Science.gov

Sample records for fluid leak analysis

  1. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  2. Capacitive system detects and locates fluid leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Electronic monitoring system automatically detects and locates minute leaks in seams of large fluid storage tanks and pipelines covered with thermal insulation. The system uses a capacitive tape-sensing element that is adhesively bonded over seams where fluid leaks are likely to occur.

  3. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  4. Leak location in fluid filled cables using the PFT method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafurian, R.; Dominguez, J.; Tai, N.; Dietz, R.N.; Rodenbaugh, T.

    1999-01-01

    A new method of pinpointing dielectric fluid leaks on pipe-type and self-contained cables using perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) is presented. The method has successfully been used on the Con Edison transmission system to locate leaks of dielectric fluid on both types of cables. Application of the PFT technique does not require feeder deenergization and provides major advantages over the conventional method of freeze and pressure testing. Description of the method and results of field application are presented in the paper.

  5. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-05-31

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  6. STS-35 scrub 3 hydrogen leak analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seymour, Dave

    1991-01-01

    During the summer of 1990, space shuttle Columbia experienced both an external tank/orbiter disconnect hydrogen leak and multiple internal aft compartment hydrogen leaks. After the third scrub of STS-35, a leak investigation team was organized. In support of this team, an analysis of the data obtained during scrub 3 was performed. Based on this analysis, the engine 2 prevalve was concluded to be the most likely leak location and to account for most of the observed leakage.

  7. Management of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Encephaloceles.

    PubMed

    Illing, Elisa A; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-08-01

    Encephaloceles and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks of the frontal sinus may result from congenital, traumatic, spontaneous, or neoplastic causes. Paramount to success is adequate preoperative planning with accurate history, physical exam, endoscopy, imaging, and testing to confirm location of the leak and origin of the disease. Generally, frontal sinus CSF leaks may be addressed endoscopically with favorable anatomy, proper surgical technique, and appropriate equipment. Open surgical approaches (eg, osteoplastic flap) are often required for superior/lateral defects or if the surgeon is not experienced with endoscopic frontal sinus techniques. PMID:27450619

  8. Leak locating microphone, method and system for locating fluid leaks in pipes

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Spevak, Lev

    1994-01-01

    A leak detecting microphone inserted directly into fluid within a pipe includes a housing having a first end being inserted within the pipe and a second opposed end extending outside the pipe. A diaphragm is mounted within the first housing end and an acoustic transducer is coupled to the diaphragm for converting acoustical signals to electrical signals. A plurality of apertures are provided in the housing first end, the apertures located both above and below the diaphragm, whereby to equalize fluid pressure on either side of the diaphragm. A leak locating system and method are provided for locating fluid leaks within a pipe. A first microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a first selected location and sound is detected at the first location. A second microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a second selected location and sound is detected at the second location. A cross-correlation is identified between the detected sound at the first and second locations for identifying a leak location.

  9. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis on Privacy Leak Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  10. Comprehensive quantitative analysis on privacy leak behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  11. PROCESSES AFFECTING SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document focuses solely on the process affecting migration of fluids from a leaking tank and their effects on monitoring methodologies. Based upon the reviews presented, soil heterogeneities and the potential for multiphase flow will lead to high monitoring uncertainties if l...

  12. Method and apparatus for continuous fluid leak monitoring and detection in analytical instruments and instrument systems

    DOEpatents

    Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.

    2010-07-13

    A method and device are disclosed that provide for detection of fluid leaks in analytical instruments and instrument systems. The leak detection device includes a collection tube, a fluid absorbing material, and a circuit that electrically couples to an indicator device. When assembled, the leak detection device detects and monitors for fluid leaks, providing a preselected response in conjunction with the indicator device when contacted by a fluid.

  13. Surgical challenge: endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) result from an abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the extracranial space. Approximately 90% of CSF leak at the anterior skull base manifests as rhinorrhea and can become life-threatening condition. Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) has become a common otolaryngologist procedure. The aim of this article is to consider our experience and to evaluate the outcomes in patients who underwent a purely endoscopic repair of CSF leaks of the anterior skull base. Findings Retrospective chart review was performed of all patients surgically treated for CSF leaks presenting to the Section of Nasal and Sinus Disorders at the Service of ENT–Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela (CHUS), between 2004 and 2010. A total of 30 patients who underwent repair CSF leak by ESS. The success rate was 93.4% at the first attempt; only two patients (6.6%) required a second surgical procedure, and none of it was necessary to use a craniotomy for closure. Follow-up periods ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Conclusion Identifying the size, site, and etiology of the CSF leak remains the most important factor in the surgical success. It is generally accepted that the ESS have made procedures minimally invasive, and CSF leak is now one of its well-established indications with low morbidity and high success rate, with one restriction for fistulas of the posterior wall of the frontal sinus should be repaired in conjunction with open techniques. PMID:22925201

  14. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  15. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  16. GASFLOW analysis of a tritium leak accident

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, R.F.; Fujita, R.K.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    The consequences of an earthquake-induced fire involving a tritium leak were analyzed using the GASFLOW computer code. Modeling features required by the analysis include ventilation boundary conditions, flow of a gas mixture in an enclosure containing obstacles, thermally induced buoyancy, and combustion phenomena.

  17. [Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak may cause intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ingelise

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is often misinterpreted as migraine or tension headache. This type of headache is, however, orthostatic and resolves in supine position. CT scan/MRI of the brain has characteristic findings, enhancement of the pachymeninges and bilateral hygroma. An extreme situation of a 70-year-old woman with sagging midbrain is described in this case report. Although this type of headache may be caused by a dural fistula with spinal fluid leak it is not necessary to locate the lesion with myelografi/MR. Timely treatment with an epidural blood patch at any lumbal level could prevent potentially life-threatening complications and the headache resolved within hours/few days. PMID:25557447

  18. Simulation and evaluation of respirator faceseal leaks using computational fluid dynamics and infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhipeng; Yang, James; Zhuang, Ziqing; Roberge, Raymond

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation approach for the prediction of leakage between an N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) and a headform and an infrared camera (IRC) method for validating the CFD approach. The CFD method was used to calculate leak location(s) and 'filter-to-faceseal leakage' (FTFL) ratio for 10 headforms and 6 FFRs.The computational geometry and leak gaps were determined from analysis of the contact simulation results between each headform-N95 FFR combination. The volumetric mesh was formed using a mesh generation method developed by the authors. The breathing cycle was described as a time-dependent profile of the air velocity through the nostril. Breathing air passes through both the FFR filter medium and the leak gaps. These leak gaps are the areas failing to achieve a seal around the circumference of the FFR. The CFD approach was validated by comparing facial temperatures and leak sites from IRC measurements with eight human subjects. Most leaks appear at the regions of the nose (40%) and right (26%) and left cheek (26%) sites. The results also showed that, with N95 FFR (no exhalation valves) use, there was an increase in the skin temperature at the region near the lip, which may be related to thermal discomfort. The breathing velocity and the viscous resistance coefficient of the FFR filter medium directly impacted the FTFL ratio, while the freestream flow did not show any impact on the FTFL ratio. The proposed CFD approach is a promising alternative method to study FFR leakage if limitations can be overcome. PMID:23243192

  19. Primary Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Mario A.; Bialer, Omer Y.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is increasingly recognized as a cause of spontaneous cerebrospinal (CSF) leak in the ENT and neurosurgical literature. The diagnosis of IIH in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks is classically made a few weeks after surgical repair of the CSF leak when symptoms and signs of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) appear. Methods Case reports and literature review. Two young obese women developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea related to an empty sella in one, and a cribriform plate encephalocele in the other. Both patients underwent surgical repair of the CSF leak. A few weeks later, they developed chronic headaches and bilateral papilledema. Lumbar punctures showed elevated CSF-opening pressures with normal CSF contents, with temporary improvement of headaches. A man with a three-year history of untreated IIH developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea. He experienced improvement of his headaches and papilledema after a CSF shunting procedure, and the rhinorrhea resolved after endoscopic repair of the leak. Results These cases and the literature review confirm a definite association between IIH and spontaneous CSF leak based on: 1) similar demographics; 2) increased ICP in some patients with spontaneous CSF leak after leak repair; 3) higher rate of leak recurrence in patients with raised ICP; 4) patients with intracranial hypertension secondary to tumors may develop CSF leak, confirming that raised ICP from other causes than IIH can cause CSF leak. Conclusions CSF leak may occasionally keep IIH patients symptom-free; however, classic symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension may develop after the CSF leak is repaired, exposing these patients to a high risk of recurrence of the leak unless an ICP-lowering intervention is performed. PMID:24042170

  20. Spontaneous sphenoid sinus cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningoencephalocele – are they due to patent Sternberg's canal?

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewska, Magdalena; Krzeski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Sternberg's canal is a congenital bony defect in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. If it persists to adulthood, it may become a source of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) and meningoencephalocele. The aim of the study was to describe the authors’ experience and review articles related to spontaneous sphenoid sinus CSF leaks and Sternberg's canal. We analysed patients managed surgicallly due to sphenoid sinus CSF leak and performed a PubMed database search. Two female patients with spontaneous CSF leak of sphenoid origin were found. Both patients underwent surgery with the endoscopic endonasal approach, and the defect was closed using the multi-layer technique. Twelve articles related to CSF leaks of sphenoid origin (due to Sternberg's canal) were found in the PubMed database. Lines of lesser resistance within sphenoid bone may underlie CSF leak pathology together with intracranial hypertension. The endoscopic transnasal approach to the sphenoid sinus is an excellent alternative to standard transcranial procedures. PMID:26240642

  1. Spontaneous sphenoid sinus cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningoencephalocele - are they due to patent Sternberg's canal?

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Magdalena; Brożek-Mądry, Eliza; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-07-01

    Sternberg's canal is a congenital bony defect in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. If it persists to adulthood, it may become a source of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) and meningoencephalocele. The aim of the study was to describe the authors' experience and review articles related to spontaneous sphenoid sinus CSF leaks and Sternberg's canal. We analysed patients managed surgicallly due to sphenoid sinus CSF leak and performed a PubMed database search. Two female patients with spontaneous CSF leak of sphenoid origin were found. Both patients underwent surgery with the endoscopic endonasal approach, and the defect was closed using the multi-layer technique. Twelve articles related to CSF leaks of sphenoid origin (due to Sternberg's canal) were found in the PubMed database. Lines of lesser resistance within sphenoid bone may underlie CSF leak pathology together with intracranial hypertension. The endoscopic transnasal approach to the sphenoid sinus is an excellent alternative to standard transcranial procedures. PMID:26240642

  2. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K.; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05. Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups. Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma. PMID:26080170

  3. Determining optimal fluid and air leak cut off values for chest drain management in general thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Guzman, Miguel; Periklis, Perikleous; Niwaz, Zakiyah; Socci, Laura; Raubenheimer, Hilgardt; Adams, Ben; Gurung, Lokesh; Uzzaman, Mohsin

    2015-01-01

    Background Chest drain duration is one of the most important influencing aspects of hospital stay but the management is perhaps one of the most variable aspects of thoracic surgical care. The aim of our study is to report outcomes associated with increasing fluid and air leak criteria of protocol based management. Methods A 6-year retrospective analysis of protocolised chest drain management starting in 2007 with a fluid criteria of 3 mL/kg increasing to 7 mL/kg in 2011 to no fluid criteria in 2012, and an air leak criteria of 24 hours without leak till 2012 when digital air leak monitoring was introduced with a criteria of <20 mL/min of air leak for more than 6 hours. Patient data were obtained from electronic hospital records and digital chest films were reviewed to determine the duration of chest tube drainage and post-drain removal complications. Results From 2009 to 2012, 626 consecutive patients underwent thoracic surgery procedures under a single consultant. A total of 160 did not require a chest drain and data was missing in 22, leaving 444 for analysis. The mean age [standard deviation (SD)] was 57±19 years and 272 (61%) were men. There were no differences in the incidence of pneumothoraces (P=0.191), effusion (P=0.344) or re-interventions (P=0.431) for drain re-insertions as progressively permissive criteria were applied. The median drain duration dropped from 1-3 days (P<0.001) and accordingly hospital stay reduced from 4-6 days (P<0.001). Conclusions Our results show that chest drains can be safely removed without fluid criteria and air leak of less than 20 mL/min with median drain duration of 1 day, associated with a reduced length of hospital stay. PMID:26716045

  4. Rock deformation models and fluid leak-off in hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya M.; Bercovici, David; Oristaglio, Michael L.

    2013-09-01

    Fluid loss into reservoir rocks during hydraulic fracturing is modelled via a poro-elastoplastic pressure diffusion equation in which the total compressibility is a sum of fluid, rock and pore space compressibilities. Inclusion of pore compressibility and porosity-dependent permeability in the model leads to a strong pressure dependence of leak-off (i.e. drainage rate). Dilation of the matrix due to fluid invasion causes higher rates of fluid leak-off. The present model is appropriate for naturally fractured and tight gas reservoirs as well as for soft and poorly consolidated formations whose mechanical behaviour departs from simple elastic laws. Enhancement of the leak-off coefficient by dilation, predicted by the new model, may help explain the low percentage recovery of fracturing fluid (usually between 5 and 50 per cent) in shale gas stimulation by hydraulic fracturing.

  5. Unilateral Endoscopic Approach for Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Corrie E.; Brown, Seth M.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak closure remains one of the most difficult surgeries for skull base surgeons, particularly with frontal sinus involvement. Technological advances in endoscopic surgery increasingly allow for less morbid approaches to the frontal sinus. We describe a series of patients who underwent endoscopic frontal sinus CSF leak repair utilizing a unilateral approach, to evaluate the utility and outcomes of this method. We performed a retrospective review of four cases in tertiary care centers. Participants included patients with CSF leak involving the frontal sinus. Main outcome measures included cessation of CSF leak and frontal sinus patency. Three patients were closed on the first surgical attempt; one with a communicating hydrocephalus required a revision procedure. Leak etiologies included prior craniotomy for frontal sinus mucopyocele, spontaneous meningoencephalocele, erosion due to mucormycosis, and prior endoscopic sinus surgery. The frontal sinus remained patent in three of four patients. No patients have evidence of a leak at a minimum of 1 year after surgery. The repair of frontal sinus CSF leaks is possible in specific cases with an endoscopic unilateral approach in leaks with multiple etiologies. Surgeons should consider this approach when selecting the appropriate procedure for repair of frontal sinus CSF leaks. PMID:22451816

  6. Dural diverticulum with a symptomatic cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Nicholas; Williamson, Clinton; Williamson, Natalie; Fortes, Manuel; Tjauw, Iwan; Vij, Vikas; Trojan, Ryan

    2016-03-01

    A case report of a 63-year-old female patient with a cervical spinal dural diverticulum and intracranial hypotension secondary to a symptomatic CSF leak after minor trauma. The patient responded well after the cervical approach epidural blood patch procedure. PMID:26973722

  7. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  8. Iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension after gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Albert; Creedon, Kerry; Sahjpaul, Ramesh

    2014-09-01

    Perineural cysts are common lesions of the sacral spine. They have rarely been reported in a presacral location, leading to their misdiagnosis as a gynecological lesion. The authors report the second such case, in a patient undergoing fenestration of what was presumed to be a benign pelvic cyst, and the resultant high-flow CSF leak that occurred. They describe the clinical presentation and manifestations of intracranial hypotension, as well as the pertinent investigations. They also review the literature for the best management options for this condition. Although they are uncommon, large perineural cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis when examining patients with a pelvic lesion. Appropriate imaging investigations should be performed to rule out a perineural cyst. The CSF leak that occurs from iatrogenic cyst fenestration may not respond to traditional first-line treatments for intracranial hypotension and may require early surgical intervention. The authors would recommend neurosurgical involvement prior to definitive treatment. PMID:24905389

  9. Comprehensive leak detection survey and benefit/cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scholze, R.J. Jr.; Maloney, S.W.

    1995-06-01

    Fort Carson, Colorado was the site of a comprehensive leak detection investigation of the potable water system with the express purpose of quantifying the benefits to be derived by a military installation from use of leak detection and repair technology. Military bases are often the size of a small city and one Directorate or Department has responsibility for all real estate (buildings, roads, grounds, etc.) unlike a municipal public works department. The investigation used state of the art noise correlation and computer correlation technology to survey the distribution system mains. This was complemented by a building to building survey covering office and commercial buildings along with family and barracks housing where investigators entered buildings and quantified visible leaks in faucets and water closets, etc. Following repairs and a year`s time, a follow-on survey is performed to again examine all aspects of the system. The result was a complete economic evaluation and benefit/cost analysis of the installation. Representative findings include: the majority of distribution system leaks were at hydrants or similar appurtenances; and family housing was found to be the other major concentration of leaks. However, where the first survey found 80 percent of housing units had leaks, findings from the second round on the order of 20 percent. Office buildings were found from the first survey to not merit follow-on attention due to limited numbers of leaks. Water-consciousness was raised for both the responsible directorate and individuals in family housing and leak repair was given a higher priority for repairs. This paper will outline the leak detection methodology used, characterize the types and patterns of leaks found, introduce an economic analysis for the entire leak detection process, and finally, provide lessons learned with practical results and implications.

  10. Endoscopic Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks after Firearm Injuries: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Solares, C. Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe two cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak repair after gunshot wound to the head. Design Retrospective review of two cases. Settings A large regional tertiary care facility. Participants Two patients with gunshot wounds to the skull base. Main Outcome Measures Preoperative and postoperative physical and radiologic findings. Results Patients in this series underwent endoscopic surgery, debridement, and repair of CSF leaks after gunshot wounds to the head. To date, the patients are without CSF leak. Conclusions Endoscopic closure of anterior skull base CSF leaks in patients with gunshot wounds can be safe and effective. Treatment should be decided by the severity of neurologic deterioration throughout the emergency period and the existence or absence of associated intracranial lesions. Timing for surgery should be decided with great care and with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26251818

  11. Refractory Thoracolumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak after Multiple Spinal Ependymoma Resections Treated with External Ventricular Drainage.

    PubMed

    Galgano, Michael A; Hazama, Ali; Deshaies, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Temporary external ventricular drainage for refractory thoracolumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is not reported in the literature. We describe a recent case that utilized this technique. Methods Retrospective review of the patient's case notes was performed and the literature on this subject reviewed. Results The patient underwent multiple complex spinal surgeries for resection of innumerable metastatic ependymoma lesions. A case of significant refractory CSF leak developed and as a last resort a right frontal external ventricular drain was placed. The CSF leak ceased, and the patient was eventually discharged home without further complication. Conclusion External ventricular drainage can be a viable option for temporary proximal CSF diversion to treat refractory thoracolumbar CSF leaks. PMID:26835210

  12. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pleural Fluid Analysis , Pericardial Fluid ...

  13. Pleural Fluid Analysis Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Pleural Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Pleural Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pericardial Fluid Analysis , Peritoneal Fluid ...

  14. Anterior horn cell loss from subdural hygroma: a consequence of spontaneous spinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Mihaylova, Temenuzhka; Biondo, Andrew; Zak, Imad; Lewis, Richard A

    2011-06-15

    We describe a case of a 50-year-old man with bilateral shoulder girdle weakness caused by anterior subdural hygroma secondary to a previous spontaneous CSF leak. The CSF leak occurred and resolved 16 years prior to presenting with a 6-year progressive painless, asymmetric proximal muscle weakness involving both upper extremities. Current examination reveals remarkably restricted atrophy and weakness in bilateral C5-6 muscles and absent biceps and brachioradialis reflexes. Neuroimaging shows a subdural CSF collection extending from C1 to L2 anteriorly causing thecal sac effacement at the C4 level and secondary Chiari deformity. The clinical picture demonstrates severe weakness in C5-6 muscles with sparing of all other myotomes. The acute clinical features as well as neuroimaging characteristics of spontaneous CSF leak are well known but the late effects are less described. The development of a subdural fluid collection secondary to a spinal fluid leak can cause damage to the anterior spinal cord years after the leak. The underlying pathophysiology of the motor neuron loss remains unclear but there appears to be a pressure effect localized to the C4-5 region. The possibility that intervention to prevent or treat the subdural CSF collection might have avoided the shoulder girdle weakness is considered. PMID:21440260

  15. [A Case of Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Associated with Cervical Spondylosis].

    PubMed

    Arai, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Hirohito; Shiomi, Ryoji; Tatsumi, Shotaro; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension associated with cervical spondylosis have rarely been observed, and only a few cases are reported. A 69-year-old woman, previously treated for rectal and thyroid cancer, complained of a non-postural persistent headache. The patient regularly practiced aerobic exercise, but a month earlier she had started experiencing headache and neck pain while exercising. Computed tomography(CT)showed bilateral chronic subdural hematomas, and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)revealed diffuse dural enhancement and tonsillar herniation. We drained the subdural hematomas and replaced the ventricular reservoir to safely access the cerebrospinal fluid space. After surgery, the persistent headache disappeared for several days, but a postural headache emerged. CT myelogram showed extradural accumulation of the contrast medium at the C2-5 level with cervical spondylosis. The patient was treated with conservative therapy of bed rest and intravenous fluid hydration for two weeks, and the headache improved. CT myelogram after treatment showed no extradural accumulation of the contrast medium. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak associated with cervical spondylosis could be induced by the repeated minor mechanical stress caused by physical exercise. Therefore, the possibility that non-postural persistent headache may be caused by spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak should not be underestimated. PMID:27605479

  16. Technetium Tc-99m pyrophosphate for cerebrospinal fluid leaks: radiopharmaceutical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ponto, James A; Graham, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To confirm the anticipated image quality and absence of adverse reactions in patients undergoing clinical practice cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak imaging procedures using technetium Tc-99m pyrophosphate (PYP). METHODS Following the recent discontinuation of preservative-free calcium trisodium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid kits, PYP was selected as a suitable alternative for CSF leak imaging procedures. Procedures were established for its preparation and dispensing, paying special attention to safety considerations, and its use in clinical practice was implemented. Medical records, including images, were reviewed for the first 15 patients undergoing clinical practice CSF imaging procedures using Tc-99m PYP to confirm anticipated image quality and absence of adverse effects. RESULTS Review of CSF leak imaging procedures using Tc-99m PYP in 15 patients showed images to be of uniformly high quality. The vast majority of injected radiopharmaceutical remained in the CSF throughout the duration of the imaging procedure, allowing visualization of CSF leaks. Only a small amount of Tc-99m PYP diffused into the blood with resultant uptake on the skeleton and excretion into the urine, which did not interfere with image interpretation. No adverse reactions were noted in any of the patients. CONCLUSION With proper attention to safety considerations, Tc-99m PYP is a safe and effective alternative for performing CSF leak imaging procedures. PMID:24257695

  17. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak.

    PubMed

    Baba, Murad; Tarar, Omer; Syed, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus. PMID:27217961

  18. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Tarar, Omer; Syed, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus. PMID:27217961

  19. Hazardous Gas Leak Analysis in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1991-01-01

    Helium tests of the main propulsion system in the Space Shuttle and on hydrogen leaks are examined. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers (MS) to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long tubes to sample gas from the payload bay, mid-body, aft engine compartment, and external tank. The purpose is to improve the HGDS, especially in its potential for locating cryogen leaks. Pre-existing leak data was analyzed for transient information to determine if the leak location could be pinpointed from test data. A rapid response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested. Large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MS was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MS data. One conclusion is that the backup HGDS sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second.

  20. Synovial fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  1. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  2. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  3. Modified Graded Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complete sellar floor reconstruction is critical to avoid postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during transsphenoidal surgery. Recently, the pedicled nasoseptal flap has undergone many modifications and eventually proved to be valuable and efficient. However, using these nasoseptal flaps in all patients who undergo transsphenoidal surgery, including those who had none or only minor CSF leakage, appears to be overly invasive and time-consuming. Methods Patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal tumor surgery within a 5 year-period were reviewed. Since 2009, we classified the intraoperative CSF leakage into grades from 0 to 3. Sellar floor reconstruction was tailored to each leak grade. We did not use any tissue grafts such as abdominal fat and did not include any procedures of CSF diversions such as lumbar drainage. Results Among 200 cases in 188 patients (147 pituitary adenoma and 41 other pathologies), intraoperative CSF leakage was observed in 27.4% of 197 cases : 14.7% Grade 1, 4.6% Grade 2a, 3.0% Grade 2b, and 5.1% Grade 3. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in none of the cases. Septal bone buttress was used for Grade 1 to 3 leakages instead of any other foreign materials. Pedicled nasoseptal flap was used for Grades 2b and 3 leakages. Unused septal bones and nasoseptal flaps were repositioned. Conclusion Modified classification of intraoperative CSF leaks and tailored repair technique in a multilayered fashion using an en-bloc harvested septal bone and vascularized nasoseptal flaps is an effective and reliable method for the prevention of postoperative CSF leaks. PMID:26279811

  4. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W.; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  5. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery.

    PubMed

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin; Petridis, Athanasios K

    2016-04-26

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  6. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the waste transfer leak

    SciTech Connect

    ZIMMERMAN, B.D.

    2003-03-21

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological/consequence of the bounding waste transfer leak accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding waste transfer leak accident is a fine spray leak into the air. The calculation applies reasonably conservative input parameters in accordance with DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A, guidance. The calculated offsite dose of 0.7 rem does not challenge the Evaluation Guideline.

  8. Coupled Model for CO2 Leaks from Geological Storage: Geomechanics, Fluid Flow and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, G.; Prevost, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deep saline aquifers are considered as a promising option for long-term storage of carbon dioxide. However, risk of CO2 leakage from the aquifers through faults, natural or induced fractures or abandoned wells cannot be disregarded. Therefore, modeling of various leakage scenarios is crucial when selecting a site for CO2 sequestration and choosing proper operational conditions. Carbon dioxide is injected into wells at supercritical conditions (t > 31.04 C, P > 73.82 bar), and these conditions are maintained in the deep aquifers (at 1-2 km depth) due to hydrostatic pressure and geothermal gradient. However, if CO2 and brine start to migrate from the aquifer upward, both pressure and temperature will decrease, and at the depth of 500-750 m, the conditions for CO2 will become subcritical. At subcritical conditions, CO2 starts boiling and the character of the flow changes dramatically due to appearance of the third (vapor) phase and latent heat effects. When modeling CO2 leaks, one needs to couple the multiphase flow in porous media with geomechanics. These capabilities are provided by Dynaflow, a finite element analysis program [1]; Dynaflow has already showed to be efficient for modeling caprock failure causing CO2 leaks [2, 3]. Currently we have extended the capabilities of Dynaflow with the phase transition module, based on two-phase and three-phase isenthalpic flash calculations [4]. We have also developed and implemented an efficient method for solving heat and mass transport with the phase transition using our flash module. Therefore, we have developed a robust tool for modeling CO2 leaks. In the talk we will give a brief overview of our method and illustrate it with the results of simulations for characteristic test cases. References: [1] J.H. Prevost, DYNAFLOW: A Nonlinear Transient Finite Element Analysis Program. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. http://www.princeton.edu/~dynaflow/ (last update 2013

  9. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians. PMID:24467958

  10. Intracranial fat migration: A newly described complication of autologous fat repair of a cerebrospinal fluid leak following supracerebellar infratentorial approach

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Cassie A.; Aujla, Parvir; Moreno, Mario; Veeravagu, Anand; Li, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intracranial fat migration following autologous fat graft and placement of a lumbar drain for cerebrospinal fluid leak after pineal cyst resection surgery has not been previously reported. Case presentation The authors present a case of a 39-year-old male with a history of headaches who presented for removal of a pineal cyst from the pineal region. He subsequently experienced cerebrospinal fluid leak and postoperative Escherichia coli (E. Coli) wound infection, and meningitis, which were treated initially with wound washout and antibiotics in addition to bone removal and primary repair with primary suture-closure of the durotomy. A lumbar drain was left in place. The cerebrospinal fluid leak returned two weeks following removal of the lumbar drain; therefore, autologous fat graft repair and lumbar drain placement were performed. Three days later, the patient began experiencing right homonymous hemianopia and was found via computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to have autologous fat in the infra‑ and supratentorial space, including intraparenchymal and subarachnoid spread. Symptoms began to resolve with supportive care over 48 hours and had almost fully resolved within one week. Discussion This is the first known report of a patient with an autologous fat graft entering the subarachnoid space, intraparenchymal space, and ventricles following fat graft and lumbar drainage. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of monitoring for complications of lumbar drain placement. PMID:25557086

  11. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma--Wait and See, or Lumbar Drain?

    PubMed

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K; Li, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05.Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups.Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma. PMID:26080170

  12. Successful treatment of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak headache with fluoroscopically guided epidural blood patch: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Fattouh, Maher; Dews, Teresa; Kapural, Leonardo; Malak, Osama; Mekhail, Nagy

    2003-12-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a rare clinical entity that may result in disabling headaches. It occurs as a result of dural defects, and the initial symptoms resemble those of postdural puncture headache. However, the positional headache can later evolve into a persistent chronic daily headache. The diagnosis of spontaneous CSF leak can be very challenging, but increasing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques are yielding ever more cases. When conservative management fails, the pain management clinician is called upon to administer an epidural blood patch. The success of this technique is dependent upon accurate diagnosis of the site of leakage and targeted epidural administration of the blood patch to this area. In this report, we describe four consecutive cases that were referred to our pain management department over an 18-month period and were successfully treated with site-directed epidural blood patches. PMID:14750917

  13. Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Congenital and Acquired Temporal Bone Defects—A Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Wiet, Richard J.; Micco, Alan G.; Zhao, Jin-cheng

    1994-01-01

    Twelve patients presenting with tegmen defects and requiring surgical repair were retrospectively reviewed from 1982 to 1993. One half of the patients presented with a cerebrospinal fluid leak at some time in the course of their illness. Nine cases were considered to be acquired, secondary to previous mastoid surgery or trauma. All 9 had encephalocoeles. Three spontaneous leaks were considered congenital; 2 of these patients had encephalocoeles. This report represents a long-term follow-up of these cases, with an average follow-up of 7,6 years. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging technology, as well as contrast studies, have tremendously aided in diagnosis and planning of surgical repair. Nine repairs were done through a dual transmastoid and middle fossa approach, with the other 3 done via a transmastoid approach only. We favored temporalis muscle flaps and temporalis fascia over synthetic materials for defect repairs. The long-term results and complications are discussed. PMID:17170935

  14. Leak detector uses ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Keir, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Probe located on outer wall of vacuum-jacketed fluid lines detects leaks on inner wall. Probe picks up and amplifies vibrations that occur when gas rushes through leak and converts them to audible signal or CRT display. System is considerably simpler to use than helium leak detectors and allows rapid checks to be made as part of routine maintenance.

  15. Calculation notes for surface leak resulting in pool, TWRS FSAR accident analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Surface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  16. Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  17. Sealing Nitrogen Tetroxide Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, George G.; Houston, Donald W.; Scott, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    Use of Furmanite FSC-N-6B sealant in clam-shell sealing device makes it possible to stop leaks of nitrogen tetroxide through defective or improperly-seated plumbing fittings. Devised to stop leaks in vent line of small rocket motor on Space Shuttle. Also used on plumbing containing hydrazine and other hazardous fluids, and repair withstands severe temperature, vibration, and shock. Leaks stopped in place, without draining or replacement of leaking parts.

  18. U.S. strategic petroleum reserve Big Hill 114 leak analysis 2012.

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, David L.; Roberts, Barry L.; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Park, Byoung Yoon; Rudeen, David Keith

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent well integrity issues related to cavern 114 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. DM Petroleum Operations, M&O contractor for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, recognized an apparent leak in Big Hill cavern well 114A in late summer, 2012, and provided written notice to the State of Texas as required by law. DM has since isolated the leak in well A with a temporary plug, and is planning on remediating both 114 A- and B-wells with liners. In this report Sandia provides an analysis of the apparent leak that includes: (i) estimated leak volume, (ii) recommendation for operating pressure to maintain in the cavern between temporary and permanent fixes for the well integrity issues, and (iii) identification of other caverns or wells at Big Hill that should be monitored closely in light of the sequence of failures there in the last several years.

  19. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Corwin Lee; Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Galyean, William Jospeh

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  20. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  1. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  2. Calculation notes in support of TWRS FSAR spray leak accident analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25

    This document contains the detailed calculations that support the spray leak accident analysis in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The consequence analyses in this document form the basis for the selection of controls to mitigate or prevent spray leaks throughout TWRS. Pressurized spray leaks can occur due to a breach in containment barriers along transfer routes, during waste transfers. Spray leaks are of particular safety concern because, depending on leak dimensions, and waste pressure, they can be relatively efficient generators of dispersible sized aerosols that can transport downwind to onsite and offsite receptors. Waste is transferred between storage tanks and between processing facilities and storage tanks in TWRS through a system of buried transfer lines. Pumps for transferring waste and jumpers and valves for rerouting waste are located inside below grade pits and structures that are normally covered. Pressurized spray leaks can emanate to the atmosphere due to breaches in waste transfer associated equipment inside these structures should the structures be uncovered at the time of the leak. Pressurized spray leaks can develop through holes or cracks in transfer piping, valve bodies or pump casings caused by such mechanisms as corrosion, erosion, thermal stress, or water hammer. Leaks through degraded valve packing, jumper gaskets, or pump seals can also result in pressurized spray releases. Mechanisms that can degrade seals, packing and gaskets include aging, radiation hardening, thermal stress, etc. An1782other common cause for spray leaks inside transfer enclosures are misaligned jumpers caused by human error. A spray leak inside a DST valve pit during a transfer of aging waste was selected as the bounding, representative accident for detailed analysis. Sections 2 through 5 below develop this representative accident using the DOE- STD-3009 format. Sections 2 describes the unmitigated and mitigated accident

  3. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cleans the skin around the insertion site. Numbing medicine (anesthetic) is injected into the skin. A needle is placed through the skin and muscles of the chest wall into the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you ...

  4. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have liver disease See whether an injury to the abdomen has caused internal bleeding ... fluid may be a sign of tumor or injury. High white blood cell ... the abdomen. Large differences between the amount of albumin in ...

  5. Single cell rheometry with a microfluidic constriction: Quantitative control of friction and fluid leaks between cell and channel walls

    PubMed Central

    Preira, Pascal; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Bico, José; Théodoly, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We report how cell rheology measurements can be performed by monitoring the deformation of a cell in a microfluidic constriction, provided that friction and fluid leaks effects between the cell and the walls of the microchannels are correctly taken into account. Indeed, the mismatch between the rounded shapes of cells and the angular cross-section of standard microfluidic channels hampers efficient obstruction of the channel by an incoming cell. Moreover, friction forces between a cell and channels walls have never been characterized. Both effects impede a quantitative determination of forces experienced by cells in a constriction. Our study is based on a new microfluidic device composed of two successive constrictions, combined with optical interference microscopy measurements to characterize the contact zone between the cell and the walls of the channel. A cell squeezed in a first constriction obstructs most of the channel cross-section, which strongly limits leaks around cells. The rheological properties of the cell are subsequently probed during its entry in a second narrower constriction. The pressure force is determined from the pressure drop across the device, the cell velocity, and the width of the gutters formed between the cell and the corners of the channel. The additional friction force, which has never been analyzed for moving and constrained cells before, is found to involve both hydrodynamic lubrication and surface forces. This friction results in the existence of a threshold for moving the cells and leads to a non-linear behavior at low velocity. The friction force can nevertheless be assessed in the linear regime. Finally, an apparent viscosity of single cells can be estimated from a numerical prediction of the viscous dissipation induced by a small step in the channel. A preliminary application of our method yields an apparent loss modulus on the order of 100 Pa s for leukocytes THP-1 cells, in agreement with the literature data. PMID:24404016

  6. Fracture probability and leak before break analysis for the cold neutron source moderator vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1998-04-01

    Fracture mechanics calculations are made to ensure the safety of the moderator vessel against failure by fracture. The 6061-T6 aluminum alloy is used for the moderator vessel structure. The fracture analysis of the moderator vessel consists of: (1) the probability of fracture calculations at the locations of the moderator where either the primary stress or the secondary stress assumes the highest value, (2) the vessel wall leak-before-break analysis by applying an edge crack solution, and (3) the crack penetration calculation as a result of radiation embrittlement by applying the flaw assessment diagram (FAD). The probability of fracture for the capsule is calculated by using a direct probability integration method instead of the Monte Carlo simulation method used by the PRAISE Code or the FAVOR Code developed in Oak Ridge. The probability of fracture as a function of radiation embrittlement is obtained. The leak before break analysis indicates that the vessel will fail by leak before fail by catastrophic fracture. A mass spectrometer will be installed to monitor the leak of hydrogen circulating within the moderator.

  7. Transient monoplegia and paraesthesia after an epidural blood patch for a spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alvin Ho-Kwan; Li, Lai-Fung; So, Vincent Ching; Leung, May Ka-Mei; Lui, Wai-Man

    2015-09-01

    We describe the very rare complication of new onset complete paralysis and numbness of one limb after an epidural blood patch in a 36-year-old woman. Intracranial hypotension resulting from a spinal cerebrospinal fluid fistula may be treated by epidural injection of autologous blood that is, a blood patch. This is usually a safe and effective procedure. The woman's muscle strength of hip flexion, extension, ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion decreased from 5/5 to 0/5 following the procedure. After symptom onset, an MRI of her spine showed no compressive or ischaemic lesions amenable to urgent intervention. The cause of neurological deficit was at that time unknown and steroids were administered. Her symptoms persisted for about 2 days and gradually improved. In this paper, the management plan and the course of this rare and alarming complication is reported. PMID:25986178

  8. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after septoplasty: A potential complication of occult anterior skull base encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Resha S.; Choudhry, Osamah J.; Liu, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea after septoplasty is a known entity resulting from errors in surgical technique and improper handling of the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone. When these occur, urgent management is necessary to prevent deleterious sequelae such as meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. Encephaloceles are rare occurrences characterized by herniation of intracranial contents through a skull base defect that can predispose patients to CSF rhinorrhea. In this report, we present a case of CSF rhinorrhea occurring 2 weeks after septoplasty likely from manipulation of an occult anterior skull base encephalocele. To our knowledge, no previous similar case has been reported in the literature. Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of occult encephaloceles while performing septoplasties because minimal manipulation of these entities may potentially result in postoperative CSF leakage. PMID:23772326

  9. Hepaticojejunostomy--analysis of risk factors for postoperative bile leaks and surgical complications.

    PubMed

    Antolovic, Dalibor; Koch, Moritz; Galindo, Luis; Wolff, Sandra; Music, Emira; Kienle, Peter; Schemmer, Peter; Friess, Helmut; Schmidt, Jan; Büchler, Markus W; Weitz, Jürgen

    2007-05-01

    Anastomoses between the jejunum and the bile duct are an important component of many surgical procedures; however, risk factors for clinically relevant bile leaks have not yet been adequately defined. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of bile leaks after hepaticojejunostomy and to define predictive factors associated with this risk and with surgical morbidity. Between October 2001 and April 2004, hepaticojejunostomies were performed in 519 patients in a standardized way. Patient- and treatment-related data were documented prospectively. A bile leak was defined as bilirubin concentration in the drains exceeding serum bilirubin with a consecutive change of clinical management or occurrence of a bilioma necessitating drainage. Surgical morbidity occurred in 15% of patients, the incidence of a bile leak was 5.6%. Multivariate analysis confirmed preoperative radiochemotherapy, preoperative low cholinesterase levels, biliary complications after liver transplantation necessitating a hepaticojejunostomy, and simultaneous liver resection as risk factors for bile leakages, whereas biliary complications after liver transplantation necessitating hepaticojejunostomy, simultaneous liver resection, and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with postoperative surgical morbidity. Our results demonstrate that hepaticojejunostomy is a safe procedure if performed in a standardized fashion. The above found factors may help to better predict the risk for complications after hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:17394045

  10. Supine Digital Subtraction Myelography for the Demonstration of a Dorsal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak in a Patient with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Michael; Chaudhary, Navjot; Leung, Andrew; Ng, Wai

    2012-01-01

    A patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to a spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak required localization of the leakage site prior to surgical management. Conventional, computed tomography and prone digital subtraction myelography failed to localize the dural tear, which was postulated to be dorsally located. We present here a digital subtraction myelographic approach to accurately localize a dorsal site of CSF leakage by injecting iodinated contrast via a lumbar drain with the patient in the supine position. PMID:23378882

  11. Photoacoustic spectrometry for trace gas analysis and leak detection using different cell geometries.

    PubMed

    Gondal, M A; Dastageer, A; Shwehdi, M H

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer with high selectivity and sensitivity has been developed for trace gas analysis and for the detection of gas leak at part per trillion by volume (pptV) level. This PA system comprises of a resonant photoacoustic cell, a pulsed line tunable CO(2) laser as an excitation source and a sensitive electret microphone as a photoacoustic detector with an option to trigger the safety alarm system for early warning of gas leaks. In this work, three resonant PA cells with various geometries have been developed at our laboratory for the detection of photoacoustic signal using pulsed laser system and their comparative performance have been studied. As a special application of this PA system, the detection of sulfur hexa fluoride (SF(6)) gas using these three cells has been carried out for optimizing the sensitivity. Besides this, our PA system can very well be applied for pollution monitoring and detection of hazardous gases in a noisy environment. PMID:18969274

  12. Towards an analysis of leak-before-break assessments in the ductile tearing regime

    SciTech Connect

    Parfitt, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    This paper presents the elastic-plastic fracture analysis of a typical semi-elliptical axial surface flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw and assessing the leak-before break situation in a pressure vessel subject to pressure. The paper first discusses the semi-elliptical flaw J-integral solution and the thru-thickness flaw solution as modified herein. Then a review is presented of the three ductile tearing stability fracture analysis methods based on the fully plastic J-integral solution; (1) the crack driving force diagram, (2) the tearing modulus diagram, and (3) the failure assessment diagram. These methods are then used to determine the factors of safety to initiation of ductile tearing as the crack grows. Factors of safety based on either pressure alone or crack size alone are illustrated. An illustration is given of a leak-before-break solution discussing the semi-elliptical flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw in the vessel. The paper concludes with a discussion of additional effort needed to better characterize leak-before-break solutions in the ductile tearing regime.

  13. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  14. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  15. Low Level Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA has transferred the improved portable leak detector technology to UE Systems, Inc.. This instrument was developed to detect leaks in fluid systems of critical launch and ground support equipment. This system incorporates innovative electronic circuitry, improved transducers, collecting horns, and contact sensors that provide a much higher degree of reliability, sensitivity and versatility over previously used systems. Potential commercial uses are pipelines, underground utilities, air-conditioning systems, petrochemical systems, aerospace, power transmission lines and medical devices.

  16. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-09-01

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  17. Leak detection/verification

    SciTech Connect

    Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L.

    1997-04-01

    Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

  18. Analysis of potential for jet-impingement erosion from leaking steam generator tubes during severe accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Diercks, D. R.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2002-05-01

    This report summarizes analytical evaluation of crack-opening areas and leak rates of superheated steam through flaws in steam generator tubes and erosion of neighboring tubes due to jet impingement of superheated steam with entrained particles from core debris created during severe accidents. An analytical model for calculating crack-opening area as a function of time and temperature was validated with tests on tubes with machined flaws. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used to calculate the jet velocity impinging on neighboring tubes as a function of tube spacing and crack-opening area. Erosion tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-velocity erosion rig at the University of Cincinnati, using micrometer-sized nickel particles mixed in with high-temperature gas from a burner. The erosion results, together with analytical models, were used to estimate the erosive effects of superheated steam with entrained aerosols from the core during severe accidents.

  19. A new multilayer reconstruction using nasal septal flap combined with fascia graft dural suturing for high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak after endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kentaro; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Yamada, Shozo

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of a new endoscopic multilayer reconstruction using nasal septal flap (NSF) to prevent high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak after endoscopic endonasal surgery. This study was a retrospective review on 97 patients who underwent multilayer reconstructions using NSF combined with fascia graft dural suturing after endoscopic endonasal surgery between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients were divided into two groups, third ventricle opening group and nonopening group, based on the presence of a direct connection between the third ventricle and the paranasal sinus after tumor removal. Furthermore, we compared this procedure with our previous reconstruction after resection of craniopharyngioma. Finally, we checked the patients who had postoperative prolonged discomfort of the nasal cavity for over a year. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurred in three patients (3.1 %): one from the third ventricle opening group and the remaining two from the nonopening group. External lumbar drain was performed after surgery in only seven patients (7.2 %). The incidence of postoperative CSF leak was similar in both groups, whereas the rate of craniopharyngioma in the third ventricle opening group was significantly higher. The incidence of postoperative CSF leak after resection of craniopharyngioma was not statistically significant but obviously higher in the previous group (12.2 %) compared with that in the present group (2.3 %). Twelve patients (12.4 %) had postoperative nasal discomfort of the nasal cavity for over a year. Multilayer reconstruction using NSF combined with fascia graft dural suturing is a more reliable method for preventing postoperative high-flow CSF leakage after endoscopic endonasal surgery even if there is a direct connection between the third ventricle and the paranasal sinus. However, we should pay close attention especially to prolonged discomfort of the nasal cavity after harvesting NSF

  20. Leak Testing and Implications of Operations to Locate Leak Horizons at West Hackberry Well 108

    SciTech Connect

    SATTLER, ALLAN R.; EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; PIECHOCKI, ALAN

    2002-06-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve site at West Hackberry, Louisiana has historically experienced casing leaks. Numerous West Hackberry oil storage caverns have wells exhibiting communication between the interior 10 3/4 x 20-inch (oil) annulus and the ''outer cemented'' 20 x 26-inch annulus. Well 108 in Cavern 108 exhibits this behavior. It is thought that one, if not the primary, cause of this communication is casing thread leaks at the 20-inch casing joints combined with microannuli along the cement casing interfaces and other cracks/flaws in the cemented 20 x 26-inch annulus. An operation consisting of a series of nitrogen leak tests, similar to cavern integrity tests, was performed on Cavern 108 in an effort to determine the leak horizons and to see if these leak horizons coincided with those of casing joints. Certain leaky, threaded casing joints were identified between 400 and 1500 feet. A new leak detection procedure was developed as a result of this test, and this methodology for identifying and interpreting such casing joint leaks is presented in this report. Analysis of the test data showed that individual joint leaks could be successfully identified, but not without some degree of ambiguity. This ambiguity is attributed to changes in the fluid content of the leak path (nitrogen forcing out oil) and possibly to very plausible changes in characteristics of the flow path during the test. These changes dominated the test response and made the identification of individual leak horizons difficult. One consequence of concern from the testing was a progressive increase in the leak rate measured during testing due to nitrogen cleaning small amounts of oil out of the leak paths and very likely due to the changes of the leak path during the flow test. Therefore, careful consideration must be given before attempting similar tests. Although such leaks have caused no known environmental or economic problems to date, the leaks may be significant because of the potential

  1. A probabilistic method for leak-before-break analysis of CANDU reactor pressure tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Puls, M.P.; Wilkins, B.J.S.; Rigby, G.L.

    1997-04-01

    A probabilistic code for the prediction of the cumulative probability of pressure tube ruptures in CANDU type reactors is described. Ruptures are assumed to result from the axial growth by delayed hydride cracking. The BLOOM code models the major phenomena that affect crack length and critical crack length during the reactor sequence of events following the first indications of leakage. BLOOM can be used to develop unit-specific estimates of the actual probability of pressure rupture in operating CANDU reactors and supplement the existing leak before break analysis.

  2. Synovial fluid analysis by ferrography.

    PubMed

    Evans, C H; Bowen, E R; Bowen, J; Tew, W P; Westcott, V C

    1980-01-01

    Ferrography is a technique for magnetically harvesting and separating metallic particles from aqueous and non-aqueous suspensions. We have adapted this method of analysis to the study of cartilaginous and osseous wear particles, as well as fragments of soft tissue, found in the synovial fluid of human joints. As ferrography employes magnetism to harvest particles and arrange them in an orderly fashion, it is first necessary to impart a positive magnetic susceptibility to the biological materials. The trivalent paramagnetic cation of the rare earth element erbium is used for this purpose. Based on this principle, a method for the ferrographic analysis of synovial fluid has been devised, which is presently being employed in the study of human joint disease. Using this technique, improved diagnosis of arthritis may be possible. In addition, it may lead to a deeper understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of degenerative arthritis and other destructive joint diseases. PMID:7419857

  3. Laser-Pulse/Fiber-Optic Liquid-Leak Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    Several potential leak sites monitored using single sensing fiber. Fluid systems monitored quickly for leaks in remote, hazardous, or inaccessible locations by system of compact, lightweight fiber-optic leak sensors presently undergoing development. Sensors installed at potential leak sites as joints, couplings, and fittings. Sensor read by sending laser pulse along fiber, then noting presence or relative amplitude of return pulse. Leak-monitoring technique applicable to wide range of fluid systems and minimizes human exposure to toxic or dangerous fluids.

  4. Mitigated Transfer Line Leaks that Result in Surface Pools and Spray Leaks into Pits

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    1999-12-07

    This analysis provides radiological and toxicological consequence calculations for postulated mitigated leaks during transfers of six waste compositions. Leaks in Cleanout Boxes equipped with supplemental covers and leaks in pits are analyzed.

  5. Leak rate measurements for satellite subsystems and residual gas analysis during space environment tests. [thermal vacuum and solar simulation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The measuring and evaluation procedure for the determination of leak rates of satellite subsystems with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and the results of the residual gas analysis are described. The method selected for leak rate determination was placing the system into a vacuum chamber and furnishing the chamber with a mass spectrometer and calibrated leaks. The residual gas of a thermal vacuum test facility, in which the thermal balance test radiation input was simulated by a heated canister, was analyzed with the mass spectrometer in the atomic mass unit range up to 300 amu. In addition to the measurements during the space environment tests, mass spectrometric studies were performed with samples of spacecraft materials. The studies were carried out during tests for the projects HELIOS, AEROS B and SYMPHONIE.

  6. Leak-Path Factor Analysis for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, C.; Leonard, M.

    1999-06-13

    Leak-path factors (LPFs) were calculated for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) located in the Plutonium Facility, Building 41 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55. In the unlikely event of an accidental fire powerful enough to fail a container holding actinides, the subsequent release of oxides, modeled as PuO{sub 2} aerosols, from the facility and into the surrounding environment was predicted. A 1-h nondestructive assay (NDA) laboratory fire accident was simulated with the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. Fire-driven air movement along with wind-driven air infiltration transported a portion of these actinides from the building. This fraction is referred to as the leak-path factor. The potential effect of smoke aerosol on the transport of the actinides was investigated to verify the validity of neglecting the smoke as conservative. The input model for the NMSF consisted of a system of control volumes, flow pathways, and surfaces sufficient to model the thermal-hydraulic conditions within the facility and the aerosol transport data necessary to simulate the transport of PuO{sub 2} particles. The thermal-hydraulic, heat-transfer, and aerosol-transport models are solved simultaneously with data being exchanged between models. A MELCOR input model was designed such that it would reproduce the salient features of the fire per the corresponding CFAST calculation. Air infiltration into and out of the facility would be affected strongly by wind-driven differential pressures across the building. Therefore, differential pressures were applied to each side of the building according to guidance found in the ASHRAE handbook using a standard-velocity head equation with a leading multiplier to account for the orientation of the wind with the building. The model for the transport of aerosols considered all applicable transport processes, but the deposition within the building clearly was dominated by gravitational settling.

  7. Space Station Freedom seal leakage rate analysis and testing summary: Air leaks in ambient versus vacuum exit conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P. I.; Markovitch, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report is intended to reveal the apparent relationship of air seal leakage rates between 2 atmospheres (atm) to 1 atm and 1 atm to vacuum conditions. Gas dynamics analysis is provided as well as data summarizing the MSFC test report, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study With Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report'.

  8. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  9. Hamiltonian analysis of interacting fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Ghosh, Subir; Mitra, Arpan Krishna

    2015-05-01

    Ideal fluid dynamics is studied as a relativistic field theory with particular stress on its hamiltonian structure. The Schwinger condition, whose integrated version yields the stress tensor conservation, is explicitly verified both in equal-time and light-cone coordinate systems. We also consider the hamiltonian formulation of fluids interacting with an external gauge field. The complementary roles of the canonical (Noether) stress tensor and the symmetric one obtained by metric variation are discussed.

  10. Crack instability analysis methods for leak-before-break program in piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mattar Neto, M.; Nobrega, P.G.B. da

    1995-11-01

    The instability evaluation of cracks in piping systems is a step that is considered when a high-energy line is investigated in a leak-before-break (LBB) program. Different approaches have been used to assess stability of cracks: (a) local flow stress (LFS); (b) limit load (LL); (c) elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) as J-integral versus tearing modulus (J-T) analysis. The first two methods are used for high ductile materials, when it is assumed that remaining ligament of the cracked pipe section becomes fully plastic prior to crack extension. EPFM is considered for low ductile piping when the material reaches unstable ductile tearing prior to plastic collapse in the net section. In this paper the LFS, LL and EPFM J-T methodologies were applied to calculate failure loads in circumferential through-wall cracked pipes with different materials, geometries and loads. It presents a comparison among the results obtained from the above three formulations and also compares them with experimental data available in the literature.

  11. Contextual analysis of fluid intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy A.; Pink, Jeffrey E.; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2008-01-01

    The nature of fluid intelligence was investigated by identifying variables that were, and were not, significantly related to this construct. Relevant information was obtained from three sources: re-analyses of data from previous studies, a study in which 791 adults performed storage-plus-processing working memory tasks, and a study in which 236 adults performed a variety of working memory, updating, and cognitive control tasks. The results suggest that fluid intelligence represents a broad individual difference dimension contributing to diverse types of controlled or effortful processing. The analyses also revealed that very few of the age-related effects on the target variables were statistically independent of effects on established cognitive abilities, which suggests most of the age-related influences on a wide variety of cognitive control variables overlap with age-related influences on cognitive abilities such as fluid intelligence, episodic memory, and perceptual speed. PMID:19137074

  12. Contextual analysis of fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Salthouse, Timothy A; Pink, Jeffrey E; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2008-01-01

    The nature of fluid intelligence was investigated by identifying variables that were, and were not, significantly related to this construct. Relevant information was obtained from three sources: re-analyses of data from previous studies, a study in which 791 adults performed storage-plus-processing working memory tasks, and a study in which 236 adults performed a variety of working memory, updating, and cognitive control tasks. The results suggest that fluid intelligence represents a broad individual difference dimension contributing to diverse types of controlled or effortful processing. The analyses also revealed that very few of the age-related effects on the target variables were statistically independent of effects on established cognitive abilities, which suggests most of the age-related influences on a wide variety of cognitive control variables overlap with age-related influences on cognitive abilities such as fluid intelligence, episodic memory, and perceptual speed. PMID:19137074

  13. Aerospace Payloads Leak Test Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovsky, Oleg; Grayson, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized and sealed aerospace payloads can leak on orbit. When dealing with toxic or hazardous materials, requirements for fluid and gas leakage rates have to be properly established, and most importantly, reliably verified using the best Nondestructive Test (NDT) method available. Such verification can be implemented through application of various leak test methods that will be the subject of this paper, with a purpose to show what approach to payload leakage rate requirement verification is taken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The scope of this paper will be mostly a detailed description of 14 leak test methods recommended.

  14. Genome-wide SNP analysis of the Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (Clarkson disease)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Iwaki, Shoko; Chan, Eunice; Wisch, Laura; Young, Michael; Nelson, Celeste M; Porcella, Stephen F; Druey, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    The Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) is an extremely rare, orphan disease that resembles, and is frequently erroneously diagnosed as, systemic anaphylaxis. The disorder is characterized by repeated, transient, and seemingly unprovoked episodes of hypotensive shock and peripheral edema due to transient endothelial hyperpermeability. SCLS is often accompanied by a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). Using Affymetrix Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) microarrays, we performed the first genome-wide SNP analysis of SCLS in a cohort of 12 disease subjects and 18 controls. Exome capture sequencing was performed on genomic DNA from nine of these patients as validation for the SNP-chip discoveries and de novo data generation. We identified candidate susceptibility loci for SCLS, which included a region flanking CAV3 (3p25.3) as well as SNP clusters in PON1 (7q21.3), PSORS1C1 (6p21.3), and CHCHD3 (7q33). Among the most highly ranked discoveries were gene-associated SNPs in the uncharacterized LOC100130480 gene (rs6417039, rs2004296). Top case-associated SNPs were observed in BTRC (rs12355803, 3rs4436485), ARHGEF18 (rs11668246), CDH13 (rs4782779), and EDG2 (rs12552348), which encode proteins with known or suspected roles in B cell function and/or vascular integrity. 61 SNPs that were significantly associated with SCLS by microarray analysis were also detected and validated by exome deep sequencing. Functional annotation of highly ranked SNPs revealed enrichment of cell projections, cell junctions and adhesion, and molecules containing pleckstrin homology, Ras/Rho regulatory, and immunoglobulin Ig-like C2/fibronectin type III domains, all of which involve mechanistic functions that correlate with the SCLS phenotype. These results highlight SNPs with potential relevance to SCLS. PMID:24808988

  15. Contextual Analysis of Fluid Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy A.; Pink, Jeffrey E.; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2008-01-01

    The nature of fluid intelligence was investigated by identifying variables that were, and were not, significantly related to this construct. Relevant information was obtained from three sources: re-analyses of data from previous studies, a study in which 791 adults performed storage-plus-processing working memory tasks, and a study in which 236…

  16. Geomechanical analysis to predict the oil leak at the wellbores in Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byoung Yoon

    2014-02-01

    Oil leaks were found in wellbores of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interbed between the caprock bottom and salt top. A three dimensional finite element model, which contains wellbore element blocks and allows each cavern to be configured individually, is constructed to investigate the wellbore damage mechanism. The model also contains element blocks to represent interface between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interbed behavior in a realistic manner. The causes of the damaged casing segments are a result of vertical and horizontal movements of the interbed between the caprock and salt dome. The salt top subsides because the volume of caverns below the salt top decrease with time due to salt creep closure, while the caprock subsides at a slower rate because the caprock is thick and stiffer. This discrepancy yields a deformation of the well. The deformed wellbore may fail at some time. An oil leak occurs when the wellbore fails. A possible oil leak date of each well is determined using the equivalent plastic strain failure criterion. A well grading system for a remediation plan is developed based on the predicted leak dates of each wellbore.

  17. Analysis of a water-coolant leak into a very high-temperature vitrification chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.

    1998-06-11

    A coolant-leakage incident occurred during non-radioactive operation of the Plasma Hearth Process waste-vitrification development system at Argonne National Laboratory when a stray electric arc ruptured az water-cooling jacket. Rapid evaporation of the coolant that entered the very high-temperature chamber pressurized the normally sub-atmospheric system above ambient pressure for over 13 minutes. Any positive pressurization, and particularly a lengthy one, is a safety concern since this can cause leakage of contaminants from the system. A model of the thermal phenomena that describe coolant/hot-material interactions was developed to better understand the characteristics of this type of incident. The model is described and results for a variety of hypothetical coolant-leak incidents are presented. It is shown that coolant leak rates above a certain threshold will cause coolant to accumulate in the chamber, and evaporation from this pool can maintain positive pressure in the system long after the leak has been stopped. Application of the model resulted in reasonably good agreement with the duration of the pressure measured during the incident. A closed-form analytic solution is shown to be applicable to the initial leak period in which the peak pressures are generated, and is presented and discussed.

  18. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  19. Targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) through a single catheter access site for treatment of a cerebral spinal fluid leak causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) usually occurs in the setting of a spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak. We report the first description of a case of SIH caused by a CSF leak which improved after a targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) at the right T1-T2 level. An 81-year-old woman presented with an orthostatic headache for 6 days. MRI of the brain with contrast demonstrated low lying cerebellar tonsils, an engorged transverse sinus flow void, bifrontal small subdural fluid collections, and diffuse dural enhancement. CT myelography showed extravasation of intrathecal contrast at the right T1-T2 level. A targeted epidural patch was performed by injection of n-BCA through a catheter at the right T1-T2 level. After treatment, the patient's symptoms immediately improved and she was without a headache at 1-year follow-up. PMID:26038380

  20. Targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) through a single catheter access site for treatment of a cerebral spinal fluid leak causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) usually occurs in the setting of a spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak. We report the first description of a case of SIH caused by a CSF leak which improved after a targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) at the right T1-T2 level. An 81-year-old woman presented with an orthostatic headache for 6 days. MRI of the brain with contrast demonstrated low lying cerebellar tonsils, an engorged transverse sinus flow void, bifrontal small subdural fluid collections, and diffuse dural enhancement. CT myelography showed extravasation of intrathecal contrast at the right T1-T2 level. A targeted epidural patch was performed by injection of n-BCA through a catheter at the right T1-T2 level. After treatment, the patient's symptoms immediately improved and she was without a headache at 1-year follow-up. PMID:26047904

  1. Analysis of Skylab fluid mechanics science demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Butz, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the data reduction and analysis of the Skylab fluid mechanics demonstrations are presented. All the fluid mechanics data available from the Skylab missions were identified and surveyed. The significant fluid mechanics phenomena were identified and reduced to measurable quantities wherever possible. Data correlations were performed using existing theories. Among the phenomena analyzed were: static low-g interface shapes, oscillation frequency and damping of a liquid drop, coalescence, rotating drop, liquid films and low-g ice melting. A survey of the possible applications of the results was made and future experiments are recommended.

  2. Apparatus and method for fluid analysis

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Bary W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Shepard, Chester L.; Reeves, James H.

    2004-11-02

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for analyzing a fluid used in a machine or in an industrial process line. The apparatus has at least one meter placed proximate the machine or process line and in contact with the machine or process fluid for measuring at least one parameter related to the fluid. The at least one parameter is a standard laboratory analysis parameter. The at least one meter includes but is not limited to viscometer, element meter, optical meter, particulate meter, and combinations thereof.

  3. Apparatus And Method For Fluid Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Bary W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Shepard, Chester L.; Reeves, James H.

    2003-05-13

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for analyzing a fluid used in a machine or in an industrial process line. The apparatus has at least one meter placed proximate the machine or process line and in contact with the machine or process fluid for measuring at least one parameter related to the fluid. The at least one parameter is a standard laboratory analysis parameter. The at least one meter includes but is not limited to viscometer, element meter, optical meter, particulate meter, and combinations thereof.

  4. Application of the leak-before-break concept in nuclear power plant safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.A.; Rivkin, E.Yu.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this report was to attempt to justify the leak-before-break concept in reactor safety analyses, thus eliminating the need to show protection against the double-ended guillotine break in these analyses. The two assumptions of the concept: (1) A complete break would not occur, and (2) A leak via a through crack would be discovered before the crack size approached the critical value were discussed and conditions to insure validity of each assumption were outlined. Methods of analyses in various countries were also discussed. It was noted that the determination of the area of elastoplastic opening of a crack for a prescribed flow rate is a difficult problem, and it was recommended that testing be performed on full size pipes under postulated conditions.

  5. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  6. Dialysate leaks in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, M; Ouimet, D; Pichette, V

    2001-01-01

    Dialysate leakage represents a major noninfectious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). An exit-site leak refers to the appearance of any moisture around the PD catheter identified as dialysate; however, the spectrum of dialysate leaks also includes any dialysate loss from the peritoneal cavity other than via the lumen of the catheter. The incidence of dialysate leakage is somewhat more than 5% in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, but this percentage probably underestimates the number of early leaks. The incidence of hydrothorax or pleural leak as a complication of PD remains unclear. Factors identified as potentially related to dialysate leakage are those related to the technique of PD catheter insertion, the way PD is initiated, and weakness of the abdominal wall. The pediatric literature tends to favor Tenckhoff catheters over other catheters as being superior with respect to dialysate leakage, but no consensus on catheter choice exists for adults in this regard. An association has been found between early leaks (< or =30 days) and immediate CAPD initiation and perhaps median catheter insertion. Risk factors contributing to abdominal weakness appear to predispose mostly to late leaks; one or more of them can generally be identified in the majority of patients. Early leakage most often manifests as a pericatheter leak. Late leaks may present more subtly with subcutaneous swelling and edema, weight gain, peripheral or genital edema, and apparent ultrafiltration failure. Dyspnea is the first clinical clue to the diagnosis of a pleural leak. Late leaks tend to develop during the first year of CAPD. The most widely used approach to determine the exact site of the leakage is with computed tomography after infusion of 2 L of dialysis fluid containing radiocontrast material. Treatments for dialysate leaks include surgical repair, temporary transfer to hemodialysis, lower dialysate volumes, and PD with a cycler. Recent recommendation propose

  7. Sealant provides economical solution to subsurface leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, S.

    1999-02-01

    A series of unique field-tested leak sealants have been developed that can withstand the extreme pressure and temperature conditions found in the oilfield. The unique quality of the sealants is that the sealing mechanism is activated by the differential pressure created through a leak site. The sealants are comparable with oil- and glycol-based hydraulic fluids and are particularly useful for sealing leaks in subsurface safety valves, wellhead tubing and casing hanger seals, PBR seal joints, umbilical leaks and subsea well control systems. The chemical remains fluid until it is released through a leak site. The sealant mimics platelets in the human body by forming deposits on leak walls. This process creates a matrix across the leak similar to coagulating blood on a cut. Leak sites can be metal-to-metal seals, elastomer seals, pinhole leaks, or connection leaks. The pressure-activated sealant is stable at high pressures and temperatures up to 15,000 psi and 320 F and does not react with elastomers. The sealant will not plug valves because any pressure from that occurs while opening and closing the valve only lasts for a few seconds, and it is a sustained pressure drop that is required to activate the chemical.

  8. Derivation of effectiveness-NTU method for heat exchangers with heat leak

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Soyars

    2001-11-01

    A powerful and useful method for heat exchanger analysis is the effectiveness-NTU method. The equations for this technique presented in textbooks, however, are limited to the case where all of the heat transfer occurs between the two fluid streams. In an application of interest to us, cryogenic heat exchangers, we wish to consider a heat leak term. Thus, we have derived equations for the {var_epsilon}-NTU method with heat leak involved. The cases to be studied include evaporators, condensers, and counter-flow, with heat leak both in and out.

  9. Leak detection method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, B.A.

    1982-05-11

    A method and apparatus are described for using sulfur hexafluoride to detect leaks in fluid processing systems. Leak detection can be performed with the processing system continuing in operation. This apparatus detects leakage through a partition separating a portion of a first path from portion of a second path in a fluid processing system, while operation of the system is continued. The apparatus comprises a combination of 1) means for introducing a known quantity of sulfur hexafluoride into fluid flowing in the first path upstream of a partition; 2) means for continuously removing a sample of fluid flowing in the second path at a locus downstream of the partition; 3) means for removing normally liquid components from the sample; 4) means for testing the sample to determine the presence of sulfur hexafluoride; and 5) means for indicating the amount of sulfur hexafluoride in the sample. 2 claims.

  10. Heat exchanger with leak detecting double wall tubes

    DOEpatents

    Bieberbach, George; Bongaards, Donald J.; Lohmeier, Alfred; Duke, James M.

    1981-01-01

    A straight shell and tube heat exchanger utilizing double wall tubes and three tubesheets to ensure separation of the primary and secondary fluid and reliable leak detection of a leak in either the primary or the secondary fluids to further ensure that there is no mixing of the two fluids.

  11. Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code, SINFAC, consists of additional routines added to April, 1983, version of SINDA. Additional routines provide for mathematical modeling of active heat-transfer loops. Simulates steady-state and pseudo-transient operations of 16 different components of heat-transfer loops, including radiators, evaporators, condensers, mechanical pumps, reservoirs, and many types of valves and fittings. Program contains property-analysis routine used to compute thermodynamic properties of 20 different refrigerants. Source code written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Hydraulic-Leak Detector for Hidden Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Loo, S.

    1986-01-01

    Slow leakage of fluid made obvious. Indicator consists of wick wrapped at one end around joint to be monitored. Wick absorbs hydraulic fluid leaking from joint and transmits to opposite end, located outside cover plate and visible to inspector. Leakage manifested as discoloration of outside end of wick. Indicator reveals leaks in hidden fittings on hydraulic lines. Fast inspection of joints without disassembly. Used in aerospace, petroleum, chemical, nuclear, and other industries where removing covers for inspection impossible, difficult, or time-consuming.

  13. Dimensional analysis of aqueous magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Răcuciu, M.; Creangă, D. E.; Suliţanu, N.; Bădescu, V.

    2007-11-01

    A comparison of the synthesis and characterization of three aqueous magnetic fluids intended for biomedical applications is presented. Stable colloidal suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation method with the magnetite cores being coated with β-cyclodextrin, tetramethylammonium hydroxide and citric acid. Rheological properties of the fluids were investigated, i.e. viscosity (capillary method) and surface tension (stalagmometric method) in correlation with their density (picnometric method). The dimensional distributions of the ferrophase particles physical diameter of these three magnetic fluids - revealed on the basis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data - as well as the diameter distributions of some other magnetic fluids presented in the literature, were comparatively analyzed using the box-plot statistical method. In order to extract complementary data on the magnetic diameter of an iron oxide core, magnetization measurements as well as X-ray diffraction pattern analysis were carried out. Interpretation of all the measurement data was accomplished by assessing the suitability of the three magnetic fluid samples from the viewpoint of their stability and biocompatibility.

  14. Proteomic analysis of human osteoarthritis synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized mainly by progressive degradation of the hyaline cartilage. Patients with osteoarthritis often postpone seeking medical help, which results in the diagnosis being made at an advanced stage of cartilage destruction. Sustained efforts are needed to identify specific markers that might help in early diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and in improving therapeutic outcomes. We employed a multipronged proteomic approach, which included multiple fractionation strategies followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis to explore the proteome of synovial fluid obtained from osteoarthritis patients. In addition to the total proteome, we also enriched glycoproteins from synovial fluid using lectin affinity chromatography. Results We identified 677 proteins from synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis of which 545 proteins have not been previously reported. These novel proteins included ADAM-like decysin 1 (ADAMDEC1), alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP), CD84, fibulin 1 (FBLN1), matrix remodelling associated 5 (MXRA5), secreted phosphoprotein 2 (SPP2) and spondin 2 (SPON2). We identified 300 proteins using lectin affinity chromatography, including the glycoproteins afamin (AFM), attractin (ATRN), fibrillin 1 (FBN1), transferrin (TF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and vasorin (VSN). Gene ontology analysis confirmed that a majority of the identified proteins were extracellular and are mostly involved in cell communication and signaling. We also confirmed the expression of ANPEP, dickkopf WNT signaling pathway inhibitor 3 (DKK3) and osteoglycin (OGN) by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis of osteoarthritis synovial fluid samples. Conclusions We present an in-depth analysis of the synovial fluid proteome from patients with osteoarthritis. We believe that the catalog of proteins generated in this study will further enhance our knowledge regarding the

  15. Pressure Rise Analysis When Hydrogen Leak from a Cracked Pipe in the Cryogenic Hydrogen System in J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Ushijima, I.; Kato, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    2006-04-01

    As one of the main experimental facilities in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1 MW proton beam is being constructed. Cryogenic hydrogen at supercritical pressure is selected as a moderator. The total nuclear heating at the moderators is estimated to be a 3.7 kW. A hydrogen system to cool the moderators has been designed. The most severe off-normal event for the cryogenic hydrogen system is considered to be a hydrogen leak when a pipe cracks. In such a case, the hydrogen must be discharged to atmosphere quickly and safely. An analytical code that simulates the pressure change during a hydrogen leak was developed. A pressure rise analysis for various sized cracks was performed, and the required sizes for relief devices were determined. A safety valve size is φ42.7 mm and a rupture disc for vacuum layer should have a diameter of 37.1 mm, respectively.

  16. Pressure Rise Analysis When Hydrogen Leak from a Cracked Pipe in the Cryogenic Hydrogen System in J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Ushijima, I.; Kato, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    2006-04-27

    As one of the main experimental facilities in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1 MW proton beam is being constructed. Cryogenic hydrogen at supercritical pressure is selected as a moderator. The total nuclear heating at the moderators is estimated to be a 3.7 kW. A hydrogen system to cool the moderators has been designed. The most severe off-normal event for the cryogenic hydrogen system is considered to be a hydrogen leak when a pipe cracks. In such a case, the hydrogen must be discharged to atmosphere quickly and safely. An analytical code that simulates the pressure change during a hydrogen leak was developed. A pressure rise analysis for various sized cracks was performed, and the required sizes for relief devices were determined. A safety valve size is {phi}42.7 mm and a rupture disc for vacuum layer should have a diameter of 37.1 mm, respectively.

  17. Leak detection by acoustic emission monitoring. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, Bernard; Winder, A. A.

    1994-05-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of detecting leaks from underground storage tanks or pipelines using acoustic emissions. An extensive technical literature review established that distinguishable acoustic emission signals will be generated when a storage tank is subjected to deformation stresses. A parametric analysis was performed which indicated that leak rates less than 0.1 gallons per hour can be detected for leak sizes less than 1/32 inch with 99% probability if the transient signals were sensed with an array of accelerometers (cemented to the tank or via acoustic waveguides), each having a sensitivity greater than 250 mv/g over a frequency range of 0.1 to 4000 Hz, and processed in a multi-channel Fourier spectrum analyzer with automatic threshold detection. An acoustic transient or energy release processor could conceivably detect the onset of the leak at the moment of fracture of the tank wall. The primary limitations to realizing reliable and robust acoustic emission monitoring of underground fluid leaks are the various masking noise sources prevalent at Air Force bases, which are attributed to aircraft, motor traffic, pump station operation, and ground tremors.

  18. Automated fluid analysis apparatus and techniques

    DOEpatents

    Szecsody, James E.

    2004-03-16

    An automated device that couples a pair of differently sized sample loops with a syringe pump and a source of degassed water. A fluid sample is mounted at an inlet port and delivered to the sample loops. A selected sample from the sample loops is diluted in the syringe pump with the degassed water and fed to a flow through detector for analysis. The sample inlet is also directly connected to the syringe pump to selectively perform analysis without dilution. The device is airtight and used to detect oxygen-sensitive species, such as dithionite in groundwater following a remedial injection to treat soil contamination.

  19. Ninth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Ninth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 98) was held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio from August 31 to September 4, 1998. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Integrating Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer into the Design Process." Highlights of the workshop (in addition to the papers published herein) included an address by the NASA Chief Engineer, Dr. Daniel Mulville; a CFD short course by Dr. John D. Anderson of the University of Maryland; and a short course by Dr. Robert Cochran of Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, lectures and hands-on training were offered in the use of several cutting-edge engineering design and analysis-oriented CFD and Heat Transfer tools. The workshop resulted in international participation of over 125 persons representing aerospace and automotive industries, academia, software providers, government agencies, and private corporations. The papers published herein address issues and solutions related to the integration of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer into the engineering design process. Although the primary focus is aerospace, the topics and ideas presented are applicable to many other areas where these and other disciplines are interdependent.

  20. Manufacturing in space: Fluid dynamics numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.; Spradley, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Natural convection in a spherical container with cooling at the center was numerically simulated using the Lockheed-developed General Interpolants Method (GIM) numerical fluid dynamic computer program. The numerical analysis was simplified by assuming axisymmetric flow in the spherical container, with the symmetry axis being a sphere diagonal parallel to the gravity vector. This axisymmetric spherical geometry was intended as an idealization of the proposed Lal/Kroes growing experiments to be performed on board Spacelab. Results were obtained for a range of Rayleigh numbers from 25 to 10,000. For a temperature difference of 10 C from the cooling sting at the center to the container surface, and a gravitional loading of 0.000001 g a computed maximum fluid velocity of about 2.4 x 0.00001 cm/sec was reached after about 250 sec. The computed velocities were found to be approximately proportional to the Rayleigh number over the range of Rayleigh numbers investigated.

  1. The Tenth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok (Compiler); McConnaughey, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tenth Thermal arid Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 99) was held at the Bevill Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 13-17, 1999. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Tools and Techniques Contributing to Engineering Excellence". Forty-seven technical papers were presented in four sessions. The sessions were: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Paper, and (4) Fluids Paper. Forty papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining seven papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) twelve short courses, (c) thirteen product overview lectures, and (d) three keynote lectures. The workshop resulted in participation of 171 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

  2. Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Twelfth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 01) was held at the Bevill Center, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama, September 10-14, 2001. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Engineering Excellence and Advances in the New Millenium." Forty-five technical papers were presented in four sessions: (1) Thermal Spacecraft/Payloads, (2) Thermal Propulsion/Vehicles, (3) Interdisciplinary Papers, and (4) Fluids Papers. Thirty-nine papers were published in these proceedings. The remaining six papers were not available in electronic format at the time of publication. In addition to the technical papers, there were (a) nine hands-on classes on thermal and flow analyses software, (b) thirteen short courses and product overview lectures, (c) five keynote lectures and, (d) panel discussions consisting of eight presentations. The workshop resulted in participation of 195 persons representing NASA Centers, Government agencies, aerospace industries, academia, software providers, and private corporations.

  3. The Sixth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop consisted of classes, vendor demonstrations, and paper sessions. The classes and vendor demonstrations provided participants with the information on widely used tools for thermal and fluids analysis. The paper sessions provided a forum for the exchange of information and ideas among thermal and fluids analysis. Paper topics included advances an uses of established thermal and fluids computer codes (such as SINDA and TRASYS) as well as unique modeling techniques and applications.

  4. Assessment of supercritical fluids for drug analysis.

    PubMed

    Messer, D C; Taylor, L T; Moore, W N; Weiser, W E

    1993-12-01

    Supercritical fluid (SF) CO2 is receiving a great deal of interest in the scientific and engineering community as a replacement for toxic organic solvents. Analytical chemists employ large quantities of organic solvents during preparation of the sample for analysis. The application of SF extraction with CO2 and modified CO2 to the isolation of active drug components and metabolites from various pharmaceutical and biological matrices is reviewed. Studies are described that deal with spiked drugs in animal feed, residual solvent in drug formulations, and active ingredients in over-the-counter products. The experimental challenges to implementing this technology for trace analysis are discussed. While much of the impetus for working with SFs is prompted by regulatory issues, it would appear that SFs afford the analyst a better-cheaper-faster-safer way of performing drug analysis. PMID:8122298

  5. Temperature and Atomic Oxygen Effects on Helium Leak Rates of a Candidate Main Interface Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, Nicholas; Wasowski, Janice L.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Helium leak tests were completed to characterize the leak rate of a 54 in. diameter composite space docking seal design in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA's) Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). The evaluated seal design was a candidate for the main interface seal on the LIDS, which would be compressed between two vehicles, while docked, to prevent the escape of breathable air from the vehicles and into the vacuum of space. Leak tests completed at nominal temperatures of -30, 20, and 50 C on untreated and atomic oxygen (AO) exposed test samples were examined to determine the influence of both test temperature and AO exposure on the performance of the composite seal assembly. Results obtained for untreated seal samples showed leak rates which increased with increased test temperature. This general trend was not observed in tests of the AO exposed specimens. Initial examination of collected test data suggested that AO exposure resulted in higher helium leak rates, however, further analysis showed that the differences observed in the 20 and 50 C tests between the untreated and AO exposed samples were within the experimental error of the test method. Lack of discernable trends in the test data prevented concrete conclusions about the effects of test temperature and AO exposure on helium leak rates of the candidate seal design from being drawn. To facilitate a comparison of the current test data with results from previous leak tests using air as the test fluid, helium leak rates were converted to air leak rates using standard conversion factors for viscous and molecular flow. Flow rates calculated using the viscous flow conversion factor were significantly higher than the experimental air leakage values, whereas values calculated using the molecular flow conversion factor were significantly lower than the experimentally obtained air leak rates. The difference in these sets of converted flow rates and their deviation from the

  6. Chlorofluorocarbon leak detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1990-12-01

    There are about 590 large coolant systems located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) leaking nearly 800,000 lb of R-114 refrigerant annually (1989 estimate). A program is now under way to reduce the leakage to 325,000 lb/year -- an average loss of 551 lb/year (0.063 lb/h) per coolant system, some of which are as large as 800 ft. This report investigates leak detection technologies that can be used to locate leaks in the coolant systems. Included are descriptions, minimum leak detection rate levels, advantages, disadvantages, and vendor information on the following technologies: bubbling solutions; colorimetric leak testing; dyes; halogen leak detectors (coronea discharge detectors; halide torch detectors, and heated anode detectors); laser imaging; mass spectroscopy; organic vapor analyzers; odorants; pressure decay methods; solid-state electrolytic-cell gas sensors; thermal conductivity leak detectors; and ultrasonic leak detectors.

  7. Seismic Investigation of the Pointer Ridge offshore southwestern Taiwan: Detection of fluid migration pathways and fault seal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W. C.; Liu, C. S.; Lin, C. C.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes both 2D and 3D seismic images in the Pointer Ridge area for gas hydrate investigation. Pointer Ridge is a ridge situated on the passive China continental margin formed by down slope erosion of the continental slope material on either side of the ridge. High methane flux rate and several seismic chimneys were observed in this area from previous studies, which may imply active ongoing fluid migration processes. To find the possible fluid migration pathways and understand the fluid migration processes, we firstly use both 2D and 3D seismic images to map the spatial distribution of the BSRs, and to identify the structural and sedimentary features in our study area. Secondly, seismic attribute analyses are carried out for fluid migration pathways detection and fault seal analysis. Finally, we propose a conceptual model to illustrate how fluids migrate along those pathways to the seafloor. The results show that the fluid migration pathways obtained from seismic attribute analysis results correlate well with the chimney and fault structures recognized from conventional seismic amplitude sections. We suggest that high angle normal faults may play an important role for fluid migrating upward, and the ongoing fluid migration processes will increase the seafloor instabilities. Since the Pointer Ridge is a gas hydrate leaking site, our results could provide useful information for further risk evaluation.

  8. Distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Kempen, C.; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sonjian

    2013-05-01

    With the increase worldwide demand for hydrocarbon fuels and the vast development of new fuel production and delivery infrastructure installations around the world, there is a growing need for reliable fuel leak detection technologies to provide safety and reduce environmental risks. Hydrocarbon leaks (gas or liquid) pose an extreme danger and need to be detected very quickly to avoid potential disasters. Gas leaks have the greatest potential for causing damage due to the explosion risk from the dispersion of gas clouds. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fast response, high sensitivity, distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection (HySenseTM) system based on the use of an optical fiber that uses a hydrocarbon sensitive fluorescent coating to detect the presence of fuel leaks present in close proximity along the length of the sensor fiber. The HySenseTM system operates in two modes, leak detection and leak localization, and will trigger an alarm within seconds of exposure contact. The fast and accurate response of the sensor provides reliable fluid leak detection for pipelines, tanks, airports, pumps, and valves to detect and minimize any potential catastrophic damage.

  9. Distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Kempen, C.; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian

    2013-05-01

    With the increase worldwide demand for hydrocarbon fuels and the vast development of new fuel production and delivery infrastructure installations around the world, there is a growing need for reliable fuel leak detection technologies to provide safety and reduce environmental risks. Hydrocarbon leaks (gas or liquid) pose an extreme danger and need to be detected very quickly to avoid potential disasters. Gas leaks have the greatest potential for causing damage due to the explosion risk from the dispersion of gas clouds. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fast response, high sensitivity, distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection (HySensTM) system based on the use of an optical fiber that uses a hydrocarbon sensitive fluorescent coating to detect the presence of fuel leaks present in close proximity along the length of the sensor fiber. The HySenseTM system operates in two modes, leak detection and leak localization, and will trigger an alarm within seconds of exposure contact. The fast and accurate response of the sensor provides reliable fluid leak detection for pipelines, tanks, airports, pumps, and valves to detect and minimize any potential catastrophic damage.

  10. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  11. Analysis of Underground Storage Tanks System Materials to Increased Leak Potential Associated with E15 Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Theiss, Timothy J; Janke, Christopher James; Pawel, Steven J

    2012-07-01

    include model year 2001 light-duty vehicles, but specifically prohibited use in motorcycles and off-road vehicles and equipment. UST stakeholders generally consider fueling infrastructure materials designed for use with E0 to be adequate for use with E10, and there are no known instances of major leaks or failures directly attributable to ethanol use. It is conceivable that many compatibility issues, including accelerated corrosion, do arise and are corrected onsite and, therefore do not lead to a release. However, there is some concern that higher ethanol concentrations, such as E15 or E20, may be incompatible with current materials used in standard gasoline fueling hardware. In the summer of 2008, DOE recognized the need to assess the impact of intermediate blends of ethanol on the fueling infrastructure, specifically located at the fueling station. This includes the dispenser and hanging hardware, the underground storage tank, and associated piping. The DOE program has been co-led and funded by the Office of the Biomass Program and Vehicle Technologies Program with technical expertise from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The infrastructure material compatibility work has been supported through strong collaborations and testing at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). ORNL performed a compatibility study investigating the compatibility of fuel infrastructure materials to gasoline containing intermediate levels of ethanol. These results can be found in the ORNL report entitled Intermediate Ethanol Blends Infrastructure Materials Compatibility Study: Elastomers, Metals and Sealants (hereafter referred to as the ORNL intermediate blends material compatibility study). These materials included elastomers, plastics, metals and sealants typically found in fuel dispenser infrastructure. The test fuels evaluated in the ORNL study were SAE standard test fuel formulations used to assess material-fuel compatibility within a

  12. Analysis of Waste Leak and Toxic Chemical Release Accidents from Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) Diluent System

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2000-09-15

    Radiological and toxicological consequences are calculated for 4 postulated accidents involving the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) diluent addition systems. Consequences for the onsite and offsite receptor are calculated. This analysis contains technical information used to determine the accident consequences for the River Protection Project (RPP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  13. Continuation finite element analysis of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Tai-Whang

    A finite element procedure using a mixed formulation and a predictor-corrector type continuation algorithm for the analysis of two dimensional steady state flows of viscoelastic fluids is described. As a simple but nontrivial test example, radial flow immenating from a line by the numerical discretization and believed to be the cause for previous numerical failures, are shown and branch solution paths are followed by step length adjustment and by convergent tolerance relaxation. A technique for jumping over bifurcation points is presented and used to increase the Weissenberg number with no apparent limit for the radial flow problem. A second example related to extrusion of viscoelastic material is also analyzed. Steady state velocity fields, deviatoric stress distributions and pressure distributions for several different Weissenberg numbers are presented with bifurcation points and turning points noted.

  14. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  15. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  16. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  17. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  18. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  19. Computational thermo-fluid analysis of a disk brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Kuraishi, Takashi; Tabata, Shinichiro; Takagi, Hirokazu

    2016-06-01

    We present computational thermo-fluid analysis of a disk brake, including thermo-fluid analysis of the flow around the brake and heat conduction analysis of the disk. The computational challenges include proper representation of the small-scale thermo-fluid behavior, high-resolution representation of the thermo-fluid boundary layers near the spinning solid surfaces, and bringing the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) calculated in the thermo-fluid analysis of the flow to the heat conduction analysis of the spinning disk. The disk brake model used in the analysis closely represents the actual configuration, and this adds to the computational challenges. The components of the method we have developed for computational analysis of the class of problems with these types of challenges include the Space-Time Variational Multiscale method for coupled incompressible flow and thermal transport, ST Slip Interface method for high-resolution representation of the thermo-fluid boundary layers near spinning solid surfaces, and a set of projection methods for different parts of the disk to bring the HTC calculated in the thermo-fluid analysis. With the HTC coming from the thermo-fluid analysis of the flow around the brake, we do the heat conduction analysis of the disk, from the start of the breaking until the disk spinning stops, demonstrating how the method developed works in computational analysis of this complex and challenging problem.

  20. Analysis of fluid inclusions in halite

    SciTech Connect

    Lazar, B.; Holland, H.D.

    1988-02-01

    A technique has been developed to drill into fluid inclusions in halite, to extract the inclusions fluids, and to determine the concentration of all of the major and some of the minor constituents in these fluids. The minimum diameter of usable fluid inclusions is ca. 250 ..mu..m. After dilution, the fluids are analyzed by ion chromatography and coulometry. Uncertainties in the concentration of the major cations and anions is on the order of 4%. The analytical scheme provides much more precise analyses of inclusion fluids than have been available to date. The analyses are a useful starting point for reconstructing the composition of the sea water from which the evaporite brines evolved.

  1. Pseudotumor-like syndrome and cerebrospinal fluid leak in meningiomas involving the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashish H; Ivan, Michael E; Komotar, Ricardo J

    2016-07-01

    Meningiomas that partially or completely occlude the superior sagittal sinus may create a pseudotumor-like syndrome in certain patients. These patients may have impaired CSF absorption as a result of higher proximal venous pressure. Higher pressures after resection may encumber adequate wound healing and worsen symptoms. Here, the authors present a small series of patients with meningiomas involving the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus, with documented high intracranial pressure prior to surgery. This paper aims to address the proposed etiology of high intracranial pressure in these patients and its associated complications, including CSF leak, wound dehiscence, pressure-related headaches, and visual complaints. In this paper, the authors propose a management plan to avoid wound complications and pseudotumor-related complications. When considering surgical intervention for patients with compromise of the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus, careful attention must be paid to addressing potentially elevated intracranial pressure perioperatively. PMID:26684779

  2. Detecting Methane Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Hinkley, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    Remote sensor uses laser radiation backscattered from natural targets. He/Ne Laser System for remote scanning of Methane leaks employs topographic target to scatter light to receiver near laser transmitter. Apparatus powered by 1.5kW generator transported to field sites and pointed at suspected methane leaks. Used for remote detection of natural-gas leaks and locating methane emissions in landfill sites.

  3. Analysis of fluid/mechanical systems using EASY5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert W., Jr.; Arndt, Scott D.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper illustrates how the use of a general analysis package can simplify modeling and analyzing fluid/mechanical systems. One such package is EASY5, a Boeing Computer Services product. The basic transmission line equations for modeling piped fluid systems are presented, as well as methods of incorporating these equations into the EASY5 environment. The paper describes how this analysis tool has been used to model several fluid subsystems of the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  4. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  5. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  6. Distributed fiber optic acoustic sensor for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmer, John P.; Kingsley, Stuart A.; Laudo, John S.; Krak, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Leaks in dielectric fluid-filled, high-voltage distribution lines can cause significant problems for the electric power industry. Often, these lines run over long distance and are difficult to access. Operators may know that a leak exists because additional fluid is required to maintain pipe pressure; however, locating the leak is often a significant challenge. A system that could monitor and locate leaks within the electrical distribution pipe lines would be highly desirable. We present a distributed fiber optic acoustic sensor technology that could be used to measure and locate leaks within fluid-filled, high-voltage distribution lines. In this application, the optical fiber sensor is placed inside the fluid-filled pipe and can potentially locate leaks to within several meters. The fiber optic acoustic sensor is designed such that it can listen to the sound produced by the fluid as it escapes from the pipe into the surrounding soil. The fluid inside the pipe is typically maintained at a pressure of 200 psi and escapes at high velocity when a leak occurs. The distributed fiber optic sensing system being developed is based upon the Sagnac interferometer and is unusual in that range information is not obtained by the more common method of optical time domain reflectometry or optical frequency domain reflectometry, but by essentially a CW technique which works in the frequency domain. It is also unusual in that the signal processing technique actually looks for the absence of a signal.

  7. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  8. The Fifth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Fifth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop was held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute, Brook Park, Ohio, cosponsored by NASA Lewis Research Center and the Ohio Aerospace Institute, 16-20 Aug. 1993. The workshop consisted of classes, vendor demonstrations, and paper sessions. The classes and vendor demonstrations provided participants with the information on widely used tools for thermal and fluid analysis. The paper sessions provided a forum for the exchange of information and ideas among thermal and fluids analysts. Paper topics included advances and uses of established thermal and fluids computer codes (such as SINDA and TRASYS) as well as unique modeling techniques and applications.

  9. Development of a computational aero/fluids analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, P. B.

    1987-01-01

    The Computational Aero/Fluids Analysis System (AFAS) provides the analytical capability to perform state-of-the-art computational analyses in two difficult fluid dynamics disciplines associated with the Space Shuttle program. This system provides the analysis tools and techniques for rapidly and efficiently accessing, analyzing, and reformulating the large and expanding external aerodynamic data base while also providing tools for complex fluid flow analyses of the SSME engine components. Both of these fluid flow disciplines, external aerodynamics and internal gasdynamics, required this capability to ensure that MSFC can respond in a timely manner as problems are encountered and operational changes are made in the Space Shuttle.

  10. The Fourth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Fourth Annual Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop was held from August 17-21, 1992, at NASA Lewis Research Center. The workshop consisted of classes, vendor demonstrations, and paper sessions. The classes and vendor demonstrations provided participants with the information on widely used tools for thermal and fluids analysis. The paper sessions provided a forum for the exchange of information and ideas among thermal and fluids analysts. Paper topics included advances and uses of established thermal and fluids computer codes (such as SINDA and TRASYS) as well as unique modeling techniques and applications.

  11. Apparatus for detecting leaks

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Eugene T.

    1976-02-24

    A method and apparatus for determining the position of and estimating the size of leaks in an evacuating apparatus comprising the use of a testing gas such as helium or hydrogen flowing around said apparatus whereby the testing gas will be drawn in at the site of any leaks.

  12. SINFAC - SYSTEMS IMPROVED NUMERICAL FLUIDS ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code, SINFAC, consists of additional routines added to the April 1983 revision of SINDA, a general thermal analyzer program. The purpose of the additional routines is to allow for the modeling of active heat transfer loops. The modeler can simulate the steady-state and pseudo-transient operations of 16 different heat transfer loop components including radiators, evaporators, condensers, mechanical pumps, reservoirs and many types of valves and fittings. In addition, the program contains a property analysis routine that can be used to compute the thermodynamic properties of 20 different refrigerants. SINFAC can simulate the response to transient boundary conditions. SINFAC was first developed as a method for computing the steady-state performance of two phase systems. It was then modified using CNFRWD, SINDA's explicit time-integration scheme, to accommodate transient thermal models. However, SINFAC cannot simulate pressure drops due to time-dependent fluid acceleration, transient boil-out, or transient fill-up, except in the accumulator. SINFAC also requires the user to be familiar with SINDA. The solution procedure used by SINFAC is similar to that which an engineer would use to solve a system manually. The solution to a system requires the determination of all of the outlet conditions of each component such as the flow rate, pressure, and enthalpy. To obtain these values, the user first estimates the inlet conditions to the first component of the system, then computes the outlet conditions from the data supplied by the manufacturer of the first component. The user then estimates the temperature at the outlet of the third component and computes the corresponding flow resistance of the second component. With the flow resistance of the second component, the user computes the conditions down stream, namely the inlet conditions of the third. The computations follow for the rest of the system, back to the first component

  13. Analysis of large-leak test SWAT-3 Run-6 data by use of sodium-water-reaction analysis code SWAAM-I

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Lin, H.C.

    1982-02-01

    The Sodium Water Advanced Analysis Method computer code (SWAAM-I) is used to analyze the large-leak test data SWAT-3 Run-6. The SWAT-3 is the mockup of the secondary system of the Japanese breeder-reactor demonstration plant Monju. The steam-generator design for the Monju reactor was a helical-coil-tube type with a cover-gas space, and the SWAT-3 Run-6 Test vessel simulates this design of the steam generator. The objectives of this work are: (1) to examine the adequacy of the SWAAM-I code for the helical-coil-tube steam-generator system, (2) to understand and confirm the understanding of phenomena that have major design implications, and (3) to define needs for additional development of SWAAM-I code capabilities.

  14. Fluid flow systems analysis to save energy

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, P.S.

    1999-07-01

    Industrial processes use rotating equipment (e.g.; pump, fan, blower, centrifugal compressor, positive displacement compressor) and pipe (or duct) to move fluid from point A to B, with many processes using electric motors as the prime mover. Most of the systems in the industry are over-designed to meet a peak load demand which might occur over a small fraction of the time or to satisfy a higher pressure demanded by a much smaller user in the same process. The system over-design will result in a selection of larger but inefficient rotating equipment and electric motor system. A careful life cycle cost and economic evaluation must be undertaken to ensure that the process audit, reengineering and equipment selections are not impacting the industrial process goals, but result in a least optimal cost over the life of the project. The paper will define, discuss, and present various process systems in chemical, hydrocarbon and pulp and paper industries. It will discuss the interactive impact of the changes in the mechanical system configuration and the changes in the process variables to better redesign the system and reduce the cost of operation. it will also present a check list of energy conservation measures (ECM) or opportunities. Such ECMs will be related to hydraulics, system components, process modifications, and system efficiency. Two or three case studies will be presented focusing on various conservation measures that improve electrical operating efficiency of a distillation column system. An incremental cost and payback analysis will be presented to assist the investment in process optimization and energy savings' measures.

  15. Study and analysis of leaking underground-storage-tank remediation techniques incorporated in states in EPA Region 6. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, E.

    1990-05-23

    The intent of the research project was initially to determine the effectiveness of groundwater remediation techniques utilized within EPA Region VI for the cleanup of leaking underground storage tanks (LUST). The paper concluded that effectiveness of groundwater remediation is primarily dependent on the choice of remediation parameters rather than the type of technique used. Furthermore, the choice of remediation parameters depends on the value of hydrogeologic parameters that characterize the site and are determined during the initial site assessment.

  16. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  17. Proteomic analysis of mare follicular fluid during late follicle development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Follicular fluid accumulates into the antrum of follicle from the early stage of follicle development. Studies on its components may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying follicular development and oocyte quality. With this objective, we performed a proteomic analysis of mare follicular fluid. First, we hypothesized that proteins in follicular fluid may differ from those in the serum, and also may change during follicle development. Second, we used four different approaches of Immunodepletion and one enrichment method, in order to overcome the masking effect of high-abundance proteins present in the follicular fluid, and to identify those present in lower abundance. Finally, we compared our results with previous studies performed in mono-ovulant (human) and poly-ovulant (porcine and canine) species in an attempt to identify common and/or species-specific proteins. Methods Follicular fluid samples were collected from ovaries at three different stages of follicle development (early dominant, late dominant and preovulatory). Blood samples were also collected at each time. The proteomic analysis was carried out on crude, depleted and enriched follicular fluid by 2D-PAGE, 1D-PAGE and mass spectrometry. Results Total of 459 protein spots were visualized by 2D-PAGE of crude mare follicular fluid, with no difference among the three physiological stages. Thirty proteins were observed as differentially expressed between serum and follicular fluid. Enrichment method was found to be the most powerful method for detection and identification of low-abundance proteins from follicular fluid. Actually, we were able to identify 18 proteins in the crude follicular fluid, and as many as 113 in the enriched follicular fluid. Inhibins and a few other proteins involved in reproduction could only be identified after enrichment of follicular fluid, demonstrating the power of the method used. The comparison of proteins found in mare follicular fluid

  18. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) Version 6 - General Purpose Thermo-Fluid Network Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Leclair, Andre; Moore, Ric; Schallhorn, Paul

    2011-01-01

    GFSSP stands for Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program. It is a general-purpose computer program to compute pressure, temperature and flow distribution in a flow network. GFSSP calculates pressure, temperature, and concentrations at nodes and calculates flow rates through branches. It was primarily developed to analyze Internal Flow Analysis of a Turbopump Transient Flow Analysis of a Propulsion System. GFSSP development started in 1994 with an objective to provide a generalized and easy to use flow analysis tool for thermo-fluid systems.

  19. Detection of interstate liquids pipeline leaks: Feasibility evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    1998-10-20

    The approximately 200,000-mile fuel pipeline system in the US operates at flow rates up to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons per hour (GPH). Most commercial technologies only provide on-line leak detection at about 0.3% of flow rate, i.e., about 7,500 GPH or larger. Detection of leaks at about 1 GPH or so is desirable both from a regulatory and leak-prevention standpoint. Brookhaven`s commercially-accepted perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology for underground leak detection of utility industry dielectric fluids at leak rates less than 0.1 GPH, with new enhancements, will be able to cost-effectively detect fuel pipeline system leaks to about 1 GPH--3 orders-of-magnitude better than any on-line system. The magnitude of detected leaks would be calculable as well. Proposed mobile surveys (such as those used periodically in the gas pipeline industry) at about 110 to 120 miles per day would allow such small leaks to be detected at 10-ppb tagging levels (less than $1,500 of PFT for a 48-hour tag at the maximum transport rate) under worst-case meteorological dispersion conditions. Smaller leaks could be detected by proportionately larger tagging concentrations. Leaks would be pinpointed by subsequent conventional barholing and vapor analyses. There are no health nor safety issues associated with the use of the proposed technological approach nor any consequential environmental impacts associated with the proposed magnitudes of PFT tagging.

  20. DETECTION OF INTERSTATE LIQUIDS PIPELINE LEAKS: FEASIBILITY EVALUATION.

    SciTech Connect

    DIETZ,R.N.

    1998-10-20

    The approximately 200,000-mile fuel pipeline system in the U.S. operates at flow rates up to 2.5 x 10{sup 6}gallons per hour (GPH). Most commercial technologies only provide on-line leak detection at about 0.3% of flow rate, i.e., about 7,500 GPH or larger. Detection of leaks at about 1 GPH or so is desirable both from a regulatory and leak-prevention standpoint. Brookhaven's commercially-accepted perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology for underground leak detection of utility industry dielectric fluids at leak rates less than 0.1 GPH, with new enhancements, will be able to cost-effectively detect fuel pipeline system leaks to about 1 GPH--3 orders-of-magnitude better than any on-line system. The magnitude of detected leaks would be calculable as well. Proposed mobile surveys (such as those used periodically in the gas pipeline industry) at about 110 to 120 miles per day would allow such small leaks to be detected at 10-ppb tagging levels (less than $1,500 of PFT for a 48-hour tag at the maximum transport rate) under worst-case meteorological dispersion conditions. Smaller leaks could be detected by proportionately larger tagging concentrations. Leaks would be pinpointed by subsequent conventional barholing and vapor analyses. There are no health nor safety issues associated with the use of the proposed technological approach nor any consequential environmental impacts associated with the proposed magnitudes of PFT tagging.

  1. Methods for analysis of fluoroquinolones in biological fluids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods for analysis of 10 selected fluoroquinolone antibiotics in biological fluids are reviewed. Approaches for sample preparation, detection methods, limits of detection and quantitation and recovery information are provided for both single analyte and multi-analyte fluoroquinolone methods....

  2. Technique for detecting liquid metal leaks

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.

    1979-01-01

    In a system employing flowing liquid metal as a heat transfer medium in contact with tubular members containing a working fluid, i.e., steam, liquid metal leaks through the wall of the tubular member are detected by dislodging the liquid metal compounds forming in the tubular member at the leak locations and subsequently transporting the dislodged compound in the form of an aerosol to a detector responsive to the liquid metal compound. In the application to a sodium cooled tubular member, the detector would consist of a sodium responsive device, such as a sodium ion detector.

  3. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  4. Analysis of Fluid Flow over a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, and computer program product for modeling heat radiated by a structure. The flow of a fluid over a surface of a model of the structure is simulated. The surface has a plurality of surface elements. Heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements in response to the fluid flowing over the surface of the model of the structure is identified. An effect of heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other is identified. A model of the heat radiated by the structure is created using the heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements and the effect of the heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other.

  5. Analysis for flow of Jeffrey fluid with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Asad, Sadia; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-04-01

    An analysis of the boundary layer flow and heat transfer in a Jeffrey fluid containing nanoparticles is presented in this paper. Here, fluid motion is due to a stretchable cylinder. The thermal conductivity of the fluid is taken to be temperature-dependent. The partial differential equations of velocity, temperature, and concentration fields are transformed to a dimensionless system of ordinary differential equations. Nonlinear governing analysis is computed for the homotopy solutions. The behaviors of Brownian motion and thermophoresis diffusion of nanoparticles have been examined graphically. Numerical values of the local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed.

  6. Automated analysis for fluid flow topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1989-01-01

    A new approach for visualizing vector data sets was developed by reducing the original vector field to a set of critical points and their connections, and was applied to fluid flow data sets. The critical point representation allows for considerable reduction in the data complexity. The representations are displayed as surfaces which are much simpler than the original data set, yet retain all the pertinent flow topology information. It is suggested that topological representations may be useful for database comparison.

  7. Computerized leak training

    SciTech Connect

    Parella, C.; Monroe, A.

    1985-11-01

    Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation's computerized leak detection training system is discussed. The system is able to simulate gas leak situations by means of a computer. The training setup includes actual visual display via slides of houses represented on a plotting board; computer with plotter board in front that simulates an area and various leakage situations; a typical handheld CGI; and a control pad for the computer. The training system has filled a valuable need in the area of emergency training.

  8. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  9. Gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E.

    1988-01-01

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  10. WRSS jumper leak assessment

    SciTech Connect

    BAILEY, J.W.

    1999-06-23

    The purpose of this assessment is: (1) to assemble and document the facts associated with three recently installed jumpers which have leaked either during actual process operation or during post installation testing; (2) to describe the corrective actions taken and to identify any process improvements which need to be implemented in the Hanford jumper design and installation activities; and (3) to document WRSS jumper leak lessons learned for use by future projects and other jumper design, fabrication, and installation activities.

  11. Body fluid identification by integrated analysis of DNA methylation and body fluid-specific microbial DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ajin; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Hwan Young

    2014-01-01

    Identification of body fluids found at crime scenes provides important information that can support a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. Previous studies have reported that DNA methylation analysis at several tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs) enables successful identification of semen, and the detection of certain bacterial DNA can allow for identification of saliva and vaginal fluid. In the present study, a method for detecting bacterial DNA was integrated into a previously reported multiplex methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-polymerase chain reaction. The developed multiplex PCR was modified by the addition of a new semen-specific marker and by including amplicons for the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of saliva- and vaginal fluid-specific bacteria to improve the efficacy to detect a specific type of body fluid. Using the developed multiplex system, semen was distinguishable by unmethylation at the USP49, DACT1, and PFN3 tDMRs and by hypermethylation at L81528, and saliva could be identified by detection of saliva-specific bacteria, Veillonella atypica and/or Streptococcus salivarius. Additionally, vaginal fluid and menstrual blood were differentiated from other body fluids by hypomethylation at the PFN3 tDMR and the presence of vaginal fluid-specific bacteria, Lactobacillus crispatus and/or Lactobacillus gasseri. Because the developed multiplex system uses the same biological source of DNA for individual identification profiling and simultaneously analyses various types of body fluid in one PCR reaction, this method will facilitate more efficient body fluid identification in forensic casework. PMID:24052059

  12. Leaking chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás

    2013-04-01

    There are numerous physical situations in which a hole or leak is introduced in an otherwise closed chaotic system. The leak can have a natural origin, it can mimic measurement devices, and it can also be used to reveal dynamical properties of the closed system. A unified treatment of leaking systems is provided and applications to different physical problems, in both the classical and quantum pictures, are reviewed. The treatment is based on the transient chaos theory of open systems, which is essential because real leaks have finite size and therefore estimations based on the closed system differ essentially from observations. The field of applications reviewed is very broad, ranging from planetary astronomy and hydrodynamical flows to plasma physics and quantum fidelity. The theory is expanded and adapted to the case of partial leaks (partial absorption and/or transmission) with applications to room acoustics and optical microcavities in mind. Simulations in the limaçon family of billiards illustrate the main text. Regarding billiard dynamics, it is emphasized that a correct discrete-time representation can be given only in terms of the so-called true-time maps, while traditional Poincaré maps lead to erroneous results. Perron-Frobenius-type operators are generalized so that they describe true-time maps with partial leaks.

  13. Leaks in pipe networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pudar, Ranko S.; Liggett, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Leak detection in water-distribution systems can be accomplished by solving an inverse problem using measurements of pressure and/or flow. The problem is formulated with equivalent orifice areas of possible leaks as the unknowns. Minimization of the difference between measured and calculated heads produces a solution for the areas. The quality of the result depends on number and location of the measurements. A sensitivity matrix is key to deciding where to make measurements. Both location and magnitude of leaks are sensitive to the quantity and quality of pressure measurements and to how well the pipe friction parameters are known. The overdetermined problem (more measurements than suspected leaks) gives the best results, but some information can be derived from the underdetermined problem. The variance of leak areas, based on the quality of system characteristics and pressure data, indicates the likely accuracy of the results. The method will not substitute for more traditional leak surveys but can serve as a guide and supplement.

  14. Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Cryogenic Liquid Turbulent Flow Fluid Film Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Computational programs developed for the thermal analysis of tilting and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings are described. The motion of a cryogenic liquid on the thin film annular region of a fluid film bearing is described by a set of mass and momentum conservation, and energy transport equations for the turbulent bulk-flow velocities and pressure, and accompanied by thermophysical state equations for evaluation of the fluid material properties. Zeroth-order equations describe the fluid flow field for a journal static equilibrium position, while first-order (linear) equations govern the fluid flow for small amplitude-journal center translational motions. Solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations provides the bearing flow rate, load capacity, drag torque and temperature rise. Solution to the first-order equations determines the rotordynamic force coefficients due to journal radial motions.

  15. Hourly analysis of cerebrospinal fluid glucose shows large diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marcel M; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Willemsen, Michèl A; Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important in the diagnostics of many neurological disorders. Since the influence of food intake on the cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio is largely unknown, we studied fluctuations in these parameters in healthy adult volunteers during a period of 36 h. Our observations show large physiological fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid glucose and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio, and their relation to food intake. These findings provide novel insights into the physiology of cerebral processes dependent on glucose levels such as energy formation (e.g. glycolysis), enzymatic reactions (e.g. glycosylation), and non-enzymatic reactions (e.g. advanced endproduct glycation). PMID:26945018

  16. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  17. Parametric analysis and testing of an electrorheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindler, Jason E.; Wereley, Norman M.

    1999-06-01

    This study seeks to validate a predictive damper analysis, based on an idealized Bingham plastic shear flow mechanism, which incorporates leakage effects in an electrorheological (ER) damper. The ER bypass damper operates by a piston head pushing ER fluid out of a hydraulic cylinder and through an ER fluid bypass. The pressure to force ER fluid through the bypass produces the majority of the device's damping. The ER bypass is composed of an annulus formed from two concentric aluminum tubes. The application of a voltage potential between the aluminum tubes creates an electric field in the annulus that increases the yield stress of the ER fluid. The yield stress modifies the velocity profile of the fluid in the annulus and augments the damping coefficient of the device. The ER fluid damper contains a controlled amount of leakage around the piston head. The leakage allows ER fluid to flow from one side of the piston head to the opposite side without passing through the ER bypass. In this analysis, the leakage damping coefficient with incorporated leakage effects, predict the amount of energy dissipated for a complete cycle of the piston rod. Measured force verses displacement cycles for multiple frequencies and electric fields validate the ability of the non-dimensional groups and the leakage damping coefficient to predict the damping levels for an ER bypass damper with leakage.

  18. Pleural Fluid Analysis: Standstill or a Work in Progress?

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, T.; Al-Alawi, M.; Chotirmall, S. H.; McElvaney, N. G.

    2012-01-01

    Pleural fluid analysis yields important diagnostic information in pleural effusions in combination with clinical history, examination, and radiology. For more than 30 years, the initial and most pragmatic step in this process is to determine whether the fluid is a transudate or an exudate. Light's criteria remain the most robust in separating the transudate-exudate classification which dictates further investigations or management. Recent studies have led to the evaluation and implementation of a number of additional fluid analyses that may improve the diagnostic utility of this method. This paper discusses the current practice and future direction of pleural fluid analysis in determining the aetiology of a pleural effusion. While this has been performed for a few decades, a number of other pleural characteristics are becoming available suggesting that this diagnostic tool is indeed a work in progress. PMID:22448326

  19. ISS-CREAM Thermal and Fluid System Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Rosemary S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. The ISS-CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass for the International Space Station) payload is being developed by an international team and will provide significant cosmic ray characterization over a long time frame. Cold fluid provided by the ISS Exposed Facility (EF) is the primary means of cooling for 5 science instruments and over 7 electronics boxes. Thermal fluid integrated design and analysis was performed for CREAM using a Thermal Desktop model. This presentation will provide some specific design and modeling examples from the fluid cooling system, complex SCD (Silicon Charge Detector) and calorimeter hardware, and integrated payload and ISS level modeling. Features of Thermal Desktop such as CAD simplification, meshing of complex hardware, External References (Xrefs), and FloCAD modeling will be discussed.

  20. SPAR improved structure/fluid dynamic analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Pearson, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of flowing fluid and elastic structure was added to the SPAR computer code. A method, developed and adopted for use in SPAR utilizes the existing assumed stress hybrid plan element in SPAR. An operational mode was incorporated in SPAR which provides the capability for analyzing the flaw of a two dimensional, incompressible, viscous fluid within rigid boundaries. Equations were developed to provide for the eventual analysis of the interaction of such fluids with an elastic solid.

  1. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

  2. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, Crystal; Harlow, Don; Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis; Johnson, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching. (authors)

  3. Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Cryogenic Liquid Turbulent Flow Fluid Film Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    San Andres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a thermohydrodynamic analysis and computer programs for the prediction of the static and dynamic force response of fluid film bearings for cryogenic applications. The research performed addressed effectively the most important theoretical and practical issues related to the operation and performance of cryogenic fluid film bearings. Five computer codes have been licensed by the Texas A&M University to NASA centers and contractors and a total of 14 technical papers have been published.

  4. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  5. Detecting well casing leaks in Bangladesh using a salt spiking method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stahl, M.O.; Ong, J.B.; Harvey, C.F.; Johnson, C.D.; Badruzzaman, A.B.M.; Tarek, M.H.; VanGeen, A.; Anderson, J.A.; Lane, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    We apply fluid-replacement logging in arsenic-contaminated regions of Bangladesh using a low-cost, down-well fluid conductivity logging tool to detect leaks in the cased section of wells. The fluid-conductivity tool is designed for the developing world: it is lightweight and easily transportable, operable by one person, and can be built for minimal cost. The fluid-replacement test identifies leaking casing by comparison of fluid conductivity logs collected before and after spiking the wellbore with a sodium chloride tracer. Here, we present results of fluid-replacement logging tests from both leaking and non-leaking casing from wells in Araihazar and Munshiganj, Bangladesh, and demonstrate that the low-cost tool produces measurements comparable to those obtained with a standard geophysical logging tool. Finally, we suggest well testing procedures and approaches for preventing casing leaks in Bangladesh and other developing countries.

  6. Detecting Well Casing Leaks in Bangladesh Using a Salt Spiking Method

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, M.O.; Ong, J.B.; Harvey, C.F.; Johnson, C.D.; Badruzzaman, A.B.M.; Tarek, M.H.; van Geen, A.; Anderson, J.A.; Lane, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    We apply fluid-replacement logging in arsenic-contaminated regions of Bangladesh using a low-cost, down-well fluid conductivity logging tool to detect leaks in the cased section of wells. The fluid-conductivity tool is designed for the developing world: it is lightweight and easily transportable, operable by one person, and can be built for minimal cost. The fluid-replacement test identifies leaking casing by comparison of fluid conductivity logs collected before and after spiking the wellbore with a sodium chloride tracer. Here, we present results of fluid-replacement logging tests from both leaking and non-leaking casing from wells in Araihazar and Munshiganj, Bangladesh, and demonstrate that the low-cost tool produces measurements comparable to those obtained with a standard geophysical logging tool. Finally, we suggest well testing procedures and approaches for preventing casing leaks in Bangladesh and other developing countries. PMID:24898169

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis after unprovoked first seizure

    PubMed Central

    Zisimopoulou, Vaso; Mamali, Margarita; Katsavos, Serafeim; Siatouni, Anna; Tavernarakis, Antonios; Gatzonis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics after an unprovoked first seizure (UFS). We reviewed the medical records of 71 patients with UFS who underwent lumbar puncture, and examined the CSF parameters. Each CSF parameter was evaluated separately for potential correlations with the other study variables. We observed an overall frequency of CSF abnormalities of 35.2%. CSF protein was the most common abnormal parameter (31%) and showed significant positive correlations with male gender (p=0.037) and older age (p=0.007). Only seven patients (9.9%) had an abnormal cell count (5–40 cells/μl). Higher CSF cell counts were found to predict a longer hospitalization period (p=0.005). No relationship with abnormal EEG findings could be established (p=0.169). This study is one of the few to evaluate postictal CSF parameters in a clinical setting, and to our knowledge the first to investigate these parameters specifically in the emergency department. The development of a rapid, easy-to-use test that does not require extensive laboratory equipment to differentiate UFS from other conditions could be of great value in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27358223

  8. Assessment of historical leak model methodology as applied to the REDOX high-level waste tank SX-108

    SciTech Connect

    JONES, T.E.

    1999-09-22

    Using the Historical Leak Model approach, the estimated leak rate (and therefore, projected leak volume) for Tank 241-SX-108 could not be reproduced using the data included in the initial document describing the leak methodology. An analysis of parameters impacting tank heat load calculations strongly suggest that the historical tank operating data lack the precision and accuracy required to estimate tank leak volumes using the Historical Leak Model methodology.

  9. Potentiometric analysis of water soluble cutting fluid-metal combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, E.E.

    1991-12-01

    The results of corrosion studies conducted by the University of Kansas under Contract G257763 for Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), are given. These potentiometric studies evaluate the corrosivity of two water soluble cutting fluids at varying concentrations on samples of 304 stainless steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, and beryllium copper. This testing serves two purposes: (1) to develop effective test procedures adaptable to existing KCD corrosion measurement equipment for corrosion analysis of cutting fluid-metals combinations, and (2) to understand the relative corrosiveness of the varying water soluble cutting fluids on different metals. The tests used were adapted from the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM). Future testing will identify polarization techniques for establishing corrosion rates which will be used in evaluating both water soluble cutting fluids and other aqueous solutions used at KCD.

  10. Fluid and thermal performance analysis of PMSM used for driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shuye; Cui, Guanghui; Li, Zhongyu; Guan, Tianyu

    2016-03-01

    The permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is widely used in ships under frequency conversion control system. The fluid flow performance and temperature distribution of the PMSM are difficult to clarify due to its complex structure and variable frequency control condition. Therefore, in order to investigate the fluid and thermal characteristics of the PMSM, a 50 kW PMSM was taken as an example in this study, and a 3-D coupling analysis model of fluid and thermal was established. The fluid and temperature fields were calculated by using finite volume method. The cooling medium's properties, such a velocity, streamlines, and temperature, were then analyzed. The correctness of the proposed model, and the rationality of the solution method, were verified by a temperature test of the PMSM. In this study, the changing rheology on the performance of the cooling medium and the working temperature of the PMSM were revealed, which could be helpful for designing the PMSM.

  11. Analysis of the cochlear amplifier fluid pump hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zagadou, Brissi Franck; Mountain, David C

    2012-04-01

    We use analysis of a realistic three-dimensional finite-element model of the tunnel of Corti (ToC) in the middle turn of the gerbil cochlea tuned to the characteristic frequency (CF) of 4 kHz to show that the anatomical structure of the organ of Corti (OC) is consistent with the hypothesis that the cochlear amplifier functions as a fluid pump. The experimental evidence for the fluid pump is that outer hair cell (OHC) contraction and expansion induce oscillatory flow in the ToC. We show that this oscillatory flow can produce a fluid wave traveling in the ToC and that the outer pillar cells (OPC) do not present a significant barrier to fluid flow into the ToC. The wavelength of the resulting fluid wave launched into the tunnel at the CF is 1.5 mm, which is somewhat longer than the wavelength estimated for the classical traveling wave. This fluid wave propagates at least one wavelength before being significantly attenuated. We also investigated the effect of OPC spacing on fluid flow into the ToC and found that, for physiologically relevant spacing between the OPCs, the impedance estimate is similar to that of the underlying basilar membrane. We conclude that the row of OPCs does not significantly impede fluid exchange between ToC and the space between the row of OPC and the first row of OHC-Dieter's cells complex, and hence does not lead to excessive power loss. The BM displacement resulting from the fluid pumped into the ToC is significant for motion amplification. Our results support the hypothesis that there is an additional source of longitudinal coupling, provided by the ToC, as required in many non-classical models of the cochlear amplifier. PMID:22302113

  12. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark; Gera, Dinesh

    2001-11-06

    In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

  13. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  14. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  15. Refrigerant leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative leak detector visually demonstrates refrigerant loss from precision volume of large refrigeration system over established period of time from single test point. Mechanical unit is less costly than electronic "sniffers" and is more reliable due to absence of electronic circuits that are susceptible to drift.

  16. Leaks, Lumps, and Lines: Stigma and Women's Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisler, Joan C.

    2011-01-01

    Women's bodies have often been positioned in art and popular culture as monstrous or defiled and women's bodily products (e.g., menstrual fluid, breast milk) as disgusting. This framing has led to the stigmatization of aspects of women's bodies (e.g., leaking fluids, lumps of fat, and lines in the skin that indicate aging), especially those…

  17. Modeling the Risk of Fire/Explosion Due to Oxidizer/Fuel Leaks in the Ares I Interstage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, Robert W.; Stott, James E.; Hales, Christy

    2008-01-01

    A significant flight hazard associated with liquid propellants, such as those used in the upper stage of NASA's new Ares I launch vehicle, is the possibility of leakage of hazardous fluids resulting in a catastrophic fire/explosion. The enclosed and vented interstage of the Ares I contains numerous oxidizer and fuel supply lines as well as ignition sources. The potential for fire/explosion due to leaks during ascent depends on the relative concentrations of hazardous and inert fluids within the interstage along with other variables such as pressure, temperature, leak rates, and fluid outgasing rates. This analysis improves on previous NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) estimates of the probability of deflagration, in which many of the variables pertinent to the problem were not explicitly modeled as a function of time. This paper presents the modeling methodology developed to analyze these risks.

  18. Downhole fluid analysis and asphaltene science for petroleum reservoir evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Oliver C; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Zuo, Julian Y; Dong, Chengli

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum reservoirs are enshrouded in mysteries associated with all manner of geologic and fluid complexities that Mother Nature can inspire. Efficient exploitation of petroleum reservoirs mandates elucidation of these complexities; downhole fluid analysis (DFA) has proven to be indispensable for understanding both fluids and reservoir architecture. Crude oil consists of dissolved gases, liquids, and dissolved solids, known as the asphaltenes. These different fluid components exhibit fluid gradients vertically and laterally, which are best revealed by DFA, with its excellent precision and accuracy. Compositional gradient analysis falls within the purview of thermodynamics. Gas-liquid equilibria can be treated with a cubic equation of state (EoS), such as the Peng-Robinson EoS, a modified van der Waals EoS. In contrast, the first EoS for asphaltene gradients, the Flory-Huggins-Zuo (FHZ) EoS, was developed only recently. The resolution of the asphaltene molecular and nanocolloidal species in crude oil, which is codified in the Yen-Mullins model of asphaltenes, enabled the development of this EoS. The combination of DFA characterization of gradients of reservoir crude oil with the cubic EoS and FHZ EoS analyses brings into view wide-ranging reservoir concerns, such as reservoir connectivity, fault-block migration, heavy oil gradients, tar mat formation, huge disequilibrium fluid gradients, and even stochastic variations of reservoir fluids. New petroleum science and DFA technology are helping to offset the increasing costs and technical difficulties of exploiting ever-more-remote petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24702298

  19. SPAR improved structure-fluid dynamic analysis capability, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient and general method of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of fluid flow and elastic structures is investigated. The improvement of Structural Performance Analysis and Redesign (SPAR) code is summarized. All error codes are documented and the SPAR processor/subroutine cross reference is included.

  20. Analysis, scientific computing and fundamental studies in fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, H.B.; Saffman, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    Progress is reported on work in the following areas: vortex dynamics and turbulence, fingers and bubbles in Hele-Shaw cells and unbounded fluid, vortex reconnection, pattern selection in solidifying systems, Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, Wavy-Taylor vortex flows, high reynolds number laminar flows, and lastly numerical analysis and dynamical systems. (GHH)

  1. Potential applications of computational fluid dynamics to biofluid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.; Kwak, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was developed to the stage where it has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. In view of advances made in aerospace applications, the computational approach can be used for biofluid mechanics research. Several flow simulation methods developed for aerospace problems are briefly discussed for potential applications to biofluids, especially to blood flow analysis.

  2. Method and means of passive detection of leaks in buried pipes

    DOEpatents

    Claytor, T.

    1979-10-30

    A method and means for passive detection of a leak in a buried pipe containing fluid under pressure includes a plurality of acoustic detectors that are placed in contact with the pipe. Noise produced by the leak is detected by the detectors, and the detected signals are correlated to locate the leak. In one embodiment of the invention two detectors are placed at different locations to locate a leak between them. In an alternate embodiment two detectors of different waves are placed at substantially the same location to determine the distance of the leak from the location.

  3. Method and means of passive detection of leaks in buried pipes

    DOEpatents

    Claytor, Thomas N.

    1981-01-01

    A method and means for passive detection of a leak in a buried pipe containing fluid under pressure includes a plurality of acoustic detectors that are placed in contact with the pipe. Noise produced by the leak is detected by the detectors, and the detected signals are correlated to locate the leak. In one embodiment of the invention two detectors are placed at different locations to locate a leak between them. In an alternate embodiment two detectors of different waves are placed at substantially the same location to determine the distance of the leak from the location.

  4. Improved Portable Ultrasonic Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Moerk, John S.; Haskell, William D.; Cox, Robert B.; Polk, Jimmy D.; Strobel, James P.; Luaces, Frank

    1995-01-01

    Improved portable ultrasonic leak detector features three interchangeable ultrasonic-transducer modules, each suited for operation in unique noncontact or contact mode. One module equipped with ultrasound-collecting horn for use in scanning to detect leaks from distance; horn provides directional sensitivity pattern with sensitivity multiplied by factor of about 6 in forward direction. Another module similar, does not include horn; this module used for scanning close to suspected leak, where proximity of leak more than offsets loss of sensitivity occasioned by lack of horn. Third module designed to be pressed against leaking vessel; includes rugged stainless-steel shell. Improved detectors perform significantly better, smaller, more rugged, and greater sensitivity.

  5. Leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    The problems associated with leaking underground storage tanks are discussed. An estimated 10-30% of the 3.5 million or more underground tanks now used to store petroleum products and other liquids may be leaking their contents to the surrounding environment. The EPA is initiating a national field survey of tanks used for the storing of engine fuels. The first phase of the survey will cover a representative sample of 1050 facilities and approximately 2800 tanks. EPA will analyze the questionnaires and then select a sub-sample of about 500 tanks to examine leakage problems in more detail. In the absence of specific groundwater protection legislation or regulation, EPA is planning to use the Toxic Substances Control Act to regulate underground tanks.

  6. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Luong, Amy Khai; Kulp, Thomas J.; Devdas, Sanjay

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  7. Vacuum leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazokas, G. P. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A leak detector for use with high vacuum seals as used in feedthroughs and hatch covers for manned spacecraft and vacuum systems is described. Two thermistors are used, one exposed directly to vacuum and the other exposed to a secondary chamber formed by the seal being monitored and a second auxiliary seal. Leakage into the secondary chamber causes an unbalance of an electrical bridge circuit in which the thermistors are connected.

  8. Aspects of leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  9. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  10. [Determination of body fluid based on analysis of nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Korabečná, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent methodological approaches of molecular genetics allow isolation of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from negligible forensic samples. Analysis of these molecules may be used not only for individual identification based on DNA profiling but also for the detection of origin of the body fluid which (alone or in mixture with other body fluids) forms the examined biological trace. Such an examination can contribute to the evaluation of procedural, technical and tactical value of the trace. Molecular genetic approaches discussed in the review offer new possibilities in comparison with traditional spectrum of chemical, immunological and spectroscopic tests especially with regard to the interpretation of mixtures of biological fluids and to the confirmatory character of the tests. Approaches based on reverse transcription of tissue specific mRNA and their subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragmentation analysis are applicable on samples containing minimal amounts of biological material. Methods for body fluid discrimination based on examination of microRNA in samples provided so far confusing results therefore further development in this field is needed. The examination of tissue specific methylation of nucleotides in selected gene sequences seems to represent a promising enrichment of the methodological spectrum. The detection of DNA sequences of tissue related bacteria has been established and it provides satisfactory results mainly in combination with above mentioned methodological approaches. PMID:26419517

  11. Automated hydrostatic testing for pipeline leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B. ); Musilli, M. )

    1994-11-01

    Leaks in pipelines carrying such products as crude oil and crude oil by-products lead not only to loss of product, but present the prospect of blowouts in the future that can cause millions of dollars in property damage and costly EPA-mandated cleanups. These leaks are considered sufficiently serious that the US Department of Transportation, which is charged with regulating the safety of pipelines throughout the country, may at times require pipeline operators to hydrostatically test their pipelines. One fully automated pipeline leak locating method based on computer analysis of dynamic pressure signals uses three IBM-compatible personal computers and two 16-channel high-speed analog-to-digital interfaces. The system detects leaks by means of dynamic pressure changes sampled at a high rate and locates them precisely by means of pressure signal velocity. In this way, leaks as small as 3--13mm (0.125--0.5 in.) can be located with an accuracy of a single pipe length in a pipeline section of 160 km (100 mi). This article describes the instrumentation needed and the test procedure used.

  12. Factors predicting the occurrence of a gastrojejunal anastomosis leak following gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Sufi, Pratik; Heath, Dugal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Occurrence of anastomotic leaks following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), arising principally from the gastro-jejunal anastomosis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Their early detection and treatment is essential. However, a significant number of postoperative oral contrast studies fail to identify leaks, and a negative study providing false reassurance can lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Physiological features including tachycardia, increased respiratory rate and pyrexia or elevations in C-reactive protein and white cell count are seen in patients with leaks. In this study we examine physiological and laboratory parameters in patients with and without anastomotic leaks following RYGB to try and improve the detection of leaks. Aim To evaluate clinical signs and laboratory tests in determination of the development of gastrojejunal leaks after gastric bypass surgery. Material and methods The study examined 116 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RYGB. Clinical signs and laboratory results were reviewed retrospectively. Results Four gastrojejunostomy leaks in our series were identified after RYGB surgery. All these patients were treated successfully. Leak patients’ in-hospital stay was longer. Tachycardia among leak patients occurs from day 1 with 100% sensitivity and 87% specificity at a cut-off point of 90 bpm. A temperature difference appears on day 2 in leak patients. The CRP was higher on day 2 and 3 in leak patients. Higher intravenous fluid requirements were observed in patients with leaks. Conclusions Gastrojejunal anastomosis leak is associated with longer in-hospital treatment. The earliest significant indicators of a leak are tachycardia and positive fluid balance. A temperature spike and CRP rise occur on day 2. Leak patients matched SIRS WBC count criteria on day 3. PMID:25337170

  13. Fluid sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studenick, D. K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inlet leak is described for sampling gases, more specifically, for selectively sampling multiple fluids. This fluid sampling device includes a support frame. A plurality of fluid inlet devices extend through the support frame and each of the fluid inlet devices include a longitudinal aperture. An opening device that is responsive to a control signal selectively opens the aperture to allow fluid passage. A closing device that is responsive to another control signal selectively closes the aperture for terminating further fluid flow.

  14. New Methods for Sensitivity Analysis in Chaotic, Turbulent Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi

    2012-11-01

    Computational methods for sensitivity analysis are invaluable tools for fluid mechanics research and engineering design. These methods are used in many applications, including aerodynamic shape optimization and adaptive grid refinement. However, traditional sensitivity analysis methods break down when applied to long-time averaged quantities in chaotic fluid flowfields, such as those obtained using high-fidelity turbulence simulations. Also, a number of dynamical properties of chaotic fluid flows, most notably the ``Butterfly Effect,'' make the formulation of new sensitivity analysis methods difficult. This talk will outline two chaotic sensitivity analysis methods. The first method, the Fokker-Planck adjoint method, forms a probability density function on the strange attractor associated with the system and uses its adjoint to find gradients. The second method, the Least Squares Sensitivity method, finds some ``shadow trajectory'' in phase space for which perturbations do not grow exponentially. This method is formulated as a quadratic programing problem with linear constraints. This talk is concluded with demonstrations of these new methods on some example problems, including the Lorenz attractor and flow around an airfoil at a high angle of attack.

  15. Spectrophotometric analysis of amniotic fluid in Rh immunised pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, I; Mahajan, U; Sawhney, H; Jolly, J G

    1990-02-01

    A total of 307 amniotic fluid analysis done in 344 Rh negative immunised mothers showed that 46, 83 and 178 delta OD values at 450 millimicrons fell in the upper, middle and lower zones of Liley's charts respectively. The correlation of spectrophotometric analysis with the condition of the baby at birth was about 95 per cent in the upper and lower zones. In the middle zone, however, it was about 75 per cent only. Also, in 7 women in whom the OD at 450 millimicrons fell in the middle zone, the babies were found to be Rh negative; in another baby, the OD difference fell in upper zone. In spite of these limitations amniotic fluid examination seems to be an important single guide to severity, being superior to other parameters like previous obstetric history, antibody titre alone and Liley's charts, which are still widely used. PMID:2112116

  16. Supercritical fluid extraction in plant essential and volatile oil analysis.

    PubMed

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh

    2007-09-01

    The use of supercritical fluids, especially carbon dioxide, in the extraction of plant volatile components has increased during two last decades due to the expected advantages of the supercritical extraction process. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a rapid, selective and convenient method for sample preparation prior to the analysis of compounds in the volatile product of plant matrices. Also, SFE is a simple, inexpensive, fast, effective and virtually solvent-free sample pretreatment technique. This review provides a detailed and updated discussion of the developments, modes and applications of SFE in the isolation of essential oils from plant matrices. SFE is usually performed with pure or modified carbon dioxide, which facilitates off-line collection of extracts and on-line coupling with other analytical methods such as gas, liquid and supercritical fluid chromatography. In this review, we showed that a number of factors influence extraction yields, these being solubility of the solute in the fluid, diffusion through the matrix and collection process. Finally, SFE has been compared with conventional extraction methods in terms of selectivity, rapidity, cleanliness and possibility of manipulating the composition of the extract. PMID:17624357

  17. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, P.T.

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  18. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, Patrick T.

    1981-01-01

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  19. Variable leak gas source

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  20. Superfluid helium leak sealant study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one leak specimens were fabricated in the ends of stainless steel and aluminum tubes. Eighteen of these tubes were coated with a copolymer material to seal the leak. The other three specimens were left uncoated and served as control specimens. All 21 tubes were cold shocked in liquid helium 50 times and then the leak rate was measured while the tubes were submerged in superfluid helium at 1.7 K. During the cold shocks two of the coated specimens were mechanically damaged and eliminated from the test program. Of the remaining 16 coated specimens one suffered a total coating failure and resulting high leak rate. Another three of the coated specimens suffered partial coating failures. The leak rates of the uncoated specimens were also measured and reported. The significance of various leak rates is discussed in view of the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Dewar performance.

  1. Mitochondrial proton and electron leaks

    PubMed Central

    Jastroch, Martin; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Mookerjee, Shona; Treberg, Jason R.; Brand, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton and electron leak have a major impact on mitochondrial coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species. In the first part of this chapter, we address the molecular nature of the basal and inducible proton leak pathways, and their physiological importance. The basal leak is unregulated, and a major proportion can be attributed to mitochondrial anion carriers, while the proton leak through the lipid bilayer appears to be minor. The basal proton leak is cell-type specific and correlates with metabolic rate. The inducible leak through the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) and uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can be activated by fatty acids, superoxide, or peroxidation products. The physiological role of inducible leak through UCP1 in mammalian brown adipose tissue is heat production, whereas the roles of non-mammalian UCP1 and its paralogous proteins, in particular UCP2 and UCP3, are not yet resolved. The second part of the chapter focuses on the electron leak that occurs in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Exit of electrons prior to the reduction of oxygen to water at cytochrome c oxidase causes the production of superoxide. As the mechanisms of electron leak are crucial to understanding their physiological relevance, we summarize the mechanisms and topology of electron leak from Complex I and III in studies using isolated mitochondria. We also highlight recent progress and challenges of assessing electron leak in the living cell. Finally, we emphasise the importance of proton and electron leak as therapeutic targets in body weight regulation and insulin secretion. PMID:20533900

  2. Application of integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Bey, Kim S.; Thornton, Earl A.; Morgan, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response creating a multidisciplinary interaction. Interfacing state-of-the-art disciplinary analysis methods is not efficient, hence interdisciplinary analysis methods integrated into a single aerothermostructural analyzer are needed. The NASA Langley Research Center is developing such methods in an analyzer called LIFTS (Langley Integrated Fluid-Thermal-Structural) analyzer. The evolution and status of LIFTS is reviewed and illustrated through applications.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik; Fan, Yi; Cheng, Stephen; Chow, Kwok

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD) is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality. An aortic dissection is formed when blood infiltrates the layers of the vascular wall, and a new artificial channel, the false lumen, is created. The expansion of the blood vessel due to the weakened wall enhances the risk of rupture. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. Both idealized geometry and realistic patient configurations from computed tomography (CT) images are investigated. Physiological boundary conditions from in vivo measurements are employed. Flow configuration and biomechanical forces are studied. Quantitative analysis allows clinicians to assess the risk of rupture in making decision regarding surgical intervention.

  4. [Scintigraphy of the intraperitoneal cavity using technetium 99m as a diagnostic technique for diaphragmatic leaks in peritoneal dialysis: regarding two cases].

    PubMed

    Gil Carballeira, I; Ramos Sánchez, R; Antonia Azancot, M; Bartolomé Espinosa, J; Vilaplana Moltó, M; Camps Domènech, J

    2009-01-01

    Pleural effusion secondary to pleuroperitoneal communication is an unusual complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Many modalities have been used to diagnosis pleuroperitoneal: pleural fluid analysis, chest X- ray, Tc-99m gammagraphy, computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance image. Some of these procedures are invasive or have a high risk of induced-contrast nephrotoxicity. We present two case reports of pleuroperitoneal leak in two patients on peritoneal dialysis diagnosed with Tc-99m gammagraphy. We conclude that Tc- 99m gammagraphy is a simple, safe, non invasive, low radiation exposure and cost effective method in the assessment and evaluation of complications related to peritoneal dialysis such as pleuroperitoneal leak. PMID:19554061

  5. Model reduction for parametric instability analysis in shells conveying fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochupillai, Jayaraj; Ganesan, N.; Padmanabhan, Chandramouli

    2003-05-01

    Flexible pipes conveying fluid are often subjected to parametric excitation due to time-periodic flow fluctuations. Such systems are known to exhibit complex instability phenomena such as divergence and coupled-mode flutter. Investigators have typically used weighted residual techniques, to reduce the continuous system model into a discrete model, based on approximation functions with global support, for carrying out stability analysis. While this approach is useful for straight pipes, modelling based on FEM is needed for the study of complicated piping systems, where the approximation functions used are local in support. However, the size of the problem is now significantly larger and for computationally efficient stability analysis, model reduction is necessary. In this paper, model reduction techniques are developed for the analysis of parametric instability in flexible pipes conveying fluids under a mean pressure. It is shown that only those linear transformations which leave the original eigenvalues of the linear time invariant system unchanged are admissible. The numerical technique developed by Friedmann and Hammond (Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. Efficient 11 (1997) 1117) is used for the stability analysis. One of the key research issues is to establish criteria for deciding the basis vectors essential for an accurate stability analysis. This paper examines this issue in detail and proposes new guidelines for their selection.

  6. Underground fluid composition analysis based on the near infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxi; Liao, Yanbiao; Zhang, Min

    2011-11-01

    The near-infrared spectrum is very practical for real-time analyzing in the field of industry. This paper describes the structure of optical system, which is a part of the well logging instruments. The optical system is designed to analyze the composition of underground fluid, using the differences between oil and water in near-infrared absorption. Using Beer- Lambert law, the article analyzes the light intensity when broad-spectrum light passes through the liquid. According to the results of analysis, a group of wavelength including center wavelength and bandwidth can be selected. With each selected wavelength, light intensity changes significantly as the concentration of liquid changes. By measuring the light intensity, the system can analyse the composition of underground fluid.

  7. Proceedings of the 11th Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakowski, Barbara

    2002-07-01

    The Eleventh Thermal & Fluids Analysis WorkShop (TFAWS 2000) was held the week of August 21-25 at The Forum in downtown Cleveland. This year's annual event focused on building stronger links between research community and the engineering design/application world and celebrated the theme "Bridging the Gap Between Research and Design". Dr. Simon Ostrach delivered the keynote address "Research for Design (R4D)" and encouraged a more deliberate approach to performing research with near-term engineering design applications in mind. Over 100 persons attended TFAWS 2000, including participants from five different countries. This year's conference devoted a full-day seminar to the discussion of analysis and design tools associated with aeropropulsion research at the Glenn Research Center. As in previous years, the workshop also included hands-on instruction in state-of-the-art analysis tools, paper sessions on selected topics, short courses and application software demonstrations. TFAWS 2000 was co-hosted by the Thermal/Fluids Systems Design and Analysis Branch of NASA GRC and by the Ohio Aerospace Institute and was co-chaired by Barbara A. Sakowski and James R. Yuko. The annual NASA Delegates meeting is a standard component of TFAWS where the civil servants of the various centers represented discuss current and future events which affect the Community of Applied Thermal and Fluid ANalystS (CATFANS). At this year's delegates meeting the following goals (among others) were set by the collective body of delegates participation of all Centers in the NASA material properties database (TPSX) update: (1) developing and collaboratively supporting multi-center proposals; (2) expanding the scope of TFAWS to include other federal laboratories; (3) initiation of a white papers on thermal tools and standards; and (4) formation of an Agency-wide TFAWS steering committee.

  8. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  9. CALIFORNIA LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of California. This database was developed and is maintained by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). Point locations represent tanks where leak events have occurred. Tank latitude-long...

  10. HAWAII LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage of leaking underground storage tanks(LUST) for the state of Hawaii. The original database was developed and is maintained by the State of Hawaii, Dept. of Health. The point locations represent facilities where one or more leaking underground storage tank exists. ...

  11. Leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    McLearn, M.E.; Miller, M.J.; Kostecki, P.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Presio, L.M.; Suyama, W.; Kucharski, W.A.

    1988-04-01

    Remedial options for leaking underground storage tanks were investigated in a joint project of the Electric Power Research Institute and the Underground Storage Tank Committee of the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group. Both existing and emerging technologies were examined. Thirteen remedial techniques were identified and initially characterized as in situ or non-in situ. In situ methods include volatilization, biodegradation, leaching and chemical reaction, vitrification, passive remediation, and isolation or containment. Non-in situ techniques include land treatment, thermal treatment, asphalt incorporation, solidification and stabilization, groundwater extraction and treatment, chemical extraction, and excavation. Soil and groundwater remediation problems have many site-specific consideration which must be considered in choosing an appropriate remedial option; these include cleanup goals, site and contaminant characteristics, cost, exposures pathways, and others. Appropriate remedial techniques are chosen by assessing technical, implementational, environmental and economic consideration of each available option to achieve the desired cleanup goal at the specified site.

  12. Ultrasonic Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for detecting ultrasonic vibrations. such as those generated by a small leak in a pressurized container. vessel. pipe. or the like. comprises an ultrasonic transducer assembly and a processing circuit for converting transducer signals into an audio frequency range signal. The audio frequency range signal can be used to drive a pair of headphones worn by an operator. A diode rectifier based mixing circuit provides a simple, inexpensive way to mix the transducer signal with a square wave signal generated by an oscillator, and thereby generate the audio frequency signal. The sensitivity of the system is greatly increased through proper selection and matching of the system components. and the use of noise rejection filters and elements. In addition, a parabolic collecting horn is preferably employed which is mounted on the transducer assembly housing. The collecting horn increases sensitivity of the system by amplifying the received signals. and provides directionality which facilitates easier location of an ultrasonic vibration source.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:15911019

  14. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  15. Analysis of fluid-structural instability in water

    SciTech Connect

    Piccirillo, N.

    1997-02-01

    Recent flow testing of stainless steel hardware in a high pressure/high temperature water environment produced an apparent fluid-structural instability. The source of instability was investigated by studying textbook theory and by performing NASTRAN finite element analyses. The modal analyses identified the mode that was being excited, but the flutter instability analysis showed that the design is stable if minimal structural damping is present. Therefore, it was suspected that the test hardware was the root cause of the instability. Further testing confirmed this suspicion.

  16. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  17. [Present status and trend of heart fluid mechanics research based on medical image analysis].

    PubMed

    Gan, Jianhong; Yin, Lixue; Xie, Shenghua; Li, Wenhua; Lu, Jing; Luo, Anguo

    2014-06-01

    With introduction of current main methods for heart fluid mechanics researches, we studied the characteristics and weakness for three primary analysis methods based on magnetic resonance imaging, color Doppler ultrasound and grayscale ultrasound image, respectively. It is pointed out that particle image velocity (PIV), speckle tracking and block match have the same nature, and three algorithms all adopt block correlation. The further analysis shows that, with the development of information technology and sensor, the research for cardiac function and fluid mechanics will focus on energy transfer process of heart fluid, characteristics of Chamber wall related to blood fluid and Fluid-structure interaction in the future heart fluid mechanics fields. PMID:25219260

  18. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF HUMAN BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID AFTER SUBSGEMENTAL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Matthew W.; Will Thompson, J.; Que, Loretta G.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Arthur Moseley, M.; Marshall, Harvey E.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of airway fluid, as sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), provides a minimally invasive route to interrogate lung biology in health and disease. Here, we used immunodepletion, coupled with gel- and label-free LC-MS/MS, for quantitation of the BAL fluid (BALF) proteome in samples recovered from human subjects following bronchoscopic instillation of saline, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or house dust mite antigen into three distinct lung subsegments. Among more than 200 unique proteins quantified across nine samples, neutrophil granule-derived and acute phase proteins were most highly enriched in the LPS-exposed lobes. Of these, peptidoglycan response protein 1 was validated and confirmed as a novel marker of neutrophilic inflammation. Compared to a prior transcriptomic analysis of airway cells in this same cohort, the BALF proteome revealed a novel set of response factors. Independent of exposure, the enrichment of tracheal-expressed proteins in right lower lung lobes suggests a potential for constitutive intralobar variability in the BALF proteome; sampling of multiple lung subsegments also appears to aid in the identification of protein signatures that differentiate individuals at baseline. Collectively, this proof-of-concept study validates a robust workflow for BALF proteomics and demonstrates the complementary nature of proteomic and genomic techniques for investigating airway (patho)physiology. PMID:23550723

  19. Effect of leak location on measured respirator fit.

    PubMed

    Crutchfield, C D; Park, D L

    1997-06-01

    A significant difference in leak detection as a function of leak location was observed during a study assessing how well current models of quantitative fit-test systems detect leakage. Known sources of leakage (matched hypodermic needles) were introduced at three fixed locations into factory-probed half-mask and full-face respirators mounted on a headform-breathing machine system. The leak locations were the bridge of the nose, the cheek, and the chin. Baseline leakage into each respirator was determined by conducting a fit-test with all fixed leak sources capped. Fit tests were repeated with each individual source uncapped. Study objectives included determining (1) how well each system measured the leakage, and (2) whether leak location had any effect on leak measurement. An ambient aerosol fit-test system (Portacount Plus) and a controlled negative pressure (CNP) fit-test system (FitTester 3000) were used. The ambient aerosol system detected an overall average of 37.2% of the known leakage, with a coefficient of variation of 44.7%. An analysis of variance showed significant differences in aerosol system measurements of leakage as a function of leak location and mask type (p < 0.001). A different pattern of aerosol leak detection as a function of leak location was observed between half-mask and full-face respirators, which appears to be related to differences in in-mask airflow dynamics. The CNP system detected an overall average of 97.9% of the known leakage through the same hypodermic needles, with a coefficient of variation of 4.3%. CNP system results were not affected by leak location (p > 0.43) or mask type (p > 0.32). PMID:9183835

  20. Damping analysis of a flexible cantilever beam containing an internal fluid channel: Experiment, modeling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Masoumi, Masoud; Gaucher-Petitdemange, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Passive structural damping treatments have been applied with the use of high-viscosity fillings (in practice) and have been the focus of numerous research studies and papers. However, internal viscoelastic fluid leading to passive damping of flexible cantilever beams, has not yet been investigated in the literature. Although structures containing internal fluid channels provide multifunctional solutions to many engineering issues, they also raise damping control requests caused by unacceptable vibrations due to ambient environmental changes. In this paper, we examine ambient effects on damping properties of flexible cantilever beams, each conveying an internal high-viscosity fluid channel. Experiments are conducted to investigate how the internal fluids provide damping to the system under varied temperatures, frequencies and base-acceleration levels. While the vibration analysis of pipes conveying internal flow has been extensively studied, internal high-viscosity fluids in relation to passive damping of flexible cantilever beams and their ambient, environment-dependent behaviors have not been well-investigated. Originally motivated by research, which uses internal fluid channels to provide the cooling of multifunctional composite structures, we aim to research the damping behaviors of cantilever beams. We will conduct an experimental study and modeling analysis, examining the vibrations and frequency responses of the cantilever beams when filled with three types of internal fluids.

  1. Experimental analysis on MR fluid channel flow dynamics with complex fluid-wall interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Hideya; Takana, Hidemasa; Shinohara, Keisuke; Mizuki, Kotoe; Katagiri, Kazunari; Ohta, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    MR fluid plugging performance by aggregation of magnetized particles in MR fluid is recently expected to be one of the most promising applications in medical or safety devices, such as blood flow control, steam issuing shut-down valve and fuel supply control for automobile. In this study, dynamic response of MR fluid plugging and its breakdown in a pressure mode with complex fluid-wall interactions was experimentally investigated, considering the effects of magnetic flux density, wall surface structure, wall permeability and wall elasticity of tube. Higher endurance pressure is obtained for wall surface groove structure and for steel wall due to a strong anchoring effect by rigid cluster formation in a concave region and strong MR fluid column formation in a channel core region, respectively. Furthermore, MR fluid plugging performance and the fluid storage characteristic of PVA tube as a bio-material was clarified. Because of the large radial expansion of the tube at the applied magnetic region in a pressure mode, PVA tube shows unique characteristics, such as storing MR fluid under magnetic field and MR fluid jet issuing under releasing magnetic field.

  2. Modern wing flutter analysis by computational fluid dynamics methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Herbert J.; Batina, John T.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    The application and assessment of the recently developed CAP-TSD transonic small-disturbance code for flutter prediction is described. The CAP-TSD code has been developed for aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations and was previously applied to the calculation of steady and unsteady pressures with favorable results. Generalized aerodynamic forces and flutter characteristics are calculated and compared with linear theory results and with experimental data for a 45 deg sweptback wing. These results are in good agreement with the experimental flutter data which is the first step toward validating CAP-TSD for general transonic aeroelastic applications. The paper presents these results and comparisons along with general remarks regarding modern wing flutter analysis by computational fluid dynamics methods.

  3. Underground tank leak detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Niaki, Shahzad; Broscious, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, the increase in leaks from underground gasoline storage tanks has had a significant adverse environmental impact on the US. Current estimates from government and industry sources are that between 1.5 to 3.5 million underground storage tanks exist in the nation. Estimates of the number of leaking tanks range from 75,000 to 100,000; and 350,000 others may develop leaks within the next five years. The 1983 National Petroleum News Factbook Issue forecasts the existence of approximately 140,000 gasoline service stations in the US at the end of 1983. New York State estimates that 19% of its 83,000 active underground gasoline tanks are now leaking. Maine estimates that 25% of its 1,600 retail gasoline underground tanks are leaking approximately 11 million gallons yearly. In Michigan 39% of ground water contamination incidents are attributed to storage tanks. One of the primary causes of tank leakage is corrosion of the storage tanks. Product loss from leaking tanks may cause an adverse effect on the environment, endanger lives, reduce income, and require the expenditure of millions of dollars for cleanup. To prevent or reduce the adverse effects of gasoline leakage, an accurate method must be used to determine whether or not an underground tank is leaking.

  4. Development of perfluorocarbon tracer technology for underground leak location.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, S; McBride, T; Russell, D A

    2000-10-01

    A method has been developed for the atmospheric sampling and analysis of four perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) compounds simultaneously at the parts per trillion (ppt) level. PFTs were pre-concentrated using adsorbent tube air sampling. Analysis was achieved by thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection (ECD). Efficient separation of the PFTs from the other sample constituents was achieved by use of a capillary porous layer open tubular (PLOT) GC column without the need to cool the GC oven to sub-ambient temperatures using liquid coolants (M. de Bortoli and E. Pecchio, J. High Resolut. Chromatogr., 1985, 8, 422) or for a catalytic destruction step to remove interferents (T. W. D'Ottavio, R. W. Goodrich and R. N. Dietz, Environ. Sci. Technol., 1986, 20, 100). Results from test field trials with two volatile PFTs that were buried to simulate an underground leaking cable were successful. The PFTs were detected above ground level to pinpoint the leak position. The highest tracer concentrations were detected within 1 m of the simulated leak positions 2 days after tracer burial. The developed technology was applied to an oil leaking high voltage electricity cable. One PFT was added to the cable oil which enabled detection of the oil leak to within 3 m. The reported method has many advantages over currently used leak detection methods and could, in the future, be applied to the detection of underground leaks in a variety of cables and pipes. PMID:11254045

  5. Space Shuttle RCS Oxidizer Leak Repair for STS-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delventhal, R. A.; Faget, N. M.

    1989-01-01

    Following propellant loading of the Space Shuttle's reaction control system (RCS) for mission STS 26, an oxidizer leak was detected in the left orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod, where the RCS is located. Subsequent investigation determined that the leak was isolated at a mechanical Dynatube fitting near the RCS nitrogen tetroxide tank. An intense effort was initiated to design, fabricate, and qualify a sealing device to stop the oxidizer leak externally so that the Space Shuttle launch could proceed. It was discovered that sealing devices called clamshells were widely used throughout the petrochemical and power generation industries to stop leaks developed in large diameter pipes which carry steam or other hazardous fluids. These clamshells are available in different diameters and strengths and are placed around the pipe at the location of the leak. A sealing compound is then injected under high pressure into the clamshell to stop the leak. This technology was scaled down and applied to the problem of stopping the leak on the Orbiter, which was on a half-inch diameter line in a nearly inaccessible location. Many obstacles had to be overcome such as determining that the sealing material would be compatible with the nitrogen tetroxide and ensuring that the clamshell would actually fit around the Dynatube fitting without interfering with other lines which were in close proximity. The effort at the NASA Johnson Space Center included materials compatibility testing of several sealants, design of a clamshell to fit in the confined compartment, and manufacture and qualification of the flight hardware. A clamshell was successfully placed around the Dynatube fitting on the Orbiter and the oxidizer leak was terminated. Then it was decided to apply this technology further and design clamshells for other mechanical fittings onboard the Orbiter and develop sealing compounds which will be compatible with fuels such as monomethyl hydrazine (MMH). The potential exists for

  6. Identification of sewage leaks by active remote-sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Basson, Uri

    2016-04-01

    The increasing length of sewage pipelines, and concomitant risk of leaks due to urban and industrial growth and development is exposing the surrounding land to contamination risk and environmental harm. It is therefore important to locate such leaks in a timely manner, to minimize the damage. Advances in active remote sensing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Frequency Domain Electromagnetic (FDEM) technologies was used to identify leaking potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. This study focused on the development of these electromagnetic methods to replace conventional acoustic methods for the identification of leaks along sewage pipes. Electromagnetic methods provide an additional advantage in that they allow mapping of the fluid-transport system in the subsurface. Leak-detection systems using GPR and FDEM are not limited to large amounts of water, but enable detecting leaks of tens of liters per hour, because they can locate increases in environmental moisture content of only a few percentage along the pipes. The importance and uniqueness of this research lies in the development of practical tools to provide a snapshot and monitoring of the spatial changes in soil moisture content up to depths of about 3-4 m, in open and paved areas, at relatively low cost, in real time or close to real time. Spatial measurements performed using GPR and FDEM systems allow monitoring many tens of thousands of measurement points per hectare, thus providing a picture of the spatial situation along pipelines and the surrounding. The main purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting sewage leaks using the above-proposed geophysical methods, since their contaminants can severely affect public health. We focused on identifying, locating and characterizing such leaks in sewage pipes in residential and industrial areas.

  7. A Leak Monitor for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    GenCorp Aerojet Industrial Products, Lewis Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Case Western Reserve University developed a gas leak detection system, originally for use with the Space Shuttle propulsion system and reusable launch vehicles. The Model HG200 Automated Gas Leak Detection System has miniaturized sensors that can identify extremely low concentrations of hydrogen without requiring oxygen. A microprocessor-based hardware/software system monitors the sensors and displays the source and magnitude of hydrogen leaks in real time. The system detects trace hydrogen around pipes, connectors, flanges and pressure tanks, and has been used by Ford Motor Company in the production of a natural gas-powered car.

  8. Analysis of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khoonsari, Payam Emami; Häggmark, Anna; Lönnberg, Maria; Mikus, Maria; Kilander, Lena; Lannfelt, Lars; Bergquist, Jonas; Ingelsson, Martin; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of Alzheimer’s disease patients and non-demented controls to identify potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. We processed the data using five programs (DecyderMS, Maxquant, OpenMS, PEAKS, and Sieve) and compared their results by means of reproducibility and peptide identification, including three different normalization methods. After depletion of high abundant proteins we found that Alzheimer’s disease patients had lower fraction of low-abundance proteins in cerebrospinal fluid compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Consequently, global normalization was found to be less accurate compared to using spiked-in chicken ovalbumin for normalization. In addition, we determined that Sieve and OpenMS resulted in the highest reproducibility and PEAKS was the programs with the highest identification performance. Finally, we successfully verified significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of eight proteins (A2GL, APOM, C1QB, C1QC, C1S, FBLN3, PTPRZ, and SEZ6) in Alzheimer’s disease compared to controls using an antibody-based detection method. These proteins are involved in different biological roles spanning from cell adhesion and migration, to regulation of the synapse and the immune system. PMID:26950848

  9. Waste Transfer Leaks Control Decision Record

    SciTech Connect

    RYAN, G.W.

    2000-06-27

    Control decision meetings for Waste Transfer Leaks were held on April 24,25,26, and 27, 2000. The agenda for the control decision meetings is included in Appendix A, and attendee lists are included in Appendix B. The purpose of the control decision meetings was to review and revise previously selected controls for the prevention or mitigation of waste transfer leak accidents. Re-evaluation of the controls is warranted due to revisions in the hazard and accident analysis for these Tank Farm events. In particular, calculated radiological consequences are significantly reduced from those currently reported in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Revised hazard and accident analysis and a revised control recommendation will be reflected in an Authorization Basis Amendment to be submitted at the Department of Energy, Office of River Protection's (ORP's) request by June 30, 2000 to satisfy ORP Performance Incentive (PI) 2.1.1, Revision 1, ''Authorization Basis Management Process Efficiency Improvement''. The scope of the control decision meetings was to address all waste transfer leak-related hazardous conditions identified in the Tank Farm hazard analysis database, excluding those associated with the use of the Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System (RCSTS) slurry line and sluicing of Tank 241-C-106, which is addressed in FSAR Addendum 1. The scope of this control decision process does include future waste feed delivery waste transfer operations.

  10. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology