differences in plasma testosterone and in counts of androgen receptor-positive cells in key brain regions of Sceloporus lizard species that differ in aggression

    PubMed Central

    Hews, Diana K.; Hara, Erina; Anderson, Maurice C.

    2012-01-01

    We studied neuroendocrine correlates of aggression differences in adults of two Sceloporus lizard species. These species differ in the degree of sex difference in aggressive color signals (belly patches) and in aggression: S. undulatus (males blue, high aggression; females white, low aggression) and S. virgatus (both sexes white, lower aggression). We measured plasma testosterone and counted cells expressing androgen receptor-like immunoreactivity to the affinity-purified polyclonal AR antibody, PG-21, in three brain regions of breeding season adults. Male S. undulatus had the highest mean plasma testosterone and differed significantly from conspecific females. In contrast, there was no sex difference in plasma testosterone concentrations in S. virgatus. Male S. undulatus also had the highest mean number of AR-positive cells in the preoptic area: the sexes differed in S. undulatus but not in S. virgatus, and females of the two species did not differ. In the ventral medial hypothalamus, S. undulatus males had higher mean AR cell counts compared to females, but again there was no sex difference in S. virgatus. In the habenula, a control brain region, the sexes did not differ, and although the sex by species interaction significant was not significant, there was a trend (p = 0.050) for S. virgatus to have higher mean AR cell counts than S. undulatus. Thus hypothalamic AR cell counts paralleled sex and species differences in aggression, as did mean plasma testosterone levels in these breeding-season animals. PMID:22230767

  13. Amniotic fluid derived stem cells give rise to neuron-like cells without a further differentiation potential into retina-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Raabe, O; Wenisch, S; Arnhold, S

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid contains heterogeneous cell types and has become an interesting source for obtaining fetal stem cells. These stem cells have a high proliferative capacity and a good differentiation potential and may thus be suitable for regenerative medicine. As there is increasing evidence, that these stem cells are also able to be directed into the neural lineage, in our study we investigated the neuronal and glial differentiation potential of these cells, so that they may also be applied to cure degenerative diseases of the retina. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from routine prenatal amniocentesis at 15 to 18 weeks of pregnancy of human amniotic fluid and expanded in the cell culture. Cells were cultivated according to standard procedures for mesenchymal stem cells and were differentiated along the neural lineage using various protocols. Furthermore, it was also tried to direct them into cell types of the retina as well as into endothelial cells. Cells of more than 72 amniotic fluid samples were collected and characterized. While after induction neural-like phenotypes could actually be detected, which was confirmed using neural marker proteins such as GFAP and ßIII tubulina further differentiation into retinal like cells could not reliably be shown. These data suggest that amniotic fluid derived cells are an interesting cell source, which may also give rise to neural-like cells. However, a more specific differentiation into neuronal and glial cells could not unequivocally be shown, so that further investigations have to becarried out. PMID:23862099

  14. CD4+ Cell Count and HIV Load as Predictors of Size of Anal Warts Over Time in HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Hung N.; Amirian, E. Susan; Chan, Wenyaw; Beasley, R. Palmer; Piller, Linda B.

    2012-01-01

    Background.?Little is known about the associations between CD4+ cell counts, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load, and human papillomavirus low-risk types in noncancerous clinical outcomes. This study examined whether CD4+ count and HIV load predict the size of the largest anal warts in 976 HIV-infected women in an ongoing cohort. Methods.?A linear mixed model was used to determine the association between size of anal wart and CD4+ count and HIV load. Results.?The incidence of anal warts was 4.15 cases per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.834.77) and 1.30 cases per 100 person-years (95% CI, 1.001.58) in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women, respectively. There appeared to be an inverse association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4+ count at baseline; however, this was not statistically significant. There was no association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4+ count or HIV load over time. Conclusions.?There was no evidence for an association between size of the largest anal warts and CD4+ count or HIV load over time. Further exploration on the role of immune response on the development of anal warts is warranted in a larger study. PMID:22246682

  15. Effect of a 12-week walking exercise program on body composition and immune cell count in patients with breast cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Jeong; Shin, Yun A; Suk, Min Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 12-week walking exercise program on body composition and immune cell count in patients with breast cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy. Methods Twenty patients (age, 47.8 3.12) participated in the study. Body composition (weight, body mass index, muscle weight, body fat mass, and percent body fat) and the cell counts for immune cells (white blood corpuscles, lymphocytes, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, natural killer cells, and natural killer T cells) were measured before and after the 12-week walking exercise program. SPSS 17.0 statistical software was used. The two-way repeated ANOVA with post hoc was used to determine the difference between time and interaction. Results There were significant reductions in the weight (p < .05), BMI (p < .01), and percent body fat (p < .05) after the 12-week walking exercise program. However, the immune cell counts did not change significantly. Conclusion These results indicated that the 12-week walking exercise program had an effect on the balances among weight, BMI and percent body fat in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26525495

  16. Lamin A/C deficiency reduces circulating tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael J; Denais, Celine; Chan, Maxine F; Wang, Zhexiao; Lammerding, Jan; King, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths and is initiated when cancer cells detach from the primary tumor, invade the basement membrane, and enter the circulation as circulating tumor cells (CTCs). While metastasis is viewed as an inefficient process with most CTCs dying within the bloodstream, it is evident that some CTCs are capable of resisting hemodynamic shear forces to form secondary tumors in distant tissues. We hypothesized that nuclear lamins A and C (A/C) act as key structural components within CTCs necessary to resist destruction from elevated shear forces of the bloodstream. Herein, we show that, compared with nonmalignant epithelial cells, tumor cells are resistant to elevated fluid shear forces in vitro that mimic those within the bloodstream, as evidenced by significant decreases in cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Knockdown of lamin A/C significantly reduced tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress, with significantly increased cell death compared with parental tumor cell and nontargeting controls. Interestingly, lamin A/C knockdown increased shear stress-induced tumor cell apoptosis, but did not significantly affect cellular necrosis. These data demonstrate that lamin A/C is an important structural component that enables tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress-mediated death in the bloodstream, and may thus facilitate survival and hematogenous metastasis of CTCs. PMID:26447202

  17. Fluid biopsy for circulating tumor cell identification in patients with early-and late-stage non-small cell lung cancer: a glimpse into lung cancer biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Marco; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Boshuizen, Rogier; Kolatkar, Anand; Honnatti, Meghana; Cho, Edward H.; Marrinucci, Dena; Sandhu, Ajay; Perricone, Anthony; Thistlethwaite, Patricia; Bethel, Kelly; Nieva, Jorge; van den Heuvel, Michel; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are an established prognostic marker in metastatic prostate, breast and colorectal cancer, and recent data suggest a similar role in late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to sensitivity constraints in current enrichment-based CTC detection technologies, there are few published data about CTC prevalence rates and morphologic heterogeneity in early-stage NSCLC, or the correlation of CTCs with disease progression and their usability for clinical staging. We investigated CTC counts, morphology and aggregation in early stage, locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients by using a fluid-phase biopsy approach that identifies CTCs without relying on surface-receptor-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. HD-CTCs were analyzed in blood samples from 78 chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients. 73% of the total population had a positive HD-CTC count (>0 CTC in 1 mL of blood) with a median of 4.4 HD-CTCs mL-1 (range 0-515.6) and a mean of 44.7 (±95.2) HD-CTCs mL-1. No significant difference in the medians of HD-CTC counts was detected between stage IV (n = 31, range 0-178.2), stage III (n = 34, range 0-515.6) and stages I/II (n = 13, range 0-442.3). Furthermore, HD-CTCs exhibited a uniformity in terms of molecular and physical characteristics such as fluorescent cytokeratin intensity, nuclear size, frequency of apoptosis and aggregate formation across the spectrum of staging. Our results demonstrate that despite stringent morphologic inclusion criteria for the definition of HD-CTCs, the HD-CTC assay shows high sensitivity in the detection and characterization of both early- and late-stage lung cancer CTCs. Extensive studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of CTC profiling in early-stage lung cancer. This finding has implications for the design of extensive studies examining screening, therapy and surveillance in lung cancer patients.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid T cell clones from patients with multiple sclerosis: recognition of idiotopes on monoclonal IgG secreted by autologous cerebrospinal fluid B cells.

    PubMed

    Holmøy, Trygve; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Thompson, Keith Michael; Hestvik, Anne Lise Karlsgot; Bogen, Bjarne; Vartdal, Frode

    2005-06-01

    Due to somatic recombination and hypermutation, Ig variable heavy (V(H)) and light (V(L)) regions contain unique immunogenic determinants, idiotopes (Id), which can stimulate T cells. To address the relevance of this in a human disease, monoclonal IgG (mAb)-secreting B cell clones were established from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). HLA-DR-restricted CD4(+) T cell lines and clones from CSF of both patients specifically recognized autologous CSF mAb. The CSF T cell clones produced IFN-gamma; some also produced TNF-alpha, IL-10 and IL-5. V(H) and V(L) on the monoclonal IgG derived from CSF B cells expressed amino acid replacements due to somatic mutations. A T cell epitope was mapped to a V(H) framework region, where an amino acid replacement was critical for the T cell recognition. The finding of Id-specific T cells and Id-bearing B cells in the CSF indicates that they coexist within the diseased organ, and provide a basis for the study of Id-driven T-B cell collaboration in a human autoimmune disease. PMID:15864781

  19. Herd-level and territorial-level factors influencing average herd somatic cell count in France in 2005 and 2006.

    PubMed

    Raboisson, Didier; Dervill, Marie; Herman, Nicolas; Cahuzac, Eric; Sans, Pierre; Allaire, Gilles

    2012-08-01

    Mastitis is a multifactorial disease and the most costly dairy production issue. In spite of extensive literature on udder-health risk factors, effects of metabolic diseases, farmers' competencies and livestock farming system on somatic cells count (SCC) are sparsely described. Herd-level or territorial-level factors affecting monthly composite milk weighted mean cow SCC (CMSCC) were analysed with a linear mixed effect model. The average CMSCC was 266,000 cells/ml. Half of the herds had CMSCC >300,000 cells/ml for 2-6 months a year, and 15% of herds for more than 7 months a year. CMSCC was positively associated with the number of cows, having a beef or fattening herd in addition to the dairy herd, the monthly average days in milk, the yearly age at first calving, the yearly proportion of purchased cows and the yearly culling rate. Moreover, a positive association is reported between CMSCC and the monthly proportion of cows probably with subacute ruminal acidosis (fat percentage minus protein percentage ?030%, for Holstein) and negative energy balance (protein to fat ratio ?066, for Holstein), the yearly average calving interval, having at least one dead cow and the mean monthly temperature. The association was negative for a predominant breed other than Holstein, the monthly milk production, the yearly dry-off period length, the monthly first calving cow proportion, having an autumn calving peak, being a Good Breeding Practices member, the monthly number of days with rain, the altitude and the territorial cattle density. CMSCC varied widely among the 11 dairy production areas. In conclusion, this study showed the average CMSCC for the French dairy cows, compared with international results. Moreover, it quantified the contribution of several factors to CMSCC, in particular metabolic diseases and the farm environment. PMID:22687283

  20. Characteristics of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells and their tropism to human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Liru; Wang, Dejun; Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Yan; Liang, Tian; Zhang, Guangmei

    2015-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from amniotic fluid (AF) have become an attractive stem cells source for cell-based therapy because they can be harvested at low cost and avoid ethical disputes. In human research, stem cells derived from AF gradually became a hot research direction for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity and their tumor tropism regardless of the tumor size, location and source. Our work aimed to obtain and characterize human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) and detect their ovarian cancer tropsim in nude mice model. Ten milliliters of twenty independent amniotic fluid samples were collected from 16-20 week pregnant women who underwent amniocentesis for fetal genetic determination in routine prenatal diagnosis in the first affiliated hospital of Harbin medical university. We successfully isolated the AFMSCs from thirteen of twenty amniotic fluid samples. AFMSCs presented a fibroblastic-like morphology during the culture. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the cells were positive for specific stem cell markers CD73,CD90, CD105, CD166 and HLA-ABC (MHC class I), but negative for CD 45,CD40, CD34, CD14 and HLA-DR (MHC class II). RT-PCR results showed that the AFMSCs expressed stem cell marker OCT4. AFMSCs could differentiate into bone cells, fat cells and chondrocytes under certain conditions. AFMSCs had the high motility to migrate to ovarian cancer site but didn't have the tumorigenicity. This study enhances the possibility of AFMSCs as drug carrier in human cell-based therapy. Meanwhile, the research emphasis in the future can also put in targeting therapy of ovarian cancer. PMID:25880317

  1. Characteristics of Human Amniotic Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Tropism to Human Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liru; Wang, Dejun; Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Yan; Liang, Tian; Zhang, Guangmei

    2015-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from amniotic fluid (AF) have become an attractive stem cells source for cell-based therapy because they can be harvested at low cost and avoid ethical disputes. In human research, stem cells derived from AF gradually became a hot research direction for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity and their tumor tropism regardless of the tumor size, location and source. Our work aimed to obtain and characterize human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) and detect their ovarian cancer tropsim in nude mice model. Ten milliliters of twenty independent amniotic fluid samples were collected from 16-20 week pregnant women who underwent amniocentesis for fetal genetic determination in routine prenatal diagnosis in the first affiliated hospital of Harbin medical university. We successfully isolated the AFMSCs from thirteen of twenty amniotic fluid samples. AFMSCs presented a fibroblastic-like morphology during the culture. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the cells were positive for specific stem cell markers CD73,CD90, CD105, CD166 and HLA-ABC (MHC class I), but negative for CD 45,CD40, CD34, CD14 and HLA-DR (MHC class II). RT-PCR results showed that the AFMSCs expressed stem cell marker OCT4. AFMSCs could differentiate into bone cells, fat cells and chondrocytes under certain conditions. AFMSCs had the high motility to migrate to ovarian cancer site but didnt have the tumorigenicity. This study enhances the possibility of AFMSCs as drug carrier in human cell-based therapy. Meanwhile, the research emphasis in the future can also put in targeting therapy of ovarian cancer. PMID:25880317

  2. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamara, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making. PMID:24198613

  3. APOE Polymorphism Is Associated with C-reactive Protein Levels but Not with White Blood Cell Count: Dong-gu Study and Namwon Study.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yong-Woon; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Choi, Jin-Su; Rhee, Jung-Ae; Lee, Young-Hoon; Nam, Hae-Sung; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Park, Kyeong-Soo; Ryu, So-Yeon; Choi, Seong-Woo; Kim, Hee Nam; Cauley, Jane A; Shin, Min-Ho

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the association of the APOE polymorphism with serum C-reactive protein levels and white blood cell count in two large population-based studies in Korean. The datasets included the Dong-gu study (n = 8,893) and the Namwon Study (n = 10,032). APOE genotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Multivariable linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship of APOE genotypes with C-reactive protein levels and white blood cell count with adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and serum lipids. In the multivariate model, carriers of E3E4 or E4E4 genotype had significantly lower C-reactive protein levels compared with carriers of E3E3 genotype group (0.50 mg/L vs. 0.67 mg/L; 0.37 mg/L vs. 0.67 mg/L, respectively, for the Dong-gu Study and 0.47 mg/L vs. 0.66 mg/L; 0.45 mg/L vs. 0.66 mg/L, respectively, for the Namwon Study). However, there was no difference in white blood cell count among APOE genotypes. We found that the APOE E4 allele is associated with lower C-reactive protein levels, but not white blood cell count. Our results suggest that APOE genotype may influence C-reactive protein levels through non-inflammatory pathway. PMID:26130946

  4. The relationship between virus load response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and change in CD4 cell counts: A report from the Women's interagency HIV study.

    PubMed

    DeHovitz, J A; Kovacs, A; Feldman, J G; Anastos, K; Young, M; Cohen, M; Gange, S J; Melnick, S; Greenblatt, R M

    2000-11-01

    The relationship between the pattern of virus load response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and CD4 lymphocyte response was assessed in a cohort of 249 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected women at 3 times: 1 before and 2 after initiation of therapy, with follow-up of 6-12 months. Patients with a durable response to HAART (i.e., >1 log decrease in HIV-1 RNA sustained for the study periods) had a continuous and significant increase in CD4 cell counts over time, whereas those with no response (<0.5 log decrease in HIV-1 RNA) had a slight decline. Patients with a mixed response (initial decrease >1 log, followed by a subsequent decrease <0.5 log) had an increase in CD4 cell count, followed by a plateau. The trend in CD4 cell count differed significantly by response to HAART, with those patients who experienced a durable response having significantly higher CD4 cell counts than others. PMID:11010840

  5. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous fluids under pressure with a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Ni, Huaiwei; Chen, Qi; Keppler, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Electrical conductivity data of aqueous fluids under pressure can be used to derive the dissociation constants of electrolytes, to assess the effect of ionic dissociation on mineral solubility, and to interpret magnetotelluric data of earth's interior where a free fluid phase is present. Due to limitation on the tensile strength of the alloy material of hydrothermal autoclaves, previous measurements of fluid conductivity were mostly restricted to less than 0.4 GPa and 800 °C. By adapting a Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell, we have developed a new method for acquiring electrical conductivity of aqueous fluids under pressure. Our preliminary results for KCl solutions using the new method are consistent with literature data acquired with the conventional method, but the new method has great potential for working in a much broader pressure range. PMID:25430149

  6. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous fluids under pressure with a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Huaiwei; Chen, Qi; Keppler, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Electrical conductivity data of aqueous fluids under pressure can be used to derive the dissociation constants of electrolytes, to assess the effect of ionic dissociation on mineral solubility, and to interpret magnetotelluric data of earth's interior where a free fluid phase is present. Due to limitation on the tensile strength of the alloy material of hydrothermal autoclaves, previous measurements of fluid conductivity were mostly restricted to less than 0.4 GPa and 800 C. By adapting a Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell, we have developed a new method for acquiring electrical conductivity of aqueous fluids under pressure. Our preliminary results for KCl solutions using the new method are consistent with literature data acquired with the conventional method, but the new method has great potential for working in a much broader pressure range.

  7. Lingual antimicrobial peptide and lactoferrin concentrations and lactoperoxidase activity in bovine colostrum are associated with subsequent somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Naoki; Shibata, Ayumi; Kubota, Hirokazu; Yoshimura, Yukinori

    2013-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether potential levels of innate immune factors (lingual antimicrobial peptide (LAP), lactoferrin (LF) and lactoperoxidase (LPO)) in colostrum are associated with subsequent milk somatic cell count (SCC) in dairy cows. Quarter milk samples were collected daily for 1 week postpartum to measure LAP and LF concentrations and LPO activity. SCC in milk was determined weekly for 2 months postpartum and its correlations to concentrations of LAP and LF and LPO activity were examined. Only small variations of all immune factors were found among four udders in each individual cow, whereas there were great differences in these factors among cows. Negative correlation was detected only between LPO activity and mean and maximum SCC, whereas its relationship was not significant. LAP and LF concentrations were significantly correlated positively to mean, maximum and minimum SCC. These results suggest that the great difference in innate immune factors among animals and high LAP and LF concentrations in colostrum may be associated with subsequent high incidence of SCC increase. PMID:24001397

  8. Prognostic impact of blast cell counts in dysplastic bone marrow disorders (MDS and CMML I) with concomitant fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Machherndl-Spandl, Sigrid; Sega, W; Bsmller, H; Germing, U; Gruber, Ch; Nachtkamp, K; Reinecke, P; Sperr, W R; Wimazal, F; Mllauer, L; Sotlar, K; Horny, H P; Tchler, H; Valent, P; Krieger, O

    2014-01-01

    In a retrospective study, 43 patients with dysplastic neoplasms of the bone marrow (myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative-overlap neoplasms) associated with marked (grades 2-3) fibrosis were examined. Histopathologic and morphologic findings as well as cytogenetic and molecular results were correlated with clinical endpoints. Multilineage dysplasia (34 of 43 patients, 79 %) and hypercellular bone marrow (64 %) were found in most patients. In ten of 35 patients, poor risk karyotypes according to the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) were recorded. The JAK2 V617F mutation was detected in four of 30 patients (13 %), and the KIT D816V mutation was found in two of 30 patients (6 %). Patients were mainly treated with palliative drugs and best supportive care. After an observation time of 1-41 (median 21) months, ten of 43 patients (23 %) had developed a secondary acute leukemia. The median survival of all 43 patients was 21.4 months (range 1.8-88.2 months). Of all prognostic parameters examined, the blast cell count at diagnosis was found to be a most reliable and most predictive marker concerning survival and leukemia progression. This confirms previous studies in dysplastic bone marrow neoplasms without fibrosis. PMID:24241126

  9. Estimation of Genetic and Phenotypic Parameters for Production Traits and Somatic Cell Count for Jersey Dairy Cattle in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Missanjo, Edward; Imbayarwo-Chikosi, Venancio; Halimani, Tinyiko

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and phenotypic parameters for production traits and somatic cell count (SCC) for Jersey dairy cattle in Zimbabwe were estimated. A total of 10986 lactation records were obtained from Zimbabwe Livestock Identification Trust, with cows calving in the period from 1996 to 2008. An ASReml program fitting an animal model was used for the analyses. Heritability estimates for milk yield, fat yield, protein yield, fat percentage, protein percentage, and Log10SCC were 0.30, 0.32, 0.33, 0.42, 0.44, and 0.08, respectively. The corresponding repeatability estimates were 0.39, 0.38, 0.39, 0.49, 0.51, and 0.16, respectively. The genetic and phenotypic correlations between different production traits ranged from ?0.86 to 0.95 and from ?0.88 to 0.98, respectively. The genetic and phenotypic correlations between production traits and Log10SCC were weak almost nonsignificantly differentl from zero. The results imply that milk traits for Jersey dairy cattle in Zimbabwe are more heritable. Therefore, these traits may be preferred by breeders as selection criteria for development of effective genetic improvement programme. PMID:23956868

  10. Effect of storage temperature on prokaryotic cell counts and community composition analysis from fixed and filtered seawater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Christine; Moss, Shaun M.; Azam, Farooq

    2008-06-01

    Marine, pelagic prokaryotes commonly are visualized and enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy after staining with fluorescent, DNA-binding dyes and sample preparation and storage has a major influence on obtaining reliable estimates. However, sampling often takes place in remote locations and the recommended continuous sample storage at -20C until further sample evaluation is often logistically challenging or infeasible. We investigated the effect of storage temperature on fixed and filtered seawater samples for subsequent enumeration of total prokaryotic cells and community composition analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Prokaryotic abundance in surface seawater was not significantly different after 99 days when filters were stored either at room temperature (RT) or at -20C. Furthermore, there was no loss in detection rates of phylotypes by FISH from filters stored at RT or -20C for 28-30 days. We conclude that fixed and filtered seawater samples intended for total prokaryote counts or for FISH may be maintained long-term at room temperature, and this should logistically facilitate diverse studies of prokaryote ecology, biogeography, and the occurrence of human and fish/shellfish pathogens.

  11. Trends in and correlates of CD4+ cell count at antiretroviral therapy initiation after changes in national ART guidelines in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Mutimura, Eugene; Addison, Diane; Anastos, Kathryn; Hoover, Donald; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Karenzie, Ben; Izimukwiye, Isabelle; Mutesa, Leo; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Nashi, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Background Initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the advanced stages of HIV infection remains a major challenge in sub-Saharan Africa. This study was conducted to better understand barriers and enablers to timely ART initiation in Rwanda where ART coverage is high and national ART eligibility guidelines first expanded in 20072008. Methods Using data on 6326 patients (?15 years) at five Rwandan clinics, we assessed trends and correlates of CD4+ cell count at ART initiation and the proportion initiating ART with advanced HIV disease (CD4+ <200 cells/l or WHO stage IV). Results Out of 6326 patients, 4486 enrolling in HIV care initiated ART with median CD4+ cell count of 211 cells/l [interquartile range: 131300]. Median CD4+ cell counts at ART initiation increased from 183 cells/l in 2007 to 293 cells/l in 20112012, and the proportion with advanced HIV disease decreased from 66.2 to 29.4%. Factors associated with a higher odds of advanced HIV disease at ART initiation were male sex [adjusted odds ratios (AOR) = 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32.1] and older age (AOR4655+ vs. <25 = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.24.3). Among those initiating ART more than 1 year after enrollment in care, those who had a gap in care of 12 or more months prior to ART initiation had higher odds of advanced HIV disease (AOR = 5.2; 95% CI: 1.221.1). Conclusion Marked improvements in the median CD4+ cell count at ART initiation and proportion initiating ART with advanced HIV disease were observed following the expansion of ART eligibility criteria in Rwanda. However, sex disparities in late treatment initiation persisted through 20112012, and appeared to be driven by later diagnosis and/or delayed linkage to care among men. PMID:25562492

  12. Exploring the characteristics and dynamics of Ontario dairy herds experiencing increases in bulk milk somatic cell count during the summer.

    PubMed

    Shock, D A; LeBlanc, S J; Leslie, K E; Hand, K; Godkin, M A; Coe, J B; Kelton, D F

    2015-06-01

    Regionally aggregated bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) data from around the world shows a repeatable cyclicity, with the highest levels experienced during warm, humid seasons. No studies have evaluated this seasonal phenomenon at the herd level. The objectives of this study were to define summer seasonality in BMSCC on an individual herd basis, and subsequently to describe the characteristics and dynamics of herds with increased BMSCC in the summer. The data used for this analysis were from all dairy farms in Ontario, Canada, between January 2000 and December 2011 (n≈4,000 to 6,000 herds/yr). Bulk milk data were obtained from the milk marketing board and consisted of bulk milk production, components (fat, protein, lactose, other solids), and quality (BMSCC, bacterial count, inhibitor presence, freezing point), total milk quota of the farm, and milk quota and incentive fill percentage. A time-series linear mixed model, with random slopes and intercepts, was constructed using sine and cosine terms as predictors to describe seasonality, with herd as a random effect. For each herd, seasonality was described with reference to 1 cosine function of variable amplitude and phase shift. The predicted months of maximal and minimal BMSCC were then calculated. Herds were assigned as low, medium, and high summer increase (LSI, MSI, and HSI, respectively) based on percentiles of amplitude in BMSCC change for each of the 4 seasons. Using these seasonality classifications, 2 transitional repeated measures logistic regression models were built to assess the characteristics of MSI and HSI herds, using LSI herds as controls. Based on the analyses performed, a history of summer BMSCC increases increased the odds of experiencing a subsequent increase. As herd size decreased, the odds of experiencing HSI to MSI in BMSCC increased. Herds with more variability in daily BMSCC were at higher odds of experiencing MSI and HSI in BMSCC, as were herds with lower annual mean BMSCC. Finally, a negative association was noted between filling herd production targets and experiencing MSI to HSI in BMSCC. These findings provide farm advisors direction for predicting herds likely to experience increases in SCC over the summer, allowing them to proactively focus udder health prevention strategies before the high-risk summer period. PMID:25864052

  13. High Goblet Cell Count Is Inversely Associated with Ploidy Abnormalities and Risk of Adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Carissa A.; Liu, Karen; Fong, Pui Yee; Li, Xiaohong; Cowan, David S.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Reid, Brian J.; Blount, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Goblet cells may represent a potentially successful adaptive response to acid and bile by producing a thick mucous barrier that protects against cancer development in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between goblet cells (GC) and risk of progression to adenocarcinoma, and DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities, in BE patients. Experimental Design Baseline mucosal biopsies (N=2988) from 213 patients, 32 of whom developed cancer during the follow up period, enrolled in a prospective dynamic cohort of BE patients were scored in a blinded fashion, for the total number (#) of GC, mean # of GC/crypt (GC density), # of crypts with ≥ 1 GC, and the proportion of crypts with ≥1 GC, in both dysplastic and non-dysplastic epithelium separately. The relationship between these four GC parameters and DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities and adenocarcinoma outcome was compared, after adjustment for age, gender, and BE segment length. Results High GC parameters were inversely associated with DNA content flow cytometric abnormalities, such as aneuploidy, ploidy >2.7N, and an elevated 4N fraction > 6%, and with risk of adenocarcinoma. However, a Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the total # of GC and the total # crypts with ≥1 GC were the only significant GC parameters (p<0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions The results of this study show, for the first time, an inverse relationship between high GC counts and flow cytometric abnormalities and risk of adenocarcinoma in BE. Further studies are needed to determine if GC depleted foci within esophageal columnar mucosa are more prone to neoplastic progression or whether loss of GC occurs secondary to underlying genetic abnormalities. PMID:26230607

  14. Impact of area and sire by herd interaction on heritability estimates for somatic cell count in Italian Holstein Friesian cows.

    PubMed

    Samor, A B; Van Arendonk, J A; Groen, A F

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the paper was to estimate variance components for somatic cell scores for Italian Holsteins using data from three different areas of the country. A total of 2,202,804 first-parity test-day records, collected from 1990 to 1997 in three areas of Italy (Mantova, Milano, and Parmigiano cheese area), were available for study. The areas differ in herd size, feeding systems and especially in milk use. A minimum standard of quality is also required by some specific methods of cheese production, as for example from the Parmigiano Reggiano cheese chain. These reasons, taken together, affect the attention given to the quality of milk production in herds, and, therefore, to the sanitation levels. A pedigree file was extracted from the national database of Holstein Friesian breed. For computational reasons, eight samples of the data were extracted per area. Variance components were estimated by sample using two different test-day repeatability models. The first model included fixed effects of herd-test date, days in milk (30-d intervals) and calving month, and random effects of permanent environment, additive genetic and residual error. Estimated heritabilities in the first model ranged from 0.06 to 0.09 and repeatabilities from 0.36 to 0.45. Only small differences were detected among areas. In the second model, a random sire x herd interaction effect was added. Including the sire x herd effect resulted in heritability estimates ranging between 0.05 and 0.08 and repeatabilities from 0.35 to 0.45. The analysis revealed that only a small fraction of the total variance (0.35 to 1.5%) could be explained by sire x herd interaction effect. Based on this research, it appears that parameter estimates for somatic cell count do not differ by region, and inclusion of a sire x herd interaction effect is unnecessary. PMID:11768099

  15. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePLUS

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  16. Normal Distribution of CD8+ T-Cell-Derived ELISPOT Counts within Replicates Justifies the Reliance on Parametric Statistics for Identifying Positive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Karulin, Alexey Y.; Caspell, Richard; Dittrich, Marcus; Lehmann, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of positive ELISPOT responses for low frequencies of antigen-specific T-cells is controversial. In particular, it is still unknown whether ELISPOT counts within replicate wells follow a theoretical distribution function, and thus whether high power parametric statistics can be used to discriminate between positive and negative wells. We studied experimental distributions of spot counts for up to 120 replicate wells of IFN-γ production by CD8+ T-cell responding to EBV LMP2A (426 – 434) peptide in human PBMC. The cells were tested in serial dilutions covering a wide range of average spot counts per condition, from just a few to hundreds of spots per well. Statistical analysis of the data using diagnostic Q-Q plots and the Shapiro-Wilk normality test showed that in the entire dynamic range of ELISPOT spot counts within replicate wells followed a normal distribution. This result implies that the Student t-Test and ANOVA are suited to identify positive responses. We also show experimentally that borderline responses can be reliably detected by involving more replicate wells, plating higher numbers of PBMC, addition of IL-7, or a combination of these. Furthermore, we have experimentally verified that the number of replicates needed for detection of weak responses can be calculated using parametric statistics. PMID:25738924

  17. Association of White Blood Cell Count and Differential with the Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Misialek, Jeffrey R.; Bekwelem, Wobo; Chen, Lin Y.; Loehr, Laura R.; Agarwal, Sunil K.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Norby, Faye L.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Background Although inflammation is involved in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), the association of white blood cell (WBC) count and differential with AF has not been thoroughly examined in large cohorts with extended follow-up. Methods We studied 14,500 men and women (25% blacks, 55% women, mean age 54) free of AF at baseline (1987–89) from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, a community-based cohort in the United States. Incident AF cases through 2010 were identified from study electrocardiograms, hospital discharge records and death certificates. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for AF associated with WBC count and differential. Results Over a median follow-up time of 21.5 years for the entire cohort, 1928 participants had incident AF. Higher total WBC count was associated with higher AF risk independent of AF risk factors and potential confounders (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04–1.15 per 1-standard deviation [SD] increase). Higher neutrophil and monocyte counts were positively associated with AF risk, while an inverse association was identified between lymphocyte count and AF (multivariable adjusted HRs 1.16, 95% CI 1.09–1.23; 1.05, 95% CI 1.00–1.11; 0.91, 95% CI 0.86–0.97 per 1-SD, respectively). No significant association was identified between eosinophils or basophils and AF. Conclusions High total WBC, neutrophil, and monocyte counts were each associated with higher AF risk while lymphocyte count was inversely associated with AF risk. Systemic inflammation may underlie this association and requires further investigation for strategies to prevent AF. PMID:26313365

  18. Sperm counts and serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels before and after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in men with testicular germ cell cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelsen, J.G.

    1984-02-01

    Sperm counts were low (median, 15 X 10(6) per ejaculate) and serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were moderately elevated (median, 31 IU/l) after unilateral orchiectomy and immediately before radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 34 patients with seminomas and 20 patients with nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. The scattered radiation (0.2 to 1.3 Gray (Gy)) reaching the remaining testicle during radiotherapy caused azoospermia in more than two thirds of the patients. A median of 540 days elapsed after the end of treatment before spermatozoa were again found in semen samples, while a median of 1250 days passed before the pretreatment sperm count was reached. One to 5 years after treatment, sperm counts were still low (median, 6 X 10(6) per ejaculate) and serum FSH was elevated (median, 61 IU/l). The adjuvant chemotherapy given to the 20 patients with nonseminomatous tumors did not appear to affect restitution appreciably.

  19. Seminal fluid factors regulate activin A and follistatin synthesis in female cervical epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, David J; Schjenken, John E; Mottershead, David G; Robertson, Sarah A

    2015-12-01

    Seminal fluid induces pro-inflammatory cytokines and elicits an inflammation-like response in the cervix. Here, Affymetrix microarray and qPCR was utilised to identify activin A (INHBA) and its inhibitor follistatin (FST) amongst the cytokines induced by seminal plasma in Ect1 ectocervical epithelial cells, and a similar response was confirmed in primary ectocervical epithelial cells. TGFB is abundant in seminal plasma and all three TGFB isoforms induced INHBA in Ect1 and primary cells, and neutralisation of TGFB in seminal plasma suppressed the INHBA response. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide in seminal plasma also elicited INHBA, but potently suppressed FST production. There was moderate reciprocal inhibition between FST and INHBA, and cross-attenuating effects were seen. These data identify TGFB and potentially LPS as factors mediating seminal plasma-induced INHBA synthesis in cervical cells. INHBA and FST induced by seminal fluid in cervical tissues may thus contribute to regulation of the post-coital response in women. PMID:26415587

  20. Fluorescent intensity-based differential counting of FITC-doped silica nanoparticles: applications of CD4+ T-cell detection in microchip-type flowcytometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hoyoung; Bang, Hyunwoo; Lee, Won Gu; Lim, Hyunchang; Park, Junha; Lee, Joonmo; Riaz, Asif; Cho, Keunchang; Chung, Chanil; Han, Dong-Chul; Chang, Jun Keun

    2007-12-01

    Although CD4+ T-cells are an important target of HIV detection, there have been still major problems in making a diagnosis and monitoring in the third world and the region with few medical facilities. Then, it is necessary to use portable diagnosis devices at low cost when you put an enumeration of CD4+ T-cells. In general, the counting of CD4 below 200cells/uL makes it necessary to initiate antiretroviral treatment in adults (over 13 years old). However, lymphocyte subsets (including CD4 counts) of infants and young children are higher than those of adults. This fact shows the percentage of CD4+ T-cells of blood subsets, i.e., CD4/CD45%, CD4/CD8% or CD4/CD3% means a more reliable indicator of HIV infection than absolute counts in children. To know the percentage of CD4+ T-cell by using two fluorescent dyes of different emission wavelength, at least, one laser and two PMT detectors are in general needed. Then, it is so hard to develop a portable device like a 'toaster size' because this makes such a device more complex including many peripheral modules. In this study, we developed a novel technique to control the intensity of fluorescent dye-doped silica nanoparticles. I synthesized FITC-doped silica nanoparticles conjugated CD4 antibody 10 times brighter than FITC-conjugated CD45 antibody. With the difference of intensity of two fluorescent dyes, we measured two parameters by using only a single detector and laser. Most experiments were achieved with uFACS (microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter) on an inverted microscope (IX71, Olympus). In conclusion, this method enables us to discriminate the difference between CD4 and CD45 in an intensity domain simultaneously. Furthermore, this technique would make it possible develop much cheaper and smaller devices which can count the number of CD4 T-cells.

  1. Modeling CD4+ cell count increase over a six-year period in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in Senegal.

    PubMed

    De Beaudrap, Pierre; Etard, Jean-Franois; Diouf, Assane; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Guye, Ndye Fatou; Guye, Pape Mandoumb; Sow, Papa Salif; Mboup, Souleymane; Ndoye, Ibra; Ecochard, Ren; Eric, Delaporte

    2009-06-01

    To assess the extents and determinants of long-term CD4 cell increases after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), changes in CD4 cell counts were analyzed in a cohort of HIV-1-infected Senegalese using a mixed-effects model. After a median follow-up of 54 months, an average of 483 CD4 cells/mm3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 331; 680) was reached. The average asymptote level was approximately 421 cells/mm3 (95% CI = 390; 454) in patients with < 200 cells/mm3 at baseline and approximately 500 cells/mm3 in patients with > 200 cells/mm3. The independent predictors of long-term CD4 cell reconstitution were the baseline CD4 cell count and the monthly average viral load over the entire follow-up. This good long-term immune reconstitution, optimal in subjects with low average viral loads and > 200 CD4 cells/mm3 at baseline, argues in favor of the earliest possible access to ART and underlines the importance of strict compliance with the treatment. PMID:19478274

  2. Applications of Amniotic Membrane and Fluid in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Kerry; Gruslin, Andre; Hengstschlger, Markus; Pei, Duanqing; Cai, Jinglei; Nikaido, Toshio; Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud

    2012-01-01

    The amniotic membrane (AM) and amniotic fluid (AF) have a long history of use in surgical and prenatal diagnostic applications, respectively. In addition, the discovery of cell populations in AM and AF which are widely accessible, nontumorigenic and capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types has stimulated a flurry of research aimed at characterizing the cells and evaluating their potential utility in regenerative medicine. While a major focus of research has been the use of amniotic membrane and fluid in tissue engineering and cell replacement, AM- and AF-derived cells may also have capabilities in protecting and stimulating the repair of injured tissues via paracrine actions, and acting as vectors for biodelivery of exogenous factors to treat injury and diseases. Much progress has been made since the discovery of AM and AF cells with stem cell characteristics nearly a decade ago, but there remain a number of problematic issues stemming from the inherent heterogeneity of these cells as well as inconsistencies in isolation and culturing methods which must be addressed to advance the field towards the development of cell-based therapies. Here, we provide an overview of the recent progress and future perspectives in the use of AM- and AF-derived cells for therapeutic applications. PMID:23093978

  3. Clinical Outcome of HIV Viraemic Controllers and Noncontrollers with Normal CD4 Counts Is Exclusively Determined by Antigen-Specific CD8+ T-Cell-Mediated HIV Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Tansiri, Yada; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Hansasuta, Pokrath

    2015-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study we evaluated T-cell responses using several assays to determine immune correlates of HIV control that distinguish untreated viraemic controllers (VC) from noncontrollers (NC) with similar CD4 counts. Samples were taken from 65 ART-nave chronically HIV-infected VC and NC from Thailand with matching CD4 counts in the normal range (>450 cells/?l). We determined HIVp24-specific T-cell responses using standard Interferon-gamma (IFN?) ELISpot assays, and compared the functional quality of HIVp24-specific CD8+ T-cell responses using polychromatic flow cytometry. Finally, in vitro HIV suppression assays were performed to evaluate directly the activity of CD8+ T cells in HIV control. Autologous CD4+ T cells were infected with primary patient-derived HIV isolates and the HIV suppressive activity of CD8+ T cells was determined after co-culture, measuring production of HIVp24 Ag by ELISA. The HIVp24-specific T-cell responses of VC and NC could not completely be differentiated through measurement of IFN?-producing cells using ELISpot assays, nor by the absolute cell numbers of polyfunctional HIVp24-specific CD8+ T cells. However, in vitro HIV suppression assays showed clear differences between VC and NC. HIV suppressive activity, mediated by either ex vivo unstimulated CD8+ T cells or HIVp24-specific T-cell lines, was significantly greater using cells from VC than NC cells. Additionally, we were able to demonstrate a significant correlation between the level of HIV suppressive activity mediated by ex vivo unstimulated CD8+ T cells and plasma viral load (pVL) (Spearman r = -0.7345, p = 0.0003). This study provides evidence that in vitro HIV suppression assays are the most informative in the functional evaluation of CD8+ T-cell responses and can distinguish between VC and NC. PMID:25764310

  4. A mathematical model of fluid secretion from a parotid acinar cell

    PubMed Central

    Gin, Elan; Crampin, Edmund J.; Brown, David A.; Shuttleworth, Trevor J.; Yule, David I.; Sneyd, James

    2007-01-01

    Salivary fluid secretion is crucial for preventing problems such as dryness of mouth, difficulty with mastication and swallowing, as well as oral pain and dental cavities. Fluid flow is driven primarily by the transepithelial movement of chloride and sodium ions into the parotid acinus lumen. The activation of Cl− channels is calcium dependent, with the average elevated calcium concentration during calcium oscillations increasing the conductance of the channels, leading to an outflow of Cl−. The accumulation of NaCl in the lumen drives water flow by osmosis. We construct a mathematical model of the calcium concentration oscillations and couple this to a model for Cl− efflux. We also construct a model governing fluid flow in an isolated parotid acinar cell, which includes a description of the rate of change of intracellular ion concentrations, cell volume, membrane potential and water flow rate. We find that [Ca2+] oscillations lead to oscillations in fluid flow, and that the rate of fluid flow is regulated by the average calcium concentration and not the frequency of the oscillations. PMID:17559884

  5. Herd management and social variables associated with bulk tank somatic cell count in dairy herds in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Schewe, R L; Kayitsinga, J; Contreras, G A; Odom, C; Coats, W A; Durst, P; Hovingh, E P; Martinez, R O; Mobley, R; Moore, S; Erskine, R J

    2015-11-01

    The ability to reduce somatic cell counts (SCC) and improve milk quality depends on the effective and consistent application of established mastitis control practices. The US dairy industry continues to rely more on nonfamily labor to perform critical tasks to maintain milk quality. Thus, it is important to understand dairy producer attitudes and beliefs relative to management practices, as well as employee performance, to advance milk quality within the changing structure of the dairy industry. To assess the adoption rate of mastitis control practices in United States dairy herds, as well as assess social variables, including attitudes toward employees relative to mastitis control, a survey was sent to 1,700 dairy farms in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Florida in January and February of 2013. The survey included questions related to 7 major areas: sociodemographics and farm characteristics, milking proficiency, milking systems, cow environment, infected cow monitoring and treatment, farm labor, and attitudes toward mastitis and related antimicrobial use. The overall response rate was 41% (21% in Florida, 39% in Michigan, and 45% in Pennsylvania). Herd size ranged from 9 to 5,800 cows. Self-reported 3-mo geometric mean bulk tank SCC (BTSCC) for all states was 194,000 cells/mL. Multivariate analysis determined that proven mastitis control practices such as the use of internal teat sealants and blanket dry cow therapy, and not using water during udder preparation before milking, were associated with lower BTSCC. Additionally, farmer and manager beliefs and attitudes, including the perception of mastitis problems and the threshold of concern if BTSCC is above 300,000 cells/mL, were associated with BTSCC. Ensuring strict compliance with milking protocols, giving employees a financial or other penalty if BTSCC increased, and a perceived importance of reducing labor costs were negatively associated with BTSCC in farms with nonfamily employees. These findings highlight the need for a comprehensive approach to managing mastitis, one that includes the human dimensions of management to maintain the practice of scientifically validated mastitis control practices. PMID:26298763

  6. Changes in B-Cell Counts and Percentages during Primary HIV Infection Associated with Disease Progression in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chen; Jiang, Yongjun; Zhang, Zining; Hu, Qinghai; Chu, Zhenxing; Xu, Junjie; Zhao, Bin; Ding, Haibo; Liu, Jing; Han, Xiaoxu; Cao, Yaming; Shang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Numerous anomalies in B-cell phenotypes and functions have been described in HIV-infected individuals. However, the actual relationship between B cells and disease progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated B-cell counts/percentages during a 12-month infection period in HIV-infected individuals that eventually developed into typical progressors (TPs) or rapid progressors (RPs). We found, after 12 months of infection, the baseline B-cell counts/percentages correlated positively with CD4+ T-cell counts (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.026) and negatively with HIV viral set points (P = 0.014 and P = 0.002). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high baseline B-cell counts/percentages were associated with a slow CD4-cell decline. B-cell kinetics indicated the baseline B-cell counts/percentages could be factors distinguishing between TPs and RPs. The combination of the baseline B-cell counts and percentages was associated with rapid disease progression (a 80.7% predictive value as measured by the area under the curve). These results indicate that the baseline B-cell counts/percentages might be associated with HIV disease progression. PMID:26436092

  7. Mapping the osteocytic cell response to fluid flow using RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Govey, Peter M; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Donahue, Henry J

    2015-12-16

    Bone adaptation to mechanical loading is regulated via signal transduction by mechano-sensing osteocytes. Mineral-embedded osteocytes experience strain-induced interstitial fluid flow and fluid shear stress, and broad shifts in gene expression are key components in the signaling pathways that regulate bone turnover. RNA sequencing analysis, or RNA-Seq, enables more complete characterization of mechano-responsive transcriptome regulation than previously possible. We hypothesized that RNA-Seq of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells reveals both expected and novel gene transcript regulation in cells previously fluid flowed and analyzed using gene microarrays. MLO-Y4 cells were flowed for 2h with 1Pa oscillating fluid shear stress and post-incubated 2h. RNA-Seq of original samples detected 55 fluid flow-regulated gene transcripts (p-corrected <0.05), the same number previously detected by microarray. However, RNA-Seq demonstrated greater dynamic range, with all 55 transcripts increased >1.5-fold or decreased <0.67-fold whereas 10 of 55 met this cut-off by microarray. Analyses were complimentary in patterns of regulation, though only 6 transcripts were significant in both RNA-Seq and microarray analyses: Cxcl5, Cxcl1, Zc3h12a, Ereg, Slc2a1, and Egln1. As part of a broad inflammatory response inferred by gene ontology analyses, we again observed greatest up-regulation of inflammatory C-X-C motif chemokines, and newly implicated HIF-1? and AMPK signaling pathways. Importantly, we detected both expected fluid flow-sensitive transcripts (e.g. Nos2 [iNOS], Ptgs2 [COX-2], Ccl7) and transcripts not previously identified as flow-sensitive, e.g. Ccl2. We found RNA-Seq advantageous over microarrays because of its greater dynamic range and ability to analyze unbiased estimation of gene expression, informing our understanding of osteocyte signaling. PMID:26573903

  8. Fluid Flow through a High Cell Density Fluidized-Bed during Centrifugal Bioreactor Culture

    PubMed Central

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Van Wie, Bernard J.; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    An increasing demand for products such as tissues, proteins, and antibodies from mammalian cell suspension cultures is driving interest in increasing production through high-cell density bioreactors. The centrifugal bioreactor (CCBR) retains cells by balancing settling forces with surface drag forces due to medium throughput and is capable of maintaining cell densities above 108 cells/mL. This article builds on a previous study where the fluid mechanics of an empty CCBR were investigated showing fluid flow is nonuniform and dominated by Coriolis forces, raising concerns about nutrient and cell distribution. In this article, we demonstrate that the previously reported Coriolis forces are still present in the CCBR, but masked by the presence of cells. Experimental dye injection observations during culture of 15 μm hybridoma cells show a continual uniform darkening of the cell bed, indicating the region of the reactor containing cells is well mixed. Simulation results also indicate the cell bed is well mixed during culture of mammalian cells ranging in size from 10 to 20 μm. However, simulations also allow for a slight concentration gradient to be identified and attributed to Coriolis forces. Experimental results show cell density increases from 0.16 to 0.26 when centrifugal force is doubled by increasing RPM from 650 to 920 at a constant inlet velocity of 6.5 cm/s; an effect also observed in the simulation. Results presented in this article indicate cells maintained in the CCBR behave as a high-density fluidized bed of cells providing a homogeneous environment to ensure optimal growth conditions. PMID:20205172

  9. Effect of milk base and starter culture on acidification, texture, and probiotic cell counts in fermented milk processing.

    PubMed

    Sodini, I; Lucas, A; Oliveira, M N; Remeuf, F; Corrieu, G

    2002-10-01

    In the present work, the compared effect of milk base and starter culture on acidification, texture, growth, and stability of probiotic bacteria in fermented milk processing, was studied. Two strains of probiotic bacteria were used, Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5 and L. rhamnosus LR35, with two starter cultures. One starter culture consisted only of Streptococcus thermophilus ST7 (single starter culture); the other was a yogurt mixed culture with S. thermophilus ST7 and L. bulgaricus LB12 (mixed starter culture). For the milk base preparation, four commercial dairy ingredients were tested (two milk protein concentrates and two casein hydrolysates). The resulting fermented milks were compared to those obtained with control milk (without enrichment) and milk added with skim milk powder. The performance of the two probiotic strains were opposite. L. acidophilus LA5 grew well on milk but showed a poor stability during storage. L. rhamnosus LR35 grew weakly on milk but was remarkably stable during storage. With the strains tested in this study, the use of the single starter culture and the addition of casein hydrolysate gave the best probiotic cell counts. The fermentation time was of about 11 h, and the probiotic level after five weeks of storage was greater than 106 cfu/ml for L. acidophilus LA5 and 10(7) cfu/ml for L. rhamnosus LR35. However, an optimization of the level of casein hydrolysate added to milk base has to be done, in order to improve texture and flavor when using this dairy ingredient. PMID:12416799

  10. The effect of pulsation ratio on teat condition, milk somatic cell count and productivity in dairy cows in automatic milking.

    PubMed

    Ferneborg, Sabine; Svennersten-Sjaunja, Kerstin

    2015-11-01

    The pulsation ratio of a milking machine affects milk flow and milking time, and has also been reported to influence teat condition and milk somatic cell count (SCC). However, most studies comparing pulsation ratios have been performed on conventional cluster milking (whole-udder level), where effects such as deteriorated teat end condition and increased milk SCC are likely to be caused by over-milking on teats that are emptied faster than the other teats. When the teat cups are detached from each udder quarter separately which can be done in automatic milking systems (AMS), the risk of over-milking, especially in front teats, may be significantly reduced. This study investigated the effects of pulsation ratio on teat end condition, milk SCC, milk yield, milking time and milk flow in an automatic milking system where each udder quarter is milked separately. In total, 356 cows on five commercial farms were included in a split-udder design experiment comparing three pulsation ratios (60:40, 70:30 and 75:25) with the standard pulsation ratio (65:35) during 6 weeks. Pulsation rate was 60 cycles/min and vacuum level 46 kPa. The 70:30 and 75:25 ratios increased peak and average milk flow and the machine-on time was shorter with 75:25, while both peak and average milk flows were lower and machine-on time was longer with the 60:40 ratio. No negative effects on teat condition or milk SCC were observed with any of the pulsation ratios applied during the study. Thus it is possible that increased pulsation ratio can be used to increase milking efficiency in AMS where quarter milking is applied. PMID:26411595

  11. Circulating white blood cell count and measures of adipose tissue inflammation predict higher 24-h energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Le, Duc Son; Xu, Xiaoyuan; Scalise, Michael; Ferrante, Anthony W; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Energy expenditure (EE) and measures of inflammation increase with adiposity, and this obesity-induced chronic and subclinical inflammation was extensively reported to be a cause of insulin resistance. However, whether subclinical inflammation has a role in increasing EE, which may be at the cost of developing insulin resistance, is not clear. Methods We investigated the association between circulating white blood cell count (WBC) in a population of Native Americans (n=243) with measurement of EE in a respiratory chamber, and in a subset of the same population (n=34), with gene expression measures of inflammation in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAAT). All subjects were healthy on oral glucose tolerance test. Statistically, nonnormally distributed variables were logarithmically transformed before analyses to approximate normal distributions. Results WBC was associated with 24-h EE adjusted for age, sex, fat-free mass, and fat mass (r=0.13, P=0.04). In SAAT, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), shown as log10-transformed TNF-α (r=0.36, P=0.05), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), shown as log10-transformed PAI-1 (lPAI-1; r=0.41, P=0.02), expressions were also positively correlated with adjusted 24-h EE. lPAI-1 was also correlated with adjusted sleep EE (r=0.34, P=0.07). Conclusions In conclusion, circulating markers of inflammation (WBC) and markers of inflammation within adipose tissue (TNF-α and PAI-1) are positively associated with EE, indicating a role of chronic subclinical inflammation in the regulation of metabolic rate. PMID:19934269

  12. Evaluation of a Method for Estimating Retinal Ganglion Cell Counts Using Visual Fields and Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ali S.; Hood, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the accuracy and generalizability of a published model that derives estimates of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) counts and relates structural and functional changes due to glaucoma. Methods. Both the Harwerth et al. nonlinear model (H-NLM) and the Hood and Kardon linear model (HK-LM) were applied to an independent dataset of frequency-domain optical coherence tomography and visual fields, consisting of 48 eyes of 48 healthy controls, 100 eyes of 77 glaucoma patients and suspects, and 18 eyes of 14 nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) patients with severe vision loss. Using the coefficient of determination R2, the models were compared while keeping constant the topographic maps, specifically a map by Garway-Heath et al. and a separate map by Harwerth et al., which relate sensitivity test stimulus locations to corresponding regions around the optic disc. Additionally, simulations were used to evaluate the assumptions of the H-NLM. Results. Although the predictions of the HK-LM with the anatomically-derived Garway-Heath et al. map were reasonably good (R2 = 0.31–0.64), the predictions of the H-NLM were poor (R2 < 0) regardless of the map used. Furthermore, simulations of the H-NLM yielded results that differed substantially from RGC estimates based on histology from human subjects. Finally, the value-added of factors increasing the relative complexity of the H-NLM, such as assumptions regarding age- and stage-dependent corrections to structural measures, was unclear. Conclusions. Several of the assumptions underlying the H-NLM should be revisited. Studies and models relying on the RGC estimates of the H-NLM should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25604684

  13. Silicone fluid as a high-pressure medium in diamond anvil cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan, Deirdre D.; Clarke, David R.; Schiferl, David

    1996-02-01

    The usefulness of a silicone oil, Dow Corning 200, as a pressure medium in diamond anvil cells has been investigated. Common indicators of deviatoric stresses on ruby, such as changes in the R-line widths and the R2-R1 peak separation, show that this fluid does not deviate from hydrostaticity up to 15 GPa (150 kbar). The behavior of silicone is found to be very similar to the commonly used 4:1 methanol:ethanol mixture, while being much easier to use because of its higher viscosity. This ease of use and excellent performance makes silicone fluid a superior pressure medium.

  14. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus detected by separation and incubation of cells from salmonid cavity fluid.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Batts, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus is usually detected by inoculating susceptible cell cultures with cavity ("ovarian") fluid (CF) from spawning females. We identified additional adult carriers of virus in spawning populations of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) by collecting nonerythrocytic cells from CF samples by low-speed centrifugation, culturing the cells for at least 7 d at 15 °C, and then testing the culture medium for virus. Virus appeared in the cultured cells from some samples of CF that remained negative during incubation. In additional samples of CF from these species, the virus titer increased in cultured cells compared with the titer in the original CF sample. With chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha), no negative samples converted to positive during incubation, but the virus titer was retained in incubated CF cells, but not in cell-free CF.

  15. Baseline CD4+ T lymphocyte cell counts, hepatitis B and C viruses seropositivity in adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection at a tertiary hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adekunle, Ajayi Ebenezer; Oladimeji, Ajayi Akande; Temi, Adegun Patrick; Adeseye, Ajayi Iyiade; Akinyeye, Ojo Abiodun; Taiwo, Raimi Hussean

    2011-01-01

    Background Ekiti State of Nigeria is known to have the lowest prevalence of HIV in Nigeria. University Teaching Hospital (UTH), Ado Ekiti was recently upgraded to serve as one of the three centres for HIV/AIDS referral, diagnosis and treatment in Ekiti State. We evaluated the baseline immunologic and biochemical parameters of patients presenting at the ART clinic of University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State. Methods All HIV seropositive patients not yet on antiretroviral therapy, who presented at the ART Clinic within the study period had at the first visit to the clinic, their blood sample taken for CD4 cell counts estimation, HBsAg and anti- HCV screening, ALT, AST as well as hemoglobin estimation as part of the routine workup to assess their disease health status and need for antiretroviral therapy. Statistical significance was taken as p< 0.05. Results A total of 273 patients comprising 79 (28.9%) males and 194 (71.1%) females were included in the study (F:M = 2.46: 1). The mean age of the study population was 36.21± 10.20 years with mean age of males (39.52 ± 9.95years) significantly higher than females (34.88 ± 10.02; p=0.001). The overall prevalence of HBsAg in the study population was 6.6% with a sex specific prevalence of 8.1% and 6% for males and females, respectively. No statistically significance difference in the mean serum alanine transaminase, serum aspartate transaminase, hemoglobin and CD4+ T- Lymphocytes cell count of those who had HBsAg negative status compared to those who had HBsAg positive status. Two (0.7%) of the patients had positive serum anti HCV antibodies. The CD4+ T- Lymphocytes cell count ranged between 5 – 1050 cells/µl with a mean of 286.19 ± 233.31 cells/µl. The majority of patients (71.8%) had a CD4+ T- Lymphocytes cell count < 350 cells/µl. Conclusion At the time of presentation, majority of our patients had a CD4+ T- Lymphocytes cell count less than 350 cells/µl consistent with significant immune-suppression. More sustained and vigorous awareness campaigns still need to be done in Ekiti State to diagnose this disease early. There is also a need to accelerate the integration of hepatitis B virus screening and treatment programme into HIV/AIDS programme because of the morbidity and mortality implication of HBV and HIV co-infection. PMID:22145054

  16. CD8+ T-cell counts: an early predictor of risk and mortality in critically ill immunocompromised patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Critically ill immunocompromised (CIIC) patients with pulmonary infection are a population at high risk for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). The host defenses are important factors to consider in determining the risk and outcome of infection. Quantification of changes in the status of host immunity could be valuable for clinical diagnosis and outcome prediction. Methods We evaluated the quantitative changes in key humoral and cellular parameters in CIIC patients with pulmonary infection and their potential influence on the risk and prognosis of IPA. We monitored the evolution of these parameters in 150 CIIC patients with pulmonary infection on days 1, 3 and 10 (D1, D3 and D10) following ICU admission. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Follow-up included 60- and 90-day mortality. Results Among the 150 CIIC patients included in this study, 62 (41.3%) had microbiological evidence of IPA. Compared with patients without IPA, CD3+, CD8+, CD28+CD4+ and CD28+CD8+ CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts (D1, D3 and D10) and B-cell counts (D1 and D3) were significantly reduced in patients with IPA (P?cell counts were independent predictors of IPA in CIIC patients. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of immune parameters predicting 28-day mortality revealed area under the curve values of 0.82 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.92), 0.94 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.99), and 0.94 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.99) for CD8+ T-cell counts (D1, D3 and D10, respectively) and 0.84 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.94), 0.92 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.99) and 0.90 (95% CI 0.79 to 0.99) for CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts (D1, D3 and D10, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis provided evidence that CD8+ and CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts (<149.5 cells/mm3 and <75 cells/mm3, respectively) were associated with early mortality in CIIC patients with IPA (logrank test; P?cell counts were significantly lower in CIIC patients with IPA than in non-IPA patients. Lower CD8+ and CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts in CIIC patients with pulmonary infection were associated with higher risk and early mortality in IPA and may be valuable for clinical diagnosis and outcome prediction. PMID:23883548

  17. Bioprinted amniotic fluid-derived stem cells accelerate healing of large skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Aleksander; Mack, David; Kapetanovic, Edi; Atala, Anthony; Jackson, John D; Yoo, James; Soker, Shay

    2012-11-01

    Stem cells obtained from amniotic fluid show high proliferative capacity in culture and multilineage differentiation potential. Because of the lack of significant immunogenicity and the ability of the amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells to modulate the inflammatory response, we investigated whether they could augment wound healing in a mouse model of skin regeneration. We used bioprinting technology to treat full-thickness skin wounds in nu/nu mice. AFS cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were resuspended in fibrin-collagen gel and "printed" over the wound site. At days 0, 7, and 14, AFS cell- and MSC-driven wound closure and re-epithelialization were significantly greater than closure and re-epithelialization in wounds treated by fibrin-collagen gel only. Histological examination showed increased microvessel density and capillary diameters in the AFS cell-treated wounds compared with the MSC-treated wounds, whereas the skin treated only with gel showed the lowest amount of microvessels. However, tracking of fluorescently labeled AFS cells and MSCs revealed that the cells remained transiently and did not permanently integrate in the tissue. These observations suggest that the increased wound closure rates and angiogenesis may be due to delivery of secreted trophic factors, rather than direct cell-cell interactions. Accordingly, we performed proteomic analysis, which showed that AFS cells secreted a number of growth factors at concentrations higher than those of MSCs. In parallel, we showed that AFS cell-conditioned media induced endothelial cell migration in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that bioprinting AFS cells could be an effective treatment for large-scale wounds and burns. PMID:23197691

  18. Bioprinted Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells Accelerate Healing of Large Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Aleksander; Mack, David; Kapetanovic, Edi; Atala, Anthony; Jackson, John D.; Yoo, James

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells obtained from amniotic fluid show high proliferative capacity in culture and multilineage differentiation potential. Because of the lack of significant immunogenicity and the ability of the amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells to modulate the inflammatory response, we investigated whether they could augment wound healing in a mouse model of skin regeneration. We used bioprinting technology to treat full-thickness skin wounds in nu/nu mice. AFS cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were resuspended in fibrin-collagen gel and “printed” over the wound site. At days 0, 7, and 14, AFS cell- and MSC-driven wound closure and re-epithelialization were significantly greater than closure and re-epithelialization in wounds treated by fibrin-collagen gel only. Histological examination showed increased microvessel density and capillary diameters in the AFS cell-treated wounds compared with the MSC-treated wounds, whereas the skin treated only with gel showed the lowest amount of microvessels. However, tracking of fluorescently labeled AFS cells and MSCs revealed that the cells remained transiently and did not permanently integrate in the tissue. These observations suggest that the increased wound closure rates and angiogenesis may be due to delivery of secreted trophic factors, rather than direct cell-cell interactions. Accordingly, we performed proteomic analysis, which showed that AFS cells secreted a number of growth factors at concentrations higher than those of MSCs. In parallel, we showed that AFS cell-conditioned media induced endothelial cell migration in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that bioprinting AFS cells could be an effective treatment for large-scale wounds and burns. PMID:23197691

  19. Extensive chronic GVHD is associated with donor blood CD34+ cell count after G-CSF mobilization in non-myeloablative allogeneic PBSC transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, N; Prébet, T; De Latour, R Peffault; Katsahian, S; Kuentz, M; Piard, N; Réa, D; Norol, F; Jouet, J P; Ribeil, J A; Tabrizi, R; Rio, B; Lioure, B; Tiberghien, P; Bourhis, J H; Sirvent, A; Bordigoni, P; Blaise, D; Michallet, M; Vernant, J P

    2012-12-01

    The correlation between the incidence of GVHD and the number of infused CD34(+) cells remains controversial for PBSC transplantation after a reduced-intensity-conditioning (RIC) regimen. We evaluated 99 patients transplanted with an HLA-identical sibling after the same RIC (2-Gy-TBI/fludarabine). Donor and recipient characteristics, donor's blood G-CSF-mobilized CD34(+) cell count, and number of infused CD34(+) and CD3(+) cells were analyzed as risk factors for acute and chronic GVHD There was a trend for an increased incidence of extensive chronic GVHD in the quartile of patients receiving more than 10 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg (P = 0.05). Interestingly, the number of donor's blood CD34(+) cells at day 5 of G-CSF mobilization was closely associated with the incidence of extensive chronic GVHD, that is, 48% (95% CI: 28-68) at 24-months in the quartile of patients whose donors had the highest CD34(+) cell counts versus 24.3% (95% CI: 14-34) in the other patients (P = 0.007). In multivariate analysis, the only factor correlating with extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was the donor's blood CD34(+) cell count after G-CSF (HR 2.49; 95% CI: 1.16-5.35, P = 0.019). This study shows that the incidence of cGVHD is more strongly associated with the donor's ability to mobilize CD34(+) cells than with the number of infused CD34(+) cells. PMID:22609881

  20. Cytologic features of ovarian granulosa cell tumors in pleural and ascitic fluids.

    PubMed

    Omori, Makiko; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yuminamochi, Tsutomu; Nakazawa, Kumiko; Ishii, Yoshio; Fukasawa, Hiroko; Hashi, Akihiko; Hirata, Shuji

    2015-07-01

    Adult granulosa cell tumor (AGCT) is an uncommon neoplasm of the ovary with potential for aggressive behavior and late recurrence. The most important prognostic factor for AGCT is tumor stage. Thus, cytological assessment of pleural or ascitic fluids is crucial for initial staging and subsequent patient management. We report herein two cases of ovarian AGCT presenting with exfoliated tumor cells in pleural and ascitic fluid. The first case involved a 61-year-old woman who presented with stage Ic (a) AGCT. Seven years after initial diagnosis, pleural effusion and pleural dissemination were identified. The second case involved a 50-year-old woman who presented with stage IV AGCT with massive ascites and right pleural effusion. Fluid cytology from both cases showed cohesive or loose clusters of small uniform neoplastic cells with round-to-oval nuclei, coffee-bean-shaped nuclear grooves, small nucleoli, and scant cytoplasm. Call-Exner bodies were also observed in these cytologic specimens. In the differential diagnosis of small monomorphic tumor cells in pleural effusion or ascites, coffee-bean-shaped nuclear grooves and cell clusters forming Call-Exner bodies are diagnostic clues of AGCT. PMID:25605680

  1. A practical device designed to concentrate cells for cytomorphological studies of biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Torres-Guerra, E

    1998-03-01

    In the present work, a device designed for concentrating cells from biological fluids is described. The instrument consists of a tube in which the inner cavity has a conical shape at one of its ends and a small orifice is found at the bottom, while the tube's exterior maintains its cylindrical shape. The tube is placed inside a second tube that ends on a flat surface on which a glass cover slide is placed. The sample to be studied is placed in the inner tube of the assembled device and spun in a regular clinical centrifuge. Cells are collected on the glass slide, fixed and stained for microscopical studies. The device was tested using 23 samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. An adequate number of intact cells was recovered for observation, and a precise diagnosis was possible. Cells from three aliquots of each CSF sample were concentrated by this method, and by the more expensive standard commercial cytocentrifuge, with similar results. The device described here provides an easy, efficient and inexpensive method, for the concentration of cells from organic fluids. PMID:9586398

  2. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Krömmelbein, Natascha; Wiebusch, Lüder; Schiedner, Gudrun; Büscher, Nicole; Sauer, Caroline; Florin, Luise; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP) is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production. PMID:26848680

  3. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication.

    PubMed

    Krmmelbein, Natascha; Wiebusch, Lder; Schiedner, Gudrun; Bscher, Nicole; Sauer, Caroline; Florin, Luise; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP) is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production. PMID:26848680

  4. Cell Recovery in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid in Smokers Is Dependent on Cumulative Smoking History

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Reza; Tornling, Gran; Grunewald, Johan; Eklund, Anders; Skld, C. Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Background Smoking is a risk factor for various lung diseases in which BAL may be used as a part of a clinical investigation. Interpretation of BAL fluid cellularity is however difficult due to high variability, in particular among smokers. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effect of smoking on BAL cellular components in asymptomatic smokers. The effects of smoking cessation, age and gender were also investigated in groups of smokers and exsmokers. Methods We performed a retrospective review of BAL findings, to our knowledge the largest single center investigation, in our department from 1999 to 2009. One hundred thirty two current smokers (48 males and 84 females) and 44 ex-smokers (16 males and 28 females) were included. A group of 295 (132 males and 163 females) never-smokers served as reference. Result The median [595 pctl] total number of cells and cell concentration in current smokers were 63.4 [28.6132.1]106 and 382.1 [189.7864.3]106/L respectively and correlated positively to the cumulative smoking history. Macrophages were the predominant cell type (96.7% [90.499.0]) followed by lymphocytes (2% [0.87.7]) and neutrophils (0.6% [02.9]). The concentration of all inflammatory cells was increased in smokers compared to never smokers and ex-smokers. BAL fluid recovery was negatively correlated with age (p<0.001). Smoking men had a lower BAL fluid recovery than smoking women. Conclusion Smoking has a profound effect on BAL fluid cellularity, which is dependent on smoking history. Our results performed on a large group of current smokers and ex-smokers in a well standardized way, can contribute to better interpretation of BAL fluid cellularity in clinical context. PMID:22479573

  5. Effect of Varying Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability & Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun; Dozier, David; Triantafillu, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Cancer stem cells cultured in vitro in stirred bioreactors are exposed to shear stress. By observing the effect of shear stress on cancer stem cell viability, laboratory cell growth could be optimized. In addition, metastasized cancer stem cells in vivo are naturally exposed to shear stress, a factor influencing stem cell differentiation, while circulating in the bloodstream. Changes in protein expression after exposure to shear stress could allow for identification and targeting of circulating cancer cells. In this study, blood flow through capillaries was simulated by using a syringe pump to inject suspensions of Kasumi-1 leukemia stem cells into model blood vessels composed of PEEK tubing 125 microns in diameter. The Hagen-Poisseuille equation was used to solve for operating flow rates based on specified amounts of shear stress. After exposure, cell counts and viabilities were observed using an optical microscope and proteins were analyzed using Western blotting. It was observed that at a one minute exposure to stress, cell viability increased as the amount of shear was increased from 10 to 60 dynes per square centimeter. Results from this research are applicable to optimization of large-scale stem cell growth in bioreactors as well as to the design of targeted cancer therapies. Funding from NSF REU grant #1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Stokes flow of a micropolar fluid past an assemblage of spheroidal particle-in-cell models with slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherief, H. H.; Faltas, M. S.; Ashmawy, E. A.; Nashwan, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    In a cell model it is assumed that the three-dimensional assemblage may be considered to consist of a number of identical unit cells, each of which contains a particle surrounded by a fluid envelope with a fictitious surface (free surface) containing a volume of fluid sufficient to make the fractional void volume in the cell identical to that in the entire assemblage. The quasi-steady axisymmetric translational motion of a spherical or spheroidal cell of an incompressible micropolar fluid is investigated utilizing the cell model method. The inner particle of the cell is assumed to be solid and the outer to be fictitious. Linear velocity and microrotation slip boundary conditions on the surface of the solid particle are proposed. Normalized mobility is obtained for both spherical and spheroidal particles in the cell model and is represented graphically. Expressions for the superficial fluid velocity through an assemblage of spherical and spheroidal particles are obtained.

  7. Identification of immature granulocytes in cancer chemotherapy patients by cell counting vs. microscopic examination of blood smears

    PubMed Central

    CHE, YI-QUN; SHEN, DI; ZHANG, SHI-MIN; QI, JUN

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cell formation occurs through various mechanisms that may result in the growth of tumor blood vessels. Thus, novel methods are required to provide tumor therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the reliability of the abnormality-indicating alarm information provided by the automatic hematology analyzer in the measurement of immature granulocytes (IG) and assess the factors involved. The quality control groups at three concentration levels were repeatedly determined within 20 days to observe the within-run precision. The quality control groups at two concentration levels were repeatedly determined within 20 days to observe the between-run precision. The results obtained by the two methods were compared and the reliability of IG measurement using the hematology analyzer was analyzed. Additionally, IG parameters of 120 venous blood specimens collected from cancer patients were measured by cell counting using a hematology analyzer and stained blood smears were observed. The within-run precision experiment showed that the coefficient of variation (CV) values of the IG percentage in the high, middle and low concentration levels were 3.62, 6.75 and 13.69%, respectively, while the CV values of the IG percentage in the two-level between-run precision experiment were 5.6 and 7.1%, respectively. All of the CV values were <15% and within the permitted range. The true-positive rates obtained using the hematology analyzer in the IG?1%, 110% groups were 11.5, 65.4 and 95.0%, respectively, and the false-negative rates were 0. The IG percentages obtained through the hematology analyzer measurement and from the microscopic observation were (6.9811.18) and (9.3620.71)%, respectively. Results of the correlation analysis revelaed that there was an excellent correlation between the two methods (r=0.1364). A significant difference between the two methods was observed using the signed-rank test (P=0.001). Manual microscopic observation is essential for the IG specimen that has been measured using an automatic hematology analyzer and has received an abnormality alarm. For cancer patients who receive chemotherapy, this application helps to provide laboratory data for clinical disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. PMID:24649334

  8. The interaction between a solid body and viscous fluid by marker-and-cell method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    A computational method for solving nonlinear problems relating to impact and penetration of a rigid body into a fluid type medium is presented. The numerical techniques, based on the Marker-and-Cell method, gives the pressure and velocity of the flow field. An important feature in this method is that the force and displacement of the rigid body interacting with the fluid during the impact and sinking phases are evaluated from the boundary stresses imposed by the fluid on the rigid body. A sample problem of low velocity penetration of a rigid block into still water is solved by this method. The computed time histories of the acceleration, pressure, and displacement of the block show food agreement with experimental measurements. A sample problem of high velocity impact of a rigid block into soft clay is also presented.

  9. Human amniotic fluid stem cells possess the potential to differentiate into primordial follicle oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoli; Wang, Ning; Qiang, Rong; Wan, Qianhui; Qin, Mingming; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Huayan

    2014-04-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that embryonic stem cells were capable of differentiating into primordial germ cells through the formation of embryoid bodies that subsequently generated oocyte-like cells (OLCs). Such a process could facilitate studies of primordial follicle oocyte development in vitro and regenerative medicine. To investigate the pluripotency of human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs) and their ability to differentiate into germ cells, we isolated a CD117(+)/CD44(+) hAFSC line that showed fibroblastoid morphology and intrinsically expressed both stem cell markers (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2) and germ cell markers (DAZL, STELLA). To encourage differentiation into OLCs, the hAFSCs were first cultured in a medium supplemented with 5% porcine follicular fluid for 10 days. During the induction period, cell aggregates formed and syntheses of steroid hormones were detected; some OLCs and granulosa cell-like cells could be loosened from the surface of the culture dish. Cell aggregates were collected and replated in oocyte culture medium for an additional 7-10 days. OLCs ranging from 50 to 120 ?m presenting zona pellucida were observed in cumulus-oocyte complexes; some OLCs developed spontaneously into multicell structures similar to preimplantation embryos. Approximately 2% of the hAFSCs differentiated to meiotic germ cells that expressed folliculogenesis- and oogenesis-associated markers. Although the in vitro maturation and fertilization potentials are as yet unproven, short-term (<25 days) and high-efficiency (>2%) derivation of OLCs from hAFSCs might provide a new approach to the study of human germ cell development in vitro. PMID:24571984

  10. Mechanotransduction in bone: do bone cells act as sensors of fluid flow?

    PubMed

    Turner, C H; Forwood, M R; Otter, M W

    1994-08-01

    When compact bone is subjected to bending loads, interstitial fluid in the bone matrix flows away from regions of high compressive stress. The amount of interstitial fluid flow is strongly influenced by the loading rate in a dose-dependent fashion. We hypothesize that interstitial fluid flow affects bone formation, and we tested this hypothesis indirectly by measuring the effect of different loading frequencies on bone formation rate in vivo. The right tibiae of adult female rats were subjected to applied bending at frequencies of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Hz for a 2-wk period. The rats were then killed and histomorphometric measurements of bone formation were made of the midshaft of the tibia. Bending of the tibia increased bone formation rate in the higher-frequency (0.5 to 2.0 Hz) loading groups as much as fourfold, yet no increase in bone formation rate was observed for loading frequencies below 0.5 Hz. In a separate experiment, we found stress-generated potentials (SGP) in the rat tibia to increase monotonically with increasing loading frequency. The dose-response relationship between loading frequency and the bone formation response closely resembles the relationship between loading frequency and SGP within bone. The qualitative similarity between these two relationships suggests that increased bone formation is associated with increased SGP, which are caused by interstitial fluid flow. Bone cells are known to be sensitive to electric fields and may respond directly to SGP. Also, fluid shear forces have been shown to stimulate bone cells in culture, so it is possible that increased interstitial fluid flow directly affects bone formation. PMID:8070637

  11. Androgen Action via Testicular Arteriole Smooth Muscle Cells Is Important for Leydig Cell Function, Vasomotion and Testicular Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michelle; Sharpe, Richard M.; Moffat, Lindsey; Atanassova, Nina; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Kilter, Sigrid; Bergh, Anders; Smith, Lee B.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of blood flow through the testicular microvasculature by vasomotion is thought to be important for normal testis function as it regulates interstitial fluid (IF) dynamics which is an important intra-testicular transport medium. Androgens control vasomotion, but how they exert these effects remains unclear. One possibility is by signalling via androgen receptors (AR) expressed in testicular arteriole smooth muscle cells. To investigate this and determine the overall importance of this mechanism in testis function, we generated a blood vessel smooth muscle cell-specific AR knockout mouse (SMARKO). Gross reproductive development was normal in SMARKO mice but testis weight was reduced in adulthood compared to control littermates; this reduction was not due to any changes in germ cell volume or to deficits in testosterone, LH or FSH concentrations and did not cause infertility. However, seminiferous tubule lumen volume was reduced in adult SMARKO males while interstitial volume was increased, perhaps indicating altered fluid dynamics; this was associated with compensated Leydig cell failure. Vasomotion was impaired in adult SMARKO males, though overall testis blood flow was normal and there was an increase in the overall blood vessel volume per testis in adult SMARKOs. In conclusion, these results indicate that ablating arteriole smooth muscle AR does not grossly alter spermatogenesis or affect male fertility but does subtly impair Leydig cell function and testicular fluid exchange, possibly by locally regulating microvascular blood flow within the testis. PMID:21049031

  12. Hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell: Application to studies of geologic fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming

    2003-01-01

    The hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) was designed to simulate the geologic conditions of crustal processes in the presence of water or other fluids. The HDAC has been used to apply external pressure to both synthetic and natural fluid inclusions in quartz to minimize problems caused by stretching or decrepitation of inclusions during microthermometric analysis. When the HDAC is loaded with a fluid sample, it can be considered as a large synthetic fluid inclusion and therefore, can be used to study the PVTX properties as well as phase relations of the sample fluid. Because the HDAC has a wide measurement pressure-temperature range and also allows in-situ optical observations, it has been used to study critical phenomena of various chemical systems, such as the geologically important hydrous silicate melts. It is possible, when the HDAC is combined with synchrotron X-ray sources, to obtain basic information on speciation and structure of metal including rare-earth elements (REE) complexes in hydrothermal solutions as revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Recent modifications of the HDAC minimize the loss of intensity of X-rays due to scattering and absorption by the diamonds. These modifications are especially important for studying elements with absorption edges below 10 keV and therefore particularly valuable for our understanding of transport and deposition of first-row transition elements and REE in hydrothermal environments.

  13. RBC count

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dehydration (such as from severe diarrhea) Kidney tumor (renal cell carcinoma) Low blood oxygen level (hypoxia) Scarring ... failure (for example, from radiation, toxins, or tumor) Deficiency of a hormone called erythropoietin (caused by kidney ...

  14. Effect of supplements: Probiotics and probiotic plus honey on blood cell counts and serum IgA in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Tehrani, Hajar-Alsadat; Rabbani-Khorasgani, Mohammad; Hosseini, Sayyed Mohsen; Mokarian, Fariborz; Mahdavi, Hoda; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy is frequently used in treatment approaches of pelvic malignancies. Nevertheless, it has some known systemic effects on blood cells and the immune system that possibly results in their susceptibility to infection. Probiotics are live microbial food ingredients that provide a health advantage to the consumer. Honey has prebiotic properties. The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate probable effects of probiotic or probiotics plus honey on blood cell counts and serum IgA levels in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Sixty-seven adult patients with pelvic cancer were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either: (1) Probiotic capsules (including: Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, and Streptococcus thermophiles) (n = 22), (2) probiotic capsules plus honey (n = 21) or (3) placebo capsules (n = 24) all for 6 weeks. Blood and serum samples were collected for one week before radiotherapy and 24-72 h after the end of radiotherapy. Results: White blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), platelet counts, and serum IgA level were not significantly changed in patients taking probiotic (alone or plus honey) during pelvic radiotherapy. The mean decrease in RBC count was 0.52, 0.18, and 0.23 × 106 cells/μL, WBC count was 2.3, 1.21, and 1.34 × 103 cells/μL and platelet count was, 57.6, 53.3, and 66.35 × 103 cells/μL for the probiotic, probiotic plus honey, and placebo groups, respectively. The mean decrease of serum IgA was 22.53, 29.94, and 40.73 mg/dL for the probiotic, probiotic plus honey, and placebo groups, respectively. Conclusion: The observed nonsignificant effect of probiotics may be in favor of local effects of this product in the gut rather than systemic effects, however, as a trend toward a benefit was indicated, further studies are necessary in order to extract effects of probiotics or probiotic plus honey on hematologic and immunologic parameters in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy. PMID:26622258

  15. An altered repertoire of T cell receptor V gene expression by rheumatoid synovial fluid T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, C; Marguerie, C; So, A K

    1992-01-01

    The pattern of T cell receptor V gene expression by lymphocytes from rheumatoid synovial fluid and paired peripheral blood samples was compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay. Eight rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had varying durations of disease (from 2 to 20 years) were studied. In all patients there was evidence of a different pattern of V gene expression between the two compartments. Significantly increased expression of at least one V alpha or V beta gene family by synovial fluid T cells was observed in all the patients studied. Three different V alpha (V alpha 10, 15 and 18) and three V beta (V beta 4, 5 and 13) families were commonly elevated. Sequencing of synovial V beta transcripts demonstrated that the basis of increased expression of selected V gene families in the synovial fluid was due to the presence of dominant clonotypes within those families, which constituted up to 53% of the sequences isolated from one particular synovial V gene family. There were considerable differences in the NDJ sequences found in synovial and peripheral blood T cell receptor (TCR) transcripts of the same V beta gene family. These data suggest that the TCR repertoire in the two compartments differs, and that antigen-driven expansion of particular synovial T cell populations is a component of rheumatoid synovitis, and is present in all stages of the disease. PMID:1458680

  16. Influence of truck-transportation on the function of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Hanafusa, Yasuko; Kariya, Yoshihiro

    2005-05-01

    The study sought to evaluate whether truck-transportation had an impact on the respiratory immune system of cattle. Six castrated 6-10-month-old Holstein calves were shipped approximately 100 km by road for 4 h. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples, collected immediately before transportation, at 4 h (soon after transportation), and on days 3 and 7 after transportation, were examined. A marked elevation of plasma cortisol concentration was observed at 4 h, but this level was unchanged in controls. The chemiluminescence (CL) response of phagocytes in BAL fluid cells, composed mainly of alveolar macrophage, decreased significantly after transportation (P<0.05). Transportation increased the CD3+ T cell population significantly (P<0.05), and a significant increase (P<0.05) in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ cells in BAL fluid was evident. We conclude that short-term road transportation alters pulmonary cells and their function, which may engender bovine respiratory disorders. PMID:15797476

  17. AB105. High-level peripheral total and differential white blood cells count are independently associated with lower urinary tract symptoms in Chinese male population

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng; Mo, Zengnan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inflammation involved in the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) has been shown in majority of studies. However, the role of systemic inflammation in LUTS has not been firmly established. Thus, the current study was to examine the association between peripheral total and differential white blood cells count (WBCs), an important systemic inflammation marker, and LUTS in a large-scale Chinese male population. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study of male heath among people aged 18-88 years had been set up from July 2011 to November 2011 in Fangchenggang, Guangxi, China. In current study, 4,694 participants were included. Total WBCs and differential count were measured with an automated hematology analyzer and LUTS were assessed by International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Meanwhile, potential confounding covariates were also included. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the association between total WBCs and differential count and LUTS. Results Comparing with none/mild LUTS, the average of total WBCs and neutrophil count was much higher in moderate/severe LUTS (P<0.001). Men who had higher total WBCs and neutrophil count levels were more likely to report overall LUTS and obstructive symptoms, as for individual symptoms of LUTS, primarily showed as intermittency and urgency symptoms. Besides, statistically significant associations were presented between neutrophil count and irritative symptoms (OR =1.49, 95% CI, 1.08-2.05) and weak stream symptom (OR =1.93, 95% CI, 1.13-3.29), when comparing them from the 1st to 4th neutrophil count quartiles. All above associations were independent of potential confounding variables. Additionally, we also observed that the risk factors of LUTS included age, hypertension, education, diabetes mellitus and alcohol drinking. Conclusions The current study firstly showed that LUTS was positively associated with total WBCs and differential neutrophil count, and many factors contributed to the risk of LUTS. These findings support the hypothesis that inflammation may be involved in the mechanism of LUTS.

  18. [Corrected count].

    PubMed

    1991-11-27

    The data of the 1991 census indicated that the population count of Brazil fell short of a former estimate by 3 million people. The population reached 150 million people with an annual increase of 2%, while projections in the previous decade expected an increase of 2.48% to 153 million people. This reduction indicates more widespread use of family planning (FP) and control of fertility among families of lower social status as more information is being provided to them. However, the Ministry of Health ordered an investigation of foreign family planning organizations because it was suspected that women were forced to undergo tubal ligation during vaccination campaigns. A strange alliance of left wing politicians and the Roman Catholic Church alleges a conspiracy of international FP organizations receiving foreign funds. The FP strategies of Bemfam and Pro-Pater offer women who have little alternative the opportunity to undergo tubal ligation or to receive oral contraceptives to control fertility. The ongoing government program of distributing booklets on FP is feeble and is not backed up by an education campaign. Charges of foreign interference are leveled while the government hypocritically ignores the grave problem of 4 million abortions a year. The population is expected to continue to grow until the year 2040 and then to stabilize at a low growth rate of .4%. In 1980, the number of children per woman was 4.4 whereas the 1991 census figures indicate this has dropped to 3.5. The excess population is associated with poverty and a forsaken caste in the interior. The population actually has decreased in the interior and in cities with 15,000 people. The phenomenon of the drop of fertility associated with rural exodus is contrasted with cities and villages where the population is 20% less than expected. PMID:12286542

  19. A Higher Correlation of HCV Core Antigen with CD4+ T Cell Counts Compared with HCV RNA in HCV/HIV-1 Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yuanlin; Cao, Guanghua; Zhi, Yuhong; Wang, Shuiwang; Xu, Chunhui; Wei, Lai; Lu, Fengmin; Zhuang, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Development of HCV infection is typically followed by chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in most patients, while spontaneous HCV viral clearance (SVC) occurs in only a minority of subjects. Compared with the widespread application of HCV RNA testing by quantitative RT-PCR technique, HCV core antigen detection may be an alternative indicator in the diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infections and in monitoring the status of infectious individuals. However, the correlation and differences between these two indicators in HCV infection need more investigation, especially in patients coinfected by HIV-1. In this study, a total of 354 anti-HCV and/or anti-HIV serum positive residents from a village of central China were enrolled. Besides HCV-related hepatopathic variables including clinical status, ALT, AST, anti-HCV Abs, as well as the altered CD4+/CD8+ T cell counts, HCV core antigen and HCV viral load were also measured. The concentration of serum HCV core antigen was highly correlated with level of HCV RNA in CHC patients with or without HIV-1 coinfection. Of note, HCV core antigen concentration was negatively correlated with CD4+ T cell count, while no correlation was found between HCV RNA level and CD4+ T cell count. Our findings suggested that quantitative detection of plasma HCV core antigen may be an alternative indicator of HCV RNA qPCR assay when evaluating the association between HCV replication and host immune status in HCV/HIV-1 coinfected patients. PMID:21858166

  20. Exposure of cells to a cell number-counting factor decreases the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase to decrease intracellular glucose levels in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Jang, Wonhee; Gomer, Richard H

    2005-01-01

    The development of Dictyostelium discoideum is a model for tissue size regulation, as these cells form groups of approximately 2 x 10(4) cells. The group size is regulated in part by a negative feedback pathway mediated by a secreted multipolypeptide complex called counting factor (CF). CF signal transduction involves decreasing intracellular CF glucose levels. A component of CF, countin, has the bioactivity of the entire CF complex, and an 8-min exposure of cells to recombinant countin decreases intracellular glucose levels. To understand how CF regulates intracellular glucose, we examined the effect of CF on enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. Exposure of cells to CF has little effect on amylase or glycogen phosphorylase, enzymes involved in glucose production from glycogen. Glucokinase activity (the first specific step of glycolysis) is inhibited by high levels of CF but is not affected by an 8-min exposure to countin. The second enzyme specific for glycolysis, phosphofructokinase, is not regulated by CF. There are two corresponding enzymes in the gluconeogenesis pathway, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase. The first is not regulated by CF or countin, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase is regulated by both CF and an 8-min exposure to countin. The countin-induced changes in the Km and Vmax of glucose-6-phosphatase cause a decrease in glucose production that can account for the countin-induced decrease in intracellular glucose levels. It thus appears that part of the CF signal transduction pathway involves inhibiting the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase, decreasing intracellular glucose levels and affecting the levels of other metabolites, to regulate group size. PMID:15643062

  1. Direct demonstration of tubular fluid flow sensing by macula densa cells

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells in the cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL) detect variations in tubular fluid composition and transmit signals to the afferent arteriole (AA) that control glomerular filtration rate [tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF)]. Increases in tubular salt at the MD that normally parallel elevations in tubular fluid flow rate are well accepted as the trigger of TGF. The present study aimed to test whether MD cells can detect variations in tubular fluid flow rate per se. Calcium imaging of the in vitro microperfused isolated JGA-glomerulus complex dissected from mice was performed using fluo-4 and fluorescence microscopy. Increasing cTAL flow from 2 to 20 nl/min (80 mM [NaCl]) rapidly produced significant elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in AA smooth muscle cells [evidenced by changes in fluo-4 intensity (F); F/F0 = 1.45 0.11] and AA vasoconstriction. Complete removal of the cTAL around the MD plaque and application of laminar flow through a perfusion pipette directly to the MD apical surface essentially produced the same results even when low (10 mM) or zero NaCl solutions were used. Acetylated ?-tubulin immunohistochemistry identified the presence of primary cilia in mouse MD cells. Under no flow conditions, bending MD cilia directly with a micropipette rapidly caused significant [Ca2+]i elevations in AA smooth muscle cells (fluo-4 F/F0: 1.60 0.12) and vasoconstriction. P2 receptor blockade with suramin significantly reduced the flow-induced TGF, whereas scavenging superoxide with tempol did not. In conclusion, MD cells are equipped with a tubular flow-sensing mechanism that may contribute to MD cell function and TGF. PMID:20719981

  2. Immune cell counts and risks of respiratory infections among infants exposed pre- and postnatally to organochlorine compounds: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Anders; Thuvander, Ann; Aune, Marie; Johannisson, Anders; Darnerud, Per Ola; Ronquist, Gunnar; Cnattingius, Sven

    2008-01-01

    Background Early-life chemical exposure may influence immune system development, subsequently affecting child health. We investigated immunomodulatory potentials of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p,p'-DDE in infants. Methods Prenatal exposure to PCBs and p,p'-DDE was estimated from maternal serum concentrations during pregnancy. Postnatal exposure was calculated from concentrations of the compounds in mother's milk, total number of nursing days, and percentage of full nursing each week during the 3 month nursing period. Number and types of infections among infants were registered by the mothers (N = 190). White blood cell counts (N = 86) and lymphocyte subsets (N = 52) were analyzed in a subgroup of infants at 3 months of age. Results Infants with the highest prenatal exposure to PCB congeners CB-28, CB-52 and CB-101 had an increased risk of respiratory infection during the study period. In contrast, the infection odds ratios (ORs) were highest among infants with the lowest prenatal mono-ortho PCB (CB-105, CB-118, CB-156, CB-167) and di-ortho PCB (CB-138, CB-153, CB-180) exposure, and postnatal mono- and di-ortho PCB, and p,p'-DDE exposure. Similar results were found for pre- and postnatal CB-153 exposure, a good marker for total PCB exposure. Altogether, a negative relationship was indicated between infections and total organochlorine compound exposure during the whole pre- and postnatal period. Prenatal exposure to CB-28, CB-52 and CB-101 was positively associated with numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes in infants 3 months after delivery. Prenatal exposure to p,p'-DDE was negatively associated with the percentage of eosinophils. No significant associations were found between PCB and p,p'-DDE exposure and numbers/percentages of lymphocyte subsets, after adjustment for potential confounders. Conclusion This hypothesis generating study suggests that background exposure to PCBs and p,p'-DDE early in life modulate immune system development. Strong correlations between mono- and di-ortho PCBs, and p,p'-DDE exposures make it difficult to identify the most important contributor to the suggested immunomodulation, and to separate effects due to pre- and postnatal exposure. The suggested PCB and p,p'-DDE modulation of infection risks may have consequences for the health development during childhood, since respiratory infections early in life may be risk factors for asthma and middle ear infections. PMID:19055819

  3. Different screening tests and milk somatic cell count for the prevalence of subclinical bovine mastitis in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Md Nazmul; Das, Ziban Chandra; Talukder, Anup Kumar; Alam, Mohammad Shah; Rahman, Abu Nasar Md Aminoor

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cows with subclinical mastitis (SCM) is an important tool for sustainable dairying and implementing effective mastitis control strategies. A total of 892 quarters milk samples from 228 lactating cows were screened by California mastitis test (CMT), White side test (WST), Surf field mastitis test (SFMT), and somatic cell count (SCC) to study the prevalence of bovine SCM in some selected areas of Bangladesh. Out of 228 cows, 148 (64.9%), 138 (60.5%), 132 (57.9%), and 164 (71.9%) were found positive for SCM by CMT, WST, SFMT, and SCC, respectively. The prevalence of bovine SCM was diagnosed 45.7, 40.2, 36.6, and 29.6% in Chittagong, Sirajgonj, Mymensingh, and Gazipur districts, respectively, based on a combination of all tests. The overall quarter-wise prevalence of SCM was 45.7, 43.5, 41.2, and 55.0% for CMT, WST, SFMT, and SCC. Single quarters and left front quarters were more prone to SCM (P < 0.05). Friesian crossbred cows (56.4%), BCS 2.0-2.5 (55.4%), and parity 4-6 (52.4%), the late lactation stage (5-8 months; 64.7%) and high yielding cows (16-20 L/day; 65.3%) were more susceptible to SCM (P < 0.05). The sensitivity of the CMT, WST, SFMT, and SCC was 65.8, 57.9, 51.0, and 82.5%; specificity 76.2, 72.4, 69.5, and 89.4%; percentage accuracy 70.0, 64.8, 59.9, and 85.2%; positive predictive value 75.2, 69.8, 64.9, and 92.7%, respectively. The categories of CMT reactions were strongly correlated with SCC (P < 0.05). Kappa value of SCC was higher than that of other tests (SCC>CMT>WST>SFMT). Thus, CMT was concluded to be the most accurate (r = 0.782) field diagnostic test after laboratory test like SCC (r = 0.924). However, the use of any single test may not be reliable in diagnosing SCM, while the result of CMT supported by SCC might be used effectively to pinpoint diagnosis of SCM in dairy animals than alone. PMID:25326717

  4. Effect of dexamethasone in feed on intestinal permeability, differential white blood cell counts, and immune organs in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Vicuña, E A; Kuttappan, V A; Galarza-Seeber, R; Latorre, J D; Faulkner, O B; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G; Bielke, L R

    2015-09-01

    We have previously shown that intestinal barrier function can be adversely affected by poorly digested diets or feed restriction, resulting in increased intestinal inflammation-associated permeability. Three experiments were conducted in broilers to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) treatment on systemic fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-D; 3-5 kDa) levels, indicative of increased gut epithelial leakage. Experiment 1 compared DEX injections of 1 mg/kg, once per day on d 3, 5, and 9, with feed administration at 0.57, 1.7, or 5.1 ppm d 4 to 10, with FITC-D serum concentrations 2.5 h after gavage with 4.16 mg/kg FITC-D. All DEX treatments resulted in marked (2 to 6X; P<0.05) increased serum FITC-D levels. Feed DEX administration resulted in greater (P<0.05) gut permeability than injection at any dose, with numerically optimal effects at the lowest dose tested. In experiments 2 and 3, chicks were randomly assigned to a starter ration containing either control (CON) or DEX treated feed (0.57 ppm/kg; d 3 to 10 experiment 2, d 4 to 10 experiment 3). At d 10, all chicks were treated by oral gavage with FITC-D and serum samples were obtained as described above. Samples of the liver were aseptically collected, homogenized, diluted 1:4 wt/vol in sterile saline, and serial dilutions were plated on tryptic soy agar to evaluate total numbers of aerobic bacteria in the liver as an index of bacterial translocation (BT). In both experiments, FITC-D absorption was significantly enhanced (P<0.05) in DEX-treated chicks, again indicating increased paracellular leakage across the gut epithelium associated with dissolution of tight junctions. Experiment 2 differential cell counts showed an increased heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, and immune organ (spleen and bursa of Fabricius) weights for experiments 2 and 3 were decreased (P<0.05) from controls. In experiments 2 and 3, dietary DEX administration resulted in numerically (experiment 2) or significantly (P<0.05) increased enteric BT to the liver, supporting the observation that dietary DEX causes a stress-like inflammatory GI response, which may contribute to subclinical or clinical disease, and may be a useful model for ongoing disease mitigation research related to stress-related diseases of GIT origin. PMID:26195804

  5. Granular Fingering in Fluid Injection into Dense Granular Media in a Hele-Shaw Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiying; Zhang, Fengshou; Callahan, Patrick; Ayoub, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    We study experimentally spontaneous pattern formation in a dry dense granular medium invaded by an aqueous glycerin solution in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. By varying the invading fluid viscosity via the weight concentration of glycerin, and by adjusting the normalized injection velocity via the injection rate and the gap size of the cell, we observe four distinct fluid-grain displacement regimes: (i) a simple radial flow regime, (ii) an infiltration-dominated regime, (iii) a grain displacement-dominated regime, and (iv) a viscous fingering-dominated regime. We argue that these displacement regimes emerge as a result of competition among the various energy dissipation mechanisms and can be classified based on the characteristic times involved in the injection process.

  6. Insights Into Fetal and Neonatal Development Through Analysis of Cell-Free RNA in Body Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Diana W.; Maron, Jill L.; Johnson, Kirby L.

    2010-01-01

    The use of cell-free nucleic acids in the circulation of pregnant women for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis is arguably one of the hottest current topics in prenatal medicine. Between 1997 and the present era this field has gone from basic research to clinical application for diagnosis of fetal gender and Rhesus D status. Over the next few years it is likely that noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for Down syndrome will also be possible. Here we summarize current and future clinical applications of analyzing cell-free fetal DNA and RNA in both maternal and neonatal body fluids, including maternal plasma, serum, whole blood, amniotic fluid, and neonatal saliva. We describe methods to evaluate normal and abnormal fetal and neonatal development using gene expression microarrays. We also discuss the ways in which differentially-regulated gene lists can advance knowledge of both fetal and neonatal biology, as well as suggest novel possibilities for fetal and neonatal treatment. PMID:20851538

  7. Supercritical fluid chromatography interface for a differentially pumped dual-cell fourier transform mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Laude, D.A. Jr.; Pentoney, S.L. Jr.; Griffiths, P.R.; Wilkins, C.L.

    1987-09-15

    A Fourier transform mass spectrometer used as a detector and identifier for supercritical fluid chromatography demonstrates low nanogram detection limits and a pressure-limited resolution in excess of 10,000 at m/z 128 for the molecular ion of naphthalene. Supercritical carbon dioxide is introduced directly into the source of a dual differential pumped trapped ion cell generating pressures in the low 10/sup -4/ Torr range with sample detection occurring in the analyzer cell at pressures a factor of 100 lower. Ionization is accomplished by charge exchange with carbon dioxide to yield spectra exhibiting 70-eV-like fragmentation patterns. Supercritical fluid chromatography/Fourier transform mass spectrometry data for three test samples, a six-component mixture of substituted aromatic compounds and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, a five-component barbiturate mixture, and a seven-component pesticide mixture, are presented.

  8. Intracellular Calcium Changes in Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells in Response to Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ritu; Yellowley, Clare E.; Civelek, Mete; Ainslie, Kristy; Hodgson, Louis; Tarbell, John M.; Donahue, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSM) are normally exposed to transmural fluid flow shear stresses, and after vascular injury, blood flow shear stresses are imposed upon them. Since Ca2+ is a ubiquitous intracellular signaling molecule, we examined the effects of fluid flow on intracellular Ca2+ concentration in rat aortic smooth muscle cells to assess VSM responsiveness to shear stress. Cells loaded with fura 2 were exposed to steady flow shear stress levels of 0.510.0 dyn/cm2 in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The percentage of cells displaying a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) increased in response to increasing flow, but there was no effect of flow on the ([Ca2+]i) amplitude of responding cells. Addition of Gd3+ (10 ?M) or thapsigargin (50 nM) significantly reduced the percentage of cells responding and the response amplitude, suggesting that influx of Ca2+ through ion channels and release from intracellular stores contribute to the rise in ([Ca2+]i) in response to flow. The addition of nifedipine (1 or 10 ?M) or ryanodine (10 ?M) also significantly reduced the response amplitude, further defining the role of ion channels and intracellular stores in the Ca2+ response. PMID:12051621

  9. Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Petsche Connell, Jennifer; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that a population of stem cells can be isolated from amniotic fluid removed by amniocentesis that are broadly multipotent and nontumorogenic. These amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSC) could potentially provide an autologous cell source for treatment of congenital defects identified during gestation, particularly cardiovascular defects. In this review, the various methods of isolating, sorting, and culturing AFSC are compared, along with techniques for inducing differentiation into cardiac myocytes and endothelial cells. Although research has not demonstrated complete and high-yield cardiac differentiation, AFSC have been shown to effectively differentiate into endothelial cells and can effectively support cardiac tissue. Additionally, several tissue engineering and regenerative therapeutic approaches for the use of these cells in heart patches, injection after myocardial infarction, heart valves, vascularized scaffolds, and blood vessels are summarized. These applications show great promise in the treatment of congenital cardiovascular defects, and further studies of isolation, culture, and differentiation of AFSC will help to develop their use for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and cardiovascular therapies. PMID:23350771

  10. Natural convection of magnetic fluid in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C.-Y.; Su, W.-P.

    2005-03-01

    The nature convection of a magnetic fluid in a square Hele-Shaw cell is studied experimentally with heat transfer measurements and liquid crystal thermography. Both results show that the vertically imposed magnetic field has destabilizing influence. The flow instability modes become different from that in two-dimensional cavity cases, with and without the magnetic field. A pair of symmetric counter-rotating vortices is observed for the first instability mode.

  11. Synovial fluid antigen-presenting cells unmask peripheral blood T cell responses to bacterial antigens in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Life, P F; Viner, N J; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1990-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells (MC) from patients with both reactive arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides proliferate in vitro in response to bacteria clinically associated with the triggering of reactive arthritis. In all cases, such SFMC responses are greater than the corresponding peripheral blood (PB) MC responses, often markedly so, and the mechanism for this is unclear. We have investigated this phenomenon by comparing the relative abilities of irradiated non-T cells derived from PB and SF to support autologous T cell responses to ReA-associated bacteria. Seven patients whose SFMC had been shown previously to respond to bacteria were studied. We demonstrate antigen-specific responses of PB T cells to bacteria in the presence of SF non-T cells which are in marked contrast to the minimal responses of either unfractionated PBMC or PB T cells reconstituted with PB non-T cells. We also show that PB, but not SF T cells respond strongly to autologous SF non-T cells in the absence of antigen or mitogen. These findings demonstrate that SF antigen-presenting cells (APC) are potent activators of PB T cells. We conclude that the contrasting responses of SFMC and PBMC to bacterial antigens may be accounted for at least in part by an enhanced ability of SF APC to support T cell proliferative responses. PMID:2311298

  12. Synovial fluid antigen-presenting cells unmask peripheral blood T cell responses to bacterial antigens in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Life, P F; Viner, N J; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1990-02-01

    We and others have previously shown that synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells (MC) from patients with both reactive arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides proliferate in vitro in response to bacteria clinically associated with the triggering of reactive arthritis. In all cases, such SFMC responses are greater than the corresponding peripheral blood (PB) MC responses, often markedly so, and the mechanism for this is unclear. We have investigated this phenomenon by comparing the relative abilities of irradiated non-T cells derived from PB and SF to support autologous T cell responses to ReA-associated bacteria. Seven patients whose SFMC had been shown previously to respond to bacteria were studied. We demonstrate antigen-specific responses of PB T cells to bacteria in the presence of SF non-T cells which are in marked contrast to the minimal responses of either unfractionated PBMC or PB T cells reconstituted with PB non-T cells. We also show that PB, but not SF T cells respond strongly to autologous SF non-T cells in the absence of antigen or mitogen. These findings demonstrate that SF antigen-presenting cells (APC) are potent activators of PB T cells. We conclude that the contrasting responses of SFMC and PBMC to bacterial antigens may be accounted for at least in part by an enhanced ability of SF APC to support T cell proliferative responses. PMID:2311298

  13. High transduction efficiency of human amniotic fluid stem cells mediated by adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Grisafi, Davide; Piccoli, Martina; Pozzobon, Michela; Ditadi, Andrea; Zaramella, Patrizia; Chiandetti, Lino; Zanon, Giovanni Franco; Atala, Anthony; Zacchello, Franco; Scarpa, Maurizio; De Coppi, Paolo; Tomanin, Rosella

    2008-10-01

    In the last few years some studies have shown the possibility of deriving progenitors with various potential from the amniotic fluid. Amniocentesis is a widely accepted method for prenatal diagnosis; it is associated with low risk both for the mother and the fetus and overcomes the ethical problems commonly associated to other sources. Recently we have described that amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells, for their ability to differentiate to various lineages, could represent a good candidate for therapeutic applications. For gene therapy purposes human AFS (hAFS) cells should be genetically modified with a therapeutic gene and delivered systematically or injected directly into the tissue of interest. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of transducing hAFS cells with adenoviral vectors and to determine whether transduced stem cells retain the ability to differentiate into different lineages. Herein, we showed that hAFS cells could be efficiently infected by first generation adenovirus vectors. In addition, we demonstrated that infection and expression of two different marker genes, LacZ and EGFP, have no effect on cells phenotype and differentiation potential. In particular, on undifferentiated status, hAFS cells continued to express both the transgenes and stemness cell markers OCT4 and SSEA4. When cultured under mesenchymal conditions, infected cells could still differentiate into osteocytes and adipocytes expressing lineage specific genes. These preliminary findings suggest that adenovirus may be useful to engineer populations of pluripotent stem cells, which may be used in a wide range of gene therapy treatments. PMID:18564037

  14. A cell-based sensor of fluid shear stress for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sarvesh; Voldman, Joel

    2015-03-21

    Microsystems designed for cell-based studies or applications inherently require fluid handling. Flows within such systems inevitably generate fluid shear stress (FSS) that may adversely affect cell health. Simple assays of cell viability, morphology or growth are typically reported to indicate any gross disturbances to cell physiology. However, no straightforward metric exists to specifically evaluate physiological implications of FSS within microfluidic devices, or among competing microfluidic technologies. This paper presents the first genetically encoded cell sensors that fluoresce in a quantitative fashion upon FSS pathway activation. We picked a widely used cell line (NIH3T3s) and created a transcriptional cell-sensor where fluorescence turns on when transcription of a relevant FSS-induced protein is initiated. Specifically, we chose Early Growth Factor-1 (a mechanosensitive protein) upregulation as the node for FSS detection. We verified our sensor pathway specificity and functionality by noting induced fluorescence in response to chemical induction of the FSS pathway, seen both through microscopy and flow cytometry. Importantly, we found our cell sensors to be inducible by a range of FSS intensities and durations, with a limit of detection of 2 dynes cm(-2) when applied for 30 minutes. Additionally, our cell-sensors proved their versatility by showing induction sensitivity when made to flow through an inertial microfluidic device environment with typical flow conditions. We anticipate these cell sensors to have wide application in the microsystems community, allowing the device designer to engineer systems with acceptable FSS, and enabling the end-user to evaluate the impact of FSS upon their assay of interest. PMID:25648195

  15. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall.

  16. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall. PMID:24032936

  17. Differential proteomics analysis of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinsons disease

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lifei; Wang, Dongtao; Wang, Lihong; Lan, Wenjie; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Parkinsons disease (PD) is one common neurodegenerative disease featured with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Multiple factors participate in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. In this study, we investigated the proteomics profiles of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluids from both PD patients and normal people, in order to explore the correlation between disease factors and PD. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from both PD and normal people and were separated for mononuclear cells in vitro. Proteins were then extracted and separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins with differential expressions were identified by comparison to standard proteome expression profile map, followed by software and database analysis. In PD patients, there were 8 proteins with consistent expression profile and 16 proteins with differential expressions. Those differential proteins identified include cytoskeleton proteins (actin, myosin), signal transduction proteins (adenosine cyclase binding protein 1, calcium binding protein, talin) and anti-oxidation factor (thioredoxin peroxide reductase). PD patients had differential protein expressional profiles in the mononuclear cells of cerebrospinal fluids compared to normal people, suggesting the potential involvement of cytoskeleton and signal transduction proteins in apoptosis of neuronal apoptosis and PD pathogenesis. PMID:26823915

  18. Polymer dynamics and fluid flow in actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theriot, Julie

    2005-03-01

    In living cells, nonequilibrium protein polymerization reactions are frequently used to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy and thereby generate useful force for cellular movements. We have examined the polymer and fluid dynamics in two biological cases where the assembly of branched actin filament networks generates force: the intracellular movement of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, and the extension of the leading edge of skin epithelial cells during wound-healing. In both cases, net actin filament assembly occurs at the front of the network structure and net disassembly occurs at the rear. Actin protein subunits and other network components must be recycled through the fluid phase to the front of the polymerizing network in order for forward movement to continue at steady state. For actin-based movement of Listeria monocytogenes, we have found that actin recycling is not rate-limiting; instead, the speed of movement is governed by the cooperative dissociation of groups of noncovalent protein-protein bonds attaching the filamentous network to the bacterial surface. In contrast, rapid actin-based extension at the leading edge of moving epithelial cells is associated with unusual perturbations in intracellular fluid flow.

  19. Atypical manifestation of progressive outer retinal necrosis in AIDS patient with CD4+ T-cell counts more than 100 cells/microL on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Reeponmahar, Somporn; Tantisiriwat, Woraphot

    2009-06-01

    Typical progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is an acute ocular infectious disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with extremely low CD4+ T-cell counts. It is a form of the Varicella- zoster virus (VZV) infection. This destructive infection has an extremely rapid course that may lead to blindness in affected eyes within days or weeks. Attempts at its treatment have had limited success. We describe the case of a bilateral PORN in an AIDS patient with an initial CD4+ T-cell count >100 cells/microL that developed after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A 29-year-old Thai female initially diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 1998, presented with bilaterally decreased visual acuity after initiating HAART two months earlier. Multiple yellowish spots appeared in the deep retina without evidence of intraocular inflammation or retinal vasculitis. Her CD4+ T-cell count was 127 cells/microL. She was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and positive VZV in the aqueous humor and vitreous by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Despite combined treatment with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreous ganciclovir, the patient's visual acuity worsened with no light-perception in either eye. This case suggests that PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of reduced visual acuity in AIDS patients initiating HAART with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. PORN may be a manifestation of the immune reconstitution syndrome. PMID:19702067

  20. Atypical manifestation of progressive outer retinal necrosis in AIDS patient with CD4+ T-cell counts more than 100 cells/microL on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Vichitvejpaisal P; Reeponmahar S; Tantisiriwat W

    2009-06-01

    Typical progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is an acute ocular infectious disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with extremely low CD4+ T-cell counts. It is a form of the Varicella- zoster virus (VZV) infection. This destructive infection has an extremely rapid course that may lead to blindness in affected eyes within days or weeks. Attempts at its treatment have had limited success. We describe the case of a bilateral PORN in an AIDS patient with an initial CD4+ T-cell count >100 cells/microL that developed after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A 29-year-old Thai female initially diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 1998, presented with bilaterally decreased visual acuity after initiating HAART two months earlier. Multiple yellowish spots appeared in the deep retina without evidence of intraocular inflammation or retinal vasculitis. Her CD4+ T-cell count was 127 cells/microL. She was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and positive VZV in the aqueous humor and vitreous by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Despite combined treatment with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreous ganciclovir, the patient's visual acuity worsened with no light-perception in either eye. This case suggests that PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of reduced visual acuity in AIDS patients initiating HAART with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. PORN may be a manifestation of the immune reconstitution syndrome.

  1. Single cell rheometry with a microfluidic constriction: Quantitative control of friction and fluid leaks between cell and channel walls

    PubMed Central

    Preira, Pascal; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Bico, José; Théodoly, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We report how cell rheology measurements can be performed by monitoring the deformation of a cell in a microfluidic constriction, provided that friction and fluid leaks effects between the cell and the walls of the microchannels are correctly taken into account. Indeed, the mismatch between the rounded shapes of cells and the angular cross-section of standard microfluidic channels hampers efficient obstruction of the channel by an incoming cell. Moreover, friction forces between a cell and channels walls have never been characterized. Both effects impede a quantitative determination of forces experienced by cells in a constriction. Our study is based on a new microfluidic device composed of two successive constrictions, combined with optical interference microscopy measurements to characterize the contact zone between the cell and the walls of the channel. A cell squeezed in a first constriction obstructs most of the channel cross-section, which strongly limits leaks around cells. The rheological properties of the cell are subsequently probed during its entry in a second narrower constriction. The pressure force is determined from the pressure drop across the device, the cell velocity, and the width of the gutters formed between the cell and the corners of the channel. The additional friction force, which has never been analyzed for moving and constrained cells before, is found to involve both hydrodynamic lubrication and surface forces. This friction results in the existence of a threshold for moving the cells and leads to a non-linear behavior at low velocity. The friction force can nevertheless be assessed in the linear regime. Finally, an apparent viscosity of single cells can be estimated from a numerical prediction of the viscous dissipation induced by a small step in the channel. A preliminary application of our method yields an apparent loss modulus on the order of 100 Pa s for leukocytes THP-1 cells, in agreement with the literature data. PMID:24404016

  2. AIDS and Non-AIDS Morbidity and Mortality Across the Spectrum of CD4 Cell Counts in HIV-Infected Adults Before Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in Cte dIvoire

    PubMed Central

    Minga, Albert; Gabillard, Delphine; Ouassa, Timothe; Messou, Eugene; Morris, Brandon; Traore, Moussa; Coulibaly, Ali; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Lewden, Charlotte; Mnan, Herv; Abo, Yao; Dakoury-Dogbo, Nicole; Toure, Siaka; Seyler, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background.?In Western Europe, North America, and Australia, large cohort collaborations have been able to estimate the short-term CD4 cell countspecific risk of AIDS or death in untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected adults with high CD4 cell counts. In subSaharan Africa, these CD4 cell countspecific estimates are scarce. Methods.?From 1996 through 2006, we followed up 2 research cohorts of HIV-infected adults in Cte dIvoire. This included follow-up off antiretroviral therapy (ART) across the entire spectrum of CD4 cell counts before the ART era, and only in patients with CD4 cell counts >200?cells/?L once ART became available. Data were censored at ART initiation. We modeled the CD4 cell count decrease using an adjusted linear mixed model. CD4 cell countspecific rates of events were obtained by dividing the number of first events occurring in a given CD4 cell count stratum by the time spent in that stratum. Results.?Eight hundred sixty patients were followed off ART over 2789 person-years (PY). In the ?650, 500649, 350499, 200349, 100199, 5099, and 049?cells/?L CD4 cell count strata, the rates of AIDS or death were 0.9, 1.7, 3.7, 10.4, 30.9, 60.8, and 99.9 events per 100 PY, respectively. In patients with CD4 cell counts ?200 CD4?cells/?L, the most frequent AIDS-defining disease was tuberculosis (decreasing from 4.0 to 0.6 events per 100 PY for 200349 and ?650 cells/?L, respectively), and the most frequent HIV non-AIDS severe diseases were visceral bacterial diseases (decreasing from 9.1 to 3.6 events per 100 PY). Conclusions.?Rates of AIDS or death, tuberculosis, and invasive bacterial diseases are substantial in patients with CD4 cell counts ?200 cells/?L. Tuberculosis and bacterial diseases should be the most important outcomes in future trials of early ART in subSaharan Africa. PMID:22173233

  3. Short-time scale variation of phytoplankton succession in Lisbon bay (Portugal) as revealed by microscopy cell counts and HPLC pigment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A.; Mendes, C. R.; Palma, S.; Brotas, V.

    2008-08-01

    The phytoplankton distribution and composition in Lisbon bay was studied, at a short time scale based on a weekly sampling, during one year (April 2004 - May 2005), using microscopic examination and pigment analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This work is a contribution to the knowledge on species succession and ecology of coastal communities. The frequency of the sampling permitted monitoring peak blooming and decaying, a process which frequently occurred within 1 -2 weeks. Cell counts determined that the classes Dinophyceae, Bacillariophyceae and Prymnesiophyceae dominated the assemblages. Maxima abundances and diversity of phytoplankton were observed from spring to autumn. HPLC analysis reflected the major seasonal variations observed by the cell counts and in addition detected the presence of four small sized phytoplankton classes that were not identified by microscopy. Phytoplankton counts were essential to identify the main contributing species to total chlorophyll a. Fucoxantin, peridinin and 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin appeared as good indicators for diatoms, dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, respectively, with synchronized seasonal variations and significant positive correlations.

  4. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from normal rats stimulates DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, C.C.; McCormick-Shannon, K.; Mason, R.J.

    1989-02-01

    Proliferation of alveolar type II cells after lung injury is important for the restoration of the alveolar epithelium. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) may represent an important source of growth factors for alveolar type II cells. To test this possibility, BALF fluid was collected from normal rats, concentrated 10-fold by Amicon filtration, and tested for its ability to stimulate DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. BALF induced a dose-dependent increase in type II cell DNA synthesis resulting in a 6-fold increase in (3H)thymidine incorporation. Similar doses also stimulated (3H)thymidine incorporation into rat lung fibroblasts by 6- to 8-fold. Removal of pulmonary surface active material by centrifugation did not significantly reduce the stimulatory activity of BALF for type II cells. The stimulation of type II cell DNA synthesis by BALF was reduced by 100% after heating at 100 degrees C for 10 min, and by approximately 80% after reduction with dithiothreitol, and after trypsin treatment. Dialysis of BALF against 1 N acetic acid resulted in a 27% reduction in stimulatory activity. The effect of BALF in promoting type II cell DNA synthesis was more pronounced when tested in the presence of serum, although serum itself has very little effect on type II cell DNA synthesis. When BALF was tested in combination with other substances that stimulate type II cell DNA synthesis (cholera toxin, insulin, epidermal growth factor, and acidic fibroblast growth factor), additive effects or greater were observed. When BALF was chromatographed over Sephadex G150, the activity eluted with an apparent molecular weight of 100 kDa.

  5. Necrosis and apoptosis of polymorphonuclear cells exposed to peritoneal dialysis fluids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cendoroglo, M; Sundaram, S; Groves, C; Ucci, A A; Jaber, B L; Pereira, B J

    1997-12-01

    Conventional peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids are known to inhibit polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) phagocytosis, oxidative burst and enzyme release. However, the relative contributions of apoptosis and/or necrosis to this dysfunction have not been examined. We investigated the effects of osmolality, glucose concentration and heat-sterilization of PD fluids on necrosis and apoptosis of PMN. Polymorphonuclear cells were isolated from 8 healthy volunteers and exposed to different PD fluids for four hours. PMN were then double-stained with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to study the proportion of viable, apoptotic and necrotic cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to confirm the results obtained with flow cytometry. The fluids studied were conventionally heat-sterilized 1.5% Dianeal (1.5% D), conventionally heat-sterilized 4.25% Dianeal (4.25% D), 1.5% D in which the osmolality was increased to that of 4.25% D by adding mannitol (1.5% D + M), a filter-sterilized version of 4.25% D (4.25% D-F) and a 1.1% amino acid PD fluid (AA) (Nutrineal PD4). All PD fluids had their pH equilibrated (pH = 7.4) by the addition of sodium bicarbonate. Compared to PMN exposed to culture medium, a significantly higher proportion of necrosis was observed in PMN exposed to 1.5% D (P = 0.04). The 4.25% D induced greater necrosis than 1.5% D (P = 0.001), and the 4.25% D also induced significantly more necrosis (P = 0.002) compared to 4.25% D-F. These data suggest that the consequences of heat-sterilization, rather than high glucose concentration are responsible for the necrosis observed. Indeed, the proportion of necrotic PMN with 4.25% D-F was not significantly different from 1.5% D. The 1.5% D + M and AA induced significantly more apoptosis compared to 1.5% D (P = 0.006 and P < 0.05, respectively), suggesting that apoptosis can be induced by the high osmolality of PD fluids. However, 1.5% D +/- M also induced significantly more apoptosis (P = 0.007) compared to 4.25% D-F. This suggests that the apoptosis effect is specific for the osmolyte present in PD fluids, and that mannitol and amino acids induce more apoptosis than glucose. In summary, the different non-physiological components of conventional PD fluids evaluated in this study had a differential effect on PMN survival. Heat sterilization of high glucose-containing PD fluids was associated predominantly with necrosis of PMN, and high osmolality with apoptosis. PMID:9407510

  6. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows surface-linked ligands to diffuse freely in two dimensions. Ligands can become reorganized beneath cells, by reaction-diffusion processes, and may also adopt spatial configurations reflecting those of their cognate receptors on the cell surface (Figure 1B). This provides a significant benefit over conventional cell signaling and culturing systems that present inflexible distributions of signaling molecules. In this study, we observe marked differences in the response of cells to membrane surface displayed soluble ligands as a function of membrane fluidity. Tethering of soluble signaling molecules to fluid supported membranes opens up opportunities to use already developed membrane fabrication technologies to present soluble components within a surface array format.

  7. Spindle Shaped Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells from Amniotic Fluid Promote Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Pappa, Kalliopi I.; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Watt, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid obtained at amniocentesis, when cultured, generates at least two morphologically distinct mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) subsets. Of these, the spindle shaped amniotic fluid MSCs (SS-AF-MSCs) contain multipotent cells with enhanced adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic capacity. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, the capacity of these SS-AF-MSCs to support neovascularization by umbilical cord blood (UCB) endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) derived cells in both in vitro and in vivo models. Interestingly, although the kinetics of vascular tubule formation in vitro were similar when the supporting SS-AF-MSCs were compared with the best vasculogenic supportive batches of bone marrow MSCs (BMSCs) or human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs), SS-AF-MSCs supported vascular tubule formation in vivo more effectively than BMSCs. In NOD/SCID mice, the human vessels inosculated with murine vessels demonstrating their functionality. Proteome profiler array analyses revealed both common and distinct secretion profiles of angiogenic factors by the SS-AF-MSCs as opposed to the hDFs and BMSCs. Thus, SS-AF-MSCs, which are considered to be less mature developmentally than adult BMSCs, and intermediate between adult and embryonic stem cells in their potentiality, have the additional and very interesting potential of supporting increased neovascularisation, further enhancing their promise as vehicles for tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:23359810

  8. Proteomic analysis of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm cells grown under physiologically relevant fluid shear stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The biofilm forming bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for maladies ranging from severe skin infection to major diseases such as bacteremia, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. A flow displacement system was used to grow S. aureus biofilms in four physiologically relevant fluid shear rates (50, 100, 500 and 1000s-1) to identify proteins that are associated with biofilm. Results Global protein expressions from the membrane and cytosolic fractions of S. aureus biofilm cells grown under the above shear rate conditions are reported. Sixteen proteins in the membrane-enriched fraction and eight proteins in the cytosolic fraction showed significantly altered expression (p?fluid shear. These 24 proteins were identified using nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS. They were found to be associated with various metabolic functions such as glycolysis / TCA pathways, protein synthesis and stress tolerance. Increased fluid shear stress did not influence the expression of two important surface binding proteins: fibronectin-binding and collagen-binding proteins. Conclusions The reported data suggest that while the general metabolic function of the sessile bacteria is minimal under high fluid shear stress conditions, they seem to retain the binding capacity to initiate new infections. PMID:24855455

  9. Application of Fluid Mechanical Force to Embryonic Sources of Hemogenic Endothelium and Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Diaz, Miguel F.; Wenzel, Pamela L.

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, hemodynamic forces caused by blood flow support vascular remodeling, arterialization of luminal endothelium, and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) emergence. Previously, we reported that fluid shear stress plays a key role in stimulating nitric oxide (NO) signaling in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) and is essential for definitive hematopoiesis. We employed a Dynamic Flow System modified from a cone-and-plate assembly to precisely regulate in vitro exposure of AGM cells to a defined pattern of laminar shear stress. Here, we present the design of a microfluidic platform accessible to any research group that requires small cell numbers and allows for recirculation of paracrine signaling factors with minimal damage to nonadherent hematopoietic progenitors and stem cells. We detail the assembly of the microfluidic platform using commercially available components and provide specific guidance in the use of an emerging standard in the measurement of embryonic HSC potential, intravenous neonatal transplantation. PMID:25063503

  10. Effector T-cell trafficking between the leptomeninges and the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Körner, Henrike; Krueger, Martin; Vidoli, Stefano; Haberl, Michael; Mielke, Dorothee; Brylla, Elke; Issekutz, Thomas; Cabañas, Carlos; Nelson, Peter J; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Rohde, Veit; Bechmann, Ingo; Lodygin, Dmitri; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander

    2016-02-18

    In multiple sclerosis, brain-reactive T cells invade the central nervous system (CNS) and induce a self-destructive inflammatory process. T-cell infiltrates are not only found within the parenchyma and the meninges, but also in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that bathes the entire CNS tissue. How the T cells reach the CSF, their functionality, and whether they traffic between the CSF and other CNS compartments remains hypothetical. Here we show that effector T cells enter the CSF from the leptomeninges during Lewis rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. While moving through the three-dimensional leptomeningeal network of collagen fibres in a random Brownian walk, T cells were flushed from the surface by the flow of the CSF. The detached cells displayed significantly lower activation levels compared to T cells from the leptomeninges and CNS parenchyma. However, they did not represent a specialized non-pathogenic cellular sub-fraction, as their gene expression profile strongly resembled that of tissue-derived T cells and they fully retained their encephalitogenic potential. T-cell detachment from the leptomeninges was counteracted by integrins VLA-4 and LFA-1 binding to their respective ligands produced by resident macrophages. Chemokine signalling via CCR5/CXCR3 and antigenic stimulation of T cells in contact with the leptomeningeal macrophages enforced their adhesiveness. T cells floating in the CSF were able to reattach to the leptomeninges through steps reminiscent of vascular adhesion in CNS blood vessels, and invade the parenchyma. The molecular/cellular conditions for T-cell reattachment were the same as the requirements for detachment from the leptomeningeal milieu. Our data indicate that the leptomeninges represent a checkpoint at which activated T cells are licensed to enter the CNS parenchyma and non-activated T cells are preferentially released into the CSF, from where they can reach areas of antigen availability and tissue damage. PMID:26863192

  11. Ocular Fluid As a Replacement for Serum in Cell Cryopreservation Media

    PubMed Central

    Venna, Naresh Kumar; Murthy, Ch Lakshmi N.; Idris, Mohammed M.; Goel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Cryostorage is of immense interest in biomedical research, especially for stem cell-based therapies and fertility preservation. Several protocols have been developed for efficient cryopreservation of cells and tissues, and a combination of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) is commonly used. However, there is a need for an alternative to FBS because of ethical reasons, high cost, and risk of contamination with blood-borne diseases. The objective of the present study was to examine the possibility of using buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) ocular fluid (BuOF) to replace FBS in cryomedia. Frozen–thawed cells, which were cryopreserved in a cryomedia with BuOF, were assessed for viability, early and late apoptosis, and proliferation. Three cell lines (CHO, HEK, and C18-4), mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, and primary cells, such as mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs), and mouse bone marrow cells (mBMCs), were cryopreserved in cryomedia containing 10% DMSO (D10) with 20% FBS (D10S20) or D10 with 20% BuOF (D10O20). For all three cell lines and mES cells cryopreserved in either D10S20 or D10O20, thawed cells showed no difference in cell viability or cell recovery. Western blot analysis of frozen–thawed-cultured cells revealed that the expression of Annexin V and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins, and the ratio of BAX/BCL2 proteins were similar in all three cell lines, mES cells, and hPBMCs cryopreserved in D10S20 and D10O20. However, initial cell viability, cell recovery after culture, and PCNA expression were significantly lower in MEF cells, and the BAX/BCL2 protein ratio was elevated in mBMCs cryopreserved in D10O20. Biochemical and proteomic analysis of BuOF showed the presence of several components that may have roles in imparting the cryoprotective property of BuOF. These results encourage further research to develop an efficient serum-free cryomedia for several cell types using BuOF. PMID:26135924

  12. White Blood Cell, Neutrophil, and Lymphocyte Counts in Individuals in the Evacuation Zone Designated by the Government After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident: The Fukushima Health Management Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Akira; Ohira, Tetsuya; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Ohtsuru, Akira; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kobashi, Gen; Ozasa, Kotaro; Yasumura, Seiji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Lymphocytes are susceptible to damage from radiation, and the white blood cell (WBC) count, including counts of neutrophils and lymphocytes, is a useful method of dosimetry. According to the basic survey of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS), among 13 localities where evacuation was recommended, Iitate and Namie had more individuals with external radiation exposure of more than 5 mSv than the other evacuation areas. We analyzed whether or not WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts decreased after the disaster. Methods The subjects of this study were 45 278 men and women aged 20 to 99 years (18 953 men and 26 325 women; mean age 56 years) in the evacuation zone who participated in the Comprehensive Health Check (CHC) from June 2011 to the end of March 2012. Results Significant differences were detected in the mean values of WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts, and for the proportion of individuals under the minimum standard for WBC and neutrophil counts, among the 13 localities. However, the distribution of individuals at each 200-cell/L increment in lymphocyte count were similar in these areas, and the WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts did not decrease in Iitate or Namie specifically. Conclusions No marked effects of radiation exposure on the distribution of WBC counts, including neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were detected within one year after the disaster in the evacuation zone. PMID:25311030

  13. Fuel cell assembly unit for promoting fluid service and electrical conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.

    1999-01-01

    Fluid service and/or electrical conductivity for a fuel cell assembly is promoted. Open-faced flow channel(s) are formed in a flow field plate face, and extend in the flow field plate face between entry and exit fluid manifolds. A resilient gas diffusion layer is located between the flow field plate face and a membrane electrode assembly, fluidly serviced with the open-faced flow channel(s). The resilient gas diffusion layer is restrained against entering the open-faced flow channel(s) under a compressive force applied to the fuel cell assembly. In particular, a first side of a support member abuts the flow field plate face, and a second side of the support member abuts the resilient gas diffusion layer. The support member is formed with a plurality of openings extending between the first and second sides of the support member. In addition, a clamping pressure is maintained for an interface between the resilient gas diffusion layer and a portion of the membrane electrode assembly. Preferably, the support member is spikeless and/or substantially flat. Further, the support member is formed with an electrical path for conducting current between the resilient gas diffusion layer and position(s) on the flow field plate face.

  14. [Differentiation of human amniotic fluid stem cells into cardiomyocytes through embryonic body formation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Shuai; Cheng, Xiang; Dou, Zhongying; Wang, Huayan

    2008-09-01

    To isolate human amniotic fluid stem cells (hASCs) and induce hASCs into cardiomyocytes after forming the embryonic bodies. We cultivated hASCs isolated from the amniotic fluid continually for over 42 passages. The biological characteristics of hASCs were detected by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and flow cytometer, hASCs at 10-15th passage were suspension cultured to form embryonic bodies that were induced to cardiomyocytes. Fibroblastoid-type hASCs were obtained. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that hASCs were positive for some specific makers of the embryonic stem cell. hASCs could form embryonic bodies that were alkaline-phosphatase positive and expressed fgf5, zeta-globin and alpha-fetoprotein. The embryonic bodies could differentiate into cardiomyocytes showing alpha-actin positive and Tbx5, Nkx2.5, GATA4 and alpha-MHC positive. We conclued that hASCs obtained from human amniotic fluid could differentiate into cardiomyocytes through the formation of embryonic bodies. PMID:19160841

  15. A compact 7-cell Si-drift detector module for high-count rate X-ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, K.; Reckleben, C.; Diehl, I.; Klr, H.

    2015-01-01

    A new Si-drift detector module for fast X-ray spectroscopy experiments was developed and realized. The Peltier-cooled module comprises a sensor with 7 7-mm2 active area, an integrated circuit for amplification, shaping and detection, storage, and derandomized readout of signal pulses in parallel, and amplifiers for line driving. The compactness and hexagonal shape of the module with a wrench size of 16mm allow very short distances to the specimen and multi-module arrangements. The power dissipation is 186mW. At a shaper peaking time of 190 ns and an integration time of 450 ns an electronic rms noise of ~11 electrons was achieved. When operated at 7 C, FWHM line widths around 260 and 460 eV (Cu-K?) were obtained at low rates and at sum-count rates of 1.7 MHz, respectively. The peak shift is below 1% for a broad range of count rates. At 1.7-MHz sum-count rate the throughput loss amounts to 30%. PMID:26366028

  16. PIMA Point of Care CD4+ Cell Count Machines in Remote MNCH Settings: Lessons Learned from Seven Districts in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai; Chiyaka, Edward T.; Mushayi, Wellington; Musuka, Godfrey; Naluyinda-Kitabire, Florence; Mushavi, Angella; Chikwasha, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    An evaluation was commissioned to generate evidence on the impact of PIMA point-of-care CD4+ count machines in maternal and new-born child health settings in Zimbabwe; document best practices, lessons learned, challenges, and recommendations related to scale up of this new technology. A mixed methodology approach that included 31 in-depth interviews with stakeholders involved in procurement, distribution, and use of the POC machines was employed. Additionally, data was also abstracted from 207 patient records from 35 sites with the PIMA POC CD4+ count machines and 10 other comparative sites without the machine. A clearer training strategy was found to be necessary. The average time taken to initiate clients on antiretroviral treatment (ART) was substantially less, 15 days (IQR-1-149) for sites with a PIMA POC machine as compared to 32.7 days (IQR-1-192) at sites with no PIMA POC machine. There was general satisfaction because of the presence of the PIMA POC CD4+ count machine at sites that also initiated ART. PMID:24847177

  17. A Study of Alternate Biomarkers in HIV Disease and Evaluating their Efficacy in Predicting T CD4+ Cell Counts and Disease Progression in Resource Poor Settings in Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Era

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, K V; Sabitha, V; Rao, Ratna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS, has been a challenge to medical fraternity since it was first discovered in 1983. About 40 million people are living with HIV infection globally and 99% of the infected people are in south East Asia (SEA). Traditionally, HIV disease and progression, initiation of HAART and response to therapy is monitored by assessing in regular intervals, the T CD4+ cell counts and plasma HIV/RNA viral load. Resource poor, low and low middle income group countries still have no finances to acquire infrastructure and scientific technology for performing such tests. Objectives: Since very few studies are available, they have demonstrated the role of alternate biomarkers that can be used to predict CD4 cell counts and thereby, monitor HIV disease progression and HAART. We aimed to measure certain haematological parameters in HIV seropositive patients and to evaluate their efficacy in predicting TCD4+ cell counts. Methods: The study group included 250 HIV seropositive patients with an age range of 18-65 years. 140(56%) males and 110(44%) females were included in the study. Absolute TCD4+cell counts and CD8+T cell counts were measured by using a flow cytometer. (MMWR Recommendations and Reports, 1992) TLC; HB%, AEC and ESR were estimated by using conventional haematological methods. CRP was evaluated by latex agglutination test (Immuno CRP Latex Agglutination Test). Results: Among the tested haematological markers, a TLC of <1800 cells/mm3 showed high specificity (100%) in predicting CD4 counts of < 200 cells/mm3, with an accuracy of 61.46%. Haemoglobin and Absolute Eosinophilic counts showed high specificities of 84.09% and 94.32% respectively in predicting CD4 counts which were below 350 cells/mm3. ESR with 98.98% sensitivity and AEC which had 83.67% sensitivity were able to predict CD4 counts of <200 cells/mm3. Conclusion: Among the tested biomarkers, it was seen that Absolute Eosinophilic counts of more than 550 cells/mm3, Blood Haemoglobin which was less than 10 g%, ESR which measured more than 20 mm, CRP values of >1.2 and TLC of <1800 cells/mm3 could be helpful in predicting CD4 cell counts of < 350 and <200 cells/mm3. PMID:23998059

  18. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  19. Silicone fluid as a high-pressure medium in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, D.D.; Clarke, D.R.; Schiferl, D.

    1996-02-01

    The usefulness of a silicone oil, Dow Corning 200, as a pressure medium in diamond anvil cells has been investigated. Common indicators of deviatoric stresses on ruby, such as changes in the {ital R}-line widths and the {ital R}2-{ital R}1 peak separation, show that this fluid does not deviate from hydrostaticity up to {approximately}15 GPa (150 kbar). The behavior of silicone is found to be very similar to the commonly used 4:1 methanol:ethanol mixture, while being much easier to use because of its higher viscosity. This ease of use and excellent performance makes silicone fluid a superior pressure medium. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Surface force confinement cell for neutron reflectometry studies of complex fluids under nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Hie J; Smith, Gregory S; Hamilton, William A; Mulder, Dennis J; Kuhl, Tonya L; Mays, Jimmy

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we describe the construction of a new neutron surface force confinement cell (NSFCC). The NSFCC is equipped with hydraulically powered in situ, temporally stable, force control system for simultaneous neutron reflectometry studies of nanoconfined complex fluid systems. Test measurements with deuterated toluene confined between two opposing diblock copolymer (polystyrene+poly 2-vinylpyridine) coated quartz substrates demonstrate the capabilities of the NSFCC. With increasing hydraulically applied force, a series of well-defined decreasing separations were observed from neutron reflectivity measurements. No noticeable changes in the hydraulic pressure used for controlling the surface separation were observed during the measurements, demonstrating the high stability of the apparatus. This newly designed NSFCC introduces a higher level of control for studies of confinement and consequent finite size effects on nanoscale structure in a variety of complex fluid and soft condensed matter systems. PMID:19044730

  1. Shape transitions of fluid vesicles and red blood cells in capillary flows

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of fluid vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) in cylindrical capillary flow is studied by using a three-dimensional mesoscopic simulation approach. As flow velocity increases, a model RBC is found to transit from a nonaxisymmetric discocyteto an axisymmetric parachute shape (coaxial with the flow axis), while a fluid vesicle is found to transit from a discocyte to a prolate ellipsoid. Both shape transitions reduce the flow resistance. The critical velocities of the shape transitions are linearly dependent on the bending rigidity and on the shear modulus of the membrane. Slipper-like shapes of the RBC model are observed around the transition velocities. Our results are in good agreement with experiments on RBCs. PMID:16186506

  2. Shape transitions of fluid vesicles and red blood cells in capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-10-01

    The dynamics of fluid vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) in cylindrical capillary flow is studied by using a three-dimensional mesoscopic simulation approach. As flow velocity increases, a model RBC is found to transit from a nonaxisymmetric discocyteto an axisymmetric parachute shape (coaxial with the flow axis), while a fluid vesicle is found to transit from a discocyte to a prolate ellipsoid. Both shape transitions reduce the flow resistance. The critical velocities of the shape transitions are linearly dependent on the bending rigidity and on the shear modulus of the membrane. Slipper-like shapes of the RBC model are observed around the transition velocities. Our results are in good agreement with experiments on RBCs. mesoscale hydrodynamics simulation | microfluidics | shape transformations

  3. A Multiplexed Assay to Detect Antimicrobial Peptides in Biological Fluids and Cell Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Austin W.; Zhao, Yifeng; Landman, Alison S.; Garcia, Marta Rodriguez; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal tissues represent the front line in defense against potential pathogens, and one means by which mucosa provide protection is via the secretion of antimicrobials which can interfere with potential pathogens as well as recruit and modify the responses of immune cells. Here we describe adaptation of ELISA assays to microsphere format, facilitating simultaneous quantification of antimicrobial peptides including elafin, MIP3α, HBD2, HBD3, SLPI, RANTES, SDF1, lactoferrin, LL-37, and HNP1-3. The multiplexed assay exhibits excellent reproducibility, shows linearity over a two order of magnitude concentration range for most analytes, is compatible with biological fluids such as cervicovaginal lavage fluid, and presents significant cost and sample savings relative to traditional ELISA assays. PMID:24035708

  4. Characteristics of silicone fluid as a pressure transmitting medium in diamond anvil cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongrong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Pravica, Michael; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2004-11-01

    The properties of a silicone fluid with initial viscosity of 1 cst as a pressure transmitting medium for diamond anvil cells have been determined by ruby R1 line broadening and R1-R2 separation measurements to 64 GPa at ambient temperature. By these criteria, the silicone fluid is as good a pressure medium as a 4:1 methanol:ethanol mixture at low pressures to about 20 GPa, and is better than the mixture at higher pressures. Although argon media are better than the silicone at pressures to 30 GPa, this silicone behaves as well as argon at higher pressures. Furthermore, the silicone is easier to load than argon and is almost chemically inert.

  5. Application of multiple levels of fluid shear stress to endothelial cells plated on polyacrylamide gels

    PubMed Central

    Galie, P. A.; van Oosten, A.; Chen, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of endothelial cell response to fluid shear stress have previously been performed on unphysiologically rigid substrates. We describe the design and implementation of a microfluidic device that applies discrete levels of shear stress to cells plated on hydrogel-based substrates of physiologicallyrelevant stiffness. The setup allows for measurements of cell morphology and inflammatory response to the combined stimuli, and identifies mechanisms by which vascular stiffening leads to pathological responses to blood flow. We found that the magnitude of shear stress required to affect endothelial cell morphology and inflammatory response depended on substrate stiffness. Endothelial cells on 100 Pa substrates demonstrate a greater increase in cell area and cortical stiffness and decrease in NF-?B nuclear translocation in response to TNF-? treatment compared to controls than cells plated on 10 kPa substrates. The response of endothelial cells on soft substrates to shear stress depends on the presence of hyaluronan (HA). These results emphasize the importance of substrate stiffness on endothelial function, and elucidate a means by which vascular stiffening in aging and disease can impact the endothelium. PMID:25573790

  6. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell degradation: A parametric analysis using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozden, Ender; Tari, Ilker

    2016-02-01

    A Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is numerically investigated both as fresh and as degraded with the help of observed degradation patterns reported in the literature. The fresh fuel cell model is validated and verified with the data from the literature. Modifying the model by varying the parameters affected by degradation, a degraded PEM fuel cell model is created. The degraded fuel cell is parametrically analyzed by using a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. The investigated parameters are the membrane equivalent weight, the Catalyst Layer (CL) porosity and viscous resistance, the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) porosity and viscous resistance, and the bipolar plate contact resistance. It is shown for the first time that PEM fuel cell overall degradation can be numerically estimated by combining experimental data from degraded individual components. By comparing the simulation results for the fresh and the degraded PEM fuel cells for two years of operation, it is concluded that the effects of overall degradation on cell potential is significant - estimated to be 17% around the operating point of the fuel cell at 0.95 V open circuit voltage and 70 °C operating temperature.

  7. [Molecular Karyotyping of Cell-Free DNA from Blastocoele Fluid as a Basis for Noninvasive Preimplantation Genetic Screening of Aneuploidy].

    PubMed

    Skryabin, N A; Lebedev, I N; Artukhova, V G; Zhigalina, D I; Stepanov, I A; Krivoschekova, G V; Svetlakov, A V

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of DNA fragments in the blastocoele fluid is promising for the development of new noninvasive methods for the preimplantation genetic diagnosis of chromosomal diseases. However, to date there are no data confirming the concordance between the molecular karyotype of cell-free DNA from blastocoele fluid and the blastocyst cells per se. This paper reports on this concordance according to the results of molecular-cytogenetic analysis of the chromosomal set with the use of comparative genomic hybridization. PMID:26845860

  8. Total Lymphocyte Count and Haemoglobin Concentration Combined as a Surrogate Marker for Initiating Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in a Resource-limited Setting as against CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Dhamangaonkar, AC; Mathew, A; Pazare, AR

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To find a sensitive and low-cost surrogate marker for CD4 count for initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) [CD4 < 200 /mm3], in the form of total lymphocyte count (TLC) < 1200 /mm3 combined with haemoglobin (Hb) with multiple Hb cut-offs. Method: Two hundred and three consecutive treatment-nave adult HIV positive outpatients attending the virology clinic in World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage 1, 2 or 3 were enrolled in the study. Their complete blood counts and CD4 counts were done. Descriptive statistics was done by two methods correlating TLC alone with CD4 and the other using combined marker of TLC and Hb with CD4 count. Result: Total lymphocyte count alone did not correlate well with CD4 counts (r = 0.13; p = 0.065). Sensitivity of TLC < 1200 /mm3 to predict CD4 < 200 /mm3 was low (23.27%) and the sensitivity of the combined marker (TLC + Hb) increased with higher Hb cut-offs. Conclusion: Adding Hb to TLC markedly improved the sensitivity of the marker to predict CD4 count < 200/mm3. We also recommend a trade-off Hb cut-off of 10.5 g/dL for optimum sensitivity and specificity in this population subset. PMID:25781283

  9. A fictitious domain method with a hybrid cell model for simulating motion of cells in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Wenrui; Xu, Zhiliang; Liu, Chun; Lin, Guang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we develop a hybrid model to represent membranes of biological cells and use the distributed-Lagrange-multiplier/fictitious-domain (DLM/FD) formulation for simulating the fluid/cell interactions. The hybrid model representing the cellular structure consists of a continuum representation of the lipid bilayer, from which the bending force is calculated through energetic variational approach, a discrete cytoskeleton model utilizing the worm-like chain to represent network filament, and area/volume constraints. For our computational scheme, a formally second-order accurate fractional step scheme is employed to decouple the entire system into three sub-systems: a fluid problem, a solid problem and a Lagrange multiplier problem. The flow problem is solved by the projection method; the solid problem based on the cell model is solved by a combination of level set method, ENO reconstruction, and the Newton method; and the Lagrange multiplier problem is solved by immerse boundary interpolation. The incompressibility of the material is implemented with the penalty function method. Numerical results compare favorably with previously reported numerical and experimental results, and show that our method is suited to the simulation of the cell motion in flow.

  10. Reliable and Accurate CD4+ T Cell Count and Percent by the Portable Flow Cytometer CyFlow MiniPOC and CD4 Easy Count Kit-Dry, as Revealed by the Comparison with the Gold Standard Dual Platform Technology

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, Milena; De Biasi, Sara; Bianchini, Elena; Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Scacchetti, Tiziana; Trenti, Tommaso; Borghi, Vanni; Mussini, Cristina; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background An accurate and affordable CD4+ T cells count is an essential tool in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Flow cytometry (FCM) is the gold standard for counting such cells, but this technique is expensive and requires sophisticated equipment, temperature-sensitive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and trained personnel. The lack of access to technical support and quality assurance programs thus limits the use of FCM in resource-constrained countries. We have tested the accuracy, the precision and the carry-over contamination of Partec CyFlow MiniPOC, a portable and economically affordable flow cytometer designed for CD4+ count and percentage, used along with the CD4% Count Kit-Dry. Materials and Methods Venous blood from 59 adult HIV+ patients (age: 2558 years; 43 males and 16 females) was collected and stained with the MiniPOC CD4% Count Kit-Dry. CD4+ count and percentage were then determined in triplicate by the CyFlow MiniPOC. In parallel, CD4 count was performed using mAbs and a CyFlow Counter, or by a dual platform system (from Beckman Coulter) based upon Cytomic FC500 (Cytostat tetrachrome kit for mAbs) and Coulter HmX Hematology Analyzer (for absolute cell count). Results The accuracy of CyFlow MiniPOC against Cytomic FC500 showed a correlation coefficient (CC) of 0.98 and 0.97 for CD4+ count and percentage, respectively. The accuracy of CyFlow MiniPOC against CyFlow Counter showed a CC of 0.99 and 0.99 for CD4 T cell count and percentage, respectively. CyFlow MiniPOC showed an excellent repeatability: CD4+ cell count and percentage were analyzed on two instruments, with an intra-assay precision below 5% deviation. Finally, there was no carry-over contamination for samples at all CD4 values, regardless of their position in the sequence of analysis. Conclusion The cost-effective CyFlow MiniPOC produces rapid, reliable and accurate results that are fully comparable with those from highly expensive dual platform systems. PMID:25622041

  11. Defect in recruiting effector memory CD8+ T-cells in malignant pleural effusions compared to normal pleural fluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusions (MPE) are a common and fatal complication in cancers including lung or breast cancers, or malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). MPE animal models and immunotherapy trials in MPM patients previously suggested defects of the cellular immunity in MPE. However only few observational studies of the immune response were done in MPM patients, using questionable control groups (transudate). Methods We compared T cell populations evaluated by flow cytometry from blood and pleural effusion of untreated patients with MPM (n?=?58), pleural metastasis of adenocarcinoma (n?=?30) or with benign pleural lesions associated with asbestos exposure (n?=?23). Blood and pleural fluid were also obtained from healthy subjects, providing normal values for T cell populations. Results Blood CD4+ or CD8+ T cells percentages were similar in all groups of patients or healthy subjects. Whereas pleural fluid from healthy controls contained mainly CD8+ T cells, benign or malignant pleural effusions included mainly CD4+ T cells. Effector memory T cells were the main T cell subpopulation in pleural fluid from healthy subjects. In contrast, there was a striking and selective recruitment of central memory CD4+ T cells in MPE, but not of effector cells CD8+ T cells or NK cells in the pleural fluid as one would expect in order to obtain an efficient immune response. Conclusions Comparing for the first time MPE to pleural fluid from healthy subjects, we found a local defect in recruiting effector CD8+ T cells, which may be involved in the escape of tumor cells from immune response. Further studies are needed to characterize which subtypes of effector CD8+ T cells are involved, opening prospects for cell therapy in MPE and MPM. PMID:23816056

  12. Performance Evaluation of the Plateletworks in the Measurement of Blood Cell Counts as compared to the Beckman Coulter Unicel DXH 800

    PubMed Central

    McNair, Erick; Qureshi, A. Mabood; Bally, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Prior to undergoing cardiac surgery many patients may have impaired platelet function due to platelet inhibition. Point of care testing (POCT) that produces quick results of platelet counts and function allow earlier clinician interpretation, diagnosis and treatment. Before being adopted for routine clinical use, a POCT devices performance must be evaluated by standard laboratory techniques to ensure high quality results. The purpose of this study is to determine the performance of the Plateletworks BC 3200 automated hematology analyzer by correlating its precision, accuracy and linearity for the measurement of blood counts to our hospital central laboratory analyzer (Beckman Coulter Unicel DXH 800). The study utilizes well described methods for Within-Run and Day-to-Day precision, comparison of methods (bias), and linearity. Control samples from the manufacturer were used for the precision studies, blood samples from 115 cardiac surgical subjects were used for comparison of methods and accuracy, and pre-diluted control samples from the manufacturer were used for the linearity studies. The precision of the Plateletworks analyzer was acceptable. The overall coefficient of variation (CV) for the measured parameters at all levels of control for Within-Run precision was acceptable ranging from 0.656.4%. Likewise, the CV for the measured parameters at all levels of control for Day-to-Day precision was acceptable ranging from 1.45% to 6.7%. The correlation and accuracy between the two analyzers for the evaluated parameters (platelets, red blood cells, white blood cells, and hemoglobin) was acceptable. The linearity for the measured parameters was also acceptable with a range between 98100%. The performance of the Plateletworks analyzer was acceptable for providing blood cell counts as compared to our central hospital laboratory analyzer. PMID:26405360

  13. Increased Levels of Erythropoietin in Nipple Aspirate Fluid and in Ductal Cells from Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mannello, Ferdinando; Fabbri, Laura; Ciandrini, Eleonora; Tonti, Gaetana A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Erythropoietin (Epo) is an important regulator of erythropoiesis, and controls proliferation and differentiation of both erythroid and non-erythroid tissues. Epo is actively synthesized by breast cells during lactation, and also plays a role in breast tissues promoting hypoxia-induced cancer initiation. Our aims are to perform an exploratory investigation on the Epo accumulation in breast secretions from healthy and cancer patients and its localization in breast cancer cells. Methods: Epo was determined by ELISA, immunoprecipitation, western blot and immunocytochemical analyses in 130 Nipple Aspirate Fluids (NAF) from 102 NoCancer and 28 Breast Cancer (BC) patients, comparing results with those found in 10 milk, 45 serum samples and breast cancer cell lines. Results: Epo levels in NAFs were significantly higher than those in milk and serum. No difference in Epo electrophoretic mobility was found among NAF, milk and serum samples, and conditioned cell culture medium. Immunolocalization of intracellular Epo in ductal cells floating in BC NAFs was similar to those of cancer cell lines. No significant correlation between TNM classification and Epo in NAFs from BC patients was found. Significantly higher Epo concentration was found in NAF from BC patients compared to