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Sample records for fluid temperature transient

  1. Determination of transient fluid temperature using the inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes an inverse method to obtain accurate measurements of the transient temperature of fluid. A method for unit step and linear rise of temperature is presented. For this purpose, the thermometer housing is modelled as a full cylindrical element (with no inner hole), divided into four control volumes. Using the control volume method, the heat balance equations can be written for each of the nodes for each of the control volumes. Thus, for a known temperature in the middle of the cylindrical element, the distribution of temperature in three nodes and heat flux at the outer surface were obtained. For a known value of the heat transfer coefficient the temperature of the fluid can be calculated using the boundary condition. Additionally, results of experimental research are presented. The research was carried out during the start-up of an experimental installation, which comprises: a steam generator unit, an installation for boiler feed water treatment, a tray-type deaerator, a blow down flashvessel for heat recovery, a steam pressure reduction station, a boiler control system and a steam header made of martensitic high alloy P91 steel. Based on temperature measurements made in the steam header using the inverse method, accurate measurements of the transient temperature of the steam were obtained. The results of the calculations are compared with the real temperature of the steam, which can be determined for a known pressure and enthalpy.

  2. Transient Wellbore Fluid Flow Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1982-04-06

    WELBORE is a code to solve transient, one-dimensional two-phase or single-phase non-isothermal fluid flow in a wellbore. The primary thermodynamic variables used in solving the equations are the pressure and specific energy. An equation of state subroutine provides the density, quality, and temperature. The heat loss out of the wellbore is calculated by solving a radial diffusion equation for the temperature changes outside the bore. The calculation is done at each node point in themore » wellbore.« less

  3. General Transient Fluid Flow Algorithm

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-03-12

    SALE2D calculates two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitude resultsmore » from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a two-dimensional network of quadrilateral cells for either cylindrical or Cartesian coordinates, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.« less

  4. Low temperature fluid blender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Blender supplies hydrogen at temperatures from 289 deg K to 367 deg K. Hydrogen temperature is controlled by using blender to combine flow from liquid hydrogen tank /276 deg K/ and gaseous hydrogen cylinder /550 deg K/. Blenders are applicable where flow of controlled low-temperature fluid is desired.

  5. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert; Lovely, David

    1999-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required to understand the underlying physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of much interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snap-shot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense. The following is a list of the important physical phenomena found in transient (and steady-state) fluid flow: (1) Shocks, (2) Vortex cores, (3) Regions of recirculation, (4) Boundary layers, (5) Wakes. Three papers and an initial specification for the (The Fluid eXtraction tool kit) FX Programmer's guide were included. The papers, submitted to the AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, are entitled : (1) Using Residence Time for the Extraction of Recirculation Regions, (2) Shock Detection from Computational Fluid Dynamics results and (3) On the Velocity Gradient Tensor and Fluid Feature Extraction.

  6. High temperature drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Stong, R.E.; Walinsky, S.W.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes an aqueous drilling fluid suitable for high-temperature use. This fluid is composed of a water base. Clay is suspended in the base and from about 0.01-25 pounds per barrel total composition of a hydrolyzed terpolymer of maleic anhydride, styrene and a third monomer selected from acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylic acid and metacrylic acid. The molar ratio of maleic anhydride to styrene to the third monomer is from about 30:10:60 to 50:40:10, and the alkali metal, ammonium and lower aliphatic amine salts thereof, the weight-average molecular weight of the hydrolyzed terpolymer is from about 500-10,000.

  7. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1998-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required to understand the underlying physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of much interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one 'snap-shot' of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense. The following is a list of the important physical phenomena found in transient (and steady-state) fluid flow: Shocks; Vortex ores; Regions of Recirculation; Boundary Layers; Wakes.

  8. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  9. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  10. Transient response of high temperature PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J.; Shin, J. Y.; Song, T. W.

    A transient three-dimensional, single-phase and non-isothermal numerical model of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell with high operating temperature has been developed and implemented in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The model accounts for transient convective and diffusive transport, and allows prediction of species concentration. Electrochemical charge double-layer effect is considered. Heat generation according to electrochemical reaction and ohmic loss are involved. Water transportation across membrane is ignored due to low water electro-osmosis drag force of polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The prediction shows transient in current density which overshoots (undershoots) the stabilized state value when cell voltage is abruptly decreased (increased). The result shows that the peak of overshoot (undershoot) is related with cathode air stoichiometric mass flow rate instead of anode hydrogen stoichiometric mass flow rate. Current is moved smoothly and there are no overshoot or undershoot with the influence of charge double-layer effect. The maximum temperature is located in cathode catalyst layer and both fuel cell average temperature and temperature deviation are increased with increasing of current load.

  11. Transient elasticity and polymeric fluids: Small-amplitude deformations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Oliver; Liu, Mario; Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R

    2016-02-01

    Transient elasticity (TE) is a concept useful for a systematic generalization of viscoelasticity. Due to its thermodynamic consistency, it naturally leads to a simple description of non-Newtonian effects displayed by polymeric fluids, granular media, and other soft matter. We employ a continuum-mechanical theory that is derived from TE and tailored to polymeric fluids, showing how it captures a surprisingly large number of phenomena in shear and elongational flows, including stationary, oscillatory, and transient ones, as well as the flow down an inclined channel. Even the Weissenberg effect is well accounted for. This theory is applicable for small- as well as large-amplitude deformations. We concentrate on the former in the present article, leaving the latter to a companion article. PMID:26986419

  12. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  13. TRUMP. Transient & S-State Temperature Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Elrod, D.C.; Turner, W.D.

    1992-03-03

    TRUMP solves a general nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation describing flow in various kinds of potential fields, such as fields of temperature, pressure, or electricity and magnetism; simultaneously, it will solve two additional equations representing, in thermal problems, heat production by decomposition of two reactants having rate constants with a general Arrhenius temperature dependence. Steady-state and transient flow in one, two, or three dimensions are considered in geometrical configurations having simple or complex shapes and structures. Problem parameters may vary with spatial position, time, or primary dependent variables, temperature, pressure, or field strength. Initial conditions may vary with spatial position, and among the criteria that may be specified for ending a problem are upper and lower limits on the size of the primary dependent variable, upper limits on the problem time or on the number of time-steps or on the computer time, and attainment of steady state.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Transient in Cryogenic Fluid Network of Rocket Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Flachbart, Robin

    2003-01-01

    Fluid transients, also known as water hammer, can have a significant impact on the design and operation of both spacecraft and launch vehicles propulsion systems. These transients often occur at system activation and shut down. For ground safety reasons, many spacecrafts are launched with the propellant lines dry. These lines are often evacuated by the time the spacecraft reaches orbit. When the propellant isolation valve opens during propulsion system activation, propellant rushes into lines creating a pressure surge. During propellant system shutdown, a pressure surge is created due to sudden closure of a valve. During both activation and shutdown, pressure surges must be predicted accurately to ensure structural integrity of the propulsion system fluid network. The method of characteristics is the most widely used method of calculating fluid transients in pipeline [ 1,2]. The method of characteristics, however, has limited applications in calculating flow distribution in complex flow circuits with phase change, heat transfer and rotational effects. A robust cryogenic propulsion system analyzer must have the capability to handle phase change, heat transfer, chemical reaction, rotational effects and fluid transients in conjunction with subsystem flow model for pumps, valves and various pipe fittings. In recent years, such a task has been undertaken at Marshall Space Flight Center with the development of the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), which is based on finite volume method in fluid network [3]. GFSSP has been extensively verified and validated by comparing its predictions with test data and other numerical methods for various applications such as internal flow of turbo-pump [4], propellant tank pressurization [5,6], chilldown of cryogenic transfer line [7] and squeeze film damper rotordynamics [8]. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the applicability of the finite volume method to predict fluid transient in cryogenic flow

  15. Configurational temperature profile in confined fluids. II. Molecular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhommelle, Jerome; Evans, Denis J.

    2001-04-01

    In an earlier paper, we applied configurational expressions of the temperature to the calculation of temperature profiles within a confined atomic fluid. This paper focuses on the application of these expressions to confined molecular fluids using ethane and hexane as examples. We first give configurational expressions for the temperature for these constrained systems. The configurational temperature profiles so obtained are compared to the kinetic temperature calculated using the equipartition principle, in equilibrium systems. These expressions are then used in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of fluids undergoing planar Poiseuille flow. We show that these configurational expressions provide a direct and accurate determination of the temperature profile for these systems.

  16. Scaling temperature dependent rheology of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Stephen G.; Powell, Louise A.; Becnel, Andrew C.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are suspensions of micron-scale magnetizable particles suspended in a carrier fluid. When field is applied, MR fluids develop a field controllable yield stress and a field independent post-yield viscosity. However, this viscosity has substantial temperature dependence, varying by up to an order of magnitude over the operating temperature range of MR fluid devices. We apply non-Brownian suspension theory to explain this result and find that the majority of this effect should be caused by the temperature dependent behavior of the carrier fluid. Thus, if two fluids share the same carrier fluid, then their fluid properties should scale in temperature similarly. This result is first validated by measuring viscosity across temperature for custom model fluids designed to conform to theory, showing temperature scaling within 5% for both the MR fluids and their carrier fluid. Then, on a series of related commercially available fluids with unknown additive content, we show that the MR fluids exhibit common scaling to within 4%. We also investigate the effects of magnetic hysteresis and find that it induces a negligible increase in yield stress and no measurable change in viscosity. We conclude that our non-dimensional analysis enables the temperature dependence of novel MR fluids to be characterized with fewer experiments.

  17. Application of a Differential Transform Method to the Transient Natural Convection Problem in a Vertical Tube with Variable Fluid Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2016-02-01

    The transient natural convection of a viscous fluid in a heated vertical tube is studied using the two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM). A time-dependent Dirichlet boundary condition is imposed for tube wall temperature. The partial differential equations for the velocity and temperature fields within the tube are solved by the DTM while considering temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of the fluid. As a result, tractable solutions in double-series form are derived for the temperature and flow velocity. The transformed functions included in the solutions are obtained through a simple recursive procedure. Numerical results illustrate the effects of temperature-dependent properties on transient temperature and flow behaviour, including the Nusselt number and volumetric flow rate. The DTM gives accurate series solutions without any special functions for nonlinear transient heat transfer problems which are advantageous in finding the derivative or integral.

  18. Nanoscale transient porosity controls large-scale metamorphic fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plümper, Oliver; Botan, Alexandru; Los, Catharina; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    investigations we used non-equilibrium thermodynamics and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of nanoscale pore transport phenomena on metamorphic mineral replacement reactions. Our findings suggest that fluid transport through nanoscale transient pore networks may control regional-scale metamorphism and metasomatism, at least in the feldspar-dominated crust.

  19. Network Flow Simulation of Fluid Transients in Rocket Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Hamill, Brian; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Majumdar, Alok

    2011-01-01

    Fluid transients, also known as water hammer, can have a significant impact on the design and operation of both spacecraft and launch vehicle propulsion systems. These transients often occur at system activation and shutdown. The pressure rise due to sudden opening and closing of valves of propulsion feed lines can cause serious damage during activation and shutdown of propulsion systems. During activation (valve opening) and shutdown (valve closing), pressure surges must be predicted accurately to ensure structural integrity of the propulsion system fluid network. In the current work, a network flow simulation software (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) based on Finite Volume Method has been used to predict the pressure surges in the feed line due to both valve closing and valve opening using two separate geometrical configurations. The valve opening pressure surge results are compared with experimental data available in the literature and the numerical results compared very well within reasonable accuracy (< 5%) for a wide range of inlet-to-initial pressure ratios. A Fast Fourier Transform is preformed on the pressure oscillations to predict the various modal frequencies of the pressure wave. The shutdown problem, i.e. valve closing problem, the simulation results are compared with the results of Method of Characteristics. Most rocket engines experience a longitudinal acceleration, known as "pogo" during the later stage of engine burn. In the shutdown example problem, an accumulator has been used in the feed system to demonstrate the "pogo" mitigation effects in the feed system of propellant. The simulation results using GFSSP compared very well with the results of Method of Characteristics.

  20. Groundwater temperature transients on the Armutlu peninsula, eastern Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, Heiko; Caka, Deniz; Seyis, Cemil; Italiano, Francesco; Celik, Cengiz; Wang, Rongjiang; Baris, Serif

    2016-04-01

    Since many years MAM and GFZ in co-operation with Kocaeli University (KU) operate fluid monitoring stations around the Sea of Marmara. In the frame of MARsite (MARsite has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 308417) these networks were jointly evaluated for the first time. The on-land fluid monitoring networks continuously monitor the following parameters: soil radon (21 sites), temperature and conductivity of thermal springs (9 sites) operated by MAM covering the whole Marmara region; fluid pressure and water level/temperature (8 sites) within ARNET operated by GFZ/KU. ARNET is a combined seismological/hydrogeological monitoring network covering the Armutlu peninsula located SE of Istanbul. Additional to the geothermal wells and springs - our main target to detect transients of potentially seismo-tectonic origin - three shallow groundwater wells (tenth of meters deep) are being operated to identify and quantify seasonal variations, and meteorological influences like rainfall and snowmelt. But it turned out that these shallow aquifer systems showed very stable conditions with very small annual temperature amplitudes (0.2 - 0.3°C). One of these shallow monitoring wells is located just south of Lake Iznik (in the village of Sölöz) very close to the southern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone. Water level showed a steady decreasing trend since June 2012. This trend resulted in a data gap starting in January 2014, when the water level dropped below the sensor position. After adjusting the sensor position, positive spikes in the borehole temperature were recorded in June and August 2014, and again in 2015. The spikes are characterised by a sharp temperature increase followed by a decay lasting several days until the pre-event temperature was reached again. Since the spikes occurred on two independent logger systems, and since they lasted several days, a

  1. Temperature controller for a fluid cooled garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, A. B.; Blackaby, J. R.; Billingham, J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automatic controller for controlling the inlet temperature of the coolant to a fluid cooled garment without requiring skin sensors is described. Temperature is controlled by the wearer's evaporative water loss rate.

  2. Temperature stability and durability of MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhao, Guang-ming

    2012-04-01

    Temperature stability and durability of magnetorheological fluids are important for engineering application. The damper with magnetorheological fluids were put in environment of -40°C to 130°C and the forces were measured under different currents. Durability was evaluated by performance experiments of 2×106, 3.5×106,and 5×106 cycles. The results show that magnetorheological fluids have ideal temperature stability and durability.

  3. Temperature stability and durability of MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhao, Guang-ming

    2011-11-01

    Temperature stability and durability of magnetorheological fluids are important for engineering application. The damper with magnetorheological fluids were put in environment of -40°C to 130°C and the forces were measured under different currents. Durability was evaluated by performance experiments of 2×106, 3.5×106,and 5×106 cycles. The results show that magnetorheological fluids have ideal temperature stability and durability.

  4. Imaging hydraulic fractures using temperature transients in the Belridge Diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, G.T.; Johnston, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    Results of a temperature transient analysis of Shell`s Phase 1 and Phase 2 Diatomite Steamdrive Pilots are used to image hydraulic injection fracture lengths, angles, and heat injectivities into the low-permeability formation. The Phase 1 Pilot is a limited-interval injection test. In Phase 2, steam is injected into two 350 ft upper and lower zones through separate hydraulic fractures. Temperature response of both pilots is monitored with sixteen logging observation wells. A perturbation analysis of the non-linear pressure diffusion and heat transport equations indicates that at a permeability of about 0.1 md or less, heat transport in the Diatomite tends to be dominated by thermal diffusivity, and pressure diffusion is dominated by the ratio of thermal expansion to fluid compressibility. Under these conditions, the temperature observed at a logging observation well is governed by a dimensionless quantity that depends on the perpendicular distance between the observation well and the hydraulic fracture, divided by the square root of time. Using this dependence, a novel method is developed for imaging hydraulic fracture geometry and relative heat injectivity from the temperature history of the pilot.

  5. Configurational temperature profile in confined fluids. I. Atomic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhommelle, Jerome; Evans, Denis J.

    2001-04-01

    Two configurational expressions for the temperature are applied to the calculation of temperature profiles within a confined atomic fluid in a narrow slit pore. The configurational temperatures profiles so obtained are compared to the kinetic temperature, calculated from the equipartition principle, in equilibrium (EMD), and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of planar Poiseuille flow. We show that one of the configurational expressions exhibits a system-size dependence which prevents its application to the determination of high-resolution temperature profiles. The other expression yields good agreement with the kinetic temperature profile in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems.

  6. Transient Thermal Model and Analysis of the Lunar Surface and Regolith for Cryogenic Fluid Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Plachta, David W.; Yasan, Mohammad M.

    2008-01-01

    A transient thermal model of the lunar surface and regolith was developed along with analytical techniques which will be used to evaluate the storage of cryogenic fluids at equatorial and polar landing sites. The model can provide lunar surface and subsurface temperatures as a function of latitude and time throughout the lunar cycle and season. It also accounts for the presence of or lack of the undisturbed fluff layer on the lunar surface. The model was validated with Apollo 15 and Clementine data and shows good agreement with other analytical models.

  7. Transient Thermo-fluid Model of Meniscus Behavior and Slag Consumption in Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonayat, A. S. M.; Thomas, Brian G.

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of the slag layer between the oscillating mold wall, the slag rim, the slag/liquid steel interface, and the solidifying steel shell, is of immense importance for the surface quality of continuous-cast steel. A computational model of the meniscus region has been developed, that includes transient heat transfer, multi-phase fluid flow, solidification of the slag, and movement of the mold during an oscillation cycle. First, the model is applied to a lab experiment done with a "mold simulator" to verify the transient temperature-field predictions. Next, the model is verified by matching with available literature and plant measurements of slag consumption. A reasonable agreement has been observed for both temperature and flow-field. The predictions show that transient temperature behavior depends on the location of the thermocouple during the oscillation relative to the meniscus. During an oscillation cycle, heat transfer variations in a laboratory frame of reference are more severe than experienced by the moving mold thermocouples, and the local heat transfer rate is increased greatly when steel overflows the meniscus. Finally, the model is applied to conduct a parametric study on the effect of casting speed, stroke, frequency, and modification ratio on slag consumption. Slag consumption per unit area increases with increase of stroke and modification ratio, and decreases with increase of casting speed while the relation with frequency is not straightforward. The match between model predictions and literature trends suggests that this methodology can be used for further investigations.

  8. Inference of permeability heterogeneity from joint inversion of transient flow and temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhishuai; Jafarpour, Behnam; Li, Lianlin

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of the rock permeability distribution in compartmentalized deep aquifers, enhanced geothermal systems, and hydrocarbon reservoirs is important for predicting the flow and transport behavior in these formations. Reliable prediction of the fluid flow and transport processes can, in turn, lead to effective development of the subsurface energy and environmental resources. In deep formations where thermal gradients are significant, the transient temperature data can provide valuable information about the permeability distribution with depth and about the vertical fluid displacement. This paper examines the importance of temperature data in resolving the distribution of permeability with depth by jointly, and individually, integrating the transient temperature and flow data. We demonstrate that when estimating permeability distributions in deep geothermal reservoirs, incorporating temperature data can increase the resolution of the permeability distribution profile with depth. To illustrate the importance of temperature measurements, we adopt a coupled transient heat and fluid flow as a forward model to predict the heat and fluid transport in a geothermal reservoir and develop an adjoint model for efficient computation of the gradient information for model calibration. We perform a series of numerical experiments for integration of flow and pressure data alone, temperature data alone, and flow and pressure jointly with temperature data. In each case, we apply the maximum A-posteriori (MAP) method and the randomized maximum likelihood (RML) method for inversion and uncertainty quantification. Analysis of the sensitivity of temperature and production data to heterogeneous permeability distributions reveals that the temperature of fluid, even when measured at the surface, is sensitive to the permeability distribution in the vertical extent of the reservoir. Hence, temperature measurements can be augmented with flow-related data to enhance the resolution of

  9. Low temperature breakers for gelled fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Syrinek, A.R.; Lyon, L.B.

    1989-01-03

    A method is described for breaking gelled viscosities of oil-based gelled fracturing fluids containing a gellant comprising aluminum complexes of alkyl phosphate esters and a proppant. The fracturing fluids are used in low-temperature formations having operating temperatures ranging between 60/sup 0/ - 120/sup 0/F. The oil-based gelled fracturing fluids are treated with an effective viscosity breaking amount of a chemical breaker consisting essentially of an admixture of hydrated lime and sodium bicarbonate containing a weight ratio ranging between 100/0 to about 20/80 hydrated lime to sodium bicarbonate.

  10. Plasma-Catalysis During Temperature Transient Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, John

    2001-08-05

    A combination of catalysts is used together with nonthermal plasma in simulated diesel exhaust, while the gas temperature is varied. The catalysts both store and convert pollutants. As a result, pollutant concentrations during temperature ramps are different than those at steady state conditions. The data are presented for plasma followed by BaY, alumina, and Pt catalysts in simulated exhaust. When temperature ramps from high to low, apparent NOx conversion is quite high. However, when temperature is ramped from low to high, lower apparent conversions are seen. In a typical test cycle, average NOx conversion between 100 and 400 C is 60%. Peak conversion during the down ramp is over 90%, and minimum conversion during the up ramp is 30%. The composition of the effluent gas also varies during the temperature cycle. Intermediates such as methyl nitrate and hydrogen cyanide are not present following the combination of catalysts.

  11. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William G.; Bonner, Richard W.; Dussinger, Peter M.; Hartenstine, John R.; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.

    2007-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 725 K (170 to 450 C), including space nuclear power system radiators, fuel cells, and high temperature electronics cooling. Historically, water has been used in heat pipes at temperatures up to about 425 K (150 C). Recent life tests, updated below, demonstrate that titanium/water and Monel/water heat pipes can be used at temperatures up to 550 K (277 C), due to water's favorable transport properties. At temperatures above roughly 570 K (300 C), water is no longer a suitable fluid, due to high vapor pressure and low surface tension as the critical point is approached. At higher temperatures, another working fluid/envelope combination is required, either an organic or halide working fluid. An electromotive force method was used to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This procedure was used to reject aluminum and aluminum alloys as envelope materials, due to their high decomposition potential. Titanium and three corrosion resistant superalloys were chosen as envelope materials. Life tests were conducted with these envelopes and six different working fluids: AlBr3, GaCl3, SnCl4, TiCl4, TiBr4, and eutectic diphenyl/diphenyl oxide (Therminol VP-1/Dowtherm A). All of the life tests except for the GaCl3 are ongoing; the GaCl3 was incompatible. As the temperature approaches 725 K (450 C), cesium is a potential heat pipe working fluid. Life tests results are also presented for cesium/Monel 400 and cesium/70-30 copper/nickel heat pipes operating near 750 K (477 C). These materials are not suitable for long term operation, due to copper transport from the condenser to the evaporator.

  12. Transient dynamics of a colloidal particle driven through a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruben Gomez-Solano, Juan; Bechinger, Clemens

    2015-10-01

    We study the transient motion of a colloidal particle actively dragged by an optical trap through different viscoelastic fluids (wormlike micelles, polymer solutions, and entangled λ-phage DNA). We observe that, after sudden removal of the moving trap, the particle recoils due to the recovery of the deformed fluid microstructure. We find that the transient dynamics of the particle proceeds via a double-exponential relaxation, whose relaxation times remain independent of the initial particle velocity whereas their amplitudes strongly depend on it. While the fastest relaxation mirrors the viscous damping of the particle by the solvent, the slow relaxation results from the recovery of the strained viscoelastic matrix. We show that this transient information, which has no counterpart in Newtonian fluids, can be exploited to investigate linear and nonlinear rheological properties of the embedding fluid, thus providing a novel method to perform transient rheology at the micron-scale.

  13. Fracturing fluids for low temperature wells

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, C.T.; Dollarhide, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Highly viscous fluids are used to initiate and propagate fractures and to place proppant in the fractures during the hydraulic stimulation process. These fluids can cause damage to the conductivity of the induced fractures if they are not properly cleaned out after the fracturing treatment. The clean-up process is aided by the degradation of the polymers, and in low temperature wells the breakdown of the polymer must be chemically induced. This work presents data on a new fracturing fluid aimed specifically at stimulating low temperature and low pressure reservoirs. The system consists of a CO/sub 2/-energized, cross-linked hydroxypropyl guar fluid. The gel is degraded by a traditional breaker that is activated by a new, low temperature breaker activator. The fluid is effective in wells as cool as 60 F and with bhp as low as 100 psi and should be particularly applicable to the shallow gas wells in the Alberta Medicine Hat and high level Keg River areas.

  14. Restricted versus Standard Maintenance Fluid Volume in Management of Transient Tachypnea of Newborn: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dehdashtian, Masoud; Aramesh, Mohammad-Reza; Melekian, Arash; Aletayeb, Mohammad-Hasan; Ghaemmaghami, Anahita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of Transient Tachypnea of Newborn (TTN) is higher in infants born by cesarean section than with  vaginal delivery. Treatment of transient tachypnea of newborn is supportive. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of restricted fluid volume intake on the course of respiratory distress in patients with TTN. Methods: This is a quasi-experimental clinical trial of 83 neonates diagnosed with TTN admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in south west Iran. In this study the effect of restriction of maintenance fluid volume in the course of respiratory distress in newborns with transient tachypnea was assessed. Findings: In the standard fluid volume intake group 18 (42.8%) cases needed nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) and one (2.38%) case mechanical ventilation, and in restricted fluid volume intake group 13 (32.5%) cases needed NCPAP and two (5%) cases mechanical ventilation. 54.82% of cases were supported with oxyhood in the standard fluid volume and 62.5% in the restricted fluid volume intake group. Differences in duration of the needed NCPAP and oxygen hood between the two groups were significant. Fluid restriction had no adverse effect on the urine specific gravity or weight loss of the studied newborns. Conclusion: Limited fluid administered to newborns with transient tachypnea of newborn is safe and resulted in shorter duration of respiratory support. PMID:25793064

  15. Micromechanical transient sensor for measuring viscosity and density of a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Oden, Patrick I.; Warmack, Robert J.; Finot, Eric Laurent

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the viscosity and/or specific density of a fluid utilizes a microcantilever vibrated in the analyte fluid. The source of vibration is switched on and off and the transient behavior or decay in amplitude of the vibration is monitored. The method is particularly useful for the measurement of process conditions in remote locations in real time.

  16. Fluid-Rock Dynamic Interaction in Magmatic Conduits: Modelling Transients Using an Analytical Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Scheu, Bettina; Sanchez-Sesma, Francisco; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    We compute transients fluid-rock dynamic interaction in a fluid driven axisymmetric conduit embedded in an infinite, homogeneous elastic space. Both fluid and solid are dynamically coupled fulfilling continuity of velocities and radial stresses at the conduit's wall. The calculation model considers the viscosity as a key parameter leading to non-linear scheme. A pressure transient at a point of the conduit, that perturbs a steady flow of incompressible viscous fluid, produces the interaction between the fluid and motion at the conduit's walls. The fluid motion induces the elastic response of the conduit forcing it to oscillate radially. The fluid-filled conduit dynamics is governed by three second-order, ordinary non-linear differential equations, which are solved numerically by applying a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Boundary conditions satisfy the Bernoulli's principle allowing coupling several pipe segments which may present smooth variation in fluid properties. The nature of the source involves different pressure excitations functions including those measuring during simulations of gas burst and fragmentation of volcanic rocks under controlled laboratory conditions. Far-field velocity synthetics radiated by motion of the conduit's walls and fluid flows ascending to the surface, display characteristic waveforms and frequency content that are similar to those of long-period signals and tremor observed at active volcanoes. Results suggest that transient fluid flow induced oscillations may explain long-period and tremor signals. Advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  17. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and Cp-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results form previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  18. Numerical simulation of transient temperature field during laser keyhole welding of 304 stainless steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renping; Lei, Yongping; Shi, Yaowu

    2011-06-01

    A three-dimensional transient numerical model was developed to study the temperature field and molten pool shape during continuous laser keyhole welding. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) method was employed to track free surfaces. Melting and evaporation enthalpy, recoil pressure, surface tension, and energy loss due to evaporating materials were considered in this model. The enthalpy-porosity technique was employed to account for the latent heat during melting and solidification. Temperature fields and weld pool shape were calculated using FLUENT software. The calculated weld dimensions agreed reasonable well with the experimental results. The effectiveness of the developed computational procedure had been confirmed.

  19. Ignition transient analysis of a solid rocket motor using a one dimensional two fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardue, Byron A.; Han, Samuel S.

    1992-07-01

    A one dimensional two fluid numerical model has been used to study the ignition transient stage of a Space Shuttle solid rocket motor. During the ignition phase of a solid rocket motor a pressure transient is induced by complex transport processes involving the igniter gas heat transfer to the propellant, chemical reactions at the propellant surface, and the interaction of the fluid with the attached rocket nozzle. One dimensional models used in the past neglected the aluminum oxide particles which are present in the combustion gases. The current model uses the IPSA (Inter-Phase-Slip-Algorithm) to solve the transient compressible flow equations for the rocket chamber and attached nozzle. Numerical results for head end pressure changes and overall thrust are compared with both measurement data and predictions of a one dimensional one fluid model.

  20. FLUID TRANSIENTS IN A PIPELINE WITH ONE END OPEN

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R

    2008-06-09

    Water hammer during multi-phase flow is rather complex, but in some cases an upper limit to the pressure surge magnitude during water hammer can be estimated. In the case considered here, a two mile long pipeline with a single high point was permitted to partially drain. Due to gravitational effects, air bubbles up through the pipe line to its highest point, but the time required for air to reach the top of the pipe is rather long. Consequently, some transients caused by valve operations are affected by air entrapment and some are not. The intent of this research was to investigate the complex interactions between air, water vapor, and liquid during water hammer in a long pipe with one end of the pipe open to atmospheric conditions. To understand the system dynamics, experimental data was obtained from a long pipeline with an open end and also from a short, transparent tube. Transient calculations were performed for valve closures and pump operations as applicable. The limitations of available calculation techniques were considered in detail.

  1. Modeling quantum fluid dynamics at nonzero temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Berloff, Natalia G.; Brachet, Marc; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the intricate dynamics of quantum fluids, in particular in the rapidly growing subfield of quantum turbulence which elucidates the evolution of a vortex tangle in a superfluid, requires an in-depth understanding of the role of finite temperature in such systems. The Landau two-fluid model is the most successful hydrodynamical theory of superfluid helium, but by the nature of the scale separations it cannot give an adequate description of the processes involving vortex dynamics and interactions. In our contribution we introduce a framework based on a nonlinear classical-field equation that is mathematically identical to the Landau model and provides a mechanism for severing and coalescence of vortex lines, so that the questions related to the behavior of quantized vortices can be addressed self-consistently. The correct equation of state as well as nonlocality of interactions that leads to the existence of the roton minimum can also be introduced in such description. We review and apply the ideas developed for finite-temperature description of weakly interacting Bose gases as possible extensions and numerical refinements of the proposed method. We apply this method to elucidate the behavior of the vortices during expansion and contraction following the change in applied pressure. We show that at low temperatures, during the contraction of the vortex core as the negative pressure grows back to positive values, the vortex line density grows through a mechanism of vortex multiplication. This mechanism is suppressed at high temperatures. PMID:24704874

  2. Measurement of the thermal properties of electrically conducting fluids using coated transient hot wires

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    Measurements of fluid thermal properties using the transient hot-wire technique are described. When bare hot wires are used in electrically conducting fluids there are additional measurement uncertainties due to the formation of electric double layers on the surfaces of the wires and the cell wall. If the electrical conductivity of the fluid is large enough there is also significant power generation in the fluid. These measurement uncertainties can be eliminated by electrically insulating the hot wires with a thin film. The use of tantalum hot wires with an anodized layer of tantalum pentoxide is demonstrated with measurements on nonpolar argon and polar 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane (R134a). Although coated tantalum hot wires have been used previously in a transient mode to measure the thermal conductivity of liquids, this work is the first demonstration of the use of coated wires to measure thermal conductivity in the liquid, vapor, and supercritical gas phases.

  3. Measurement of the thermal properties of electrically conducting fluids using coated transient hot wires

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Measurements of fluid thermal properties using the transient hot-wire technique are described. When bare hot wires are used in electrically conducting fluids there are additional measurement uncertainties due to the formation of electric double layers on the surfaces of the wires and the cell wall. If the electrical conductivity of the fluid is large enough there is also significant power generation in the fluid. These measurement uncertainties can be eliminated by electrically insulating the hot wires with a thin film. The use of tantalum hot wires with an anodized layer of tantalum pentoxide is demonstrated with measurements on nonpolar argon and polar 1,1,1,2 tetrafluorethane (R134a). Although coated tantalum hot wires have been used previously in a transient mode to measure the thermal conductivity of liquids, this work is the first demonstration of the use of coated wires to measure thermal conductivity in the liquid, vapor, and supercritical gas phases.

  4. Thermal stresses in the wall of pipes caused by periodic change of temperature of medium fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atefi, Gholamali; Mahmoudi, Hamid

    2012-06-01

    The problem of thermal stresses induced in pipes due to periodic change of medium fluid temperature has never been considered completely. In this paper an analytical solution for obtaining thermal stresses in a pipe caused by periodic time varying of temperature of medium fluid is offered. Transient heat conduction equation in cylindrical coordinates for a long hollow cylinder under periodic change of ambient temperature condition is solved analytically using Fourier series and Temperature distribution in the wall of pipe as a function of time and radial direction is specified. Then resulting thermal stresses are obtained using thermoelasticity relations. Because of the use of Fourier series expansion in obtaining the transient temperature field the proposed method is very comprehensive and covers many theoretical and practical problems. The results for thermal stresses have been compared with former works and show excellent agreement for the same conditions.

  5. Fluid-solid coupled simulation of the ignition transient of solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Peijin; He, Guoqiang

    2015-05-01

    The first period of the solid rocket motor operation is the ignition transient, which involves complex processes and, according to chronological sequence, can be divided into several stages, namely, igniter jet injection, propellant heating and ignition, flame spreading, chamber pressurization and solid propellant deformation. The ignition transient should be comprehensively analyzed because it significantly influences the overall performance of the solid rocket motor. A numerical approach is presented in this paper for simulating the fluid-solid interaction problems in the ignition transient of the solid rocket motor. In the proposed procedure, the time-dependent numerical solutions of the governing equations of internal compressible fluid flow are loosely coupled with those of the geometrical nonlinearity problems to determine the propellant mechanical response and deformation. The well-known Zeldovich-Novozhilov model was employed to model propellant ignition and combustion. The fluid-solid coupling interface data interpolation scheme and coupling instance for different computational agents were also reported. Finally, numerical validation was performed, and the proposed approach was applied to the ignition transient of one laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. For the application, the internal ballistics were obtained from the ground hot firing test, and comparisons were made. Results show that the integrated framework allows us to perform coupled simulations of the propellant ignition, strong unsteady internal fluid flow, and propellant mechanical response in SRMs with satisfactory stability and efficiency and presents a reliable and accurate solution to complex multi-physics problems.

  6. Temperature-dependent transient creep and dynamics of cratonic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, Boris I.

    2013-11-01

    Large-scale mantle convection forms the upper boundary layer (lithosphere) where the vertical temperature drop is about 1300 K. Theoretical rheology and laboratory experiments with rock samples show that transient creep occurs while creep strains are sufficiently small. The transient creep is described by the temperature-dependent Andrade rheological model. Since plate tectonics allows only small deformations in lithospheric plates, creep of the lithosphere plates is transient whereas steady-state creep, described by non-Newtonian power-law rheological model, takes place in the underlying mantle. The solution of stability problem shows that the lithosphere is stable but small-scale convective oscillations are attenuated very weakly in regions of thickened lithosphere beneath continental cratons (subcratonic roots) where the thickness of the lithosphere is about 200 km. These oscillations create small-scale convective cells (the horizontal dimensions of the cells are of the order of the subcratonic lithosphere thickness). Direction of motion within the cells periodically changes (the period of convective oscillations is of the order of 3 × 108 yr). In this study, the oscillations of cratonic lithosphere caused by initial relief perturbation are considered. This relief perturbation is assumed to be created by overthrusting in orogenic belts surrounding cratons. The perturbation of the Earth's surface relief leads to a fast isothermal process of isostatic recovery. In the presence of vertical temperature gradient, vertical displacements, associated with the recovery process in the lithosphere interior, instantly produce the initial temperature perturbations exciting thermoconvective oscillations in the cratonic lithosphere. These small-amplitude convective oscillations cause oscillatory crustal movements which form sedimentary basins on cratons.

  7. Transient growth in Taylor-Couette flow of a Bingham fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we investigate linear transient growth of perturbation energy in Taylor-Couette flow of a Bingham fluid. The effects of yield stress on transient growth and the structure of the optimal perturbation are mainly considered for both the wide-gap case and the narrow-gap case. For this purpose we complement the linear stability of this flow subjected to axisymmetric disturbances, presented by Landry et al. [M. P. Landry, I. A. Frigaard, and D. M. Martinez, J. Fluid Mech. 560, 321 (2006), 10.1017/S0022112006000620], with the transient growth characteristics of both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations. We obtain the variations of the relative amplitude of optimal perturbation with yield stress, analyze the roles played by the Coriolis force and the additional stress in the evolution of meridional perturbations for the axisymmetric modes, and give the explanations for the possible change of the optimal azimuthal mode (featured by the maximum optimal energy growth Gopt) with yield stress. These results might help us in the understanding of the effect of fluid rheology on transient growth mechanism in vortex flows.

  8. Transient growth in Taylor-Couette flow of a Bingham fluid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we investigate linear transient growth of perturbation energy in Taylor-Couette flow of a Bingham fluid. The effects of yield stress on transient growth and the structure of the optimal perturbation are mainly considered for both the wide-gap case and the narrow-gap case. For this purpose we complement the linear stability of this flow subjected to axisymmetric disturbances, presented by Landry et al. [M. P. Landry, I. A. Frigaard, and D. M. Martinez, J. Fluid Mech. 560, 321 (2006)], with the transient growth characteristics of both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations. We obtain the variations of the relative amplitude of optimal perturbation with yield stress, analyze the roles played by the Coriolis force and the additional stress in the evolution of meridional perturbations for the axisymmetric modes, and give the explanations for the possible change of the optimal azimuthal mode (featured by the maximum optimal energy growth G(opt)) with yield stress. These results might help us in the understanding of the effect of fluid rheology on transient growth mechanism in vortex flows. PMID:25974605

  9. Rabbit tendon cells produce MMP-3 in response to fluid flow without significant calcium transients.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Joanne M; Elfervig-Wall, Michelle K; Tsuzaki, Mari; Herzog, Walter; Banes, Albert J

    2002-03-01

    Forces applied to tendon during movement cause cellular deformation, as well as fluid movement. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that rabbit tendon fibroblasts detect and respond to fluid-induced shear stress. Cells were isolated from the paratenon of the rabbit Achilles tendon and then subjected to fluid flow at 1 dyn/cm(2) for 6h in a specially designed multi-slide flow device. The application of fluid flow led to an increased expression of the collagenase-1 (MMP-1), stromelysin-1 (MMP-3), cyclooxygenase II (COX-2) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) genes. The release of proMMP-3 into the medium exhibited a dose-response with the level of fluid shear stress. However, not all cells aligned in the direction of flow. In other experiments, the same cells were incubated with the calcium-reactive dye FURA-2 AM, then subjected to laminar fluid flow in a parallel plate flow chamber. The cells did not significantly increase intracellular calcium concentration when exposed to fluid shear stress levels of up to 25 dyn/cm(2). These results show that gene expression in rabbit tendon cells is sensitive to fluid flow, but that signal transduction is not dependent on intracellular calcium transients. The upregulation of the MMP-1, MMP-3 and COX-2 genes shows that fluid flow could be an important mechanical stimulus for tendon remodelling or injury. PMID:11858805

  10. Transient Middle Eocene atmospheric CO₂ and temperature variations.

    PubMed

    Bijl, Peter K; Houben, Alexander J P; Schouten, Stefan; Bohaty, Steven M; Sluijs, Appy; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2010-11-01

    The long-term warmth of the Eocene (~56 to 34 million years ago) is commonly associated with elevated partial pressure of atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO(2)). However, a direct relationship between the two has not been established for short-term climate perturbations. We reconstructed changes in both pCO(2) and temperature over an episode of transient global warming called the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO; ~40 million years ago). Organic molecular paleothermometry indicates a warming of southwest Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) by 3° to 6°C. Reconstructions of pCO(2) indicate a concomitant increase by a factor of 2 to 3. The marked consistency between SST and pCO(2) trends during the MECO suggests that elevated pCO(2) played a major role in global warming during the MECO. PMID:21051636

  11. Transient analysis and burnout of high temperature superconducting current leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, S. Y.; Hull, J. R.

    The transient behaviour of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads operated between liquid helium and liquid nitrogen temperatures is analysed for burnout conditions upon transition of the HTS into the normal state. Leads composed of HTS only and of HTS sheathed by pure silver or silver alloy are investigated numerically for temperature-dependent properties and analytically for temperature-independent properties. For lower values of shape factor (current density times length), the lead can be operated indefinitely without burnout. At higher values of shape factor, the lead reaches burnout in a finite time. With high current densities, the leads heat adiabatically. For a fixed shape factor, low current densities are desired to achieve long burnout times. To achieve a low helium boil-off rate in the superconducting state without danger of burnout, there is a preferred temperature dependence for thermal conductivity, and silver alloy sheaths are preferred to pure silver sheaths. However, for a given current density, pure silver sheaths take longer to burn out.

  12. Laboratory experiments and continuous fluid monitoring at Campi Flegrei to understand pressure transients in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, Heiko; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Chiodini, Giovanni; Pilz, Marco; Walter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The hydrothermal system beneath Campi Flegrei is strongly affected by sub-surface processes as manifested by the existence of a geothermal "plume" below Solfatara (Bruno et al. 2007), associated with formation of new fumaroles and the spatial pattern of exhalation vents. Within the frame of MED-SUV (The MED-SUV project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) under Grant agreement no 308665), pressure tansients in the hydrothermal system of Campi Flegrei shall be studied using a combination of laboratory experiments and continuous pressure/temperature monitoring at fumaroles, mudpools, hot springs, and geothermal wells. Four groundwater monitoring sites were installed in September 2013: one in the Fangaia mud pool inside Solfatara and three within the geothermal area of Agnano, which is located roughly 3 km to the East of the Solfatara crater. In 2014 additional sensors were installed in Pisciarelli. Autonomous devices are being used to record the water level and water temperature at 10 minute intervals. Records reveal significant changes of the hydrothermal system in September 2013 at the Agnano main spring during the night from 23 to 24 September. Both, the water level and the water temperature dropped significantly, confirmed by visual inspection of the spa operators. The pool of the main spring almost emptied and the flow rate was significantly reduced, implying a profound change in the system. Similar water level drops occurred in the following months. Gas bubbles are likely to play a major role with respect to spatio-temporal variations in shallow fluid systems below Solfatara. Thus, additional to the field measurements we investigate potential bubble-related mechanisms capable to increase fluid pressure. The BubbleLab at GFZ has been setup. We are able to simulate earthquake ground motions with a shaking table, track the size and velocity of rising bubbles via a camera system, and quantify transients with a set of

  13. Analysis of reactivity and temperature transient experiments at the AVR high-temperature reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, W.; Gerwin, H.; Kindt, T.; Patscher, W.

    1987-09-01

    In the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor high-temperature reactor low-enriched fuel elements have been loaded for several years, replacing about half of the initial highly enriched uranium-thorium fuel. This changeover is accompanied by an elaborate experimental program wherein changes in the neutronic and thermohydraulics behavior of the system are monitored. Within this program reactor transients are induced by means of either circulator speed reduction or control rod movement. The resulting transients in neutron flux and temperatures are recorded and used as a basis for detailed theoretical analysis. Working groups at several institutions have carried out transient calculations using different dynamic codes. The results are presented and differences are discussed. In general, the experimental values were reproduced in a very satisfactory way.

  14. Analysis of transient flow and starting pressure gradient of power-law fluid in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Jian-Yi; Cai, Jianchao

    2015-09-01

    A transient flow model for power-law fluid in fractal porous media is derived by combining transient flow theory with the fractal properties of tortuous capillaries. Pressure changes of transient flow for power-law fluid in fractal porous media are related to pore fractal dimension, tortuosity fractal dimension and the power-law index. Additionally, the starting pressure gradient model of power-law fluid in fractal porous media is established. Good agreement between the predictions of the present model and that of the traditional empirical model is obtained, the sensitive parameters that influence the starting pressure gradient are specified and their effects on the starting pressure gradient are discussed.

  15. Development of single fluid volume element method for simulation of transient fluid flow in self-siphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viridi, S.; Novitrian, Nurhayati, Hidayat, W.; Latief, F. D. E.; Zen, F. P.

    2014-09-01

    A simple model for transient flow in a narrow pipe is presented in this work. The model is simply derived from Newton's second law of motion. As an example it is used to predict flow occurrence in two forms of self-siphon, which are inverted-U and M-like forms. Simulation for system consists only a vertical pipe is also presented since it is actually part of the both siphon systems. For the simple systems the model can have good predictions but for the complex system it can only have 89.6 % good prediction. Its simplicity can be used to illustrate how the interface between fluid and air, single fluid volume element (SFVE) moves along the siphon. The method itself is named as SFVE method.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Transient Temperature Response of Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Seiichi; Tatesaku, Akihiro; Dantsuka, Yuki; Fujiwara, Seiji; Kunimine, Kanji

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of thermophysical properties of thin liquid films are important to understand interfacial phenomena due to film structures composed of amphiphilic molecules in soap film, phospholipid bilayer of biological cell and emulsion. A transient hot-wire technique for liquid films less than 1 \\upmu m thick such as soap film has been proposed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity simultaneously. Two-dimensional heat conduction equations for a solid cylinder with a liquid film have been solved numerically. The temperature of a thin wire with liquid film increases steeply with its own heat generation. The feasibility of this technique is verified through numerical experiments for various thermal conductivities, diffusivities, and film thicknesses. Calculated results indicate that the increase in the volumetric average temperature of the thin wire sufficiently varies with the change of thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the soap film. Therefore, the temperature characteristics could be utilized to evaluate both the thermal conductivity and diffusivity using the Gauss-Newton method.

  17. Temperature Measurement in Supersonic Flows by Predissociative Transient Thermal Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Peter; Miles, Richard

    1998-11-01

    We present temporally resolved measurements of temperature in a range of supersonic flows by measuring the acoustic decay of laser created transient gratings. This is an extension of the LITA (Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics) technique. A thermal density grating is created in the flow folloing absorption and thermalization of light from an interference pattern created by the crossed beams of a short-pulsed laser. Rapid thermalization occurs by collisions with energetic 0 photofragments following predissociation of O^2 in air by absorption of 193 nm light. The grating relaxes to local equilibrium by acoustic and diffusive decay. The acoustic decay launches two counter- propagating gratings traveling at the speed-of-sound. The interference of the stationary thermal grating with the two counter-propagating acoustic gratings creates a variation in grating modulation depth with time. The modulation frequency is proportional to the speed-of-sound and is used in our measurements to determine temperature. Bragg diffraction off the grating by a cw probe laser is observed as an oscillatory decay over hundreds of nanoseconds; the modulation frequency is extracted from this signal by Fourier analysis. We present single laser pulse measurements of temperature in a Mach 2.0 and 3.9 nozzle flows, and in weakly ionized flows for which this technique has been developed.

  18. Thermal fluids in low temperature systems. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lynde, P.G.; Yonkers, E.D.

    1996-02-01

    This article focuses on the lifeblood of these systems, the thermal transfer fluid itself. Low-temperature heat-transfer fluids are used to condition engine fluids, test chambers, cooling fluids, or a combination of these in environmental test facilities. To meet the specific test criteria, these fluids may be required to maintain pumpability and function with thermal efficiency at temperatures as low as {minus}120 F. This article presents information related to heat-transfer fluids used in low-temperature cooling applications. Three general groups of fluids are discussed: water-based antifreezes (ethylene and propylene glycol solutions); chlorinated solvents (methylene chloride and trichloroethylene); organic and synthetic coolants (diethylbenzene, two forms of dimethylpolysiloxane, heavy naphtha hydrotreated, and citrus terpene).

  19. Code System to Calculate Transient 2-Dimensional 2-Fluid Flow Dynamics.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-19

    Version 00 The transient dynamics of two-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. Separate sets of field equations govern the gas and liquid phase dynamics. The six field equations for the two phases couple through mass, momentum, and energy exchange.

  20. Transient temperature distributions in a cylinder heated by microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, H.W.; Barmatz, M.; Wagner, P.

    1996-12-31

    Transient temperature distributions were calculated for a lossy dielectric cylinder coaxially aligned in a cylindrical microwave cavity excited in a single mode. Results were obtained for sample sizes that range from fibers to large cylinders. Realistic values for temperature dependent complex dielectric constants and thermophysical properties of the samples were used. Losses in cavity walls were taken into account as were realistic thermal emissivities at all surfaces. For a fine mesh of points in time, normal mode properties and microwave power absorption profiles were evaluated using analytic expressions. Those expressions correspond to exact solutions of Maxwell`s equations within the framework of a cylindrical shell model. Heating produced by the microwave absorption was included in self-consistent numerical solutions of thermal equations. In this model, both direct microwave heating and radiant heating of the sample (hybrid heating) were studied by including a lossy dielectric tube surrounding the sample. Calculated results are discussed within the context of two parametric studies. One is concerned with relative merits of microwave and hybrid heating of fibers, rods, and larger cylinders. The other is concerned with thermal runaway.

  1. Validation of a fluid-structure interaction numerical model for predicting flow transients in arteries.

    PubMed

    Kanyanta, V; Ivankovic, A; Karac, A

    2009-08-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) numerical models are now widely used in predicting blood flow transients. This is because of the importance of the interaction between the flowing blood and the deforming arterial wall to blood flow behaviour. Unfortunately, most of these FSI models lack rigorous validation and, thus, cannot guarantee the accuracy of their predictions. This paper presents the comprehensive validation of a two-way coupled FSI numerical model, developed to predict flow transients in compliant conduits such as arteries. The model is validated using analytical solutions and experiments conducted on polyurethane mock artery. Flow parameters such as pressure and axial stress (and precursor) wave speeds, wall deformations and oscillating frequency, fluid velocity and Poisson coupling effects, were used as the basis of this validation. Results show very good comparison between numerical predictions, analytical solutions and experimental data. The agreement between the three approaches is generally over 95%. The model also shows accurate prediction of Poisson coupling effects in unsteady flows through flexible pipes, which up to this stage have only being predicted analytically. Therefore, this numerical model can accurately predict flow transients in compliant vessels such as arteries. PMID:19482285

  2. Transient response of an electrorheological fluid under square-wave electric field excitation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Li, Cuihong; Zhang, Minliang; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu

    2005-08-01

    The transient process of an electrorheological (ER) fluid based on zeolite and silicone oil sheared between two parallel plates to which a square-wave electric field is applied has been experimentally studied. The transient shear stress response to the strain or time is tested. The characteristic constants of time under different applied electric fields and shear rates have been determined. The response time is found to be proportional to shear rate with an exponent of about -0.75 in the tested shear rate range, which agrees with the theoretical predictions made by others. But it only shows a small dependence on the strength of the applied electric field. The results show that the transient process of ER fluids is related to the structure formation in the shearing. When the required shear strain is reached, the shear stress rises to a stable value under constant electric field. Although the electric field strength greatly affects the yield strength, it shows little effect on the stress response time. Also, experiments showed the electric field-induced shear stress decreased with an increase of shear rate. PMID:15927589

  3. Steady and transient fluid shear stress stimulate NO release in osteoblasts through distinct biochemical pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be a potent stimulus in osteoblasts and osteocytes and may therefore play an important role in load-induced bone remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of flow-activated pathways. Previously we reported that fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Here we demonstrate that flow-induced NO release is mediated by shear stress and that this response is distinctly biphasic. Transients in shear stress associated with the onset of flow stimulated a burst in NO production (8.2 nmol/mg of protein/h), while steady flow stimulated sustained NO production (2.2 nmol/mg of protein/h). Both G-protein inhibition and calcium chelation abolished the burst phase but had no effect on sustained production. Activation of G-proteins stimulated dose-dependent NO release in static cultures of both calvarial osteoblasts and UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells. Pertussis toxin had no effect on NO release. Calcium ionophore stimulated low levels of NO production within 15 minutes but had no effect on sustained production. Taken together, these data suggest that fluid shear stress stimulates NO release by two distinct pathways: a G-protein and calcium-dependent phase sensitive to flow transients, and a G-protein and calcium-independent pathway stimulated by sustained flow.

  4. Fracturing fluid high-temperature breaker for improving well performance

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, B.

    1994-05-01

    Oxidative breakers are currently being used in fracturing treatments to reduce polymeric gel damage in high-temperature reservoirs. Dissolved high-temperature oxidative breakers are very reactive at high temperatures (275 to 350 F), typically requiring less than 0.25 lbm/1,000 gal of fluid. Recent introduction of a new nonpersulfate oxidative high-temperature encapsulated breaker (HTEB) provides controlled degradation of the fracturing fluid polymers. Laboratory tests show viscosity reduction and delayed release of active oxidizer breaker. HTEB conductivity data show a two-fold increase in retained permeability at 300 F in a borate-crosslinked fluid system.

  5. Draft tube pressure pulsation predictions in Francis turbines with transient Computational Fluid Dynamics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melot, M.; Nennemann, B.; Désy, N.

    2014-03-01

    An automatic Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure that aims at predicting Draft Tube Pressure Pulsations (DTPP) at part load is presented. After a brief review of the physics involved, a description of the transient numerical setup is given. Next, the paper describes a post processing technique, namely the separation of pressure signals into synchronous, asynchronous and random pulsations. Combining the CFD calculation with the post-processing technique allows the quantification of the potential excitation of the mechanical system during the design phase. Consequently it provides the hydraulic designer with a tool to specifically target DTPP and thus helps in the development of more robust designs for part load operation of turbines.

  6. TEMPEST: A computer code for three-dimensional analysis of transient fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    TEMPEST (Transient Energy Momentum and Pressure Equations Solutions in Three dimensions) is a powerful tool for solving engineering problems in nuclear energy, waste processing, chemical processing, and environmental restoration because it analyzes and illustrates 3-D time-dependent computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer analysis. It is a family of codes with two primary versions, a N- Version (available to public) and a T-Version (not currently available to public). This handout discusses its capabilities, applications, numerical algorithms, development status, and availability and assistance.

  7. Transient shutdown analysis of low-temperature thermal diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The various thermal diodes available for use in cryogenic systems are described. Two diode types, liquid-trap and liquid-blockage diodes, were considered to be the most attractive, and thermal models were constructed to predict their behavior in the reverse mode. The diodes, which are of similar size and throughput, were also examined experimentally in a parallel test setup under nominally identical conditions. Their characteristics were ascertained in terms of forward-mode and reverse-mode conductances, shutdown times and energies, and recovery to forward-mode operation with ethane as the working fluid in the temperature range 170 K to 220 K. Results show that the liquid-blockage diode is the quicker of the two diodes to shut down from the forward mode (8 min as opposed to 10 min). However, the liquid-blockage diode has a larger reverse-mode conductance which results in a greater overall evaporator temperature rise. The importance of the relative size and heat inputs to the condenser/reservoir configuration of the liquid-blockage diode and the evaporator trap configuration for the liquid-trap diode are demonstrated. Also included are data which show the susceptibility of the diodes to recovery to forward-mode operation. Guidelines for the choice of a particular diode for an actual application are given.

  8. Transient electrokinetic response of finely layered, fluid-filled porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, M.; Delprat-Jannaud, F.; Garambois, S.

    2012-04-01

    Transient electrokinetic coupling phenomena created at the microscopic scale by the passage of seismic waves through fluid-saturated porous media generate conversions between seismic and electromagnetic (EM) energy which can be observed at the macroscopic scale. Far from being a mere scientific curiosity, transient seismoelectric or electroseismic phenomena are especially appealing to oil and gas exploration and hydrogeology as they open up the (fairly unique) possibility to characterize fluid-bearing geological formations with the resolution of seismic methods. Indeed, electrokinetic effects are likely to reconcile the sensitivity of electromagnetic exploration methods to fluids with the high resolving power of seismic prospecting techniques for structural imaging, thus naturally bridging the gap between these two important geophysical investigation means. Accounting for the electromagnetic dimension of the seismic wave propagation, or conversely, accounting for the seismic dimension of electromagnetic wave propagation gives new insights into the microstructure and physico-chemistry of fluid-filled porous or fractured media. We present full-waveform simulations of the coupled seismoelectromagnetic wave propagation in fluid-saturated, finely stratified porous media of interest to oil and gas exploration. Our simulation code uses the macroscopic governing equations derived by Pride [1994], which couple Biot's theory and Maxwell equations via flux/force transport equations. The synthetic seismoelectrograms and seismomagnetrograms are computed by extending the generalized reflection and transmission matrix method and by using a discrete wave number integration of the global reflectivity obtained in the frequency wave number domain. The theoretical signals clearly display the coseismic electric and magnetic fields travelling with the seismic disturbances as well as the seismic-to-electromagnetic conversions taking place at contrasts in solid and fluid properties. Our

  9. WHTSubmersible: a simulator for estimating transient circulation temperature in offshore wells with the semi-submersible platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xun-cheng; Liu, Yong-wang; Guan, Zhi-chuan

    2015-10-01

    Offshore wellbore temperature field is significant to drilling fluids program, equipment selection, evaluations on potential risks caused by casing thermal stress, etc. This paper mainly describes the theoretical basis, module structure and field verification of the simulator WHTSubmersible. This computer program is a useful tool for estimating transient temperature distribution of circulating drilling fluid on semi-submersible platform. WHTSubmersible is based on a mathematical model which is developed to consider radial and axial two-dimensional heat exchange of the inner drill pipe, the annulus, the drill pipe wall, the sea water and the formation in the process of drilling fluid circulation. The solution of the discrete equations is based on finite volume method with an implicit scheme. This scheme serves to demonstrate the numerical solution procedure. Besides, the simulator also considers the heating generated by drilling fluid circulation friction, drill bit penetrating rocks, friction between the drill column and the borehole wall, and the temperature effect on thermal physical properties and rheology of the drilling fluid. These measures ensure more accurate results. The simulator has been programmed as a dynamic link library using Visual C++, the routine interface is simple, which can be connected with other computer programs conveniently. The simulator is validated with an actual well temperature filed developed on a semi-submersible platform in South China, and the error is less than 5 %.

  10. Thermo-Physical Properties of Intermediate Temperature Heat Pipe Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Duane E. (Technical Monitor); Devarakonda, Angirasa; Anderson, William G.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. The paper reports further evaluation of potential heat pipe fluids in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to 700 K in continuation of two recent reports. More thermo-physical property data are examined. Organic, inorganic, and elemental substances are considered. The evaluation of surface tension and other fluid properties are examined. Halides are evaluated as potential heat pipe fluids. Reliable data are not available for all fluids and further database development is necessary. Many of the fluids considered are promising candidates as heat pipe fluids. Water is promising as a heat pipe fluid up to 500 to 550 K. Life test data for thermo-chemical compatibility are almost non-existent.

  11. Volume and density changes of biological fluids with temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal expansion of human blood, plasma, ultrafiltrate, and erythrocycte concentration at temperatures in the range of 4-48 C is studied. The mechanical oscillator technique which has an accuracy of 1 x 10 to the -5 th g/ml is utilized to measure fluid density. The relationship between thermal expansion, density, and temperature is analyzed. The study reveals that: (1) thermal expansion increases with increasing temperature; (2) the magnitude of the increase declines with increasing temperature; (3) thermal expansion increases with density at temperatures below 40 C; and (4) the thermal expansion of intracellular fluid is greater than that of extracellular fluid in the temperature range of 4-10 C, but it is equal at temperatures greater than or equal to 40 C.

  12. A numerical solver for high dimensional transient Fokker-Planck equation in modeling polymeric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yifei; Kumar, Mrinal

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a tensor decomposition approach combined with Chebyshev spectral differentiation is presented to solve the high dimensional transient Fokker-Planck equations (FPE) arising in the simulation of polymeric fluids via multi-bead-spring (MBS) model. Generalizing the authors' previous work on the stationary FPE, the transient solution is obtained in a single CANDECOMP/PARAFAC decomposition (CPD) form for all times via the alternating least squares algorithm. This is accomplished by treating the temporal dimension in the same manner as all other spatial dimensions, thereby decoupling it from them. As a result, the transient solution is obtained without resorting to expensive time stepping schemes. A new, relaxed approach for imposing the vanishing boundary conditions is proposed, improving the quality of the approximation. The asymptotic behavior of the temporal basis functions is studied. The proposed solver scales very well with the dimensionality of the MBS model. Numerical results for systems up to 14 dimensional state space are successfully obtained on a regular personal computer and compared with the corresponding matrix Riccati differential equation (for linear models) or Monte Carlo simulations (for nonlinear models).

  13. [Testing Research of Transient Temperature Distribution for the Barrel Surface by Speckle Pattern Interferometry].

    PubMed

    Lang, Wen-jie; Chen, Guo-guang; Tian, Xiao-li; Xin, Chang-fan

    2016-02-01

    There are some problems in the traditional transient temperature test equipment. The thermal inertia is great, and can only be a single point of detection. To be able to achieve real-time monitoring for transient temperature distribution change of the gun body surface, the test system for transient temperature distribution was designed based on Speckle Pattern Interferometry (SPI) and spectroscopy. In the system, transient temperature change of the barrel led to slight deformation, and it was converted into speckle interference fringes by SPI technology. Spectral distribution function was obtained by the interference fringes by the Fourier transform, so the information of interference fringe deformation was incorporated into the frequency domain. The data of temperature distribution can be inverted on any sampling time by spectral distribution function. In experiments, the ZX-FB1 fiber optic thermometer was used to test transient temperature on a single point as the standard value. The center wavelength of the laser was 555 nm, and the speckle pattern interference fringes were collected by area array CCD. Image Recognition-Speckle Pattern Interferometry (IR-SPI) and Fourier Transform-Speckle Pattern Interferometry (FT-SPI) were used in experiments, the calculation of transient temperature was completed through two methods. Experimental results are that both methods can achieve transient temperature detection. But the FT-SPI is higher in terms of accuracy, and it can effectively overcome the gross error caused by the surface defects, paint wear and other similar problems. PMID:27209730

  14. Effect of temperature on rotational viscosity in magnetic nano fluids.

    PubMed

    Patel, R

    2012-10-01

    Flow behavior of magnetic nano fluids with simultaneous effect of magnetic field and temperature is important for its application for cooling devices such as transformer, loud speakers, electronic cooling and for its efficiency in targeted drug delivery and hyperthermia treatment. Using a specially designed horizontal capillary viscometer, temperature-sensitive and non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids are studied. In both these case the temperature-dependent rotational viscosity decreases, but follows a quite different mechanism. For temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, the reduction in rotational viscosity is due to the temperature dependence of magnetization. Curie temperature ((T)(c)) and pyromagnetic coefficient are extracted from the study. A fluid with low T(c) and high pyromagnetic coefficient is useful for thermo-sensitive cooling devices and magnetic hyperthermia. For non-temperature-sensitive magnetic nano fluids, reduction in rotational viscosity is due to removal of physisorbed secondary surfactant on the particle because of thermal and frictional effects. This can be a good analogy for removal of drug from the magnetic particles in the case of targeted drug delivery. PMID:23096152

  15. Temperature dependence of fluid transport in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Wang, Binglei; Park, Taehyo; Qiao, Yu; Zhou, Qulan; Chen, Xi

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the temperature-dependent nanofluidic transport behavior is critical for developing thermomechanical nanodevices. By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the thermally responsive transport resistance of liquids in model carbon nanotubes is explored as a function of the nanopore size, the transport rate, and the liquid properties. Both the effective shear stress and the nominal viscosity decrease with the increase of temperature, and the temperature effect is coupled with other non-thermal factors. The molecular-level mechanisms are revealed through the study of the radial density profile and hydrogen bonding of confined liquid molecules. The findings are verified qualitatively with an experiment on nanoporous carbon.

  16. Streptococcus mutans biofilm transient viscoelastic fluid behaviour during high-velocity microsprays.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, S; Johnston, D A; Rmaile, A; Gottenbos, B; De Jager, M; Aspiras, M; Starke, E M; Ward, M T; Stoodley, P

    2016-06-01

    Using high-speed imaging we assessed Streptococcus mutans biofilm-fluid interactions during exposure to a 60-ms microspray burst with a maximum exit velocity of 51m/s. S. mutans UA159 biofilms were grown for 72h on 10mm-length glass slides pre-conditioned with porcine gastric mucin. Biofilm stiffness was measured by performing uniaxial-compression tests. We developed an in-vitro interproximal model which allowed the parallel insertion of two biofilm-colonized slides separated by a distance of 1mm and enabled high-speed imaging of the removal process at the surface. S. mutans biofilms were exposed to either a water microspray or an air-only microburst. High-speed videos provided further insight into the mechanical behaviour of biofilms as complex liquids and into high-shear fluid-biofilm interaction. We documented biofilms extremely transient fluid behaviour when exposed to the high-velocity microsprays. The presence of time-dependent recoil and residual deformation confirmed the pivotal role of viscoelasticity in biofilm removal. The air-only microburst was effective enough to remove some of the biofilm but created a smaller clearance zone underlying the importance of water and the air-water interface of drops moving over the solid surface in the removal process. Confocal and COMSTAT analysis showed the high-velocity water microspray caused up to a 99.9% reduction in biofilm thickness, biomass and area coverage, within the impact area. PMID:26771168

  17. Temperature dependence of particle-particle interactions in electrorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Foulc, J.-N.

    2000-04-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of particle-particle interactions in electrorheological (ER) fluids for the temperature range 20-100 °C. The attraction force between polyamide spheres immersed in silicone oil is measured as a function of temperature. The force-temperature characteristic shows a broad maximum around 40 °C, corresponding to an increase of about 30% compared to the force measured at room temperature. In view of these results we proposed that the temperature dependence of the shear stress in ER fluids is directly related to the variation of the local particle-particle attraction forces. Data are discussed in light of models which were proposed in the literature to describe particle-particle interactions. At high electric fields "conduction models" could explain the observed temperature dependence through the variations of the oil breakdown field with temperature. However, limitations of such models are also clearly evidenced by data obtained at low electric fields.

  18. Fluids at high dynamic pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Hamilton, D.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Radousky, H.B.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.

    1985-06-01

    Electrical conductivity data for shocked liquid nitrogen, Hugoniot data for liquid air, shock temperatures for liquid ammonia, and double-shock equation-of-state data for Al are discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Hydrostatic fluid bearing gyro. [temperature control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brello, E. Y.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing are described of a thermal control assembly capable of precisely controlling the LDG-540 Gyro case temperature at 50 C over an ambient environment range of 23 C and atmosphere pressure to 5 C and a vacuum of 0.00001 torr. The thermal control assembly is a hermetically sealed enclosure about the LDG-540 Gyro with envelope dimensions not to exceed those of the Saturn K8-AB5 Gyro. The heaters are capable of delivery 30 watts at 28 V.D.C. and have dual temperature sensors rated at 750 ohms at 50 C. All six (6) LGD-540 Gyros will be equipped with a fine control heater and a resistance thermometer to monitor the gyro cast temperature. All six gyros will be interchangeable in the thermal control assembly by means of simply assembly techniques.

  20. Adiabatic Compression of Oxygen: Real Fluid Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    The adiabatic compression of oxygen has been identified as an ignition source for systems operating in enriched oxygen atmospheres. Current practice is to evaluate the temperature rise on compression by treating oxygen as an ideal gas with constant heat capacity. This paper establishes the appropriate thermodynamic analysis for the common occurrence of adiabatic compression of oxygen and in the process defines a satisfactory equation of state (EOS) for oxygen. It uses that EOS to model adiabatic compression as isentropic compression and calculates final temperatures for this system using current approaches for comparison.

  1. Fluid-temperature logs for selected wells in eastern Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, K.L.; Widness, S.

    1983-12-01

    This Open-File Report consists of fluid temperature logs compiled during studies of the geohydrology and low temperature geothermal resources of eastern Washington. The fluid temperature logs are divided into two groups. Part A consists of wells which are concentrated in the Moses Lake-Ritzville-Connell area. Full geophysical log suites for many of these wells are presented in Stoffel and Widness (1983) and discussed in Widness (1983, 1984). Part B consists of wells outside of the Moses Lake-Ritzville-Connell study area.

  2. Transient elasticity and the rheology of polymeric fluids with large amplitude deformations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Oliver; Liu, Mario; Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R

    2016-02-01

    Transient elasticity is a systematic generalization of viscoelasticity. Its purpose is to give a coherent description of non-Newtonian effects displayed by soft-matter systems, especially polymer melts and solutions. Using the concept of transient elasticity we describe here a hydrodynamic model for polymeric fluids, which is applicable for large amplitude deformations. We present an energy density with only two independent parameters, which is compatible with all thermodynamic requirements and which reduces for small deformations to models studied previously. The expression discussed is simple enough to allow full analytic treatment and shows semiquantitative agreement with experimental data. This model is used to capture many of the interesting effects thought to be characteristic of polymer rheology for large deformations including viscosity overshoot near the onset of shear flow, the onset of elongational flows in situations for which there is no stationary solution as well as shear thinning and normal stress differences for a large range of shear rates. In addition, we analyze how well our model accounts for empirical relations including the Cox-Merz rule, the Yamamoto relation, and Gleißle's mirror relations. PMID:26986420

  3. Transient elasticity and the rheology of polymeric fluids with large amplitude deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Oliver; Liu, Mario; Pleiner, Harald; Brand, Helmut R.

    2016-02-01

    Transient elasticity is a systematic generalization of viscoelasticity. Its purpose is to give a coherent description of non-Newtonian effects displayed by soft-matter systems, especially polymer melts and solutions. Using the concept of transient elasticity we describe here a hydrodynamic model for polymeric fluids, which is applicable for large amplitude deformations. We present an energy density with only two independent parameters, which is compatible with all thermodynamic requirements and which reduces for small deformations to models studied previously. The expression discussed is simple enough to allow full analytic treatment and shows semiquantitative agreement with experimental data. This model is used to capture many of the interesting effects thought to be characteristic of polymer rheology for large deformations including viscosity overshoot near the onset of shear flow, the onset of elongational flows in situations for which there is no stationary solution as well as shear thinning and normal stress differences for a large range of shear rates. In addition, we analyze how well our model accounts for empirical relations including the Cox-Merz rule, the Yamamoto relation, and Gleißle's mirror relations.

  4. Nonvolcanic Tremors and Intraslab Fluid Migration in Guerrero, Mexico, During Slow Slip Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Husker, A. L.; Villafuerte, C. D.; Caballero, E.; Legrand, D.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2014-12-01

    migration speeds. We conclude that fluid diffusive transport is not responsible of the NVT and LFE migration during the SSEs but instead that slip transients act as a long-term pumping process decreasing the effective pressure where the seismicity takes place as a consequence of small stress perturbations associated to the propagation of the aseismic slip.

  5. Extended Vofire algorithm for fast transient fluid-structure dynamics with liquid-gas flows and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, Vincent; Kokh, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    The present paper is dedicated to the simulation of liquid-gas flows with interfaces in the framework of fast transient fluid-structure dynamics. The two-fluid interface is modelled as a discontinuity surface in the fluid property. We use an anti-dissipative Finite-Volume discretization strategy for unstructured meshes in order to capture the position of the interface within a thin diffused volume. This allows to control the numerical diffusion of the artificial mixing between components and provide an accurate capture of complex interface motions. This scheme is an extension of the Vofire numerical solver. We propose specific developments in order to handle flows that involved high density ratio between liquid and gas. The resulting scheme capabilities are validated on basic examples and also tested against large scale fluid-structure test derived from the MARA 10 experiment. All simulations are performed using EUROPLEXUS fast transient dynamics software.

  6. Bond homolysis in high-temperature fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, S.E.; Robaugh, D.A.; Alfieri, A.D.; Miller, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    Rate constants for the homolysis of 1,2-diphenylethane have been determined in tetralin, in dodecahydrotriphenylene, and in the gas phase at temperatures above 350/sup 0/C. The least-squares-derived Arrhenius expression for this reaction in the gas phase is k/sub 1//s/sup -1/ = 10/sup (15.25+-0.15)-(62.31+-0.50)/theta (theta = 0.004576T/K) and is consistent with available thermokinetic data. In liquid tetralin up to its critical temperature and in liquid dodecahydrotriphenylene Arrhenius parameters for this reaction were found to be distinctly higher than gas-phase values, and rate constants to be somewhat lower. These differences between gas- and liquid-phase kinetics are attributed to recombination of nascent free radicals in solution (the cage effect), the probability of which decreases with decreasing viscosity.

  7. Convective heat transfer to low-temperature fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Research into forced and natural convection processes in low-temperature (cryogenic) fluids is reviewed with primary emphasis on forced convection. Boundaries of the near-critical region are defined, fluid properties near the critical state are discussed, and heat-transfer processes around the critical point are described. The thermodynamics of the critical point is analyzed together with transport properties of a near-critical fluid, and the quantum states of low-temperature molecular hydrogen (para and ortho) are discussed. Experimental work on heat transfer in free, natural, and forced convection systems is briefly summarized. Graham's (1969) penetration model for near-critical fluids is outlined, near-critical heat transfer is discussed in relation to conventional geometric effects, and the effects of curvature on the properties of near-critical hydrogen are noted. Theoretical considerations in free and forced convection are examined.

  8. On the Ginzburg temperature of ionic and dipolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, V. C.; Schröer, W.

    1997-02-01

    Critical fluctuations in fluids are investigated within the framework of the generalized van der Waals theory. The square-gradient term—added to the Landau expansion of the Helmholtz free energy density—is obtained following a procedure similar to that originally proposed by van der Waals in the theory of surface tension, however replacing the Heaviside step function originally used by an approximative pair distribution function. Representative for ionic fluids we choose the restricted primitive model (RPM) and treat it within the Debye-Hückel theory, thus neglecting effects of ion pairing. The other approximative extreme—complete ion pairing resulting in a fluid of hard dipolar dumbbells—is mimicked by a fluid composed of dipolar hard spheres (DHS). For this case we use the Onsager reaction field and the second pressure virial coefficient. We calculate the amplitudes of the correlation length and the Ginzburg temperatures, and find (in reduced quantities) ξ0*=3.50 and ΔTGi*=0.0087 for the ionic system, and ξ0*=0.82 and ΔTGi*=1.63 for the dipolar fluid. For calibration we compute the same quantities for simple neutral fluids and obtain ξ0*=0.50 and ΔTGi*=2.89 for a Sutherland fluid (hard core term plus attractive r-6-potential) and ξ0*=0.43 and ΔTGi*=8.50 for a square-well fluid. The result of a smaller Ginzburg temperature for the ionic fluid than for nonionic fluids in a treatment that neglects ion pairing is clearly at variance with the results of other groups. The correlation length in the low-density limit obtained from our approach has the same functional dependencies as the Lee-Fisher expression, but differs by a numerical factor of 5.7.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy in high temperature dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in conjunction with a two-stage light-gas gun has been used to obtain vibrational spectra of shock-compressed liquid N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and their mixtures, as well as liquid N{sub 2}O. The experimental spectra are compared to spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities to obtain vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and linewidths. The derived spectroscopic parameters suggest thermal equilibrium of the vibrational populations is established in less than a few nanoseconds after shock passage. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations. The variation of the vibrational frequency shift at pressure with species concentration in mixtures is investigated.

  10. Effect of Non-Uniform Inlet Temperature on Flow Stagnation in a Pumped Fluid Tube Radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reavis, Gretchen

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a non-uniform inlet temperature on the panel fluid tube flow stagnation point is examined using a spacecraft radiator panel model with 20 fluid tubes constructed in Thermal Desktop®. Fluid temperature variations due to panel edge effect and localized hot and cold spots in the flow path were simulated by varying the fluid inlet temperature on one or more tubes. Results show that a large fluid inlet temperature difference between tubes can decrease the fluid system stability and increase the possibility of fluid stagnation with the coldest fluid tube initiating stagnation. Conversely, a small fluid inlet temperature difference between tubes can, in some cases, increase the fluid system stability and decrease the possibility of fluid stagnation. A uniform fluid inlet temperature provides for a near optimization of the stagnation point as compared to fluid temperature gradients across the panel.

  11. Controllable Fluids:. the Temperature Dependence of Post-Yield Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Keith D.; Duclos, Theodore G.

    This paper represents the first detailed description of the affect of temperature on the properties exhibited by state-of-the-art electrorheological (ER) and magnetorheological (MR) fluids. In particular, shear stress versus shear strain rate curves, dynamic and static yield stress values, zero-field viscosity data, and current density measurements are discussed. Specific comments concerning the stability of both mechanical and electrical properties over broad temperature ranges are provided. Finally, insight into the advantages associated with using electrorheological and magnetorheological fluids in a controllable device is provided.

  12. Numerical simulation on influence of bonding temperature in transient liquid phase bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Raja, M. Karthick

    2016-05-01

    In this article, numerical simulation of transient liquid phase bonding of ceramic/metal joint has been carried out by using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software. To increase the wettability, aluminium sheet was used as an interlayer. Hence, numerical simulation of TLP bonding process is done by varying the bonding temperature. Transient thermal analysis had been carried out for each cases and temperature distribution was predicted by the developed numerical model. From the simulation studies, it is found that the decrease in bonding temperature enhances favourable temperature distribution and eventually improves the joint efficiency of graphite/copper joints.

  13. Measurements of seismic attenuation and transient fluid pressure in partially saturated Berea sandstone: evidence of fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz

    2013-10-01

    A novel laboratory technique is proposed to investigate wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale as a mechanism for seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks. This technique combines measurements of seismic attenuation in the frequency range from 1 to 100 Hz with measurements of transient fluid pressure as a response of a step stress applied on top of the sample. We used a Berea sandstone sample partially saturated with water. The laboratory results suggest that wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale is dominant in partially saturated samples. A 3-D numerical model representing the sample was used to verify the experimental results. Biot's equations of consolidation were solved with the finite-element method. Wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale was the only attenuation mechanism accounted for in the numerical solution. The numerically calculated transient fluid pressure reproduced the laboratory data. Moreover, the numerically calculated attenuation, superposed to the frequency-independent matrix anelasticity, reproduced the attenuation measured in the laboratory in the partially saturated sample. This experimental-numerical fit demonstrates that wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale and matrix anelasticity are the dominant mechanisms for seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone.

  14. Modeling and analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo- hydrodynamic events using computational fluid dynamics and high performance computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.; Froehle, P.; Wang, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2004-01-01

    This work has explored the preliminary design of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool for the analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events using high performance computing platforms. The goal of this tool will be to extend the capabilities of an existing established CFD code, STAR-CD, allowing the car manufacturers to analyze the impact of transient operational events on the underhood thermal management by exploiting the computational efficiency of modern high performance computing systems. In particular, the project has focused on the CFD modeling of the radiator behavior during a specified transient. The 3-D radiator calculations were performed using STAR-CD, which can perform both steady-state and transient calculations, on the cluster computer available at ANL in the Nuclear Engineering Division. Specified transient boundary conditions, based on experimental data provided by Adapco and DaimlerChrysler were used. The possibility of using STAR-CD in a transient mode for the entire period of time analyzed has been compared with other strategies which involve the use of STAR-CD in a steady-state mode at specified time intervals, while transient heat transfer calculations would be performed for the rest of the time. The results of these calculations have been compared with the experimental data provided by Adapco/DaimlerChrysler and recommendations for future development of an optimal strategy for the CFD modeling of transient thermo-hydrodynamic events have been made. The results of this work open the way for the development of a CFD tool for the transient analysis of underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events, which will allow the integrated transient thermal analysis of the entire cooling system, including both the engine block and the radiator, on high performance computing systems.

  15. Modeling and analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo - hydrodynamic events using computational fluid dynamics and high performance computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Froehle, P.; Tentner, A.; Wang, C.

    2003-09-05

    This work has explored the preliminary design of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool for the analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events using high performance computing platforms. The goal of this tool will be to extend the capabilities of an existing established CFD code, STAR-CD, allowing the car manufacturers to analyze the impact of transient operational events on the underhood thermal management by exploiting the computational efficiency of modern high performance computing systems. In particular, the project has focused on the CFD modeling of the radiator behavior during a specified transient. The 3-D radiator calculations were performed using STAR-CD, which can perform both steady-state and transient calculations, on the cluster computer available at ANL in the Nuclear Engineering Division. Specified transient boundary conditions, based on experimental data provided by Adapco and DaimlerChrysler were used. The possibility of using STAR-CD in a transient mode for the entire period of time analyzed has been compared with other strategies which involve the use of STAR-CD in a steady-state mode at specified time intervals, while transient heat transfer calculations would be performed for the rest of the time. The results of these calculations have been compared with the experimental data provided by Adapco/DaimlerChrysler and recommendations for future development of an optimal strategy for the CFD modeling of transient thermo-hydrodynamic events have been made. The results of this work open the way for the development of a CFD tool for the transient analysis of underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events, which will allow the integrated transient thermal analysis of the entire cooling system, including both the engine block and the radiator, on high performance computing systems.

  16. Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures in a research engine for gas stream temperatures cycling between 1067 and 1567 k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, D. J.; Yeh, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures were obtained from tests conducted on air-cooled blades in a research turbojet engine, cycling between cruise and idle conditions. Transient data were recorded by a high speed data acquisition system. Temperatures at the same phase of each transient cycle were repeatable between cycles to within 3.9 K (7 F). Turbine inlet pressures were repeatable between cycles to within 0.32 N/sq cm (0.47 psia). The tests were conducted at a gas stream temperature of 1567 K (2360 F) at cruise, and 1067 K (1460 F) at idle conditions. The corresponding gas stream pressures were about 26.2 and 22.4 N/sq cm (38 and 32.5 psia) respectively. The nominal coolant inlet temperature was about 811 K (1000 F).

  17. Measuring transient high temperature thermal phenomena in hostile environment

    SciTech Connect

    Brenden, B.B.; Hartman, J.S.; Reich, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    The design of equipment for measuring temperature and strain in a rapidly heated and pressurized cylinder of stainless steel is discussed. Simultaneous cinematography of the full circumference of the cylinder without interference with temperature and strain measurements is also illustrated. The integrated system uses a reflective chamber for the sample and requires careful consideration of the spectral energy distribution utilized by each instrument.

  18. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  19. Properties of planetary fluids at high shock pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.; McCandless, P.C.

    1991-03-01

    Models of the interiors of Uranus and Neptune are discussed. Pressures and temperatures in the interiors can be achieved in representative constituent molecular fluids by shock compression. Experimental techniques are described and recent results for synthetic Uranus and hydrogen are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Transient solid-fluid interactions in rat brain tissue under combined translational shear and fixed compression.

    PubMed

    Haslach, Henry W; Leahy, Lauren N; Hsieh, Adam H

    2015-08-01

    An external mechanical insult to the brain may create internal deformation waves, which have shear and longitudinal components that induce combined shear and compression of the brain tissue. To isolate such interactions and to investigate the role of the extracellular fluid (ECF) in the transient mechanical response, translational shear stretch up to 1.25 under either 0 or 33% fixed normal compression is applied without preconditioning to heterogeneous sagittal slices which are nearly the full length of the rat brain cerebrum. The normal stress contribution is estimated by separate unconfined compression stress-stretch curves at 0.0667/s and 1/s engineering strain rates to 33% strain. Unconfined compression deformation causes lateral dimension expansion less than that predicted for an incompressible material under large deformation and often a visible loss of internal fluid from the specimen so that the bulk brain tissue is not incompressible in vitro, as sometimes assumed for mathematical modeling. The response to both slow 0.001/s and moderate 1/s shear translational stretch rates is deformation rate dependent and hardening under no compression but under 33% compression is nearly linear perhaps because of increased solid-solid friction. Both shear and normal stress relaxation are faster after the fast rate deformation possibly because higher deformation rates produce higher ECF hydrostatic pressure that primarily drives stress relaxation. The experimental results on ECF behavior guide the form of our nonlinear viscoelastic mathematical model. Our data are closely fit by non-equilibrium evolution equations that involve at most three specimen-specific empirical parameters and that are based on the idea that stretch of axons and glial processes resists load-induced ECF pressure. PMID:25913604

  1. Evidence that transient changes in sudomotor output with cold and warm fluid ingestion are independently modulated by abdominal, but not oral thermoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nathan B.; Bain, Anthony R.; Cramer, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Two studies were performed to 1) characterize changes in local sweat rate (LSR) following fluid ingestion of different temperatures during exercise, and 2) identify the potential location of thermoreceptors along the gastrointestinal tract that independently modify sudomotor activity. In study 1, 12 men cycled at 50% V̇o2peak for 75 min while ingesting 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C, 37°C, or 50°C fluid 5 min before exercise; and after 15, 30, and 45-min of exercise. In study 2, 8 men cycled at 50% V̇o2peak for 75 min while 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C or 50°C fluid was delivered directly into the stomach via a nasogastric tube (NG trials) or was mouth-swilled only (SW trials) after 15, 30, and 45 min of exercise. Rectal (Tre), aural canal (Tau), and mean skin temperature (Tsk); and LSR on the forehead, upper-back, and forearm were measured. In study 1, Tre, Tau, and Tsk were identical between trials, but after each ingestion, LSR was significantly suppressed at all sites with 1.5°C fluid and was elevated with 50°C fluid compared with 37°C fluid (P < 0.001). The peak difference in mean LSR between 1.5°C and 50°C fluid after ingestion was 0.29 ± 0.06 mg·min−1·cm−2. In study 2, LSR was similar between 1.5°C and 50°C fluids with SW trials (P = 0.738), but lower at all sites with 1.5°C fluid in NG trials (P < 0.001) despite no concurrent differences in Tre, Tau, and Tsk. These data demonstrate that 1) LSR is transiently altered by cold and warm fluid ingestion despite similar core and skin temperatures; and 2) thermoreceptors that independently and acutely modulate sudomotor output during fluid ingestion probably reside within the abdominal area, but not the mouth. PMID:24577060

  2. High vacuum measurements and calibrations, molecular flow fluid transient effects

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Gavalas, Nickolas A.

    2015-04-29

    High vacuum pressure measurements and calibrations below 1 × 10-8 Torr are problematic. Specifically, measurement accuracies change drastically for vacuum gauges when pressures are suddenly lowered in vacuum systems. How can gauges perform like this? A brief system description is first required to answer this question. Calibrations were performed using a vacuum calibration chamber with attached vacuum gauges. To control chamber pressures, vacuum pumps decreased the chamber pressure while nitrogen tanks increased the chamber pressure. By balancing these opposing pressures, equilibrium in the chamber was maintained at selected set point pressures to perform calibrations. When pressures were suddenly decreased during set point adjustments, a sudden rush of gas from the chamber also caused a surge of gas from the gauges to decrease the pressures in those gauges. Gauge pressures did not return to equilibrium as fast as chamber pressures due to the sparse distribution of gas molecules in the system. This disparity in the rate of pressure changes caused the pressures in different gauges to be different than expected. This discovery was experimentally proven to show that different gauge designs return to equilibrium at different rates, and that gauge accuracies vary for different gauge designs due to fluid transients in molecular flow.

  3. Transient Dynamic Response and Failure of Sandwich Composite Structures under Impact Loading with Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y. W.; Violette, M. A.; McCrillis, R. D.; Didoszak, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) effect on transient dynamic response and failure of sandwich composite structures under impact loading. The primary sandwich composite used in this study consisted of a 6.35 mm balsa core and a multi-ply symmetrical plain weave 6 oz E-glass skin. Both clamped sandwich composite plates and beams were studied using a uniquely designed vertical drop-weight testing machine. There were three impact conditions on which these experiments focused. The first of these conditions was completely dry (or air surrounded) testing. The second condition was completely water submerged. The final condition was also a water submerged test with air support at the backside of the plates. The tests were conducted sequentially, progressing from a low to high drop height to determine the onset and spread of damage to the sandwich composite when impacted with the test machine. The study showed the FSI effect on sandwich composite structures is very critical such that impact force, strain response, and damage size are generally much greater with FSI under the same impact condition. As a result, damage initiates at much lower impact energy conditions with the effect of FSI. Neglecting to account for FSI effects on sandwich composite structures results in very non-conservative analysis and design. Additionally, it was observed that the damage location changed for sandwich composite beams with the effect of FSI.

  4. High vacuum measurements and calibrations, molecular flow fluid transient effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leishear, Robert A.; Gavalas, Nickolas A.

    2015-04-29

    High vacuum pressure measurements and calibrations below 1 × 10-8 Torr are problematic. Specifically, measurement accuracies change drastically for vacuum gauges when pressures are suddenly lowered in vacuum systems. How can gauges perform like this? A brief system description is first required to answer this question. Calibrations were performed using a vacuum calibration chamber with attached vacuum gauges. To control chamber pressures, vacuum pumps decreased the chamber pressure while nitrogen tanks increased the chamber pressure. By balancing these opposing pressures, equilibrium in the chamber was maintained at selected set point pressures to perform calibrations. When pressures were suddenly decreased duringmore » set point adjustments, a sudden rush of gas from the chamber also caused a surge of gas from the gauges to decrease the pressures in those gauges. Gauge pressures did not return to equilibrium as fast as chamber pressures due to the sparse distribution of gas molecules in the system. This disparity in the rate of pressure changes caused the pressures in different gauges to be different than expected. This discovery was experimentally proven to show that different gauge designs return to equilibrium at different rates, and that gauge accuracies vary for different gauge designs due to fluid transients in molecular flow.« less

  5. Measurement of transient surface temperatures during rubbing using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Tau; Yu, Jianwei; Yu, Xiaofen

    2013-10-01

    Infrared thermometer could provide IR radiance information to get the corresponding temperature as the machine is working. But the emissivity coefficient, which converts IR radiance to temperature, would vary with change of surface properties during rubbing, and this would bring dynamic error in measurement. In this study, we introduced a special tester, in the side of which compact IR thermometer are mounted. The thermometer enables us to measure contact surface temperature directly during tests of a rotating ring and a flat block which had a laser diode fixed under its contact surface. Based on Kirchhoff theory, the calculate model of the spectral emissivity is constructed. The normal emissivity at target region are measured through trigonometric ray consisted of InGaAsP laser source, PbSe detector and objective surface. So the temperature value from the IR thermometer could be corrected dynamically according to the real-time emissivity. The structure and the principle of the apparatus are described. The key technologies and the corresponding solution methods are briefly discussed. The error due to the rapid variations of emissivity value with change in contact conditions was shown, and it must be taken into consideration in radiometric temperature measurement in rubbing and could be especially useful in the verification of friction surface temperature predictions.

  6. Computer program simplifies transient and steady-state temperature prediction for complex body shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giebler, K. N.

    1966-01-01

    Computer program evaluates heat transfer modes and calculates either the transient or steady-state temperature distributions throughout an object of complex shape when heat sources are applied to specified points on the object. It uses an electrothermal model to simulate the conductance, heat capacity, and temperature potential of the object.

  7. Surface temperature transients from pulsed laser heating of UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagnik, S. K.; Olander, D. R.

    1988-07-01

    Surface heating of UO 2 by a pulsed laser was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Targets of solid uranium dioxide in vacuum were rapidly heated to peak temperatures of 3700 K, as measured by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The measured target surface temperatures were compared with a one-dimensional heat transport model that accounts for conduction and melting in the solid and ablation and radiation from the surface. Congruent vaporization of UO 2 was assumed. The measured temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam as well as temperature-dependent physical and thermodynamic properties of UO 2 are used as input to the calculations. Agreement of the theory with the measurements was further validated by post-irradiation microscopic examination of the target surface. Additional tests were performed to assess qualitatively the attenuation of laser light and thermal radiation from the surface by the vapor blow-off from the target. This effect was found to be insignificant.

  8. Transient temperature and mixing times of quantum walks on cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Nicolás; Donangelo, Raul; Portugal, Renato; Romanelli, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The definition of entanglement temperature for a quantum walk on a line is extended to N cycles, which are more amenable to a physical implementation. We show that, for these systems, there is a linear connection between the thermalization time and the mixing time and, also, that these characteristic times become insensitive to the system size when N is larger than a few units.

  9. Application of computational fluid dynamics and fluid structure interaction techniques for calculating the 3D transient flow of journal bearings coupled with rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Guichang; Liu, Shulian; Zheng, Shuiying

    2012-09-01

    Journal bearings are important parts to keep the high dynamic performance of rotor machinery. Some methods have already been proposed to analysis the flow field of journal bearings, and in most of these methods simplified physical model and classic Reynolds equation are always applied. While the application of the general computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-fluid structure interaction (FSI) techniques is more beneficial for analysis of the fluid field in a journal bearing when more detailed solutions are needed. This paper deals with the quasi-coupling calculation of transient fluid dynamics of oil film in journal bearings and rotor dynamics with CFD-FSI techniques. The fluid dynamics of oil film is calculated by applying the so-called "dynamic mesh" technique. A new mesh movement approach is presented while the dynamic mesh models provided by FLUENT are not suitable for the transient oil flow in journal bearings. The proposed mesh movement approach is based on the structured mesh. When the journal moves, the movement distance of every grid in the flow field of bearing can be calculated, and then the update of the volume mesh can be handled automatically by user defined function (UDF). The journal displacement at each time step is obtained by solving the moving equations of the rotor-bearing system under the known oil film force condition. A case study is carried out to calculate the locus of the journal center and pressure distribution of the journal in order to prove the feasibility of this method. The calculating results indicate that the proposed method can predict the transient flow field of a journal bearing in a rotor-bearing system where more realistic models are involved. The presented calculation method provides a basis for studying the nonlinear dynamic behavior of a general rotor-bearing system.

  10. Feasibility Assessment of Thermal Barrier Seals for Extreme Transient Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The assembly joints of modem solid rocket motor cases are generally sealed using conventional O-ring type seals. The 5500+ F combustion gases produced by rocket motors are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic insulation. Special compounds are used to fill insulation gaps leading up to the seals to prevent a direct flowpath to them. Design criteria require that the seals should not experience torching or charring during operation, or their sealing ability would be compromised. On limited occasions, NASA has observed charring of the primary O-rings of the Space Shuttle solid rocket nozzle assembly joints due to parasitic leakage paths opening up in the gap-fill compounds during rocket operation. NASA is investigating different approaches for preventing torching or charring of the primary O-rings. One approach is to implement a braided rope seal upstream of the primary O-ring to serve as a thermal barrier that prevents the hot gases from impinging on the O-ring seals. This paper presents flow, resiliency, and thermal resistance for several types of NASA rope seals braided out of carbon fibers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the seals when exposed to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Rope seals braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over six minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Room and high temperature flow tests are presented for the carbon seals for different amounts of linear compression. Room temperature compression tests were performed to assess seal resiliency and unit preloads as a function of compression. The thermal barrier seal was tested in a subscale "char" motor test in which the seal sealed an intentional defect in the gap insulation. Temperature measurements indicated that the seal blocked 2500 F combustion gases on the upstream side with very little temperature

  11. Transient fuel-pin temperature calculations using describing functions. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, T.E.; Peddicord, K.L.; Nielsen, L.H.

    1982-02-01

    Temperature dependent properties make the transient thermal analysis of reactor fuel pins nonlinear. Traditionally, finite difference or finite element methods have been used to solve this system. An analytically based method is presented in which the transient temperature profiles are calculated using describing functions to characterize the system nonlinearities. In the past the describing functions approach has been used exclusively in the solution of ordinary differential equation systems. This study appears to be the first application of describing functions in the solution of partial differential equations.

  12. A Method for Calculating Transient Surface Temperatures and Surface Heating Rates for High-Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a method that can calculate transient aerodynamic heating and transient surface temperatures at supersonic and hypersonic speeds. This method can rapidly calculate temperature and heating rate time-histories for complete flight trajectories. Semi-empirical theories are used to calculate laminar and turbulent heat transfer coefficients and a procedure for estimating boundary-layer transition is included. Results from this method are compared with flight data from the X-15 research vehicle, YF-12 airplane, and the Space Shuttle Orbiter. These comparisons show that the calculated values are in good agreement with the measured flight data.

  13. Method of Generating Transient Equivalent Sink and Test Target Temperatures for Swift BAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Swift mission has a 600-km altitude and a 22 degrees maximum inclination. The sun angle varies from 45 degrees to 180 degrees in normal operation. As a result, environmental heat fluxes absorbed by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) radiator and loop heat pipe (LHP) compensation chambers (CCs) vary transiently. Therefore the equivalent sink temperatures for the radiator and CCs varies transiently. In thermal performance verification testing in vacuum, the radiator and CCs radiated heat to sink targets. This paper presents an analytical technique for generating orbit transient equivalent sink temperatures and a technique for generating transient sink target temperatures for the radiator and LHP CCs. Using these techniques, transient target temperatures for the radiator and LHP CCs were generated for three thermal environmental cases: worst hot case, worst cold case, and cooldown and warmup between worst hot case in sunlight and worst cold case in the eclipse, and three different heat transport values: 128 W, 255 W, and 382 W. The 128 W case assumed that the two LHPs transport 255 W equally to the radiator. The 255 W case assumed that one LHP fails so that the remaining LHP transports all the waste heat from the detector array to the radiator. The 382 W case assumed that one LHP fails so that the remaining LHP transports all the waste heat from the detector array to the radiator, and has a 50% design margin. All these transient target temperatures were successfully implemented in the engineering test unit (ETU) LHP and flight LHP thermal performance verification tests in vacuum.

  14. Transient solution for a plane-strain fracture driven by a shear-thinning, power-law fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagash, D. I.

    2006-12-01

    This paper analyses the problem of a fluid-driven fracture propagating in an impermeable, linear elastic rock with finite toughness. The fracture is driven by injection of an incompressible viscous fluid with power-law rheology. The relation between the fracture opening and the internal fluid pressure and the fracture propagation in mobile equilibrium are described by equations of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), and the flow of fluid inside the fracture is governed by the lubrication theory. It is shown that for shear-thinning fracturing fluids, the fracture propagation regime evolves in time from the toughness- to the viscosity-dominated regime. In the former, dissipation in the viscous fluid flow is negligible compared to the dissipation in extending the fracture in the rock, and in the later, the opposite holds. Corresponding self-similar asymptotic solutions are given by the zero-viscosity and zero-toughness (J. Numer. Anal. Meth. Geomech. 2002; 26:579-604) solutions, respectively. A transient solution in terms of the crack length, the fracture opening, and the net fluid pressure, which describes the fracture evolution from the early-time (toughness-dominated) to the large-time (viscosity-dominated) asymptote is presented and some of the implications for the practical range of parameters are discussed. Copyright

  15. Numerical Model of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Transport in the Subsurface with Pressure Transient, Density Effects, and Imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsell, D.; Rajaram, H.; Dempsey, D.; Viswanathan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid that is injected into the deep subsurface for shale gas extraction is important to ensure that shallow drinking water aquifers are not contaminated from an environmental and public health perspective and to understand formation damage from an oil and gas production perspective. Upward pressure gradients, permeable pathways such as faults or improperly abandoned wellbores, and the density contrast of the HF fluid to the surrounding brine encourages upward HF fluid migration. In contrast, the very low shale permeability and the imbibition of water into partially-saturated shale may sequester much of the HF fluid. Using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM), single-phase flow and transport simulations are performed to quantify how much HF fluid is removed via the wellbore as flowback and produced water and how much reaches overlying aquifers; imbibition is calculated with a semi-analytical one-dimensional solution and treated as a sink term. The travel time for HF fluid to reach the shallow aquifers is highly dependent on the amount of water imbibed and the suction applied to the well. If imbibition rates and suction are small, the pressure transient due to injection and the density contrast allows rapid upward plume migration at early times. The density contrast diminishes considerably within tens to hundreds of years as mixing occurs. We present estimates of HF fluid migration to shallow aquifers during the first 1,000 years after hydraulic fracturing begins for ranges of subsurface properties.

  16. Circular radiation heat shields with temperature dependent emissivities: transient and steady-state analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Li, X.; Hu, S.; Li, Z.; Chen, A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation heat loss is an important type of heat loss in thermal systems. In this work, a numerical study of the transient response of two circular radiation heat shields inserted between two parallel and circular surfaces of emissivities ɛ1 and ɛ2 is presented. The same dimensions have been assumed for the two main radiating surfaces and the two radiation shields. The radiation shields are assumed to have different emissivities on their top (ɛ3 and ɛ5) and bottom ( ɛ4 and ɛ6) surfaces, and both are assumed to be different but linear functions of temperature. A specific configuration is investigated in detail to highlight the transient temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the system. Some new results for the transient temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the system such as the effect of shield location, shield emissivities, the temperature dependence of shield emissivities, system dimensions, temperatures of the hot and cold surfaces and emissivities of the hot and cold surfaces are presented for future references. It has been observed that increasing the temperature of the first radiation shield by changing a parameter such as surface emissivity or distance between the radiation shield or the temperature of the hot surface, will not necessarily decrease the temperature of the second radiation shield.

  17. Transient tachypnea - newborn

    MedlinePlus

    TTN; Wet lungs - newborns; Retained fetal lung fluid; Transient RDS; Prolonged transition; Neonatal - transient tachypnea ... As the baby grows in the womb, the lungs make a special fluid. This fluid fills the ...

  18. Constraints on the transient climate response from observed global temperature and ocean heat uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutti, Reto; Tomassini, Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    Projections of future transient global temperature increase in climate models for a known forcing depend on the strength of the atmospheric feedbacks and the rate of transient ocean heat uptake. A Bayesian framework and an intermediate complexity climate model are used to calculate a probability density function (PDF) of the transient climate response (TCR), constrained by observations of global surface warming and ocean heat uptake. The PDF constrained by observations is wider than the TCR range of current climate models, and has a slightly lower mean. Uncertainties in the observed ocean warming are shown to potentially affect the TCR. It is proposed, however, that even if models were found to overestimate ocean heat uptake, correcting that bias would lead to revisions in surface temperature projections over the twenty-first century that are smaller than the uncertainties introduced by poorly quantified atmospheric feedbacks.

  19. TEMLOPI/V.2: a computer program for estimation of fully transient temperatures in geothermal wells during circulation and shut-in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Garcia, A.; Santoyo, E.; Hernandez, I.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes the development, validation and application of the TEMLOPI/V.2 computer program. This program is a useful tool for estimating in-situ the transient temperature distribution of the fluids employed for drilling geothermal wells. TEMLOPI/V.2 is based on a mathematical model which is developed to consider two-dimensional transient heat transfer during drilling and shut-in conditions in and around a geothermal well. The solution of the partial differential equations is based on the finite-difference technique with an implicit scheme. This scheme serves to demonstrate the numerical solution procedure. Each radial grid node is placed in a different thermal region: flow inside the pipe, metal pipe wall, flow inside annulus, and the surrounding formation. The program was written in FORTRAN 77 using modular programming and runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The software code, its architecture, input and output files, the solution algorithm, flow diagrams and source programs are described in detail. From validation tests, computed temperatures differ by less than 5°C from analytically obtained temperatures. Comparison of results from the fully transient TEMLOPI/V.2 simulator and the pseudo-transient version, TEMLOPI/V.1, with measured data shows that the fully transient model provides better results. Application of TEMLOPI/V.2 is demonstrated in a practical application study of well EAZ-2 from Los Azufres Mexican geothermal field.

  20. Rotational viscometer for high-pressure high-temperature fluids

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotational viscometer which is well adapted for use with fluids at high temperatures and/or pressures. In one embodiment, the viscometer includes a substantially non-magnetic tube having a closed end and having an open end in communication with a fluid whose viscosity is to be determined. An annular drive magnet is mounted for rotation about the tube. The tube encompasses and supports a rotatable shaft assembly which carries a rotor, or bob, for insertion in the fluid. Affixed to the shaft are (a) a second magnet which is magnetically coupled to the drive magnet and (b) a third magnet. In a typical operation, the drive magnet is rotated to turn the shaft assembly while the shaft rotor is immersed in the fluid. The viscous drag on the rotor causes the shaft assembly to lag the rotation of the drive magnet by an amount which is a function of the amount of viscous drag. A first magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the drive magnet. A second magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the third magnet. An output is generated indicative of the phase difference between the two waveforms.

  1. Rotational viscometer for high-pressure, high-temperature fluids

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    1983-06-06

    The invention is a novel rotational viscometer which is well adapted for use with fluids at high temperatures and/or pressures. In one embodiment, the viscometer include a substantially non-magnetic tube having a closed end and having an open end in communication with a fluid whose viscosity is to be determined. An annular drive magnet is mounted for rotation about the tube. The tube encompasses and supports a rotatable shaft assembly which carries a rotor, or bob, for insertion in the fluid. Affixed to the shaft are (a) a second magnet which is magnetically coupled to the drive magnet and (b) a third magnet. In a typical operation, the drive magnet is rotated to turn the shaft assembly while the shaft rotor is immersed in the fluid. The viscous drag on the rotor causes the shaft assembly to lag the rotation of the drive magnet by an amount which is a function of the amount of viscous drag. A first magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the drive magnet. A second magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the third magnet. Means are provided to generate an output indicative of the phase difference between the two waveforms. The viscometer is comparatively simple, inexpensive, rugged, and does not require shaft seals.

  2. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on body temperature during arthroscopic elbow surgery in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, K.R.; MacFarlane, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    This prospective randomised clinical trial evaluated the effect of warmed irrigation fluid on body temperature in anaesthetised dogs undergoing arthroscopic elbow surgery. Nineteen dogs undergoing elbow arthroscopy were included in the study and were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Group RT received irrigation fluid at room temperature (RT) while dogs in group W received warmed (W) irrigation fluid (36°C). A standardised patient management and anaesthetic protocol was used and body temperature was measured at four time points; (T1) pre-anaesthetic examination, (T2) arrival into theatre, (T3) end of surgery and (T4) arrival into recovery. There was no significant difference in body temperature at any time point between the groups. The mean overall decrease in body temperature between pre-anaesthetic examination (T1) and return to the recovery suite (T4) was significant in both groups, with a fall of 1.06±0.58°C (p<0.001) in group RT and 1.53±0.76°C (p<0.001) group W. There was no significant difference between the groups. At the end of surgery (T3) 4/19 (21.1%) of dogs were hypothermic (<37°C). The addition of warmed irrigation fluids to a temperature management protocol in dogs undergoing elbow arthroscopy during general anaesthesia did not lead to decreased temperature losses. PMID:26623323

  3. Effects of temperature on performance of a compressible magnetorheological fluid damper-liquid spring suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Michael; Wang, Xiaojie; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2011-03-01

    A compact compressible magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper-liquid spring (CMRFD-LS) suspension system is designed, developed and tested. The performances of the CMRFD-LS are investigated under room temperature. However, MR fluids are temperature dependent. The effect of temperature is observed in both the viscosity and the compressibility of the MR fluid. This study is to experimentally determine how temperature affects the performance of a CMRFD-LS device. A test setup is developed to measure the stiffness and energy dissipated by the system under various frequency loadings, magnetic fields and temperatures. The experimental results demonstrate that both the stiffness and the energy dissipated by the CMRFD-LS are inversely related to the temperature of the MR fluid. These changes in damper characteristics show that the compressibility of MR fluid is proportional to the fluid temperature, while the viscosity of the MR fluid is inversely related to the fluid temperature.

  4. COMPARING SIMULATED AND EXPERIMENTAL HYSTERETIC TWO- PHASE TRANSIENT FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hysteretic model for two-phase permeability (k)-saturation (S)-pressure (P) relations is outlined that accounts for effects of nonwetting fluid entrapment. The model can be employed in unsaturated fluid flow computer codes to predict temporal and spatial fluid distributions. Co...

  5. Analytical solution and computer program (FAST) to estimate fluid fluxes from subsurface temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; Irvine, Dylan J.

    2016-02-01

    This study details the derivation and application of a new analytical solution to the one-dimensional, transient conduction-advection equation that is applied to trace vertical subsurface fluid fluxes. The solution employs a flexible initial condition that allows for nonlinear temperature-depth profiles, providing a key improvement over most previous solutions. The boundary condition is composed of any number of superimposed step changes in surface temperature, and thus it accommodates intermittent warming and cooling periods due to long-term changes in climate or land cover. The solution is verified using an established numerical model of coupled groundwater flow and heat transport. A new computer program FAST (Flexible Analytical Solution using Temperature) is also presented to facilitate the inversion of this analytical solution to estimate vertical groundwater flow. The program requires surface temperature history (which can be estimated from historic climate data), subsurface thermal properties, a present-day temperature-depth profile, and reasonable initial conditions. FAST is written in the Python computing language and can be run using a free graphical user interface. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution and FAST using measured subsurface temperature and climate data from the Sendia Plain, Japan. Results from these illustrative examples highlight the influence of the chosen initial and boundary conditions on estimated vertical flow rates.

  6. Comparison of digital holographic interferometry and constant temperature anemometry for measurement of temperature field in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít.; Vít, Tomáś; Dančová, Petra; Kopecký, Václav

    2015-05-01

    The presented paper shows possibility of using digital holographic interferometry (DHI) for temperature field measurement in moving fluids. This method uses a modified Twymann-Green setup having double sensitivity instead of commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of interferometer in order to obtain sufficient phases change of the field. On the other hand this setup is not light efficient as Mach-Zehnder interferometer. For measurement of the fast periodical phenomenon is not necessary to use always the high speed camera. One can consider this field to coherent phenomenon. With employing one digital camera synchronized to periodic field and external triggered one can capture whole period of the phenomenon. However the projections form one viewing direction of asymmetrical temperature field maybe misguided. Hence for sufficient examination of the asymmetrical field one should capture a large number of the phenomenon's projections from different viewing directions. This projections are later used for 3D tomographic reconstruction of the whole temperature field and its time evolution. One of the commonly used method for temperature field measurement in moving fluids is hot wire method - constant temperature anemometry (CTA). In contrast to whole field measurement of DHI it is an invasive point temperature measurement method. One of the limiting factor of using CTA in moving fluids is frequency of temperature changes. This changes should not exceed 1 kHz. This limitation could be overcome by using of optical methods such as DHI. The results of temperature field measurement achieved by both method are compared in the paper.

  7. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

    1989-07-18

    A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

  8. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, James L.; Vresk, Josip

    1989-01-01

    A thermal transient anemometer having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe.

  9. High-temperature organic-fluid fouling unit

    SciTech Connect

    Kuru, W.C.; Panchal, C.B.

    1997-06-01

    A new type of fouling unit is developed for high-temperature (500 C) and high-pressure (70 atmosphere) fouling experiments by modifying a commercial autoclave. Key modifications are the installation of a helical impeller in a flow tube and a fouling probe in the autoclave to simulate the fluid dynamics and heat transfer of typical heat-exchange equipment. A calibration technique is described, and fouling results are presented for experimental runs with indene and kerosene. The results are compared with those obtained using other types of fouling test units. Other potential applications of the fouling unit, such as corrosion and micro-scale reaction experiments, are discussed.

  10. Transient response of sheared magnetic powder excited by a stepwise magnetic field and its comparison with ER and MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, KaiKai; Tian, Yu; Shan, Lei; Jiang, Jile

    2013-09-01

    The transient shear behavior of magnetic powder (MP) excited by a stepwise magnetic field in a rotational magnetic powder clutch (MPC) was experimentally studied. The experiment showed that the stable shear stress was approximately proportional to the applied magnetic flux density. The characteristic rising time of the shear stress was independent of the strength of the magnetic field and was affected by the shear rate. It took less than 0.1 s for the shear stress to rise to 63% (1 - e-1) of the stable value. The transient shear stress rising process consisted of two subprocesses: the chain forming process which was less than 100 ms, and the chain coarsening process lasting for dozens of seconds. Upon switching the field off, the shear stress fell rapidly to zero in 0.1 s. Control methods to improve the transient response time of the MPC were discussed and experimentally verified: applying a low voltage in advance; applying a high level voltage for the torque to rise to the target torque and then a desired voltage. These transient characteristics of MP were compared with those of electrorheological (ER) and magneto-rheological (MR) fluids and actuators. The study provides a better understanding of MP excited by a magnetic field and the implications for application.

  11. Low Temperature Transient Performance of Polymer Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Karl

    2009-11-01

    Polymer Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (p-OLEDs) are conjugated polymers that conduct electric charges, enabling their use as semiconductors. Typical applications for p-OLEDs include high-resolution, high-efficiency displays, and when printed onto plastic substrates, thin and flexible patterned light sources such as vehicle dashboard displays and telephone keypads. We are investigating turn-on and turn-off transient effects in p-OLEDs that vary with temperature and the electrical driver. We have found that the turn-on transient is thermally activated, that light output is immediately proportional to current flow into the device, and that light emission continues from the device even after bias is removed. When these phenomena are fully characterized, they may explain transient effects seen in previous work, help describe the activation energies and rate kinetics in the device, and broaden the range of environments in which p-OLED devices may be used.

  12. An earthquake transient method for pebble-bed reactors and a fuel temperature model for TRISO fueled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortensi, Javier

    This investigation is divided into two general topics: (1) a new method for analyzing the safe shutdown earthquake event in a pebble bed reactor core, and (2) the development of an explicit tristructural-isotropic fuel model for high temperature reactors. The safe shutdown earthquake event is one of the design basis accidents for the pebble bed reactor. The new method captures the dynamic geometric compaction of the pebble bed core. The neutronic and thermal-fluids grids are dynamically re-meshed to simulate the re-arrangement of the pebbles in the reactor during the earthquake. Results are shown for the PBMR-400 assuming it is subjected to the Idaho National Laboratory's design basis earthquake. The study concludes that the PBMR-400 can safely withstand the reactivity insertions induced by the slumping of the core and the resulting relative withdrawal of the control rods. This characteristic stems from the large negative Doppler feedback of the fuel. This Doppler feedback mechanism is a major contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors that use fuel based on TRISO particles. The correct prediction of the magnitude and time-dependence of this feedback effect is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. An explicit TRISO fuel temperature model named THETRIS has been developed in this work and incorporated in the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes. The new model yields similar results to those obtained with more complex methods, requiring multi-TRISO calculations within one control volume. The performance of the code during fast and moderately-slow transients is verified. These analyses show how explicit TRISO models improve the predictions of the fuel temperature, and consequently, of the power escalation. In addition, a brief study of the potential effects on the transient behavior of high-temperature reactors due to the presence of a gap inside the TRISO particles is included

  13. Rayleigh light scattering measurements of transient gas temperature in a rapid chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.F.; Peterson, J.E.

    2000-02-01

    A laser-induced Rayleigh light scattering (RLS) system was used to measure transient gas temperatures in a simulated rapid chemical vapor deposition (RCVD) reactor. The test section geometry was an axisymmetric jet of carrier gas directed down, impinging on a heated water surface. RLS was used to measure instantaneous gas temperature at several locations above the wafer as it was heated from room temperature to 475 K. Gas flow rate and wafer temperature correspond to jet Reynolds number Re{sub i} = 60, wafer maximum Grashof number Gr{sub H} = 4.4 x 10{sup 6}, and a maximum mixed convection parameter Gr{sub H}/Re{sub i}{sup 2} = 1200; all conditions typical of impinging jet reactors common in the numerical literature. Uncertainty of RLS transient temperature from a propagated error analysis was {+-}2--4 K. Peak gas temperature fluctuations were large (in the order of 25 to 75 C). Both flow visualization and RLS measurements showed that the flow field was momentum dominated prior to heating initiation, but became unstable by Gr{sub H}/Re{sub i}{sup 2} = 5. It then consisted of buoyancy-induced plumes and recirculations. Up to the peak wafer temperature, the flow field continued to be highly three-dimensional, unsteady, and dominated by buoyancy. RLS measurements are shown to provide information on carrier gas instantaneous temperature and flow field stability, both critical issues in RCVD processing.

  14. Method and apparatus for controlling combustor temperature during transient load changes

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Chalfant, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus includes a fast acting air bypass valve connected in parallel with an air inlet to the combustor. A predetermined excess quantity of air is supplied from an air source to a series connected fuel cell and combustor. The predetermined excess quantity of air is provided in a sufficient amount to control the temperature of the combustor during start-up of the fuel processor when the load on the fuel cell is zero and to accommodate any temperature transients during operation of the fuel cell.

  15. Biodegradation of aircraft deicing fluids in soil at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Klecka, G M; Carpenter, C L; Landenberger, B D

    1993-06-01

    The effects of substrate concentration and temperature on the biodegradation of five different aircraft deicing fluids was examined in soil samples obtained from an area adjacent to an airport runway. The principle organic constituents, which included ethylene, propylene, and diethylene glycols, were shown to be mineralized to carbon dioxide in soil microcosms incubated at temperatures ranging from -2 to 25 degrees C. No lag period was observed, and biological transformation of the test chemicals began immediately after addition to the soil. Glycol biodegradation was observed in soil at concentrations ranging from 392 to 5278 mg/kg, suggesting that high levels of the deicing fluids are unlikely to be inhibitory to soil microorganisms. All three glycols were readily degraded in soil at 8 and 25 degrees C, regardless of whether the compounds were present singly or as a component of a mixture. In addition, the biodegradation rates for the three compounds were very similar. Average rates were in the range of 19.7 to 27.0 mg/kg soil per day at 8 degrees C and 66.3 to 93.3 mg/kg soil per day for soil samples incubated at 25 degrees C. The soil biodegradation rates were reduced in soils at -2 degrees C to between 2.3 and 4.5 mg/kg per day. Based on these results, biodegradation is expected to play a major role in removing residual levels of glycols from soils adjacent to airport taxiways and runways. PMID:7691522

  16. The effect of transient temporal pulse shape on surface temperature and tungsten damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R. P.; Pitts, R. A.; van den Berg, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The plasma-facing components (PFCs) in future fusion devices such as ITER will receive intense transient heat fluxes from plasma instabilities, such as edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions, which will limit material lifetime. The energy density and transient pulse duration are typically used to characterize the PFC damage threshold. However, these parameters are not sufficient to define a damage threshold, because different transient pulse shapes with the same energy density and same pulse duration produce different peak surface temperatures (and thus stresses, which ultimately determine material damage). The surface temperature and damage of tungsten (the material to be used for the ITER divertor target armor) in the form of surface roughening and melting are investigated using various temporal pulse shapes from an Nd:YAG laser in the PISCES-B facility. The heat flux factor is examined and shown to be an inadequate parameter to characterize the temperature rise except for square temporal pulse shapes. For ELM-like heat pulses, the long tail in the temporal shape results in a lower peak surface temperature and less damage compared to a symmetric triangle pulse with equal energy density.

  17. Transient formation characteristics of temperature stratified flow in a horizontal water pipe with an injection of hot water from a hole of a pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Okinotani, Takeshi; Ozoe, Hiroyuki

    1999-07-01

    Temperature stratified flow was numerically analyzed in a horizontal pipe. Initially cold water is running and developed in a pipe. From a part of a pipe wall, hot water is injected. Subsequent transient velocity and temperature stratification process was numerically analyzed. This process is a model for such transfer phenomena as follows, i.e., blowing of fresh air into a long tunnel, replacing process of hazardous fluids from a pipeline of an industrial plant with safer fluids, ventilation of a large construction house or ducts, transient combustion process in a tunnel or huge duct, transient flow and temperature characteristics in a canal or river with multiple sub channels. These various cases become more complicated and more serious for the larger scale systems. Temperature stratified flow is everywhere established which makes the prediction difficult. This paper presents transient three-dimensional numerical analyses for a horizontal pipe in which laminar cold water runs steadily. Hot water is injected from a lower side corner of a pipe. Model equations consist of fully three-dimensional balance equations in a cylindrical coordinate. Total tube length computed is 10 times of a pipe diameter d{sub 0}. Hot water inlet hole is 0.4d{sub 0} long in an axial direction and {pi}d{sub 0}/8 in a circumferential direction near the entrance of the system. Reynolds number in a pipe is 1000. Reynolds number of the hot water at the injection hole is 447. Grashof number based on the temperature difference is 5 x 10{sup 7} and Pr = 5.41. Transient three-dimensional velocity profiles and isotherms are presented. The instantaneous water temperature represents oscillatory fluctuation depending on the level in a pipe and on the axial distance from the injection hole. For the tube diameter 0.1m, an average temperature arrived a quasi-steady state after 5 minutes with strong temperature stratification even at 1m from an injection hole. Near the injection hole, hot water makes

  18. Predicting the Reliability of Ceramics Under Transient Loads and Temperatures With CARES/Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Palfi, Tamas; Baker, Eric H.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology is shown for predicting the time-dependent reliability of ceramic components against catastrophic rupture when subjected to transient thermomechanical loads (including cyclic loads). The methodology takes into account the changes in material response that can occur with temperature or time (i.e., changing fatigue and Weibull parameters with temperature or time). This capability has been added to the NASA CARES/Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code. The code has been modified to have the ability to interface with commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) codes executed for transient load histories. Examples are provided to demonstrate the features of the methodology as implemented in the CARES/Life program.

  19. A method for temperature estimation in high-temperature geothermal reservoirs by using synthetic fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, Giovanni; Orlando, Andrea; Chiarantini, Laura; Borrini, Daniele; Weisenberger, Tobias B.

    2016-04-01

    Super-hot geothermal systems in magmatic areas are a possible target for the future geothermal exploration either for the direct exploitation of fluids or as a potential reservoirs of Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Reservoir temperature measurements are crucial for the assessment of the geothermal resources, however temperature determination in the high-temperature (>380°C) zone of super-hot geothermal systems is difficult or impossible by using either mechanical temperature and pressure gauges (Kuster device) and electronic devices. In the framework of Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration (IMAGE) project, we developed a method to measure high reservoir temperature by the production of synthetic fluid inclusions within an apparatus that will be placed in the high-temperature zone of geothermal wells. First experiments were carried out by placing a gold capsule containing pre-fractured quartz and an aqueous solution (10 wt.% NaCl + 0.4 wt.% NaOH) in an externally heated pressure vessel. Experimental pressure-temperature conditions (i.e. 80-300 bars and 280-400°C) were set close to the liquid/vapour curve of pure H2O or along the H2O critical isochore. The experiments showed that synthetic fluid inclusions form within a relatively short time (even in 48 hours) and that temperatures calculated from homogenization temperatures and isochores of newly formed inclusions are close to experimental temperatures. A second set of laboratory experiments were carried out by using a stainless steel micro-rector in which a gold capsule (containing the pre-fractured quartz and the aqueous solution) was inserted together with an amount of distilled water corresponding to the critical density of water. These experiments were conducted by leaving the new micro-reactor within a furnace at 400°C and were aimed to reproduce the temperature existing in super-hot geothermal wells. Synthetic fluid inclusions formed during the experiments had trapping temperature

  20. Transient modeling of the thermohydraulic behavior of high temperature heat pipes for space reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Michael L.; Doster, Joseph M.

    1986-01-01

    Many proposed space reactor designs employ heat pipes as a means of conveying heat. Previous researchers have been concerned with steady state operation, but the transient operation is of interest in space reactor applications due to the necessity of remote startup and shutdown. A model is being developed to study the dynamic behavior of high temperature heat pipes during startup, shutdown and normal operation under space environments. Model development and preliminary results for a hypothetical design of the system are presented.

  1. Ductile creep and compaction: A mechanism for transiently increasing fluid pressure in mostly sealed fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sleep, N.H.; Blanpied, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    A simple cyclic process is proposed to explain why major strike-slip fault zones, including the San Andreas, are weak. Field and laboratory studies suggest that the fluid within fault zones is often mostly sealed from that in the surrounding country rock. Ductile creep driven by the difference between fluid pressure and lithostatic pressure within a fault zone leads to compaction that increases fluid pressure. The increased fluid pressure allows frictional failure in earthquakes at shear tractions far below those required when fluid pressure is hydrostatic. The frictional slip associated with earthquakes creates porosity in the fault zone. The cycle adjusts so that no net porosity is created (if the fault zone remains constant width). The fluid pressure within the fault zone reaches long-term dynamic equilibrium with the (hydrostatic) pressure in the country rock. One-dimensional models of this process lead to repeatable and predictable earthquake cycles. However, even modest complexity, such as two parallel fault splays with different pressure histories, will lead to complicated earthquake cycles. Two-dimensional calculations allowed computation of stress and fluid pressure as a function of depth but had complicated behavior with the unacceptable feature that numerical nodes failed one at a time rather than in large earthquakes. A possible way to remove this unphysical feature from the models would be to include a failure law in which the coefficient of friction increases at first with frictional slip, stabilizing the fault, and then decreases with further slip, destabilizing it. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  2. Simulation of transient fluid flow in mold region during steel continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Thomas, B. G.; Sengupta, J.

    2012-07-01

    A system of models has been developed to study transient flow during continuous casting and applied to simulate an event of multiple stopper-rod movements. It includes four sub-models to incorporate different aspects in this transient event. A three-dimensional (3-D) porous-flow model of the nozzle wall calculates the rate argon gas flow into the liquid steel, and the initial mean bubble size is estimated. Transient CFD models simulate multiphase flow of steel and gas bubbles in the Submerged Entry Nozzle (SEN) and mold and have been validated with experimental data from both nail dipping and Sub-meniscus Velocity Control (SVC) measurements. To obtain the transient inlet boundary conditions for the simulation, two semi-empirical models, a stopper-rod-position based model and a metal-level-based model, predict the liquid steel flow rate through the SEN based on recorded plant data. Finally the model system was applied to study the effects of stopper rod movements on SEN/mold flow patterns. Meniscus level fluctuations were calculated using a simple pressure method and compared well with plant measurements. Insights were gained from the simulation results to explain the cause of meniscus level fluctuations and the formation of sliver defects during stopper rod movements.

  3. A New Correction Technique for Strain-Gage Measurements Acquired in Transient-Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance

    1996-01-01

    Significant strain-gage errors may exist in measurements acquired in transient-temperature environments if conventional correction methods are applied. As heating or cooling rates increase, temperature gradients between the strain-gage sensor and substrate surface increase proportionally. These temperature gradients introduce strain-measurement errors that are currently neglected in both conventional strain-correction theory and practice. Therefore, the conventional correction theory has been modified to account for these errors. A new experimental method has been developed to correct strain-gage measurements acquired in environments experiencing significant temperature transients. The new correction technique has been demonstrated through a series of tests in which strain measurements were acquired for temperature-rise rates ranging from 1 to greater than 100 degrees F/sec. Strain-gage data from these tests have been corrected with both the new and conventional methods and then compared with an analysis. Results show that, for temperature-rise rates greater than 10 degrees F/sec, the strain measurements corrected with the conventional technique produced strain errors that deviated from analysis by as much as 45 percent, whereas results corrected with the new technique were in good agreement with analytical results.

  4. Monotonic and transient creep experiments for single phase gamma TiAl at intermediate temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, M.; Hemker, K.J.

    1997-12-31

    Monotonic creep experiments (constant stress and constant temperature) of a single phase {gamma} Ti{sub 47}Al{sub 51}Mn{sub 2} were conducted within a temperature region where the yield stress anomaly is observed (500 C--600 C). The creep strength was found to have a normal temperature dependence. In addition to the monotonic creep experiments, temperature change experiments were performed. The creep activation energy obtained by the transient experiments was found to be significantly lower than that obtained from the monotonic experiments. TEM observations indicate that the microstructure evolves throughout creep, and no evidence of the formation of subgrains was observed. Instead, the mobility and the multiplication of ordinary dislocations were found to play a dominant role in intermediate temperature creep of single phase {gamma}TiAl.

  5. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump. PMID:19894088

  6. Steady state and transient temperature distributions in the human thigh covered with a cooling pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leo, R. J.; Shitzer, A.; Chato, J. C.; Hertig, B. A.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was done on the performance of cooling pads attached to a human thigh. Each cooling pad consisted of a long, water cooled tube formed into a serpentine shape with uniform spacing between the parallel sections. The analytical work developed a cylindrical model for the human thigh. The transient times predicted by this model ranged from 25 to 80 minutes, which is reasonably close to the experimental results. Calculated and measured steady state temperature profiles were in fair agreement. The transient times associated with a change from a high metabolic rate of 1800 Btu/hr (528 w) to a low level of 300 Btu/hr (88 w), were found to be about 120 minutes. A change from 300 Btu/hr (264 w) to 300 Btu/hr (88 w) resulted in 90 to 100 minute transients. However, the transient times for a change in metabolic rate in the opposite direction from 300 Btu/hr (88 w) to 1800 Btu/hr (528 w) were 40 to 60 minutes.

  7. Transient simulations of large-scale hydrogeological processes causing temperature and salinity anomalies in the Tiberias Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Fabien; Inbar, Nimrod; Siebert, Christian; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Guttman, Joseph; Möller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Hot and salty waters occur in the surroundings of the Lake Tiberias. Transient numerical simulations of thermally-driven flow without salinity effects show that mixed convection can explain the upsurge of thermal waters through permeable faults and the high temperature gradient in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG). It turns out that by including salinity effects, the flow patterns differ from those of a purely thermal regime because heavy brines dampen upward buoyant flow and convective cells. Accordingly, the fault permeability had to be increased to restore a good fit with the measured temperatures. This further supports the hypothesis that the high temperature gradient in the LYG is likely due to fractures or faults in that area. The thermohaline simulations also suggest that the derivatives of relic seawater brines are the major source of salinity. Deep brines leaching salt diapirs cannot reach the surface. However, the presence of local shallower salt bodies below the lake can potentially contribute to the salinity of the western spring and well waters, though in very small amount. This is in agreement with geochemical data according to which the major source of the brines of the Tiberias Basin represents seawater evaporation brines. Besides being of importance for understanding the hydrogeological processes that salinize Lake Tiberias, the presented simulations provide a real-case example illustrating large-scale fluid patterns due to only one source of buoyancy (heat) and those that are additionally coupled to salinity.

  8. Fluid simulations of toroidal ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Isliker, H.; Pavlenko, V.P.; Hizanidis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2006-02-15

    The evolution of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode instability is numerically studied by using the equations based on the standard reactive fluid model. The long-term dynamics of the instability are investigated using random-phase, small-amplitude fluctuations for initial conditions. The main events during the evolution of the instability that lead to the formation of large-scale coherent structures are described and the role of the dominant nonlinearities is clarified. The polarization drift nonlinearity leads to the inverse energy cascade while the convective ion heat nonlinearity is responsible for the saturation of the instability. Finally, the sensitivity of the saturated state to the initial plasma conditions is examined.

  9. Role of pore fluid pressure on transient strength changes and fabric development during serpentine dehydration at mantle conditions: Implications for subduction-zone seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Brooks; Hirth, Greg

    2015-07-01

    To further investigate the dehydration embrittlement hypothesis and its possible link to subduction-zone seismicity, we conducted deformation experiments on antigorite serpentinite in a Griggs-type apparatus at conditions below and above antigorite stability. Temperature ramps (crossing the antigorite thermal stability) were used in conjunction with a new experimental method that allows fluid produced during dehydration reactions to be drained, partially drained or undrained. During temperature ramps, weakening coupled with transient slip initiated at ˜ 650 °C, coincident with the predicted phase transition of antigorite to olivine and talc at ˜ 1 GPa. The weakening-rate and steady-state strength were dependent on drainage conditions; undrained samples weakened over a few minutes and supported the lowest shear stress (˜ 50 MPa), while drained samples weakened over a few hours and supported the highest shear stress (˜ 210 MPa). The coefficient of friction (shear stress over normal stress) in drained samples decreased from ˜0.4 to ˜0.16 after the temperature ramp. The strengths of samples that were first annealed at 700 °C for ˜ 12 h, then deformed, were similar to those observed in the temperature ramp experiments. Strain localization along fractures occurred in all samples during temperature ramping, regardless of the drainage conditions. However, microstructural observations indicate deformation by ductile mechanisms at higher strain under both undrained and drained conditions. The rheology and microstructures suggest dehydrating serpentinite deforms via semibrittle flow with grain-scale ductile deformation more active at high pore fluid pressures. Our results suggest that earthquakes in serpentinized mantle do not nucleate as a direct result of unstable frictional sliding along fractures generated at the onset of dehydration reactions.

  10. Range of applicability of the linear fluid slosh theory for predicting transient lateral slosh and roll stability of tank vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolaei, Amir; Rakheja, Subhash; Richard, Marc J.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model is developed to study the transient lateral sloshing in horizontal cylindrical containers assuming inviscid, incompressible and irrotational flows. The model is derived by implementing the linearized free-surface boundary condition and bipolar coordinate transformation, resulting in a truncated system of linear ordinary differential equations, which is numerically solved to determine the fluid velocity potentials followed by the hydrodynamic forces and moment. The model results are compared with those obtained from the multimodal solution. The free-surface elevation and hydrodynamic coefficients are also compared with the reported experimental and analytical data as well as numerical simulations to establish validity of the model. The capability of the model for predicting non-resonant slosh is also evaluated using the critical free-surface amplitude. The model validity is further illustrated by comparing the transient liquid slosh responses of a partially filled tank subject to steady lateral acceleration characterizing a vehicle turning maneuver with those obtained from fully nonlinear CFD simulations and pendulum models. It is shown that the linear slosh model yields more accurate prediction of dynamic slosh than the pendulum models and it is significantly more computationally efficient than the nonlinear CFD model. The slosh model is subsequently applied to roll plane model of a suspended tank vehicle to study the effect of dynamic liquid slosh on steady-turning roll stability limit of the vehicle under constant and variable axle load conditions. The results suggest that the roll moment arising from the dynamic fluid slosh yields considerably lower roll stability limit of the partly-filled tank vehicle compared to that predicted from the widely reported quasi-static fluid slosh model.

  11. Analysis, approximation, and computation of a coupled solid/fluid temperature control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, Max D.; Lee, Hyung C.

    1993-01-01

    An optimization problem is formulated motivated by the desire to remove temperature peaks, i.e., 'hot spots', along the bounding surfaces of containers of fluid flows. The heat equation of the solid container is coupled to the energy equations for the fluid. Heat sources can be located in the solid body, the fluid, or both. Control is effected by adjustments to the temperature of the fluid at the inflow boundary. Both mathematical analyses and computational experiments are given.

  12. Links between fluid circulation, temperature, and metamorphism in subducting slabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinelli, G.A.; Wang, K.

    2009-01-01

    The location and timing of metamorphic reactions in subducting lithosph??re are influenced by thermal effects of fluid circulation in the ocean crust aquifer. Fluid circulation in subducting crust extracts heat from the Nankai subduction zone, causing the crust to pass through cooler metamorphic faci??s than if no fluid circulation occurs. This fluid circulation shifts the basalt-to-eclogite transition and the associated slab dehydration 14 km deeper (35 km farther landward) than would be predicted with no fluid flow. For most subduction zones, hydrothermal cooling of the subducting slab will delay eclogitization relative to estimates made without considering fluid circulation. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Solving the heat-flow problem with transient relativistic fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denicol, G. S.; Niemi, H.; Bouras, I.; Molnár, E.; Xu, Z.; Rischke, D. H.; Greiner, C.

    2014-04-01

    Israel-Stewart theory is a causal, stable formulation of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics. This theory has been shown to give a decent description of the dynamical behavior of a relativistic fluid in cases where shear stress becomes important. In principle, it should also be applicable to situations where heat flow becomes important. However, it has been shown that there are cases where Israel-Stewart theory cannot reproduce phenomena associated with heat flow. In this paper, we derive a relativistic dissipative fluid-dynamical theory from kinetic theory which provides a good description of all dissipative phenomena, including heat flow. We explicitly demonstrate this by comparing this theory with numerical solutions of the relativistic Boltzmann equation.

  14. Heat exchanger temperature response for duty-cycle transients in the NGNP/HTE.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-12

    Control system studies were performed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) interfaced to the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) plant. Temperature change and associated thermal stresses are important factors in determining plant lifetime. In the NGNP the design objective of a 40 year lifetime for the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) in particular is seen as a challenge. A control system was designed to minimize temperature changes in the IHX and more generally at all high-temperature locations in the plant for duty-cycle transients. In the NGNP this includes structures at the reactor outlet and at the inlet to the turbine. This problem was approached by identifying those high-level factors that determine temperature rates of change. First are the set of duty cycle transients over which the control engineer has little control but which none-the-less must be addressed. Second is the partitioning of the temperature response into a quasi-static component and a transient component. These two components are largely independent of each other and when addressed as such greater understanding of temperature change mechanisms and how to deal with them is achieved. Third is the manner in which energy and mass flow rates are managed. Generally one aims for a temperature distribution that minimizes spatial non-uniformity of thermal expansion in a component with time. This is can be achieved by maintaining a fixed spatial temperature distribution in a component during transients. A general rule of thumb for heat exchangers is to maintain flow rate proportional to thermal power. Additionally the product of instantaneous flow rate and heat capacity should be maintained the same on both sides of the heat exchanger. Fourth inherent mechanisms for stable behavior should not be compromised by active controllers that can introduce new feedback paths and potentially create under-damped response. Applications of these principles to the development of a plant control strategy for

  15. Rheologically stable, nontoxic, high-temperature, water-based drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Elward-Berry, J.; Darby, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    An exceptionally stable, high-temperature, water-based drilling fluid has been developed based on a fundamental redesign of drilling fluid components and functions, while still using commercially available materials. Rheological stability was characterized by extensive Fann 50C low-shear-rate viscosity vs. temperature studies and supporting viscoelastic rheological data. The fluid has been used in offshore and land applications, at temperatures as high as 420 F and densities as high as 15.5 lbm/gal.

  16. Modeling of Transient Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, G. T.; Hartley, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The major goal of this project is to develop mathematical models of heat pipes which can be used to predict transient behavior under normal and adverse conditions. The models and solution techniques are to be formulated so that they can be incorporated into existing NASA structural design codes. The major parameters of interest are heat flux distribution, temperature distribution, working fluid pressure distribution, fluid and containment thermal and mechanical properties and geometry. Normal transient operation is taken to be operating conditions where the capillary structure remains fully wetted. Adverse transient operation occurs when drying, re-wetting, choking, non-continuum flow, thawing, freezing, etc., occur in the internal heat pipe working fluid.

  17. TEMP: a computer code to calculate fuel pin temperatures during a transient. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, F E; Christensen, B Y; Gneiting, B C

    1980-04-01

    The computer code TEMP calculates fuel pin temperatures during a transient. It was developed to accommodate temperature calculations in any system of axi-symmetric concentric cylinders. When used to calculate fuel pin temperatures, the code will handle a fuel pin as simple as a solid cylinder or as complex as a central void surrounded by fuel that is broken into three regions by two circumferential cracks. Any fuel situation between these two extremes can be analyzed along with additional cladding, heat sink, coolant or capsule regions surrounding the fuel. The one-region version of the code accurately calculates the solution to two problems having closed-form solutions. The code uses an implicit method, an explicit method and a Crank-Nicolson (implicit-explicit) method.

  18. Code System for Transient and Steady-State Temperature Distribution in Multidimensional Systems.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-10-24

    Version 01 TRUMP solves a general nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation describing flow in various kinds of potential fields, such as fields of temperature, pressure, or electricity and magnetism; simultaneously, it will solve two additional equations representing, in thermal problems, heat production by decomposition of two reactants having rate constants with a general Arrhenius temperature dependence. Steady‑state and transient flow in one, two, or three dimensions are considered in geometrical configurations having simple or complexmore » shapes and structures. Problem parameters may vary with spatial position, time, or primary dependent variables, temperature, pressure, or field strength. Initial conditions may vary with spatial position, and among the criteria that may be specified for ending a problem are upper and lower limits on the size of the primary dependent variable, upper limits on the problem time or on the number of time‑steps or on the computer time, and attainment of steady state.« less

  19. An anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete at transient elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Baker, Graham; de Borst, René

    2005-11-15

    The behaviour of concrete at elevated temperatures is important for an assessment of integrity (strength and durability) of structures exposed to a high-temperature environment, in applications such as fire exposure, smelting plants and nuclear installations. In modelling terms, a coupled thermomechanical analysis represents a generalization of the computational mechanics of fracture and damage. Here, we develop a fully coupled anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete under high stress and transient temperature, with emphasis on the adherence of the model to the laws of thermodynamics. Specific analytical results are given, deduced from thermodynamics, of a novel interpretation on specific heat, evolution of entropy and the identification of the complete anisotropic, thermomechanical damage surface. The model is also shown to be stable in a computational sense, and to satisfy the laws of thermodynamics. PMID:16243703

  20. A numerical study of the Kernel-conformation transformation for transient viscoelastic fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F. P.; Oishi, C. M.; Afonso, A. M.; Alves, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a numerical application of a generic conformation tensor transformation for simulating highly elastic flows of non-Newtonian fluids typically observed in computational rheology. In the Kernel-conformation framework [14], the conformation tensor constitutive law for a viscoelastic fluid is transformed introducing a generic tensor transformation function. The numerical stability of the application of the Kernel-conformation for highly elastic flows is ultimately related with the specific kernel function used in the matrix transformation, but also to the existence of singularities introduced either by flow geometry or by the characteristics of the constitutive equation. In this work, we implement this methodology in a free-surface Marker-And-Cell discretization methodology implemented in a finite differences method. The main contributions of this work are two fold: on one hand, we demonstrate the accuracy of this Kernel-conformation formulation using a finite differences method and free surfaces; on the other hand, we assess the numerical efficiency of specific kernel functions at high-Weissenberg number flows. The numerical study considers different viscoelastic fluid flow problems, including the Poiseuille flow in a channel, the lid-driven cavity flow and the die-swell free surface flow. The numerical results demonstrate the adequacy of this methodology for high Weissenberg number flows using the Oldroyd-B model.

  1. Estimating transient climate response using consistent temperature reconstruction methods in models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M.; Cowtan, K.; Hawkins, E.; Stolpe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observational temperature records such as HadCRUT4 typically have incomplete geographical coverage and blend air temperature over land with sea surface temperatures over ocean, in contrast to model output which is commonly reported as global air temperature. This complicates estimation of properties such as the transient climate response (TCR). Observation-based estimates of TCR have been made using energy-budget constraints applied to time series of historical radiative forcing and surface temperature changes, while model TCR is formally derived from simulations where CO2 increases at 1% per year. We perform a like-with-like comparison using three published energy-budget methods to derive modelled TCR from historical CMIP5 temperature series sampled in a manner consistent with HadCRUT4. Observation-based TCR estimates agree to within 0.12 K of the multi-model mean in each case and for 2 of the 3 energy-budget methods the observation-based TCR is higher than the multi-model mean. For one energy-budget method, using the HadCRUT4 blending method leads to a TCR underestimate of 0.3±0.1 K, relative to that estimated using global near-surface air temperatures.

  2. Predicting transient particle transport in enclosed environments with the combined computational fluid dynamics and Markov chain method.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Lin, C-H; Long, Z; Chen, Q

    2014-02-01

    To quickly obtain information about airborne infectious disease transmission in enclosed environments is critical in reducing the infection risk to the occupants. This study developed a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Markov chain method for quickly predicting transient particle transport in enclosed environments. The method first calculated a transition probability matrix using CFD simulations. Next, the Markov chain technique was applied to calculate the transient particle concentration distributions. This investigation used three cases, particle transport in an isothermal clean room, an office with an underfloor air distribution system, and the first-class cabin of an MD-82 airliner, to validate the combined CFD and Markov chain method. The general trends of the particle concentrations vs. time predicted by the Markov chain method agreed with the CFD simulations for these cases. The proposed Markov chain method can provide faster-than-real-time information about particle transport in enclosed environments. Furthermore, for a fixed airflow field, when the source location is changed, the Markov chain method can be used to avoid recalculation of the particle transport equation and thus reduce computing costs. PMID:23789964

  3. Low temperature biodegradation of airport de-icing fluids.

    PubMed

    Revitt, D M; Worrall, P

    2003-01-01

    The biodegradabilities of glycol- and acetate-based aircraft de-icing fluids on airport surfaces have been investigated at three temperatures between 0 degrees C and 10 degrees C. The aqueous solubilities of these substances can result in high BOD loadings in runoff and pose serious toxicity problems in receiving waters. The measured surface biodegradation rates for de-icing products based on ethylene/diethylene glycol (Konsin), propylene glycol (Kilfrost) and potassium acetate (Clearway) at 4 degrees C were 0.082, 0.073 and 0.033 day(-1). The resulting reductions in the potential BOD loadings, of a single application of a typical mixture of these products, over a 5 day biodegradation period are predicted to be 32.9%, 30.2% and 21.4%, respectively at 8 degrees C, 4 degrees C and 1 degrees C. For consecutive daily applications, the comparable cumulative reductions over 5 days are 20.8%, 18.9% and 13.3%. The subsequent savings in the amount of treatment required for airport runoff prior to safe discharge to receiving waters are discussed and hence the relevance of surface biodegradation processes to the design of stormwater treatment systems involving the wash-off of biodegradable pollutants following retention on urban surfaces. PMID:14703144

  4. Analytical study of the liquid phase transient behavior of a high temperature heat pipe. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roche, Gregory Lawrence

    1988-01-01

    The transient operation of the liquid phase of a high temperature heat pipe is studied. The study was conducted in support of advanced heat pipe applications that require reliable transport of high temperature drops and significant distances under a broad spectrum of operating conditions. The heat pipe configuration studied consists of a sealed cylindrical enclosure containing a capillary wick structure and sodium working fluid. The wick is an annular flow channel configuration formed between the enclosure interior wall and a concentric cylindrical tube of fine pore screen. The study approach is analytical through the solution of the governing equations. The energy equation is solved over the pipe wall and liquid region using the finite difference Peaceman-Rachford alternating direction implicit numerical method. The continuity and momentum equations are solved over the liquid region by the integral method. The energy equation and liquid dynamics equation are tightly coupled due to the phase change process at the liquid-vapor interface. A kinetic theory model is used to define the phase change process in terms of the temperature jump between the liquid-vapor surface and the bulk vapor. Extensive auxiliary relations, including sodium properties as functions of temperature, are used to close the analytical system. The solution procedure is implemented in a FORTRAN algorithm with some optimization features to take advantage of the IBM System/370 Model 3090 vectorization facility. The code was intended for coupling to a vapor phase algorithm so that the entire heat pipe problem could be solved. As a test of code capabilities, the vapor phase was approximated in a simple manner.

  5. Characterization of reservoir rocks and fluids by surface electromagnetic transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Blohm, M.W. ); Stoyer, C.H. ); James, B.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve the interpretations of transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements over two-dimensional subsurface structures. TEM is a surface electromagnetic method employed in fossil energy reservoir exploration and characterization. Electrical measurements find application in (i) assisting in fossil energy exploration mainly in areas where seismic methods yield inadequate data quality, such as volcanic covered terrain, permafrost areas, and the Rocky Mountain overthrust; (ii) mapping contacts between hydrocarbon and brines in shallow producing horizons, and (iii) in monitoring enhanced oil recovery processes which cause zones of lower resistivity. Accomplishments for this past year are presented for the following tasks: (1) site selection and acquisition of high density, 3-component TEM data set over test site; (2) finite element forward modeling; and (3) TEM 2-D subsurface imaging.

  6. Characterization of reservoir rocks and fluids by surface electromagnetic transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Blohm, M.W.; Stoyer, C.H.; James, B.A.

    1992-07-17

    The objectives of this research were to improve the interpretations of transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements over two-dimensional subsurface structures. TEM is a surface electromagnetic method employed in fossil energy reservoir exploration and characterization. Electrical measurements find application in (i) assisting in fossil energy exploration mainly in areas where seismic methods yield inadequate data quality, such as volcanic covered terrain, permafrost areas, and the Rocky Mountain Overthrust; (ii) mapping contacts between hydrocarbon and brines in shallow producing horizon, and (iii) in monitoring enhanced oil recovery processes which cause zones of lower resistivity. The work under this contract consisted of three tasks: (1) Selection of a test site and acquisition of a high density, 3-component data set over the test site; (2) development of finite element modeling algorithms for computing 3-D EM fields over 2-D EM fields over 2-D subsurface structures; and development of TEM 2-D subsurface imaging method. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  7. Cosmological thermodynamics with Hawking temperature on the apparent horizon and Unruh temperature of the fluid: Some interesting consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subhajit

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamics on the cosmological apparent horizon of a flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric has been investigated with Bekenstein entropy and Hawking temperature on the horizon, and Unruh temperature for the fluid inside the horizon. This temperature is experienced by a radial comoving observer infinitesimally close to the horizon due to the pressure exerted by the fluid bounded by the horizon. An expression for the entropy of the fluid has been obtained which is found to be proportional to the volume of the thermodynamic system which implies that the Unruh temperature of the fluid is inconsistent with the holographic principle. Further, we have been able to find an expression for the effective entropy of the system. Finally, assuming a barotropic equation of state p=wρ (w constant) for the fluid, it has been shown that the generalized second law holds good for a non-phantom w, while thermodynamic equilibrium is never possible for such a scenario.

  8. Local-heterogeneous responses and transient dynamics of cage breaking and formation in colloidal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Preetom; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Li, Chun-Biu; Terdik, Joseph Z.; Scherer, Norbert F.; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying the interactions in dense colloidal fluids requires a properly designed order parameter. We present a modified bond-orientational order parameter, bar{ψ }6, to avoid problems of the original definition of bond-orientational order parameter. The original bond-orientational order parameter can change discontinuously in time but our modified order parameter is free from the discontinuity and, thus, it is a suitable measure to quantify the dynamics of the bond-orientational ordering of the local surroundings. Here we analyze bar{ψ }6 in a dense driven monodisperse quasi-two-dimensional colloidal fluids where a single particle is optically trapped at the center. The perturbation by the trapped and driven particle alters the structure and dynamics of the neighboring particles. This perturbation disturbs the flow and causes spatial and temporal distortion of the bond-orientational configuration surrounding each particle. We investigate spatio-temporal behavior of bar{ψ }6 by a Wavelet transform that provides a time-frequency representation of the time series of bar{ψ }6. It is found that particles that have high power in frequencies corresponding to the inverse of the timescale of perturbation undergo distortions of their packing configurations that result in cage breaking and formation dynamics. To gain insight into the dynamic structure of cage breaking and formation of bond-orientational ordering, we compare the cage breaking and formation dynamics with the underlying dynamical structure identified by Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) estimated from the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field. The LCSs are moving separatrices that effectively divide the flow into distinct regions with different dynamical behavior. It is shown that the spatial distribution of the FTLE field and the power of particles in the wavelet transform have positive correlation, implying that LCSs provide a dynamic structure that dominates the dynamics of cage breaking and

  9. Temperature dependence of magnetic moments of nanoparticles and their dipole interaction in magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out for magnetite-based fluids over a wide temperature range. The fluids were stabilized with commonly used surfactants (fatty acids) and new surfactants (polypropylene glycol and tallow acids). The coefficients of temperature dependence of the particle magnetic moments were determined by fitting of the measured and calculated values of magnetic susceptibility. The influence of the inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction on the susceptibility was taken into account in the framework of A.O. Ivanov's model. The corrections for thermal expansion were determined by density measurements of the carrier fluid. The obtained values of temperature coefficients correlate to the solidification temperature of the fluid samples. For fluids with a low solidification temperature the value of the temperature coefficient of particle magnetization coincides with its value for bulk magnetite.

  10. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados

    PubMed Central

    Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world’s coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representative reef sites in Barbados during the two most significant warm-water events ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean, i.e., 2005 and 2010, and describe prevailing island-scale sea water conditions during both events. In so doing, we demonstrate that coral bleaching and subsequent mortality were considerably lower in 2010 than in 2005 for all species, irrespective of site, even though the anomalously warm water temperature profiles were very similar between years. We also show that during the 2010 event, Barbados was engulfed by a transient dark green turbid water mass of riverine origin coming from South America. We suggest that reduced exposure to high solar radiation associated with this transient water mass was the primary contributing factor to the lower bleaching and mortality observed in all corals. We conclude that monitoring these episodic mesoscale oceanographic features might improve risk assessments of southeastern Caribbean reefs to warm-water events in the future. PMID:27326377

  11. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Oxenford, Hazel A; Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world's coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representative reef sites in Barbados during the two most significant warm-water events ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean, i.e., 2005 and 2010, and describe prevailing island-scale sea water conditions during both events. In so doing, we demonstrate that coral bleaching and subsequent mortality were considerably lower in 2010 than in 2005 for all species, irrespective of site, even though the anomalously warm water temperature profiles were very similar between years. We also show that during the 2010 event, Barbados was engulfed by a transient dark green turbid water mass of riverine origin coming from South America. We suggest that reduced exposure to high solar radiation associated with this transient water mass was the primary contributing factor to the lower bleaching and mortality observed in all corals. We conclude that monitoring these episodic mesoscale oceanographic features might improve risk assessments of southeastern Caribbean reefs to warm-water events in the future. PMID:27326377

  12. High temperature creep of SiC densified using a transient liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Jou, Z.C.; Virkar, A.V. ); Cutler, R.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Silicon carbide-based ceramics can be rapidly densified above approximately 1850 {degree}C due to a transient liquid phase resulting from the reaction between alumina and aluminum oxycarbides. The resulting ceramics are fine-grained, dense, and exhibit high strength at room temperature. SiC hot pressed at 1875 {degree}C for 10 min in Ar was subjected to creep deformation in bending at elevated temperatures between 1500 and 1650 {degree}C in Ar. Creep was thermally activated with an activation energy of 743 kJ/mol. Creep rates at 1575 {degree}C were between 10{sup {minus}9}/s and 10{sup {minus}7}/s at an applied stress between 38 and 200 MPa, respectively, resulting in a stress exponent of {approx}1.7.

  13. Transient Thermal Impedance Measurements on Low-Temperature-Sintered Nanoscale Silver Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yunhui; Wang, Tao; Cao, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Lu, Guo-Quan; Chen, Xu

    2012-11-01

    A measurement system for thermal impedance ( Z th) was developed to evaluate the transient thermal performance of sintered nanoscale silver joints. Five different temperature profiles for low-temperature sintering were evaluated by Z th measurements of the joints. The thermal impedance of the sintered samples was altered by the different sintering conditions. Samples that underwent heating profiles with a separate drying stage offered lower thermal impedance than those sintered directly. Exerting pressure of more than 1 MPa during sintering insignificantly improved the thermal impedance. Besides, the impedance could be lowered by extending the holding time of the drying stage and applying pressure as low as 1 MPa during sintering. Characterization of microstructures of the sintered layers was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With more cracks present, the thermal impedance of the chip joints increased. The presence of cracks was possibly attributed to fast drying or the lack of a drying step.

  14. Lifetime improvement of sheathed thermocouples for use in high-temperature and thermal transient operations

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Clift, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Premature failure of small-diameter, magnesium-oxide-insulated sheathed thermocouples occurred when they were placed within nuclear fuel rod simulators (FRSs) to measure high temperatures and to follow severe thermal transients encountered during simulation of nuclear reactor accidents in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) thermal-hydraulic test facilities. Investigation of thermally cycled thermocouples yielded three criteria for improvement of thermocouple lifetime: (1) reduction of oxygen impurities prior to and during their fabrication, (2) refinement of thermoelement grain size during their fabrication, and (3) elimination of prestrain prior to use above their recrystallization temperature. The first and third criteria were satisfied by improved techniques of thermocouple assembly and by a recovery anneal prior to thermocouple use.

  15. Temperature and voltage coupling to channel opening in transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8).

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-12-19

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol(-1). The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening. PMID:25352597

  16. Temperature and Voltage Coupling to Channel Opening in Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8)*♦

    PubMed Central

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol−1. The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening. PMID:25352597

  17. The role of grain boundaries and transient porosity in rocks as fluid pathways for reaction front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Laura; John, Timm; King, Helen E.; Geisler, Thorsten; Putnis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The pseudomorphic replacement of Carrara marble by calcium phosphates was used as a model system in order to study the influence of different fluid pathways for reaction front propagation induced by fluid-rock interaction. In this model, grain boundaries present in the rock as well as the transient porosity structures developing throughout the replacement reaction enable the reaction front to progress further into the rock as well as to the center of each single grain until transformation is complete. Hydrothermal treatment of the marble using phosphate bearing solutions led to the formation of hydroxylapatite and β-TCP; the formation of the latter phase was probably promoted by the presence of ∼0.6 wt.% Mg in the parent carbonate phase. Completely transformed single grains show a distinctive zoning, both in composition and texture. Whereas areas next to the grain boundary consist of nearly pure hydroxylapatite and show a coarse porosity, areas close to the center of the single grains show a high amount of β-TCP and a very fine porous microstructure. If fluorine was added as an additional solution component, up to 3 wt.% of F were incorporated into the product apatite and the formation of β-TCP was avoided. The use of the isotope 18O as a chronometer for the replacement reaction makes it possible to reconstruct the chronological development of the calcium phosphate reaction front. Raman analysis revealed that the incorporation of 18O in the PO4 tetrahedron of hydroxylapatite results in the development of distinct profiles in the calcium phosphate reaction front perpendicular to the grain boundaries of the marble. Through the use of the 18O chronometer, it is possible to estimate and compare the time effectiveness of the different fluid pathways in this model system. The results demonstrate that the grain boundaries are an effective pathway enabling the fluid to penetrate the rock more than one order of magnitude faster compared to the newly developing channel

  18. Temperature-driven transient charge and heat currents in nanoscale conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eich, F. G.; Di Ventra, M.; Vignale, G.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the short-time behavior of the heat and charge currents through nanoscale conductors exposed to a temperature gradient. To this end, we employ Luttinger's thermomechanical potential to simulate a sudden change of temperature at one end of the conductor. We find that the direction of the charge current through an impurity is initially opposite to the direction of the charge current in the steady-state limit. Furthermore, we investigate the transient propagation of energy and particle density driven by a temperature variation through a conducting nanowire. Interestingly, we find that the velocity of the wavefronts of, both, the particle and the energy wave have the same constant value, insensitive to changes in the average electronic density. In the steady-state regime, we find that, at low temperatures, the local temperature and potential, as measured by a floating probe lead, exhibit characteristic oscillations due to quantum interference, with a periodicity that corresponds to half the Fermi wavelength of the electrons.

  19. Transient monoplegia and paraesthesia after an epidural blood patch for a spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alvin Ho-Kwan; Li, Lai-Fung; So, Vincent Ching; Leung, May Ka-Mei; Lui, Wai-Man

    2015-09-01

    We describe the very rare complication of new onset complete paralysis and numbness of one limb after an epidural blood patch in a 36-year-old woman. Intracranial hypotension resulting from a spinal cerebrospinal fluid fistula may be treated by epidural injection of autologous blood that is, a blood patch. This is usually a safe and effective procedure. The woman's muscle strength of hip flexion, extension, ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion decreased from 5/5 to 0/5 following the procedure. After symptom onset, an MRI of her spine showed no compressive or ischaemic lesions amenable to urgent intervention. The cause of neurological deficit was at that time unknown and steroids were administered. Her symptoms persisted for about 2 days and gradually improved. In this paper, the management plan and the course of this rare and alarming complication is reported. PMID:25986178

  20. Intestinal temperature does not reflect rectal temperature during prolonged, intense running with cold fluid ingestion.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Félix A; Dion, Tommy; Asselin, Audrey; Gariepy, Carolanne; Boucher, Pierre M; Berrigan, Félix; Goulet, Eric D B

    2015-02-01

    It is generally assumed that intestinal temperature (Tint), as measured with a telemetric pill, agrees relatively well with rectal temperature (Trec) during exercise. However, whether Tint reflects Trec during prolonged, intense and continuous exercise when cold fluids are consumed is unknown. Therefore, we compared Trec and Tint during a half-marathon during which cold water was ingested to prevent bodyweight (BW) losses >2%. Nine endurance athletes (age 30  ±  5 years) underwent a 21.1 km running time-trial (TT) in the heat (~30 °C and 44% RH) while BW losses were maintained to ~1% with continuous cold (4 °C) water provision. Tint and Trec were monitored throughout the TT. Hypohydration level, TT time and fluid intake were 1.2  ±  0.4% BW, 93.2  ±  9.9 min and 2143  ±  264 ml, respectively. Trec was systematically higher than Tint by 0.25 °C (95% CI: 0.14-0.37 °C). Tint and Trec showed an excellent relative (r = 0.90, p < 0.01), but poor absolute agreement as reflected by a 95% limit of agreement of ±1.07 °C and a standard error of measurement of ±0.39 °C. In conclusion, Tint does not mirror Trec during prolonged, intense running with cold fluid ingestion and, therefore, these measures should not be used interchangeably under this scenario. PMID:25582636

  1. Chemical reactions accompanying fluid flow through granite held in a temperature gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Morrow, C.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Distilled water was passed at a low rate down a temperature gradient through cylinders of Barre and Westerly Granite. Temperatures ranged from 80-100??C at the outer edges of the cylinders to 250-300??C in central, drilled holes which housed the heating coils. The measured permeabilities of the granite cylinders decreased by as much as two orders of magnitude in experiments of 1-3 weeks' duration. The amount of permeability decrease varied directly with temperature and inversely with the rate of fluid flow. The compositions of the fluids discharged from the granites were functions of temperature and flow rate as well as mineral composition, with dissolved silica concentrations showing trends different from those of the other analyzed species. Fluids from experiments run at higher temperatures but at much lower initial rates of fluid flow had higher concentrations of most ions but substantially lower dissolved silica contents. In contrast, an increase in temperature at similar rates of fluid flow resulted in higher silica concentrations. In the experiments, the distilled water acquired enough dissolved materials at high temperatures to become supersaturated with respect to several minerals at the low-temperature edges of the cylinders. Some of this material, particularly silica, was deposited along grain boundaries and microfractures, causing the observed permeability decreases. The very low rates of fluid flow in some high-temperature experiments significantly increased the rates of SiO2 precipitation and reduced dissolved silica concentrations relative to other species in the discharged fluids. ?? 1983.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Frisani, Angelo; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2010-11-02

    The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is a key heat removal system during normal and off-normal conditions. The design and validation of the RCCS is necessary to demonstrate that VHTRs can survive to the postulated accidents. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) STAR-CCM+/V3.06.006 code was used for three-dimensional system modeling and analysis of the RCCS. A CFD model was developed to analyze heat exchange in the RCCS. The model incorporates a 180-deg section resembling the VHTR RCCS experimentally reproduced in a laboratory-scale test facility at Texas A&M University. All the key features of the experimental facility were taken into account during the numerical simulations. The objective of the present work was to benchmark CFD tools against experimental data addressing the behavior of the RCCS following accident conditions. Two cooling fluids (i.e., water and air) were considered to test the capability of maintaining the RCCS concrete walls' temperature below design limits. Different temperature profiles at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall obtained from the experimental facility were used as boundary conditions in the numerical analyses to simulate VHTR transient evolution during accident scenarios. Mesh convergence was achieved with an intensive parametric study of the two different cooling configurations and selected boundary conditions. To test the effect of turbulence modeling on the RCCS heat exchange, predictions using several different turbulence models and near-wall treatments were evaluated and compared. The comparison among the different turbulence models analyzed showed satisfactory agreement for the temperature distribution inside the RCCS cavity medium and at the standpipes walls. For such a complicated geometry and flow conditions, the tested turbulence models demonstrated that the

  3. Prediction of transient temperatures for an air-cooled rotating disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. A.; Owen, J. M.

    1985-09-01

    The numerical solution of Fourier's conduction equation is used to compute the transient temperature distribution in a rotating disc. The convective boundary conditions for the disc surfaces are based on simple formulae obtained from the solutions of the boundary-layer equations, and the computed surface temperatures are compared with measurements made on a rotating-disc rig. Free-disc tests, at rotational Reynolds numbers up to Re sub phi = 2.5 x 10(6), are used to provide a datum from which to judge the numerical method. Although the numerical solution tends to overestimate the cooling rate of the heated free disc at high Reynolds numbers, the agreement between computed and measured temperatures is considered reasonable. Rotating-cavity tests, in which a heated disc is cooled by a radial outflow of air, are used to examine the suitability of the simple convective boundary conditions. As the computed temperatures show reasonable agreement with the measured values, it is suggested that the proposed formulae for convection in a rotating cavity might be useful for design purposes.

  4. Temperature-dependent transformation thermotics for unsteady states: Switchable concentrator for transient heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Shen, Xiangying; Huang, Jiping; Ni, Yushan

    2016-04-01

    For manipulating heat flow efficiently, recently we established a theory of temperature-dependent transformation thermotics which holds for steady-state cases. Here, we develop the theory to unsteady-state cases by considering the generalized Fourier's law for transient thermal conduction. As a result, we are allowed to propose a new class of intelligent thermal metamaterial - switchable concentrator, which is made of inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. When environmental temperature is below or above a critical value, the concentrator is automatically switched on, namely, it helps to focus heat flux in a specific region. However, the focusing does not affect the distribution pattern of temperature outside the concentrator. We also perform finite-element simulations to confirm the switching effect according to the effective medium theory by assembling homogeneous isotropic materials, which bring more convenience for experimental fabrication than inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. This work may help to figure out new intelligent thermal devices, which provide more flexibility in controlling heat flow, and it may also be useful in other fields that are sensitive to temperature gradient, such as the Seebeck effect.

  5. Transient increase of ATP as a response to temperature up-shift in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soini, Jaakko; Falschlehner, Christina; Mayer, Christina; Böhm, Daniela; Weinel, Stefan; Panula, Johanna; Vasala, Antti; Neubauer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli induces the heat shock response to a temperature up-shift which is connected to the synthesis of a characteristic set of proteins, including ATP dependent chaperones and proteases. Therefore the balance of the nucleotide pool is important for the adaptation and continuous function of the cell. Whereas it has been observed in eukaryotic cells, that the ATP level immediately decreased after the temperature shift, no data are available for E. coli about the adenosine nucleotide levels during the narrow time range of minutes after a temperature up-shift. Results The current study shows that a temperature up-shift is followed by a very fast significant transient increase of the cellular ATP concentration within the first minutes. This increase is connected to a longer lasting elevation of the cellular respiration and glucose uptake. Also the mRNA level of typical heat shock genes increases within only one minute after the heat-shock. Conclusion The presented data prove the very fast response of E. coli to a heat-shock and that the initial response includes the increase of the ATP pool which is important to fulfil the need of the cell for new syntheses, as well as for the function of chaperones and proteases. PMID:15804347

  6. Fluid transients in pipes. Estimation of maximum pressures and forces in steam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-09-01

    Available as part of the ESDU Sub-series on Fluid Mechanics (Internal Flow), this document gives a graphical method for estimating the time-dependent pressure changes and piping forces that follow from a rapid value closure in a one-pipe system of constant cross-section carrying superheated steam. The method also assumes a frictionless flow and ignores wave steepening effects. A computer program listing in FORTRAN is also included that applies to any gas that obeys the perfect gas law, and takes into account the effects of both wall friction and wave steepening. In that case sections of the pipeline can have different cross-sectional areas and that can be used to treat a pipeline with branched ends. Worked examples are included for both methods and in the case of the computer program show specimen print-out of the input data, and of the output which includes the time variation of pressure, velocity and density at three points in the pipeline chosen by the user together with values of maximum and minimum pressure at 25 points (a value that is also open to choice by the user). The example is run for a valve with a linear variation of area with time, and for one with a nonlinear characteristic.

  7. Fluid Pressure and Temperature Response at the Nankai Trough Megasplay Fault: Initial Results of the SmartPlug Borehole Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschmidt, S.; Kopf, A.; Expedition 332 Scientists, T.

    2011-12-01

    The SmartPlug is the first borehole observatory in the IODP Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE). It was installed at Site C0010 where it penetrates one of the shallow branches of the Megasplay fault to obtain pressure and temperature data from the fault and from a hydrostatic reference section. Here, a 15 months-lasting pore pressure and temperature record collected by the SmartPlug was evaluated. The main objective was to clarify the origin of transients in the data and its possible relationship to natural processes such as earthquakes, tectonic deformation or splay fault activity, as well as storms or low-pressure weather systems. After pressure and temperature data were processed properly, comparisons were made using seismic data from the Japanese F-Net and Hi-Net, theoretical travel time calculations provided by the USGS as well as earthquake lists from the ISC. Additionally, meteorological data provided by the JMA and the U.S. COAPS as well as theoretical travel time calculations for tsunamis from the U.S. NGDC were used. It can be shown that pulse-like pressure transients are related to regional/teleseismic earthquakes, originating mainly from the "Pacific Ring of Fire", from various depths and with diverse focal mechanisms. Approaching seismic waves of at least one regional earthquake led to a significant drop in the formation pressure, which is interpreted as a seismic wave-induced increase in permeability. The arrival of Rayleigh waves caused amplification of the borehole pressure, probably due to induced fluid flow. Tremor-like pressure transients are interpreted to be microseism, which is, based on pressure transient characteristics, triggered by storms or low-pressure weather systems on the open ocean. Approaching tsunamis look similar but caused longer period oscillations in the pressure record. Mainly in the seafloor pressure data distinct peaks are visible, some of which look similar to distinct peaks in the temperature data

  8. Transient studies of low temperature catalysts for methane conversion. Final report, [September 1992--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, E.E.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this project is to use transient techniques to study gas surface interactions during the oxidative conversion of methane. Two groups of catalysts were studied: a double oxide of vanadium and phosphate or VPO, and double oxides of Ni, Co and Rh and lanthana. The objective of the studies involving the VPO catalyst was to understand gas-surface interactions leading to the formation of formaldehyde. In the second group of catalysts, involving metallo-oxides, the main objective was to study the gas-surface interactions that determine the selectivity to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons or synthesis gas. Transient techniques were used to study the methane-surface interactions and the role of lattice oxygen. The selection of the double oxides was made on the hypothesis that the metal oxide would provide an increase interaction with methane whereas the phosphate or lanthanide would provide the sites for oxygen adsorption. The hypothesis behind this selection of catalysts was that increasing the methane interaction with the catalysts would lower the reaction temperature and thus increase the selectivity to the desired products over the total oxidation reaction. In both groups of catalysts the role of Li as a modifier of the selectivity was also studied in detail.

  9. Development and Transient Analysis of a Helical-coil Steam Generator for High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Nolan A. Anderson; Piyush Sabharwall

    2011-08-01

    A high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is under development by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its design emphasizes electrical power production which may potentially be coupled with process heat for hydrogen production and other industrial applications. NGNP is considering a helical-coil steam generator for the primary heat transport loop heat exchanger based on its increased heat transfer and compactness when compared to other steam generators. The safety and reliability of the helical-coil steam generator is currently under evaluation as part of the development of NGNP. Transients, such as loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), are of interest in evaluating the safety of steam generators. In this study, a complete steam generator inlet pipe break (double ended pipe break) LOCA was simulated by an exponential loss of primary side pressure. For this analysis, a model of the helical-coil steam generator was developed using RELAP5-3D, an INL inhouse systems analysis code. The steam generator model behaved normally during the transient simulating the complete steam generator inlet pipe break LOCA. Further analysis is required to comprehensively evaluate the safety and reliability of the helical-coil steam generator design in the NGNP setting.

  10. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  11. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Patricia M.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  12. Cutting tool temperatures in contour turning: Transient analysis and experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.A.; Jen, T.C.; Lavine, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a model for predicting cutting tool temperatures under transient conditions. It is applicable to processes such as contour turning, in which the cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut may vary continuously with time. The model is intended for use in process development and trouble shooting. Therefore, emphasis is given in the model development to enable rapid computation and to avoid the need to specify parameters such as thermal contact resistances and convection coefficients which are not known in practice. Experiments were conducted to validate the predictive model. The model predictions with two different boundary conditions bound the experimental results. An example is presented which shows the utility of the model for process planning.

  13. Impact of combined transient plasma/heat loads on tungsten performance below and above recrystallization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhoff, Th.; Bardin, S.; Greuner, H.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.; Morgan, T. W.; Pintsuk, G.; Pitts, R. A.; Riccardi, B.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of recrystallization on thermal shock resistance has been identified as an issue that may influence the long term performance of ITER tungsten (W) divertor components. To investigate this issue a unique series of experiments has been performed on ITER divertor W monoblock mock-ups in three EU high heat flux facilities: GLADIS (neutral beam), JUDITH 2 (electron beam) and Magnum-PSI (plasma beam). To simulate ITER mitigated edge localised modes, heat fluxes between 0.11 and 0.6 GW m-2 were applied for Δt  <  1 ms. Two different base temperatures, Tbase  =  1200 °C and 1500 °C, were chosen on which ~18 000/100 000 transient events were superimposed representing several full ITER burning plasma discharges in terms of number of transients and particle fluence. An increase in roughening for both e-beam and plasma loaded surfaces was observed when loading during or after recrystallization and when loading at higher temperature. However, regarding the formation of cracks and microstructural modifications the response was different for e-beam and plasma loaded surfaces. The samples loaded in Magnum-PSI did not crack nor show any sign of recrystallization, even at Tbase  =  1500 °C. This could be a dynamic hydrogen flux effect, because pre-loading of samples with hydrogen neutrals (GLADIS) or without hydrogen (e-beam JUDITH 2) did not yield this result. These results show clearly that the loading method used when investigating and qualifying the thermal shock performance of materials for ITER and future fusion reactors can play an important role. This should be properly accounted for and in fact should be the subject of further R&D.

  14. Effects of transient temperature increases on odor production from thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Iranpour, R; Alatriste-Mondragon, F; Cox, H H J; Haug, R T

    2005-01-01

    The City of Los Angeles, Bureau of Sanitation, has implemented thermophilic anaerobic sludge digestion at the Hyperion and Terminal Island Treatment Plants (HTP and TITP). A two-stage continuous-batch process was established at HTP, while a single-stage sequencing batch process was established at TITP. This was to evaluate compliance with the Class A pathogen reduction requirements of U.S. EPA 40 CFR Part 503. A rapid increase of the digester temperature at TITP from 57.5 to 65.5 degrees C caused an increase of the volatile fatty acid to alkalinity ratio, a decline in digester performance, and an elevated production of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide. A rapid increase of the digester temperature at HTP from 54 to 58 degrees C caused an elevated production of methyl mercaptan, but the effect on the volatile fatty acid to alkalinity ratio and digester performance was insignificant. It is likely that these effects observed at TITP and HTP were transient responses to rapid changes in temperature. PMID:16180433

  15. Transient temperature distributions in simple conducting bodies steadily heated through a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Hermon M

    1953-01-01

    An analysis is made of the transient heat-conduction effects in three simple semi-infinite bodies: the flat insulated plate, the conical shell, and the slender solid cone. The bodies are assumed to have constant initial temperatures and, at zero time, to begin to move at a constant speed and zero angle of attack through a homogeneous atmosphere. The heat input is taken as that through a laminar boundary layer. Radiation heat transfer and transverse temperature gradients are assumed to be zero. The appropriate heat-conduction equations are solved by an iteration method, the zeroeth-order terms describing the situation in the limit of small time. The method is presented and the solutions are calculated to three orders which are sufficient to give reasonably accurate results when the forward edge has attained one-half the total temperature rise (nose half-rise time). Flight Mach number and air properties occur as parameters in the result. Approximate expressions for the extent of the conduction region and nose half-rise times as functions of the parameters of the problem are presented. (author)

  16. Sound velocity dispersion in room temperature ionic liquids studied using the transient grating method.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M; Terazima, M; Kimura, Y

    2008-03-21

    Sound velocity is determined by the transient grating method in a range from 10(6) to 10(10) Hz in three room temperature ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, and N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. In all room temperature ionic liquids studied, the sound velocity increased with increasing frequency. The cause of this change is posited to be structural relaxation in the room temperature ionic liquids. Frequency dependence of the sound velocity is not reproduced by a simple Debye relaxation model. The sound velocity dispersion relation in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate matches a Cole-Davidson function with parameters determined by a dielectric relaxation [C. Daguenet et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12682 (2006)], indicating that structural and reorientational relaxations are strongly coupled. Conversely, the sound velocity dispersions of the other two ionic liquids measured do not match those measured for dielectric relaxation, implying that structural relaxation is much faster than the reorientational relaxation. This difference is discussed in relation to the motilities of anions and cations. PMID:18361592

  17. A numerical comparison with an exact solution for the transient response of a cylinder immersed in a fluid. [computer simulated underwater tests to determine transient response of a submerged cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giltrud, M. E.; Lucas, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    The transient response of an elastic cylindrical shell immersed in an acoustic media that is engulfed by a plane wave is determined numerically. The method applies to the USA-STAGS code which utilizes the finite element method for the structural analysis and the doubly asymptotic approximation for the fluid-structure interaction. The calculations are compared to an exact analysis for two separate loading cases: a plane step wave and an exponentially decaying plane wave.

  18. Analytical solution of the transient temperature profile in gain medium of passively Q-switched microchip laser.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiahui; Li, Jianlang

    2014-11-01

    The transient temperature evolution in the gain medium of a continuous wave (CW) end-pumped passively Q-switched microchip (PQSM) laser is analyzed. By approximating the time-dependent population inversion density as a sawtooth function of time and treating the time-dependent pump absorption of a CW end-pumped PQSM laser as the superposition of an infinite series of short pumping pulses, the analytical expressions of transient temperature evolution and distribution in the gain medium for four- and three-level laser systems, respectively, are given. These analytical solutions are applied to evaluate the transient temperature evolution and distribution in the gain medium of CW end-pumped PQSM Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG lasers. PMID:25402922

  19. An estimate of the impact of transient luminous events on the atmospheric temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, E.; Berg, P.; Arnold, N. F.; Christiansen, B.; Thejll, P.

    2008-09-01

    We present an order of magnitude estimate of the impact of sprites and other transient luminous events (TLEs) on the atmospheric temperature via ozone changes. To address the effects of expected TLE-ozone changes of at most a few percent, we first study the linearity of the radiatively driven response of a stratosphere-mesosphere model and of a general circulation model (GCM) to a range of uniform climatological ozone perturbations. The study is limited to Northern Hemisphere winter conditions, when planetary wave activity is high and the non linear stratosphere-troposphere coupling can be strong. Throughout most of the middle atmosphere of both models, the radiatively driven temperature response to uniform 5% to 20% ozone perturbations shows a close-to linear relationship with the magnitude of the perturbation. A mid-latitude stratopause ozone perturbation is then imposed as an idealised experiment that mimics local temperature gradients introduced by the latitudinal dependence of TLEs. An unrealistically high 20% magnitude is adopted for the regional ozone perturbation to obtain statistical significance in the model response. The local linearity of the radiatively driven response is used to infer a first order estimate of TLE-induced temperature changes of the order of 0.015 K under typical conditions, and less than a peak temperature change of 0.3 K at 60 70 km height in coincidence of extraordinarily active TLE-producing thunderstorms before horizontal mixing quickly occurs. In the latter case, dedicated mesoscale modelling is needed to study the relevance of regional non linear processes which are expected to impact these radiatively driven responses.

  20. Fluid source and pressure temperature conditions of high-salinity fluids in syn-tectonic veins from the Northeastern Apuan Alps (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montomoli, Chiara; Ruggieri, Giovanni; Carosi, Rodolfo; Dini, Andrea; Genovesi, Marianna

    Structural studies on syn-tectonic veins cropping out in the northeastern sector of the Apuan Alps metamorphic complex (Northern Apennines, Italy) revealed two sets of veins: (1) type A fibrous veins within the “Scisti sericitici Formation”, related to a late-D1 tectonic phase; (2) B-veins, within the “Diaspri Formation” that developed between late-D1 and D2 tectonic phases. The mineralogy of the A (quartz, chlorite, hematite with minor amounts of apatite, allanite-(Ce), thorite and synchysite) and B-veins (quartz only) reflects the mineralogical composition of the host-rocks: quartz, chlorite, white mica and accessory minerals (apatite, zircon, titanite) occur in the “Scisti sericitici Formation”, while quartz is the main phase in the “Diaspri Formation”. The study of fluid inclusions trapped in quartz crystals of the syn-tectonic veins shows that the inclusions are always oversaturated in NaCl at room temperature and their salinities range from 29.5 to 37 wt.% NaCl equiv. The isochore of the earliest trapped fluid inclusions (type IA; primary inclusions in fiber quartz of A veins), coupled with mineralogical geothermometric data, constrains the pressure-temperature conditions to around 325-300 MPa and 370-380 °C during the late-D1 phase. Subsequent trapping of inclusion types IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB and VB in the two vein sets probably occurred during a pressure-temperature decrease (down to 220-245 MPa and 260-270 °C) at a lithostatic thermal gradient of 30 °C/km. Type IVB inclusions, on the other hand, were probably trapped at lower pressure (between lithostatic and hydrostatic conditions) during a transient pressure drop resulting from fault-valve action. SEM/EDS analyses on salts precipitated within opened inclusions confirmed the NaCl-rich compositions of the trapped fluids and also revealed the presence of minor amounts of Ca, K and Mn in the salts. A fluid circulation model, based on mineralogical and fluid inclusion data, was proposed for

  1. Transient fluid-structure interaction of elongated bodies by finite-element method using elliptical and spheroidal absorbing boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S K; Premkumar, R

    2003-12-01

    In a domain method of solution of exterior scalar wave equation, the radiation condition needs to be imposed on a truncation boundary of the modeling domain. The Bayliss, Gunzberger, and Turkel (BGT) boundary dampers, which require a circular cylindrical and spherical truncation boundaries in two-(2D) and three-(3D)-dimensional problems, respectively, have been particularly successful in the analysis of scattering and radiation problems. However, for an elongated body, elliptical (2D) or spheroidal (3D) truncation boundaries have potential to reduce the size of modeling domain and hence computational effort. For harmonic problems, such extensions of the first- and second-order BGT dampers are available in the literature. In this paper, BGT dampers in both elliptical and spheroidal coordinate systems have been developed for transient problems involving acoustic radiation as well as fluid-structure interaction and implemented in the context of finite-element method based upon unsymmetric pressure-displacement formulation. Applications to elongated radiators and shells are reported using several numerical examples with excellent comparisons. It is demonstrated that significant computational economy can be achieved for elongated bodies with the use of these dampers. PMID:14714787

  2. Transient fluid-structure interaction of elongated bodies by finite-element method using elliptical and spheroidal absorbing boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.; Premkumar, R.

    2003-12-01

    In a domain method of solution of exterior scalar wave equation, the radiation condition needs to be imposed on a truncation boundary of the modeling domain. The Bayliss, Gunzberger, and Turkel (BGT) boundary dampers, which require a circular cylindrical and spherical truncation boundaries in two-(2D) and three-(3D)-dimensional problems, respectively, have been particularly successful in the analysis of scattering and radiation problems. However, for an elongated body, elliptical (2D) or spheroidal (3D) truncation boundaries have potential to reduce the size of modeling domain and hence computational effort. For harmonic problems, such extensions of the first- and second-order BGT dampers are available in the literature. In this paper, BGT dampers in both elliptical and spheroidal coordinate systems have been developed for transient problems involving acoustic radiation as well as fluid-structure interaction and implemented in the context of finite-element method based upon unsymmetric pressure-displacement formulation. Applications to elongated radiators and shells are reported using several numerical examples with excellent comparisons. It is demonstrated that significant computational economy can be achieved for elongated bodies with the use of these dampers.

  3. Transient liquid phase bonding as a joining technique for high-temperature power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, Nicholas Seth

    Fundamental aspects of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding in the Cu-Sn system have been studied, with the objective of assessing the utility of the bonding technique in joining high-temperature SiC devices to direct bond copper (DBC) substrates in power electronic packages. This technique can be implemented at relatively low temperatures (in comparison to the melting point of Cu), yet provide bonds that have composition and properties that are similar to those of Cu. The bonding parameters of time, temperature, and interlayer thickness were probed. Additionally, two methods for the introduction of the interlayer were used: one based on the use of foils and the other based on electron beam deposition. The resulting microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Microstructures consisting of the phases Cu6Sn5, Cu3Sn, Cu 41Sn11, and (Cu) were produced. The time required to form a bond with the targeted microstructure, notably that of (Cu), was found to be dominated by the consumption of intermediate phases, as dictated by diffusion, and thus scaled quadratically with initial interlayer thickness. Two types of bonding defects were obtained: one due to surface contamination and the other caused by the consumption of Sn through the formation of the Cu 6Sn5 intermetallic in the solid state during heating. The successful production of samples devoid of such defects was via electron beam deposition of the interlayer material, with sufficient thickness to ensure ample material for the formation of the transient liquid phase following solid state intermetallic formation. The mechanical properties of these bonds were measured and compared with those made with Sn foil. The toughness of the bonds in samples where the Sn interlayer was introduced by electron beam deposition was greater than that of samples that used an interlayer of Sn foil. The difference was attributed to the higher level of porosity and defects in

  4. Natural occurrence and significance of fluids indicating high pressure and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1981-01-01

    Most natural minerals have formed from a fluid phase such as a silicate melt or a saline aqueous solution. Fluid inclusions are tiny volumes of such fluids that were trapped within the growing crystals. These inclusions can provide valuable but sometimes ambiguous data on the temperature, pressure, and composition of these fluids, many of which are not available from any other source. They also provide "visual autoclaves" in which it is possible to watch, through the microscope, the actual phase changes take place as the inclusions are heated. This paper reviews the methods of study and the results obtained, mainly on inclusions formed from highly concentrated solutions, at temperatures ???500??C. Many such fluids have formed as a result of immiscibility with silicate melt in igneous or high-temperature metamorphic rocks. These include fluids consisting of CO2, H2O, or hydrosaline melts that were <50% H2O. From the fluid inclusion evidence it is clear that a boiling, very hot, very saline fluid was present during the formation of most of the porphyry copper deposits in the world. Similarly, from the inclusion evidence it is clear that early (common) pegmatites formed from essentially silicate melts and that the late, rare-element-bearing and chamber-type pegmatites formed from a hydrosaline melt or a more dilute water solution. The evidence on whether this change in composition from early to late solutions was generally continuous or involved immiscibility is not as clear. ?? 1981.

  5. Time-resolved nature of exhaust gas emissions and piston wall temperature under transient operation in a small diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Reksowardojo, I.K.; Ogawa, Hideyuki; Miyamoto, Noboru; Enomoto, Yoshiteru; Kitamura, Toru

    1996-09-01

    Diesel combustion and exhaust gas emissions under transient operation (when fuel amounts abruptly increased) were investigated under a wide range of operating conditions with a newly developed gas sampling system. The relation between gas emissions and piston wall temperatures was also investigated. The results indicated that after the start of acceleration NOx, THC and smoke showed transient behaviors before reaching the steady state condition. Of the three gases, THC was most affected by piston wall temperature; its concentration decreased as the wall temperature increased throughout the acceleration except immediately after the start of acceleration. The number of cycles, at which gas concentrations reach the steady-state value after the start of acceleration, were about 1.2 times the cycle constant of the piston wall temperature for THC, and 2.3 times for smoke.

  6. Effect of horizontal heat and fluid flow on the vertical temperature distribution in a semiconfining layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ge, S.

    1996-01-01

    By including the constant flow of heat and fluid in the horizontal direction, we develop an analytical solution for the vertical temperature distribution within the semiconfining layer of a typical aquifer system. The solution is an extension of the previous one-dimensional theory by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos [1965]. It provides a quantitative tool for analyzing the uncertainty of the horizontal heat and fluid flow. The analytical results demonstrate that horizontal flow of heat and fluid, if at values much smaller than those of the vertical, has a negligible effect on the vertical temperature distribution but becomes significant when it is comparable to the vertical.

  7. Diagnostic techniques for measuring temperature transients and stress transients in the first wall of an ICF reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Melamed, N.T.; Taylor, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    The primary challenge in the design of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) power reactor is to make the first wall survive the frequent explosions of the pellets. Westinghouse has proposed a dry wall design consisting of steel tubes coated with tantalum. This report describes the design of a test chamber and two diagnostic procedures for experimentally determining the reliability of the Westinghouse design. The test chamber simulates the x-ray and ion pulse irradiation of the wall due to a pellet explosion. The diagnostics consist of remote temperature sensing and surface deformation measurements. The chamber and diagnostics can also be used to test other first-wall designs.

  8. A transient free convection study with temperature-dependent viscosity in a square cavity with a local heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astanina, M. S.; Sheremet, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Unsteady natural convection inside of a differentially-heated square enclosure filled with a fluid of temperature-dependent viscosity has been numerically studied. A mathematical model formulated in the dimensionless stream function and vorticity has been solved by a finite difference method of the second order accuracy. The effect of dimensionless time and Prandtl number on streamlines and isotherms has been investigated for Ra = 105. The results clearly demonstrate an evolution of fluid flow and heat transfer in the case of variable viscosity fluid.

  9. Evaluation of Heat Pipe Working Fluids In The Temperature Range 450 to 700 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William G.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Angirasa, Devarakonda; Mi, Ye

    2004-02-01

    In the temperature range of 450-700 K, there are currently no working fluids that have been validated for heat pipes and loop heat pipes, with the exception of water in the lower portion of the range. This paper reviews a number of potential working fluid including several organic fluids, mercury, sulfur/iodine, and halides. Physical property data are used where available, and estimated where unavailable using standard methods. The halide salts appear to possess attractive properties, with good liquid transport factors, and suitable vapor pressures. Where nuclear radiation is not a consideration, other potential working fluids are aniline, naphthalene, toluene, and phenol. The limited available life test data available suggests that toluene, naphthalene, and some of the halides are compatible with stainless steel, while the other fluids have not been tested.

  10. Wide-band complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of magnetic fluids as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Kinsella, L.; Charles, S. W.

    1999-07-01

    Measurements of the complex magnetic susceptibility over the frequency and temperature ranges of 2 MHz-6 GHz and 20 to -100°C, respectively, are reported for the first time for a magnetic fluid. The fluid used was a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles of median diameter 9 nm in a hydrocarbon oil (isopar m). Resonance was observed and found to increase from approx 1.5 GHz to 3.3 GHz in the temperature range 20 to -50°C. The increase in resonant frequency is attributed to a decrease in thermal fluctuations with decrease in temperature. At frequencies below approximately 19 MHz, a significant drop in χ'( ω) with decrease in temperature over the temperature range 20 to -100°C, is observed and is attributed to the changes in the Néel and Brownian relaxation processes. Below -60°C, the temperature at which the suspension becomes solid, Brownian relaxation ceases to exist.

  11. Two-Phase Working Fluids for the Temperature Range 50 to 350 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Owzarski, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    The decomposition and corrosion of two-phase heat transfer liquids and metal envelopes have been investigated on the basis of molecular bond strengths and chemical thermodynamics. Potentially stable heat transfer fluids for the temperature range 100 C to 350 C have been identified, and reflux heat pipes tests initiated with 10 fluids and carbon steel and aluminum envelopes to experimentally establish corrosion behavior and noncondensable gas generation rates.

  12. Final Report: Ionization chemistry of high temperature molecular fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E

    2007-02-26

    With the advent of coupled chemical/hydrodynamic reactive flow models for high explosives, understanding detonation chemistry is of increasing importance to DNT. The accuracy of first principles detonation codes, such as CHEETAH, are dependent on an accurate representation of the species present under detonation conditions. Ionic species and non-molecular phases are not currently included coupled chemistry/hydrodynamic simulations. This LDRD will determine the prevalence of such species during high explosive detonations, by carrying out experimental and computational investigation of common detonation products under extreme conditions. We are studying the phase diagram of detonation products such as H{sub 2}O, or NH{sub 3} and mixtures under conditions of extreme pressure (P > 1 GPa) and temperature (T > 1000K). Under these conditions, the neutral molecular form of matter transforms to a phase dominated by ions. The phase boundaries of such a region are unknown.

  13. High-temperature chlorine-rich fluid in the martian crust: A precursor to habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, Justin; Treiman, Allan H.; Giesting, Paul A.; Goodrich, Cyrena A.; Gross, Juliane

    2014-09-01

    We report scapolite in a melt inclusion in olivine in Nakhla, which is the first occurrence of Cl-scapolite found in a martian meteorite. Using terrestrial metamorphic experiments and modeling we constrain its origin. Cl-rich scapolite in Nakhla is consistent with formation from either a late stage Cl-rich, water-poor magma or magmatic Cl-rich hydrothermal brine at a minimum temperature of 700 °C. The temperature of hydrothermal activity recorded by the Cl-scapolite is significantly higher than the temperatures recorded by alteration minerals in Nakhla, and the fluid was Cl-rich, not CO2-rich. Our results demonstrate that high-temperature Cl-rich fluids were present within the martian crust, and any potential biologic activity would have to survive in these high temperatures and saline fluids. Halophiles can thrive in NaCl-rich systems but at significantly lower temperatures than those recorded by the scapolite. During cooling of the fluid, the system could have reached a habitable state for halophiles. Importantly, halophiles can survive the conditions of space if they are encased in salt crystals, and therefore chlorine-rich phases present an opportunity to investigate for extant life both on the surface of Mars and in martian meteorites.

  14. Fluid-inclusion evidence for previous higher temperatures in the miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, K.E.; Fournier, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    Heating and freezing data were obtained for liquid-rich secondary fluid inclusions in magmatic quartz, hydrothermal calcite and hydrothermal quartz crystals from 19 sampled depths in eight production drill holes (PGM-1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 11, 12 and 15) of the Miravalles geothermal field in northwestern Costa Rica. Homogenization temperatures for 386 fluid inclusions range from near the present measured temperatures to as much as 70??C higher than the maximum measured well temperature of about 240??C. Melting-point temperature measurements for 76 fluid inclusions suggest a calculated salinity range of about 0.2-1.9 wt% NaCl equivalent. Calculated salinities as high as 3.1-4.0 wt% NaCl equivalent for 20 fluid inclusions from the lower part of drill hole PGM-15 (the deepest drill hole) indicate that higher salinity water probably was present in the deeper part of the Miravalles geothermal field at the time these fluid inclusions were formed. ?? 1988.

  15. The dissociation and equation of state of dense fluid oxygen at high pressures and high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q F; Cai, L C; Zhang, Y; Gu, Y J

    2008-03-14

    The dissociation, pressure, and internal energy of dense fluid oxygen at high temperatures and densities have been calculated from the free-energy functions using the self-consistent fluid variational theory. In this paper, we focused on a mixture of oxygen atoms and molecules, and investigated the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperature. The single-shock Hugoniot derived from this equation of state agrees well with gas-gun experiments for pressure versus density. The equation of state and dissociation degree are predicted in the ranges of temperature of 5000-16,000 K and density of 0.1-4.5 g/cm(3). These data are formulated in the analytical forms of dissociation degree-density-temperature and pressure-density-temperature equation of state. PMID:18345911

  16. Temperature modulation of the vibrational responses of a flexible fluid-conveying pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelaja, Adekunle

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the nonlinear transverse vibration of a flexible pipe conveying hot, pressurized fluid is investigated. The pipe which is subjected to a pinned-pinned end condition extends as a result of several operating variables such as internal fluid temperature variation, pre-stress and internal pressurization. The equation of motion is solved analytically by hybrid Fourier-Laplace transforms, and the effects of inlet temperature, temperature gradient, and coefficient of area deformation are investigated on the natural frequencies and transverse dynamic response of the pipeline. While the inlet temperature and temperature gradient are found to be inversely proportional to the natural frequencies and amplitude of the dynamic response, increase in the coefficient of area deformation has little effect on the natural frequencies for the particular case considered.

  17. Transient temperature and sea level response of a two-dimensional ocean-climate model to greenhouse gas increases

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, L.D.D.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional dynamical ocean model is coupled to an energy balance climate model and used to investigate the transient surface temperature and sea level response to greenhouse gas increases. For most experiments a step function surface-troposphere heating perturbation of 6 W/sq m is applied. A transient reduction in the thermohaline overturning flux of 15-30% occurs in most experiments, although in some cases a near-total circulation collapse occurs within the first 100 years and lasts 700-1000 years. The transient circulation decrease is attributed to the greater rate of downward penetration of the heating anomaly in downwelling rather than in upwelling regions and is not a result of reduced convection. For experiments in which the steady state circulation is qualitatively unchanged after a heating perturbation, the surface temperature response is roughly uniform with latitude, in the absence of ice and snow. However, in some cases a heating perturbation induces the transition from a one-cell to a two-cell overturning circulation, or causes a complete reversal in the direction of overturning when a single cell spans both hemispheres, causing marked latitudinal variations in the surface temperature response.

  18. Properties of planetary fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Holmes, N. C.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    Observational data obtained by the Voyager space probes to the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have provided valuable information, which is used to refine the picture of the nature of the interiors of these planets. Major results from the Voyager missions include observations of substantial magnetic fields and improved models of internal density distributions. The goal is to obtain equations of state and electrical conductivity data for planetary gases (H2 and He) and the ices (H2O, CH4, and NH3, and their mixtures), which are considered to be the major constituents of the giant planets. These data are needed to test theoretical data bases used to construct models of the chemical composition of planetary interiors, models which are consistent with observables such as mass, diameter, gravitational moments, rotation rate, and magnetic field. The 100 GPa (1 Mbar) pressures and several 1000 K temperatures in the giant planets can be achieved in the lab by the shock compression of liquid specimens. Results are briefly examined.

  19. Finite-temperature fluid-insulator transition of strongly interacting 1D disordered bosons.

    PubMed

    Michal, Vincent P; Aleiner, Igor L; Altshuler, Boris L; Shlyapnikov, Georgy V

    2016-08-01

    We consider the many-body localization-delocalization transition for strongly interacting one-dimensional disordered bosons and construct the full picture of finite temperature behavior of this system. This picture shows two insulator-fluid transitions at any finite temperature when varying the interaction strength. At weak interactions, an increase in the interaction strength leads to insulator [Formula: see text] fluid transition, and, for large interactions, there is a reentrance to the insulator regime. It is feasible to experimentally verify these predictions by tuning the interaction strength with the use of Feshbach or confinement-induced resonances, for example, in (7)Li or (39)K. PMID:27436894

  20. A method of computing the transient temperature of thick walls from arbitrary variation of adiabatic-wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, P R

    1958-01-01

    A method of calculating the temperature of thick walls has been developed in which the time series and the response to a unit triangle variation of surface temperature concepts are used, together with essentially standard formulas for transient temperature and heat flow into thick walls. The method can be used without knowledge of the mathematical tools of its development. The method is particularly suitable for determining the wall temperature in one-dimensional thermal problems in aeronautics where there is a continuous variation of the heat-transfer coefficient and adiabatic-wall temperature. The method also offers a convenient means for solving the inverse problem of determining the heat-flow history when temperature history is known.

  1. Impact of synovial fluid flow on temperature regulation in knee cartilage.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Mohamadreza Nassajian; Abdel-Sayed, Philippe; Camine, Valérie Malfroy; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2015-01-21

    Several studies have reported an increase of temperature in cartilage submitted to cyclic sinusoidal loading. The temperature increase is in part due to the viscous behavior of this tissue, which partially dissipates the input mechanical energy into heat. While the synovial fluid flow within the intra-articular gap and inside the porous cartilage is supposed to play an important role in the regulation of the cartilage temperature, no specific study has evaluated this aspect. In the present numerical study, a poroelastic model of the knee cartilage is developed to evaluate first the temperature increase in the cartilage due to dissipation and second the impact of the synovial fluid flow in the cartilage heat transfer phenomenon. Our results showed that, the local temperature is effectively increased in knee cartilage due to its viscous behavior. The synovial fluid flow cannot significantly preventing this phenomenon. We explain this result by the low permeability of cartilage and the moderate fluid exchange at the surface of cartilage under deformation. PMID:25488136

  2. Retrograde methane-dominated fluid inclusions from high-temperature granulites of Rogaland, southwestern Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Kerkhof, A.M. ); Touret, J.L.R. ); Maijer, C.; Jansen, J.B.H. )

    1991-09-01

    Non-aqueous inclusions in the high-grade (800-1,000C; 4kbar) metamorphic Rogaland region, southwestern Norway, consist of mixtures of CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2}. In particular the fluid inclusions in quartz veins in migmatites are characterized by high CH{sub 4} concentrations and they were re-equilibrated at temperatures below 500C during isobaric cooling. Observations by microthermometry demonstrated several complicated sequences of phase transitions, including partial and metastable homogenization (at lower temperature than melting), and S-L or S-V transitions. The phase behavior reflects a wide variation in composition and molar volume. Fluid compositions were measured by Raman microspectrometry. By this method, also small amounts of graphite have been detected in CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} inclusions. The instantaneous formation of graphite in a CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} inclusion by induction of the argon laser beam has been observed which points to the metastability of the CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} mixture. The calculated densities of the observed fluid mixtures are relatively low, necessitating a revision of the earlier interpretation of these inclusions as containing pure high-density fluids. Inclusions in quartz, trapped after the peak of metamorphism, record fluid heterogeneity which may present evidence for fluid-deficient metamorphism during the retrograde M2-M3 metamorphism.

  3. Trefftz method for solving two-dimensional temperature field of boiling fluid flowing along the minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, S.; Piasecka, M.; Hożejowski, L.

    2013-04-01

    The paper focuses on the numerical solution to two-dimensional temperature field of boiling liquid flowing along a vertical, asymmetrically heated minichannel with a rectangular cross-section. One of the walls of a minichannel is a DC supplied heating foil. The parallel walls are made of glass panes for thermal insulation and for observation of the fluid flow and the void fraction. A thin layer of thermosensitive liquid crystal paint on the outer side of the heating foil enabled to record two-dimensional temperature distribution of outer foil surface. The paper presents computations based on Trefftz method for finding two-dimensional temperature field of boiling liquid flowing along the minichannel. The presented research is limited only to a liquid phase of the two-phase mixture observed in the minichannel. The velocity of liquid flowing through the minichannel is represented by a piecewise linear approximating function. To solve energy equation for liquid phase, Trefftz functions specially generated for this purpose were employed. Temperature field in the fluid was approximated by a linear combination of Trefftz functions. Temperature at the interface between working fluid and foil amounts to the saturation temperature. Temperature distribution in the foil and the glass pane was also computed using proper Trefftz functions.

  4. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Cold Flow Test and Transient CFD Analysis of Out-of-Round Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Brown, Andrew; McDaniels, David; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes two nozzle fluid flow interactions. They include: 1) Cold flow nozzle tests with fluid-structure interaction at nozzle separated flow; and 2) CFD analysis for nozzle flow and side loads of nozzle extensions with various out-of-round cases.

  5. The low temperature differential Stirling engine with working fluid operated on critical condition

    SciTech Connect

    Naso, V.; Dong, W.; Lucentini, M.; Capata, R.

    1998-07-01

    The research and development of low temperature differential Stirling engine has a great potential market since a lot of thermal energy at low temperature can supply it and the cost of this kind of engine is lower than general Stirling engine. The characteristics of low compression ratio and low differential temperature Stirling engine may be satisfied with working fluid compressed on critical conditions. By combining two phase heat transfer with forced convective flow in compression space and through the regenerator in the engine, a new heat transfer coefficient emerges capable of absorbing and releasing high heat fluxes without the corresponding low temperature increase. The current analysis focuses on the study of Stirling engines with working fluid compressed on critical conditions, thus at two-phase heat transfer in compression space and regenerator of the engine under forced convective flow conditions.

  6. Experimental apparatus for measuring the thermal diffusivity of pure fluids at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kruppa, B.; Jany, P.; Straub, J.

    1988-11-01

    Dynamic light scattering represents a suitable method for measuring the thermal diffusivity of optically transparent fluids. The classic application of the method is the immediate vicinity around the critical point due to its dependence upon the intensity of scattered light and its high sensitivity to undesired light scattering. By means of subsequent modifications of the experimental setup, the authors have been able to expand this region of applicability over the last 12 years and could systematically investigate numerous substances and their binary mixtures within a temperature range of 280 K < T < 350 K. Their planned investigation of fluids suitable for ORC-HP-technology necessitates performing measurements at higher temperatures and pressures. The experimental apparatus newly designed for this purpose is capable of sustaining a relatively high temperature constance at temperatures up to 700 K. Factors restricting the measurable range of state and their influence on the design of the sample cell are discussed.

  7. Identification of an average temperature and a dynamical pressure in a multitemperature mixture of fluids.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Henri; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2008-07-01

    We present a classical approach to a mixture of compressible fluids when each constituent has its own temperature. The introduction of an average temperature together with the entropy principle dictates the classical Fick law for diffusion and also novel constitutive equations associated with the difference of temperatures between the components. The constitutive equations fit with results recently obtained through a Maxwellian iteration procedure in extended thermodynamics theory of multitemperature mixtures. The differences of temperatures between the constituents imply the existence of a dynamical pressure even if the fluids have a zero bulk viscosity. The nonequilibrium dynamical pressure can be measured and may be convenient in several physical situations, such as, for example, in cosmological circumstances where--as many authors assert--a dynamical pressure played a major role in the evolution of the early universe. PMID:18764046

  8. Noncontact temperature measurements in the microgravity fluids and transport phenomena discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, Jack

    1988-01-01

    The program of activities within the Microgravity Fluids and Transport Phenomena Discipline has been structured to enable the systematic pursuit of an increased understanding of low gravity fluid behavior/phenomena in a way which ensures that the results are appropriate to the widest range of applications. This structure is discussed and an overview of some of the activities which are underway is given. Of significance is the fact that in the majority of the current and planned activities, the measurement and, or control of the fluid temperature is a key experiment requirement. In addition, many of the experiments require that the temperature measurement be nonintrusive. A description of these requirements together with the current techniques which are being employed or under study to make these measurements is also discussed.

  9. Two-phase working fluids for the temperature range of 50 to 350 deg, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Several two phase heat transfer fluids were tested in aluminum and carbon steel reflux capsules for over 25,000 hours at temperatures up to 300 C. Several fluids showed very good stability and would be useful for long duration heat transfer applications over the range 100 to 350 C. Instrumentation for the measurement of surface tension and viscosity were constructed for use with heat transfer fluids over the temperature range 0 to 300 C and with pressures from 0 to 10 atmospheres. The surface tension measuring device constructed requires less than a 1.0 cc sample and displays an accuracy of about 5 percent in preliminary tests, while the viscometer constructed for this program requires a 0.05 cc sample and shows an accuracy of about 5 percent in initial tests.

  10. Single Event Transient Analysis of an SOI Operational Amplifier for Use in Low-Temperature Martian Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Jamie S.; Scheik, Leif; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Mojarradi, Mohammad M; Chen, Yuan; Miyahira, Tetsuo; Blalock, Benjamin; Greenwell, Robert; Doyle, Barney

    2006-01-01

    The next generation of Martian rover#s to be launched by JPL are to examine polar regions where temperatures are extremely low and the absence of an earth-like atmosphere results in high levels of cosmic radiation at ground level. Cosmic rays lead to a plethora of radiation effects including Single Event Transients (SET) which can severely degrade microelectronic functionality. As such, a radiation-hardened, temperature compensated CMOS Single-On-Insulator (SOI) Operational Amplifier has been designed for JPL by the University of Tennessee and fabricated by Honeywell using the SOI V process. SOI technology has been shownto be far less sensitive to transient effects than both bulk and epilayer Si. Broad beam heavy-ion tests at the University of Texas A&M using Kr and Xebeams of energy 25MeV/amu were performed to ascertain the duration and severity of the SET for the op-amp configured for a low and high gain application. However, some ambiguity regarding the location of transient formation required the use of a focused MeV ion microbeam. A 36MeV O6(+) microbeam. the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) was used to image and verify regions of particular concern. This is a viewgraph presentation

  11. Calcium regulation by temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in human uveal melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Derckx, Raissa; Reinach, Peter S; Garreis, Fabian; Böhm, Arina; Schmelzer, Lisa; Skosyrski, Sergej; Ramesh, Niraja; Abdelmessih, Suzette; Polat, Onur Kerem; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Riechardt, Aline Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is both the most common and fatal intraocular cancer among adults worldwide. As with all types of neoplasia, changes in Ca(2+) channel regulation can contribute to the onset and progression of this pathological condition. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) are two different types of Ca(2+) permeation pathways that can be dysregulated during neoplasia. We determined in malignant human UM and healthy uvea and four different UM cell lines whether there is gene and functional expression of TRP subtypes and CB1 since they could serve as drug targets to either prevent or inhibit initiation and progression of UM. RT-PCR, Ca(2+) transients, immunohistochemistry and planar patch-clamp analysis probed for their gene expression and functional activity, respectively. In UM cells, TRPV1 and TRPM8 gene expression was identified. Capsaicin (CAP), menthol or icilin induced Ca(2+) transients as well as changes in ion current behavior characteristic of TRPV1 and TRPM8 expression. Such effects were blocked with either La(3+), capsazepine (CPZ) or BCTC. TRPA1 and CB1 are highly expressed in human uvea, but TRPA1 is not expressed in all UM cell lines. In UM cells, the CB1 agonist, WIN 55,212-2, induced Ca(2+) transients, which were suppressed by La(3+) and CPZ whereas CAP-induced Ca(2+) transients could also be suppressed by CB1 activation. Identification of functional TRPV1, TRPM8, TRPA1 and CB1 expression in these tissues may provide novel drug targets for treatment of this aggressive neoplastic disease. PMID:24084605

  12. Transient infrared temperature measurements of liquid-fuel surfaces: results of studies of flames spread over liquids.

    PubMed

    Konishi, T; Ito, A; Saito, K

    2000-08-20

    An infrared thermograph technique with an 8-12-microm spectral range was used to measure transient two-dimensional profiles of liquid (1-propanol) surface temperatures. An IR camera was placed over the liquid, allowing us to observe the fuel surface through propanol vapor. To use this technique, one must know the emissivity of the liquid surface and the IR absorption of both the liquid propanol and the propanol vapor. The emissivity of the liquid propanol was determined with a fine thermocouple temperature measurement, IR absorption with the propanol vapor was calibrated with a blackbody source, and IR absorption with a liquid propanol was theoretically estimated. The accuracy of our infrared thermograph technique proved to be better than 97% in detecting the liquid-surface temperature with a temperature sensitivity of 0.1 degrees C and a time response of 30 ms. PMID:18350009

  13. DESTRUCTION OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SOILS WITH A HIGH-TEMPERATURE FLUID-WALL (HTFW) REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a high temperature fluid-wall (HTFW) Reactor to detoxify biorefractory hazardous substances, as well as soils contaminated with hazardous materials, such as PCBs, dioxins, and organophosphates. A typical HTFW Reac...

  14. Computational fluid dynamics model of avian tracheal temperature control as a model for extant and extinct animals.

    PubMed

    Sverdlova, N S; Arkali, F; Witzel, U; Perry, S F

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory evaporative cooling is an important mechanism of temperature control in bird. A computational simulation of the breathing cycle, heat and water loss in anatomical avian trachea/air sac model has not previously been conducted. We report a first attempt to simulate a breathing cycle in a three-dimensional model of avian trachea and air sacs (domestic fowl) using transient computational fluid dynamics. The airflow in the trachea of the model is evoked by changing the volume of the air sacs based on the measured tidal volume and inspiratory/expiratory times for the domestic fowl. We compare flow parameters and heat transfer results with in vivo data and with our previously reported results for a two-dimensional model. The total respiratory heat loss corresponds to about 13-19% of the starvation metabolic rate of domestic fowl. The present study can lend insight into a possible thermoregulatory function in species with long necks and/or a very long trachea, as found in swans and birds of paradise. Assuming the structure of the sauropod dinosaur respiratory system was close to avian, the simulation of the respiratory temperature control (using convective and evaporative cooling) in the extensively experimentally studied domestic fowl may also help in making simulations of respiratory heat control in these extinct animals. PMID:23797184

  15. On the integral-balance approach to the transient heat conduction with linearly temperature-dependent thermal diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Antoine; Hristov, Jordan

    2016-04-01

    Closed form approximate solutions to nonlinear transient heat conduction with linearly temperature-dependent thermal diffusivity have been developed by the integral-balance integral method under transient conditions. The solutions uses improved direct approaches of the integral method and avoid the commonly used linearization by the Kirchhoff transformation. The main steps in the new solutions are improvements in the integration technique of the double-integration technique and the optimization of the exponent of the approximate parabolic profile with unspecified exponent. Solutions to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary condition problems have been developed as examples by the classical Heat-balance integral method (HBIM) and the Double-integration method (DIM). Additional examples with HBIM and DIM solutions to cases when the Kirchhoff transform is initially applied have been developed.

  16. Transient Modeling and Analysis of a Metabolic Heat-Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) System for a PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacomini, Christie; Powers, Aaron; Speight, Garland; Padilla, Sebastian; Paul, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    A Metabolic heat-regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) system is being developed for carbon dioxide, water and thermal control in a lunar and martian portable life support system (PLSS). A previous system analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of MTSA on PLSS design. That effort was Mars specific and assumed liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) coolant made from martian resources. Transient effects were not considered but rather average conditions were used throughout the analysis. This effort takes into further consideration the transient effects inherent in the cycling MTSA system as well as assesses the use of water as coolant. Standard heat transfer, thermodynamic, and heat exchanger methods are presented to conduct the analysis. Assumptions and model verification are discussed. The tool was used to perform various system studies. Coolant selection was explored and takes into account different operational scenarios as the minimum bed temperature is driven by the sublimation temperature of the coolant (water being significantly higher than LCO2). From this, coolant mass is sized coupled with sorbent bed mass because MTSA adsorption performance decreases with increasing sublimation temperature. Reduction in heat exchanger performance and even removal of certain heat exchangers, like a recuperative one between the two sorbent beds, is also investigated. Finally, the coolant flow rate is varied over the cycle to determine if there is a more optimal means of cooling the bed from a mass perspective. Results of these studies and subsequent recommendations for system design are presented.

  17. Water Temperature, Voluntary Drinking and Fluid Balance in Dehydrated Taekwondo Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khamnei, Saeed; Hosseinlou, Abdollah; Zamanlu, Masumeh

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary drinking is one of the major determiners of rehydration, especially as regards exercise or workout in the heat. The present study undertakes to search for the effect of voluntary intake of water with different temperatures on fluid balance in Taekwondo athletes. Six young healthy male Taekwondo athletes were dehydrated by moderate exercise in a chamber with ambient temperature at 38-40°C and relative humidity between 20-30%. On four separate days they were allowed to drink ad libitum plane water with the four temperatures of 5, 16, 26, and 58°C, after dehydration. The volume of voluntary drinking and weight change was measured; then the primary percentage of dehydration, sweat loss, fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were calculated. Voluntary drinking of water proved to be statistically different in the presented temperatures. Water at 16°C involved the greatest intake, while fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were the lowest. Intake of water in the 5°C trial significantly correlated with the subject’s plasma osmolality change after dehydration, yet it showed no significant correlation with weight loss. In conclusion, by way of achieving more voluntary intake of water and better fluid state, recommending cool water (~16°C) for athletes is in order. Unlike the publicly held view, drinking cold water (~5°C) does not improve voluntary drinking and hydration status. Key points For athletes dehydrated in hot environments, maximum voluntary drinking and best hydration state occurs with 16°C water. Provision of fluid needs and thermal needs could be balanced using 16°C water. Drinking 16°C water (nearly the temperature of cool tap water) could be recommended for exercise in the heat. PMID:24149564

  18. Temperature change, dentinal fluid flow and cuspal displacement during resin composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Ratih, D N; Palamara, J E A; Messer, H H

    2007-09-01

    Dentin-bonding agents and resin composite materials typically require light activation for polymerization. Light curing generates heat, which may influence dentinal fluid flow (DFF) and cuspal displacement. This study investigated the relationship among temperature increase, DFF and cuspal displacement in extracted human maxillary premolars with a mesial occlusal distal (MOD) cavity preparation. Two types of curing light were compared. Temperature changes were measured using thermocouples located on the occlusal cavity floor and at the pulp-dentine junction, during polymerization of bonding agent and resin composite material. DFF and cuspal displacement were measured simultaneously using automated flow measurement apparatus and direct current differential transformers respectively. Temperature increases of up to 15 degrees C were recorded during the restoration procedures. A quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) unit produced a significantly greater temperature increase than a light-emitting diode unit and curing of the bonding agent generated less temperature increase than curing of the resin composite. Heating due to exothermic reaction during polymerization of bonding agent and resin was not significantly different between light sources or between bonding and curing (P > 0.05). The QTH unit produced both greater inward fluid flow and cuspal displacement during the irradiation of bonding agent and resin composite than the light-emitting diode unit. There was not a simple relationship between temperature increase, fluid movement and cuspal displacement. From a clinical point of view, the light-emitting diode unit can be considered preferable to the QTH light, because it caused significantly smaller temperature increase, fluid shift and cuspal displacement. PMID:17716269

  19. Temperature variation in the dark cosmic fluid in the late universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver

    2016-03-01

    A one-component dark energy fluid model of the late universe is considered (w < -1) when the fluid, initially assumed laminar, makes a transition into a turbulent state of motion. Spatial isotropy is assumed so that only the bulk viscosities are included (ζ in the laminar epoch and ζturb in the turbulent epoch). Both viscosities are assumed to be constants. We derive a formula, new as far as we know, for the time dependence of the temperature T(t) in the laminar case when viscosity is included. Assuming that the laminar/turbulent transition takes place at some time ts before the big rip is reached, we then analyze the positive temperature jump experienced by the fluid at t = t∗ if ζturb > ζ. This is just as one would expect physically. The corresponding entropy production is also considered. A special point emphasized in the paper is the analogy that exists between the cosmic fluid and a so-called Maxwell fluid in viscoelasticity.

  20. Loop Heat Pipe Transient Behavior Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control with Thermoelectric Converter on Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly done by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. With this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within 0.5K or better. However, because the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if the LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP was carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor was placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir was cold-biased and was heated by a control heater. Test results show that it was feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. In particular, when a thermoelectric converter was used as the reservoir control heater, the heat source temperature could be maintained within a tight range using a proportional-integral-derivative or on/off control algorithm. Moreover, because the TEC could provide both heating and cooling to the reservoir, temperature oscillations during fast transients such as loop startup could be eliminated or substantially reduced when compared to using an electrical heater as the control heater.

  1. Force generation and temperature-jump and length-jump tension transients in muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Davis, J S; Rodgers, M E

    1995-05-01

    Muscle tension rises with increasing temperature. The kinetics that govern the tension rise of maximally Ca(2+)-activated, skinned rabbit psoas fibers over a temperature range of 0-30 degrees C was characterized in laser temperature-jump experiments. The kinetic response is simple and can be readily interpreted in terms of a basic three-step mechanism of contraction, which includes a temperature-sensitive rapid preequilibrium(a) linked to a temperature-insensitive rate-limiting step and followed by a temperature-sensitive tension-generating step. These data and mechanism are compared and contrasted with the more complex length-jump Huxley-Simmons phases in which all states that generate tension or bear tension are perturbed. The rate of the Huxley-Simmons phase 4 is temperature sensitive at low temperatures but plateaus at high temperatures, indicating a change in rate-limiting step from a temperature-sensitive (phase 4a) to a temperature-insensitive reaction (phase 4b); the latter appears to correlate with the slow, temperature-insensitive temperature-jump relaxation. Phase 3 is absent in the temperature-jump, which excludes it from tension generation. We confirm that de novo tension generation occurs as an order-disorder transition during phase 2slow and the equivalent, temperature-sensitive temperature-jump relaxation. PMID:7612845

  2. Liquid Gallium based temperature sensitive functional fluid dispersing chemically synthesized FeMB nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H. S.; Cao, L. F.; Dodbiba, G.; Fujita, T.

    2009-02-01

    In this work, FeMB (M = Nb, V) nanoparticles were first reported to be synthesized by a chemical method, from reduction of FeCl2, NbF5 (and NH4VO3) using NaBH4 as a reducing agent in aqueous solution. A new temperature sensitive functional fluid was then prepared by dispersing silica coated FeNbVB nanoparticles in liquid gallium. The result shows that the FeNbVB nanoparticles exhibit an oxidation resistance better than that of FeNbB nanoparticles. The FeNbVB nanoparticles were in the size range of 30 - 50 nm and the thickness of silica layer was observed about 10 nm by means of transmission electron microscopy. The magnetization of the synthesized particles and fluid shows a temperature dependency within the testing temperature range of 293 - 353 K, which indicated their application potential in magneto-caloric energy conversion devices.

  3. Temperatures of quartz cementation in Jurassic sandstones from the Norwegian continental shelf -- evidence from fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Walderhaug, O. )

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies of fluid inclusions in quartz overgrowths have shown quartz cementation to have taken place at temperatures within the range 60--145 C in several sandstones from the North Sea and offshore mid-Norway (Malley et al. 1986; Konnerup-Madsen and Dypvik 1988; Burley et al. 1989; Walderhaug 1990; Ehrenberg 1990; Saigal et al. 1992; Nedkvitne et al. 1993). This study aims at determining whether these results are typical for quartz cementation of sandstones by presenting homogenization temperatures for 274 aqueous and 366 hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz overgrowths from Jurassic reservoir sandstones on the Norwegian continental shelf, and by reviewing previously published fluid-inclusion data. Possible explanations for different ranges of homogenization temperatures in different sandstones are also discussed, and possible sources of quartz cement and the effect of hydrocarbon emplacement on quartz cementation are considered.

  4. Transient pool boiling in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, J. S.; Merte, H., Jr.; Keller, R. B.; Kirk, K.

    1992-01-01

    Transient nucleate pool boiling experiments using R113 are conducted for short times in microgravity and in earth gravity with different heater surface orientations and subcoolings. The heating surface is a transparent gold film sputtered on a quartz substrate, which simultaneously provides surface temperature measurements and permits viewing of the boiling process from beneath. For the microgravity experiments, which have uniform initial temperatures and no fluid motion, the temperature distribution in the R 113 at the moment of boiling inception is known. High speed cameras with views both across and through the heating surface record the boiling spread across the heater surface, which is classified into six distinct categories.

  5. Methanethiol abundance in high-temperature hydrothermal fluids from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, E.; Seewald, J. S.; Saccocia, P.; van der Meer, M.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of aqueous organic sulfur compounds in hydrothermal systems remains poorly constrained, despite their potential significance in 'prebiotic' chemistry and the origin of life. The simplest - methanethiol (CH3SH) - has been implicated as a critical abiogenic precursor to the establishment of primitive microbial metabolism in early Earth hydrothermal settings. It also represents a readily-utilized substrate for microbial sulfate-reducing communities and a potential intermediate species in abiotic CH4 formation. To assess the abundance of CH3SH and factors regulating its stability under hydrothermal conditions we measured CH3SH concentrations in a suite of hydrothermal fluids collected from the Rainbow, Lucky Strike, TAG and Lost City hydrothermal sites located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluids were collected using isobaric gas-tight samplers and analyzed for CH3SH by shipboard purge-and-trap gas chromatography. Measured concentrations at Rainbow (1.2 -- 223nM), Lucky Strike (1.1 -- 26nM), TAG (8.5 -- 11nM) and Lost City (1.6 -- 3.0nM) are all substantially lower than predicted for thermodynamic equilibrium with CO2, H2 and H2S at measured vent conditions. The highest concentrations (91 -- 223nM), however, were observed at Rainbow in intermediate temperature (128 -- 175°C) H2-rich fluids that may have undergone conductive cooling. Increased concentrations with decreasing temperature is consistent with the thermodynamic drive for the formation from CO2, suggesting a possible abiotic origin for CH3SH in some fluids. Substantially lower concentrations in the low temperature fluids at Lost City are consistent with the extremely low levels of CO2 and H2S in these fluids. Other possible sources of CH3SH to vent fluids must be considered, however, and include thermal alteration of biomass present in low-temperature environments and microbial consortia that produce CH3SH as a byproduct of anaerobic methane oxidation. Current models for the emergence of primordial

  6. The temperature dependence of the optical anisotropy in magnetic fluids: birefringence and dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf, N. A.; Manasrah, D. A.; Abdallah, M. A.; Abu-Safia, H.; Abu-Aljarayesh, I.

    1994-11-01

    The temperature dependence of birefringence, δ, and dichroism, Δ A, in Fe 3O 4 Isopar-M based magnetic fluids have been investigated in the temperature range 100 < T < 320 K and in magnetic fields up to 3 kOe. The results show that birefringence and dichroism for a given concentration and at a given field are zero below a certain temperature Ts, and then both increase with temperature until they reach a maximum at a temperature Tm, and then decrease with temperature for T > Tm. The values of Tm and Ts are found to vary with concentration and the applied field. The results also show that δ- H2 and Δ A-H2 curves deviate from linearity. This deviation is attributed to interparticle interactions, the orientation of pre-existing clusters, and the field-induced chain formation.

  7. Molecular dissociation and shock-induced cooling in fluid nitrogen at high densities and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radousky, H. B.; Nellis, W. J.; Ross, M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Radiative temperatures and electrical conductivities were measured for fluid nitrogen compressed dynamically to pressures of 18-90 GPa, temperatures of 4000-14,000 K, and densities of 2-3 g/cu cm. The data show a continuous phase transition above 30 GPa shock pressure and confirm that (delta-P/delta-T)v is less than 0, as indicated previously by Hugoniot equation-of-state experiments. The first observation of shock-induced cooling is also reported. The data are interpreted in terms of molecular dissociation, and the concentration of dissociated molecules is calculated as a function of density and temperature.

  8. The electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field and temperature profiles in levitated metal droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation was developed for the electromagnetic force field, the flow field, the temperature field (and for transport controlled kinetics), in a levitation melted metal droplet. The technique of mutual inductances was employed for the calculation of the electromagnetic force field, while the turbulent Navier - Stokes equations and the turbulent convective transport equations were used to represent the fluid flow field, the temperature field and the concentration field. The governing differential equations, written in spherical coordinates, were solved numerically. The computed results were in good agreement with measurements, regarding the lifting force, and the average temperature of the specimen and carburization rates, which were transport controlled.

  9. Transient temperature responses of hydronic radiant floor heating system by different pipe embedding depth and water supply condition.

    PubMed

    Chung, K S; Sohn, J Y; Baik, Y K; Kang, J S

    1993-07-01

    "Ondol" is a Korean unique heating system. It is a specific radiant floor heating system using combustion heat of briquette or timber in Korea. Such traditional "Ondol" is changed to radiant heating system with pipe-coil embedded in the floor or slab. This study has contributed to the understandings of the transient behaviours of Ondol-heated floor panels and enclosure exposed to this type of heating system. The result is that the water supply temperature had a large effect on the rate of increase in floor surface and room air temperature. But, in spite of a higher water supply temperature, the heat flow rate was not increased considerably. The shallow pipe embedding depths, of course, result in a low heat flow rate. PMID:8373479

  10. Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, K.E.; Keith, T.E.C.; Trusdell, F.A.

    1995-01-01

    Heating and freezing data were obtained for fluid inclusions in hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and anhydrite from several depths in three scientific observation holes drilled along the lower East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Comparison of measured drill-hole temperatures with fluid-inclusion homogenization-temperature (Th) data indicates that only about 15% of the fluid inclusions could have formed under the present thermal conditions. The majority of fluid inclusions studied must have formed during one or more times in the past when temperatures fluctuated in response to the emplacement of nearby dikes and their subsequent cooling. -from Authors